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CHICO’S FREE NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY VOLUME 42, ISSUE 40 THURSDAY, MAY 30, 2019 WWW.NEWSREVIEW.COM

OUR

GRAYING STATE

CALIFORNIA’S ELDERLY CRISES: Seniors can’t afford to retire and there aren’t enough caregivers for the forthcoming wave PAGE

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WALMART’S ($1 MILLION ) CALL

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POT TALK BEGINS

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BEAUTY FROM ASHES


FOR DENTURES WITH EXTRACTIONS ONLY

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CN&R

INSIDE

Vol. 42, Issue 40 • May 30, 2019 OPINION

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Editorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Guest Comment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Second & Flume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 This Modern World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Streetalk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

NEWSLINES

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Downstroke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Sifter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9

HEALTHLINES

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Appointment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Weekly Dose. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

GREENWAYS

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Eco Event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS

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15 Minutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 The Goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

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21 COVER STORY

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ARTS & CULTURE

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Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 This Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Fine Arts listings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Scene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Nightlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Reel World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Chow. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Arts DEVO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Brezsny’s Astrology . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33

REAL ESTATE

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CLASSIFIEDS

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ON THE COVER: DESIGN BY TINA FLYNN

Our Mission: To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. Editor Melissa Daugherty Managing Editor Meredith J. Cooper Arts Editor Jason Cassidy Staff Writers Andre Byik, Ashiah Scharaga Calendar Editor Neesa Sonoquie Contributors Robin Bacior, Alastair Bland, Michelle Camy, Vic Cantu, Nate Daly, Charles Finlay, Bob Grimm, Howard Hardee, Miles Jordan, Mark Lore, Landon Moblad, Brie Oviedo, Ryan J. Prado, Juan-Carlos Selznick, Ken Smith, Robert Speer, Carey Wilson Managing Art Director Tina Flynn Creative Services Manager Elisabeth Bayard-Arthur Ad Designers Naisi Thomas, Cathy Arnold Publications Designers Katelynn Mitrano, Nikki Exerjian Director of Sales and Advertising Jamie DeGarmo Advertising Services Coordinator Ruth Alderson Senior Advertising Consultants Brian Corbit, Laura Golino Advertising Consultants Adam Lew, Jordon Vernau Office Assistant Jennifer Osa Distribution Director Greg Erwin Distribution Manager Matt Daugherty Distribution Staff Ken Gates, Bob Meads, Pat Rogers, Larry Smith, Placido Torres, Jeff Traficante, Bill Unger, Lisa Van Der Maelen, David Wyles

President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Director of Nuts & Bolts Deborah Redmond Director of People & Culture David Stogner Director of Dollars & Sense Debbie Mantoan Nuts & Bolts Ninja Norma Huerta Payroll/AP Wizard Miranda Hansen Developer John Bisignano System Support Specialist Kalin Jenkins N&R Publications Editor Debbie Arrington N&R Publications Managing Editor Laura Hillen N&R Publications Associate Editor Derek McDow N&R Publications Writers Anne Stokes, Thea Rood N&R Publications Editorial Assistant Nisa Smith Marketing & Publications Lead Consultant Elizabeth Morabito Marketing & Publications Consultants Greta Beekhuis, Steve Caruso, Joseph Engle, Sherri Heller, Rod Malloy, Celeste Worden 353 E. Second St., Chico, CA 95928 Phone (530) 894-2300 Fax (530) 892-1111 Website newsreview.com Got a News Tip? (530) 894-2300, ext 2224 or chiconewstips@newsreview.com Calendar Events cnrcalendar@newsreview.com Calendar Questions (530) 894-2300, ext. 2243 Want to Advertise? Fax (530) 892-1111 or cnradinfo@newsreview.com Classifieds (530) 894-2300, press 2 or classifieds@newsreview.com Job Opportunities jobs@newsreview.com Want to Subscribe to CN&R? chisubs@newsreview.com Editorial Policies: Opinions expressed in CN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons, or other portions of the paper. CN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or review materials. Email letters to cnrletters@newsreview.com. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form and to edit them for libel. Advertising Policies: All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes the responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. CN&R is printed at PressWorks Ink on recycled newsprint. Circulation of CN&R is verified by the Circulation Verification Council. CN&R is a member of Chico Chamber of Commerce, Oroville Chamber of Commerce, Downtown Chico Business Association, CNPA, AAN and AWN. Circulation 38,650 copies distributed free weekly.

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OPINION

Send guest comments, 340 words maximum, to gc@newsreview.com or to 353 E. Second St., Chico, CA 95928. Please include photo & short bio.

EDITORIAL

Finding hope in Oroville This week is full of drama in the realm of the Chico-

based nonprofit organizations that appear to be clamoring for the same pots of money for their respective projects aimed at serving homeless people. Thankfully, good news is nigh. In this case, it’s coming from our neighbors in Oroville. The CN&R has learned that the Haven of Hope on Wheels project—launched last year by the Oroville Southside Community Improvement Association—is getting ready to roll. That mobile hygiene unit is designed to offer folks on the streets a chance to do laundry, as well as bathe and relieve themselves. We first wrote about Haven of Hope on Wheels a year ago. Back then, Oroville pastor Kevin Thompson and others affiliated with the Southside nonprofit had recently launched a campaign to raise around $100,000. In their effort to drum up support, they made presentations to the Oroville City Council and Butte County Board of Supervisors. Ultimately, the city of Oroville committed $175,000 in bond money toward the effort. The supervisors penned a letter of support. Haven of Hope had applied for a share of the

$4.9 million in Homeless Emergency Aid Program (HEAP) funding—one-time state grant money allocated through the Butte Countywide Homeless Continuum of Care (CoC) for efforts in municipalities that declared a shelter crisis. Haven of Hope’s proposal—to expand its coverage to the entire county—didn’t make the cut. In fact, not a single Oroville-based nonprofit received HEAP funds. It’s unfortunate Oroville was overlooked. This is a good time to remember that the City of Gold is struggling to address the homeless crisis and that it, too, has been strained by the Camp Fire. According to the state Department of Finance, Oroville’s population grew by 20.4 percent over the last year. We’re encouraged by the recent decision of the CoC board to streamline its application process, which was not only cumbersome but also unfair to smaller organizations that lack expertise in things like grant writing. For now, Haven of Hope is concentrating on Oroville’s homeless population. Eventually, the goal is to set up at numerous locations throughout the county, including sites in Chico. That’s something we should all get behind. Ω

GUEST COMMENT

If these walls could talk Tlookstandlikebare—no roof above or electricity within. They a castle ruin. They stand as a testament to the he walls of the historic Rock House restaurant

people who built them with local rocks they gathered. There is a white rock angel built into the wall in the apex of the second story. But the Camp Fire swept through and emptied the rock walls of their usefulness. It took the roof and the carpet, the tables and chairs. It took the candles and the flowers, the artwork and the curtains. The fire took the guitars, pool tables and juke box. The fire took everything except by Karen MacGowan the memories. People stop even now and take The author and David pictures. Perhaps to remember what Stookey, co-owners was, perhaps as a testament to the of the Rock House beauty that still stands. The walls in Yankee Hill, have represent those who came before been reviving it as a country cafe and us. The handcrafted details show venue for local the builders had pride in their work. musicians since 2014. The colors of the rock are the colors

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around us—they are not imported from faraway lands, not manufactured in a factory. The rocks were in the riverbeds, they were moved from mines, from roads, from the earth where we plant our feet each day. Squint your eyes and you can imagine torches along the walls and candles twinkling at tables. You can almost see a bride being led through those walls to an altar and a groom. You can hear the music, see the guests dancing, smell the banquet. The walls have seen these moments before, they have stood through time, through prime rib dinners and Thanksgiving feasts. They have held back the sun, wind, rain, hail and snow. Now they stand alone. With the right plan, the right professionals, people who care and want to help, we may once again walk among the walls and feel the history. We may sit quietly with a cup of coffee and relive old memories. We may have a meal with friends, listen to local musicians and create new memories. Unfortunately, without these heroes, the walls will be demolished to meet FEMA standards of “debris removal.” The walls and the foundation and soil below will be removed, leaving a scar where the Rock House once stood. Ω

SECOND & FLUME by Melissa Daugherty m e l i s s a d @ n e w s r e v i e w. c o m

NIMBY cowardice Last Tuesday (May 21), I listened to Angela McLaughlin of Safe Space Winter Shelter give a presentation to the Greater Chico Homeless Task Force on the proposed Orange Street Shelter. Then I watched the group vote on whether to support the effort. Not a single person voted in opposition. Among the enthusiastic aye vote-givers was Jesus Center Executive Director Laura Cootsona. The next morning, just before this paper went to print, I learned that the North Valley Community Foundation (NVCF) had returned a $1 million Walmart Foundation donation gifted in the wake of the Camp Fire. That’s the contribution the retailer had earmarked “to help address the increased needs of the local homeless population”—money Safe Space needed to open Orange Street’s doors. NVCF’s decision is just the latest bombshell related to a chain of NIMBY maneuvers that may very well spell the end of a good project. Recall how the Jesus Center spent five months as part of the plans to open the Orange Street facility. Late last month, citing public discord, that organization abruptly caved to the NIMBYs. Weeks before, Chico State President Gayle Hutchinson sent a letter to city of Chico leaders that gave a thumbs down to the location near campus. Hutchinson charged that the institution she helms supports “the creation of an additional shelter in Chico.” However, in the same sentence, she said that “we strongly urge the City Council to find an alternate location.” There’s no indication as to whom Hutchinson was referring when she wrote “we.” What’s clear is that her letter—a stain on her tenure and the institution—helped drive the aforementioned events. In it, she said the proposed shelter would serve as a “living laboratory” for students. That’s pretty flippant considering such a place could literally mean the difference between life and death for unsheltered people. Some will argue that Hutchinson’s decision stems from her thinking about the welfare of the student body first. I’m not buying that narrative. Thing is, the folks the Orange Street Shelter is designed to help already live in the university’s sphere—in nearby parks, along creeks, under bridges and, hell, very likely on campus proper. Chico State’s chief seems unaware of this. She believes the shelter would, as she put it, “bring a vulnerable population such as those who will be the primary clients of the low barrier shelter into close proximity to student housing and other campus facilities.” It’s possible many of those “clients” may not go to a shelter outside of that region—their home. If that’s the case, Hutchinson just helped torch the makings of a project that would actually provide a solution to a population she believes poses a threat. But enough about the cowardice coming from Kendall Hall. Just days after learning about the NVCF’s giveback, I learned that the Jesus Center and the Torres Community Shelter—in addition to Safe Space—are now vying for that $1 million pot. We have an update, although none of the organizations has laid out its plans (see Ashiah Scharaga’s report on page 8). Backstabbing aside, it’s important to remember the big picture here. Chico needs emergency shelter and it needs it yesterday. The good news is that Walmart is committed to distributing that cool million locally. We just hope the big-box chooses wisely.

Melissa Daugherty is editor of the CN&R


LETTERS

Cesar’s

Send email to cnrletters@newsreview.com

Your plumbing

Yard Service

Calling it like it is  Re “Taking control of sewer destiny” (The Goods, by Meredith Cooper, May 23): “Then there are the jerks in Chico treating fire survivors like vermin.” Thank you. Kevin Jeys Paradise

‘Uplifting and priceless’ Re “‘Resource for repair’” (Scene, by Ashiah Scharaga, May 23): Jess Mercer’s unwavering dedication to bringing positivity and encouragement to Camp Fire-displaced students is one of the most uplifting and priceless acts of community service I have seen in my nearly seven years as a Butte County resident. In combination with her breathtaking Key Project Tribute, Jess has been able to bring joy, love and a sense of closure to thousands of suffering humans, young and old alike. Jess not only likes to

say, “be awesome,” she’s also living it. Bill Mash Chico

Recall deconstruction  Re “Tit for tat” (Second & Flume, by Melissa Daugherty, May 23): I appreciate the fine footwork by CN&R Editor Melissa Daugherty in her quest to deconstruct the mechanics of the Stone-Ory “recall.” Thoughts: 1) Those driving this recall are established darlings of the Enterprise-Record; they merely break wind and a reporter rushes to document the air and ground vector. This has been the case for months—the usual E-R, inflammatory “journalism” we know and love. This contrived notoriety is intoxicating for our queen bees, accustomed to nesting in the dark obscurity of the social media hive, where homeless-bashing banshees spend their fevered days conjuring an authoritarian future. So, why not fire a headline-grabbing

recall-rocket, though perhaps aerodynamically ill-fated? The most exciting fireworks are those slipshod enough to surprise. 2) Why are these soccer-momsfrom-Hades so intent on destroying Stone-Ory? Executing a man on the basis of an anticipated crime is a miscarriage of justice; let these boys prove they are capable of heresy before summoning the Inquisition! You may yet be satisfied they are harmless, even if not birds of your own vile feather … precisely. 3) This recall at least rates as a solid high school hijink. At most, it’s anti-aircraft fire—missing the target, but altering the flight path. Patrick Newman Chico

More on that effort Re “Civil discourse” (Newslines, by Ashiah Scharaga, May 23): There will be a Chico City Council election next year, so why are people organizing a recall of two LETTERS c o n t i n u e d

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LETTERS c o n t i n u e d f r o m pa g e 5 councilmembers? I seldom agreed with the conservatives that formerly constituted the majority of the City Council, so I looked ahead to the 2018 election for candidates with whom I agreed on the issues. I supported them and made sure I voted for them. It never occurred to me to recall the duly elected conservatives on the council. In a democracy, we make changes through elections. The current council has faced an unprecedented disaster in the Camp Fire and its aftermath. I have attended many council meetings since the fire. I believe all the council members are working very hard. Incumbents Karl Ory, Randall Stone, Sean Morgan and Ann Schwab are putting their experience to good use. New Councilmembers Alex Brown, Kasey Reynolds and Scott Huber are learning on the run, showing due diligence in quickly understanding the issues and becoming productive members of the council. Rather than wasting time and taxpayers’ money on a recall and costly special election, why don’t those behind the recall work on finding candidates who support their views to run in the 2020 election? Don’t they respect the decisions of the voters? Nancy Park Chico

The recall against me is by fringe Trump Republicans. Several years ago, the Republican-controlled City Council attempted to evict the Saturday farmers’ market to build a multistory parking garage. I led the initiative to save the market and now every Saturday there are thousands of shoppers downtown. The same council changed the Chapman Mulberry Neighborhood Plan to allow a junkyard to stay on East 20th Street, a few hundred feet from a school. The local district attorney has sued the scrap metal business’ owners, and California has cited them for chemical pollutants. I led the referendum to reinstate the neighborhood plan. The same council, spending $300,000 of taxpayer money, sued the voters and myself for the referendum. The courts ruled in our favor. The Trump Republicans lost control of the City Council last November. We are in a crisis, with 19,000 Camp Fire survivors residing in Chico. Instead of helping the new residents, the Republicans are instead trying to take control of the City 6 

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Council. The police and the rest of the city staff are doing an outstanding job, but now will be distracted. My wife, Linda, and I hosted a survivor in our home, and we want to thank everyone who has provided assistance to these survivors. Karl Ory Chico

You and I want safety in hometown Chico—all 112,000-plus of us. Yet 25 people (.022 percent of the population) launched a more personal attack under the pretense of community safety. Members of One Chico are trying to force a recall of Mayor Randall Stone and Councilman Karl Ory. If victorious, we’d lose a progressive majority. Chico Housing Action Team’s Simplicity Village, Orange Street Shelter plans, all humanitarian efforts—dropped. In sum, big money would destroy us. The council opposed Assembly Bill 430, a main reason for the proposed recall. AB 430 gives no voice to Chico. Rather, it gives free rein to millionaire developers. One Chico members even cite Mayor Stone’s “unethical” posting of his children on Facebook as a reason for their campaign. They demand Ory’s recall because Ory was sued (as a private citizen by the formerly conservative council when Ory voiced concerns of 9,000 petitioners uniting to Move the Junkyard). He’s being attacked for being attacked for exercising First Amendment rights. Chico has too much heart and reason for this madness. The results would out-price us all, literally and symbolically, and would take our First Amendment rights, too. We can’t let that happen. Robyn Engel Chico

Money talk Re “Dramatic exit” and “Another long night” (Newslines, by Ashiah Scharaga, April 19 and May 9): The city of Chico currently spends about $25 million per year on our police force (and is proposing an increase in budget for the next fiscal year) while many of the mental health, housing and health care resources our community truly needs are going under- or totally unfunded. While the Chico Police Department has repeatedly demonstrated an inability to successfully keep those most vulnerable

You and I want safety in hometown Chico—all 112,000-plus of us. Yet 25 people (.022 percent of the population) launched a more personal attack under the pretense of community safety.

undergrounding begins. Seventythousand trees have already been wiped out by PG&E in Paradise’s utility easements. Trees are very much at risk everywhere else. Excessive tree removal is unnecessary if insulated wire is used. Robin McCollum Chico

—robyn engel

in our community safe—with numerous documented instances of excessive force, anti-blackness, racism, transphobia and murder, including the murders of Desmond Phillips and Tyler Rushing—the City Council continues to pour money into the police. The Justice for Desmond Phillips team invites the community to join us in voicing our concerns about it at the next City Council meeting. We will be making postcards to the city next Monday evening at Blackbird Café and folks can get more info on Facebook. Rain Scher Chico

