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CHICO’S FREE NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY VOLUME 42, ISSUE 41 THURSDAY, JUNE 6, 2019 WWW.NEWSREVIEW.COM

4 STOP THE HATE

THE

Wine

NOTHING FOR ORANGE STREET

ISSUE

16

Tourism, expert advice and a sweet farewell

FIRE RISK ASSESSED

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See EVENT CALENDAR, page 20


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CN&R

INSIDE

Vol. 42, Issue 41 • June 6, 2019 OPINION 

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Editorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Guest Comment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Second & Flume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 This Modern World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Streetalk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

NEWSLINES 

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Downstroke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Sifter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9

HEALTHLINES 

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Appointment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Weekly Dose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

GREENWAYS 

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Eco Event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS 

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15 Minutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 The Goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

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W

The

Wine Issue

COVER STORY  

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Wine Week Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20

ARTS & CULTURE 

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Arts Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 This Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Fine Arts listings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Scene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Nightlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Reel World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Chow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Arts DEVO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Brezsny’s Astrology . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

REAL ESTATE  

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CLASSIFIEDS  

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On THe COVeR: Design by Tina Flynn

Our Mission: To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring . To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare . To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live .

Editor Melissa Daugherty Managing Editor Meredith J . Cooper Arts Editor Jason Cassidy Staff Writers Andre Byik, Ashiah Scharaga Calendar Editor Neesa Sonoquie Contributors Robin Bacior, Alastair Bland, Michelle Camy, Vic Cantu, Nate Daly, Charles Finlay, Bob Grimm, Howard Hardee, Miles Jordan, Mark Lore, Landon Moblad, Brie Oviedo, Ryan J . Prado, Juan-Carlos Selznick, Ken Smith, Robert Speer, Carey Wilson Managing Art Director Tina Flynn Creative Services Manager Elisabeth Bayard-Arthur Ad Designers Naisi Thomas, Cathy Arnold Publications Designers Katelynn Mitrano, Nikki Exerjian Director of Sales and Advertising Jamie DeGarmo Advertising Services Coordinator Ruth Alderson Senior Advertising Consultants Brian Corbit, Laura Golino Advertising Consultants Adam Lew, Jordon Vernau Office Assistant Jennifer Osa Distribution Director Greg Erwin Distribution Manager Matt Daugherty Distribution Staff Ken Gates, Bob Meads, Pat Rogers, Larry Smith, Placido Torres, Jeff Traficante, Bill Unger, Lisa Van Der Maelen, David Wyles

President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Director of Nuts & Bolts Deborah Redmond Director of People & Culture David Stogner Director of Dollars & Sense Debbie Mantoan Nuts & Bolts Ninja Norma Huerta Payroll/AP Wizard Miranda Hansen Developer John Bisignano System Support Specialist Kalin Jenkins N&R Publications Editor Debbie Arrington N&R Publications Managing Editor Laura Hillen N&R Publications Associate Editor Derek McDow N&R Publications Writers Anne Stokes, Thea Rood N&R Publications Editorial Assistant Nisa Smith Marketing & Publications Lead Consultant Elizabeth Morabito Marketing & Publications Consultants Greta Beekhuis, Steve Caruso, Joseph Engle, Sherri Heller, Rod Malloy, Celeste Worden 353 E. Second St., Chico, CA 95928 Phone (530) 894-2300 Fax (530) 892-1111 Website newsreview .com Got a News Tip? (530) 894-2300, ext 2224 or chiconewstips@newsreview .com Calendar Events cnrcalendar@newsreview .com Calendar Questions (530) 894-2300, ext . 2243 Want to Advertise? Fax (530) 892-1111 or cnradinfo@newsreview .com Classifieds (530) 894-2300, press 2 or classifieds@newsreview .com Job Opportunities jobs@newsreview .com Want to Subscribe to CN&R? chisubs@newsreview .com Editorial Policies: Opinions expressed in CN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons, or other portions of the paper. CN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or review materials. Email letters to cnrletters@newsreview.com. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form and to edit them for libel. Advertising Policies: All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes the responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. CN&R is printed at PressWorks Ink on recycled newsprint. Circulation of CN&R is verified by the Circulation Verification Council. CN&R is a member of Chico Chamber of Commerce, Oroville Chamber of Commerce, Downtown Chico Business Association, CNPA, AAN and AWN. Circulation 38,650 copies distributed free weekly.

june 6, 2019

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OPINION

Send guest comments, 340 words maximum, to gc@newsreview.com or to 353 E. Second St., Chico, CA 95928. Please include photo & short bio.

EDITORIAL

Chico’s blind eye to racism Back in April, someone scrawled racist and homophobic

graffiti on a building at Chico State. At the time, we hoped it was a one-off case of vandalism. It wasn’t. Last month, we learned about another ugly incident: A mural on West Second Street depicting local Native American culture—that of the Mechoopda Maidu—was defaced with swastikas and the words “white power,” among other disturbing messages. And this week, the Chico Police Department reported similar hate-filled vandalism occurred at 11 locations in the southwest part of town. Let’s not forget the backdrop to these incidents. According to the Southern Poverty Law Center, the number of hate groups in the nation rose by 7 percent between 2017 and 2018, reaching an all-time high. During the same time period, so-called white nationalist groups alone increased by 50 percent. Of course, this rise in hate corresponds with the ascendance of a racist, xenophobic president who lies compulsively to enrage and frighten his base to remain in power. Locally, the spree of bigoted property destruction must be taken seriously—by the Chico PD, the university and the community at large. Law enforcement is

investigating the recent incidents, but we’ve heard little response from the higher education sector. The University Police Department issued a basic crime bulletin to the campus community following the April incident. It outlined what it referred to as “preventative tips and information,” such as locking facility doors. It included two sentences heralding the institution’s position on the matter: that it celebrates diversity and such vandalism flies “in the face of university values.” But it’s been silent about the other incidents—including one that took place a few blocks from campus, while school was in session. We all know—or should know—that racism stems from ignorance. Chico State has an important role—an obligation, really—to help stem such incidents in the community. We’re disappointed thus far in the institution’s ham-handed and half-hearted response. Local activists have talked about the incidents at City Council meetings and are doing their best to engage city leaders and the public. We realize most Chicoans can’t relate to being the target of hate. That’s largely because most folks in this white-bread town are, well, white. But our fair-skinned community needs to stop turning a blind eye to the racism in our midst. It’s a cancer and it’s going to fester if we don’t treat it. Ω

GUEST COMMENT

PG&E’s assault on another mountain community Idramatically PG&E is playing on people’s fear of wildfire by changing our Forest Ranch neighborn an attempt to improve its public-safety image,

hood, with beautiful tree-lined streets becoming a thing of the past. As part of its efforts to create clearance near power-line easements, PG&E plans to remove all vegetation within 12 feet of its infrastructure. Many of these trees are strong and healthy, unlikely to be threats, and are already heavily pruned. So far this past winter, three different contractors for PG&E have come through to flag by and trim “potential threats” to the William Robie power lines, but this is apparently The author, a Forest not enough. Ranch resident The dead, dying and diseased for 28 years, is an trees that pose threats should be emergency room registered nurse. felled. However, mature, healthy trees only add to the beauty, ecosystem and well-being of our neighborhood. We already have dealt with tree contractors’ poor

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aesthetics, often resulting in mere stumps. Must we also submit to the loss of our mature trees, the very essence of “Forest” Ranch? When a tree contractor is questioned, there are two responses. The first is that heavy snowfall will fell the tree, causing power failure. Restoring power takes a day; restoring a mature tree takes a lifetime. The second response preys on the public’s fear of wildfire. However, we know the Camp Fire was due to equipment failure and high-voltage transmission lines needing overhaul, not from a tree striking the line. This year, PG&E is letting property owners either accept or decline tree contractors’ recommendations. Residents should look at these strong, mature, majestic trees that have stood against every other threat and ask, “Is this beautiful tree truly a threat?” PG&E recently announced it’s burying lines in much of the Camp Fire burn scar, but what about other fire-prone regions? Think of the future lives, forest land and cost that would be saved. Hopefully property owners will reject PG&E’s short-sighted, self-serving removal of healthy trees and force the company to concentrate efforts on hazardous trees and undergrowth. Ω

SECOND & FLUME by Melissa Daugherty m e l i s s a d @ n e w s r e v i e w. c o m

Deadly status quo I’d been hopeful following Walmart’s pledge to donate $1 million to efforts addressing Chico’s Camp Fire-compounded homeless crisis that a year-round, low-barrier shelter would open by the end of the year. In recent months, one of the biggest projects was known as the Orange Street Shelter, and its primary organizers, folks from the Safe Space Winter Shelter, actually were shooting for the end of summer. Of course, we now know that plan isn’t feasible—at least not within the same scope. A complicated series of events—including the Jesus Center backing out as a partner on the project—led to that outcome. We learned on Tuesday (June 4) that Walmart decided to give the lion’s share of the million bucks to the Jesus Center for its so-called Renewal Center—a somewhat nebulous plan for a consolidated services facility that will take years to fund, build and start operating. The Renewal Center could be great. That remains to be seen. The rub is that the community needs a low-barrier shelter now—before more people die on the streets. And sadly, that’s not an entirely infrequent occurrence. In fact, on the same day Walmart made its announcement, I learned that a man was found deceased in the city center days earlier. I don’t know his name—only that he died in an alcove of a building on East Fourth Street, presumably across from City Hall. When I heard about that man’s death, I immediately thought of Thomas Avakian—a homeless man I met three years ago at Safe Space. Avakian may have been this newspaper’s biggest fan—he read it religiously. He was just 51 years old when he passed away in January 2018 in a spot along West Sacramento Avenue. The CN&R learned of his death from a social media post. I remember when local law enforcement used to alert the media when a body was found on the streets. It used to be deaths like that were a big deal. That hasn’t been the case for years, though. A local homeless advocate told me about the aforementioned unnamed man. She also informed me that, on March 2, yet another homeless person died on the streets. His name was Vance Lee. A brief obituary I found online reads: “Vance was born on October 30, 1962, and passed on March 2, 2019. Vance was a resident of Chico, California, at the time of passing.” How Lee ended up homeless or what he was like when he wasn’t in poor health is a mystery to me. But what I was told about the end of his days—as cancer overtook his body and disfigured his face— made me weep. Unsheltered life is brutal and death often is an event that goes unnoticed within the community at large. Tragically, Walmart’s decision will result in the status quo—a community that doesn’t have adequate facilities and services for our burgeoning homeless population. But the real victims here are the homeless individuals who quite literally will suffer as a result. Without the expanded emergency shelter Orange Street would have provided, people like Avakian, Lee and the unnamed man will continue to live and die on the streets.

Melissa Daugherty is editor of the CN&R


LETTERS

ATTENTION BOOMERS

Send email to cnrletters@newsreview.com

Conclusion: cruelty Re “Up for grabs” (Newslines, by Ashiah Scharaga, May 30): Our big issue is that economic forces are forcing so many people into such abject poverty that it has become the most urgent and tragic human crisis to hit the streets of Chico in our lifetime. Our rate of poverty is so severe we appear to be becoming a Third World country. Most of the homeless are powerless. Either we begin to address this issue or it gets worse unabated at a faster and faster rate. The Orange Street Shelter and tiny home villages will allow people the shelter that’s the prerequisite to rejoining regular society. If you follow the anti-homeless logic to its natural conclusion, it is cruelty. To isolate and criminalize doesn’t even address the root causes. In fact, the anti-homeless logic just exacerbates the situation. Just be so uncompassionate that they’ll move. How far is a person supposed to move who cannot afford an

apartment or even a bus ticket? There is no “away” for this issue to go. They’re not all going to move to a neighboring town, where there are already so many homeless people, and the services are overworked. Relocation is not a solution. A civil society doesn’t throw people away. Charles Withuhn Chico

Cannabis market Re “Pot talk” (Newslines, by Andre Byik, May 30): Chico is going to allow cannabis sales soon. What many people would like to see is a farmers’ market for cannabis. Washington and Oregon both have this type of venue. The startup cost for growers to enter with a store is prohibitive for many. There would be an area for tested and an area for nonstate tested—just like the downtown market on Saturdays. This also allows growers to meet the public and interact with the customers. Let’s give the little guys a chance in this market place. If a horse has his

fill of water, it’s time to let another wet his lips. Marc Deveraux Chico

Threats from the dais Re “Civil discourse” (Newslines, by Ashiah Scharaga, May 23): Councilman Sean Morgan made violent threats toward anyone who would call him a white supremacist. Is this an attempt to bully specific community members into silence? Morgan’s Twitter account is rife with the nation’s most notable voices in anti-Muslim, anti-immigrant and anti-black conservatism. During his time as mayor, he regularly silenced discussion on issues important to communities of color, and this recent threat toward his constituents adds to a pattern of intended misuse of authority. Morgan likely associates white supremacy with individual extremism only (think neo-Nazis or the KKK), which explains his fear of LETTERS c o n t i n u e d

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CN&R

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LETTERS c o n t i n u e d f r o m pa g e 5 being connected to the term. But the culture of white supremacy, where white domination of society is seen as the natural order of things, and the needs of other communities are erased, is very real and continues to be upheld by exactly the behavior he has demonstrated. Do not let him gaslight us into thinking otherwise. Siana Sonoquie Chico

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Re “Faith community and Walmart: Please help” (Editorial, May 23): As a member of the “faith community,” I was surprised to read that the author thought we should be doing more to help. Many churches and their members give generously of their time and finances. Perhaps they are not as visible at the Orange Street Shelter, because they are involved in serving food Wednesday nights; delivering sandwiches downtown; providing activities; offering new clothes, shoes and backpacks filled with supplies to school children at the Torres Shelter; not to mention the hundreds of folks that volunteer at the Salvation Army, the Jesus Center, Street Pastors and the list goes on. Maybe the author isn’t aware that some of the faith-based folks take to heart the words of Jesus from the book of Matthew, in chapter 6, where He says, we are not to make a big show of helping those in need so people will praise them. Or verses 3 and 4: “But when you help a needy person, do it in such a way that even your closest friend will not know about it. Then it will be a private matter, and your Father, who sees what you do in private, will reward you.” Rebecca Eitel Chico

An offensive title Re “Trigger happy” (Scene, by Robert Speer, May 23): Local filmmaker Sue Hilderbrand recently publicly debuted her movie American Totem. Native and non-Native people have been telling her before and after her showing that her appropriation of the word totem for her title is offensive and harmful to Native people. The word is a sacred part of Ojibwe culture that has been abused by white people 6 

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[T] he culture of white supremacy, where white domination of society is seen as the natural order of things ... is very real and continues to be upheld.

number of grievous and disastrous mistakes when its pipeline exploded, but that location should never have been approved for development in the first place. I support the City Council’s bold decision to withdraw from the provisions of AB 430. Let’s protect our unique and treasured town that belongs to our longtime and newest residents alike. It’s not necessary to compromise our core values to address the actual hardships of fire victims in need. James Aram Chico

—Siana Sonoquie

Editor’s note: For more on this issue, see Newslines, page 11. for centuries. She has ignored the requests of Native people to change the name of her film. The film also contains transphobia. I supported her making of the film, but I cannot support her continued intentional ignorance of the harm she is doing by clinging to a name that is unnecessary. Native American, black and brown communities continue to experience the highest rates of murder by law enforcement and racist gun violence. Indigenous immigrant communities and marginalized people who experience racial profiling are specifically impacted by forms of institutional gun violence as well. Rain Scher Chico

Good job, council Re “Chico leaders reject proposed legislation” (Downstroke, May 16): Tempers flared when our Chico City Council withdrew Chico from the provisions of Assembly Bill 430. Understandable, considering the way the AB 430 supporters sold a false narrative to the public. The fact is, affordable housing for those truly in need—renters and people without enough means—will not result from relaxing building requirements. We’ll just get more homes built to maximize developers’ profits—not affordable housing. I suggest we all pause and reflect on the 2010 gas explosion in San Bruno where a 30-inch underground gas pipeline exploded, tragically killing eight people and destroying 38 homes. Many years earlier, the Crestmoor development was built in a large field on top of that ill-fated pipeline because local civic leaders failed to regulate the pressure to develop. Sure, PG&E made any

It’s the pensions Re “Chico needs a lifeline” (Editorial, May 9) Chico has not grown by 20 percent in the wake of the Camp Fire. Like I said in my last letter, the figures the city is using to support the assumption that Camp Fire evacuees are placing a strain on city services are all estimates. Go out at rush hour—the traffic impacts we suffered in the weeks immediately following the fire were temporary. Today there are over 200 houses for sale within the city. Housing prices spiked remarkably immediately following the fire because desperate buyers were very competitive, but prices are now back to 2017 levels. The city’s financial problem is the pension liability. Ask public employees to pay more of their own pensions. For example, the city manager gets over $225,000 in salary, over $80,000 in benefits, and 70 percent of his highest year’s salary in pension at age 55. He pays 11 percent of his salary toward that pension. The taxpayers are asked to pick up the rest of his tab, including an IRC 457. If he is sincere about “living within our means,” he needs to pay more of his own pension. New hires pay 50 percent, so why are “classic” employees still paying so little? Join the conversation at chico taxpayers.com. Juanita Sumner Chico

More letters online:

We’ve got too many letters for this space. please go to www.newsreview.com/chico for additional readers’ comments on past cn&r articles.


STREETALK

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Cocobon from Trader Joe’s is a sweet red wine that goes well with dinner or by itself. I give it with chocolate truffles as a really good gift when I don’t know what to give to friends and family.

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A riesling, Chateau Ste. Michelle. It’s a very smooth, really nice wine. I don’t like anything real dry. It goes nice with dinner.

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Frei Brothers merlot. I’ve been drinking wine for over 50 years, and I like it because it is hardy and goes good with almost everything I eat.

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NEWSLINES DOWNSTROKE WALMART DECIDES

The Walmart Foundation this week awarded the Jesus Center with the lion’s share of the $1 million donation it originally entrusted to the North Valley Community Foundation in the wake of the Camp Fire. A total of $850,000 will go to the nonprofit’s Renewal Center—a project Executive Director Laura Cootsona previously told the CN&R she believes will take three years to open. The rest, $150,000, will go to the Torres Community Shelter to support its 24/7 operations and staffing. Safe Space Winter Shelter, the only other applicant Walmart invited to apply for the funds, received nothing for its Orange Street Shelter. Walmart spokeswoman Delia Garcia said that the foundation is considering a smaller, separate grant for Safe Space’s seasonal services “commensurate with their capacity for funding.”

