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ChiCo’s FREE News & eNtertaiNmeNt WEEkly Volume 42, issue 38 thursday, may 16, 2019 www.NewsreView.Com

Poor oversight and inconsistent testing endanger Camp Fire-zone residents, expert says 8

SCared at SChool

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CN&R

INSIDE

Vol. 42, Issue 38 • May 16, 2019 OPINION

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Editorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Guest Comment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Second & Flume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 This Modern World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Streetalk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

NEWSLINES

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Downstroke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Sifter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9

HEALTHLINES

12

Appointment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Weekly Dose. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

GREENWAYS

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Eco Event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS

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15 Minutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 The Goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

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25 COVER STORY

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ARTS & CULTURE

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Arts Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 This Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Fine Arts listings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Nightlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Reel World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Chow. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Arts DEVO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Brezsny’s Astrology . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35

CLASSIFIEDS

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REAL ESTATE

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ON THE COVER: DESIGN BY TINA FLYNN

Our Mission: To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. Editor Melissa Daugherty Managing Editor Meredith J. Cooper Arts Editor Jason Cassidy Contributing Editor Evan Tuchinsky Staff Writers Andre Byik, Ashiah Scharaga Calendar Editor Neesa Sonoquie Contributors Robin Bacior, Alastair Bland, Michelle Camy, Vic Cantu, Nate Daly, Charles Finlay, Bob Grimm, Howard Hardee, Miles Jordan, Mark Lore, Landon Moblad, Brie Oviedo, Ryan J. Prado, Juan-Carlos Selznick, Ken Smith, Robert Speer, Carey Wilson Managing Art Director Tina Flynn Creative Services Manager Elisabeth Bayard-Arthur Ad Designers Naisi Thomas, Cathy Arnold Publications Designers Katelynn Mitrano, Nikki Exerjian Director of Sales and Advertising Jamie DeGarmo Advertising Services Coordinator Ruth Alderson Senior Advertising Consultants Brian Corbit, Laura Golino Advertising Consultants Adam Lew, Jordon Vernau Office Assistant Jennifer Osa Distribution Director Greg Erwin Distribution Manager Matt Daugherty Distribution Staff Ken Gates, Bob Meads, Pat Rogers, Larry Smith, Placido Torres, Jeff Traficante, Bill Unger, Lisa Van Der Maelen, David Wyles

President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Director of Nuts & Bolts Deborah Redmond Director of People & Culture David Stogner Director of Dollars & Sense Debbie Mantoan Nuts & Bolts Ninja Norma Huerta Payroll/AP Wizard Miranda Hansen Developer John Bisignano System Support Specialist Kalin Jenkins N&R Publications Editor Debbie Arrington N&R Publications Managing Editor Laura Hillen N&R Publications Associate Editor Derek McDow N&R Publications Writers Anne Stokes, Thea Rood N&R Publications Editorial Assistant Nisa Smith Marketing & Publications Lead Consultant Elizabeth Morabito Marketing & Publications Consultants Greta Beekhuis, Steve Caruso, Joseph Engle, Sherri Heller, Rod Malloy, Celeste Worden 353 E. Second St., Chico, CA 95928 Phone (530) 894-2300 Fax (530) 892-1111 Website newsreview.com Got a News Tip? (530) 894-2300, ext 2224 or chiconewstips@newsreview.com Calendar Events cnrcalendar@newsreview.com Calendar Questions (530) 894-2300, ext. 2243 Want to Advertise? Fax (530) 892-1111 or cnradinfo@newsreview.com Classifieds (530) 894-2300, press 2 or classifieds@newsreview.com Job Opportunities jobs@newsreview.com Want to Subscribe to CN&R? chisubs@newsreview.com Editorial Policies: Opinions expressed in CN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons, or other portions of the paper. CN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or review materials. Email letters to cnrletters@newsreview.com. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form and to edit them for libel. Advertising Policies: All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes the responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. CN&R is printed at PressWorks Ink on recycled newsprint. Circulation of CN&R is verified by the Circulation Verification Council. CN&R is a member of Chico Chamber of Commerce, Oroville Chamber of Commerce, Downtown Chico Business Association, CNPA, AAN and AWN. Circulation 38,650 copies distributed free weekly.

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OPINION

Send guest comments, 340 words maximum, to gc@newsreview.com or to 353 E. Second St., Chico, CA 95928. Please include photo & short bio.

SECOND & FLUME

EDITORIAL

Don’t drink the water For months, the CN&R has been writing about water issues in the Camp Fire burn zone. We’re back at it this week, because we believe the contamination in the water conveyance systems is among the most significant consequences of the disaster and the issue is not getting the attention it deserves. People who’ve returned to the region are in many cases being told that their water supply meets California standards. That’s the message Del Oro Water Co. is sending its customers in Magalia and elsewhere. To be fair, Del Oro is being advised by the State Water Resources Control Board, which, in concert with its Department of Drinking Water (DDW), oversees drinking water regulations. We’re going to be blunt: Water users should not blindly trust this information. Based on the CN&R’s reporting, including extensive interviews with a national expert on large-scale drinking water contamination, neither Del Oro nor the state has sufficient evidence to say it’s safe. The problem is multifaceted, but the main point is that the all-clear signal is based on inadequate testing— both the scope and the methodology. Further troubling is that the water board has been apprised of the insufficiency and hasn’t stepped up to develop a standard for testing or to inform residents that drinking the water

by Melissa Daugherty m e l i s s a d @ n e w s r e v i e w. c o m

may pose health risks. Meanwhile, the Paradise Irrigation District is taking a cautious approach while it conducts in-depth testing. That agency released guidelines months ago advising its customers to not drink, cook with or brush their teeth with what comes from their taps. The district is supplying bottled water for those activities and calling for residents in that area to limit their exposure during showers. One of the issues for residents is that the utilities— both of them—are responsible solely for their own infrastructure. But damaged plumbing on private property is contaminated, too. So the only way for residents to gauge the safety of what’s coming out of the tap is by testing it themselves. The hard part is ensuring such analysis is thorough enough. Thing is, no agency has taken the lead on informing the public of what protocol to use, leaving thousands of people to flounder. We’re not convinced that the testing Del Oro offers its customers for a fee is adequate. What residents really need is a laboratory with the proper oversight to come in and offer people a manageable solution. In the absence of that—or intervention from the state to set standards for testing to ensure the public’s health—our advice is to steer clear of the water. □

GUEST COMMENT

Russia plunders while Trump babbles W tarian crisis at our southern border, to the north, Russian President Vladimir Putin is advancing in the

hile the Trump administration bungles a humani-

Arctic. He is establishing a permanent military district in the wilderness: Russian special forces are training for a potential conflict there; new brigades of military personnel are being developed and training exercises are being expanded; and Moscow is methodically upgrading and expanding its missile systems in an area that is dangerously close to the United States. This is also a geopolitical threat by to Canada and Norway. Roger S. Beadle The United States Geological The author, a Survey estimates that the Arctic Chico resident, is could be home to vast amounts of a Chico State alum and former smalloil and natural gas—13 percent and business owner. 30 percent of the world’s undiscovered supply, respectively. Melting ice in the Arctic Circle has opened up new transit routes and revealed previously inaccessible oil and

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natural gas fields. In recent years, Russia unveiled a new Arctic command with four new brigade combat teams; 14 new operational airfields; 16 deep-water ports; and 40 icebreakers, including many nuclear-powered vessels, with an additional 11 in development. The United States has one. Russia has worked diligently to reassert its military presence in the Arctic frontier and secure access to a strategic northern shipping corridor: the Northern Sea Route between Asia and Europe. Russia also is planning to start restricting the passage of foreign warships in the Arctic Ocean, which includes the Northern Sea Route. So, while Trump bellows about the people who live beyond our southern border, Putin, whom Trump calls “a strong leader,” is grinning like a Cheshire cat. Russia has no intention of developing friendly relations with the United States; the vision is disruption, destruction and decomposition of Western democracy. Turn around, Mr. President, the real threat is not the impoverished families to the south. The danger is what climate change has done to the permafrost to the north: opening up energy exploration that Russia is poised to take advantage of while you wistfully dream about your wall. How very sad for the “best brain in the world.” Ω