Ready the revolution  Re “Rally for reproductive rights” (Newspick, by Charles Finlay, May 23): A sense of disempowerment concerning the restriction of abortion access—and the inevitable conservative Supreme Court decision—is justified given the logical contradictions within the “pro-life” camp. It’s the opinion of this hetero-cisgendered white man that resistance must address the social and the material, the intersecting evils of patriarchy, white supremacy, capitalism and imperialism. What to do? There’s a women’s revolution taking place in Northern Syria to overthrow the sectarian, patriarchal, war-torn status quo. The Rojavan Revolution is a stateless movement based on a social contract of freedom, pluralism and ecology. The equal worth of all persons is explicit. It guarantees education and health care to all. It manifests as mandated gender quotas for representation in administrative councils that are elected from popular assemblies. Women form their own defense forces and have played a critical role in repelling ISIS. Women establish common houses to escape abusive fathers or husbands and to pursue education and culture among women. They build cooperative businesses together. Women’s empowerment is

central to the revolutionary process of social and material liberation in Rojava. We should study this model and build a better society where autonomy and collaboration are foundational principles. Steven Breedlove Chico

Gun film enlightening  Re “Trigger happy” (Scene, by Robert Speer, May 23): I went to see local filmmaker Sue Hilderbrand’s documentary, American Totem, at the Pageant Theatre. Although I’m an advocate for more gun control, I found the film to be quite balanced and objective. Ms. Hilderbrand’s film showed me a perspective of the gun culture that I hadn’t considered before. Thank you, Sue Hilderbrand, for your professional and thoughtprovoking film. Karen Laslo Chico

On PG&E’s plans PG&E told Paradise residents it plans to underground electric distribution lines as they replace existing gas lines. The project will take five years. Undergrounding is the safest alternative, though expensive and slow to install and not practical in rocky, mountainous locations. Instead, PG&E should install insulated wire immediately, to prevent wildfire this season and the excessive tree removals required by Senate Bill 901 in Cohasset, Forest Ranch and all high-fire-threat areas. PG&E estimates 100 million trees must be removed to protect dangerous bare wires and comply with SB 901. Focusing on undergrounding or tree removal overlooks the continuing threat posed by bare wire. Insulated wire offers an immediate safety upgrade and is more cost-effective than bare wire or undergrounding. Given the long build time for undergrounding, the company should install insulated wire now while

Misuse of power There hasn’t been much chatter from the White House regarding Trump’s consideration of pardoning a number of former military personnel who are convicted war criminals. While there is no groundswell of support for this incredibly injudicious proposal, there are a number of military and veteran organizations that have expressed their contempt for this misuse of the president’s power to pardon. Martin Dempsey, a retired general and former chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, succinctly stated, “Absent evidence of innocence or injustice, the wholesale pardon of U.S. service members accused of war crimes signals our troops and allies that we don’t take the law of armed conflict seriously.” It’s interesting to note that one of the proposed recipients of this thoughtless abuse of power is a former military mercenary, who while in the employment of military contractor Blackwater committed war crimes. Blackwater was founded by Erik Prince, brother of Trump cabinet member Betsy DeVos, and could well be under investigation for lying to Congress. Donald Trump appears to have a serious disdain for the law, so I guess in some twisted way it makes sense that he thumbs his nose at the rule of law by siding with war criminals. Roger S. Beadle Chico

Correction Last week’s Healthlines story (see “Peer support,” by Evan Tuchinsky) incorrectly stated that Iversen Center outreach coordinator Denise Peterson is a mother of three. She has four children. The error has been corrected online. —ed. More letters online:

We’ve got too many letters for this space. please go to www.newsreview.com/chico for additional readers’ comments on past cn&r articles.


STREETALK

What’s on your summer reading list?

Just Approved! by City of Chico and Butte County to place on Your Property as a secondary unit and/or Move it to Paradise and Live on Your Homesite while you Rebuild!

Asked at Barnes & Noble

Lexi Gawthrop teacher

Own Your Everyday, [by Jordan Lee Dooley], which is about bettering yourself and owning your mindset every day. I’m all about positivity and improving yourself.

Chris Fleig deli clerk

I really want to continue reading [the] A Song of Ice and Fire series by George R.R. Martin. They are the books that Game of Thrones is based on. I really want to read them since the Thrones show just ended and I wasn’t super happy with the ending.

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Wes Salisbury security

Anything [by] Jonathan Kellerman, who writes the Alex Delaware series. It’s about a forensic psychologist who works with a detective in L.A.

Kate O’Connell caregiver

Right now, I have a book called Princesses Behaving Badly, by Linda McRobbie. And, of course, Harry Potter, which I read to my son every night. M AY 3 0 , 2 0 1 9

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NEWSLINES DOWNSTROKE DOUBLE-MURDER SUICIDE SUSPECTED Butte County Sheriff’s Office investigators

believe a man killed his wife and 8-year-old son before committing suicide on the Berry Creek reservation in Oroville, according to spokeswoman Miranda Bowersox. The family—Francesco Milone, 32; Kaela Steele, 30; and Franklin Milone—was discovered deceased on Tuesday (May 28). Investigators identified a handgun that was used. Earlier this week, BCSO reported that Steele’s brother had visited the home, in the area where Yellow Hammer Drive crosses Tyme Way, to check on his sister, whom he hadn’t heard from in a week. When he arrived, he noticed a smell wafting from the driveway. He then requested a welfare check. Anyone with information or who is familiar with the family and their background should call BCSO’s Investigations Unit at 538-7671.

PG&E TO BURY POWER LINES

Last week, PG&E announced it would rebuild all electric distribution lines underground in Paradise and parts of Magalia and the surrounding areas that are rebuilding after the Camp Fire. The build-out will occur over five years “[d]ue to the amount of engineering, design and construction” needed, according to a PG&E press release. In the meantime, temporary overhead service is being installed. At the same time, PG&E will replace 74 miles of damaged natural gas lines underground. PG&E will host a wildfire safety open house from 6 to 8 p.m. on June 12 at the Chico Elks Lodge. Topics include emergency preparedness, safety inspections and infrastructure plans. Go to pge.com/wildfiresafety for more information.

HYGIENE TRUCK GOING MOBILE

Haven of Hope on Wheels will offer free showers and laundry services to homeless individuals with its first mobile hygiene unit starting June 14 at the Open Door Church in Oroville. The nonprofit was launched about a year ago by Oroville Southside Community Improvement Association CEO Kevin Thompson (pictured) and his management team. Thompson anticipates providing a minimum of 36 showers and 40 laundry loads per day. The goal is to secure two additional mobile units to expand countywide, and to open a resource center later this year to offer counseling, case management, life skills courses and job training. “This is the most basic right that any individual has,” Thompson said. “We’re going to work hard to support and service as many [people] as we can.” 8

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Up for grabs Walmart weighing new project proposals for $1 million post-Camp Fire grant

A 24/7 low-barrier homeless shelter, Chico service providers are back at square one. fter six months of working to open a

Though Safe Space Winter Shelter remains dedicated to opening the proposed by Orange Street Shelter, its Ashiah Scharaga partner, the Jesus Center, backed out of the project as h i a h s @ last month, its board citn ew sr ev i ew. c o m ing a lack of “civic will.” Last week, two sources of funding were revoked. On May 22, the CN&R learned that North Valley Community Foundation (NVCF) returned a $1 million grant from the Walmart Foundation earmarked for expanded services for the homeless population. In a press release, NVCF explained that “the terms of the grant agreement could not be achieved.” Those terms were for service providers to come to a consensus and establish a low-barrier shelter by Dec. 1. Shortly thereafter, the project lost $450,000 in state funding because the Jesus Center had been the primary grantee. The news caused a stir—would the sizable Walmart donation be lost altogether, no longer dedicated to helping Chico and its homeless residents? Was the Orange Street Shelter project done for? On Tuesday (May 28), Walmart spokes-

woman Delia Garcia spoke with the CN&R via phone from her Arkansas office. She made one thing clear from the get-go: While the specific project funded by the foundation could change, the commitment would not. “What’s going to change is how … that $1 million is structured; for lack of a better term, divided,” she said. The foundation specifically invited the Jesus Center, Torres Community Shelter and Safe Space to apply for the funds by today (May 30), she continued, and will be evaluating four main criteria: impact on the local homeless population, community support, project budget and organizational capacity to manage the grant. Garcia elaborated: The proposals could be for existing or new services, short- or long-term projects. The original intent was to disburse money as quickly as possible to help homeless individuals—following the Camp Fire, the Chico Walmart was the site of a large campground filled with survivors, as well as Chico’s existing homeless population. Some of the grant funds already were expended— in January, NVCF granted approximately $131,000 to the Torres Shelter to stay open 24/7 through this coming November. Garcia said Walmart is aware of that financial commitment and that “final funding decisions

will be based on the proposals submitted by each organization.” All of the service providers declined to comment on their proposals, directing questions to Walmart. “For us, the important thing is to remain true to that original intention of the grant … helping address the needs of the chronically homeless in and around Chico,” Garcia said. “There are many ways in which that can happen. … We’re looking to these organizations because they are experts in the area of homelessness in the local community. And they’re the best to advise how to address that issue.” After the Jesus Center pulled out of the

Orange Street Shelter project and the Walmart donation was returned, another chunk of money planned for the shelter ended up back on the table. The Butte Countywide Homeless Continuum of Care (CoC) had awarded $450,000 from the Homeless Emergency Aid Program (HEAP) to the Jesus Center for the shelter partnership. The CoC board, at its meeting last Wednesday (May 22), was torn about what to do with the funds; the decision to reopen the application period passed with a narrow majority vote. Chico City Councilman Scott Huber,


Angela McLaughlin tells the CN&R that Safe Space Winter Shelter is “working to ensure that the [Orange Street Shelter] project remains viable.” CN&R FILE PHOTO

who serves on the CoC board, argued that it was an “exceptional situation” and advocated for Safe Space to receive the funds, as the organization had expressed its intention of moving forward with the Orange Street project. “These people have been working for six months, hard, and they’re the best qualified people to do this,” he said. The legality of the issue made it a moot point, however. CoC coordinator Jennifer Griggs told the board the Jesus Center was the only applicant awarded. McLaughlin told the CN&R that Safe Space will apply for the HEAP funds and is “working to ensure that the [Orange Street Shelter] project remains viable.” Along with the HEAP decision, the CoC took a step toward immediately streamlining its application process with the intent of running more smoothly, especially after a controversial and confusing approach to awarding HEAP grants (see “$4.9 million conundrum,” Newslines, March 21). Instead of scheduling multiple application periods throughout the year, there will be one, from which the CoC can draw upon multiple pots of funding for projects. This year, the CoC is focusing on those that will create emergency shelter beds. This suggestion came from representatives of the Technical Assistance Collaborative (TAC), which recently began advising CoCs across the state as a result of the housing crisis, and is paid by the California Department of Housing & Community Development. The idea initially caused an uproar. Several CoC board members said it seemed unwise to lump separate funding sources with different criteria and deadlines together. The TAC consultants were grilled for a while before the board eventually came around, with multiple members saying they’d changed their minds mid-meeting. “It’s a big lift for you all to go through this process many times,” said Lisa Sloane, a TAC senior policy adviser. “And I don’t know that you’ll get a lot of different projects. “What we’d like you to try to think [is], can you get up here, get at the 100,000-foot level with us for a second … think about what it is you need in your community to move the needle on ending homelessness and address people’s needs.” Ω

Pot talk Chico cannabis committee takes on commercial policy Crystal Keesey is excited about the prospect of

a regulated cannabis industry in Chico. Keesey, a longtime Chico resident and coowner of the state-licensed cannabis business Golden State Herb—which comprises nursery and distributorship operations in Shasta Lake and a farm in Lake County— spends a lot of time on the road operating her business. “The idea of having a regulated cannabis business in Chico, where my family is, means that I can pursue this business without putting tens of thousands of miles on my vehicle,” Keesey told the CN&R. She further explained that Butte County has a “robust black-market cannabis industry,” which means people who need safe, tested and regulated marijuana products may not be getting Engage: For committee them. information, visit Keesey was one of several tinyurl.com/ members of the public who ChicoPot. attended last Wednesday’s (May 22) first meeting of Chico’s Commercial Cannabis Advisory Committee, which was formed to advise the City Council as it considers allowing commercial cannabis operations in town. Vice Mayor Alex Brown, who brought the issue forward, was appointed to the committee, which also includes local business,

education, real estate and health professionals, as well as a subject-matter expert who is an advocate for regulated cannabis. The committee has been tasked with deciding which commercial cannabis operations will be allowed and licensed, where cannabis businesses should be located, whether to limit the number of licenses for specific business types and what requirements the city will want businesses to meet in order to operate locally. During the first of at least five meetings on the topic, with a second scheduled for this week after deadline, committee members expressed their concerns and interests. Members asked questions regarding how

SIFT ER Bellies full As of Saturday (June 1), CalFresh food benefits will expand to serve elderly, blind and disabled residents who receive Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and State Supplementary Payment (SSP). This is thanks to Assembly Bill 1811, which expands eligibility. CalFresh, known federally as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), is the largest food program in California, providing monthly food benefits to low-income families. Right now, 15,228 households (or 27,149 individuals) receive CalFresh benefits countywide, according to the Butte County Department of Employment and Social Ser-

A city advisory committee has begun discussing commercial cannabis rules and regulations.

to handle revenues, as current banking restrictions have left cannabis operations as cash-only enterprises, expressed concerns about advertising or marketing that could be attractive to children, and showed interest in how cannabis revenue could benefit the city. Chico City Manager Mark Orme, who attended the meeting along with other city staff, said the city’s bank indicated it would be able to legally receive money paid to the city by the cannabis industry. Orme also explained that sales tax revenues generated by retail cannabis businesses would become general fund money, which means the City Council would have the final word on how it would be spent. An additional tax could be discussed separately, Brown said. The questions came during an introductory portion of the meeting in which members laid out the issues they hoped the committee would tackle. Jessica MacKenzie, founding member of the

vices. It anticipates serving up to 10,279 more recipients. CalFresh benefits range from $15 to $192 per person per month, with a national average of $105 to $110 per month for older adults and those with disabilities. For more info, call 877-410-8803, visit GetCalFresh.org or go to the DESS office in Oroville or Chico.

Butte County Inland Cannabis Farmers’ Association and the committee’s cannabis expert, noted at the meeting that many questions members may have have already been addressed by the state’s three regulatory bodies for cannabis: the Bureau of Cannabis Control, the Department of Food and Agriculture and the Department of Public Health. “There is already a lot of work that’s been done on limits and dosage and potency and advertising and signage and packaging for kids,” MacKenzie said. “There’s a lot of it NEWSLINES C O N T I N U E D M AY 3 0 , 2 0 1 9

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that’s been done. Perhaps not as far as some would like to take it, but there is a baseline to begin with. These are not things that have not been addressed.” She said the state spent millions of dollars and expended thousands of hours setting regulations that oversee how businesses should be run to operate in the “best public good.” MacKenzie added: “What the local entities can only do themselves is … determine land use. Where do we want them? Which ones do we want? How many of them do we want? And are there additional constraints or permanent hurdles that we, as a local community, would like to place on them?” Committee member Andy Miller, a family practice doctor and the health officer for Butte County, said that he anticipated discussing at future meetings advertising restrictions, flavored cannabis products, enforcement and packaging details such as serving and dosage information. “Having been in meetings and worked with some of the people at the state, I would say that the idea that they have put together regulations on how to operate in the best public good might be a tiny bit of an overstatement,” Miller said. “I think that the combination of their limitations and the pathway they have taken requiring local licensing means that they have created a floor of regulation and that they both support and encourage locals to then come up with the regulation they think is necessary to keep their communities safe.” Keesey, the cannabis business owner, told the CN&R that the state’s marijuana industry is “regulated down to what has to be on our ID badge.” She said regulations include restrictions on packaging imagery and opaque packaging requirements for edible products. She added that the amount of the intoxicating ingredient in cannabis, tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, is regulated in dosages, with set milligram limits. “I hope that every committee member will read the regulations,” Keesey said, adding that she was encouraged by the tenor of the meeting and the members’ “desire to build a consensus about sensible regulations for the community.” —ANDRE BYIK a nd r e b @ newsr ev iew.c o m


The California Consumer Privacy Act, passed last year, protects consumers against companies collecting their personal information online. But it’s losing its footing before it even goes into effect, in July 2020.