HATE CRIMES INTENSIFY

A vandal or vandals spray-painted swastikas and “white power” across southwest Chico over the weekend. Around 8:30 a.m. on Sunday (June 2), the Chico Police Department responded to a call regarding graffiti on the 1000 block of Poppy Street and at Rico’s Tamales on Cherry Street, according to a press release, and found swastikas spray painted at both locations. Officers later discovered nine other vandalized locations, including private homes, businesses and public transit property. Police are working on locating security camera footage. Anyone with information should call 897-4900. This is the most recent in a rash of such incidents. Last month, a Mechoopda-Maidu mural celebrating Native American culture in downtown Chico was similarly vandalized. And in April, Chico State reported “racist and homophobic graffiti” at Butte Hall.

GRANT TARGETS RIDGE MOSQUITOES

The North Valley Community Foundation has granted $310,434 to the Butte County Mosquito and Vector Control District (BCMVCD) to fight the mosquito population on the Ridge. After the Camp Fire, new mosquitobreeding sources became prevalent on vacated properties, including in stagnant swimming pools, septic tanks, ponds and miscellaneous containers. Butte County mosquitoes commonly carry West Nile virus and other diseases, such as encephalitis. BCMVCD District Manager Matt Ball (pictured) said in a press release that the grant, awarded through the Butte Strong Fund, will allow the district to increase staff, plant more mosquito fish and purchase supplies such as insecticides to treat mosquito-breeding grounds. 8

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JUNE 6, 2019

Protecting the watershed Experts share post-Camp Fire data, acknowledge there is still a lot to learn Michael Parker

Edestructive now: The Camp Fire was the most fire in California’s history. But veryone has heard it a million times by

that’s only taking into consideration manmade structures. What about the natural landstory and scape—and, in particuphoto by lar, our waterways? Meredith J. To echo the mantra Cooper of 2017’s Standing m ere d i t h c @ Rock protest, “Water n ew srev i ew. c o m is life.” That was what brought many people out to Chico State’s University Farm Tuesday (June 4) for the daylong Camp Fire Water Resources Monitoring and Research Symposium. Organized by the University of California Cooperative Extension, it included presentations from researchers who have been studying fire’s impact on ecosystems, in particular ground and surface water. The underlying message of the day, based on the preliminary results of water testing and visual monitoring following the Carr and Camp fires, shared by multiple agencies: There is still a whole lot to learn. “The level of interest was impressive— people are really looking at this with fresh eyes,” attendee Dan Efseaff, Paradise’s

Recreation & Park District manager, told the CN&R after the symposium. Topics ranged from the initial rapid response to the blaze to lessons learned from the Carr Fire to storms’ impacts on fire-stricken landscapes. Test results were shared, fieldwork compared. The strategic placement of waddles in anticipation of winter storms to keep ash and debris from flowing directly into the waterways yielded positive results, several speakers said. That effort was spearheaded by Carol Wallen, senior biologist for NorthStar Engineering, and Butte County’s Public Works Department. That firm and the county mobilized crews from the California Conservation Corps prior to the first storm in December following the Camp Fire. “Our priority was Paradise,” she said, explaining that the town’s urban features, plus the fire’s intensity, created a huge number of challenges from a watershed standpoint. They focused first on the four waterways that run through town, looking at what kinds of businesses or homes were nearby—“Was there a photo lab here, or were they developing X-rays?” RV parks presented unique challenges because of their

concrete pads—versus lawns and landscaping—and “awesome storm drain systems.” Chico’s Deer Creek Resources created a gridded map of the town that Wallen’s team used to direct the placement of waddles— which ranged from basic erosion-control devices to those that absorbed metals and other contaminants. In 16 days, she said, they laid out 110,000 feet of waddles. “What Carol’s team was able to do was huge,” said Michael Parker, an engineering geologist for the Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board who set out after the storm to test for contamination in local waterways. Like Wallen, his crew spanned various agencies, including the Department of Water Resources (DWR) and Caltrans. They agreed upon 10 testing sites, including a control site above the burn scar in Helltown and spanning down into the valley, and at Lime Saddle Marina. Early testing revealed very little contamination, which showed that the erosion-control measures were working. As the winter storms progressed and the cleanup effort began, those test results showed growing amounts of contaminants, including heavy metals and chemicals, eventually prompting public health


notices regarding creek water and shallow wells. Given the Camp Fire’s proximity to and

location upstream from Lake Oroville, a considerable amount of attention has been paid to groundwater and drinking water supplies. From a groundwater perspective, Evan MacKinnon, an environmental scientist for DWR, said he and his team initially set out to determine any potential sources of groundwater contamination. They found plenty, mostly in the form of damaged well heads and septic systems. They prioritized sites alongside watersheds— there are over 2,000 burned structures along Butte Creek, for example. “This was an urban fire,” Efseaff commented after the forum. “We have to characterize it that way—and look at man-made contaminants versus your normal redistribution of nutrients that happens after a normal forest fire. [Tuesday’s talk] made me think we should probably give those streams more room [away from structures], to keep contaminants out and keep them functioning well.” Lake Oroville, part of the State Water Project, was a hot topic as well, and while some test results revealed contamination likely due to debris from the fire, they weren’t at levels that DWR determined to be harmful to human health. At the same time, Daniel Wisheropp, an environmental scientist with DWR, said, “We need to do more work to determine what can be attributed to the fire, versus what’s [naturally] in the lake.” Paradise Irrigation District Manager Kevin Phillips explained his agency’s response Tuesday, which he characterized as ever-changing. The town still has a do-not-drink order in place and solving the problem of contaminated pipelines will take years. Twelve percent of PID’s main lines are contaminated, Phillips reported, and test results have been completely random—positive for benzene and other elements at one address and clear next door. “We’re on the precipice of finding a game plan to clear this,” he said, but PID has a gross deficit due to losing 90 percent of its paying customer base. He’s hoping to get funding to replace most—if not all—the contaminated plastic piping throughout the water system. He’s also hoping to release guidelines on how to test plumbing inside standing structures within the next week or so. “We’re really in uncharted territory,” Efseaff summed up. “We’re going to learn a lot during this experience for the future.” Ω

Housing and public safety Council approves budget and formation of Street Crimes Unit—schedules housing conference, too

Local real estate agent Brandi Laffins believes

the city’s housing crisis could be alleviated by focusing on supply and demand. “Prices are out of control and I really do believe that’s because we just don’t have enough housing,” Laffins, president of Sierra North Valley Realtors, told the City Council at its meeting Tuesday (June 4). “We have clients that are living in two-bedroom apartments that can afford $3[00,000] to $400,000 homes but they can’t find them.” If those homes become available, their apartments will then be freed up to lower-income renters who currently can’t compete when property managers are approving leases, she continued. That was just a small part of the broader conversation about housing that night, as the council discussed how to proceed post-Camp Fire. The panel unanimously voted to move forward on creating a city housing task force to discuss policy, and also directed Councilmen Scott Huber and Karl Ory to organize a housing conference for the council and community. Progress will be reported back to the panel within 90 days. That item brought out the most speakers of the evening, just over a dozen, including developers. Most, like Laffins, spoke in favor of diving

SIFT ER Red or white? Red wine drinkers tend to spend more per bottle than white wine drinkers ($40 versus $37, respectively), are more likely to consider themselves wine aficionados, and are more likely to be Game of Thrones fans. That’s according to a recent survey of 2,000 drinking-age Americans commissioned by wine-accessory maker Coravin and whose results were summarized by Food & Wine magazine. The survey further found that

into the topic. Some added a caveat, warning that the council should ensure all parties are brought to the table. Kate Leyden, executive director of the Chico Builders Association, said any policy created from these discussions should consider production of all types of housing, including affordable market rate and affordable subsidized, and should “include the people who work in the industry, the ones who understand that market,” such as land developers, builders and real estate agents. “The key to all of this is that people understand the facts of building,” she said. Huber, who proposed the conference, said he’d certainly invite representatives from the real estate and builders groups, as well as the North Valley Property Owners Association. In general, his idea is to create an event that helps the city “move forward in the most productive way” and understand its “full

W red wine drinkers tend to identify as adventurous, humble and organized, while white wine drinkers consider themselves curious, sarcastic and perfectionists. Fans of red wine, according to the results, are more likely to prefer dogs to cats, while the opposite is true for fans of white wine. And red wine drinkers tend to be introverts, and white wine drinkers extroverts. The differences didn’t stop there, as red wine drinkers were found to be early birds, while white wine drinkers are night owls.

Marin Hambley reads from more than 200 cards compiled by community members, urging the council to fund social services rather than increase the Chico Police Department’s budget. PHOTO BY ASHIAH SCHARAGA

range of options” when it comes to housing, geared toward how the city can facilitate the creation or availability of housing for very low- to moderate-income families, renters and entry-level home buyers. Also that night, the council unanimously

passed the budget, but not without outcry from community members, particularly when it came to the Chico Police Department’s budget. It increased by $1.2 million from last fiscal year and makes up most of the general fund’s operating budget, at approximately $26 million of $49.7 million (the Fire Department is next on the list, at $13 million). The council chose to continue funding for a Street Crimes Unit it brought back last year, a decision that essentially will pay for that team year-round. During public comment, Marin Hambley approached the dais with a string of more than 200 cards. Hambley, a member of the Justice for Desmond Phillips advocacy group, explained that all of the cards had suggestions as to how the city could better spend that enormous budget, namely on housing and mental health initiatives. This included suggestions of low-barrier homeless shelters, 24-hour public restrooms, storage lockers and trauma-informed police training. “It doesn’t help our unhoused community to police them. It doesn’t help our mentally ill to police them. It helps them to get resources,” Hambley said. “Instead of funding a permanent street crimes unit, fund a permanent crisis care advocacy and triage unit. “We are asking that you reconsider the NEWSLINES C O N T I N U E D JUNE 6, 2019

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budget and redirect some of those resources towards things that will actually support the most vulnerable, the most at-risk in our community.” Most of the council spoke in favor of buoying the police department further—it has been the most supported in the past six years, growing by 14 1/2 positions since 2013 (five grant-funded), according to City Manager Mark Orme. Huber defended the council’s position to expand the police force, saying that with the increased population of Chico, “we need a level of protection out there that meets the level of crime.” Councilwoman Ann Schwab added that it’s “very significant” the city has established the unit, and Orme praised the council for its desire to see that to fruition. Ory, the only critic, said he came close to voting nay because the budget is “not truly balanced” if the city is taking $350,000 per year from its $800,000 waste hauling franchise agreement to fund an expansion in the police department. Orme replied that “candidly, if we had any other options, I would use them.” “I think we gave the public the illusion we can staff with our existing budget,” Ory added. “We can’t continue to steal from one department to fund another.” During the budget discussion, Orme mentioned other highlights, such as the addition of a firefighter, which previously were reported in the CN&R. What was new Tuesday was the decision to modify the budget to hire an additional full-time code enforcement officer, rather than a part-timer. Ory made a point to inquire “hypothetically” as to how the city would pay for an expensive special election, clearly a reference to the recall effort underway for his and Mayor Randall Stone’s seats. Orme responded that it’d “most likely” come from city reserves. After the meeting, City Clerk Debbie Presson confirmed that the proposed recall petition was submitted on Tuesday, and said she will work with the City Attorney’s Office over the next 10 days to ensure its legal compliance before it can be circulated. Also of note, the council decided to abandon its previous decision to set an earlier meeting start time. —AshiAh schArAgA ash ia h s@ newsr ev iew.c o m

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Residential construction underway in Chico includes an apartment complex along Highway 32 (bounded by Walnut, West Eighth and West Ninth streets).

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Housing divide

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AB 430 advances without Chico—here’s why

James Gallagher and Randall Stone

don’t agree on much when it comes to Assembly Bill 430. Titled the Camp Fire Housing Assistance Act of 2019, the bill would streamline approval of residential development in specified jurisdictions in the North State—primarily by circumventing mandates in the California Environmental Quality Act, or CEQA, that open projects to a public-review process. Gallagher, an assemblyman whose district encompasses most of Butte County, authored and propelled AB 430 through his house of the Legislature. It awaits a hearing in the Senate Housing Committee, potentially as early as June 18. Stone, Chico’s mayor, has been one of AB 430’s most vocal critics. Since its introduction Feb. 7, he has raised concerns not only over CEQA but also the bill’s applicability to Chico and impact on affordability and local land-use decisions. At a special meeting May 10, he and other progressives on the City Council passed a motion requesting Chico’s removal. Gallagher publicly pledged to do so. The version approved by the Assembly, 70-1, on May 20 lists Chico along with Biggs, Gridley, Orland and Oroville. Gallagher told the CN&R by phone Monday (June 3) that Chico will be removed next week among amendments made ahead of the committee hearing. “That’s what I said I would do; I’m going to do it,” Gallagher said. On this matter, he and Stone see eye to eye. “The Senate committees are

aware of our decision, and our formal position is [to] let communities decide for themselves,” Stone said. Gallagher said he’ll “probably add on some other cities” to offset the loss of Chico. He didn’t identify them other than to say he’s “looking at the universe of cities that are close by the region that can potentially meet the housing demand that’s needed.” He commented online Tuesday about Yuba City’s City Council voting to be included in the legislation. Along with the municipalities mentioned above, and Butte County, Gallagher has received general support for AB 430 from business, realty and building associations. After the Camp Fire displaced tens

of thousands of people, Chico’s population grew nearly 21 percent. Brendan Vieg, deputy director of the Community Development Department, told the City Council in a May 7 report that Chico added 577 housing units in 2017 (singleand multifamily), 555 in 2018, and “it’s expected that 2019 will be a record-setting year.” Developers have 5,300 units in the “near-term pipeline.” Even if Chico were included in AB 430, the legislation wouldn’t affect those projects. Nor would it cover infill—development amid existing neighborhoods—because that’s categorically exempt from CEQA. Exempt per the bill’s language are properties in a flood plain, wetlands, very high fire hazard severity zone or zoning not

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2 Cu ft. already designated for residential use (see tinyurl.com/AB430text). Restrictions also include a 50-acre size limit. “It literally doesn’t allow any sprawl because it has to be within the boundaries or a special planning area of a city,” Gallagher said. “And you [as a developer] still have to get your permits. It just gets rid of the CEQA process that takes at least 18 months—and that’s if you don’t get sued by Richard Harriman.” Harriman, a Chico attorney, represents environmental groups in legal actions statewide. Like Stone, he told the CN&R that CEQA fits into a broader issue he has with AB 430: civic participation in the development process. Projects that, under the bill, drop to the “ministerial” level of review without CEQA would receive approval or denial only in City Hall offices, not at public meetings of the Planning Commission or City Council. Moreover, both Stone and Harriman said, provisions of the bill—if enacted as law—could linger decades past AB 430’s expiration date of Jan. 1, 2026. Development agreements that set conditions for, say, subdivisions often run 20 years to span the build-out of a project; those authorized under AB 430 would bypass CEQA. Turning a large project into several small projects, compliant with AB 430, could be accomplished by lot splits. “There’s a million different ways to usurp this,” Stone said.

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HEALTHLINES

High stakes Clean air battle with Trump threatens California’s economy by

Rachel Becker

UPrepare jobs. A statewide economic shudder. for all three if California loses its nrelenting commutes. Lost construction

clean air battle with the Trump administration. That’s the warning from state transportation planning agency officials, who say the ongoing fight over passenger vehicle standards might cause collateral damage to road and public transit projects. That could affect air quality, construction jobs, the economy and, as projects designed to improve flow are delayed, ensure Californians stay stuck in traffic. The clash is over proposed federal rollbacks to Obama-era fuel economy and greenhouse gas standards for vehicles. Trump’s Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) also has proposed revoking a waiver that lets California make its own, stricter tailpipe emissions rules. The final rule

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hasn’t been released yet—and when it is, California intends to fight it in court. “Where we’re going to start is litigating,” said California Air Resources Board (CARB) chair Mary Nichols. “And we will not yield on our standards. So we will be enforcing our standards while that goes on.” Still, she said, there’s no guarantee that California will win. In the meantime, the state must conform to air quality goals set by the EPA’s Clean Air Act. Falling short of those goals, Nichols said, could lead to lawsuits from groups that oppose freeway projects. “Or, the Trump administration, which is showing in many ways these days a desire to hurt California, could decide that they would no longer fund highway programs that have previously been approved,” she said. “And then we would be unable to continue working on a bunch of different projects that are designed to improve traffic flow—because we wouldn’t have the federal funds.” That’s where things get dicey for transportation infrastructure. About 93 percent of Californians live in parts of the state that

aren’t meeting federal standards for pollutants like ozone or tiny airborne particles, according to a recent CARB presentation. Transportation planners in these regions must show that road and transit projects won’t make the air worse. Since California has historically bad air quality and, for now, the EPA’s permission to make its own strict clean car rules, the air board has a custom-built model to estimate emissions. Baked into that model is the assumption that cars are going to get cleaner over time. If the Trump administration yanks California’s waiver, that assumption breaks down and the model stops working. Instead, major transportation projects could run the risk of grinding to a halt while the state develops a new model for the EPA to approve. “It puts a big monkey wrench into how we deliver transportation projects,” said Chris Schmidt, Southern California planning and modal programs manager with the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans). If the delays last long enough, federal dollars for some of those projects could disappear altogether thanks to use-it-or-loseit provisions in the funding, according to Tanisha Taylor, director of sustainability for the California Association of Councils of Governments, a nonprofit representing major transportation planning agencies. There are a lot of “ifs” here, but in a worst-case scenario, the association calculates that roughly 2,000 projects totaling $130 billion could be affected. “The

ramifications are pretty dire,” Schmidt said. “You’re talking about many, many projects, and we’re talking about lots and lots of money.” That includes projects in the San Joaquin Valley, which suffers from major air quality problems. Andrew Chesley, executive director for the San Joaquin Council of Governments, points to a safety improvement project slated for fiscal year 2021 that would widen a highway bottleneck and ease congestion. Applying for federal approvals and adding the project to the region’s broader transportation plans will require checking that it still conforms to clean air standards. But if the rollbacks break CARB’s model, they can’t run those calculations. “So that project is somewhat jeopardized,” Chesley said. “It’s arcane—I don’t go home at night and tell my wife about conformity findings … . But it has a real impact.” Plans to roll out new Bay Area Rapid Transit cars and extend the train to Silicon Valley could be put on hold. Projects to widen major Bay Area freeways—including Highway 101 across four counties—could stall, too. Randy Rentschler, director of legislation and public affairs for the Metropolitan Transportation Commission, cautions that major projects can stall for many reasons— and the federal rollbacks are just one. “This is not necessarily the reason why HEALTHLINES C O N T I N U E D

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APPOINTMENT Ticks can make you sick The Lyme Center of Chico is a local nonprofit dedicated to promoting awareness, education and advocacy about Lyme disease and other tick-borne illnesses, and with the end of spring comes the annual LymeAid Benefit Concert to help foster the organization’s important work throughout the year. This year’s event takes place on Friday (June 7), at 7 p.m. at the CARD Community Center, and will feature the rock ’n’ roll stylings of Hot Flash, as well as a raffle and silent auction, refreshments and a no host bar. To reserve tickets, call 433-3567 or visit thelymecenter.org for more info.