Lockdown I vividly remember diving under my desk during earthquake drills as a kid. This was in the Bay Area during the 1980s, so the duck-andcover maneuvers also carried Cold War implications. Until 1989—when I experienced the big one, the Loma Prieta quake—tremors didn’t frighten me. They generally were small and just part of life in that part of the Golden State. But the specter of nuclear fallout spooked me. Nowadays, though, kids are dealing with much more than the threat of earthquakes and nukes. Fear of an armed psychopath slipping onto school grounds isn’t unfounded. In addition to emergency preparedness drills related to natural disasters, kids go through socalled “active-shooter” exercises. Here in Chico, they’re referred to as “code red” drills, and the Chico Unified School District has been conducting them for many years. It’s still hard to fathom that our children—in some cases 5-yearolds—practice lockdown procedures. I’m sure it’s anxiety-inducing for many of the kids, teachers and other school employees. For me, the deaths of 13 innocent people at Columbine High School in Littleton, Colo.—a lovely Denver suburb where I spent a year of my life—drove home the horrors of school shootings. For my generation, what’s become known simply as “Columbine” was unlike anything we’d seen. In reality, the history of mass shootings at schools dates back much further. Thirty-three years earlier, for example, a gunman killed 17 people on the University of Texas at Austin campus. I’d read about that violent incident—aka the Texas Tower shooting—long before what happened in Littleton. But I never expected something similarly gruesome to happen in my lifetime. Sadly, two decades after Columbine, school shootings seem like a regular occurrence. Statistics show that the average death toll associated with them has spiked dramatically. A study published last year in the Journal of Child and Family Studies underscores the gravity of the epidemic: “More people have died or been injured in mass school shootings in the U.S. in the past 18 years than in the entire 20th century.” Recall how 32 died at Virginia Tech in 2007; 27 perished at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn., in 2012; and 16 were killed at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., last year. Closer to home just a few years ago, a 6-year-old boy was shot at Rancho Tehama Elementary School during a rampage by a crazed man in that town that left five people (not including the gunman) dead. Eighteen others were injured. I recently showed one of my colleagues a video of a bulletproof, in-classroom shelter—a hut-like structure designed to hold up to 32 kids and a couple of adults. This is America in 2019, I thought to myself. This week, for his first CN&R news story, staff writer Andre Byik reports on a recent incident involving Chico Junior High students that was frightening for kids and parents alike. There was no gun, nor do police believe students were in real danger. However, considering the aforementioned backdrop, the sad fact is that students, teachers, parents and school administrators cannot be too careful.

Melissa Daugherty is editor of the CN&R


LETTERS

Send email to cnrletters@newsreview.com

One on the cover Re “Secondary effects” (Cover story, by CN&R staff, May 9). Had Chico City Manager Mark Orme and Public Works Director [of operations] Erik Gustafson stood up to our “conservative” council, as it failed for over five years to realistically address infrastructure deterioration, that would have shown some real courage. Instead, these two got gold stars from Team Sorensen/Morgan as they quietly presided over government-services-byfiscal-starvation. Slash, burn, repeat. Pinning our infrastructure mess on the influx of fire survivors, while fractionally accurate, dodges the fundamental issue: We are living with bankrupt, miserly city policy, crafted in large part by current top management. It’s time to clean house. And, we need to join the 99 percent of California’s cities

Your plumbing

with a sales tax—sorry if this causes seizures and heartburn in the ranks of the tax-phobes. Patrick Newman Chico

is being said by a small group of individuals who don’t have a clue what you all are going through. B. T. Chapman Chico

To ‘Camp Fire friends’

Scoffing at committee

Re “A survivor’s plea for compassion, patience” (Guest comment, by Jessica Eggleston, May 9): I read the guest comment and was especially drawn to the comments in paragraph five, where the author says [Camp Fire survivors’] new homes have turned on them and blame them for creating traffic jams and spiked crime rates. And they are told “to get over it and make a plan.” I, for one, am far from an attitude like this toward Camp fire friends (I don’t like the word “victims”). I know that tons of others are with me, too! Please try and remain focused on the good, and forget what negative

Re “Another long night” (Newslines, by Ashiah Scharaga, May 9): I attended Tuesday’s City Council meeting where a Sustainability Committee was brought forward to study ways to combat “climate change.” You’re being lied to at the local level and the national level of our government about “climate change.” I think you need to remember what the climate hysterics said in 1976. They told us we would all be dead by the year 2000, if we didn’t stop using fossil fuel. They said we would run out of fossil fuel by 2000. They called it “global warming” in 1976. The hysteria purveyors had to switch to “climate LETTERS C O N T I N U E D

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LETTERS c o n t i n u e d f r o m pa g e 5 change” because it was easier to tag any change as “climate change.” You tell me, if the U.S. stopped all use of fossil fuel right now, effectively disabling ourselves, would that keep other nations like China, India and Russia from using oil? The fools who scare our children, spending tax dollars to do it, should stop worrying about straws and plastic bags. Instead begin to realize that without our country’s strength, nuclear war is more likely to engulf our Earth in ways a Sustainability Committee can never fix! Try listening to talk radio, then research the facts you’re being fed by the alphabet media. Loretta Ann Torres Chico

Three on PG&E Re “Twenty-twenty hindsight” (Letters, by Ray Estes, May 9): Ray Estes strongly implied in his letter that it was my claim that PG&E announced plans to shut off power to “5 million people in Northern California” for up to five days. I surely didn’t make this up, as this was reported on Action News Now. I said that “PG&E needs to install better insulation devices, like ones that don’t break and cause fires.” This is something that the PG&E CEOs should have done a long time ago. In recent letters, Estes blamed Bernie Sanders for Hillary Clinton’s loss to Trump in 2016, when in fact Sanders endorsed and vigorously campaigned for Clinton in the fall of 2016. Estes slams Sanders, who is the only major candidate who has pledged to stop spending billions of our dollars on endless, useless wars and a bloated military budget, and address serious issues in our country like health care. Like some great Democratic presidents of the past, Sanders will take on the Wall Street bankers and the corporate CEOs while fighting for the people’s interests. Estes defends those CEOs. Walter Ballin Chico

We should call for a town hall meeting for the PG&E board to stand in front of the Camp Fire survivors to explain why they are planning to increase their salary, from $271,000 to $400,000. Bob Mulholland Chico

About the time the editor was writing about her “Maddog” reputation, the California Public Utilities Commission approved a rate increase of $337 million. More rate increases are expected to be approved soon, adding about $23 monthly to PG&E bills. I wish the editor would use her Maddog reputation to rant on PG&E, whose equipment caused the Camp Fire, and was responsible for 17 of the 21 major fires in 2017. Californians already pay more for power than people in other Western states. And now they are going to pay for PG&E’s mismanagement, corruption and incompetence and very careless attitude toward safety. PG&E spends hugely on lobbying and the California Public Utilities Commission was very cozy with the administration of former Gov. Jerry Brown, which allowed very lax oversight over PG&E. Brown, a crusader for green energy, is responsible for the gigantic carbon footprint of PG&Ecreated fires. He could redeem himself by spearheading an effort to change the investor-owned utility model of PG&E, whose priority is to shareholders and maximizing profit and not safety. For a safer sustainable future, creative—even radical—thinking is necessary. PG&E must be changed, taken over, or broken into more manageable units.

Cleanup warning Be warned if you are having your lot cleaned up. We assumed they would take toxic stuff, like the house and all burned out buildings. They took out our 25-by-35 driveway, our garage floor and house foundation. All needed to rebuild. Now, besides the $20,000 for cleanup, we would have to pay for a new driveway, garage and house foundation. This makes rebuilding up there too costly to do. Allan Clark Paradise

Obstruction in D.C. I’ve been paying attention to what’s been going on in our government since the November election. Wow! And since the redacted version of the Mueller report has been released, I don’t think I’ve ever witnessed such cowardice and obstruction from the executive office. Trump—who likes to talk to President Putin (whose president?) and mass murderer Kim in North Korea—is very, very afraid of what the Mueller report shows. Don’t forget more than a dozen other investigations are going on and they’re not going to stop. Just a few days ago, Trump asserted “executive privilege” to stop any further release of the report. I got my copy online, and you can, too, for about $15 and that pesky tax. Does Trump’s action mean I have to return it? Ed Pitman Chico

Lucy Cooke Butte Valley

Ideas for wildfire wood

Corrections

While driving by the new mountains of cut timber popping up from the Camp Fire cleanup area, it occurred to my wife and me that the area would benefit from putting it back to use on the Ridge. Rather than ship it off to a mill, why not set up or use a local mill (not sure if Foothill still has their equipment intact, but they would be my first choice) to crank out framing material that can be stockpiled and sold back to local contractors at a discount? That would save quite a bit in transportation costs, and people struggling to rebuild could certainly use a price break.

The Chow feature in the April 25 issue (“Don’t overbake,” by Ken Magri) had a few inaccuracies. The green butter recipe should contain 1,000 milligrams of cannabis. In the brownie recipe, each serving should contain 11.8 milligrams of 100 percent THC. And in the infused oil, there will be 44.18 milligrams of THC per fluid ounce. The errors have been corrected online. —ed.