Privacy hacks

PHOTO BY DAVILES/ISTOCK

Democratic lawmakers in California are quietly attacking their own landmark law The California Consumer Privacy Act was hailed

as a milestone for reining in secret data-mining. But the law doesn’t go into effect until 2020, and that’s given lobbyists for Big Tech a chance to pull its teeth. Privacy advocates say that, so far, more Democratic lawmakers are lining up to actually help that effort rather than stop it. Signed into law in 2018, the CCPA empowers consumers to block companies from collecting and selling their personal information without their permission. The CCPA also gives consumers the right to insist that a business delete their personal information if they have it already. The California Attorney General’s Office will start enforcing compliance in July 2020. Given that tech giants such as Facebook, Google and Twitter—and many startups—profit almost exclusively from harvesting users’ personal information, Attorney General Xavier Becerra has said that his team may struggle to keep up with a deluge of violations. That’s partly why Assemblywoman Buffy Wicks (D-Oakland) authored Assembly Bill 1760. Not only would the bill narrow certain corporate exemptions to the CCPA, it also would authorize district attorneys, county counsels and city attorneys to bring civil actions against violators. Then, in late April, the American Civil Liberties Union of Northern California, which worked with Wicks to craft AB 1760, announced the bill was dead on arrival at the Assembly Privacy and Consumer Protection Committee. “As I understand it, there was not one member of the committee who would support it,” ACLU Legislative Director Kevin Baker told the News & Review. “But the attorney general understands you can’t expect his office alone to

enforce the rights of 40 million Californians.” Also galling to privacy advocates was the fact that, on the same day Wicks’ bill was stalled, the privacy committee moved several competing bills through its chambers, all of which opponents say limit the effectiveness of the CCPA. All three bills were introduced by Democrats. Assembly Bill 873, from Assemblywoman Jacqui

Irwin of Thousand Oaks, would, according to the Legislative Counsel, soften the restriction on personal information by allowing certain general information to be collected. The ACLU and Electronic Freedom Foundation interpret the bill’s language to remove “household” from the definition of personal information under the CCPA, thus “threatening to undermine protections for information associated with a household.” Assembly Bill 981, by Assemblyman Tom Daly of Anaheim, would exempt the insurance industry from complying with the CCPA. There also was Assembly Bill 25, from the privacy committee’s chairman, Democratic Assemblyman Ed Chau of Arcadia. That bill exempts companies in California from CCPA rules in a way that allows the collection of personal data from job applicants, employees and contractors. “All of those bills had a long list of corporate supporters,” Baker noted. One bill that privacy advocates do support is state Sen. Hannah-Beth Jackson’s Senate Bill 561. Unlike Wicks’ bill, it wasn’t sidelined in its first committee. Jackson’s bill would alter the CCPA in a way that allows any company doing business in California to be sued by individuals whose personal information is misused under the law.

Under the current CCPA, companies that break the rules have a 30-day window to “cure” the problem before the state attorney general can take action. Jackson, a Santa Barbara Democrat, called that “a get out of jail free card;” SB 561 removes the grace period. The Attorney General’s Office supports the bill. “Privacy in California is an explicit constitutional right,” Jackson said while testifying before the state Senate Judiciary Committee. Jackson then invoked the memory of slain civil rights advocate and former San Francisco Mayor George Moscone, who, six years before his murder in 1978, co-sponsored a legal effort to guarantee privacy for every Californian. A state senator at the time, Moscone wrote: “Computerization of records makes it possible to create ‘cradle-to-grave’ profiles on every American.” He added that the citizenry needed to guard against governments and corporations “collecting and stockpiling unnecessary information about us, and from misusing information gathered for one purpose in order to serve other purposes, or to embarrass us.” Jackson reflected on Moscone’s efforts in light of recent data-mining scandals. “[He] saw the handwriting on the wall as technology was emerging and the threats to potential privacy became clear,” she noted. “Those fears seem rather prescient today.” The bill Jackson was testifying for faces stern opposition from the California Chamber of Commerce. Sarah Boot, the chamber’s policy advocate, described it as a giveaway to personal injury lawyers. “Businesses will spend a fortune trying to comply with these new rights,” Boot told the judiciary committee. “SB 561 would allow thousands of trial attorneys to test businesses’ ability to perfectly comply with the complexities of this new law. This will be strict liability with no proof of injury.” Major lobbying associations for tech and digital entertainment—including Tech Net, the Consumer Technology Association, the Internet Association, the Consumer Data Industry Association and California Cable Association—all oppose Jackson’s bill. The senator succeeded in pushing SB 561 to the Senate Appropriations Committee, but there it was stalled. The committee, whose chair and majority of members are Democrats, voted to hold it from advancing. Baker supports consumers having the right to directly sue over violations of the CCPA and disputes Boot’s claim that it will have a crippling effect on small business. “They say that about anything that’s enforceable,” Baker stressed. “The bottom line is, we live with a legal system that depends on being able to hold bad guys accountable.” —SCOTT THOMAS ANDERSON sc o t ta @ newsr ev iew.c o m

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HEALTHLINES

Stability for seniors Center sees increased demand for health care post-Camp Fire

story and photo by

Ashiah Scharaga as h i a h s @new srev i ew. c o m

M tennis balls next to her on a recent morning at the Peg Taylor Center.

arcia Pokraka fixed her gaze on the bin of

It took her gloved fingers a little while to grasp one of the balls firmly enough to lift it, but she was patient. She raised it carefully and moved her right arm methodically above another basket on the floor in front of her and let go. Pokraka lifted her head and grinned in triumph. Her occupational therapist, Amy Mukai, beamed back at her, and they celebrated together. Pokraka was then on to the next tennis ball. Six years ago, Pokraka had a stroke. When she first arrived at the Peg Taylor Center in 2015, she was wheelchair-bound and could not use her right hand. Now, Mukai said, she’s started to walk and to eat breakfast without the assistance of a Saeboflex glove, which is designed to help those who have suffered traumatic brain injuries relearn how to use their hands and fingers. For 33 years, the nonprofit Peg Taylor Center has served seniors and adults with health issues, providing personalized care plans that include physical, occupational and speech therapies, dietary counseling, and group recreational activities in music, art and pet therapy and seated exercise. That afternoon at the center was a busy one. While Pokraka was working on her dexterity, another woman read aloud using an electronic program and a man used a stationary bike with hand and foot pedals. In the center’s main room, a dance class was underway, with participants tapping their feet to music. Since the Camp Fire, Mukai and her colleagues have been helping more seniors, many of whom need one-on-one assistance and care. In fact, Diane Puckett—the center’s founding executive director—said referrals have increased about 45 percent since Nov. 8. Before the fire, the center was processing 35 referrals and had 40 enrolled; since then, it has fielded an additional 57 referrals and enrolled 24 more people. Of the 55 currently enrolled, 11 lost their homes or had to evacuate (some have come and gone as their living situations have changed). Most of the survivors the center

Marcia Pokraka beams after dropping a tennis ball into a basket at the Peg Taylor Center. She suffered a stroke six years ago, and the glove she is wearing helps people regain and improve their dexterity.

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has served have been in their 70s to 90s. Puckett said the needs of the county’s oldest residents are “a large concern” for her—approximately 25 percent of Paradise’s population was 65 and older, according to the U.S. Census Bureau’s American Community Survey for 2013-17. She told the CN&R that the center always has focused on keeping seniors physically active and socially connected—isolation is a major concern, especially post-Camp Fire. “Our population has been hit hard by everything,” Puckett said. Studies have shown that social isolation and loneliness can take a toll on a person’s mental and physical health. According to the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services’ National Institute on Aging, isolation can, among other things, increase the risk of high blood pressure, heart disease, obesity, anxiety, depression and Alzheimer’s disease. Those who find themselves “unexpectedly alone,” due to the death of a partner or separation from friends or family, for example, “are at particular risk.” Many people lost their safety net after the disaster—their care providers, neighbors and even loved ones, Puckett continued. Others are still reeling from health complications due to the trauma and the smoke. Families who have contacted the center have reported noticing anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder, Puckett

APPOINTMENT

Ride back in time The folks behind the Chico Tweed Ride are hosting their spring Seersucker Ride this Sunday (June 2) at 10 a.m. in Lower Bidwell Park. Vintage bicycles and attire are encouraged for this annual leisurely loop through the park, and kids are welcome if comfortable biking in big groups. There will be lawn games, music and socializing with a big picnic at the Five-Mile Recreation Area. Arrive early for the meet and greet—take off is at the Bidwell Mansion, which provides a great opportunity for pictures in your old-timey gear. Hit the thrift store and pack your picnic basket—the simple pleasures of a bygone era await.


Enroll:

Visit pegtaylorcenter.org, email contact@ pegtaylorcenter.org or call 342-2345 to learn more.

capable of doing,” she said. “It was just a really difficult time and it was so helpful to me to be able to have that resource available.” Moving forward, the center will be adding more seniors into its program: It recently received approximately $25,000 from the North Valley Community Foundation to provide services to senior Camp Fire survivors who cannot afford the cost of the program and do not qualify for Medi-Cal. Puckett said the center’s biggest hurdle is bringing on more social work and nursing staff. The organization will continue to seek funding to meet the community need. “Our goal is to provide as much stability and safety for people as we can,” she said, “to have [our center] be as enriching and wonderful, full of sharing and friendship and love as we possibly can, no matter what’s going on in the community around us.” Ω

This guy saves you money.

said. But the program has seemed to help stabilize the mental health of seniors in the wake of the wildfire. This makes sense, considering that studies indicate when people engage in productive activities with others they tend to have a greater sense of well-being and purpose, and even live longer. When people act withdrawn, frustrated or overwhelmed, center staff work with them to help them relax and feel more comfortable, Puckett said. In turn, this support has helped families. For Rose Nystrom, the center provided a safe place for her mother, Gladys Brewer, to stay while they dealt with the aftermath of the disaster—both had lived in Paradise. Brewer came to the center frequently for six weeks before moving into an independent living facility in Chico. Nystrom said her mother was apprehensive at first, but staff was “so welcoming and so attentive” that it didn’t take long for her to feel comfortable. “They were just so kind to her. They tried to meet her needs and do things with her that she was

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WEEKLY DOSE

...It’s only a phone call away! Why LeWiston? neW oWners

angela Dodge from Paradise The majority of people with the form of depression known as seasonal affective disorder experience it during the winter months. But summer depression—or “reverse seasonal affective disorder”—exists and is more difficult to diagnose. Part of the problem is biological—research has shown that too much sunlight can interfere with the production of melatonin and serotonin, which can interrupt sleep and cause mood disorders. And though some like it hot, temps in the triple digits can cause overheating, lethargy and exhaustion, which affects normal routines like exercising and cooking at home. The summer blues also can be psychological, as people struggle with body image issues and compare their experience of the season to that of others. If you recognize some of these symptoms, get out of the heat and out of your head. Be kind to yourself and remember that it will rain again before you know it.

Source: Healthline

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GREENWAYS Napa County continues to lose its woodlands to vineyards.

Friend or foe?

PHOTO BY EPICUREAN/ISTOCK

The battle over CEQA, the state’s iconic environmental law by

Alastair Bland

Ia Valley, chainsaws and bulldozers converted steep hillside of scrubby oak woodland and n the rugged hills to the east of the Napa

rock piles into another vineyard. “That was an incredible rock-hopping wonderland, with frothing, amazing, waterfalling cascades every time it rained—I mean, it should have been a park,” said nearby resident Kellie Anderson of what is now a plot of grapevines at Bremer Family Winery, in the small community of Deer Park. Napa County’s Board of Supervisors in 2012 approved that project with a permit to remove more than 1,000 trees and import truckloads of soil to make the craggy landscape arable, without requiring an environmental impact report. These reports— involving expert inspections and assessments, detailed mitigation plans, and opportunity for public comment—are a key feature of the state’s signature environmental law: the California Environmental Quality Act, or CEQA (see-kwa). Inside the Capitol’s corridors and prodevelopment quarters, CEQA is increasingly disparaged as a villain in the state’s housing crisis. It’s characterized as a litigation lever that allows citizens—and even labor unions and business rivals—to sue or threaten to sue, obstructing direly needed housing projects on thin environmental pretenses. The Legislature is considering a handful of bills to loosen CEQA’s rules and Gov. Gavin Newsom, to fulfill his hyper-ambitious quota of new housing construction, has called for fast-tracking judicial CEQA review of housing, similar to that granted sports teams building stadiums. But the act’s environmentalist defenders are pushing back. CEQA’s champions contend that heavy-footprint projects like the

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Bremer vineyard and other earth-moving, tree-cutting endeavors slip too easily past the guard of CEQA—leading to overdrawn groundwater tables and disappearing forests. The politically potent building trades union signed a January letter defending CEQA, although it’s been negotiating on a housing plan that could include CEQA relaxations. Scores of environmental advocacy and social justice groups signed a letter this spring arguing that CEQA should be strengthened. “Despite constant attacks from special interests, CEQA is working. The law routinely results in projects that improve protections for public health and the environment,” reads the letter signed by reps from the Sierra Club, the League of Conservation Voters, the League of Women Voters and others. “Californians should not be forced to make a false choice between affordable housing and a clean environment. We can—and must—have both.” The roots of CEQA trace back to 1970, when it

was adopted amid a freeway boom and development of dams and levees that rerouted rivers to boost agriculture. The law, through which hundreds of proposed building projects are processed annually, requires public agencies to reduce or mitigate the environmental impacts of development wherever feasible. “CEQA has stopped very few housing projects in this state, but it sometimes slows them down,” said Alan Levine, director of the Coast Action Group and among those who signed that letter. Conversely, attorney Jennifer Hernandez with the San Francisco law firm Holland & Knight, labels CEQA “the tool of choice for preventing cities from approving highdensity housing.” She said housing projects About this story:

It is an abridged version of the original, which was produced for CalMatters.org.

“are in fact the top target of CEQA lawsuits statewide,” with a quarter of lawsuits against CEQA-reviewed projects targeting housing. In the big picture, though, that may not be so many. An analysis from the Rose Foundation for Communities and the Environment found that, of more than 54,000 CEQA-reviewed projects from 2013 through 2015, just 0.7 percent faced litigation—an average of less than 100 proposed housing developments per year. Hernandez contends that litigious NIMBY (“not in my backyard”) resisters have hijacked CEQA and are now using it for myopic, neighborhood gains such as views and urban skylines. She said that, by impeding infill residential development, CEQA aggravates the housing crisis, suburban sprawl, traffic and greenhouse gas emissions. Her 2015 report concluded that the most frequent targets of CEQA lawsuits are projects to advance California’s environmental objectives, including transit improvements and renewable energy facilities. There is no doubt that NIMBYs sometimes abuse CEQA. And even the specter of litigation can tie up projects for years, preemptively discouraging developers. “CEQA was created for a reason, and those reasons are being abused,” said Paul Gradeff, the developer behind a proposed student housing project in downtown Davis, where some college students are living in their cars and sleeping on couches. The Lincoln40 project has been mired in court. “CEQA can be used to delay, stall or prohibit development … under the auspices that somehow it will harm the environment,” even, he says, when a project has clear benefits. CEQA is “a self-executing statute”—no single agency is responsible for enforcing it. Rather, public agencies “are entrusted with compliance with CEQA and its provisions are enforced, as necessary, by the public through litigation and the threat thereof.” That’s what makes it such a powerful citizen tool—whether to block new bike lanes or the enlargement of oil refineries. But if no one is watching, projects—even potentially harmful ones—can march quietly forward. “You need an active group of citizens who are paying attention,” said Mark Wolfe, a San Francisco attorney specializing in CEQA cases. In Santa Barbara, West L.A. and the Bay Area, there’s “an engaged citizenry with the time and resources to be involved in these things.” Thus, he explained, projects that might not be permitted in wealthier regions may be carried out in, say, the Central Valley. “In theory, you won’t have a significant impact

if you follow the mitigations, but when it comes down to it, there’s almost always a

significant impact,” said Richard Grassetti, an East Bay environmental consultant hired by developers to navigate the permitting process. “There’s a bit of fantasy at play to think you could mitigate everything. In reality, it doesn’t really happen.” And there’s the question of conflict-ofinterest. “It can get awkward when you’re working directly for an applicant because they’re paying you and there can be pressure” to write satisfactory reports that downplay a project’s environmental impacts, Grassetti noted. He said he was fired from a job when he determined that the project’s environmental impacts would be significant. “So they found another consultant who would say the impact was not significant … based on the same data,” he explained in an email. CEQA guidelines often require that someone developing one parcel of land must protect another. Other times, if removing oaks—which receive special protections in California—the developer may plant a few small trees for each large one felled. According to Brian Bordona, the supervising planner with Napa County’s Planning, Building and Environmental Services Department, these measures work: “Both replanting by acorn or young planting are successful.” But Napa County resident Mike Hackett, who co-authored a failed 2018 ballot measure to protect Napa County’s oak woodlands, said replanting mitigations are generally a swindle for the ecosystem, because prime soils are essentially swapped for relatively worthless ground. What happened when a project triggers a full CEQA review, including an environmental impact report? A large vineyard project called Walt Ranch in Napa County did that after proposing to fell 14,000 mature trees. To ostensibly mitigate the impacts to woodland and waterways, the owners offered to permanently preserve another piece of wooded land on their property. “But the trees they’re saying they’re going to protect probably weren’t under much threat of being cut down, anyway,” said Wolfe, the CEQA attorney representing plaintiffs in a lawsuit to stop Walt Ranch. “If that land was already zoned for a massive subdivision, that would make a stronger case that the impact is mitigated, but it wasn’t.” A winery representative declined comment, noting “the project is being appealed.” So each side in the CEQA debate has its own wish list. Developers want fast-tracked approvals and a requirement that plaintiffs no longer be allowed to remain anonymous when they sue. Environmentalists want a more rigorous approval process and after-the-fact inspections. In short, both sides tend to affirm the value of the state’s iconic environmental law—just before they expound on why it needs “reform.” Ω


EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS photo by andRe byik

15 MINUTES

THE GOODS

Spinning in Chico

Falafel on the shelves

Born and raised in Long Island, New York, Amir Qureshi founded Soundscape Records as a mailorder business around 2010. After meeting his wife and moving to Chico in 2017, he opened Soundscape as a brick-and-mortar store at 347 Nord Ave., Ste. 3, which is tucked behind Xhale Tobacco and Gifts. A self-described vinyl enthusiast, Qureshi predominantly carries new records—including a variety of genres from numerous decades—with plans to introduce a wider used selection later this year. Vinyl records are enjoying a resurgence— according to the Recording Industry Association of America, the physical format generated revenues totaling $419 million in 2018, an 8 percent increase compared with the previous year and the highest level since 1988, back when Tracy Chapman’s “Fast Car” was climbing the charts.