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HEALTHLINES a project might be delayed—but it certainly doesn’t help,” Rentschler said. Darin Chidsey, chief operating officer of the Southern California Association of Governments, calculates $22 billion of transportation projects across six southern California counties could be delayed. That includes $6 billion to widen parts of Interstate 710 to curb congestion from trucks shuttling goods in and out of the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach. “Every day of delay costs money,” Chidsey said—citing costs to local residents stuck in congested commutes, to public agencies, and to the local economy. He added that “$22 billion of projects translates into a lot of jobs, a lot of economic activity—it’s critical.” From a back-of-the-envelope calculation, that could mean a hit to tens of thousands of jobs, according to Kiana Valentine, executive director for Transportation California—an advocacy group that represents labor and business in the construction industry. That’s extrapolated from the White House’s Council of Economic Advisers’ stat that “every $1 billion in federal highway and transit investment funded by the American Jobs Act would support 13,000

C O N T I N U E D F R O M PA G E 1 2

About this story:

It was produced by CalMatters, an independent public journalism venture covering California state politics and government. Learn more at calmatters.org.

jobs for one year.” From that, Valentine said, “If we’re looking at putting at risk $130 billion, we anticipate that there would be some pretty significant impacts to construction jobs and the economy in the state.” For now, transportation planners are in a state of limbo—anticipating a major setback, but not knowing when or how bad it could be. “To do a lot of contingency planning is hard to do, because we don’t know what the final rule is going to say,” Caltrans’ Schmidt said. “We’re all concerned, and we’re trying to think about what might the ramifications be—but we don’t know that. And our hope is really that the rule doesn’t get finalized.” San Joaquin’s Chesley agrees. “The headline is don’t make it tougher to do transportation improvements. It’s already tough enough as it is,” he said. “We want clean air. We want transportation projects. This rule works against both of them.” Ω

WEEKLY DOSE The curse of the summer cold Skies are blue, the creeks are flowing, the park is waiting for you to hit the trail, and then you wake up with the chills and a stuffy nose. Is it allergies or the dreaded summer cold? Though colds and allergies share the traits of sneezing, runny nose, congestion and an itchy or sore throat, a cold will include symptoms like coughing, sweating and fever. Allergies also last longer and the symptoms remain fairly consistent while a true cold will hit you with a rotating onslaught of misery as days progress. Colds are caused by some 200 viruses—those called enteroviruses are more likely to infect during warmer months. But summer colds aren’t actually more severe; they just seem so, most likely because you feel like the only one who is suffering. As with all colds, the best treatment is prevention, so use hand sanitizer, sleep well, minimize stress and exercise regularly to stay healthy.

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GREEN GREENWAYS Fire Chief Steve Standridge says a citywide vegetation management plan will provide the fire department with additional insight about potentially problematic areas when it comes to fire hazards.

Clearing the way

City creating vegetation management plan for parks, greenways to reduce fire risk

story and photo by

Ashiah Scharaga ashiahs@ n ewsrev i ew. com

CBidwell cerned about the fire danger in Upper Park, primarily when it comes to

hico Fire Chief Steve Standridge is con-

access. Take, for example, when the Stoney Fire ignited last summer. The department found it challenging to battle the blaze because of the terrain, dense vegetation and heavy winds. “We were all struggling just to find the seat of the fire … where it was going and the potential impact of that,” Standridge told the CN&R. Despite these factors, the fire department was remarkably successful. The blaze was extinguished with no injuries or homes burned. However, the fire torched 962 acres and came frighteningly close to neighborhoods, causing evacuations. (See “Scorched earth,” Newslines, July 19.) The department has since created its own internal map and protocol to better manage evacuations during disasters, chiefly due to the Camp and Stoney fires. Standridge says it identifies those areas of east Chico in the wildland-urban interface (or WUI, pronounced “wooey”)—such as Canyon Oaks, Stilson Canyon and neighborhoods

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along Manzanita Avenue and Falcon Pointe Drive—as the highest risk, because the homes are so close to parks and open spaces prone to wildfire. There’s another plan now in development that aims to tackle the other side of the coin: fire prevention. The city recently accepted a $158,907 Cal Fire Community Fire Prevention grant. It will help fund the development of a comprehensive vegetation fuels management plan for all publicly owned parks and greenways. Standridge says he’s excited about the plan, because it is “much needed” and will help the department better understand the city’s fire hazards. He’s hopeful it will pave the way for projects that address his accessibility concerns as well. “It moves [our knowledge] out of intuition into a more empirical assessment of our hazards, associated risks and vulnerable populations,” he said. “The question is, how much do we want to get in there and mitigate these fuel loads while also maintaining the natural character of the park?” The plan development process will start this July and finish up before mid-March 2021, according to Linda Herman, city park and natural resources manager. Using a combination of staff, contractors and volunteers, the city Public Works Department will start by compiling aerial footage and ground surveys. It will consult with Chico State, the Chico Fire Department,

foresters and other local experts to inventory and map native, rare and invasive vegetation. That data will be used to assess fire risk and identify projects and vegetation-control methods, along with recommendations for continued management. Ultimately, the plan will identify high-priority projects, with the top five going through environmental review. Throughout the process, there will be multiple public workshops and city meetings for review. There are five creeks and greenways that run through the city: Mudd Creek, Little Chico and Big Chico creeks, Comanche Creek and Lindo Channel. Each of those corridors poses a potential fire risk, Herman said, but because the city doesn’t have a central guiding document, there are unanswered questions as to which areas are the most important to address, and how. “It’ll be good to have those inventories and plans … something that guides us not just for Bidwell Park but also for the other greenways that go through our city,” she said. Last year, her department brought goats back to Lower Park for the first time in 15 years to chomp on coarse, invasive species like star thistle to reduce fire risk (see “Fourlegged weed eaters,” Greenways, Nov. 8). They’ll be back again this year, too, Herman confirmed. While this tactic, along with the work of volunteer groups, has helped, there still are unsafe fuel loads in city green spaces, Herman said. A particular example is the highly flammable arundo grass in Lindo Channel, a ladder fuel that grows tall. Much of the city’s greenways have become overgrown with such highly invasive species as arundo, Himalayan blackberry, European olive and broom due to “decades

of unnatural fire suppression and infestation,” wrote Paul Moore, president of the Mount Lassen Chapter of the California Native Plant Society, in a letter to the city supporting the development of the plan. Restoring a natural balance of species in city park lands and open spaces is “of paramount importance.” Woody Elliott, the plant society’s conservation chair, told the CN&R the organization also sees a “great benefit in removing biomass of invasive species in the forest understory” because it will lessen the community’s vulnerability to catastrophic fire. A key component, in his view, is its inclusion of California Environmental Quality Act review for the top five projects. That will help fast-track the projects—once they receive funding—and ensure their environmental compliance. But maintenance is going to be a hurdle moving forward. “It’s all well and good to do a oncethrough and remove your nonnative understory fuels. Two or three years later, you’ve got to go back and do it again and maintain what you’ve removed,” he said. “The city’s going to have to realize they’re on the hook for maintenance … otherwise in five years it’ll be same old, same old.” Ω

ECO EVENT

Backyard bliss Did you know that the Big Chico Creek Ecological Reserve contains 3,950 acres of diverse canyon and ridge habitats and is home to a variety of plant and animal species? The Sacramento Valley Young Planners Group has organized a spring hike at the reserve this Saturday (June 8), from 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., where you can learn about the history of this unique area and current management strategies to keep it protected. This is a don’t-miss time of year, as the reserve will be full of songbirds and wildflowers still in bloom. Email Alicia Brown at abrown@walk sacramento.org or Claudia Stuart at cstuart@buttecounty.net for more info.


EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS PHOTO BY NEESA SONOQUIE

15 MINUTES

WTHE GOODS

Following his nose

Oroville’s wine scene thrives

Sommelier and chef David McCluskey isn’t afraid to take risks. He spends his days at a local startup company and his free hours on his passion project, Spare Barrel. For the virtual winery, McCluskey buys wine that he falls in love with from wineries selling excess bulk product, which he then finesses to his liking and bottles for sale online. This particular angle of the wine business has its roots in France, where merchantvintners such as McCluskey are known as wine négociants, and it is an affordable way to get started in an expensive and competitive wine market. Spare Barrel has been in business in Chico for about two years, with two releases available—a cabernet sauvignon that won a silver medal in the San Francisco Chronicle wine competition and a petit verdot. Visit the Spare Barrel website at sparebarrelwines.com for a peek at what McCluskey is up to and to get on an email list for future releases.

so boring and repetitious.

How do you choose your wines? Primarily it’s what I can find that’s really good and perhaps a little unusual. … [M]y cab ... is from Pine Mountain, which has some of the highest vineyards in the Sonoma area. It is super rocky there and kind of cool, so the wines have a different profile. They’ve got higher acid and a little bit more green in them because it’s harder to reach full ripeness. For me, it’s about where uniqueness and flavor intersect; that’s what I am looking for.

How did the idea for Spare Barrel come about? I started this with the idea that instead of just drinking the same wine all the time I wanted to do something different. I would go find micro-lots of awesome stuff and bottle it myself—maybe it needs a little refining, a little filtering, a little blending or a few tweaks, but then maybe it’s not

What are some of the challenges of running a virtual winery? The way to get people to buy wine is to let them taste it, so that is my big challenge right now. I cannot physically show up at the farmers’ market and

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pour samples—for me, that’s illegal. The only real avenues for people in Chico to taste my wine prior to purchasing it are through a wine bar or restaurant that has bought my wine to sell or at a nonprofit event where I have donated the wine.

What makes Spare Barrel special? I put wines in bottle that are good on many levels. They’re not going to have flaws, they’ll be good now but they’ll be good in 15 years, they’re going to be interesting and they’re going to be a good value. My reputation as a person, as a nose, and as a tongue is what you have to trust. I’m not going to sell you anything I wouldn’t drink myself, and I’ve got pretty high standards. —NEESA SONOQUIE ne ss as @new srev i ew. c o m

by

Meredith J. Cooper meredithc@newsreview.com

With Butte County Wine Week starting tomorrow (June 7), it seemed a fitting time to check in on what our local wineries are up to. We highlighted a handful of them in our cover package (see page 18), and as I was sniffing around for other winerelated bits of news, I discovered a new offering from the folks at Live Vine Vineyard & Winery: cider. It seemed like a perfect reason to visit the estate, which overlooks the Lake Oroville Afterbay, and sit down with owners Shawn and Susan Smith. As a fun bonus, Shawn gave me a tour of the vineyard, which includes a variety of grapes, from syrah and zinfandel to viognier and grenache. One of the more unique offerings I found in their tasting room was a viogniersyrah blend, which Susan characterized perfectly as being a bit “peppery.” They also have a few rosés—a syrah and a grenache. My favorite of those that I tasted was also their best-seller: the Euphoria blend of syrah, barbera and zinfandel. Fruity and perfectly smooth. The couple recently launched Smith House Cider, which I also got a chance to try. It’s crisp and fresh—not at all sweet. Shawn told me they also make a Hopped Up Viking mead. Both are a way to keep busy during the off-season. The Smiths also are hard at work setting up a new winery/tasting room, as their current spot— which they opened in 2017—is at their home. It’s just around the corner from them, so they can go back and forth on a golf cart. I wish them luck!

OTHER O-TOWN NEWS While I was in Oroville, I figured I’d check in on a few other places I hadn’t been to in a while. First up, Butte County Wine Co., which happens to serve Live Vine wines and Smith House Cider (along with a ton of other local beverages). The place was hopping, which is always a good sign, and I learned they’re now serving champagne brunch on weekends and hope to launch an appetizer menu soon. From there, I moseyed around the corner to Miner’s Alley Brewing Co., which also has an impressive local wine list (in fact, they serve only local wines). I chatted briefly with the bartender, who informed me that the place had just been sold— to Brian Wong, owner of Tong Fong Low. We should expect a few changes there in the coming months. RUMOR HAS IT I’ve seen some hubbub on social media lamenting the closure of the Winchester Goose. At first, I dismissed the rumor, as I knew the bar was planning to move across the street. Upon further investigation, however, it appears the Goose may, in fact, be a thing of the past. Do not fear, however: A little birdie tells me the old Goose won’t be empty long—I hear there are plans to reopen that space as The Bank Club, an ode to a business that resided there years ago. Stay tuned for details as I get them.

A Menu From Around the World • 10 New Menu Items • Breakfast & Lunch • Authentic Flavors - Exceptional Service!

Real CideR Made FroM

NoRtheRN CalifoRNia apples tasting room open sat afternoons several Varieties available t-shirts, Glasses, and hats

Farm to Cidery Dinner with TurkeyTail Farm Sunday, June 16 • Tickets at brownpapertickets.com 2175 Baldwin Ave Oroville 95966 (530) 533-7720

Breakfast Grill

3221 EsplanadE | 530.891.4500 | mon-fri 8am-2pm sUn 8am-1pm

Lassen TRADITIONAL CIDERY

wN Newto 2018 iN Cider PiPP Mhouse r a 2019 rF y Cider d

www.lassencider.com

26 Bellarmine Ct., Chico • 530.593.0555 JUNE 6, 2019

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PHOTO COURTESY OF HICKMAN FAMILY VINEYARDS

W Welcome to Wine Week Spencer-Shirey Wines offers samples of its PM Good Times red blend during this year’s North Sierra Wine Trail.

A celebration of vino from all over the world— including right here in our backyard For this inaugural Butte County Wine Week, the CN&R has compiled a fine blend of stories about local oenophiles and an eclectic calendar of events to shine a light on some of the creative offerings our region will be serving up over the next 10 days. In our cover package, you’ll find a story about local winemakers joining forces to boost their profile as tourist destinations, along with a farewell to longtime HoneyRun Winery, which shuts its doors this month. We also check in on Safeway’s wine guru, Dave Mettler, who offers a little insight into how he helps customers choose the right bottle. The calendar of events offers a taste of something for everyone, from dinner-wine pairings to enticing discounts to paint-and-sip parties at local wineries. Also, flip through the rest of the issue for other wine-related stories to get your taste buds buzzing. Cheers!

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On the map Wineries pursue districts to encourage agritourism

W

hen Carolyn Denero moved back to Chico about two years ago, she admitted she was surprised to learn there were roughly 20 local wineries and vineyards in the Butte County area. She’d lived here in 2009, but only briefly before moving and working in multiple industries throughout California, including at the Calistoga Chamber of Commerce. Now the executive director for Explore Butte County— the region’s tourism business improvement district—Denero says it’s no secret that food and drink can make a destination, and Local wineries and a distillery drawing folks to local tasting rooms recently formed the Bangor Wine & Spirits Region to further distinguish and vineyards can have a significant the small town’s offerings. economic impact. PHOTOS BY MEREDITH J. COOPER


Tourists spent $312.1 million in Butte County last year, buoying municipal and county coffers. By far the largest revenuegenerator was food services, which topped the list at $87.1 million. That includes imbibing at the region’s dozens of wineries. “It really generates more than somebody just buying a bottle of wine. The more visitors we can bring here and show them the experience they can have here, it’s going to prolong their stay,” Denero said. What she has come to realize is that the wine industry in the region has a lot of potential for growth, especially when it comes to promoting itself as a destination. Much of that comes down to fostering a sense of place and culture around the wineries with special events and experiences. Recently, local wineries have been tapping into that potential, creating their own districts or regions to set themselves apart, cross-market and encourage travel and agritourism. Alyse Hickman says many people don’t even realize Bangor, a rural community with fewer than 1,000 residents, is a town, let alone a producer of high-quality wines. Her family’s businesses—Hickman Family Vineyards and Cobble Ridge Artisan Distillery—are part of the Bangor Wine & Spirits Region, along with Bangor Ranch Vineyard & Winery and Spencer-Shirey Wines. Distinguishing the region from the dozens of wineries and distilleries in the North State is a vital part of drawing people to their slice of the Sierra Foothills American Viticultural Area, an “appellation of origin” that includes their operations in Butte County, plus wineries in Amador, Calaveras, El Dorado, Mariposa, Nevada, Placer, Tuolumne and Yuba counties. Regions designated as an appellation of origin are federally required to source a minimum of 75 percent of their grapes locally.

Tasting wines, paired with food, at Bangor Ranch Vineyard & Winery.

Hickman said appellations can put a region on the map and speak to the value of the wine produced there. “The Sierra foothill appellation is really starting to get noticed … because our wines are amazing, our vineyards are great because of the area we’re in, the terroir.” But Hickman is focused on further distinguishing Bangor’s offerings. “We really wanted to create our own presence … to let people know there’s a little town called Bangor and we have our own region [within the appellation],” she said.

... the wine industry in the region has a lot of potential for growth, especially when it comes to promoting itself as a destination. “It’s been like a secret this whole time. … By getting our own name out there, and getting more popular, we’ll get more ag tourism, which is great for Butte County.” In addition to the Bangor region, four wineries

Right: Alyse and Tod Hickman opened the doors of Hickman Family Vineyards in 2011. VINEYARD PHOTO COURTESY OF HICKMAN FAMILY VINEYARDS

just south of Chico also have joined forces, forming the Durham Wine District. It includes Almendra Winery & Distillery, Dog Creek Cellars, Gale Vineyards and Nascere Vineyards. Jennifer Leonard, Almendra’s wine club manager, said the district was formed so the wineries could pool their resources to increase public awareness—they’re easily accessible, being within 6 miles of one another, and each has its own distinct wine-making style, so there likely is something for everyone who visits. Though the wineries haven’t created collaborative events thus

far, both the Bangor region and Durham district started offering postcard maps. “We’ve been working hard in Butte County to increase the public’s awareness of the high-quality wines we all produce, from the valley floor up into the mountainous areas,” Leonard said. “And in Butte County, the odds are you’re going to run into the owner or the winemaker at these wineries because we’re all family-owned operations.” Denero said districts such as these two are beneficial because local wineries can leverage their financial resources and collaborate to create a local draw, which then helps the region promote itself. The Sierra Oro Farm Trail is a perfect example, Denero said. Since 2005, the association has grown from a handful of farms to include more than 30 specialty farms and agricultural businesses, including wineries, throughout the county. The Bangor and Durham wineries are included in that tour; plus, the former participates in the annual North Sierra Wine Trail, a weekend tasting event created by Hickman and her husband, Tod, that includes Oroville wineries as well as those in north Yuba County. “When visitors come and see that sense of place in a community,” Denero said, it generates a “genuine interest” that spreads. What was once a singular event at one winery can become a full-day experience at multiple vineyards that collectively exposes visitors to a variety of wines and products. —ASHIAH SCHARAGA ash ia h s@ newsr ev iew.c o m

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June 7–16, 2019 Celebrating our local wine scene

THROUGHOUT WINE WEEK Boochcraft at Bill’s Boochcraft hard kombucha $1 off all week. Bill’s Towne Lounge, 135 Main St. billstownelounge.com

Bottles at The Lab Half off the purchase of bottles of wine all week. The Lab Bar & Grill, 250 Cohasset Road, Ste. 10. labbarandgrill.com

Chardonnay and Cheese Flight In addition to having the area’s largest selection of local wines, Butte County Wine Co. has created a chardonnay and cheese flight just for Wine Week. Try Poppy with goat cheese, Shooting Star with blue cheese and William Hill with brie for $15 all week. Butte County Wine Co., 1440 Myers St., Oroville.