John Lawler Magalia

More letters online:

We’ve got too many letters for this space. please go to www.newsreview.com/chico for additional readers’ comments on past cn&r articles.


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NEWSLINES DOWNSTROKE ENLOE, ANTHEM SIGN CONTRACT

After beginning negotiations more than a year ago, Enloe Medical Center and insurer Anthem Blue Cross signed a contract for private-plan subscribers through 2021. The previous agreement expired on Nov. 1 after the parties failed to settle on payment rates. Then, a week later, the Camp Fire hit, and they agreed to temporarily reinstate their contract. After approving several extensions and bringing in a thirdparty negotiator, the pair signed a contract on Monday (May 13). This has no effect on coverage for Medicare and Medi-Cal patients. In a press release, Enloe CEO Mike Wiltermood said the hospital believes “the new agreement better serves the needs of our community.”

STATE BANS PESTICIDE

The California Environmental Protection Agency banned the pesticide chlorpyrifos last Wednesday (May 8), despite federal insistence that the chemical is safe. As reported in the CN&R May 2 (see “Toxic bite,” Healthlines), scientific studies link chlorpyrifos to developmental problems in children exposed prenatally. The pesticide primarily is used on crops but also in nonagricultural settings such as golf courses. The U.S. EPA rejected a 2017 proposal for a ban, and the Trump administration has defended chlorpyrifos use in court. CalEPA said implementation could take two years, which will include a transition to “safer, more sustainable alternatives.”

COUNCIL REJECTS HOUSING BILL

After months of debate, the Chico City Council voted to reject Chico’s inclusion in Assembly Bill 430 (the Camp Fire Housing Assistance Act). Assemblyman James Gallagher (pictured), a Republican from Yuba City, drafted the bill to “fast track” development in Biggs, Chico, Gridley, Orland and Oroville by exempting those municipalities from California

Environmental Quality Act

regulations. That was the rub for the council. During a special meeting Friday (May 10), the panel voted 4-1 to request that Chico be removed from the bill. Councilwoman Kasey Reynolds was the only nay; Councilmen Scott Huber and Sean Morgan were absent. Most members of the public spoke in favor of AB 430, arguing that it would help provide much-needed housing post-Camp Fire. Others called the bill “disaster capitalism” and criticized it for ignoring affordability. 8

CN&R

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Listing concerns Parents question school administrators’ messaging about troubling student conduct

A and voicemail messages last Wednesday (May 8) from her son’s school, Chico manda Jones received simultaneous text

Junior High, alerting families to a letter that explained that two students had made a “poor story and decision” by creating a photo by list of classmates they Andre Byik “liked and did not like.” an d re b @ The letter, which was n ew sr ev i ew. c o m signed by Chico Junior’s principal, Pedro Caldera, went on to state that the list was both offensive and had caused fear in light of “current tension across our nation regarding school violence.” According to the correspondence, Chico police had been notified and the students suspected of writing the list were questioned and admitted their involvement. After reading the message, Jones, whose name has been changed to protect the privacy and safety of her child, still had questions. She spoke to her son about what he knew and also began piecing together information found online. The list, she found out, may have been more nefarious than school officials had let on. The words “kill list” were being used

by other parents, and Jones heard her son’s name may have been on it. The episode began Wednesday morning, when police responded to Chico Junior to investigate the report of a troubling list that allegedly had been compiled by two 11-year-old students. In interviews with the CN&R, neither police nor school officials described the document in detail, but said it included names. Caldera, the principal, said the list was essentially divided into categories indicating people who were safe and people who were unsafe. Chico police Cmdr. Ted McKinnon said the list contained the word “kill.” Police quickly determined that the students behind the list did not pose a credible threat. Investigators, McKinnon said, came to their conclusion after speaking with the students involved, conducting a “limited” search of their homes and consulting with their parents. The intent behind the list, the police commander said, was not to cause physical harm but to note people who were liked or disliked. “In short, I would say that the two 11-year-olds went through quite a learning lesson,” he said. But while police deemed the potential

threat as not credible, some parents have criticized the school for not fully explaining the nature of list, leaving questions regarding student safety up in the air at a time when schools have been all-too-common stages for violence across the country. Jones told the CN&R that she felt the school had been vague in describing the incident. She also questioned whether school officials had done enough to ensure student safety on campus. “They should have been completely transparent instead of saying it was just … a list of people [the students] don’t like,” Jones said. “That’s different than the word ‘kill.’ ‘Kill’ is definitely a threat, right? Don’t sugarcoat it for us. Be honest with us. These are our children and we have a right to know.” The omission of facts in the school’s messaging, she continued, was “upsetting.” “When you don’t give the full story and sugarcoat things, it’s kind of like you’re sweeping it under the rug. Are you ensuring that it’s not going to happen again? Are you ensuring that my child is going to be safe? Are you taking care of it?” Jones, believing her son had been on the list, also wondered why she had not


Pedro Caldera, the principal of Chico Junior High School, says officials are bound by federal and state laws in divulging information about incidents involving students.

been contacted further to explain what had happened. She said the school owed calls to the parents of students who were named in the document. Caldera said the school did personally contact the parents of students whose names were on the list. Rumors, however, spread on and off campus the morning it was discovered. And some students, he said, told their classmates that they were on the list when, in fact, they were not. Speaking to the school’s messaging, Caldera said officials must follow federal and state laws regarding student information. There are certain specifics, he said, that cannot be shared because officials are bound by the Family Educational Rights & Privacy Act and state Education Code. It’s a balancing act between privacy and transparency, he said, adding that he understands some people will be upset when faced with limited information. “We’re not allowed to give out specific details because then they can tie it to kids,” he explained “If something happens … [to the] kids that did what they did, now we can be held accountable if something happens to them. That is the fine line that we have to balance to keep all our kids safe … and that’s what’s so hard.” Jay Marchant, director of secondary and alternative education at Chico Unified School District, echoed Caldera. In this case, he said, “we wanted to let parents know that if their kids went home and said there was a list that said ‘kill or not kill’ kind of thing, that we knew … what is on it or not.” Marchant added that officials did their best to communicate that they were investigating a potential threat, had involved the police, and that student safety was a priority. School officials would not confirm whether disciplinary action was taken. McKinnon said school officials acted appropriately by reporting the threat to the authorities, and Chico Police Chief Mike O’Brien told the CN&R that officers take every potential threat seriously. “Obviously, it is on the forefront of our minds, being that we’re seeing so many different active shooter-type scenarios play out,” O’Brien said. “Not just in the schools, but in our houses of worship, everywhere, right? You have to take every threat seriously.” Ω

Caution in the creeks Metals, chemicals found downstream from the Camp Fire burn zone When it rains, it pours. And the Camp Fire

just keeps on pouring. The latest byproduct? Waterways testing positive for heavy metals, from aluminum to selenium, as well as chemical contaminants. And the most recent test results, released last month, show unhealthy levels of both throughout the county, primarily in Paradise and nearby creeks. What that means for people—particularly in the burn zone—is that swimming could be dangerous, as could drinking water that comes from shallow wells. “We always want to caution folks— and adults are one thing, but small children and infants tend to drink more when they’re swimming,” said Clint Snyder, assistant executive officer for the Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board. “We always want to make sure that people know when there are risks associated with swimming. Drinking that water or ingesting it can create problems. We urge an overabundance of caution until things start to stabilize in that area.” The root of the problem stems from the stuff that burned during the Camp Fire— things like cars and televisions and gas stations—that aren’t meant to be burned. Add to that a few heavy rains and a natu-

ral downslope, and the debris made its way into the water. “The latest samples were taken … following a full five-day storm event,” Snyder said. Specifically, they were taken March 27. “So we had saturated soil conditions, which facilitated overland flow—it was hitting that burn material and running off into surface waters.” What’s in those surface waters now is

cause for concern: elevated levels of aluminum, antimony, arsenic, cadmium, iron, lead, manganese, mercury and selenium. Clear Creek in Paradise is bearing the brunt of it—for instance, the recommended maximum contaminant level (MCL) of aluminum in drinking water is

SIFT ER America’s emotional temperature In 2018, Americans’ levels of stress, worry and anger increased over the previous year, by 6 percent, 5 percent and 5 percent, respectively. According to the 2019 Gallup Global Emotions Report, when asked if they’d experienced a lot of stress the previous day, 55 percent of participants said “yes.” That number is 20 points higher than the worldwide average, and trails only Greece (59), the Philippines (58) and Tanzania (57). The “worry” gap between the U.S. and the world average was much smaller, with 45 percent of Americans having been worried the day before versus 39 percent worldwide. And as for anger, the U.S. matched the global average of 22 percent.