Why got you into vinyl? I have always been a visual person, and I loved the fact that records have this expanded artwork that you can open … and flip through. It just kind of brought out kind of the best of everything. I think it’s the exclusivity and the limited nature, too, that kind of adds to the appeal. As well as taking something home that’s pretty badass that you can listen to that sounds flawless.

How would you describe your selection? When I was ready to open up my shop over here,

meredithc@newsreview.com

A few weeks ago, I got a hankering for a soda while watching TV and loaded my Boston terrier sidekick, Oliver, into the car and shot over to the ABC Market on West Ninth Street. I was not at all prepared for what I’d find inside. The single island of shelves in the middle of the store had been replaced by two sets of shelves, with an aisle between them. And instead of being stocked with only generic convenience-store fare like Pringles and Progresso, there was a fullfledged Mediterranean market. I think my jaw literally dropped. My soda craving was forgotten; it was shopping time. As I ogled the items, from couscous and falafel mix to exotic teas and spices I’d need to Google to figure out what to do with, I told the clerk how excited I was at the change. He said the owners had grown tired of making trips to Sacramento to buy ingredients, so they decided to bring the ingredients to them. Awesome! I walked out with just a jar of tahini and a bottle of rose water—even though it was cool outside, with Oliver in the car, I couldn’t stay long. Next time I’ll bring recipes!

What attracts people to vinyl? You can be someone that actually loves to listen to streaming sites and things like that, but if you have a favorite band or two, you’re going to want to go into a store and support that band. I feel like that’s also ... helped touring bands of all calibers, too, because it’s actually promoting people to get out there to support an independent shop in the community. As well as [creating] some excitement and buzz for people to get out there and explore a shop.

by

Meredith J. Cooper

I really wanted to try out a completely fresh concept, where everything would be brand new. Newer artists, more obscure artists ... titles that you won’t be able to find unless you go out as far as the Bay Area or Sacramento. More … indie exclusives or the artists that you would not typically see in other shops. And I feel like that really attributed to the shop’s success over time, and that’s what I’m continuing to roll with.

What are you currently spinning? The last record I was actually spinning, it was actually a very heavy record. It was Killer be Killed, and I’ve been on a kick on that record for weeks now. I think it’s fantastic. It’s just a supergroup of musicians from all sorts of bands like Mastodon and Dillinger Escape Plan and Soulfly. If I [could] be here 24 hours a day and just listen to music, I would do it. —Andre Byik a nd re b @new srev i ew. c o m

Reopened on the Ridge Last Friday (May 24), the Paradise Medical Group Clinic reopened on the Ridge (at 6460 Pentz Road) after having been damaged in the Camp Fire. In addition to replacing its former facility, the medical group, which also now has a Chico presence, unveiled a new tech platform dubbed PMG Connect. The platform, a collaboration with Blue Shield of California—which donated $2 million toward the Camp Fire rebuild effort—will allow patients to visit with PMG doctors via cellphone, tablet or computer. That seems especially needed considering so many people have been displaced since November. Finding a way While perusing Facebook last week, I stumbled upon a post for a bakery I hadn’t heard of before called Loophole Food. It’s run by Chico mom Jessica Jackson, who was “tired of telling my sweet kiddos ‘no’ every time they saw something in the store they couldn’t have ….” Her family eats gluten-free, so baked goods were particularly difficult to find. The photos on Jackson’s site are impressive, the doughnuts and cookies, etc., candy for the eyes. And with flavors like blackberry amethyst and blueberry lemonade, I’m intrigued even if I have no gluten allergy. It’s all free of GMOs and artificial coloring and flavoring, too. Go to myloopholefoods.com for more. Sidewalk Sale While out for a coffee break last week, a couple of co-workers and I walked past Woodstock’s Pizza and chatted briefly with the employees manning the table out front. The restaurant closed after the storms a few months ago, which caused its ceiling to cave in. Apparently, the damage was so extensive it might be a few months before it reopens. In the meantime, they’re selling slices and preordered full pies out front.

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CN&R

15


Can’t afford to retire, can’t find a job Growing number of elderly Californians still have to work by

David Wagner

M About these stories:

They’re part of the California Dream project, a statewide nonprofit media collaboration focused on issues of economic opportunity, quality of life, and the future of the California Dream. Partner organizations include CALmatters, Capital Public Radio, KPBS, KPCC and KQED with support provided by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and the James Irvine Foundation.

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ore Californians are working past the age of 65, many because they can’t afford to retire. But the seniors who most need a job often have the hardest time finding one. “For low-wage workers, you pretty much hit a wall,” said Nari Rhee, director of the Retirement Security Program at the UC Berkeley Labor Center. Blue-collar workers can keep a physically demanding job for only so long. Age discrimination can lock seniors out of new opportunities. For many, it all adds up to a kind of forced retirement.

“Even if you want to work, you really can’t,” Rhee said. “The people who are working well into their late 60s and possibly into their early 70s tend to be in professional jobs.” But financial necessity drives thousands to keep looking for work. According to figures from the U.S. Census Bureau, more than 900,000 Californians age 65 and older are working or actively looking for work. That’s up from about 590,000 in 2009. Emma Allen, 71, is one of them. She’s been job hunting for years. While searching for a permanent position, she’s been participating in a job training program for low-income seniors through the city of Los Angeles. She works the front desk at a senior center, where she’s been picking up new skills and earning a modest paycheck. She has the kind of warm smile needed to be a good receptionist. “I’m the first one they see when they come in the door,” Allen said. “Whatever they need help with, I know where to direct them.” Answering the phone is a big part of her day. One recent morning, a caller wanted to know what was on the menu for lunch. But it was pretty clear lunch wasn’t why he actually called. Allen took some time out of her day to catch

up with him. These kinds of calls are typical. “Some just want to call and talk,” Allen said. “And that’s uplifting— that you make a difference for someone who just needs to hear a voice.” Allen has been at the center more than four years. She said the people there are now like family. “You come in and sometimes you’re not feeling well. But then the first person through the door will have a big smile on their face, and say, ‘Good morning, Emma,’ and that whole gloom just goes away,” Allen said. This program aims to give lowincome seniors a better chance of reentering the workforce. But it is not intended to become a permanent job. Allen’s time is almost up. She’ll have to leave in May. “It’s very rewarding,” she said. “I’m going to miss it.” Most participants exit the program

without having found a job. Laura Trejo, general manager of the city of Los Angeles’ Department of Aging, said that despite older workers’ reliability, experience and good work ethic, the deck is often stacked against them. “We still live in a society that has a lot of ageism,” Trejo said. “People judge


Same Day Service Emma Allen drives herself to work most days. It’s convenient, but the cost of car insurance stretches her limited budget. PHOTO BY SEAN HAVEY FOR CALIFORNIA DREAM

somebody maybe by their wrinkles and the gray in their hair, and not necessarily by what they can contribute to the workplace.” Last year, Los Angeles saw a 22 percent spike in the number of homeless seniors 62 and older. Trejo thinks that convincing more employers to hire seniors could be one way to reverse that trend. “We’re seeing lots of high-risk older adults, because of the economics in Los Angeles,” she said. Seniors are paying high rents, and their fixed incomes aren’t keeping up with the escalating cost of living. “All of us should be worried. All of us should be paying attention and caring,” Trejo said. Allen needs a new job because Social Security isn’t enough to live on. After paying her rent, she has only a few hundred dollars to budget for food, utilities, car insurance and other expenses. Like many seniors, she has no savings. They were depleted by medical bills toward the end of her husband’s life. According to a 2015 report from the National Institute on Retirement Security, nearly

30 percent of working households age 55 to 64 are headed into their retirement years with zero savings. “I don’t have a choice,” Allen said. “I need the income.” The Great Recession only made things worse for many Californians nearing retirement, especially black and Latino seniors. The racial wealth gap widened during the financial crisis. A decade later, U.S. black and Mexican households in Los Angeles have only 1 percent of the wealth held by white households, according to a report from the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco. Rhee, from the UC Berkeley Labor Center, has seen the lingering effects of the recession push her mother back into the workforce. Her mom lost her home during the financial crisis. Now in her early 70s, she works a few days a week at a Costco. “She’ll say, ‘I enjoy working,’” Rhee said, because the job offers social connection and keeps her mother’s mind active. “But the primary reason she’s there is that she needs the income.” Older women can’t rely as much on Social Security. Their benefits tend to be lower, because they were paid less than men throughout their careers.

More seniors working 35.8% AGE 16-19

26.9% 19.6%

14.6%

AGE 65+

YEAR 2008

YEAR 2019

“Single women tend to have it the worst off,” Rhee said. “California really needs to confront the fact that we have an aging population, and what that’s going to mean for things like senior poverty, the need for housing and supportive services.” Working is nothing new for Allen. She started working at 15 and hasn’t stopped since. She’s been a probation officer, a special education teacher’s aide, a meat packing plant worker and, now, she’s open to pretty much anything. “I’m a people person,” she said. “Anything to do with people.” Allen has had to constantly look for a job in order to stay in her job training program. Her search is documented in a thick manila folder. Every place she’s applied to has its own entry. “I went to JC Penney, I went to Big Lots,” she said, flipping through a large stack of paperwork. “Jack in the Box, Target …” Many employers tell her to apply online, but Allen’s computer skills are limited. Her kids help out with those applications. But so far, no luck. No one has ever outright told her she’s too old to get hired. But Allen thinks age discrimination is part of why she’s not getting called back. “I could feel it, you could tell,” Allen said. “Half the time they don’t even look at the application. They just look at me. They see that I’m older, and I guess they figure I can’t keep up or whatever.” Thumbing through her job search folder, Allen said she felt tired. “Because out of all this, somewhere there should’ve been something,” she said. “I’m running out of places. I don’t know where else to go.” If she doesn’t find a job, she’ll have to move in with one of her kids. But she doesn’t want to be a burden. And she wants to keep working. “It’s part of making me feel that I’m worth something,” she said. “I’m contributing something. I’m not just sitting on my hands waiting for somebody to give me something. Maybe somewhere down the line somebody might see that.” Ω

The percentage of teenagers who are working is declining, while seniors are the only age group whose participation in the labor force has increased. SOURCE: CALIFORNIA EMPLOYMENT DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT

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CN&R

17


Who will care for the elderly? Bracing for the coming wave of seniors amid a dearth of helpers by

Elizabeth Aguilera

W

hen Cristina Hernandez notices her father is withdrawn or hasn’t come out of his room for the day, she uses her cellphone to turn on Glenn Miller or blast salsa music. Almost every time, she’ll see the 91-year-old start tapping a finger on the table or hear his walker tip tap on the floor in his room before he emerges into the kitchen. Francisco Rios has lived in Pomona with his daughter for the past 15 years.

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“I know music cheers him up,” said Hernandez, 52. “He used to dance tango, swing, boogie, cha-cha and that kind of music from south Mexico.” Rios is part of the upward swing of a coming population wave of seniors in California. Experts say the state is not prepared to support them as they age and there will not be enough caregivers as the senior demographic swells and the number of younger Californians shrinks. State officials are working on a plan for aging, and senior researchers and experts are trying to get ahead of the coming challenges. When he first moved in, Rios was still fairly mobile and independent. He helped water the lawn, took care of the garden and walked his grandchildren to school. He even went dancing regularly with a young neigh-

bor who was a salsa dance instructor. She told people he was her grandfather. Experts say about a quarter of households in California are caring for an elderly family member, and the number of seniors who will need care is expected to grow as the population ages. “The Golden State is getting grayer,” Gov. Gavin Newsom said during his State of the State speech in February. “We need to get ready for the major demographic challenge headed our way. For the first time in our history, older Californians will outnumber young children.” Newsom called for the creation of a “Master Plan on Aging,” proposed spending $3 million on Alzheimer’s research, and named former California first lady Maria Shriver to lead an Alzheimer’s Prevention

Cristina Hernandez walks with her father, Francisco Rios, 91, across the lawn at her Pomona home. She has been his primary caregiver for 15 years. PHOTO BY SEAN HAVEY FOR CALIFORNIA DREAM PROJECT

and Preparedness Task Force. The plan, Newsom said, should work to address the nursing shortage, the patchwork of senior services, the social isolation seniors often experience, and the “demand for In-Home Supportive Services that far outpaces its capacity.” There is no timeline for the plan, and Newsom’s office said they are still developing its structure. By 2030 about 19 percent of Californians, or about 1 in every 5 people, will be 65 or older, up from 12 percent in 2012, according


More Seniors in need of care 528,244 The number of seniors eligible to receive caregiving through the state’s In-Home Supportive Services program increased 18 percent in nine years. Of the 506,000 caregivers in the program, about 70 percent are family members.

505,926 5,000

480,031 447,443

446,095

437,381

425,491

454,667

425,884

SOURCES: CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL SERVICES, IN-HOME SUPPORTIVE SERVICES PROGRAM

411,322

4,000

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

B y D a na A m i h e r e of K P C C

The money helps a little, since she’s had to cut back her hours as a cashier at Target because Rios can’t be home alone. Hernandez considers herself lucky because her husband’s job provides health insurance for her family, and he earns the majority of their income. Thousands more seniors being cared for by family members don’t qualify for assistance. They make up the largest group of caregivers, said Jeannee Parker Martin, president and CEO of LeadingAge California. The trade association represents providers of senior affordable housing, including independent living, assisted living and skilled nursing facilities, as well as services offered in the home. “There will be a huge need for more caregivers in the state,” said Parker Martin. “Every state across the country now is having this issue. But in California, in particular, we already have a lack of caregivers.”

A huge need to research by the Public Policy Institute of California. This group will be more racially and ethnically diverse and will have more single and childless seniors, portending a need for culturally sensitive and professional caregivers. And by 2032 there will be more people age 65 and older than children younger than 15, said Kathryn Kietzman, a research scientist at the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research specializing in older adults who depend on support to remain at home. The state is “woefully unprepared in terms of policies to support people as they age at home,” Kietzman said. She hopes Newsom’s plan will begin the conversation to address the issue. Kietzman said the biggest challenge in senior care will fall on middle-income families that don’t qualify for state assistance and who aren’t wealthy enough to pay for services at home or at a facility. A key piece of any plan, experts say, should be making sure there are enough caregivers because they are often the difference between a senior getting to stay at home or having to go to a facility.

Under pressure Caregivers help with things like bathing, dressing, cooking, feeding, cleaning, moving around, dispensing medications, paying bills and other tasks some seniors can no longer do alone. It’s a tough job. A senior’s mental state may be fragile. Some may need help with

everything from getting out of bed to staying in bed at night. Some may not remember their caregiver or what they had for dinner. It can be frustrating, tiring and emotionally draining. Hernandez has had those moments. In early winter her dad was admitted to the hospital for a week. It was during that visit that Hernandez found herself in the bathroom crying so much that a nurse asked if she was OK. “I was a little bit frustrated. It’s a lot on your shoulders,” she said. “I have to make the right decision, choose the right treatments. You feel like his life depends on you.” Becoming a caretaker impacts every part of your life, Hernandez said. “At the beginning, I was able to say, ‘OK, you are good. I’m going to go with my girlfriends.’ And I was able to do that,” Hernandez said. ‘Now, I don’t have a social life. It does change your life. There’s a lot of compromise and a lot of responsibility.” Taking care of Rios isn’t something she ever envisioned. She didn’t grow up with him and only got to know him as an adult after she moved to the Los Angeles area. Rios danced ballroom competitions and worked as a glassmaker in Mexico City before moving his family to Tijuana. The last of his seven children were born in the border city after he had begun to cross regularly for work in a shoe factory. He had stopped coming back home by the time Hernandez, the youngest, was born. “I didn’t have a relationship [with him],

so it was kind of a surprise for me,” she said. “It took me a little bit of time to get used to it—to have him living with me.” But they’ve gotten to know each other and there is an ease between them. She calls him Paco, hardly ever “dad” unless she’s talking to doctors or others about his care. “It fell on her,” Rios said. “‘Oh, well,’ I tell her. But it went fine, and I’m better here.”

Keeping it in the family Family caregiving is not new, but it has changed. Most families do not have a stayat-home partner who can take on the responsibility. Many adult children live across the country. And others don’t have children at all. So families adapt by taking in elders and cutting back work hours or hiring help. Some manage paid caregivers and doctors from afar. Others move back home to help. The state operates a program called In-Home Supportive Services that identifies low-income seniors who need help with basics to stay at home and provides a certain amount of paid hours for caregiving. The senior hires a caregiver, usually a family member, to take care of those needs and the state program pays, usually minimum wage. Among the more than 506,000 caregivers enrolled in the program, about 70 percent are family members, according to the state’s Department of Social Services. Hernandez is paid for about 90 hours a month to care for her dad, even though she cares for him around the clock.