Ciders at The Banshee A dollar off all ciders all week. The Banshee, 134 W. Second St.

Date Nights and Wine Flights Alongside its full bar and restaurant, Almendra Winery & Distillery will be offering special wine flights and food pairings, “wine of the day” specials and a delicious meal pairing for two. Almendra Winery & Distillery, 9275 Midway Road, Durham. almendrawinery.com

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Flights, Pairings and Pours

Spike the Bottle

In addition to its wide selection of wines, Christian Michaels will be offering six different wine flights, both reds and whites. Plus, daily by-the-glass wine selections of the higher-end offerings with the Coravin wine system, which pours wine without opening the bottle. The restaurant’s chef also will be preparing locally sourced food specials each evening to pair with featured wines for that night. Christian Michaels Ristorante, 192 E. Third St. chicochristianmichaels.com

Take 15 percent off all bottles of wine at Spike’s. Spike’s Bottle Shop, 1270 E. First Ave. spikesbottleshop.com

Sours at B Street

Wine and Dine at Sicilian Cafe

New York sours a buck off all week. Fri, 6/7, 11am. B Street Public House, 117 Broadway St.

Spencer-Shirey Wines

Wine and Cheese Enjoy free wine and cheese tastings Saturdays and Sundays during Wine Week. Bangor Ranch Vineyard & Winery, 5768 La Porte Road, 707-480-1429, bangor-ranch.com

Mention Butte County Wine Week for $5 glasses of wine, paired with an entrée, every night: pinot noir with seafood on Friday, merlot with butternut squash mezzaluna on Saturday, chardonnay with scallops on Sunday, cabernet with pasta on Tuesday, zinfandel with filet mignon on Wednesday, and chardonnay with prawn scampi on Thursday. Sicilian Cafe, 1020 Main St.

Wine Bottles and Bubbly In addition to its regular wine specials and wide selection of reds and whites, Crush is offering 40 percent off bottles of champagne and 30 percent off bottles of wine to customers who mention Butte County Wine Week to their servers. Crush, 201 Broadway St. chicocrush.com

FRIDAY, JUNE 7 Chico Unified School’s Out Special

SATURDAY, JUNE 8 Champagne Flights at La Salles 9am-2pm Mimosa flights with Freixenet Champagne during brunch; plus, live music by Herd on Third. La Salles, 229 Broadway St. lasalleschico.com

Wine Weekend Wish Come True All day Buy any bottle of wine and get one wine tasting free. LaRocca Vineyards Tasting Room, 222 W. Second St. 800-808-9463. laroccavineyards.com

Cider and Pretzels

1:30pm Buy one $10 wine tasting and get the second one free (for two or more people). LaRocca Vineyards Tasting Room, 222 W. Second St.

Noon-5pm Did you know: Live Vine makes cider, too? Come by the winery for a glass of Smith House Hard Cider, paired with a housemade pretzel for $5. Live Vine Vineyard & Winery, 652 Luds Way, Oroville, 530-566-4259. livevinewines.com

First Friday After-Party

Spencer-Shirey Wine Release

6-9pm Head on over to Oroville’s only downtown winery after the First Friday festivities for an after party with music by singer/songwriters Roy and Kelly and dinner from Tacos los Serranos on the patio. Purple Line Urban Winery, 760 Safford St., Oroville. purplelinewinery.com

Noon-5pm Spencer-Shirey Wines releases its 2017 albarino. Visit the family-owned boutique winery in the serene Bangor Wine Region. The albarino will be paired with a specially prepared spinach-artichoke dip. Spencer-Shirey Wines, 6857 La Porte Road, Bangor. spencershireywines.com


SUNDAY, JUNE 16

Paint and Sip

Father’s Day Wine Treat

3pm Alongside the full bar and restaurant, Almendra will be offering this special Butte County Wine Week event: Paint and Sip in the barrel room. $45-$50. Almendra Winery & Distillery, 9275 Midway, Durham. squareup.com

All day Bring your father in for his complimentary wine tasting. Plus, buy one bottle of wine, get the second one half off. LaRocca Vineyards Tasting Room, 222 W. Second St. 800-808-9463. laroccavineyards.com

Farm to Cidery Dinner

WED., JUNE 12

5pm Special Wine Week dinner and cider pairing, featuring food from TurkeyTail Farms. Tickets for sale at TurkeyTail Farms’ Thursday Night Market booth, Rustic Nest and brownpapertickets.com. $45. Lassen Traditional Cidery, 26 Bellarmine Court. lassencider.com

Wine Wednesday All day Take 25 percent off purchases all day. LaRocca Vineyards Tasting Room, 222 W. Second St. 800-808-9463. laroccavineyards.com

Paint the Night Away

Butte County Wineries

6-9pm Paint with instruction while sipping LaRocca Vineyards’ wines and noshing on La Salles’ full menu. La Salles, 229 Broadway St. paintedcellarschico.com Live Vine Vineyard & Winery

SUNDAY, JUNE 9

Winery Tour

Noon-5pm Free wine tastings all day for Wine Week! Live Vine Vineyard & Winery, 652 Luds Way, Oroville. 530-566-4259. livevinewines.com

Wine Weekend Wish Come True

Robert Biale Vineyards Wine and Dinner Pairing

Noon-5pm Buy any bottle of wine and get one wine tasting free. LaRocca Vineyards Tasting Room, 222 W. Second St. 800-808-9463. laroccavineyards.com

Last Chance Tasting Noon-5pm Stop by the tasting room one last time and say farewell to HoneyRun Winery’s Honeywines—and stock up while supplies last. HoneyRun Winery, 2309 Park Ave. honeyrunwinery.com

Spencer-Shirey Wine Release Noon-5pm Spencer-Shirey Wines releases its 2017 albarino. Visit the family-owned boutique winery in the serene Bangor Wine Region. The albarino will be paired with a specially prepared spinach-artichoke dip. Spencer-Shirey Wines, 6857 La Porte Road, Bangor. spencershireywines.com

Christian Michaels Ristorante

Almendra Winery & Distillery

THURSDAY, JUNE 13 FRIDAY, JUNE 14 1pm Take a winemaker-led tour of the Almendra Winery & Distillery—then stay for lunch or enjoy some wine or spirits in the elegant tasting room afterward. RSVP required at facebook.com/AlmendraWinery. Free. Almendra Winery & Distillery, 9275 Midway Road, Durham.

Free Wine Tastings

Most are open noon-5 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays.

5pm Join Red Tavern for a winemaker’s dinner with Robert Biale Vineyards. Four-course meal featuring pan-seared duck breast and grilled prime ribeye, paired with amazing wines from Robert Biale. $92. Red Tavern, 1250 Esplanade. redtavern.com

Market Madness 7pm Belly Sutra belly dancing with special guest Kaira, plus $8 bottles of Nebbiolo. LaRocca Vineyards Tasting Room, 222 W. Second St. 800-808-9463. laroccavineyards.com

Patriotic Star Painting at Live Vine 7pm Head over to Live Vine Winery, which overlooks the Afterbay, for a Thursday evening of wine and sweet time with friends painting a patriotic star. Tickets are $40 and include your first glass of wine, a 12-by-12 canvas, and step-by-step instruction. Live Vine, 652 Luds Way, Oroville. livevinewines.com

$5 Fun Friday All day All wine tastings $5, with half off the sparkling wine tasting. LaRocca Vineyards Tasting Room, 222 W. Second St. 800-808-9463. laroccavineyards.com

SATURDAY, JUNE 15 Father’s Day Weekend Wine Treat All day Bring your father in for his complimentary wine tasting. Plus, buy one bottle of wine, get the second one half off. LaRocca Vineyards Tasting Room, 222 W. Second St. 800-808-9463. laroccavineyards.com

Sangria and Nachos Noon-5pm Head out to the vineyard overlooking the Afterbay for housemade sangria, paired with a top-notch nacho bar— pulled pork, melted cheese, all the fixins, for $7. Live Vine Vineyard & Winery, 652 Luds Way, Oroville. 530-566-4259. livevinewinery.com

Nascere Wine Release Noon-5pm Nascere Vineyards releases its 2014 Super Tuscan red blend, paired with food, in the beautiful tasting room. Nascere Vineyards, 3471 Durham-Dayton Highway, Durham. nascerevineyards.com

Open Wednesday-Sunday. 9275 Midway, Durham, 3436893, almendrawinery.com

Bangor Ranch Vineyard & Winery 5768 La Porte Road, Bangor, (510) 658-2056, bangorranch.com

Cobble Ridge Distillery 555 Avocado Road, Bangor; 603-1501, cobble ridgedistillery.com

Gale Vineyards 9345 Stanford Lane, Durham, 891-1264, galevineyards.com

Grey Fox Vineyards 90 Grey Fox Lane, Oroville, 589-3920, greyfox.net

Hickman Family Vineyards 77 Orange Ave., Bangor, 679-0679, hickmanfamily vineyards.com

Live Vine Vineyard & Winery’s 652 Luds Way, Oroville, 566-4259, livevinewines.com

Long Creek Winery & Ranch 323 Ward Blvd., Oroville, 589-3415, longcreekwinery.com

Nascere Vineyards 3471 Durham-Dayton Highway, Durham; 345-9904, nesserevineyards.com

Odyssey Winery and Vineyards Open Saturdays, 1-6 p.m. 6237 Cohasset Road, Chico, 891-9463, odysseywinery.com

Purple Line Urban Winery Open Wednesday-Sunday. 760 Safford St., Oroville, 5341785, purplelinewinery.com

Spencer-Shirey Wines 6857 La Porte Road, Bangor, 205-3579, spencershirey wines.com

JUNE 6, 2019

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W

A sweet farewell Amy and John Hasle worked and played hard over the years. PHOTOS COURTESY OF

HoneyRun Winery owner Amy Hasle on 25 years in the business and moving on 22

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JUNE 6, 2019

AMY HASLE For owner Amy—John retired years ago—the end is bittersweet. The business was kind to the couple, providing many lasting memories—“they all include drinking,” she joked—and lasting friendships as well. “There was the time John took Phil LaRocca out alligator paddling and he got his foot all sliced up,” she recounted about a wine industry trip to Florida. “They sort of stretched the truth and said, ‘We think Phil may have gotten bit by an alligator.’ His daughters fell for it. I’m like, ‘You think?’” “As long as I’ve been involved with LaRocca Vineyards, Amy and John have been part of the local wine scene. We’ve traveled together, we’ve helped each other, and we’ve always supported each other—as wineries and as small businesses,” said Phaedra LaRocca, Phil’s daughter and head of sales and marketing. “They made an excellent mead and berrywine and their label has always repreAmy Hasle reflects on decades of sented the history of Butte County. challenges and accomplishments In the wake of the Camp Fire, their at HoneyRun Winery. label is more significant than ever PHOTO BY MEREDITH J. COOPER and I’m really sad to see it go.” John actually started in the honey business back in 1982, and a few years later began experimenting with honeywine, giving it as gifts to friends and enjoying it at home. He and Amy met in 1989 and started up the winery after getting engaged in the early ’90s. They went through a few flavor changes, but HoneyRun’s bestseller is still blackberry. The cherry and elderberry also are popular. They made mead, too—one infused with cayenne pepper is among Amy’s personal favorites. Around 1995, they moved the business out of their garage and into the warehouse they still occupy (barely) on Park Avenue. At that point, they were selling honey, he name HoneyRun for their wine business wine and pollen. But after a while, the honey was a no-brainer for John and Amy Hasle, demand for their wine business outpaced their who launched the endeavor in their garage hives’ production. “We had a few hives at in 1992, just a mile from the footings of the home, but even they didn’t make it,” Hasle historic Honey Run Covered Bridge. After all, said, referencing the colony collapse disorder they made honey—and honeywine. Perfect. that decimated bee populations and, therefore, But as with any great story, the HoneyRun the honey market. “Now I have too many Winery’s is coming to a close, incidentally bears to have hives,” she joked. just months after the Camp Fire destroyed its The sudden dearth of honey sent HoneyRun namesake. “I miss her twice a day when I drive in and out,” Amy said during a recent interview whirling. They went from working with three dozen distributors and having their choice of inside the HoneyRun Winery.

T

honey in bulk to basically taking what they could get. That made it difficult to maintain consistency. Juice, too, was sometimes hard to come by. “Getting the juice and getting the honey was getting to be a pretty big challenge. When honey was abundant, and I got to pick 100 of those 1,500 drums, that was nice. Even the honey production crew would come out to me and say, ‘You want this batch,’” Hasle recalled. “As the honey possibilities were shrinking in the past six-seven years, that drove me crazy, trying to get the varieties of Last chance: honey I wanted.” HoneyRun Winery will be pouring at the Over the past Soroptomist International couple of years, the Brewfest Saturday (June Hasles started look8) 2-6 p.m. at Manzanita ing to sell the operaPlace; and will open the tasting room at tion. Nobody came 2309 Park Ave. one last forward, so they’ve time on Sunday, June 9, been dismantling bit noon-5 p.m. by bit. They own the warehouse, so they’re hoping to rent it out. John’s post-retirement gig of rehabbing distressed properties is coming in handy—he’s fixing the place up for a future tenant. Hasle says she’d love to see a Paradise business move in. “It would be very cool if we could even temporarily get someone from Paradise up and running again,” she said. For her part, Hasle wants to explore a second, ecologically focused career. She was always really proud of HoneyRun’s commitment to using no sulfites or preservatives. Now she’d like to dedicate herself—and her background in chemistry—to selling or creating alternatives to single-use plastic to-go containers, or to studying the breakdown of plastics. Whatever the future holds, one thing is for sure: The Hasles look forward to spending more time bicycling and enjoying other local wineries now that Amy’s not working at HoneyRun every day. “We had a lot of really great times,” she summed up. —MEREDITH J. COOPER me r e d i th c @ newsr ev iew.c o m

WINE C O N T I N U E D O N PA G E 2 4


Join Us for

Wine Week June 6-15

Special eventS June 8

Freixenet Champagne Mimosa Flights for Brunch Live Music by Herd on Third 11am-2pm

June 12

Painted Cellars serving La Rocca Wines 6-9pm To purchase Tickets visit paintedcellarschico.com

229 BROADWAY CHICO (530) 487-7207 LAsALLEsCHiCo.CoM Open Tuesday-Friday 4PM

Saturday-Sunday 9AM

Sat & Sun Brunch 9AM -2PM Daily Happy Hour 4PM-6PM Live Music Fri 4PM-6PM, Sat 11AM-2PM june 6, 2019

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Beverage ace

Dave Mettler, Safeway’s “wine guy.”

What’s the goal?

Maybe some fine dining restaurants will have sommeliers or cruise ships will have sommeliers—they’re experts in wine, so they can walk you through it or give you a presentation. It lets you connect with a customer with more authenticity of knowing what’s inside that bottle, instead of just putting it on the shelf and guessing what’s in the bottle.

Talking tannins with Chico’s venerable wine guy

D

ave Mettler is a popular guy at the Safeway on Mangrove Avenue. That’s doubly true on Friday afternoons, as this reporter witnessed while trying to peel him away from the wine department for a brief interview. It was difficult to get a word in edgewise as Mettler helped customer after customer—including a woman who drove all the way from Williams to buy imported wine—choose just the right bottle (or bottles). Mettler eventually sat down with the CN&R to talk shop and share some insight into the man whom many locals affectionately call the “wine guy.” Originally from the East Bay— and a “Raiders fan through and through”—Mettler moved to Chico when he was 14 years old. He became a “beverage steward”—his official title—a year after starting his career with the grocer back in 1987. At the time, the store on Mangrove was located across the parking lot (in the space now occupied by Sports LTD). In the early 1990s, Mettler moved over to the then-brand-new store on East Avenue, and in 1999 headed to Safeway in Bend, Ore. He’s been back in town since 2013. Two years later, based on his wine chops, Mettler was featured as an Editor’s Pick in the CN&R’s Best of Chico issue. Recently, he’s stepped things up by becoming a certified sommelier.

What is your job like on a day-to-day basis?

I just kind of keep in my mind what [customers’] likes and dislikes are and try to turn them onto something new or something that’s a little better clearance price or a special deal going on for them. Vintages are very important—the older the wine gets, the better it gets, especially if it was a special year and the winemaker nailed it.

How has it changed your job?

The confidence, maybe. … I’m still learning. If you think you know it all, you’re done. Your mind is like a parachute—it doesn’t work unless it’s open.

What are the latest wine trends?

Rosé, definitely. … Rosé is not just one style. It could be cabernet, it could be barbera, it could be a combination of syrahs, grenache, pinot noir, all these different grapes. There are a lot of different dynamics going on with rosé. It’s not just a one-hit wonder.

Tell us about the professional development you receive.

We taste wines, spirits—I mean, we’ll taste bourbons, cognacs, scotch. We get the owners, we get the distillers … we get to taste their product, learn about their product, learn the history of the winery. It’s pretty amazing. How do you help folks who are new to wine?

If you’re an entry-level person, I trade you into something a little nicer without making you spend more. … It’s an ongoing education for everyone, I think. And it’s good to have someone come back and say, “I never would have tried that, but that was amazing.”

How do you get people out of their comfort zone?

I let them know ahead of time … I’m taking you off the steps of the shallow end of the pool and I’m going to throw you a little deeper, so

What’s your go-to wine?

be ready, here it comes. … You educate them about letting the wine breathe. You don’t just pour and drink it, especially something bigger in structure. What’s one of your best wine tips?

When you open your wine and don’t finish it, throw it in the fridge.

Even if it’s a red wine?