Contributing factors to all this negativity include disapproval of President Trump, as well as negative economic situations. Among the poorest 20 percent of Americans, nearly 70 percent experienced stress and 56 percent were worried. Comparatively, far fewer among the richest 20 percent reported feeling stressed (46 percent) or worried (41 percent).

Officials urge people to limit swimming in creeks within and downstream from the Camp Fire burn zone, as the water is not safe for drinking. PHOTO BY JASON CASSIDY

1,000 parts per billion and Clear Creek’s level is 2,070 ppb; the MCL for iron is 300 ppb; Clear Creek’s level is 1,440 ppb. The water board, cooperating with the state Department of Water Resources and the California Department of Transportation, took samples in nine spots along creeks that it regularly monitors: In addition to Clear Creek, those include Butte Creek (two spots), Little Butte Creek, Hamlin Creek, Dry Creek (two spots) and Little Dry Creek. All but Butte and Little Butte showed higher than recommended levels of most of the aforementioned metals. When tested for a host of chemicals called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, all of the creeks showed higher than recommended levels of eight different compounds that could cause adverse health effects. “Back in the day, folks placed really shallow wells in … the gravel next to the creeks,” Snyder said. “The concentrations [of contaminants] we’re seeing in the surface waters has the potential to migrate into those wells.” In response to the tests, the water board issued a press release April 24 saying, “Homeowners with shallow wells along Butte Creek and Little Butte Creek should review their well construction details and consider testing their well water if they have not already done so.” Butte County offers advice for private well owners on buttecountyrecovers.org, but mostly regarding bacteria. While an advisory attached to those guidelines says E. coli has been detected in the water, the most recent water board test results came back negative for that bacteria in all creeks. Likewise, all were negaNEWSLINES C O N T I N U E D M AY 1 6 , 2 0 1 9

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tive for coliform, another bacteria. It recommends testing for benzene if there were any burnt plastics in or near the well and for heavy metals if it is near a creek or stream. “Because of the magnitude of the Camp Fire damage, the science for sampling and testing contaminated water for commercial use and for private wells is still being developed,” said Lisa Almaguerr, spokeswoman for the county’s Public Health Department. While the March results are cause for caution and concern, Snyder says he anticipates the next round of testing—planned for this month—will yield lower levels of contamination. As water flows from higher elevations through the burn zone, it’s naturally flushing the hazardous elements away. Before those results are known, however, which could be two to three weeks from now, he urges everyone—especially families with small children—to limit swimming

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“We always want to make sure that people know when there are risks associated with swimming. Drinking that water or ingesting it can create problems. We urge an overabundance of caution until things start to stabilize in that area.” —Clint Snyder, Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board

downstream and within the Camp Fire burn zone and to test their shallow wells. “The biggest thing is caution at this point in time,” he said. “This is a situation that’s not common. Right now, it’s just caution, caution, caution. And as for drinking water, folks should never be drinking untreated surface water.” Chico: 2300 Fair St. • 343-8641 • Hours: Monday-Saturday 8am–3:45pm 10

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As moderator Rob Davidson (left) tries to calm audience members, panelist Rob Berry (foreground) engages a questioner late in the forum on homelessness last Thursday (May 9) at Chico State. PHOTO BY EVAN TUCHINSKY

Jones, who in prepared remarks dissected an editorial by Berry opposing the Orange Street Shelter, took offense at the comment. “Rob, that is demonizing a population—that is fear-mongering.”

Lotus FLower Imports

McLaughlin opened the proceedings by laying out

Takes on homelessness Panel, public get passionate about problem in Chico With the prospect of a shelter in the south cam-

pus neighborhood polarizing the community, Rob Davidson knew hosting two hours of civil discourse about homelessness in Chico would be a tall order. Nonetheless, he and Susanna Boxall—faculty members at Chico State—moved ahead. They assembled a panel of five, each distinctly invested in the issue, and welcomed the public to engage them. Around 150 people attended last Thursday evening (May 9) at Chico State. “We knew it was going to get passionate, and it did,” Davidson told the CN&R afterward, as several dozen participants mingled. “It was important to have different viewpoints.” Differences emerged early and often. About the only point of consensus: The status quo isn’t working. As for why, and solutions, answers varied widely. Some in the audience didn’t stifle objections when they found a comment objectionable—others left early. The panel consisted of Angela McLaughlin, president of the Safe Space Winter Shelter, which is working to open the 24/7, low-barrier Orange Street Shelter; Rob Berry, leader of the citizens group Chico First; Robert Jones, a Chico State philosophy professor who advocates for human and animal rights; Trevor Guthrie, an Associated Students officer at Chico State, elected president for next year; and Patrick Newman, founder of Chico Friends on the Street. The event was part of Slow Theatre’s Chico Speaks Discussion Series held quarterly. Organizers Davidson and Boxall sought varied opinions. However, Berry wound up the only opponent to the Orange Street Shelter. Boxall said they’d invited others, including Chico State President Gayle Hutchinson, and expected Guthrie to share common ground with Berry

“because we heard that the Associated Students had concerns about the shelter ... we were surprised to find out that he was a supporter.” Berry—known for provocative statements at City Council meetings—drew the strongest reactions from a crowd composed of about half students and a quarter who seemed predisposed to his position. In posing a solution he calls “contact, enforcement, accountability,” he said homeless people should provide something of value, even as nominal as their “real name,” for any service or assistance. When an audience member asked panelists whether a shelter facility would empower those with housing insecurity, Berry replied it would benefit a fraction—“the easiest to help”—but not those who behave violently or criminally or have untreated addiction or illness. Then he dropped a room-rocker: “Nobody has the right to live in Chico anonymously.” As right-to-privacy retorts rippled, Berry explained that there are reasons to know who people are. For instance, the point of making contact with homeless people is to “treat an individual as an individual”—that’s how to do what McLaughlin said Safe Space does, “meet people where they are.” Besides, Berry continued, we all leave traces: Anyone who has a bank account isn’t living anonymously. Immediately, he restoked emotions: “You don’t get to drop in from L.A., rape a few people and go back to L.A., whether you are homeless or not homeless.” Berry confirmed to the CN&R that he referenced Ishmael Smith, a Los Angeleno suspected of raping a woman March 9 in south Chico. Smith, who police records say was a “transient” while in Chico, was arrested April 25 in L.A. and faces trial on a rape charge in Butte County.

Safe Space’s vision for the low-barrier shelter. (See “And then there was one,” Newslines, May 2.) She acknowledged concerns raised about the location but said it’s “as far out from downtown as we can get it … if you want to draw people from downtown, you need to be close enough that people will access the shelter.” It would provide 100 to 120 people a place to stay, food and social services. For context, Chico’s homeless population tops 1,000, with more than 400 living outside nightly, Berry deemed that solution insufficient and questioned whether $1 million granted from Walmart to fund sheltering might be used better. Guthrie—who, alongside peers across the Cal State system, has lobbied legislators on behalf of low-income students—responded: “If it only helps 100 people, is it worth it? Yes, it literally is worth it if it helps 100 people.” In making his case for low-barrier housing with services (i.e., the Orange Street Shelter), Jones discussed the dangers of living on the streets. He cited a study of five cities that found 49 percent of homeless people become victims of a violent attack and 62 percent witness a violent attack. With nearly 130,000 homeless Californians, according to 2018 figures, “this is a big problem”—and to address it, “we’re already paying from tax dollars,” he said, around $30,000 a year per person. “Insanity is doing the same thing over and over, getting no results and thinking, That’s the solution.” Newman, another shelter advocate, posited that Chico has “about a six-year history of intense activity [responding to homelessness], precipitated by exponentially growing numbers of chronically homeless—and more and more confusion and consternation in our citizenry.” After describing that history, including City Council decisions such as enacting the sit/lie ordinance that expanded police actions for loitering, Newman said: “It’s time we have a real conversation about our values and about fundamental human rights. … The homeless are hard to organize; they have a very small voice. They need our voice.” One spoke up. Organizers didn’t include a homeless person on the panel, but Richard Muenzer rose to question the panelists. After asking Berry whether his plan addresses mental health (answer: yes), Muenzer responded to his anonymity remark: “Every American that is housed and unhoused has the right to privacy and [to] pursue their happiness wherever he wants to go.” —EVAN TUCHINSKY evantu c h insk y @ newsr ev iew.c o m

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HEALTHLINES Kim, at a residential treatment facility for women struggling  with addiction, says her teddy bear is the only material   possession left from her past, “because everything I had,  I’ve lost over and over again.”