According to the California Employment Development Department, the state will need an additional 200,000 home care workers by 2024 to keep up with current levels of care. UC Berkeley’s Center for Labor Research and Education estimates California could need as many as 3.2 million home care workers. One program is helping to fill that gap for mainly low-income individuals 55 and older with health needs, but it isn’t widely available, Kietzman said. Programs of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE) offers day care services and in-home health care. Qualifying seniors get transportation to and from centers one or more days per week, receive meals, participate in activities and see a physician. In Southern California, AltaMed operates eight sites that serve about 2,600 seniors, said Maria Zamora, who oversees the program for the health care provider. There are 12 health care providers offering PACE services throughout the state. Hernandez is committed to caring for her father until she can’t do it anymore. That’s why she signed up for a caregiver class for Spanish speakers put on by the California Long-Term Care Education Center, in partnership with LA Care Health Plan. She is learning more about how to care for her dad, such as lifting, bathing and helping with medications. And she meets other caregivers and talks about the challenges they face. “I [feel] really strong that I’m going to take care of him,” Hernandez said. “I see myself taking care of him until I can’t. I think about, What if he gets older and, hopefully, makes it to 100?” Ω

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CN&R

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Arts &Culture THIS WEEK Zoe Boekinder on finding the universal in the personal

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THU

Special Events THURSDAY NIGHT MARKET: Local produce, fresh flowers, music, arts and crafts, and food trucks. Thu, 5/30, 6pm. Downtown

Tdoesn’t be extremely personal, but personal necessarily mean self-centered.

he work of the singer/songwriter can

The best vulnerable songs carry a broader relevance. “I think it’s important to put yourself into art because you know yourself really well, especially when we’re writing things that are political because they can easily sound really preachy if they’re not also personal,” said singer/songwriter Zoe Boekbinder during a recent interview. The New Orleansby based musician is no Robin stranger to connecting Bacior the personal thread to the larger message, but it wasn’t an overnight Preview: revelation. Boekinder Zoe Boekinder performs Thursday, started down a musical June 6, 7 p.m, with path in 2006 as part Phantom Tides, Scout of Vermillion Lies, a and Fera. dark cabaret duo comBlackbird prising the Boekbinder 1431 Park Ave. sisters—Zoe and 433-1577 Kim. In 2009, the two facebook.com/ parted musical ways blackbirdchico and Zoe began a solo career, pivoting into creating songs composed with strippeddown, sparse folk melodies. Not too long after this shift, Boekbinder began volunteering at California State Prison, Sacramento (aka New Folsom Prison). Boekbinder went on to volunteer for five years at the maximum security facility, and the time there had a deep impact on the artist’s creative voice. “Doing that work and seeing one part of our society that needs a lot of change made my music that I had been writing

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Chico. 345-6500. downtownchico.com

Theater BLOOMSDAY: Travel back in time to James Joyce’s Dublin streets and find out what would have happened if you had said “yes.” Theatrical adaptation by Steven Dietz. Thu, 5/30, 7:30pm. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. blueroomtheatre.com

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FRI just seem really insignificant and unimportant, and I stopped feeling inspired,” Boekbinder said. Boekbinder began what’s now become the Prison Music Project, a collection of songs stemming from workshops with inmates in the Prison Arts Program. It’s a collaboration with Ani DiFranco, who is producing the album— a mix of cover songs, adaptations of poems and raps (“[We] recorded the rapper over the phone,” Boekbinder said). The collection likely will be released in spring 2020. During the time at Folsom, Boekbinder continually wrote songs, but the content began to shift into more political territory. “I was still writing songs and not even thinking about releasing them,” Boekbinder said. “I think when I wasn’t thinking about releasing songs, when I was writing a song without ever imagining it being heard by anyone else, I could write political songs because I wasn’t scared what people would think about it. And then I ended up having a lot of songs that then felt like I should share them.”

The result was the 2018 release Shadow, a collection of songs informed by Boekbinder’s time at Folsom, as well recent personal tragedies. The songs maintain a bare bones intimacy with simple folky arrangements of rustling snare and muted guitar lines, balanced by Boekbinder’s clear voice with its evocative pronunciations and personal lyrics. “I still feel nervous singing some of these songs,” Boekbinder said. “I guess there’s one in particular; I’m always afraid someone’s going to be offended by it. I want to win people over and don’t want to shut anyone out.” The song is “Possibilities,” one specifically focused on the realities of privilege and the expanded “possibilities” in life for those whom it benefits. It’s one of many with a political nature not meant to preach, but to shine a light on a reality that’s been kept in the dark for so long. “One time after a show this white man came up to me after and said, ‘that song made me feel really bad, thank you,’” Boekbinder said. “I’m not trying to make anyone feel bad; aware is more the thing I want folks to be.” Ω

Special Events ADAM RAY: Popular comedian of the big and small screens in town for standup. Local opening line-up TBD. Fri, 5/31, 6:30pm. $15$25. El Rey Theater, 230 W. Second St. elreychico.com

HOOKED ON FISHING

Saturday, June 1 Horseshoe Lake, Bidwell Park SEE SATURDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS


FINE ARTS ON NEXT PAGE

BLOOMSDAY Thursday-Saturday, through June 15 Blue Room Theatre

SEE THURSDAY-SATURDAY, THEATER

Pershing, Decades and more. Proceeds fund Meals on Wheels. Sat, 6/1, 3pm. City Plaza, downtown Chico.

SHERWOOD MUSIC FESTIVAL: All-day music festival fundraiser for Sherwood Montessori. Headliners The Mother Hips are joined by local bands Hot Flash, Smokey the Groove and more. There will be food and plenty of free kids activities. Sat, 6/1, 2pm. $20-$30. The End of Normal, 2500 Estes. 345-6600. eventbrite.com

Theater BLOOMSDAY: See Thursday. Sat, 6/1, 7:30pm. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St.

DAMN YANKEES: See Friday. Sat, 6/1, 7:30pm. $16$22. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. chicotheatercompany.com

GARAGE FEST 2019: See Friday. Sat, 6/1, 7pm. slowtheatre.com

Sierra Nevada presents Spielberg’s classic E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial outside by the Hop Yard, with beer, yard games and food. Pat Hull opens. (Reschedule of previously rainedout event). Fri, 5/31, 7:30pm. $5. Hop Yard at Sierra Nevada, 1075 E. 20th St. sierranevada.com

VOLUNTEER FRIDAYS: Help pick up litter and pull weeds in the park. For more info call Shane at 896-7831. Fri, 5/31, 9am. Bidwell Park.

Music FRIDAY NIGHT CONCERT: Local seven-piece Americana/bluegrass band Mossy Creek plays for free. Fri, 5/31, 7pm. City Plaza, downtown Chico.

Theater BLOOMSDAY: See Thursday. Fri, 5/31, 7:30pm. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. blueroomtheatre.com

DAMN YANKEES: Classic Broadway musicalcomedy about baseball and a deal with the devil. Fri, 5/31, 7:30pm. $16-$22. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. chicotheatercompany.com

GARAGE FEST 2019: For two nights, four local theater companies will converge in one local garage to stage short productions. No host bar, live music by Loki Miller and The Sardines. The theme of this year’s festival is Love. See website for tickets and info. Fri, 5/31, 7pm. $15-$18. slowtheatre.com

1

SAT

Special Events BREW FLOW: Yoga and beers with Chelsea West. Sat 6/1, 11am. The Commons Social Empourium, 2412 Park Ave.

HOOKED ON FISHING: City of Chico’s annual kids-fishing event. The lake is stocked, loaner rods are available. Sat 6/1, 7amnoon. Horseshoe Lake, Bidwell Park. chicohookedonfishing.com

Music THE BIDWELLS: Relaxing tunes for brunch. Sat, 6/1, 11am. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

Library, 1108 Sherman Ave.

SPRING HERB FAIRE: Free day of workshops to celebrate the season with the Elderberry Apothecary. Learn about medicinal herbs and more. Sun, 6/2, 10am. One-Mile Recreation Area, Bidwell Park. theelder berryapothecary.org

Music BOGG: Jazz by Bogg and vegan brunch. Sun, 6/2, 11am. Free. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St. 530-433-0414.

THE FRONTIER MINSTREL: Local musicologist Gordy Ohliger will perform songs of the 1840s at the old Centerville Schoolhouse in Butte Creek Canyon. Sun, 6/2, 10am. Free. 13458 Centerville Road. 893-9667.

THE HOUSE THAT JUSTICE BUILT: See Saturday. Sun, 6/2, 6pm. First Christian

2

Church, 295 E. Washington Ave. chicohous ingactionteam.net

SUN BIKE-IN MOVIE NIGHT: In honor of Bike Month,

FREE MOVIE: Free movie every week, call 8912762 for title. Sun, 6/2, 2pm. Butte County

JIM BECKER: Singer/songwriter/guitarist from Los Angeles performs. Sun, 6/2, 3pm. Secret Trail Brewing Company, 132

Special Events

Meyers St., Ste. 120.

CHICO SEERSUCKER RIDE: Dress old-timey and take a leisurely ride through Lower Bidwell Park to picnic and socialize at Five Mile Recreation Area. Start at Bidwell Mansion, arrive early. Sun, 6/2, 10am. Bidwell Mansion State Historic Park, 525 Esplanade.

Theater DAMN YANKEES: See Friday. Sun, 6/2, 2pm. $16$22. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. chicotheatercompany.com

FARM TO FEAST: Celebrate the value of local food with dinner and music at the GRUB farm. Menu will be healthy and organic and include wine and beer. Sun, 6/2, 5pm. $10-$50. Grub CSA, 3269 W. Sacramento Ave. 570-6872.

FOR MORE MUSIC, SEE NIGHTLIFE ON PAGE 24

EDITOR’S PICK

lasalleschico.com

THE HOUSE THAT JUSTICE BUILT: Doin’ It Justice Community Chorus presents its 11th annual spring concert—two shows (Saturday and Sunday). Proceeds benefit Simplicity Village, a program to provide tiny homes for unhoused elders. $20 suggested donation (no one turned away for lack of funds). Sat, 6/1, 7pm. First Christian Church, 295 E. Washington Ave. chicohousingactionteam.net

ROCK THE RIDGE 19: The Paradise music festival relocates to Chico this year. Featuring fun for the whole family with food, raffle and bounce house. Featuring local bands Jeff

SHERWOOD MUSIC FESTIVAL Saturday, June 1 End of Normal

SEE SATURDAY, MUSIC

FREE LISTINGS! Post your event for free online at www. newsreview.com/calendar, or email the CN&R calendar editor at cnrcalendar@newsreview.com. Deadline for print listings is Wednesday, 5 p.m., one week prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

BRAND-NEW TRADITION In tribute to the humble beginnings of the legendary Butcher Shop theater festival born in the Latimer family garage back in the 1980s, nonprofit theater collective Slow Theatre presents Garage Fest 2019 this Friday and Saturday (May 31-June 1). The theme of the inaugural two-day festival is “Love,” and it will feature four short productions in a north Chico garage by a collection of local performance troupes, including Slow Theatre, the Chico Dance Lab, Chico Live Improv Comedy and Captain Murphy’s Flim Flam Dream Machine. There also will be Greek food for sale and a no host bar, and live music by Webster Moore and Loki Miller and The Sardines. Get your tickets and more info at slowtheatre.com. M AY 3 0 , 2 0 1 9

CN&R

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FINE ARTS

CN&R Is LookINg FoR AN AdveRtIsINg CoNsuLtANt Do you love Chico? Do you want to help local businesses succeed? So do we! the Chico news & review is a family owned business that has been part of the Chico community since 1977. our mission is to publish great newspapers which are successful and enduring, create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow while respecting personal welfare, and to have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. if you want to make a difference and do something that matters then keep reading.

AdveRtIsINg CoNsuLtANt the Cn&r is looking for an individual who cares about building relationships and partnering with local businesses. if you have the heart, we have the tools to train you to be a successful ad Consultant. you must be self-motivated, ambitious and an independent person who wants to be part of a great team. Successful reps will have a sincere desire to help our clients assess their needs and work together to create marketing campaigns that increase their business. Bilingual/fluency in Spanish is a plus.

MAP IT OUT

Shows through July 28 Museum of Northern California Art SEE ART

Art 1078 GALLERY: Something Not Yet Made, Mariam Pakbaz’s works full of movement and color. Through 6/2. 1710 Park Ave. 1078gallery.org

BEATNIKS COFFEE HOUSE & BREAKFAST JOINT: Portrait and Figure Drawing, drawings and paintings on display by Chico Art Center artists. Through 6/28. 1387 E. Eighth St.

BROWN ARTWORKS GALLERY: Reception for works by Bay Area artist Tina Tziu, Sat, 6/1, 2-6pm. 234 W. Third St., Ste. F.

CHICO ART CENTER: Uncovering A Resistance, works by Kyle Campbell, Oni Dakini, Gini Holmes, Ryan Ramos. Juried by Jacob Meders. Through 5/31. 450 Orange St., 895-8726.

HEALING ART GALLERY - ENLOE CANCER CENTER: Antonio Ramirez, photography by late Northern California artist. The Enloe Cancer Center Healing Art Gallery features artists whose lives have been touched by cancer. Through 7/19. 265 Cohasset Road, 332-3856.

MAIN EVENT GALLERY: California’s Girl of the Golden Sunshine, Tehama County Arts Council presents retrospective exhibit of late California artist Babette Fickert Dowell’s work. Through 7/6. 710 Main Street, Red Bluff, 391-3259.

MUSEUM OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA ART: Map

FoR moRe INFoRmAtIoN, vIsIt www.NewsRevIew.Com/ChICo/jobs

equal opportunity employer

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CN&R

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It Out, exhibition of Northern California artists presenting works inspired by the theme of maps. Opening event May 30, 6-8pm. Through 7/28. Also, World of Color, with featured artists Evan

Warzybok, Owen Smith, David McMillan and Naomi Griffith. Through 6/7. 900 Esplanade. monca.org

UPPER CRUST BAKERY: Beth Bjorklund, local artist’s work showcasing fruits and vegetables. Through 5/31. 130 Main St.

Museums BOLT’S ANTIQUE TOOL MUSEUM: Unique museum has over 12,000 hand tools on display, charting cataloging the evolution and history of tools. Closed Sundays. Through 6/15. $3-$0. 1650 Broderick St., Oroville.

CHICO CHILDREN’S MUSEUM: Tons of cool stuff for kids to explore including a miniature city, complete with a junior vet clinic, dentist, cafe and farmer›s market, a giant fish tank, multisensory room, imagination playground and much more. Check the website for hours and admission information. Through 8/3. $7-$9. 325 Main St. chicochildrensmuseum.org

VALENE L. SMITH MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY: Remarkable Lives, exploring the intertwined worlds of birds and humans, in partnership with the Altacal Audubon Society and Snow Goose Festival. Exhibits include bird songs and behaviors, local photography and a robotic recreation of the late Jurassic Archaeopteryx. Through 7/31. Chico State.


SCENE

Raising hope

Butte County native returns to make art, raise funds for Paradise

Iartist—it Shane Grammer want to be an was a computer class at t wasn’t art classes that made

Butte College in the early 1990s. The classic hiphop documenby Jason tary Style Wars Cassidy on a classmate’s computer screen j aso nc@ newsrev i ew.c om caught his eye. “[It] blew my doors away,” Preview: Grammer said Camp Fire Mural Series: Beauty From during a recent Ashes, Friday, June 7, interview. That 6:30-10 p.m. (VIP initial exposure to reception at 5 p.m.). graffiti inspired him Cost: $25/general; $100/VIP; free for to pursue art for a Ridge residents living, as well as to use it to help Museum of others, particularly Northern California Art those impacted by 900 Esplanade disasters or social 487-7272 injustices. monca.org Grammer has traveled all over the world—Mexico, Brazil, Asia— to paint murals that might “elicit hope from devastation.”And it was that work that prepared the Chico native to return to Butte County this past January to paint murals in the Camp Fire burn zone. “God has always used my art to bring hope and joy to the downcast and brokenhearted,” he said. The evocative murals made a huge impression on the residents of Paradise, got gobs of media attention (CNN, NPR, The Washington Post, etc.), and now Grammer is returning to Chico to capitalize on

the exposure. He has partnered with the Museum of Northern California Art (MONCA) to put on a oneday exhibit/reception to both raise money for those affected by the fire and re-create the hopeful feelings his Paradise murals engendered. Camp Fire Mural Series: Beauty From Ashes will take place Friday, June 7, and proceeds from ticket sales ($25 each, $100 to attend early VIP reception) will be split between MONCA’s summerschool program for young people experiencing post-fire trauma and the programming of the Paradise Art Center, which survived the fire. Earlier this year, if you drove into

Paradise via Clark Road from Butte College, you couldn’t miss the huge face rising from the wreckage. Grammer’s striking black-and-white aerosol mural of a solemn woman seemed to have been burned into a gray hearth and chimney (all that remained of the home of his friends Shane and Jennifer Edwards). “You come around this bend and, boom. She’s looking right at you,” Grammer said. The piece, titled “Beauty From Ashes,” spread quickly via photos on social media and struck an emotional chord for those dealing with the fire’s ugly aftermath. As he was overcome by a flood of online comments, Grammer came to realize that the mural was “the first glimmer of beauty [they’d] seen since the fire.” That mural is gone now, demolished and hauled away as part of

“Holding on to Hope” mural. PHOTO BY SHANE GRAMMER

the ongoing cleanup. But there were more to follow. Grammer painted friends on their destroyed homes; faces on burned-out cars; a memorial to Camp Fire victim Helen Page; Jesus on the side of the baptismal at Hope Christian Church—17 murals in all, of which a dozen remain. The MONCA show ties in with Grammer’s work in Paradise and will feature three components: In one room will be a series of photos by Grammer and Sacramento photographer Terence Duffy of the Paradise murals. The other parts of the exhibit include a room of other work by Grammer, and another room containing an installation titled “Hope Rises.” Painting is a side gig for Grammer. His day job is as a sculptor for the theme-park industry, and he’s designed and fabricated everything from dragons to pirate ships for fantasy lands all over the world (including Shanghai Disney). For “Hope Rises,” Grammer has put those skills to work on a 15-by14-by-8-feet sculpture created with materials donated by Storyland Studios in Lake Elsinore. The installation also will feature professionally designed lighting and original music written for the night for what promises to be an immersive and evocative experience. “I want people to be moved emotionally when they walk in,” Grammer said. Ω

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NIGHTLIFE

THURSDay 5/30—WEDNESDay 6/5

31FRIDay

ADAM RAY: Popular comedian of both 

aDaM Ray

the big and small screens in town to  make you laugh. Local opening lineup TBD.  Fri, 5/31, 6:30pm. $15-$25.  El Rey Theater, 230 W. Second St.  elreychico.com

Friday, May 31 El Rey Theater SEE FRIDay

BASSMINT: Every Friday in the Peking  Restaurant bar, dance to bass  music DJs and producers.  Fri, 5/31, 9:30pm. $5. 243 W. Second St.