Yeah. Why? Because room temperature is not whatever your room is—it’s 59 to 66 degrees. Nobody’s house is that cold, especially with Chico summers.

So, you want that wine to be cool. The warmer that wine gets, the wimpier the fruit and the bitterness is enhanced. You recently were certified in wine by the Wine & Spirit Education Trust (aka WSET). What is that and what was the process like?

It’s based out of London, England. It’s a world classification. It’s the real deal. … You’ve got 45 minutes to take the test, and it’s yea or nay. And 62 percent of us passed.

Over 15 Varietals including Port Wines

Gift Shop Picnic area Under Live oaks Beautiful valley views Weekends 12-5 530.589.3920 • Greyfox.Net • 90 Grey fox LaNe, oroviLLe 24

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JUNE 6, 2019

I’m a red wine drinker. Cabernet was my first love. I’m all over the place, though. … Why would you eat your favorite dinner every night? It wouldn’t be your favorite dinner anymore.

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June 6, 2019

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Arts &Culture Cait (Teresa HurleyMiller) and her younger self, Caithleen (Alex Hilsee), in Bloomsday.

RETURN

PHOTO BY JOE HILSEE

TO DUBLIN

THIS WEEK

Blue Room players shine in tribute to Ulysses

6

THU

I

t’s fair to say that most Americans who have actually read James Joyce’s famous novel Ulysses probably were English majors in college.

For a book that few people outside academia have read, Ulysses is remarkably enduring as a literary icon. People know it’s a great book, even if they don’t know why and find it nearly impossible to read. It’s by said that the book Robert Speer was so difficult to r ober tspeer@ write that, when newsrev iew.c om Joyce finally finished it, he stopped Review: Bloomsday shows writing for a year. Thursday-Saturday, Much of 7: 30 p.m., through Ulysses’ popularJune 15. Plus, special ity appears to stem “Bloom’s day” performance, Sunday, June from the fact that it 16, 7:30 p.m. serves as a kind of Tickets: $15 ($20 for literary guidebook final performance) to Dublin as the Blue Room Theatre city might have 139 W. First St. appeared on a sin895-3749 gle day: Thursday, blueroomtheatre.com June 16, 1904. On that day we follow the novel’s main character, Leopold Bloom, as he wanders around town, meeting people he knows and observing the life swirling around him until, finally, he climbs into bed with his faithless wife, Molly. In Dublin and cities around the world, including Chico, June 16 has occasioned what has become an annual celebration called Bloomsday—the literary twin to St. Paddy’s Day. People dress up in period costumes, play Irish music, read from Ulysses, feast on pub food and quaff Guinness stout. 26

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JUNE 6, 2019

Special Events FICTION READING: Rob Davidson and Jennifer Spiegel will read from and discuss their new books of fiction. Thu, 6/6, 6pm. The Bookstore, 118 Main St. THURSDAY NIGHT MARKET: Local produce, fresh flowers, music, arts and crafts, and food trucks. Thu, 6/6, 6pm. Downtown Chico. 345-6500. downtownchico.com

The American playwright Steven Dietz has tapped into this Irish nostalgia by writing Bloomsday, a wistful love story that plays with time and memory while appropriating, to some extent, the imagery and language of Ulysses. It is now being staged in the Blue Room Theatre, in downtown Chico, through—appropriately enough—June 16. Bloomsday’s four characters comprise two couples, one young, the other 35 years older. As we eventually come to realize, they are actually a single couple seen at two different times, with the older duo looking back on a lost opportunity for love and their younger selves struggling to ignite that love despite their inexperience and fears. When the younger couple meet, Caithleen (Alex Hilsee) is a 20-yearold tour guide whose specialty is showing visitors to Dublin the actual streets and sites mentioned in Ulysses, and Robbie (Gabriel Suddeth), also 20 years old, is an American tourist who just happens to run into Caithleen’s tour group and is smitten by her—though he knows nothing about James Joyce or Ulysses. In their middle-aged iteration, Robbie has become Robert (Bruce Dillman), an American professor visiting Dublin in search of his lost love. She in turn is now known as Cait and

is played by the formidable Teresa Hurley-Miller. A four-character play asks a lot of actors, and the four players here all do fine work. Dillman, a Blue Room veteran and retired high school teacher, slides smoothly into his role as a cynical but warm-hearted literature teacher, and Hurley-Miller is a perfect match for him (plus, she has a charming Irish accent). Suddeth has the slightest role, but he makes the most of it, visibly maturing as he tries to understand and win the antic but enthralling Caithleen. She is a particularly complex creation, not least because she seems to have oracular powers edged with madness. Hilsee brilliantly conveys her fragility and also her great depth as a character. The play has two acts. The first is spent mostly setting up the unusual situation—the time traveling, the two couples who are actually the same couple, Caithleen’s mental illness—and at times is hard to follow. The second act weaves the disparate threads together into a denouement that is accessible and moving. Credit goes to director Julia Rauter and her Blue Room crew for this excellent staging of a remarkable play. Those among us who have read Ulysses will find it especially enjoyable. Ω

CHICO BICYCLE MUSIC FESTIVAL Saturday, June 8 Various locations

SEE SATURDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS

Music BLACK JOE LEWIS & THE HONEYBEARS: The groundbreaking blues/ funk/soul crew from Austin, Texas, is joined by Little Rock, Ark., five-piece Amasa Hines. Thu, 6/6, 8pm. $20-$22. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St. sierranevada.com

Theater BLOOMSDAY: Travel back in time to James Joyce’s Dublin streets and find out what would have happened if you had said, “yes.” Play by Steven Dietz. Thu, 6/6, 7:30pm. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. blueroomtheatre.com

DAMN YANKEES: Classic romantic comedy about baseball and a deal with the devil. Thu, 6/7, 7:30pm. $16-$22. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Rd., Ste. F. chicotheatercompany.com

PULP: Noir mystery by Joseph Zettelmaier about a private investigator who has taken on the strangest case of his life. Thu, 6/6, 7:30pm. $10. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Road, Paradise. totr.org


FINE ARTS ON NEXT PAGE

WILD & SCENIC FILM FESTIVAL Saturday, June 8 Oroville State Theatre

SEE SATURDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS

MICROBREW FEST: Soroptimist International of Bidwell Rancho presents its annual fundraiser, with different craft breweries offering a wide range of beers as well as ciders and wines. Plus, food and live music. Sat 6/8, 2pm. $50. Manzanita Place, 1705 Manzanita Ave. sibidwellrancho.org/ microbrew-festival

MOVIES IN THE PARK: CARD summer movie series presents Wonder, a heartbreaker about an inspirational kid. Starts at dusk. Sat 6/8, 8pm. Sycamore Field, Lower Bidwell Park.

OLD FASHIONED COUNTRY FAIRE AND THRESHING BEE: Farmhouse tours, a horse parade, blacksmithing demos, food trucks, music and more. Sat 6/8, 9am. $2-$5. Patrick Ranch Museum, 10381 Midway, Durham.

PRIDE 2019 BENEFIT BOOK FAIR: LGBTQ-friendly

7

FRI

Special Events BEAUTY FROM ASHES: A one-day exhibit/fundraiser to support Paradise artists and survivors featuring photos by Terence Duffy of Shane Grammer’s murals painted in the ruins of the Camp Fire. $25 ($100 VIP early entry tix available). Fri, 6/7, 5pm. Museum of Northern California Art, 900 Esplanade. monca.org.

OUTLIT DRAG SHOW: Featuring new and outof-town guest drag performers. Fri, 6/7, 10pm. $5. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

book fair with inclusive activities, discussions and Drag Story Hour at 2pm. Sat 6/8, 12pm. Barnes & Noble, 2031 Dr Martin Luther King Pkwy. stonewallchicopride.com

POTLUCK, OPEN MIC AND JAM: Bring a dish to share, an acoustic instrument, your voice, a song or your favorite joke. Small donation requested. Fri, 6/7, 5pm. Feather River Senior Center, 1335 Myers St., Oroville.

Theater BLOOMSDAY: See Thursday. Fri, 6/7, 7:30pm. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. blueroom theatre.com

A CIRCUS STORY: Kinetics Academy of Dance presents fun-filled show about a young girl who becomes a trapeze artist. Fri, 6/7, 5:30pm. $12 - $18. Pleasant Valley High School, 1475 East Ave. eventbrite.com

Music LYME AID BENEFIT CONCERT: Fundraiser featuring music by Hot Flash, includes food, silent art auction and no-host bar. Fri, 6/7, 7pm. $15$17. CARD Center, 545 Vallombrosa Ave.

BEAUTY FROM ASHES Friday, June 7 MONCA

SEE FRIDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS

DAMN YANKEES: See Thursday. Fri, 6/7, 7:30pm. $16-$22. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Rd., Ste. F. chicotheatercompany.com

PULP: See Thursday. Fri, 6/7, 7:30pm. $10. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Road, Paradise. totr.org

8

SAT

Special Events

SPRING HIKE AT BIG CHICO CREEK ECOLOGICAL RESERVE: See the sights and learn more about the history of the reserve and current management strategies. For more info contact abrown@walksacramento.org or cstuart@ buttecounty.net. Sat 6/8, 10am. Chico Park & Ride, west lot, Highway 99/32.

STORYTAIL TUTORS: Reluctant, struggling and beginning readers can read to a therapy dog!. Sat 6/8, 2pm. Chico Branch Library, 1108 Sherman Ave.

WILD & SCENIC FILM FESTIVAL: Film festival to inspire environmental activism and a love for

nature. Features a range of short films documenting our oceans, ecosystem and more. Sat 6/8, 7pm. $10-$25 (visit aquatic center website). Oroville State Theatre, 1489 Myers St., Oroville. forebayaquaticcenter.com/wsff

Music HOUSE CATS: Get your swing on at brunch, with a combo of Latin, jazz, blues, rockabilly, country and pop tunes. Sat, 6/8, 11am. La Salles, 229 Broadway St. lasalleschico.com

JUNE JAM: Hosted by The Difference. All musicians and singers welcome. Any donations will go to the Handi-Riders. Sat, 6/8, 3pm. Scotty’s Landing, 12609 River Road. 321-3117.

Theater BLOOMSDAY: See Thursday. Play by Steven Dietz. Sat, 6/8, 7:30pm. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. blueroomtheatre.com

A CIRCUS STORY: See Friday. Sat 6/8, 5:30pm. $12-$18. Pleasant Valley High School, 1475 East Ave. eventbrite.com

DAMN YANKEES: See Thursday. Sat, 6/8, 7:30pm. $16-$22. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Rd., Ste. F. chicotheatercompany.com

PULP: See Thursday. Sat, 6/8, 7:30pm. $10. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Road, Paradise. totr.org

THIS WEEK CONTINUED ON PAGE 28

1078 ANNUAL GARAGE SALE: The gallery’s first garage sale fundraiser in the new space. Used furniture, clothing, knickknacks, kitchen gadgets, outdoor items and more for sale. Sat 6/8, 8am. 1078 Gallery, 1710 Park Ave.

EDITOR’S PICK

A DAY AT RICHARDSON SPRINGS: Leisurely tour of the Richardson Springs Resort with a buffet lunch in the Grand Dining Room and a guided interpretive hike. Proceeds benefit the Chico History Museum. Sat 6/8, 10am. $45$75. Richardson Springs, 15850 Richardson Springs Road. chicohistorymuseum.org

ALEXX FINDING HOME: Award-winning documentary following local woman Alexx Collins’ inspiring journey from homelessness to finding a home and healing for her and her child. Panel discussion follows with Alexx and some of those who helped along the way. Sat 6/8, 7pm. $5. Museum of Northern California Art, 900 Esplanade. monca.org

CASABLANCA: Screening of classic film, plus dinner, silent auction and no host bar. Sat 6/8, 5pm. $35. Chico Air Museum, 165 Ryan Ave. 345-6468

CHICO BICYCLE MUSIC FESTIVAL 2019: Annual festival starts at Third and Flume streets and moves on to Cedar Grove (at noon), then 2500 Estes Road (3pm). Food trucks, beer, DJs and a long list of musicians including Kyle Williams, the Pat Hull Band and Triple Tree. Sat 6/8, 11am-8pm. Various locations. becnet.org/chico-bicycle-music-festival

FREE LISTINGS! Post your event for free online at www. newsreview.com/calendar, or email the CN&R calendar editor at cnrcalendar@newsreview.com. Deadline for print listings is Wednesday, 5 p.m., one week prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

THE POWER OF CONNECTION Imagine you live on the street, are pregnant and due to give birth in weeks. You have no job, no bank account, no identification. What would you do? Chico resident Alexx Collins found herself in that predicament just a few years ago, and with perseverance and the help of others, she and her daughter now have a place to call home. Local filmmaker Ched Lohr captured Collins’ inspiring journey in the award-winning documentary Alexx Finding Home, which will be screened this Saturday (June 8), at the Museum of Northern California Art, followed by a panel discussion. JUNE 6 , 2019

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Art BEATNIKS COFFEE HOUSE & BREAKFAST JOINT: Portrait and Figure Drawing, drawings and paintings by Chico Art Center artists. Through 6/28. 1387 E. Eighth St.

CHICO ART CENTER: Small Works, group exhibit of 12-by12-inch artworks. Through 6/28. 450 Orange St. chicoartcenter.com

HEALING ART GALLERY - ENLOE CANCER CENTER: Antonio Ramirez, photography by late Northern California artist. The Enloe Cancer Center Healing Art Gallery features artists whose lives have been touched by cancer. Through 7/19. 265 Cohasset Road, 332-3856.

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JUNE 6, 2019

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Sunshine, Tehama County Arts Council presents retrospective exhibit of late California artist Babette Fickert Dowell›s work. Through 7/6. 710 Main St., Red Bluff, 391-3259.

James Canter, Stephanie Luke and Harvey Spector. Reception Friday, June 7, 3-7pm. Through 7/20. 732 Fourth St., Orland.

Museums BOLT’S ANTIQUE TOOL MUSEUM: This unique museum has more than 12,000 hand tools on display, charting cataloging the evolution and history of tools. Closed Sundays. Through 6/15. $3. 1650 Broderick St., Oroville.

CHICO CHILDREN’S MUSEUM: Featuring tons of cool stuff for kids to explore including a miniature city, complete with a junior vet clinic, dentist, cafe and farmer’s market, a giant fish tank, multi-sensory room, imagination playground and much more. Check the website for hours and admission information. Through 8/3. $7-$9. 325 Main St. chicochildrensmuseum.org

GATEWAY SCIENCE MUSEUM: Before and Beyond the

MUSEUM OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA ART: Beauty From Ashes, a one-day exhibit/fundraiser to support Paradise artists and survivors featuring photos by Terence Duffy of Shane Grammer’s murals painted in the ruins of the Camp Fire. Friday, June 7, 6:30pm. $25 ($100 VIP, early entry tix available). Plus, Map It Out, an exhibition of Northern California artists presenting works invented and inspired by the theme of maps. Through 7/28. Also, World of Color, featuring artists Evan Warzybok, Owen Smith, David McMillan and Naomi Griffith. Through 6/7. 900 Esplanade. monca.org

ORLAND ART CENTER: Triple Exposure

Moon, interactive multimedia exhibition celebrates the human and technological achievements needed to reach the moon and envisions a future Mars landing. Through 12/15. 625 Esplanade. csuchico.edu/ gateway

VALENE L. SMITH MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY: Remarkable Lives, exploring the intertwined worlds of birds and humans, in partnership with the Altacal Audubon Society and Snow Goose Festival. Exhibits include bird songs and behaviors, local photography and a robotic recreation of the late Jurassic Archaeopteryx. Through 7/31. Chico State.

Crosscurrents, photography exhibit features artists

THIS WEEK CONTINUED FROM PAGE 27

9

SUN

Special Events PRIDE 2019 BENEFIT BOOK FAIR: See Saturday. Sun, 6/9, 12pm. Barnes & Noble, 2031 Dr Martin Luther King Pkwy. stonewallchicopride.com

Music CHICO COMMUNITY CONCERT BAND: This year’s spring concert, Stage and Screen, features faves from classic movies and musicals. Sun, 6/9, 3pm. Free. Lakeside Pavilion, 2565 California Park Drive. (612) 615-5423.

HA’PENNY BRIDGE QUARTET: Celtic band for brunch. Sun, 6/9, 11am. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

WAR: The debut of the new amphitheater at the casino, with legendary 1970s American funk band. Comedian Paul Rodriguez

opens. Sun, 6/9, 8pm. $20. Rolling Hills Casino, 2655 Everett Freeman Way, Corning. rollinghillscasino.com

Theater A CIRCUS STORY: See Friday. Sun, 6/9, 2pm. $12-$18. Pleasant Valley High School, 1475 East Ave. eventbrite.com

DAMN YANKEES: See Thursday. Sun, 6/9, 2pm. $16-$22. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Rd., Ste. F. chicotheatercompany.com

PULP: See Thursday. Sun, 6/9, 2pm. $10. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Road, Paradise. totr.org

10

California leads workshop on fair housing laws and the reasonable accommodation and reasonable modification process. Includes free lunch. Mon, 6/10, 12pm. Cal Northern School of Law, 1395 Ridgewood Drive.

12

WED

Special Events POETRY READING: Hear local poets and bring your own poetry to read at this monthly meeting of creative minds. Wed, 6/12, 5:30pm. 15th Street Cafe, 1414 Park Avenue Ste. 120. (760) 898-0825.

MON

Special Events FREE FAIR HOUSING & TENANT RIGHTS CLINIC: Legal Services of Northern

FOR MORE MUSIC, SEE

NIGHTLIFE ON PAGE 30


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Slow Theatre returns to its guerrilla-theater roots

Lsouththousands to a makeshift theater in an orchard in Chico, the Butcher Shop was a DIY performanceong before it was a multiday festival attracting

art party that took place in a garage. Hence the name of Slow Theatre’s inaugural Garage Fest, which debuted last weekend by Carey Wilson (March 31-June 1). It was the local theater troupe’s return to its avantgarde roots, an updated version of the Butcher Shop that featured music, Review: dance, original short plays and improv. Garage Fest, The garage this time was a much Saturday, June 1. more refined location, at a home on Eaton Road on the edge of town. The open-air venue featured folding chairs for the audience in the driveway facing the “stage.” There also was an attached carport sheltering the live music, as well as beer, cocktails and Greek food for sale. Producer and emcee Denver Latimer—one of the founders, who started the Butcher Shop in 1989 with his siblings and friends in his parents’ garage—introduced the opening Short Form Set, by the Chico Live Improv Comedy troupe. The experience was kind of like being a fly on the wall at an intermediate acting class. Improvisational comedy is challenging, requiring absolute commitment, courage and instantaneous communal creativity. The most successful of the improv “games” was “Hollywood Director,” for which an audience member supplied the title, “Love in the Sky.” The comedians, under the direction and at the whim of Justin Bryant, continually had to change the presentation from science fiction, to musical, to Disney film. The improv set’s closing monologue, by Chris Murphy, on the theme “betrayal,” was shortened when a nonmetaphorical raincloud passed overhead with a brief shower, sending the audience to seek shelter near the refreshment outlets. After the unscheduled intermission, the Chico Dance Lab company took over the garage. Most enjoyable, and somewhat eerie, was a group dance performed to a remix of Blondie’s classic 1978 song “Heart of Glass,” arranged by avant-garde composer Philip Glass. The choreography evoked the pathos of the song with an interplay of ballet, interpretive dance and calisthenics.