(to 193, according to city public health data). And, at San Francisco General Hospital, of 7,000 annual psychiatric emergency visits last year, 47 percent were people who were not necessarily mentally ill—they were high on meth. “They can look so similar to someone that’s experiencing chronic schizophrenia,” said Dr. Anton Nigusse Bland, medical director of psychiatric emergency services at San Francisco General. “It’s almost indistinguishable in that moment.” They have methamphetamine-induced psychosis. If the person is extremely agitated, doctors might administer a sedative or even an antipsychotic medicine. Otherwise, the treatment is just waiting 12 to 16 hours for the meth to wear off. The trend in rising stimulant use is nation-

Stealth scourge Amid opioid epidemic, meth use surges story and photo by

April Dembosky

Kthe Sonoma. They got into an argument in car that night, and Kim thought someone im had been wine tasting with a friend in

was following them. She was utterly convinced. And she had to get away. “I jumped out of the car and started running, and I literally ran a mile. I went through water, went up a tree,” she said. “I was literally running for my life.” Kim was soaking wet when she walked into a woman’s house, woke her from bed and asked for help. When the woman went to call the police, Kim left and found another woman’s empty guesthouse to sleep in— Goldilocks-style. “But then I woke up and stole her car,” said Kim, who is 47 and now in recovery. (For patient confidentiality, this story is using her first name only.) Kim had been high on Xanax and methamphetamine. “I was crazy.

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Meth causes people to act completely insane.” While public health officials have focused on the opioid epidemic in recent years, another epidemic has been brewing quietly, but vigorously, behind the scenes. Methamphetamine use is surging in parts of the U.S., particularly the West, leaving first responders and addiction treatment providers struggling to handle a rising need. Across the country, overdose deaths involving meth more than quadrupled from 2011 to 2017. Admissions to treatment facilities for meth are up 17 percent. Hospitalizations related to meth jumped by about 245 percent from 2008 to 2015. And, throughout the West and Midwest, 70 percent of local law enforcement agencies say meth is their biggest drug threat. Yet, policymakers in Washington, D.C., haven’t kept up, continuing to direct the bulk of funding and attention to opioids, said Steve Shoptaw, an addiction psychologist at UCLA in Los Angeles, where he hears one story after another about meth destroying people’s lives.

“But when you’re in D.C., where people are making decisions about how to deploy resources, those stories are very much muffled by the much louder story about the opioid epidemic,” he said. Even within drug treatment circles, there’s a divide. Opioid addiction advocates are afraid their efforts to gain acceptance for measures like needle-exchange programs and safe injection sites will be threatened if meth advocates demand too much. “The bottom line is, as Americans, we have just so much tolerance to deal with addiction,” Shoptaw said. “And if the opioid users have taken that tolerance, then there’s no more.” So, lawmakers in San Francisco are trying on their own to get a grip on the toll meth is taking on their city’s public health system. The mayor recently established a task force to combat the epidemic. “It’s something we really have to interrupt,” said Rafael Mandelman, a San Francisco district supervisor who will cochair the task force. “Over time, this does lasting damage to people’s brains. If they do not have an underlying medical condition at the start, by the end, they will.” Since 2011, emergency room visits related to meth in San Francisco have jumped 600 percent (to 1,965 visits in 2016, the last year for which ER data is available) and admissions to the hospital are up 400 percent

wide: cocaine on the East Coast, meth on the West Coast, said Dr. Daniel Ciccarone, a professor of medicine and substance use researcher at UC San Francisco. “It is an epidemic wave that’s coming, that’s already here,” he said. “But it hasn’t HEALTHLINES c o n t i n u e d

o n pa g e 1 5

appointment Cycle buddies

Just because the Wildflower Century is over doesn’t mean it’s time to put that bike away. There are plenty of rides here in town each week, and North Rim Adventure Sports is in charge of a whole slew of them. If you are in the mood for a relaxed morning ride on flat ground, you may want to try the Easy Does It Sunday Ride. Grab your helmet, some water and a few snacks and meet at Hooker Oak Park at 9 a.m. this Sunday (May 19) for a 12-mile pedal around Bidwell Park. For other rides, check out the group ride calendar at www.northrimadventure.com.


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HEALTHLINES

C O N T I N U E D F R O M PA G E 1 2

About the article:

This is an edited version of a story coproduced by NPR, KQED and Kaiser Health News (which publishes California Healthline, a service of the California Health Care Foundation). Visit californiahealthline.org for the unabridged article.

particularly hard to treat. Last month, Kim completed a six-month residential treatment program for women in San Francisco called the Epiphany Center. She came directly from jail, after serving time for her housewarming-and-car-theft spree in Sonoma. She said that in the first 30 days all she could do was try to clear the chaos from her mind. Kim, who has four children, is hopeful that this round of treatment will stick. She is living in transitional housing, has a job and has been accepted to a program at UC Berkeley to finish her college degree. “I’ve gone through 12 different programs, and it’s been for my children, for my mom, for the courts. I’ve never come to be there for myself,” Kim said. “So it’s like I’ve come to a place where it has to be for me.” Ω

This guy saves you money.

fully reached our public consciousness.” Drug preferences are generational, Ciccarone said. It was heroin (an opioid) in the 1970s, cocaine and crack in the ’80s. Then opiate pills. Then methamphetamine. Then heroin. And now meth again. “The culture creates this notion of let’s go up, let’s not go down,” Ciccarone said. “New people coming into drug use are saying, ‘Whoa, I don’t really want to do that. I hear it’s deadly.’” Kim has been with meth through two waves. When she got into speed in the 1990s, she was hanging out with bikers, going to clubs in San Francisco. “Now what I see, in any neighborhood, you can find it. It’s not the same as it used to be, where it was kind of taboo,” Kim said. “It’s more socially accepted now.” Over her two decades of meth use, Kim has been through drug treatment more than a dozen times. Relapse is part of recovery, and among meth users, 60 percent will start using again within a year of finishing treatment. Unlike opioids, there are no medication treatments for meth addiction, which makes it

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CN&R

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GREENWAYS WAYS Earthbound Skills students practice using binoculars with instructor Matthew Knight during a nature skills obstacle course.

Back to nature Outdoor school fosters playful learning, reverence for the Earth story and photo by

Ashiah Scharaga ashiahs@ n ewsrev iew. com

Amorning, in Bidwell Park during a recent Thursday they gasped in anticipation. s 10 children sat on shade-dappled grass

The students—part of Earthbound Skills’ Forest Foxes class (for homeschooled children ages 4 to 7)—were about to handle the preserved skin of a dead rattlesnake brought in by instructor Rachel Rickard. Many of the children delicately traced the scales as they passed it around and stared in reverence. One boy placed the hide on the grass and curled it up, shaking its rattler, pretending to bring the creature back to life. Every moment was a teachable one for Rickard, fellow instructor Jahnia Mitchell and instructor trainee Catie Roberson. How does this creature differ from the gopher snake they recently studied? Its scale patterns, the children replied. How old was it? They weren’t sure. Count the segments of the rattler, Rickard hinted. Nine, the children counted, in awe of its age. Rickard explained why it died—her husband killed it to protect her family. They honored its existence through a ceremony at her home, and “it still gets to live on as a teacher for us.” This was just the beginning of the itinerary for the day. Soon the kids would go off to explore Big Chico Creek, and later they’d make sun tea with lemon balm and fir tips gathered from Rickard’s garden. Mitchell and her partner, Matthew Knight, founded Earthbound Skills in 2012 to teach naturalist, wilderness-survival and primitive-living skills. The nature observation and awareness school started with

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workshops in the couple’s backyard, then progressed to school field trips and regular outdoor classes across Chico, primarily through partnerships with local chartered homeschools. In the beginning, the couple held a onehour weekly class with four students. They now offer four- and six-hour classes to more than 80 students across three different age groups, five days a week. The pair studied at the Tom Brown Jr.’s Tracker School in New Jersey, which specializes in nature observation, wilderness therapy and survivalist training. Earthbound Skills’ six instructors have a variety of skillsets. For example, Wyatt Hersey, also an artist, works as a field ornithologist in the summer months. Mitchell said she loves what she does, in part because of the “undeniable” impact it has had for the children, who discover that they have an “intuitive passion and curiosity of nature.” The instructors often stumble upon spontaneous teaching moments—the students, for example, discovered beaver chew marks on cattail and tule a few seasons ago in Bidwell Park. Naturally, they began tracking the animal. “We finally found where the beaver was living in the park, and it was a super exciting day for us,” Mitchell said. “[These discoveries create] a connection with the students and their environment. A track is not just a lifeless Get outdoors:

Earthbound Skills is enrolling children in its summer camp. Visit earthboundskills.com for more details.