BIKE-IN MOVIE NIGHT: In honor of Bike 

30THURSDay

COMEDY NIGHT: Headliner Anthony K  hails from Modesto. He is joined  by local comics TJ Hudson, Annie  Fischer and more.  Thu, 5/30, 7pm. $17. Unwined Kitchen & Bar,  980 Mangrove Ave.

THE LATE BLOOMERS BAND: For TLC  Thursday: local five-piece band  plays swing, blues, gospel and  oldies.  Thu, 5/30, 6pm. Tender Loving  Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

LOW FLYING BIRDS: Americana and  bluegrass for happy hour during  the downtown market.  Thu, 5/30,

6pm. La Salles, 220 Broadway St.  lasalleschico.com

REGGAE NIGHT: DJs spinning the 

jams. Thu, 5/30, 6pm. The Commons  Social Empourium, 2412 Park Ave.

SINGER/SONGWRITER/PERFORMER SHOWCASE: Featuring performances  by local artists Dallas Darnell,  Jeffrey Obser, Todd Harrison and  more.  Thu, 5/30, 6:30pm. Farm Star  Pizza, 2359 Esplanade, 343-2056.

THURSDAY NIGHT DJ: Beat the heat  with a rotating list of DJs spinning  all vinyl til late.  Thu, 5/30, 8pm. Bill’s  Towne Lounge, 135 Main St.

Month, Sierra Nevada presents  Spielberg’s classic E.T. The ExtraTerrestrial outside by the Hop  Yard, with beer, yard games and  food. Pat Hull opens. (Reschedule of  previously rained-out event).  Fri, 5/31, 7:30pm. $5. Hop Yard at Sierra  Nevada, 1075 E. 20th St. sierra  nevada.com

CHUCK EPPERSON & LOKI MILLER: Popular local duo performs original  tunes.  Fri, 5/31, 7pm. The Commons  Social Empourium, 2412 Park Ave.,  895-8257.

COMEDY NIGHT: Stacked comedy  lineup of local talent headlined by  Anthony K from Modesto, hosted  by the adorable Becky Lynn.  Fri, 5/31, 8:30pm. $5. Duffy’s Tavern, 337  Main St.

DISCO BALL MAIDEN VOYAGE: The  Women’s Club has a new disco ball  and wants to celebrate with improv, 

games, dancing and music by the  Scarlet Pumps. Cash bar, food by  Tender Loving.  Fri, 5/31, 6pm. Chico  Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St. chico  womensclub.org

DJ COOTDOG: Spinning tunes for late  happy hour.  Fri, 5/31, 10pm. La  Salles, 229 Broadway St. 

THE DREaM oF THE ’90S IS alIvE

The 1990s: Churning guitar riffs and angsty male voices, isolation and beer saturated the air like mosquitoes in June, and princes of the era were the dudes in Floater, a three-piece alt-rock group from Portland, Ore., with a massive local following. If you are still under its spell, you’re in luck—the band plays Lost on Main this Saturday (June 1). Go feel young again.

MANZANITA FALLS: Sweet indie rock  band from Santa Rosa shares  the bill with local dreamers  Sisterhood and Aric Jeffries of Solar  Estates.  Fri, 5/31, 8:30pm. $7. The  Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

FRIDAY NIGHT CONCERT: Local sevenpiece Americana/bluegrass band  Mossy Creek plays for free.  Fri, 5/31, 7pm. City Plaza, downtown  Chico.

THE OCCASIONAL SWINGERS: Live 

music at the winery.  Fri, 5/31, 6pm. Almendra Winery & Distillery,  9275 Midway Road, Durham.

OPEN MIC: Bring an instrument.  Acoustic/electric guitar and drum  set available to use. Sign up at  7:30pm. All ages welcome until  10pm.  Fri, 5/31, 8pm. $1. Down Lo,  319 Main St., 966-8342. 

PABLO DYLAN & EZRA BELL:  Bob Dylan’s  grandson performs his own unique  style of folk-rock, and Portland’s  Ezra Bell leans on nostalgia with  some ’60s/’70s style folk-rock of its  own.  Fri, 5/31, 7:30pm. $7. Argus Bar  + Patio, 212 W. Second St.,  facebook. com/argusbar

PUB SCOUTS: Traditional Irish music 

for happy hour.  Fri, 5/31, 4pm. $1.  Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St. 

REUNION – A TRIBUTE TO THE ’70S: Cover band playing sexy 1970s  radio hits  Fri, 5/31, 9:30pm. $5.  Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3  Alverda Drive, Oroville.

ROOTS REGGAE PARTY: Jam on with  J Ras & The Higher Elevation and  Triple Tree.  Fri, 5/31, 9:30pm. $10. 

call for

Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave.   facebook.com/TackleBoxChico

SOUNDWAVE: Cover band specializing  in classic rock and modern hits  to get you on the dance floor.  Fri, 5/31, 8:30pm. Feather Falls Casino &  Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

STEVE COOK: Eclectic jams for your 

dining soundtrack.  Fri, 5/31, 6pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W.  Fourth St.

artists the Cn&r newsstand art projeCt CN&R is seeking artists to transform our newsstands into functional art. to see how you can be a part of this project, please contact mattd@newsreview.com 24

CN&R

M ay 3 0 , 2 0 1 9


THIS WEEK: FIND MORE ENTERTaINMENT aND SPECIaL EVENTS ON PaGE 20 6/1, 7pm. $7. 1078 Gallery, 1710 Park  Ave. 1078gallery.org

NO BETTER Saturday, June 1 Ike’s Place

2SUNDay

SEE SaTURDay

JOHN SEID AND LARRY PETERSON: slingin’ for late happy hour.  Sat, 6/1, 9:30pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.  lasalleschico.com

REUNION – A TRIBUTE TO THE ’70S: See 

Friday. Sat, 6/1, 9:30pm. $5. Feather  Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda  Drive, Oroville.

SOUL POSSE: Sing-along dance party  with fun local band playing hits  from yesterday and today.  Sat, 6/1, 6:30pm. Farm Star Pizza, 2359  Esplanade., 828-8040.

music. Sat, 6/1, 6pm. Diamond  Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St.

STRUNG NUGGET GANG: Local blue-

grass string band performs.  Fri, 5/31, 7pm. The Exchange, 1975  Montgomery St., Oroville. theex  changeoroville.com

MEN NEXT DOOR UNCOVERED: Hot 

TYLER DEVOLL: Happy hour music with a  talented singer/songwriter.  Fri, 5/31, 4pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

SOUNDWAVE: See Friday.  Sat, 6/1,

guys dancing in the Magic Mike  Experience show (without Channing  Tatum).  Sat, 6/1, 9:30pm. $19-$35.  Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave. facebook.com/TackleBoxChico

8:30pm. Feather Falls Casino &  Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

MALTEAZERS: The house burlesque  troupe performs to your favorite eighties jams in a program  titled, That’s Like Totally Bitchin’  Burlesque.  Sat, 6/1, 10pm. $7. The  Maltese, 1600 Park Ave. maltesebar  chico.com

NO BETTER: Emo night with sad-song 

1SaTURDay

singers from Redlands. Dirt Parade,  Self Doubt and Citysick share the  bill.  Sat, 6/1, 7:30pm. $7. Ike’s Place,  648 W. Fifth St.

FLOATER: Popular alternative-rock 

band returns to town.  Sat, 6/1, 9pm. $15. Lost on Main, 319 Main St.  facebook.com/lostonmain

JOHN SEID, LARRY PETERSON, BOB LITTELL: An eclectic mix of dinner 

OVERDRIVE: Local ’70s and ’80s cover 

band performs.  Sat, 6/1, 9pm. Studio  Inn Lounge, 2582 Esplanade.

VIKING SKATE COUNTRY, GUEST NO. 66, WRVNG: An all-ages, all-local blowout 

REESE WEILS: Singin’ and guitar 

with noisemakers VSC, the weirdos  of Guest No. 66, new all-lady crew  WRVNG, and the debut of Y Tu.  Sat,

Soulful songs and tasty tunes for  dinnertime.  Sun, 6/2, 6pm. 5th  Street Steakhouse, 345 W. Fifth St.

5WEDNESDay

DEAN MARTIN & FRIENDS DINNER SHOW: Las Vegas impressionist Tom  Stevens plays the King of Cool.  Wed, 6/5, 6:30pm. Feather Falls Casino &  Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

OPEN MIC: Showcase your talents at  open mic hosted by Mr. Bang! All 

ages, sign-ups start at 5:30pm.  Wed, 6/5, 6pm. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

OPEN MIC COMEDY: Your weekly  Wednesday dose of free comedy  with experienced and first-time  comedians. Sign-ups start at  8pm.  Wed, 6/5, 9pm. Studio Inn  Lounge, 2582 Esplanade.

OPEN MIC COMEDY NIGHT: Working on a  bit? See if it’s a hit or heckle-worthy, and enjoy cheap beer specials.  Sign ups start at 8pm.  Sun, 6/2, 9pm. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.  maltesebarchico.com

THE SHORT TIMERS IMPROV SHOW: Short-form improv with the Short  Timers featuring classic improv  games and CLIC originals.  Sun, 6/2, 7pm. $5. Chico Live Improv Comedy,  561 E. Lindo Ave. chicolivecomedy. com

4TUESDay

THE MURDER JUNKIES: Underground  punk rockers and former G.G. Allin  backing band. Joined by Oakland’s  Mad at Sam, Sac’s Public Trash and  more.  Tue, 6/4, 8pm. $8-$10. Lost On  Main, 319 Main St., 864-5525.   facebook.com/lostonmain

EVOLUTIONaRy VOICES

Chico musical ex-pat Maurice Spencer returns to his old stomping grounds this weekend with Ezra Bell (pictured), an innovative six-piece band out of Portland, Ore. Its sound crosses genres and eras, layering elements of folk, jazz and soul with piercing vocals and a smooth 1970s vibe. Also on the bill, Pablo Dylan (grandson of Bob Dylan!), an artist who has evolved from successful hip-hop beginnings to thoughtful, introspective folk-rock. Catch them both at Argus Bar + Patio this Friday night (May 31).

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The early life of Russian ballet great, and defector, Rudolf Nureyev

TwhoNureyev, the legendary Russian ballet dancer defected to the West in 1961. As such, it flourhe White Crow portrays the early years of Rudolf

ishes intermittently as a biopic, as a dance movie, and as a glancing slice of crosscultural life in the Cold War era. by Oleg Ivenko, a Ukrainian balJuan-Carlos let soloist making his movie-acting Selznick debut, plays Nureyev reasonably well, but his chief value for the film as a whole is, not surprisingly, as a dancer. The strongest acting in the film turns up among supporting players in assorted pivotal stages of The White Crow Nureyev’s story. The script by esteemed playOpens Friday, May 31. Starring Oleg Ivenko, wright and occasional filmRalph Fiennes and maker David Hare (Wetherby, The Adèle Exarchopoulos. Directed by Ralph Designated Mourner) centers on the Fiennes. Pageant events of 1961 when Nureyev and Theatre. Rated R. company are on tour in France. The portrayal of those events is interwoven with detailed flashbacks to Nureyev’s childhood and to his formative stint as a ballet student in Leningrad in the 1950s. As directed by Ralph Fiennes (who also plays a key supporting part), The White Crow meanders at times but maintains a steady interest even when the dramatic focus wobbles a bit. The intensity of Nureyev’s artistic aspirations and individual defiance comes across

3

Saturday June 8 - 7pm • State theater OrOville ticketS: cOmerS print ShOp & OrOville chamber www.fOrebayaquaticcenter.cOm

26

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M AY 3 0 , 2 0 1 9

in impressive terms, but with him and others the film seems reluctant to give fuller attention to matters of psychological turmoil. The best performance in the film comes (all too briefly) from Fiennes himself, in the role of Alexander Pushkin, Nureyev’s teacher, mentor, political protector and guide. Pushkin and his wife, Xenia (Chulpan Khamatova), form a ménage a trois with the young Nureyev, and Fiennes brings a fine, lucid pathos to Pushkin’s acceptance of his status, relatively speaking, as odd man out in the threesome. Aleksey Morozov, who plays Nureyev’s KGB minder, also gets a chance to show a moment or two of intriguingly mixed emotions. Adèle Exarchopoulos (Blue Is the Warmest Color) is a mysterious and quietly emphatic presence as the well-connected woman who facilitates Nureyev’s defection in France. And the title? A note at the start of the film tells us that “white crow (belaya vorona)” is a Russian idiom “used to describe a person who is unusual, extraordinary, not like others, an outsider.” In the film itself, Nureyev tells a friend that “white crow” is a nickname he’s had since childhood. Ω

1 2

3 4

Poor

Good

Fair

Very Good

5 Excellent


FILM SHORTS Reviewers: Bob Grimm and Juan-Carlos Selznick.

Opening this week Godzilla: King of the Monsters

The giant lizard-like creature from the sea is back with his bone-rattling roar and flaming breath in this sequel to Godzilla (2014) that also features a whole gang of other monsters, including Mothra, Rodan and the three-headed Ghidorah. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

Ma

Octavia Spencer stars as the title character in this horror flick about a lonely veterinary assistant who develops an unhealthy obsession with a group of teens that she befriends. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

Rocketman

An appropriately fantastical musical biopic on the life of piano-playing rock legend Elton John. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

3

The White Crow

See review this issue. Pageant Theatre. Rated R —J.C.S.

Now playing Aladdin

Guy Ritchie (Sherlock Holmes, Snatch) wrote and directed this live-action adaptation of the classic Middle Eastern folk tale starring Naomi Scott as Princess Jasmine, Mena Massoud as impoverished thief Aladdin, and Will Smith as the genie who can make wishes come true. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

4

Avengers: Endgame

There are tons of questions this movie needed to answer: Is everybody really dead? Where’s Thanos (Josh Brolin)? Where’s Hawkeye (Jeremy Renner)? Is Tony Stark/ Iron Man (Robert Downey Jr.) doomed in space? Does Star-Lord (Chris Pratt) still have his Walkman in the great beyond? And, how can I really talk about anything specific in this film without becoming the Spoiler King? I can say that the movie answers many of the questions everyone’s been asking, and more, thanks to another well-balanced screenplay and a crack directorial job from the team of Anthony and Joe Russo. I can

also tell you that the movie borrows a lot from Back to the Future Part II, and that the Hulk undergoes a fantastic wardrobe change. Despite a three-hour running time, all of this zips by in spectacularly entertaining fashion and very rarely misses the mark. And in the midst of all the action, Downey Jr. delivers another soulful, endearing performance, well beyond anything you would’ve expected from a Marvel movie before he started showing up in them. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13 —B.G.

Booksmart

Actress Olivia Wilde makes her directorial debut with this comedy about a couple of teen girls who try to make up for a highschool career focused solely on studying with one night of partying. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

Brightburn

A couple unable to have children seemingly have their prayers answered when a meteorite containing a baby crashes to Earth. Once the boy reaches adolescence, however, he discover he possesses superpowers and begins to use them in not-so-heroic ways. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

Butte County

W NE Week

A Dog’s Journey

Like the persistent soul that lived in the succession of dogs from the 2017 film A Dog’s Purpose, the premise is reincarnated in the form of this tear-jerking/feel-good sequel about more dogs and their unified spirit teaching us about the meaning of it all. Cinemark 14. Rated PG.