After a brief, scheduled intermission, actor Loki Miller performed a monologue from Leonard Nimoy’s one-man play, Vincent, accompanied by Olivia Cerullo on keyboard. Miller is masterful at fully inhabiting extraordinary characters, and in this scene he alternated between narrative commentary by Vincent van Gogh’s art dealer brother, Theo, and excerpts from letters written by the great and much-suffering artist himself. Slow Theatre is presenting a free, public reading of the entire play on June 9, at 2 p.m., at the 1078 Gallery. And this preview was a good example of the theater company’s deliberate approach and its focus on the process as much as the final product. Lightening the mood considerably was a psychedelic garage-rock opera satire, Khalutu’s Apex Society, performed by Captain Murphy’s Flim Flam Dream Machine. It told the story of Izzy (played Andy Hafer), who emerges from a 20-year coma after being confronted by Death (Latimer in black bobbed wig) and is taken on a tour of the mysteries of the universe by Cosmic Mushroom God Khalutu (Greg Ellery in full hippie regalia). In true garage-rock style, Captain Murphy’s loudly distorted, wah-wah-drenched guitar shenanigans made the lyrics that ostensibly explained Izzy’s cosmic vision completely incomprehensible, but it was a fun and funny ride. Closing the show was Latimer’s Disaster, which he dedicated to those affected by the Camp Fire, and which is also a work in progress that will become part of 2019’s Butcher Shop festival. The increasingly absurd narrative features commentary from a trio of newspeople—cynical producer Paul (Murphy), anchorwoman Sara (Eliza Odegard), and on-the-scene reporter Rob (Brian Sampson). The disaster they are reporting on is never defined or described, and Latimer’s dialogue incorporates standard newsie clichés and homilies to illustrate how disaster reporting has become almost formulaic as we become inundated with the daily barrage of increasingly horrifying news. The characters’ eventual breakdown into nonsequitur interjections wrung some ironic but heartfelt laughter from viewers who empathized with their job of maintaining poise in the face of inexplicable cataclysmic events. Ω

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NIGHTLIFE

THURSDAY 6/6—WEDNESDAY 6/12 DJ COOTDOG: Spinning tunes for late

ZOE BOEKBINDER & PHANTOM TIDES Tonight, June 6 Blackbird SEE THURSDAY

TRIPLE TREE: Reggae jams for dancing. Thu, 6/6, 6pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

YURKOVIC: TLC Thursdays presents local melody-driven blues band with a Delta sound. Thu, 6/6, 6pm. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

ZOE BOEKBINDER: New Orleans-based singer/songwriter performs with Oakland’s Phantom Tides and Chico one-name solo performers Scout and Fera. Thu, 6/6, 7pm. $5-$10. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

Zoe Boekbinder

6THURSDAY

BLACK JOE LEWIS & THE HONEYBEARS: The groundbreaking blues/funk/soul crew from Austin, Texas, band is joined by Little Rock, Ark., five-piece Amasa Hines. Thu, 6/6, 8pm. $20-$22. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St. sierranevada.com

INDIE-ROCK NIGHT: All-locals: Similar

Th

is

Fr

id ay !

Alien, False Face and Cat Duo. Thu, 6/6, 7pm. $7. 1078 Gallery, 1710 Park Ave. 1078gallery.org

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JUNE 6, 2019

JOHN SEID AND LARRY PETERSON: Smooth dinner tunes on the patio. Thu, 6/6, 6pm. Grana, 198 E. Second St.

SUNNY ACRES: Local psychedelic space punk band plays the patio. Thu, 6/6, 9pm. $5. Argus Bar + Patio, 212 W. Second St.

THURSDAY NIGHT DJ: Beat the heat with a rotating list of DJs spinning all vinyl till late. Thu, 6/6, 8pm. Bill’s Towne Lounge, 135 Main St.

7FRIDAY

BASSMINT: Every Friday in the Peking Restaurant bar, dance to bass music DJs and producers. Fri, 6/7, 9:30pm. $5. BassMint, 243 W. Second St.

FRIDAY NIGHT CONCERT: Soul, jazz and funk with the Chuck Epperson Jr. Band. Fri, 6/7, 7pm. City Plaza, downtown Chico.

happy hour. Fri, 6/7, 10pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St. lasalleschico.com

FIRST FRIDAY HAPPY HOUR: Longtime Chico drummer Carey Wilson’s 65th birthday celebration featuring live music from The Stüff That Leaks Out and performances by Eastern Star Bellydance and Belly Sutra. Fri, 6/7, 4:30pm. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St.

EXOTIC BIRD

The sound of Kyle Field’s longtime project Little Wings (pictured) flutters into your heart like a cool wind through an open window at dawn, every song a poem spilling lyrics like loose change. With a couple decades of music under his belt, Field will have a deep well of songs to dip into this Monday (June 10) at Tender Loving Coffee. Local contemplative troubadour Donald Beaman opens.

JOHN SEID, LARRY PETERSON, CHRIS WENGER: Soulful songs and tasty

tunes for dinnertime. Fri, 6/7, 6:30pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St.

LYME AID BENEFIT CONCERT: Fundraiser featuring music by Hot Flash, includes food, silent art auction and no-host bar. Fri, 6/7, 7pm. $15-$17. CARD Center, 545 Vallombrosa Ave.

OBE AND LOKI: Live music at the

winery. Fri, 6/7, 6pm. Almendra Winery & Distillery, 9275 Midway Road, Durham.

OPEN MIC: Bring an instrument. Acoustic/electric guitar and drum set available to use. Sign up at 7:30pm. All ages welcome until 10pm. Fri, 6/7, 8pm. $1. Down Lo, 319 Main St., 966-8342.

OUTLIT DRAG SHOW: Featuring new and out of town guest drag performers. Fri, 6/7, 10pm. $5. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

PURPLE XPERIENCE: Five-piece Prince tribute group hailing from

Minneapolis. Fri, 6/7, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

ROOTS & BOOTS: Powerhouse country concert featuring Sammy Kershaw, Aaron Tippin and Collin Raye. Fri, 6/7, 8pm. $35-$95. Gold Country Casino & Hotel, 4020 Olive Highway, Oroville. goldcountrycasino.com

WOODY & SUNSHINE: Funky two-person jam band. Fri, 6/7, 11pm. Down Lo, 319 Main St.

8SATURDAY

CHORD FOUR: L.A.-based avant-garde jazz ensemble plays with Bryan


THIS WEEK: FIND MORE ENTERTAINMENT AND SPECIAL EVENTS ON PAGE 26

CHORD FOUR Saturday, June 8 Tender Loving Coffee

LONG TIME: Boston tribute band

SEE SATURDAY

6/9, 6pm. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

plays the hits and more. Sat, 6/8, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

OPEN MIC COMEDY NIGHT: Working on a

SOUL POSSE: Shake a leg at the Wags & Whiskers benefit with Chico cover band. Sat, 6/8, 7pm. The Commons Social Empourium, 2412 Park Ave.

TEMPO REGGAE PARTY: Monthly day

bit? See if it’s a hit or heckle-worthy, and enjoy cheap beer specials. Sign ups start at 8pm. Sun, 6/9, 9pm. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave. maltesebarchico.com

WAR: Celebrate the debut of the new amphitheater at Rolling Hills Casino with this legendary American funk band of the 1970s. Comedian Paul Rodriguez opens. Sun, 6/9, 8pm. $20. Rolling Hills Casino, 2655 Everett Freeman Way, Corning. rollinghills casino.com

and night party featuring reggae, dancehall, dub and roots from Nor Cal’s top DJs, bands and soundsystems. Plus, a delicious $20 buffet. Sat, 6/8, 5pm. Sipho’s, 1228 Dayton Road, (805) 801-3844.

UP TO 11: Local headbangin’ cover

10MONDAY

band performs your favorite hard rock hits. Sat, 6/8, 9pm. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave.

LITTLE WINGS: Legendary indie folk-

YOUR HANDS WRITE HISTORY:

McAllister’s Honk Shoe. Sat, 6/8, 8pm. $10-$12. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

THE DAMAGED GOODS DEMO-RELEASE: Local alt-rock crew celebrates new recording. Little Black Cloud and Elwood of Chico open. Sat, 6/8, 9pm. $7. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

JOHN SEID, LARRY PETERSON, CHRIS WENGER: Soulful songs and tasty tunes for dinnertime. Sat, 6/8, 6:30pm. Diamond Steakhouse,

220 W. Fourth St.

KATIE BARRETT & FRIENDS: Fun tunes

for late-night happy hour. Sat, 6/8, 10pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

12WEDNESDAY

9SUNDAY

LONG HALLWAYS: Eclectic post-rock band from Portland performs. Locals Solar Estates and LDF, a new project with members of Two Door Rev and Thin Air, open the show. Sat, 6/8, 7pm. $7. 1078 Gallery, 1710 Park Ave. 1078gallery.org

rocker returns to Chico and shares the bill with Donald Beaman for night of extraordinary sounds. Mon, 6/10, 8pm. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

Progressive metal band from Medford joined by The Deprived, Deathbreaker, Ghost Heart, and Swampheavy for a full night of hardcore. Sat, 6/8, 7pm. $10. The Spirit, 2360 Oro Quincy Highway, Oroville.

OPEN MIC COMEDY: Your weekly

HENRY CROOK BIRD EP-RELEASE: Folk and country blues musician celebrates new recording. Local singer/ songwriter Sean Corkery opens. Sun,

Wednesday dose of free comedy with experienced and first-time comedians. Signups start at 8pm. Wed, 6/12, 9pm. Studio Inn Lounge, 2582 Esplanade.

Good Food, GReAt enteRtAinMent,

A NEW GROOVE

Most great artists evolve, challenging themselves by exploring new territory. Austin, Texas, blues/funk band Black Joe Lewis & the Honeybears has done some changing of late. Lewis describes the new album as their “most subversive record to date,” exploring darker themes and drawing from the hard-edged twang of hill country blues, cowpunk, and Southern soul. Witness the new sound tonight (June 6) at the Sierra Nevada Big Room. Five-piece rock crew Amasa Hines from Little Rock, Ark., opens.

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CN&R

31


REEL WORLD FILM SHORTS Reviewers: Bob Grimm and Juan-Carlos Selznick.

Opening this week The Biggest Little Farm

A gorgeously shot documentary that follows a young married couple over the course of eight years as they leave city life behind and move to the country to try and start a farm and live in harmony with nature. In the process they encounter challenges and conflicts that lead to a better understanding of biodiversity and a new way of life. Pageant Theatre. Rated R.

Dark Phoenix

The classic “Dark Phoenix Saga” storyline from Marvel’s Uncanny X-Men comic finally gets its due with a full film that explores the transformation of Jean Grey (played by Sophie Turner) from mild-mannered telepathic/telekinetic to the all-powerful Phoenix, and finally to the all-destructive Dark Phoenix. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

Monsters wasted

Pickaxe (1999)

Special effects can’t make up for bad writing

La film up the greatest Godzilla premise ever and produce that is both great and terrible at the same time.

egendary Entertainment found a way to totally muck

How is so much suckage possible in a movie that features Godzilla, Rodan, Mothra and multiheaded Monster Zero? My summer is ruined, and it isn’t even summer by Bob Grimm yet. Godzilla: King of the Monsters bg r i mm@ does have some terrific monnewsrev i ew.c om ster battles in it, and the special effects are mind-bogglingly good. Godzilla squares off against legendary foes that first appeared in Godzilla: King of the early 1950/60s films of the the Monsters franchise, while getting some Starring Millie Bobby Brown, Vera Farmiga, much needed assistance from the Bradley Whitford. great Mothra, and all of the monDirected by Michael sters are wonders to behold on Dougherty. Cinemark screen. 14, Feather River But still, I cannot endorse Cinemas. Rated PG-13. this movie. The human stuff in between and during the monster scenes is dreadful. The script and staging for the homo sapiens is so bad that the film derails every time things cut to military types in a war room. The story, such as it is, picks up where the previous film, Godzilla (2014), left off, with a world in a state of disarray after monster attacks on San Francisco and Las Vegas. And how do the humans dust themselves off and find a way to coexist with the likes of giant sea reptiles and moths after the decimation of the Bay Area? Apparently, according to writer-director Michael Dougherty, we deliver inane dialogue really slowly, and inexplicably play with a sonar gadget that calls out to the monsters in a manner that either chills them

2

32

CN&R

JUNE 6, 2019

out or fires them up and, of course, winds up sparking the monster mayhem. That gadget was created by Dr. Emma Russell (Vera Farmiga), who lost a child in the San Francisco attack and is attempting to communicate to the monster animals alongside her daughter (Millie Bobby Brown). The monsters get the only well-staged scenes, featuring beautiful closeups and battered landscapes. Meanwhile, the poor actors are left to sit around in a situation room looking lost as they observe and comment on the action taking place elsewhere. Bradley Whitford as a doctor gets the Lowery Cruthers-in-Jurassic World role (as played by Jake Johnson). That is, he’s the nerdy guy cracking wise from afar while monsters eat people and military folks scratch their heads—only Whitford’s character’s lines aren’t funny. Brown is decent here, but again, with material so bad, there’s not much for the Stranger Things actress to work with. And she’s already completed her shots for the next installment, Godzilla vs. Kong, due out in 2020, so she’s not escaping this franchise quite yet. Before making this film, Dougherty directed some OK horror entries (Krampus, Trick’r Treat). He’s also on board as a screenwriter for Godzilla vs. Kong, with Adam Wingard—also a horror specialist (You’re Next, and the awful Blair Witch reboot)—as director. I’m not optimistic. Perhaps Legendary should stop putting large blockbusters such as these into the hands of relatively new and mediocre horror directors. Ω

1 2 3 Poor

Fair

Good

4 Very Good

5 Excellent

The classic environmental documentary about activists standing up to logging interests to protect old-growth forests in Oregon. Shows tonight (June 6), 7 p.m. Suggested donation: $5-$10. A benefit for Earth First! Journal. Pageant Theatre. Not rated.

The Secret Life of Pets 2

In this second film in the computeranimated franchise, Max the Jack Russell terrier (voiced by Patton Oswalt, who replaced Louis C.K.) and his animal friends continue to have adventures whenever their humans aren’t around. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

Now playing Aladdin

Guy Ritchie (Sherlock Holmes, Snatch) wrote and directed this live-action adaptation of the classic Middle Eastern folk tale starring Naomi Scott as Princess Jasmine, Mena Massoud as impoverished thief Aladdin, and Will Smith as the genie who can make wishes come true. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

4

Avengers: Endgame

There are tons of questions this movie needed to answer: Is everybody really dead? Where’s Thanos (Josh Brolin)? Where’s Hawkeye (Jeremy Renner)? Is Tony Stark/Iron Man (Robert Downey Jr.) doomed in space? Does Star-Lord (Chris

Pratt) still have his Walkman in the great beyond? And, how can I really talk about anything specific in this film without becoming the Spoiler King? I can say that the movie answers many of the questions everyone’s been asking, and more, thanks to another well-balanced screenplay and a crack directorial job from the team of Anthony and Joe Russo. I can also tell you that the movie borrows a lot from Back to the Future Part II, and that the Hulk undergoes a fantastic wardrobe change. Despite a three-hour running time, all of this zips by in spectacularly entertaining fashion and very rarely misses the mark. And in the midst of all the action, Downey Jr. delivers another soulful, endearing performance, well beyond anything you would’ve expected from a Marvel movie before he started showing up in them. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13 —B.G.

Booksmart

Actress Olivia Wilde makes her directorial debut with this comedy about a couple of teen girls who try to make up for a highschool career focused solely on studying with one night of partying. Cinemark 14. Rated R.

2

Godzilla: King of the Monsters

See review this issue. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13 —B.G.

John Wick: Chapter 3 – Parabellum

In part three of the film series, “retired” super-assassin John Wick (Keanu Reeves) is in big trouble as a guild of elite killers hunts him down to claim the $14 million price placed on his head. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

Ma

Octavia Spencer stars as the title character in this horror flick about a lonely veterinary assistant who develops an unhealthy obsession with a group of teens that she befriends. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

Pokémon Detective Pikachu

A part real-life/part animated fantasy flick set in a world where people collect Pokémon to do battle against each other, with Ryan Reynolds starring as the voice of Pikachu, a Pokémon and budding detective who helps a human track down a missing person. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

Rocketman

An appropriately fantastical musical biopic on the life of piano-playing rock legend Elton John. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

The Biggest Little Farm


CHOW

W NO.

It Is A Complete sentenCe

Serving Butte, Glenn & Tehama Counties

Conjuring the wine spirits

342-RAPE

24 hr. hotline (Collect Calls Accepted) www.rapecrisis.org

Almendra distiller Connor Vaccaro (left) and owner Berton Bertagna.