depression on the ground … eventually that track leads to a live animal somewhere.” In addition, the kids learn how to identify poison oak and other troublesome plants, as well as those that can be sources of medicine. Every year, they learn how to safely ignite and put out an outdoor fire. Lessons go beyond plant identification and survival skills. The children create relationships with the plants and animals, Mitchell said. They learn the story of each living thing, and how it relates to everything else in the natural world: what they look like, where they live, and what they like to eat and why, for example. This helps foster “that love and desire to protect those things” as they get older. Portia Ceruti told the CN&R that her son, Sabin, discovered he is great at creating rope and now knows how to start a fire using a bow drill he made. He has a hard time leaving each class at the end of the day, she added. That also was true of her daughter, who has since aged out of the program. That Thursday afternoon, as the Forest

Foxes wrapped up a modified game of tag (emulating foxes and rabbits), the Woodland Scouts arrived with instructors Knight and Ian Wallick Colunga. The 10- to 14-year-olds pored over field guides, working in three teams to complete a naturalist study of a mountain lion, red-shouldered hawk and poison oak, respectively. Then, they excitedly whipped through a naturalist skills obstacle course. Among other things, they practiced archery (with padded

arrows), simulated the gait of a monkey on a balance beam, twisted plant fibers into rope and identified animal tracks using molds they created on a previous trip to the Sacramento River. Knight said the course was designed to recap everything the kids had learned during the semester and to encourage them to interact in a “playful way that cultivates a higher level of awareness” with their surroundings, their bodies, one another and plants and animals. Though the school year is winding down, Earthbound Skills soon will launch into its summer camp season. One day, Mitchell and Knight hope to establish a permanent location to expand activity and learning opportunities—they could grow, cultivate and harvest plants with the children on-site, for example. The hands-on nature of the school has resonated with parents and kids alike. “So much focus is put on book learning and standardized testing and stuff that we’ve forgotten kids learn a lot through play,” Mitchell said. “Every time that they learn about something, it’s not just from being told … they learn because they have a direct experience with it that creates a relationship with that plant or with that animal.” Ω

ECO EVENT

Full moon fever The Chico Creek Nature Center wants to take you into the park at night. Join one of the organization’s certified naturalists for a free group hike under a full moon this Saturday (May 18), at 8:30 p.m., as part of the Life by Moonlight: Night Hike series. Each month showcases Bidwell Park under a different moon phase. This affects the kinds of animals and birds that go out and about, as well as the variety of plants that grow. Experience the full spectrum of the park under a sky filled with stars, and plan to learn a few things, too. Meet at the Chico Creek Nature Center (1968 E. Eighth St.).


EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS PHOTO BY ANDRE BYIK

15 MINUTES

THE GOODS

The right fit Rainbow Sandals and flip-flops are in high-demand these days at Heel and Sole Shoes, which has been under new stewardship since March, when sisters Adriana and Gloria Covarrubias (pictured, left to right) purchased the Chico business at 708 Mangrove Ave. The pair call the store their second home, having both worked there for a combined total of more than two decades. The sisters, who spent parts of their childhood in Mexico before moving to Butte County, want to keep in the store’s tradition of carrying a wide selection of brands and styles. They also want to offer programs that cater to the community’s needs. Adriana, wearing a pair of Mia sandals that share her namesake, and Gloria, wearing a pair of Steve Madden hightop sneakers, recently joined this Converse-wearing writer to share their thoughts.

Why did you purchase the store? Adriana: Ever since I was little, I wanted to be my own boss. I always wanted to own a business. I always knew that was going to happen. I just didn’t know how it was going to happen. Heel and Sole was there. The opportunity was there. I had a great partner to do it with, and, you know, we both jumped right in.

How does the store stand out? Adriana: It’s such a store that’s full of shoes. It’s a unique place to be. It’s not something that

Beyond sushi

you see everywhere. People come in and they’re like, “I’ve never seen a store like this.” And they love the fact that we have such a great selection. We definitely have loyal customers. We’ve had people come in and say, “Thank you for keeping the store open.”

What are your plans moving forward? Gloria: We have a lot of plans, but, right now, we’re taking it one day at a time. Our biggest focus is bringing back the brands that customers want to see. I think that [previous owner Rick Stuelpnagel] sold through a lot of his inventory, and sometimes people are coming in asking for brands that he didn’t even carry. We just got in some Pumas, some Under Armour. We got in a couple of Nikes, Converse. I mean, people keep asking for something else, so, we’re like, “OK, we’ll try it.”

Is that how you keep up with trends? Gloria: Yeah. Customers’ suggestions a lot of the time. They will come in and ask, “Do you carry this?” You hear it enough times where you’re, “OK, we’ll look into it and see what we can do.” There’s brands we’re still working on. But if the customer is asking for it, then we’re going to do our best to bring in what people are asking for.

What should people know about Heel and Sole? Gloria: We’re a local-owned company. We plan on doing a lot of different programs … with work shoes and shoes for nurses. And if anybody has any ideas of how we can help … we’re more than happy to hear that and look for solutions. I know it’s shoes, but it’s a big part of people’s lives.

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I first met Jeramie Sabelman a few years back when I interviewed him for a piece I wrote in the CN&R’s Chico dining guide, Savor. I wanted to learn more about the head chef and owner of one of Chico’s most loved restaurants, Japanese Blossoms. I discovered that Sabelman truly cares about what he puts on a plate—about its freshness, about it supporting local farmers, about its healthfulness, even about its carbon footprint. Since then, he started selling premade sushi rolls at New Earth Market, then at In Motion Fitness, and finally at Chico State. Japanese Blossoms won Best Local Restaurant in Chico in CN&R’s annual poll last year, and he’s won Best Chef. And there’s more on the horizon. Sabelman announced this week that he’s opening a second location—sort of. Cabana Cafe inside InMo is closing its doors May 24 and Sabelman will be working over the summer to transform the space into Synergy. The fare will be simple: salads, wraps and bowls, grab-and-go style, with an emphasis on providing quick, healthy meals. There’ll still be sushi, too. I’m excited to check it out—maybe it’ll inspire me to get my butt to the gym!

MORE SUSHI NEWS Back in 2012, I wrote a story about sustainable sushi, and a few weeks later, I got an email from Jimmy Lee saying he was about to open Aonami Sustainable Sushi, which has developed quite a following in the years since. Fastforward to last week, when I got a call from Lee, who wanted to let me know that he has a fun event planned at his sushi spot next month. He’ll be serving a prix fixe menu with ocean conservationist/author Casson Trenor, who will read from his latest book. It’s scheduled for June 19. TIME TO MEDITATE If there’s one thing people could use a dose of in these postCamp Fire times, it’s serenity, calm. So it’s fitting that the Lotus Guide Center for Healing & Information is opening in the heart of downtown Paradise, on the Skyway. From what the Lotus Guide’s Rahasya Poe tells me about the center, it looks to be pretty rad. It’s a partnership with Love’s Vibrant Art—Marianna Love’s is the only large collection of paintings to survive the Camp Fire, according to Poe. Plus, it will be a space for stress-relief workshops; open-mic and movie nights; weekly active meditations led by Poe’s wife, Dhara; and a detox center for first responders and people moving back to the area, run by Doctors Against Disease. Go celebrate the grand opening this weekend (May 18) at 4 p.m. MORE HEALING: Thanks to a grant from the North Valley Community Foundation,

Chico Community Acupuncture is able to bring back the free services for Camp Fire survivors it offered immediately after the disaster. “But still, wave after wave of people have come in at various stages of grief, anger, stress related exacerbation of health conditions, trauma recovery,” owner Olivia Peters-Lazaro wrote in an email. Call 345-5300, or go to ChicoCommunityAcupuncture.com for more info.

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Testing the

WATERS

expert decries state’s response to Camp Fire water contamination, potential dangers to public health—especially for Del Oro customers story and photos by

Meredith J. Cooper m er ed i t hc@ n ew sr ev i ew. com

S

herri and Thomas Gardner are not concerned that the results of the first water test at their burned-out property

in Magalia came back positive for a higher concentration of benzene, a known carcinogen, than the state deems healthy for drinking. After all, a second test came back “ND,” or non-detect.

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“The state maximum is 1 part per billion and the feds have theirs at 5—we were dead in the middle at 2.6,” Thomas said last week from the couple’s comfortable RV, which is parked on their now debris-free property. “We’re not at all worried. We’re brushing our teeth with [the water], we’re using it for ice.” The Gardners are confident because the Del Oro Water Co., their supplier, and the California State Water Resources Control Board, which oversees drinking water regulations, have said that what’s coming out of their faucets is potable. Del Oro has been likewise assured—by the same water board—that its testing methods are sound. But having never grappled with the magnitude of the problem, in which tens of thousands of homes and businesses—and their associated plumbing—burned up, the water board is operating in uncharted territory.