The Hustle

A female-centered remake of Dirty Rotten Scoundrels with Anne Hathaway and Rebel Wilson taking over the roles of the high-rent/ low-rent scam artists out to get revenge on the “dirty rotten” men who’ve wronged them. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

John Wick: Chapter 3 – Parabellum

In part three of the film series, “retired” super-assassin John Wick (Keanu Reeves) is in big trouble as a guild of elite killers hunts him down to claim the $14 million price placed on his head. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

Pokémon Detective Pikachu

A part real-life/part animated fantasy flick set in a world where people collect Pokémon to do battle against each other, with Ryan Reynolds starring as the voice of Pikachu, a Pokémon and budding detective who helps a human track down a missing person. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

Ma

JUNE 7-16, 2019 A celebration of all things wine, from new releases and winemaker dinners to wine and food tastings. Do you have a fun event you want to be part of Wine Week? Send details/questions to wineweek@newsreview.com or go to buttecountywineweek.com for more info. For more information about advertising in this special issue, call 894-2300 PRESENTED BY:

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Free eVeNT

1st Anniversary & Rib Cook-Off Saturday, June 15Th Noon to 10PM Rib Cook-Off Contest Call or come by to enter! (530) 892-3845 $5 rib PlATe!

Donations & proceeds benefit rebuilding the covered bridge. SPoNSoreD by:

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15th Street Cafe

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Japchae from Oshio Teriyaki.

Oshio truck adds superb, flavorful Korean cuisine to Chico’s food scene

W left a noticeable void in Chico’s international cuisine scene, as it had been the only place in town

hen Enjoy Teriyaki closed its doors in early 2018, it

serving Korean food. But while I very much enjoyed that spot, a swift replacement arrived—the Oshio Teriyaki food story and truck. It opened last summer and photo by has filled the vacancy and then Meredith J. some. Cooper Over the past few months, I’ve mer ed i t hc found several occasions to stop by @newsrev i ew.c om the truck, which parks at the corner of Eighth and Main streets, across from Chico Natural Foods. To Oshio Teriyaki date, I’ve tried about a quarter of Food truck, parked at the menu, and everything has been 118 W. Eighth St. downright delicious. 566-2252 For my first visit, I stopped by Open Tuesday-Saturday, on my way home for lunch one 11 a.m.-7 p.m. afternoon. Owner and chef Micki Kim greeted me with a smile. I decided to order two of the truck’s staples—chicken teriyaki and bulgogi (marinated, stirfried beef). Both come with rice, salad and a mandu (potsticker), for $9.50 and $10.95, respectively. I took it home and shared with my boyfriend, Chuck. As an intro to Oshio, we couldn’t have asked for more. And while I’d say I preferred the chicken over the beef, I have nothing particularly negative to report on the latter; it’s just a personal choice. The mandu were more like Japanese gyoza than Chinese potstickers—which is to say they have thinner wrappers and are pan-fried versus steamed, giving them a satisfying crunch into the flavorful chicken and veggie mixture inside. Even the salad was good—something Chuck and I both noted—making the entire plate a home run.

I was hooked. I had to try more of Kim’s menu. For my next visit, I ordered the L.A. ribs (galbi), which are short ribs cut across the bone, marinated and grilled. Served over rice with salad and kimchi, they’re a little pricier at $14.75, but the meal was substantial. The rib meat was super tender and the sauce sweet without being overpowering. I skipped the kimchi because I’m simply not a fan, and the plate still lasted two sittings. For my third and final visit, I opted for the japchae ($13.75), a traditional Korean dish that consists of glass noodles, veggies and meat. At Oshio, you get a choice of chicken or beef—I chose the chicken. This was my favorite dish yet! The glass noodles (made with the starch of sweet potatoes or mung beans) are really unique—clear and bouncy, with a slight chew. The matchstick carrot spears, cabbage and sliced bell peppers added color and crunch, and the chicken a bit of teriyaki-flavored protein. Aside from the glass noodles, the most delightful surprise was the black fungus mushrooms. I prefer their other name, cloud ear mushrooms, which sounds both more appetizing and descriptive, as they were like little clouds in the dish, imparting a mild mushroom flavor, and a satisfying texture, soft with a slight bite. I’m going to have a hard time ordering anything other than the japchae, but there are plenty more options that Kim serves up out of her little truck. The bibimbap is at the top of my list, but I’m also intrigued by some of the items on the phone-in-ahead menu. These are dishes that take longer to prepare, so Kim requests that extra time. The jjajangmyeon— black bean noodles with vegetables—for example, sounds particularly interesting. If it’s anything like the rest of the menu, it’ll be fantastic. Ω

Monday - Friday 11am - 2pm Featuring Sandwiches, wraps & Salads

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M AY 3 0 , 2 0 1 9

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ARTS DEVO by Jason Cassidy • jasonc@newsreview.com

secrets of

success. The CN&R’s annual Entrepreneur Issue will be on stands June 20. Tell your entrepreneurial story to our 110,000 readers with a profile in this issue. For more information about how to participate, call your News & Review advertising representative today at (530) 894-2300.

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The Life of PabLo Bob dylan’s grandson was a rapper? That makes sense.

Pablo dylan (son of Bob’s oldest child, Jesse) is 24 years old, so Kanye West would probably hold more sway than Woody Guthrie over a young man coming up in the 21st century. It also makes sense that someone in that bloodline would venture beyond one genre and try out other sounds as the young musician has on his new album, The Finest somersault, which finds him sounding a lot like his grandfather across nine folk/folk-rock tunes. He has the same nasally voice, and a very familiar wordiness and freeform cadence that is unmistakably Dylan. Back when he was rapping as a teenager, the fogies and trolls were relentlessly brutal and unkind, but I’m betting some of the old-timers will be on board with this familiar sound. I couldn’t care less about whether he sounds like his famous kin, I just dig that his voice is rough and vulnerable and I am eager to see how it evolves as he moves out of the shadows of the past. For now, there are some pretty great songs to grab onto: “Eye of the Storm” is a grand opening statement, and a couple of the quiet acoustic tunes— “One Too Many Nights” and “When We Are All Free”—are as confident and catchy as … well, you know, that other Dylan’s stuff. Oh, I almost forgot: Pablo’s playing in Chico. For real! This Friday (May 31), at Pablo Dylan argus Bar + Patio.

PLay To keeP froM crying Tread all over the USA and escape Washington gridlock before mysterious weather disturbances swallow you up! Roll the dice to survive climate change and political scandal. To make the lengthy journey to Alaska, you’ll need plenty of fossil fuel and rugged individualism. Roads and bridges? Pfft! If the country seems backwards to you, don’t compromise—just move farther to the right! Ha ha! Very funny. That’s not how things really are … right? Please … If that excerpt gives you chills or the cold sweats, then Woody Houchin’s game, GoP: a Game of Political survival, might be for you. The local husband, father and one-day Jeopardy champion (it’s true, he was a contestant on the show in 2013) was fed up with stressing out over politics, so he redirected the energy into creating a prototype for a game that satirizes 45 years of “Grand” Old Party scandal and corruption. That statement of purpose above is from the intro to his game, the objective of which is to make it to Alaska before you’re wiped out by climate change. Along the way, you can set up shell corporations, create media scapegoats (immigrants, maybe?), employ the services of a Macedonian troll farm and pay off your mistress with taxpayer money. But don’t buy cocaine from an undercover FBI agent and share it with GOP: A Game of Political Survival an exotic dancer or you’ll have to do community service and move back one space. Houchin has set up an Indiegogo campaign (igg.me/at/GOP) to raise money for the design of a more refined version, and he’s produced a handful of prototypes and will be donating them to a few local businesses—naked Lounge, Blackbird, Tender Loving Coffee—this weekend. Go try it out, and maybe divert some funds from your Cayman Islands account and donate to his efforts.


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The following houses were sold in Butte County by real estate agents or private parties during the week of May 13- May 17, 2019 The housing prices are based on the stated documentary transfer tax of the parcel and may not necessarily reflect the actual sale price of the home. ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

4357 Keefer Rd

Chico

$799,000

3/3

SQ. FT. 2904

26 Redding Ct

Chico

$313,000

3/1

SQ. FT. 1050

2643 Lakewest Dr

Chico

$535,000

3/2

1893

1021 Rushmore Ave

Chico

$302,500

3/2

1170

15089 Richardson Springs Rd

Chico

$535,000

2/3

2061

1617 Hemlock St

Chico

$300,000

4/2

1760

2623 Amanecida Cmn

Chico

$505,000

3/2

1800

2655 Waverly Ct

Chico

$297,000

3/2

1728

631 Burnt Ranch Way

Chico

$480,000

5/3

3113

505 Windham Way

Chico

$470,000

3/2

1835

627 Windham Way

Chico

$454,000

3/2

1867

39 Sorenson Cir

Chico

$452,500

2/2

1800

2972 Sweetwater Fls

Chico

$451,000

4/3

1863

1273 Whitewood Way

Chico

$450,000

3/2

1606

1519 E 1st Ave

Chico

$450,000

4/2

1581

439 Royal Glen Ln

Chico

$423,000

3/2

1436

9 Benton Ave

Chico

$420,000

4/2

1727

3 Mefford Way

Chico

$380,000

6/2

2220

89 Saint Francis Dr

Chico

$379,000

6/4

2100

1265 Marvin Way

Chico

$365,000

3/2

1322

2 Morning Rose Way

Chico

$360,000

3/2

1600

34 Saint Francis Dr

Chico

$355,000

3/2

2100

38 Saint Francis Dr

Chico

$355,000

3/2

2100

1340 W 4th St

Chico

$347,000

4/2

5809

1269 E 9th St

Chico

$293,000

3/1

1376

365 E 7th Ave

Chico

$290,000

3/2

1258

1712 Hemlock St

Chico

$290,000

2/1

958

2938 Pennyroyal Dr

Chico

$251,500

2/2

1103 1026

1125 Sheridan Ave #54

Chico

$217,000

3/2

1244 Magnolia Ave #9

Chico

$178,000

3/2

960

1391 Ringtail Way

Chico

$132,000

3/2

1126

872 E 19th St

Chico

$115,000

2/1

672

Chico

$98,000

1/1

600

26 Hart Dr

2375 Notre Dame Blvd #2

Oroville

$411,000

3/2

1992

11 Hercules Ave

Oroville

$372,000

3/2

1709

27 Hart Dr

Oroville

$335,000

3/2

1883

11 Glen Cir

Oroville

$310,000

3/2

1936

57 Circle View Dr

Oroville

$270,000

3/2

2052

4828 Power House Hill Rd

Oroville

$266,000

4/2

1484

1266 East Ave

Chico

$335,000

6/3

2544

5268 Harrison Rd

Paradise

$450,000

3/3

2095

1508 E Lassen Ave

Chico

$325,000

3/2

1248

1192 Bille Rd

Paradise

$284,000

3/2

1851

111 Winchester Ct

Chico

$325,000

3/2

1187 ma y 30, 2019

CN&R

31


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REAL ESTATE TATE

Call for a quote. (530) 894-2300 ext. 2

a Limited Liability Company. Signed: KIM JAMISON, OWNER Dated: March 25, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000386 Published: May 9,16,23,30, 2019

Phone hours: M-F 9am-5pm. Deadlines for print: Line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Display ad deadline: Friday 2pm

For more information about advertising in our Real estate section,

All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. Further, the News & Review specifically reserves the right to edit, decline or properly classify any ad. Errors will be rectified by re-publication upon notification. The N&R is not responsible for error after the first publication. The N&R assumes no financial liability for errors or omission of copy. In any event, liability shall not exceed the cost of the space occupied by such an error or omission. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes full responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. *Nominal fee for

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATMENT The following persons are doing business as THE WATCHMAN at 130 W. 3rd St. Chico, CA 95928. THE WATCHMAN THE ORIGINAL LLC 130 W. 3rd St. Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by this Legal Notice continues

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as C AND C UTILITY, INC at 632 Entler Avenue Chico, CA 95928. C & C UTILITY, INC. 632 Entler Avenue Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: KIMBERLY CABRAL, CEO Dated: April 30, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000549 Published: May 9,16,23,30, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATMENT The following person is doing business as ATLAS ENGRAVING at 432 Nord Avenue Chico, CA 95926. JACOB CURTIS OLSEN 432 Nord Avenue Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JACOB OLSEN Dated: May 2, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000558 Published: May 9,16,23,30, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as WOFCHUCK FAMILY FARM at 1725 Dayton Road Chico, CA 95928. COLLEEN BRIDGET WOFCHUCK 1725 Dayton Road Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: COLLEEN WOFCHUCK Dated: April 30, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000551 Published: May 9,16,23,30, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as IN AND OUTBOARDS at 864 Inyo Street Chico, CA 95928. MICHAEL NEVENS 864 Inyo Street Chico, CA 95928. NICHOLAS ANTHONY TOGNERI 857 Inyo Street Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: NICHOLAS TOGNERI Dated: May 2, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000559 Published: May 9,16,23,30, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing this Legal Notice continues

business as THE LOTUS CENTER at 6268 Skyway Paradise, CA 95969. WILLAIM RAY POE 6499 Toadtown Way Magalia, CA 95954. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: WILLIAM POE Dated: April 30, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000550 Published: May 9,16,23,30, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as D & E AUTO CORPORATION at 3328 Esplanade, Suite D Chico, CA 95973. D & E AUTO CORPORATION 3328 Esplanade, Suite D Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: AARON WEBER, CEO Dated: April 25, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000535 Published: May 16,23,30, June 6, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CHICO FACE PAINTING at 314 West 16th Street #A Chico, CA 95928. NORA MACHADO 314 West 16th Street #A Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: NORA MACHADO Dated: May 7, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000574 Published: May 16,23,30, June 6, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as RPM MARINE at 5656 Pentz Rd Paradise, CA 95969. MICHAEL THEADORE OMARY 5656 Pentz Rd Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: MICHAEL T O’MARY Dated: May 8, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000583 Published: May 16,23,30, June 6, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following persons have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name RPM MARINE at 5656 Pentz Road Paradise, CA 95969. LOGAN JEFFREY CUSEO 15192 Coutolenc Road Magalia, CA 95954. MICHAEL THEADORE OMARY 5656 Pentz Road Paradise, CA 95969. This business was conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: MICHAEL T O’MARY Dated: May 8, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000377 this Legal Notice continues

Published: May 16,23,30, June 6, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ARTISANS FAIRE, BAH HUMBUG FESTIVAL OF CRAFTS, CHRISTMAS FAIRE, CYRCLE PRODUCTIONS, ROONEY ENTERPRISES at 1429 W 7th Street Chico, CA 95928. STEPHEN M ROONEY 1429 W 7th Street Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: STEPHEN ROONEY Dated: April 16, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000485 Published: May 16,23,30, June 6, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CHICO YARD GAMES at 739 Dias Dr Chico, CA 95926. SEAN PATRICK CASTLEMAN 739 Dias Dr Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: SEAN CASTLEMAN Dated: May 8, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000577 Published: May 16,23,30, June 6, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BILLY GOAT BRAND at 1178 Filbert Ave Chico, CA 95926. TAYLOR AYOSE ANDERSON-NILSSON 1178 Filbert Ave Chico, CA 95926. SHAUN ERIC BOYER 866 Vallombrosa Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: SHAUN BOYER Dated: May 10, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000594 Published: May 16,23,30, June 6, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as STELLER BLIND REPAIR at 1068 Lupin Ave Chico, CA 95973. KEVIN HIROSHI STELLER 1068 Lupin Ave Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: KEVIN STELLER Dated: May 10, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000591 Published: May 16,23,30, June 6, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BCCAC, BUTTE COUNTY CANNABIS ART CLUB at 1618 Nord Avenue, #11 Chico, this Legal Notice continues

CA 95926. CHRISTOPHER PATRICK HOWELL 3341 Neal Road Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: CHRIS HOWELL Dated: May 10, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000590 Published: May 16,23,30, June 6, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as KBIZ, RHEMA WORD OF FAITH, VINCE HAYNIE ENTERPRISES, VINCE HAYNIE MINISTRIES at 574 East 12th Street Chico, CA 95926. VINCENT HAYNIE PO Obx 7508 Chico, CA 95927. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: VINCENT HAYNIE Dated: May 13, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000605 Published: May 23,30, June 6,13, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as MAKABE MUSIC at 1558 Bridge Street #8 Oroville, CA 95965. HARDLEY W BOGLE 1558 Bridge Street #8 Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: HARDLEY BOGLE Dated: April 30, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000555 Published: May 23,30, June 6,13, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as THE WORM FARM at 9050 Lassell Lane Durham, CA 95938. DURHAM WORM FARM INC 9033 Esquon Rd Durham, CA 95938. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: JOHN STEWART, PRESIDENT Dated: April 29, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000543 Published: May 23,30, June 6,13, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as POMONA APARTMENTS at 813 Nord Avenue Chico, CA 95926. SNET 3 LLC 4324 Orange Grove Avenue Sacramento, CA 95841. This business is conducted by a Limited Liabiliity Company. Signed: WILLIAM SHERIDAN, MANAGER Dated: May 15, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000607 Published: May 23,30, June 6,13, 2019


FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PANINI MACHINI, SHORTCYCLE at 3002 Clark Road Butte Valley, CA 95965. JOEL DAVID MATZINGER 3002 Clark Road Butte Valley, CA 95965. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JOEL MATZINGER Dated: May 15, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000617 Published: May 23,30, June 6,13, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PAINT PARTIES BY DAWN at 14380 Madonna Court Magalia, CA 95954. DAWN ELISE HICKEY 14380 Madonna Court Magalia, CA 95954. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: DAWN HICKEY Dated: May 17, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000625 Published: May 23,30, June 6,13, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as DWYER LOGGING at 331 Black Bart Road Oroville, CA 95966. DOMINIC DWYER 331 Black Bart Road Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: DOMINIC DWYER Dated: May 17, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000624 Published: May 23,30, June 6,13, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following persons have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name DWYER LOGGING at 331 Black Bart Rd Oroville, CA 95966. DOMINIC SILAS DWYER 331 Black Bart Rd Oroville, CA 95966. DAKONA LEE DWYER 331 Black Bart Rd Oroville, CA 95966. This business was conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: DOMINIC DWYER Dated: May 17, 2019 FBN Number: 2018-0000176 Published: May 23,30, June 6,13, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BEST USE, SMART ASSET MANAGEMENT at 259 E 9th St Chico, CA 95928. ERIK KENT HINESLEY 271 E 9th St Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ERIK HINESLEY Dated: May 9, 2019

this Legal Notice continues

FBN Number: 2019-0000586 Published: May 23,30, June 6,13, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as DOWN LO, LOST ON MAIN at 319 Main Street Chico, CA 95928. LOST IN CHICO 319 Main Street Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: KYLE ULLRICH, CEO Dated: April 30, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000544 Published: May 30, June 6,13,20, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as JESSEE EQUIPMENT MANUFACTURING at 2434 Dayton Road, Building #2 Chico, CA 95928. JMME NUT MANUFACTURING CORPORATION, INC. 2434 Dayton Road, Building #2 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: RICKY D. SIMAS, PRESIDENT Dated: May 16, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000620 Published: May 30, June 6,13,20, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BIDWELL REAL ESTATE, BIDWELL REALTY, BIDWELL REALTY, INC., CENTURY 21 BIDWELL REALTY at 5 Skyline Blvd Oroville, CA 95966. BIDWELL REALTY, INC. 5 Mt Hope Court Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: JAMES M. GUDERIAN, BROKER/OWNER Dated: May 22, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000648 Published: May 30, June 6,13,20, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BIDWELL REAL ESTATE, BIDWELL REALTY, BIDWELL REALTY, INC, CENTURY 21 BIDWELL REALTY at 5263 Royal Oaks Dr Oroville, CA 95966. BIDWELL REALTY, INC 5 Mt Hope Court Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: JAMES GUDERIAN, BROKER/OWNER Dated: May 22, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000649 Published: May 30, June 6,13,20, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing this Legal Notice continues

business as THE PROGRESSIVE SCHOOLHOUSE at 2400 Notre Dame Blvd Chico, CA 95928. LORI TENNANT 2657 Cactus Ave. Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: LORI A. TENNANT Dated: May 15, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000613 Published: May 30, June 6,13,20, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as LORI TENNANT FINE ART at 2400 Notre Dame Blvd Chico, CA 95928. LORI ANN TENNANT 2657 Cactus Ave. Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: LORI A. TENNANT Dated: May 15, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000614 Published: May 30, June 6,13,20, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as LIVING FREE HEALING CENTER, THE WELLNESS COLLECTIVE at 1 Williamsburg Suite E Chico, CA 95926. JANE VICTORIA MINERS 1933 Mars Way Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JANE MINERS Dated; May 6, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000568 Published: May 30, June 6,13,20, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BIG AL’S DRIVE IN at 1844 Esplanade Chico, CA 95926. PEACH TREE RESTAURANT INC 185 Cohasset Rd Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signd: NAEEM REHMAN, VICE PRESIDENT Dated: May 21, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000639 Published: May 30, June 6,13,20, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as EVAS ULTRA BLIND CLEANING SERVICE at 530 Windham Way Chico, CA 95973. DANIEL VUJIC 530 Windham Way Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: DANIEL VUJIC Dated: May 24, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000658 Published: May 30, June 6,13,20, 2019

NOTICES NOTICE OF LIEN SALE Notice is hereby given pursuant to the California Self-Storage Self-Service Act, Section 21700-21716 of the Business & Professions Code, the undersigned intends to sell the personal property described below to enforce a lien imposed on said stored property. The undersigned will sell at public sale by competitive bidding at the location where the said property has been stored. GRIDLEY SELF STORAGE 1264 Highway 99 Gridley, CA 95948 Butte County, State of California Unit No. #A006 ZACHERY EVENSON Items: Miscellaneous household items, Furniture, Unit No. #D046 ANTONIO LUIS VALENCIA Items: Miscellaneous household items, furniture Lien Sale will be held: Date: Saturday, June 8, 2019 Time: 10:00am Location: 1264 Highway 99 Gridley, CA 94958 530-846-3768 Successful bidders must present a valid form of identification and be prepared to pay cash for purchased items. All items are sold “as is” and must be removed at the time of sale. Sale is subject to cancellation in the event that a settlement is reached between the owner and tenant. Published: May 23,30, 2019

NOTICE OF LIEN SALE Notice is hereby given pursuant to the California Self-Storage Self-Service Act, Section 21700-21716 of the Business & Professions Code, the undersigned intends to sell the personal property described below to enforce a lien imposed on said stored property. The undersigned will sell at public sale by competitive bidding at the location where the said property has been stored. DISCOUNT STORAGE 5100 Clark Road Paradise, CA 95969 Butte County, State of California Unit No. #C-15 JASON EDWARDS Items: Miscellaneous household items, furniture Lien Sale will be held: Date: Saturday, June 8, 2019 Time: 10:00am Location: 5100 Clark Road Paradise, CA 94969 530-872-9999 Successful bidders must present a valid form of identification and be prepared to pay cash for purchased items. All items are sold “as is” and must be removed at the time of sale. Sale is subject to cancellation in the event that a settlement is reached between the owner and tenant. Published: May 23,30, 2019

NOTICE OF LIEN SALE Pursuant to CA. Business Code 21700, in lieu of rents due, the following units contain tools, electronics, furniture, clothes, this Legal Notice continues

furniture, boxes, personal items, recreation equipment and tools. Unit 8 DAVID GUTERREZ personal items, furniture, boxes etc. Unit 23 SUSAN JOHNSON personal items, boxes, furniture etc. Unit 24 SUSAN JOHNSON personal items, boxes, furniture etc. Unit 31 NICHOLAS CORTEZ personal items, boxes electronics etc. Unit 32 DUSTIN BARNEWOLT personal items, boxes, tools etc. Contents to be sold to the highest bidder on: Saturday June 08, 2019. Beginning at 9:00 A.M. Sale to be held at: George’s Mini Storage 2801 Burnap Avenue Chico CA. 95973. (530) 965-6010 Published: May 23,30, 2019

NOTICE OF LIEN SALE Pursuant to CA. Business Code 21700, in lieu of rents due, the following units contain tools, electronics, furniture, clothes, furniture, boxes, personal items, recreation equipment and tools. Unit A8 DAVID BRAZIL personal items, furniture, boxes etc. Unit A10 JENNIFER MAYNARD personal items, boxes, tools, bikes etc. Unit A11 LORRANIE ROSSON personal items, boxes, home furnishings etc. Unit A18 VANESSA WADE personal items, boxes etc. Unit B6 TIFFANY BARNES personal items, boxes electronics etc. Unit D4 JUSTIN STRAEDE personal items, boxes, home furnishings etc. Unit D6 RICK MESA Unit E7 TRINA WASHBURN personal items, boxes electronics etc. Unit F5 ARAUJO ALEXANDER TRINA WASHBURN personal items, boxes etc. Unit F11 TAMBRA HEIDRICH personal items, boxes etc. Contents to be sold to the highest bidder on: Saturday June 08, 2019. Beginning at 10:30 A.M. Sale to be held at: George’s Mini Storage 2701 Burnap Avenue Chico CA. 95973. (530) 965-6010 Published: May 23,30, 2019

NOTICE OF LIEN SALE 2006 Mercedes C230 VIN# WDBRF52H76F822174 CA Lic# 7LJW612 Lien Sale June 05, 2019 10:00am at NORTH VALLEY TOWING 4950 Cohasset Rd #6 Chico, CA 95973 Published: May 30, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner SARAH HANSEN filed a petition with this court for a decree changing this Legal Notice continues

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY For the week oF May 30, 2019 ARIES (March 21-April 19): In the com-

ing weeks, it will make good sense for you to travel down winding paths replete with interesting twists and provocative turns. The zig-zags you’ll be inspired to pursue won’t be inconvenient or inefficient, but rather will be instrumental in obtaining the healing you need. To honor and celebrate this oddly lucky phase, I’ll quote parts of “Flying Crooked,” a poem by Robert Graves. “The butterfly will never master the art of flying straight, yet has a just sense of how not to fly: He lurches here and here by guess and God and hope and hopelessness. Even the acrobatic swift has not his flying-crooked gift.”

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Has a part of you become too timid, docile or prosaic? Is there an aspect of your beautiful soul that is partially muzzled, submissive or housebroken? If so, now is a favorable time to seek an antidote. But listen closely: The cure isn’t to become chaotic, turbulent and out of control. It would be counterproductive to resort to berserk mayhem. Here’s a better way: Be primal, lush and exciting. Be wildly playful and unpredictably humorous and alluringly intriguing. Try experiments that rouse your rowdy sweetness, your unkempt elegance, your brazen joy and your sensual intelligence.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): I prefer live theater to movies. The glossy flawlessness of films, accomplished by machines that assemble and polish, is less emotionally rich than the direct impact of live performers’ unmediated voices and bodies and emotions. Their evocative imperfections move me in ways that glossy flawlessness can’t. Even if you’re not like me, Gemini, I invite you to experiment with my approach for a while—not just in the entertainment you choose, but in all areas of your life. As much as possible, get your experience raw and unfiltered.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): I’ve got

a message for you from Cancerian poet Tyler Knott Gregson. Please read it every day for the next 15 days, including when you first wake up and right before sleep. Here it is: “Promise me you will not spend so much time treading water and trying to keep your head above the waves that you forget, truly forget, how much you have always loved to swim.”

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): In 2003, a group of

thieves in Antwerp, Belgium pulled off the biggest jewelry heist in history. To steal the diamonds, gold and other gems, together worth more than $100 million, they had to outsmart security guards, a seismic sensor, a protective magnetic field, Doppler radar, infrared detectors and a lock. I mention this because I suspect that in the coming weeks you will have a comparable ability to insinuate yourself into the presence of previously inaccessible treasures and secrets and codes. You’ll be able to penetrate barriers that have kept you shut off from valuable things. (P.S. But I hope that unlike the Antwerp thieves, you’ll use your superpowers in an ethical manner.)

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): In the north-

east corner of Spain, bordering France, is an area known as Catalonia. With its own culture and language, it has a long history of seeking complete autonomy. On four occasions it has declared itself to be independent from Spain. The most recent time was in 2017, when 92% of the Catalans who voted expressed the desire to be free of Spain’s rule. Alas, none of the rebellions have succeeded. In the latest instance, no other nation on Earth recognized Catalonia’s claim to be an independent republic. In contrast to its frustrated attempts, your own personal quest to seek greater independence could make real progress in the coming months. For best results, formulate a clear intention and define the precise nature of the sovereignty you seek. Write it down!

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): A Libran

blogger with the handle OceanAlgorithms wrote, “I’m simultaneously wishing I were

by rob brezsny a naturalist whose specialty is finding undiscovered species in well-explored places; and a skateboarding mathematician meditating on an almost-impossible-to-solve equation as I practice my skateboard tricks; and a fierce forest witch who casts spells on nature-despoilers; and a Gothic heroine with 12 suitors; and the sexiest cat that ever lived.” I love how freewheeling and wide-ranging OceanAlgorithms is with their imaginative fantasies. In light of current astrological omens, I encourage you to do the same. Give yourself permission to dream and scheme extravagantly.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Geologists

aren’t exactly sure why, but almost 6 million years ago, the Strait of Gibraltar closed up. As a result, the Mediterranean Sea was cut off from the Atlantic Ocean, and within a 1,000 years, it had mostly disappeared. Fast forward 600,000 years. Again, geologists don’t understand how it happened, but a flood broke through the barrier, allowing the ocean to flow back into the Mediterranean basin and restore it to its previous status as a sea. I propose that we invoke that replenishment as a holy symbol for the process you’re engaged in: a replenishment of your dried-out waters.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

I invite you to meditate on this proposal from writer Radha Marcum: “The spiritual definition of love is that when you look at the person you love, it makes you love yourself more.” I hope there’s a lot of that kind of action going on for you in the next four weeks. According to my assessment of life’s secret currents, all of creation will be conspiring to intensify and deepen your love for yourself by intensifying and deepening your love for other people. Cooperate with that conspiracy, please!

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Is

there a creature on Earth that’s more annoying than the mosquito? I’ve never heard anyone gaze upon one of the pesky monsters sucking blood out of her arm and say, “Aw, what a cute little bug.” And yet every year there is a town in Russia that holds a jokey three-day celebration in honor of the mosquito. The people who live in Berezniki even stage a “most delicious” competition, in which people allow themselves to be pricked by mosquitoes for 20 minutes, with an award going to whoever accumulates the most bites. I highly approve of the spirit of this approach for your own use in the coming weeks. If you have fun with the things that bother you, I bet they won’t bother you as much.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): It’s

the Forever Season. You have a poetic license to act as if your body will live for a hundred years and your soul will live for all eternity. You are authorized to believe that in the coming decades you will grow steadily wiser, kinder, happier and wilder. During the Forever Season, you may have dreams like flying over a waterfall at sunset, or finding the lost magic you were promised before you were born, or discovering the key to a healing you feared would always elude you. As you careen through this unpredictable grace period, your understanding of reality may expand dramatically. I bet you’ll get practical epiphanies about how to express yourself with greater effectiveness.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): A musical

historian from Cambridge University decided it would be amusing to perform forgotten songs that were written in the Rhineland a 1,000 years ago. His research wasn’t easy, because musical notation was different back then. But he ultimately reconstructed the tunes in ways that he felt were 80% faithful to the originals. He and other musicians subsequently performed and recorded them. I propose a somewhat comparable assignment for you in the coming weeks. You will benefit, I believe, from trying to recover the truth about events that occurred a long time ago and/or by trying to revivify old beauty that has new relevance.

www.RealAstrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888. M ay 3 0 , 2 0 1 9

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names as follows: Present name: BRAYDEN ANDREW MEAD Proposed name: BRAYDEN ANDREW HANSEN THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: June 26, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: May 8, 2019 Case Number: 19CV01319 Published: May 16,23,30, June 6, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: AMBER LEE FRENCH Proposed name: AMBER LEE ST CLARE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: June 26, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: May 9, 2019 Case Number: 19CV01343 Published: May 23,30, June 6,13, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner CHARLES KELLY filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: this Legal Notice continues

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Present name: CHARLES KELLY Proposed name: CHARLES HENRY EUGENE KELLY THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: June 26, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: May 9, 2019 Case Number: 19CV01403 Published: May 30, June 6,13,20, 2019

PETITION NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE LUELLA ESTHER BITSIE aka LUELLA E. BITSIE aka LUELLA BITSIE aka L. ESTHER BITSIET To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: LUELLA ESTHER BITSIE aka LUELLA E. BITSIE aka LUELLA BITSIE aka L. ESTHER BITSIE a petition for Probate has been filed by: GREGORY L. BITSIE in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: GREGORY L. BITSIE be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: June 18, 2019 this Legal Notice continues

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Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: TBA Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: DANA L. CAMPBELL Tyree & Campbell, LLP 1600 Humboldt Road, Suite 4 Chico, CA 95928. (530) 894-2100 Case Number: 19PR00215 Dated: May 7, 2019 Published: May 16,23,30, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE CHRIS J. IRWIN To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: CHRIS J. IRWIN, also known as CHRIS JAMES IRWIN A Petition for Probate has been filed by: BRIAN C. IRWIN in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: BRIAN C. IRWIN be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court this Legal Notice continues

approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: June 18, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: TBA Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: KELLY ALBRECHT, ESQ. 1440 Lincoln Street Oroville, CA 95965 (530) 534-9900 Dated: May 14, 2019 Case Number: 19PR00232 Published: May 23,30, June 6, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE RAFAELA HIGUERA ANDRADE, aka RAFAELA H. ANDRADE, aka RAFAELA ANDRADE To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: RAFAELA HIGUERA ANDRADE, aka RAFAELA H. ANDRADE, aka RAFAELA ANDRADE a petition for Probate has been filed by: this Legal Notice continues

SUSAN ANDRADE and MARY L. ANDRADE in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: SUSAN ANDRADE and MARY L. ANDRADE be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: June 18, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: TBD Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: REBECCA YUHASZ McKernan, Lanam, Bakke & Williams LLP 55 Independence Circle, Suite 106 Chico, CA 95973. (530) 877-4961 Case Number: 19PR00244 this Legal Notice continues

Dated: May 23, 2019 Published: May 30, June 6,13, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE BERNIECE EDNA SCHMIDT, aka BERNIECE E. SCHMIDT, aka BERNIECE SCHMIDT To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: BERNIECE EDNA SCHMIDT, aka BERNIECE E. SCHMIDT, aka BERNIECE SCHMIDT a petition for Probate has been filed by: JEFFERY L. VAN DREW in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: JEFFERY L. VAN DREW be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decendent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions,

this Legal Notice continues

however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: June 18, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: TBD Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or

this Legal Notice continues

personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: REBECCA YUHASZ McKernan, Lanam, Bakke & Williams LLP 55 Independence Circle, Suite 106 Chico, CA 95973. (530) 877-4961 Case Number: 19PR00240 Dated: May 20, 2019 Published: May 30, June 6,13, 2019

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