Almendra brings brandy to the North State

ISon-Kissed and Carol Bertagna were looking to expand their Vineyards operation to include brandy-

n 2014, when local farmers/winemaking couple Berton

making, they flew out to Kentucky in search of a still. While there, they got a call from employee/soon-to-be-distiller Connor story and photo by Vaccaro, telling them he’d found one Jason Cassidy here—out in a field in Nord, northwest of Chico, covered in overgrowth j aso nc@ newsrev i ew.c om but intact. It turned out that the landowner, who lived on the East Coast, had Almendra Winery & Distillery purchased one of the copper Prulho9275 Midway, Durham brand stills from French Cognac343-6893 maker Rémy Martin after it closed almendrawinery.com its Napa distillery in 2002—and then left it exposed to the elements until the Bertagnas called and arranged to purchase it. Today, after a couple years of refurbishment, the polished copper charentais alembic-style still (the traditional vessel used to make Cognac for centuries) looks brand new sitting inside the barrel room at Almendra Winery & Distillery in Durham. The winery/ distillery opened in 2016, and officially added brandies (and other spirits) as well as the Almendra wine label to the portfolio. Almendra now boasts a restaurant and full bar, too. Given the Bertagnas’ experience, it was a natural progression to move into making brandy. “[We figured], ‘Heck, we’re doing wine, why not start distilling,” Berton Bertagna said during a recent interview at Almendra. Brandy is, after all, wine that’s been distilled—whereby the liquids are further separated via a process of heating and condensation to create a more concentrated form of alcoholic beverage that’s then aged in barrels. Bertagna and Vaccaro started out just experimenting with distillation. Vaccaro interned as a winemaker at Son-Kissed while working on a viticulture and enology degree at Oregon State. As things progressed, Bertagna sent him to the distilling program at Dry Fly Distillery in Spokane, Wash. The fruits of those labors are a series of Monkey

Face-brand spirits—vodka, gin, bourbon whiskey and brandy—as well as a handful of infused brandies under the Almendra label. The vodka, gin and bourbon whiskey are produced with a corn mash (not grapes), with the fairly smooth Kentucky-style bourbon aged for two years in American oak barrels. The gin is wonderfully unique, with a light touch on the juniper berries and a balanced blend of rosemary, mandarin oranges, lavender and almonds, making for a refreshing take on the style that’s perfect for a summer cocktail. The star, though, is the Monkey Face brandy, which is aged in toasted French oak barrels for 20 months, then finished in wine barrels for four months. It’s oaky and faintly sweet—a perfect sipper. The barrel-aging actually takes place in a separate metal warehouse from the wines, which are housed in the climate-controlled distillery. “We keep it exposed to the elements,” said Vaccaro, explaining that, as the temperature fluctuates from hot to cold, “it pushes the spirit in and out of the barrel,” which allows for the characteristics of the wood to be more fully extracted. The infused brandies, however, are not finished in barrels. Instead, the clear grape spirit straight from the still is infused with what Bertagna grows. “Being a farmer, I have access to [ingredients],” he said. That means the light and wonderfully aromatic Almendra Grove orange-flavored brandy is made by crushing mandarins in the alcohol, then straining the infused product. Same with the Almendra Harvest, infused with roasted organic almonds that give the brandy its delicate flavor and copper color. With the distillery established and the aged brandies in bottles—available at Almendra and many grocery and liquor stores around the North State—Vaccaro is now able to put the copper still to work on new varieties. Already in the bottle is a second version of the Monkey Face vodka, made with half vodka and half clear, unaged brandy. And in the works is a brandy that, instead of going into toasted oak barrels, is being aged in charred oak bourbon barrels, making for what promises to be a bold and rich update on the style. Ω

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STOP, LOOK AND LISTEN, AND CHECK THIS OUT! Remember that scene in

Beat Street when the Bronx Rockers show up with that band of longhairs that bust out some seriously dank sludge-metal, only to get served by young Lee and the Beat Street Breakers? No, because it didn’t happen. But just because old-school B-boy moves and spine-rattling doom metal haven’t mixed before doesn’t mean they shouldn’t. It comes as no surprise to Arts DEVO that the unlikely crossover actually has been realized by local music-videomaking duo Michelle Camy and Brandon Squyres. Once again, the couple have brought something completely new to the world with a just-released video for ultra-heavy Chico four-piece Amarok’s song “Devoured.” Starring with the four band members (including Squyres, who plays bass and sings) is world-class B-boy David Shreibman, aka Kid David (brother of Jesse Shreibman, one-time Chico dude and current drummer for Bell Witch), who has danced in competitions all over the world and performed with Gwen Stefani and Justin Beiber, among others. With the bonerattling track trudging Kid David meets Amarok. alongside, the video is a beautiful nine-minute black-and-white meditation of contrasts that cuts between the band in a shadowy room and scenes of Kid David outdoors showing off his impressive moves—often in slo-mo—boombox at his side. Visit facebook.com/amarokdoom for a link.

ALEXX’S STORY Alexx Collins is one of the coolest people I’ve met in Chico. She’s fun, hilarious and delightful to talk to. And she plays a musical saw! She’s the kind of person you want to hang out with. I didn’t meet Collins until she’d gotten herself off the streets, and the more I spent time around her (we play music together on occasion), the harder it was to reconcile the dynamic person in front of me with the story of a 14-year-old who was kicked out of her home and then spent the next dozen years without one (as told so well by former CN&R staff writer Ken Smith in “The long road home,” Cover story, Aug. 31, 2017). In fact, Collins’ story might be the perfect example of how even the most capable among us can be forced to the streets by conditions beyond our control, and that it takes a lot of organized assistance to overcome those conditions and get one’s life back in order. Her powerful story is being told again by local filmmaker/writer/musician Ched Lohr in his new documentary, Alexx Finding Home. The film just won an award for Best Editing at the Fusion International Film Festival, and it premiers locally at the Museum of Northern California Art this Saturday (Jan. 8), at 7 p.m., and will be followed by a panel discussion with the filmmaker, Collins and local advocate Siana Sonoquie. Cost is $5, and proceeds benefit Safe Space Winter Shelter. ART FOR YOUR HEALTH Calling all rad people using art to heal illness and

trauma. Camp Fire Long Term Recovery Group and the Chico Arts Commission are trying to compile a comprehensive directory of individuals and organizations using “music, movement, dance, art, painting, sculpture, poetry, writing, acting and other artforms” to aid in recovery. Send names and any questions to campfirewellness@gmail.com In the meantime, the Chico Art Center (450 Orange St.) is home to the Women’s Retreat for Camp Fire Survivors, on the second Saturday of each month. Hosted by artist Lynn Abbiati (whose home was destroyed by the fire), the arts-making retreat is “a place for women to stop, take time for self care, to dream a little.” Next one: June 8, 10 a.m.,-4 p.m. All are welcome; cost $5 (to cover materials). Register at campfirewomensretreat.app.rsvpify.com.


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14855 klamath ct. magalia • $259,900 big chico creek estates 3 bed/2.5 bth, 2,402 sq ft with a floor plan that flows, new New exterior & Pricebeauty! Reduced! Beautiful Home hardwood floors in kitchen, fresh interior paint, lush landspace .30 lot size! $530,000 interior paint, septic Mild fixer. 1990 modular home. 3 bed, 2 bath with lots of tank, windows, wood beautiful home with2updated plantation shutters, formal living, formal dining, family 3 bed bath onkitchen, a foundation, room, and pristine!! Gorgeous grounds with lush landscape! 4 bed/2 bth, 2,504 sq ft $575,000 upgrades. Call now for more stove, appliances & 1568 sq ft, .77 acre on the so much more! stunning durham estate ProPerty! roPerty! Custom one owner home, 4bd/3ba, 3,546 sq ft, 5.79 info and private showing. IN G agricultural sideproperty, ofEthe N Dgreen P acres. Pool, shop, possible horse Chandelier walnuts, 3-car garage & so much more! CalDRE #02056059 line and minutes from town. $995,000 Call today! $179,000. Call me for details. one owner home! Open floor plan, laminate flooring, walk in closets in each bedroom! A well Olivia Larrabee l 530.520.3169 Pebblewood Pines condo! Wonderful 3 bed/2 1/2 bath, 1,889 sq ft. Lovely courtyard setting, nicely maintained home! 2-car garage and OWNED SOLAR! $379,900

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1.59 Acre Double Lot with beautiful valley AFFORDABLE... move views. in ready! and canyon Cozy home, 2$120,000 bd / 1 bath, sits on large lot with large side area for 3/1 with huge parking and RV access to back yard in Chico. yard. Home includes a basement $269,000 (3 rooms). A Must See...

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The following houses were sold in Butte County by real estate agents or private parties during the week of May 20- May 24, 2019 The housing prices are based on the stated documentary transfer tax of the parcel and may not necessarily reflect the actual sale price of the home. ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

61 Quail Covey Ct

Chico

$805,000

3/3

SQ. FT. 3674

199 E 19th St

Chico

$257,000

2/1

SQ. FT. 912

1567 Lazy Trail Dr

Chico

$700,000

3/3

2898

698 E 8th St

Chico

$232,000

3/2

1507

3066 Hudson Ave

Chico

$608,000

3/3

2493

937 Karen Dr

Chico

$225,000

3/2

1189

57 Skymountain Cir

Chico

$583,000

4/2

2257

2055 Amanda Way #32

Chico

$205,000

3/2

1008 1344

1171 Almond Vista Ct

Chico

$580,000

4/2

2431

3231 Mystery Run

Chico

$563,000

4/3

2870

3 Westerdahl Ct

Chico

$555,000

3/2

2105

3157 Rogue River Dr

Chico

$511,000

4/3

2523

1419 Ridgebrook Way

Chico

$500,000

4/3

2165

3187 Sespe Creek Way

Chico

$459,000

3/2

1682

254 E Shasta Ave

Chico

$439,000

2/2

1456

2523 Tuolumne Dr

Chico

$400,000

3/3

1738

3006 Rodeo Ave

Chico

$380,000

3/1

1254

2740 Revere Ln

Chico

$360,000

3/3

1516

1616 E Lassen Ave

Chico

$360,000

3/2

1231

26 Redding Ct

Chico

$357,500

3/1

1050

829 Kern St

Chico

$339,000

3/2

1076

737 Windham Way

Chico

$338,000

4/2

2357

136 W 22nd St

Chico

$327,000

3/2

1284

2159 Elm St #8

Chico

$195,000

3/2

1420 Sherman Ave #2

Chico

$171,000

2/2

920

904 Dayton Rd

Chico

$168,000

1/1

754

1420 Sherman Ave #4

Chico

$165,000

2/2

915

431 W 6th St

Chico

$140,000

4/1

980

1621 Sherman Ave

Chico

$100,000

2/2

1304

2115 Algonkin Ave

Chico

$99,000

4/1

1040

1702 Salem St

Chico

$90,000

2/1

1229

69 Duke Ln

Oroville

$499,000

3/2

1686

36 Crystal Pines Rd

Oroville

$400,000

4/2

2103

8 Dorr Ln

Oroville

$380,000

3/3

1716

4900 Oro Dam Blvd E

Oroville

$360,000

3/3

1722

6482 Alexander Ct

Paradise

$593,000

3/4

2610

1830 Chloe Ct

Paradise

$555,000

4/3

2520

5773 Fickett Ln

Paradise

$480,000

3/4

2474

2 Lacewing Ct

Chico

$315,000

3/2

1187

2119 Kennedy Ave

Chico

$315,000

4/2

1722

3845 Lime Saddle Rd

Paradise

$446,000

2/1

927

1734 Arcadian Ave

Chico

$303,000

2/2

1080

2222 De Mille Rd

Paradise

$402,000

3/2

1836

2247 Mulberry St

Chico

$285,000

2/2

1220

3480 Amber Oaks Ct

Paradise

$375,000

4/5

4641

june 6, 2019

CN&R

35


REAL ESTATE TATE For more information about advertising in our Real estate section, call us at

CLASSIFIEDS Call for a quote. (530) 894-2300 ext. 2 Phone hours: M-F 9am-5pm. Deadlines for print: Line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Display ad deadline: Friday 2pm

All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. Further, the News & Review specifically reserves the right to edit, decline or properly classify any ad. Errors will be rectified by re-publication upon notification. The N&R is not responsible for error after the first publication. The N&R assumes no financial liability for errors or omission of copy. In any event, liability shall not exceed the cost of the space occupied by such an error or omission. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes full responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. *Nominal fee for

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as D & E AUTO CORPORATION at 3328 Esplanade, Suite D Chico, CA 95973. D & E AUTO CORPORATION 3328 Esplanade, Suite D Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: AARON WEBER, CEO Dated: April 25, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000535 Published: May 16,23,30, June 6, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CHICO FACE PAINTING at 314 West 16th Street #A Chico, CA 95928. NORA MACHADO 314 West 16th Street #A Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: NORA MACHADO Dated: May 7, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000574 Published: May 16,23,30, June 6, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as RPM MARINE at 5656 Pentz Rd Paradise, CA 95969. MICHAEL THEADORE OMARY 5656 Pentz Rd Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: MICHAEL T O’MARY Dated: May 8, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000583 Published: May 16,23,30, June 6, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following persons have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name RPM MARINE at 5656 Pentz Road Paradise, CA 95969. LOGAN JEFFREY CUSEO 15192 Coutolenc Road Magalia, CA 95954. MICHAEL THEADORE OMARY 5656 Pentz Road Paradise, CA 95969. This business was conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: MICHAEL T O’MARY Dated: May 8, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000377 Published: May 16,23,30, June 6, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ARTISANS FAIRE, BAH HUMBUG FESTIVAL OF CRAFTS, CHRISTMAS FAIRE, CYRCLE PRODUCTIONS, ROONEY ENTERPRISES at 1429 W 7th Street Chico, CA 95928. STEPHEN M ROONEY 1429 W 7th Street Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: STEPHEN ROONEY Dated: April 16, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000485 Published: May 16,23,30, June 6, 2019

6,13, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as MAKABE MUSIC at 1558 Bridge Street #8 Oroville, CA 95965. HARDLEY W BOGLE 1558 Bridge Street #8 Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: HARDLEY BOGLE Dated: April 30, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000555 Published: May 23,30, June 6,13, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CHICO YARD GAMES at 739 Dias Dr Chico, CA 95926. SEAN PATRICK CASTLEMAN 739 Dias Dr Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: SEAN CASTLEMAN Dated: May 8, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000577 Published: May 16,23,30, June 6, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as THE WORM FARM at 9050 Lassell Lane Durham, CA 95938. DURHAM WORM FARM INC 9033 Esquon Rd Durham, CA 95938. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: JOHN STEWART, PRESIDENT Dated: April 29, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000543 Published: May 23,30, June 6,13, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BILLY GOAT BRAND at 1178 Filbert Ave Chico, CA 95926. TAYLOR AYOSE ANDERSON-NILSSON 1178 Filbert Ave Chico, CA 95926. SHAUN ERIC BOYER 866 Vallombrosa Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: SHAUN BOYER Dated: May 10, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000594 Published: May 16,23,30, June 6, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as POMONA APARTMENTS at 813 Nord Avenue Chico, CA 95926. SNET 3 LLC 4324 Orange Grove Avenue Sacramento, CA 95841. This business is conducted by a Limited Liabiliity Company. Signed: WILLIAM SHERIDAN, MANAGER Dated: May 15, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000607 Published: May 23,30, June 6,13, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as STELLER BLIND REPAIR at 1068 Lupin Ave Chico, CA 95973. KEVIN HIROSHI STELLER 1068 Lupin Ave Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: KEVIN STELLER Dated: May 10, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000591 Published: May 16,23,30, June 6, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BCCAC, BUTTE COUNTY CANNABIS ART CLUB at 1618 Nord Avenue, #11 Chico, CA 95926. CHRISTOPHER PATRICK HOWELL 3341 Neal Road Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: CHRIS HOWELL Dated: May 10, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000590 Published: May 16,23,30, June 6, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as KBIZ, RHEMA WORD OF FAITH, VINCE HAYNIE ENTERPRISES, VINCE HAYNIE MINISTRIES at 574 East 12th Street Chico, CA 95926. VINCENT HAYNIE PO Obx 7508 Chico, CA 95927. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: VINCENT HAYNIE Dated: May 13, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000605 Published: May 23,30, June this Legal Notice continues

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PANINI MACHINI, SHORTCYCLE at 3002 Clark Road Butte Valley, CA 95965. JOEL DAVID MATZINGER 3002 Clark Road Butte Valley, CA 95965. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JOEL MATZINGER Dated: May 15, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000617 Published: May 23,30, June 6,13, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PAINT PARTIES BY DAWN at 14380 Madonna Court Magalia, CA 95954. DAWN ELISE HICKEY 14380 Madonna Court Magalia, CA 95954. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: DAWN HICKEY Dated: May 17, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000625 Published: May 23,30, June 6,13, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as DWYER LOGGING at 331 Black Bart Road Oroville, CA 95966. DOMINIC DWYER 331 Black Bart Road Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: DOMINIC DWYER Dated: May 17, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000624 Published: May 23,30, June 6,13, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF this Legal Notice continues

ABANDONMENT The following persons have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name DWYER LOGGING at 331 Black Bart Rd Oroville, CA 95966. DOMINIC SILAS DWYER 331 Black Bart Rd Oroville, CA 95966. DAKONA LEE DWYER 331 Black Bart Rd Oroville, CA 95966. This business was conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: DOMINIC DWYER Dated: May 17, 2019 FBN Number: 2018-0000176 Published: May 23,30, June 6,13, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BEST USE, SMART ASSET MANAGEMENT at 259 E 9th St Chico, CA 95928. ERIK KENT HINESLEY 271 E 9th St Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ERIK HINESLEY Dated: May 9, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000586 Published: May 23,30, June 6,13, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as DOWN LO, LOST ON MAIN at 319 Main Street Chico, CA 95928. LOST IN CHICO 319 Main Street Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: KYLE ULLRICH, CEO Dated: April 30, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000544 Published: May 30, June 6,13,20, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as JESSEE EQUIPMENT MANUFACTURING at 2434 Dayton Road, Building #2 Chico, CA 95928. JMME NUT MANUFACTURING CORPORATION, INC. 2434 Dayton Road, Building #2 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: RICKY D. SIMAS, PRESIDENT Dated: May 16, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000620 Published: May 30, June 6,13,20, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BIDWELL REAL ESTATE, BIDWELL REALTY, BIDWELL REALTY, INC., CENTURY 21 BIDWELL REALTY at 5 Skyline Blvd Oroville, CA 95966. BIDWELL REALTY, INC. 5 Mt Hope Court Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: JAMES M. GUDERIAN, BROKER/OWNER Dated: May 22, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000648 Published: May 30, June 6,13,20, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BIDWELL REAL ESTATE, BIDWELL REALTY, BIDWELL REALTY, INC, CENTURY 21 BIDWELL REALTY at 5263 Royal Oaks Dr Oroville, CA 95966. BIDWELL REALTY, INC 5 Mt Hope Court Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: JAMES GUDERIAN, BROKER/OWNER this Legal Notice continues


Dated: May 22, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000649 Published: May 30, June 6,13,20, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as THE PROGRESSIVE SCHOOLHOUSE at 2400 Notre Dame Blvd Chico, CA 95928. LORI TENNANT 2657 Cactus Ave. Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: LORI A. TENNANT Dated: May 15, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000613 Published: May 30, June 6,13,20, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as LORI TENNANT FINE ART at 2400 Notre Dame Blvd Chico, CA 95928. LORI ANN TENNANT 2657 Cactus Ave. Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: LORI A. TENNANT Dated: May 15, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000614 Published: May 30, June 6,13,20, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as LIVING FREE HEALING CENTER, THE WELLNESS COLLECTIVE at 1 Williamsburg Suite E Chico, CA 95926. JANE VICTORIA MINERS 1933 Mars Way Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. this Legal Notice continues