That strikes a nerve with Andrew Whelton, a national expert on large-scale water contamination. He and a team of researchers came to survey the Camp Fire area earlier this year at the request of Paradise Irrigation District (PID), which serves that community. Whelton immediately suggested a few priorities: testing should be broad, health advisories should err on the side of caution, and guidance should be given to the public on how to deal with the problem. PID is taking his cue, but Del Oro is trusting the state water board, which regulates drinking water to ensure public health. The board issued boil-only notices for both districts immediately following the fire, but only warnings to alert officials of any strange odors after that. Plus, it told the water districts that testing for one contaminant—benzene—is sufficient to determine


Sherri and Thomas Gardner are eager to rebuild after their home on Ponderosa Way in Magalia burned in the Camp Fire.

water safety. That’s not good enough, says Whelton— the state agency should create and enforce a stringent protocol that’s the same for both districts, he insists. Whelton started his career over 15 years ago working for the U.S. Army, tasked with studying the implications of a chemical attack on a military base’s water supply and coming up with a response plan. Now, he’s an associate professor of civil engineering and environmental and ecological engineering at Purdue University, and a go-to figure across the country when things like oil spills wreak havoc on drinking water supplies. Among his criticism related to the Camp Fire, Whelton questions why the water board, which includes the Department of Drinking

Water (DDW), has not issued any blanket warnings to residents in the Camp Fire area about the safety of their tap water, nor has it provided adequate, accessible testing protocols. That’s led to inconsistencies when it comes to methodology, which threatens the validity of any testing, as one result can’t reliably be compared with another. When asked about regulations for water districts to follow in the wake of a natural disaster like the Camp Fire, the CN&R was told such rules don’t exist. “There are no regulations on how to respond [to a disaster],” said Dan Newton, DDW’s assistant deputy director. For instance, there are testing guidelines, but not requirements. Likewise, there are thresholds for issuing health advisories—but none that exist in the event of unknown contamination. “We ensure the systems meet the proper standards for delivering drinking water. … We’re

ultimately here to support the systems, to assist them with their decisions,” Newton said. Without a clearly defined roadmap, the two water systems—though addressing similar issues related to the same wildfire—are responding in vastly different ways, from how they’re testing water that already has shown contamination, to issuing health advisories. The result: People in the disaster zone who live 10 minutes apart are receiving conflicting messages from their respective utilities on what to do to protect themselves and their families. Because customers are responsible for the plumbing on their side of the meter, public agencies—from Butte County Public Health to the state water board—are largely leaving them without direction. Whelton says the state and county should be leading the way, directing the water districts, as well as residents—including those on wells—on how to best proceed. And, considering the lack of data available to determine the safety of water in the fire-affected areas, they should be treating it as contaminated by default, not the other way around, he says. “Telling municipalities, or water districts, that they can do whatever they want [following a disaster] doesn’t make any sense to me,” Whelton said. “The process for responding to large-scale drinking water disasters is not new. The causes are new—but responding is not new. People including myself have been involved in these types of disaster responses before.” With 19 districts across California, Del Oro is

a much larger entity than PID. It’s also privately owned—whereas PID is a public agency—which is why it says it’s ineligible for disaster assistance funding through the Federal Emergency Management Agency

John O’Farrell (left) and Jim Roberts are superintendent and assistant superintendent, respectively, of the Del Oro Water Co., which runs four water districts affected by the Camp Fire.

(FEMA) or California Office of Emergency Services (CalOES). Those agencies are providing monetary aid to PID for water testing and infrastructure repairs. John O’Farrell has been with Del Oro for 42 years and now serves as superintendent for all 19 districts. Jim Roberts is assistant superintendent, overseeing a handful of districts in the Butte County area, including the four hit by the Camp Fire—two on the Ridge, one that extends south along the Feather River and a fourth on the east side of Chico, in Butte Creek Canyon. He also runs the company’s water treatment facility at Lime Saddle. Like O’Farrell, he’s been with the company for decades—33 years this month. But neither of them has ever experienced anything like what the Camp Fire did to the water system. “You always think it’s never going to happen,” O’Farrell said. Both men live in Magalia, so they have skin in the game. Roberts’ home burned in the Camp Fire; O’Farrell’s withstood the blaze. Both remember Nov. 8 clearly and shared their stories during a recent interview in Del Oro’s Magalia office. PG&E had issued a warning the day prior that it might shut off some of its grid due to high winds, Roberts recalled, so he’d sent out an email to the region’s seven-person crew to top off their trucks’ tanks before retiring for the night, anticipating no electricity the following day. That would be one small blessing amid the chaos. O’Farrell was at the dam in Magalia WATER C O N T I N U E D M AY 1 6 , 2 0 1 9

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WATER C O N T I N U E D

F R O M PA G E 1 9

around 7 a.m. Thursday when he saw what looked like an explosion. “We’ve had fires out in Concow and Highway 70 before, but this one moved so rapidly in our direction,” he recalled. Del Oro and PID are both gravity-fed systems, so when the fire first struck Paradise, along lower Pentz Road, those service lines suddenly started spewing water, quickly depleting PID’s holding tanks in town while people fled for their lives. Del Oro, in contrast, had a bit more time to prepare, as the fire hit Magalia after Paradise, and much of the destruction there happened Nov. 9. “We started isolating blocks— streets and neighborhoods—and began shutting them off so we could rebuild storage in our reservoirs,” Roberts said. “So, the contamination I think Paradise might be dealing with is not as bad here because we didn’t depressurize most of our service lines [like PID did],” O’Farrell added. Depressurization, or lack of

water pressure, creates a vacuum effect, which sucks air—and debris and anything else—back into the system. PID experienced much more severe depressurization than Del Oro, as the fire moved so swiftly through Paradise that personnel didn’t have time to shut off valves. Del Oro did experience significant losses, however. The Buzztail District in Butte Creek Canyon lost 12 of its 32 service connections; Lime Saddle lost 193 of 385; Magalia 244 of 272; and Paradise Pines 1,779 of 4,697. The company’s overall customer base diminished by 26 percent overnight. (PID lost roughly 90 percent of its connections.) To mitigate losses, Del Oro sent a letter to customers March 1 outlining a plan to implement a $10.54 monthly “catastrophic wildfire surcharge” across its 19 districts, set to last one year. “Del Oro Water is under the jurisdiction of the California Public Utilities Commission and with their help the surcharge will cover a portion of our revenue loss until water

What’s the big deal? Benzene can cause cancer and harm unborn fetuses

B

enzene is a colorless liquid most often found in gasoline, cigarettes and, in the case of the Camp Fire, plastic pipes and water meters. It’s typically breathed in through the air, but when there’s contamination in the water system, people can be exposed to benzene in the water in three ways: through drinking it, eating it in food washed or cooked with it, or breathing it as vapor or steam. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency sets the maximum level of benzene allowable in drinking water at 5 parts per billion, but California’s standards are more stringent, at 1 ppb. The EPA says children should not be exposed to benzene-contaminated water at 10 ppb for more than 10 days. (In Paradise, multiple water samples have come back with levels in the 400 ppb range.) Breathing benzene can cause drowsiness, dizziness and unconsciousness. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, “Eating or drinking foods containing high levels of benzene can cause vomiting, irritation of the stomach, dizziness, sleepiness, convulsions, rapid heart rate, and death.” Long-term exposure is shown to cause a form of leukemia. It also can harm female reproductive organs and could hurt unborn fetuses. —MEREDITH J. COOPER m er ed i t hc@ n ew srev i ew. c o m

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rates can be revised,” Janice Hanna, director of corporate accounting and regulatory affairs for Del Oro, told the CN&R by email. “Del Oro still has 6,300 customers statewide where PID has [lost] approximately 90% of their customers. Even with the surcharge, Del Oro will be covering at least $400,000 of the [loss] with expenditure cuts.”

Jim Roberts holds a plastic pipe burned during the Camp Fire. It’s believed the plastic in pipes and meters is the source of benzene and other chemical contamination.