Signed: JANE MINERS Dated; May 6, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000568 Published: May 30, June 6,13,20, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BIG AL’S DRIVE IN at 1844 Esplanade Chico, CA 95926. PEACH TREE RESTAURANT INC 185 Cohasset Rd Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signd: NAEEM REHMAN, VICE PRESIDENT Dated: May 21, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000639 Published: May 30, June 6,13,20, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as EVAS ULTRA BLIND CLEANING SERVICE at 530 Windham Way Chico, CA 95973. DANIEL VUJIC 530 Windham Way Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: DANIEL VUJIC Dated: May 24, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000658 Published: May 30, June 6,13,20, 2019

This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: CHRISTINA PAEZ-SISINO Dated: May 8, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000578 Published: June 6,13,20,27, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as STYLE BOMB CLUB at 245 W 7th Ave Chico, CA 95926. EMILY MARIE CORONA 245 W 7th Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: EMILY CORONA Dated: May 24, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000660 Published: June 6,13,20,27, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BOUGHIE BOY at 2607 Forest Ave, Ste 130 Chico, CA 95928. JOSEPH LUTHER SELBY 1975 Bruce Road Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JOSEPH L. SELBY Dated: May 24, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000659 Published: June 6,13,20,27, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATMENT The following person is doing business as EVERGRACE CRAFTS at 573 Upham Road Bangor, CA 95914. CHRISTINA JACKELYNE PAEZ-SISINO 573 Upham Road Bangor, CA 95914.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as ADOPTION CHOICES OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA at 1469 Humboldt Rd Ste 200 Chico, CA 95928. CHICO FEMINIST WOMENS HEALTH CENTER 1901 Victor Ave Redding, CA

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96002. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: MARIKATHRYN HENDRIX, DIRECTOR Dated: May 17, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000622 Published: June 6,13,20,27, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as THE SOCIAL CHICO at 1400 W. Third St. Chico, CA 95928. FPA6 CRAIG HALL, LLC 2082 Michelson Drive 4th Floor Irvine, CA 92612. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: M. EURL, VICE PRES. Dated: May 6, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000569 Published: June 6,13,20,27, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ROD BROKER at 55 Herlax Circle Chico, CA 95926. BRENT WILLIAM CLINE 55 Herlax Circle Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: BRENT CLINE Dated: May 22, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000652 Published: June 6,13,20,27, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as OROVILLE DRY DOCK BOAT AND RV STORAGE at 170 Kelly Ridge Road Oroville, CA 95966. ROBERT LEE POSTIGO 330 Tres Pinos Rd Ste C-4 this Legal Notice continues

Hollister, CA 95023. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ROBERT L. POSTIGO Dated: May 24, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000657 Published: June 6,13,20,27, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as NORTH VALLEY MUTUAL AID at 1431 Park Avenue Chico, CA 95928. ZACHARY D BLUE 1820 Mulberry Street Chico, CA 95928. MALAMA MACNEIL 1252 E 8th Street Chico, CA 95928. MILES MONTALBANO 1206 Salem Street Chico, CA 95928. ALIZA Z SCHER PO Box 686 Hayfork, CA 96041. This business is conducted by an Unincorporated Association. Signed: MALAMA MACNEIL Dated: May 31, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000687 Published: June 6,13,20,27, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as WHISPERING TREES APARTMENTS at 1501 North Cherry #19 Chico, CA 95926. JESSE E PIPKIN 9500 Crystal Bay Ln Elk Grove, CA 95758. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JESSE PIPKIN this Legal Notice continues

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY For the week oF June 6, 2019 ARIES (March 21-April 19): “I don’t think

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): How many lan-

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Peter

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Here’s

we were ever meant to hear the same song sung exactly the same way more than once in a lifetime,” says poet Linh Dinh. That’s an extreme statement that I can’t agree with, but I understand what he’s driving at. Repeating yourself can be debilitating, even deadening. That includes trying to draw inspiration from the same old sources that have worked for you in the past. In accordance with current astrological omens, I suggest you try to minimize exact repetition in the next two weeks: both in what you express and what you absorb. For further motivation, here’s William S. Burroughs: “Truth may appear only once; it may not be repeatable.”

Benchley wrote the bestselling book Jaws, which was later turned into a popular movie. It’s the story of a great white shark that stalks and kills people in a small beach town. Later in his life, the Taurus author was sorry for its influence, which helped legitimize killing of sharks and led to steep drops in shark populations. To atone, Benchley became an aggressive advocate for shark conservation. If there’s any behavior in your own past that you regret, the coming weeks will be a good time to follow Benchley’s lead: Correct for your mistakes; make up for your ignorance; do good deeds to balance a time when you acted unconsciously.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Some birds

can fly for days without coming down to earth. Alpine swifts are the current record-holders, staying aloft for 200 consecutive days as they chase and feed on insects over West Africa. I propose we make the swift your soul ally for the next three weeks. May it help inspire you to take maximum advantage of the opportunities life will be offering you. You will have extraordinary power to soar over the maddening crowd, gaze at the big picture of your life and enjoy exceptional amounts of freedom.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): “I think

CITY OF CHICO CITY COUNCIL ACCESSORY DWELLING UNIT (ADU) OWNER-OCCUPANCY ORDINANCE AMENDMENTS Public Hearing Notice NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City of Chico City Council will hold a public hearing on Tuesday, June 18, 2019 at 6:00 p.m. in the City Council Chambers located at 421 Main Street, regarding the following: Accessory Dwelling Units (ADU) Owner-Occupancy Ordinance Amendments - The Planning Commission has recommended that the City Council adopt Accessory Dwelling Unit (ADU) Code amendments removing the owneroccupancy requirements in all areas outside the SD-4 Overlay Zone (Special Design Considerations – West Avenue Neighborhood Area). Currently, the ADU ordinance requires a property owner to live onsite in either the main residence or the ADU, and to record a deed restriction reinforcing the requirement. The Planning Commission is recommending that the owneroccupancy requirement be removed, except in the SD-4 (Special Design Considerations – West Avenue Neighborhood) overlay zone, which is bounded by West 11th Avenue to the north, West Sacramento Avenue on the south, Esplanade on the east, and Warner Street and Citrus Avenue to the west. For all other areas outside the SD-4 overlay zone, the owner-occupancy restriction would be eliminated. Also proposed are related cleanup amendments regarding ADU standards including alley setbacks. Questions regarding this project may be directed to Principal Planner Bruce Ambo at (530) 879-6801 or bruce.ambo@ chicoca.gov, or Planner Kelly Murphy at (530) 879-6535 or kelly.murphy@chicoca.gov. The proposed ADU Code amendments would not result in an increase in development beyond that which was analyzed in the Final Environmental Impact Report (EIR) prepared and certified for the Chico 2030 General Plan update (State Clearinghouse #2008122038). The proposed amendments represent a refinement of the General Plan adoption process, and in accordance with California Environmental Quality Act Guidelines Section 15162 are within the scope of the EIR. Any person may appear and be heard at the public hearing, and interested parties are encouraged to submit written comments on the above noted project. Written materials to be presented to the City Council should be delivered to the City Clerk’s office 8 days in advance of the meeting (sooner if there are holidays prior to the meeting) in order that copies may be included with the agenda and to give Council an opportunity to review the material in advance. If written materials are submitted later than this deadline, the City Council may not have adequate time to address them. All written materials should be submitted to the City of Chico City Clerk, 411 Main Street, Third Floor, or mailed to P. O. Box 3420, Chico, CA 95927. In accordance with Government Code Section 65009, if any person(s) challenges the action of the City Council in court, said person(s) may be limited to raising only those issues that were raised at the public hearing described in this notice, or in written correspondence delivered to the City Council at, or prior to, the public hearing.

by rob brezsny

gentleness is one of the most disarmingly and captivatingly attractive qualities there are,” writes poet Nayyirah Waheed. That will be emphatically true about you in the coming weeks. Your poised, deeply felt gentleness will accord you as much power as other people might draw from ferocity and grandeur. Your gentleness will enable you to crumble obstacles and slip past barriers. It will energize you to capitalize on and dissipate chaos. It will win you leverage that you’ll be able to use for months.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Is the Loch Ness

monster real? Is there a giant sea serpent that inhabits the waters of Loch Ness in Scotland? Tantalizing hints arise now and then, but no definitive evidence has ever emerged. In 1975, enterprising investigators got the idea to build a realistic-looking papier-mâché companion for Nessie and place it in Loch Ness. They hoped that this “honey trap” would draw the reclusive monster into more public view. Alas, the scheme went awry. (Lady Nessie got damaged when she ran into a jetty.) But it did have some merit. Is there an equivalent approach you might employ to generate more evidence and insight about one of your big mysteries? What strategies might you experiment with? The time is right to hatch a plan.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Earlier in your

life, you sometimes wrestled with dilemmas that didn’t deserve so much of your time and energy. They weren’t sufficiently essential to invoke the best use of your intelligence. But over the years, you have ripened in your ability to attract more useful and interesting problems. Almost imperceptibly, you have been growing smarter about recognizing which riddles are worth exploring and which are better left alone. Here’s the really good news: The questions and challenges you face now are among the finest you’ve ever had. You are being afforded prime opportunities to grow in wisdom and effectiveness.

guages are you fluent it? One? Two? More? I’m sure you already know that gaining the ability to speak more than one tongue makes you smarter and more empathetic. It expands your capacity to express yourself vividly and gives you access to many interesting people who think differently from you. I mention this because you’re in a phase of your cycle when learning a new language might be easier than usual, as is improving your mastery of a second or third language. If none of that’s feasible for you, I urge you to at least formulate an intention to speak your main language with greater candor and precision—and find other ways to expand your ability to express yourself.

Uruguayan writer Eduardo Galeano from The Book of Embraces: “In the River Plate basin we call the heart a ‘bobo,’ a fool. And not because it falls in love. We call it a fool because it works so hard.” I bring this to your attention because I hope that in the coming weeks, your heart will indeed be a hard-working, wisely foolish bobo. The astrological omens suggest that you will learn what you need to learn and attract the experiences you need to attract if you do just that. Life is giving you a manJune 6 to express daring and diligent actions in behalf of love.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

When he was 20 years old, a German student named Max Planck decided he wanted to study physics. His professor at the University of Munich dissuaded him, telling Planck, “In this field, almost everything is already discovered, and all that remains is to fill a few unimportant holes.” Planck ignored the bad advice and in 1918 won a Nobel Prize in Physics for his role in formulating quantum theory. Most of us have had a similar experience: people who’ve tried to convince us to reject our highest calling and strongest dreams. In my view, the coming weeks will be a potent time for you to recover and heal from those deterrents and discouragements in your own past.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

Not all, but many horoscope columns address your ego rather than your soul. They provide useful information for your surface self, but little help for your deep self. If you’ve read my oracles for a while, you know that I aspire to be in the latter category. In that light, you won’t be surprised when I say that the most important thing you can do in the coming weeks is to seek closer communion with your soul; to explore your core truths; to focus on delight, fulfillment and spiritual meaning far more than on status, power and wealth. As you attend to your playful work, meditate on this counsel from Capricorn author John O’Donohue: “The geography of your destiny is always clearer to the eye of your soul than to the intentions and needs of your surface mind.”

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Aquar-

ian biochemist Gertrude Belle Elion shared the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1988. She was instrumental in devising new drugs to treat AIDS and herpes, as well as a medication to facilitate organ transplants. And yet she accomplished all this without ever earning a Ph.D or M.D., a highly unusual feat. I suspect you may pull off a similar, if slightly less spectacular feat in the coming weeks: getting a reward or blessing despite a lack of formal credentials or official credibility.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Today,

Mumbai is a megacity with 12.5 million people on 233 square miles. But as late as the 18th century, it consisted of seven sparsely populated islands. Over many decades, reclamation projects turned them into a single land mass. I foresee you undertaking a metaphorically comparable project during the coming months. You could knit fragments together into a whole. You have the power to transform separate and dispersed influences into a single, coordinated influence. You could inspire unconnected things to unite in common cause.

www.RealAstrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888. June 6, 2019

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Dated: May 23, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000654 Published: June 6,13,20,27, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as FIVE STAR RANCHES at 470 B Street Biggs, CA 95917. STEPHANIE GWINN 1907 Marin Ave. Berkeley, CA 94707. JONATHAN LAVY 428 Lyndsey Ln Yuba City, CA 95993. MARK LAVY 69 Rio Bonito Road Biggs, CA 95917. GAYLE LELAND 9316 Turner Lane Durham, CA 95938. KELSEY LELAND 4274 Bladwin Ave. Culver City, CA 90232. RICHARD LELAND 9316 Turner Lane Durham, CA 95938. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: RICHARD LELAND Dated: May 21, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000644 Published: June 6,13,20,27, 2019

NOTICES NOTICE OF LIEN SALE Pursuant to CA Business Code 21700, in lieu of rents due, the following units contain clothes, furniture, boxes, etc. 127CC COURTNEY BOYDEN 6x12 (Boxes, Furniture, Suitcases, Misc.) 256SS TODD J. JOHNSTON (Personal items, Office supplies, Safe, Misc.) 278SS MICHAEL CASSIDY 6X10 (Personal items, Containers, Misc.) 284SS MICHAEL CASSIDY 6x10 (Boxes, Containers, Misc.) 303SS WANYE COLE 5x10 (Personal items, Boxes, Furniture, Misc.) 465ACC SAMMUEL HAZELIP 5x5 (Personal items, Misc.) 494CC CARSON REEK 6x12 (Artwork, Furniture, Boxes, Personal items, Misc.) 504CC DAVID A. DUNCAN 6x7 (Tools, Outdoor Equipment, Car Travel Rack, Personal items) 507AC JASON MATTHEW HEIM 6x12 (Furniture, Tools, Outdoor supplies, Misc.) 519CC GERRARD WHITE 5x12 (Furniture, Boxes, Misc.) 520CC GERRARD WHITE 11x7 (Furniture, Boxes, Misc.) Contents to be sold to the highest bidder on: Saturday June 22, 2019 Beginning at 1:00pm Sale to be held at: Bidwell Self Storage, 65 Heritage Lane, Chico, CA 95926. (530) 893-2109 Published: June 6,13, 2019 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner SARAH HANSEN filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: BRAYDEN ANDREW MEAD Proposed name: BRAYDEN ANDREW HANSEN THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. this Legal Notice continues

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NOTICE OF HEARING Date: June 26, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: May 8, 2019 Case Number: 19CV01319 Published: May 16,23,30, June 6, 2019 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: AMBER LEE FRENCH Proposed name: AMBER LEE ST CLARE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: June 26, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: May 9, 2019 Case Number: 19CV01343 Published: May 23,30, June 6,13, 2019 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner CHARLES KELLY filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: CHARLES KELLY Proposed name: CHARLES HENRY EUGENE KELLY THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: June 26, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: May 9, 2019 Case Number: 19CV01403 Published: May 30, June 6,13,20, 2019 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner SARAH ELIZABETH ADAMS and ANDREW BIGLER BURKE filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: this Legal Notice continues

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FERN BIGLER ADAMS-BURKE Proposed name: WINTER FERN ADAMS-BURKE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: July 10, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: May 20, 2019 Case Number: 19CV01522 Published: June 6,13,20,27, 2019 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner JUSTIN JAMES SHULTS filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: THOMAS JAMES SKYTTE Proposed name: THOMAS JAMES SHULTS THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: July 10, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: May 15, 2019 Case Number: 19CV01443 Published: June 6,13,20,27, 2019 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner BERNICE LOUISE MCDONALD filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: BERNICE LOUISE MCDONALD Proposed name: L AARON MILLER THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: July 17, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM this Legal Notice continues

Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: May 29, 2019 Case Number: 19CV01551 Published: June 6,13,20,27, 2019

PETITION NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE CHRIS J. IRWIN To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: CHRIS J. IRWIN, also known as CHRIS JAMES IRWIN A Petition for Probate has been filed by: BRIAN C. IRWIN in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: BRIAN C. IRWIN be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: June 18, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: TBA Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice this Legal Notice continues

form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: KELLY ALBRECHT, ESQ. 1440 Lincoln Street Oroville, CA 95965 (530) 534-9900 Dated: May 14, 2019 Case Number: 19PR00232 Published: May 23,30, June 6, 2019 NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE RAFAELA HIGUERA ANDRADE, aka RAFAELA H. ANDRADE, aka RAFAELA ANDRADE To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: RAFAELA HIGUERA ANDRADE, aka RAFAELA H. ANDRADE, aka RAFAELA ANDRADE a petition for Probate has been filed by: SUSAN ANDRADE and MARY L. ANDRADE in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: SUSAN ANDRADE and MARY L. ANDRADE be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: June 18, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: TBD Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: REBECCA YUHASZ McKernan, Lanam, Bakke & Williams LLP 55 Independence Circle, Suite this Legal Notice continues

106 Chico, CA 95973. (530) 877-4961 Case Number: 19PR00244 Dated: May 23, 2019 Published: May 30, June 6,13, 2019 NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE BERNIECE EDNA SCHMIDT, aka BERNIECE E. SCHMIDT, aka BERNIECE SCHMIDT To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: BERNIECE EDNA SCHMIDT, aka BERNIECE E. SCHMIDT, aka BERNIECE SCHMIDT a petition for Probate has been filed by: JEFFERY L. VAN DREW in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: JEFFERY L. VAN DREW be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decendent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: June 18, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: TBD Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: REBECCA YUHASZ McKernan, Lanam, Bakke & Williams LLP this Legal Notice continues

55 Independence Circle, Suite 106 Chico, CA 95973. (530) 877-4961 Case Number: 19PR00240 Dated: May 20, 2019 Published: May 30, June 6,13, 2019 NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE MARY LOUISE ROULEAU To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: MARY LOUISE ROULEAU A Petition for Probate has been filed by: DEBORAH ANN CAMPBELL and ANITA MARIE ROULEAU in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: DEBORAH ANN CAMPBELL and ANITA MARIE ROULEAU be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: June 25, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: PR Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: VANESSA J. SUNDIN Sundin Law Office 341 Broadway Street, Ste. 302 Chico, CA 95928 (530) 342-2452 this Legal Notice continues

Dated: May 30, 2019 Case Number: 19PR00259 Published: June 6,13,20, 2019 NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE ELOISE WESTON To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: ELOISE WESTON A Petition for Probate has been filed by: MARILYN DE BOARD in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: MARILYN DE BOARD be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: JUNE 25, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: TBA Room: TBA Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: MARILYN DE BOARD 1709 River Run Drive Marysville, CA 95901 Dated: June 3, 2019 Case Number: 19PR00169 Published: June 6,13,20, 2019

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