Prior to the Tubbs Fire in 2017—which

devastated Santa Rosa—there hadn’t been a case of fire causing benzene or other chemicals to leach into water systems. In fact, officials tested for it in that instance only because people began complaining of a strange odor in the water. Then, after discovering the contamination, nobody knew why it was there or how to fix it. While the culprit— plastic pipes and meters—has been identified, officials are still working to fully understand the cause. “It did not happen in Redding,” said Newton, DDW’s assistant deputy director, referring to the Carr Fire last summer. The consensus is that the combination of the swiftness of the Camp Fire and the depressurization of the water systems caused the contamination, he said. Depressurization already compromises water systems, by allowing bacteria to enter the pipes. “When the system depressurized, it immediately triggered a boil-water notice,” Newton said. After biological testing concluded the water was free of bacteria, the boil order was lifted. That was Nov. 21. No other health warnings have been triggered through the state, though it did help Del Oro pen a few for its customers. Newton’s agency has cited the Tubbs Fire as prompting it to call for benzene tests from the get-go. The first tests conducted, however, weren’t until Dec. 5. By then, the evacuation order for portions of Magalia had already been lifted. By mid-month, the entire burn area was reopened to residents. Those tests yielded positive results for benzene. “When Paradise learned of that, they immediately issued a do-notdrink notice,” Newton said. That notice is still in effect. Del Oro issued no such notice. In fact, a press release from Del Oro dated Jan. 9 states, in all caps, “There is no state mandated order prohibiting customers from drinking Del Oro water at this time.” Two days later, the state water board issued this statement:

“Paradise Irrigation District is advising consumers to use BOTTLED WATER for drinking, food preparation, and brushing teeth; while customers of Del Oro Water Company are being advised that consumers should feel safe drinking their water unless they detect odors reminiscent of plastic or fuel.” (Emphasis theirs.) While benzene can emit an odor, it doesn’t always, Whelton says. Del Oro’s Roberts and O’Farrell said they were told by the state water board that that test was reliable because the odor of the benzenecontaminated water was so strong in Santa Rosa. Whelton says that logic is not based in science. “When we showed up in February, it came to our attention that they were advised to smell the water as part of the determination if there was a problem,” Whelton said. “In the lab, if we have an unknown

contaminant, we don’t tell students to go smell it and then test it. We say, ‘Don’t touch it.’” The smell-test advisory was amended March 5, nearly two months after it was issued. “As the sources of the contaminants are better understood and further testing is defining the scope and breadth of the issue, the Division is now relying on laboratory results to determine the safety of the water,” reads a DDW release. Roberts and O’Farrell described their testing methods, as approved by water board personnel: Pipes are required to soak a minimum of 48 hours before a sample is taken. Outside that 48 hours, as crew members are able, they flush the system—send water shooting through it—to try to clear it of any contaminants. “The water board said a 48-hour soak time was adequate,” Roberts said.


Whelton questions where that time frame came from—the standard in Santa Rosa and in the PID area has been 72, he said. “It is my understanding that the City of Santa Rosa, which experienced water distribution system contamination after the Tubbs Fire, required a 72 hour ‘soak time’ of all infrastructure before water was sampled,” he wrote in a March 11 letter addressed to the DDW’s Reese Crenshaw, who was named by Del Oro officials as their point person but was unavailable to speak with the CN&R. “It is also my understanding that this 72 hour soak time approach was overseen by the DDW and EPA during support to Santa Rosa. The concern at that

time was that if a shorter soak time was permitted, any [volatile organic compounds] that were present in the plastics, including benzene (and others which were present), would not have enough time to leach from plastics into water for detection.” Del Oro also is offering to test standing homes at owners’ request, at cost: $70. That testing involves one sample taken from the kitchen sink, Roberts said, “on the fly,” meaning without any soak time. The test performed at the Gardners’ property also was “on the fly.” “We want to get an accurate representation from the location used most,” Roberts said. Another procedure Roberts and O’Farrell said was OK’d by the water board that Whelton says is inadequate: “You can take one water sample at the kitchen faucet, but there’s no evidence that that will predict contamination in your hot water heater—it’s a completely different

system,” he told the CN&R back in February (see “Widespread contamination,” Newslines, Feb. 28). In March, the county issued a warning to anyone living in standing homes in the Camp Fire zone that their houses’ plumbing systems themselves might be contaminated. Del Oro maintains that standing structures in its district are safe. Since he first came to Butte

County to consult on PID’s Camp Fire response, Whelton’s been clamoring for testing to search for more than just benzene. He’s brought his concerns to Del Oro, Butte County Public Health and numerous state agencies. While that chemical is known to be present in

Plastic water meters are the norm, but they were not able to withstand extreme heat during the Camp Fire. Del Oro officials say they plan to put in new plastic meters as residents rebuild and rehook to the water system. In contrast, Paradise Irrigation District is now using a combination of metal and concrete.

plastic plumbing, it’s also an indicator that other potentially hazardous compounds are present. That is why the DDW says its standard is to test for benzene only, Newton said. Whelton doesn’t dispute that the chemical is an indicator, but says it shouldn’t be the sole target of testing, as it doesn’t historically rule out other potentially harmful contamination. Whelton outlined his argument for wide-panel testing for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in his letter to Crenshaw: “Specifically, benzene was sometimes ‘notdetected’ (<0.5 ppb) when tert-butyl alcohol (TBA), a VOC, was found above its California drinking water

notification level of 12 ppb. TBA is regulated in drinking water by the DDW. Therefore, benzene did not indicate contamination for all regulated VOCs in Santa Rosa.” Put more bluntly, Whelton told the CN&R: “Not having benzene in the water doesn’t mean you’re safe.” Taking Whelton’s advice, PID is testing for dozens of VOCs and has gotten results above healthy levels for a number of them. The CN&R learned this week through public records requests that the water board back in December and January received tests results indicating the presence of other toxic chemicals, including lead. The water board dismissed the lead contamination, as testing came up positive only before treatment. (The before and after tests were taken two weeks apart.) In 2016, Whelton penned an article for online science newsmagazine Undark in which he said he was furious about what was happening in Flint, Mich., where people were poisoned by exposure to lead in their water. He says the sentiment still rings true today. “Since 2014, my colleagues and I estimate that roughly one million Americans have been provided toxic drinking water at their taps,” he wrote then. “[I]n what has become an epidemic of misinformation, poor testing protocols, and dangerously ignorant, bureaucratically bungled science, they, too were told that their drinking water was safe, only to find out later that it harmed them—or that officials did not really know what chemicals or other toxins were present in the water, despite having first declared it safe.” He’s still urging government agencies to take charge on behalf of their citizens. The local water districts don’t have the expertise to create protocols, so they need guidance from the state that ensures the protection of the public, Whelton said. “The failure of the state Water Resources Control Board to equally protect people in Butte County that are served by two different water systems that were affected similarly doesn’t make sense to me,” he said. As for Del Oro, whose customers have been told their water is safe despite tests coming up positive for benzene: “They’re trying their best, I believe, but this is their first time. “My thought is that they’re trying—but trying’s not good enough because people can still get hurt.” Ω

Cn&r is looking for • Advertising ConsultAnt Do you love Chico? Do you want to help local businesses succeed? So do we! The Chico News & Review is a family owned business that has been part of the Chico community since 1977. Our mission is to publish great newspapers which are successful and enduring, create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow while respecting personal welfare, and to have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. If you want to make a difference and do something that matters then keep reading.

Advertising ConsultAnt The CN&R is looking for an individual who cares about building relationships and partnering with local businesses. If you have the heart, we have the tools to train you to be a successful Ad Consultant. You must be self-motivated, ambitious and an independent person who wants to be part of a great team. Successful reps will have a sincere desire to help our clients assess their needs and work together to create marketing campaigns that increase their business. Bilingual/fluency in Spanish is a plus.

for more informAtion, visit www.newsreview.Com/ChiCo/jobs

equAl OppORTuNITY emplOYeR M AY 1 6 , 2 0 1 9

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Arts &Culture THE

“Longinquity II,” by Mariam Pakbaz

FIRE

INSIDE

THIS WEEK

Flames literal and figurative burn in two new exhibits

IMariam one-woman show at 1078 Gallery, Pakbaz says, “Even though the

n the artist statement for her current

Camp Fire smoke blew away physically, it’s still in my mind.” Although not all of the 20 pieces for the show were made after the wildfire, it’s easy to connect the whole collection of works in Something Not Yet Made to last fall’s life-changing story and event. photo by Saunthy Singh Billows of smoke and ghostlike figures of young women and Review: animals present a Not Yet Made shows familiar story and take at the 1078 Gallery center stage in most through June 2. of the mixed-mediaUncovering a Resistance shows on-wood-panel pieces. at Chico Art Center In “Longinquity II,” through May 31. a young girl astride a horse on a nighttime 1078 Gallery 1710 Park Ave. ride offers her back to 1078gallery.org the viewer, her attention on the cerulean Chico Art Center and chartreuse tapestry 450 Orange St., Ste. 6 exploding in the sky chicoartcenter.com in a pattern not unlike the style of Austrian painter Gustav Klimt. And while the rider is preoccupied, the horse morphs into a ghost, bringing to mind all the animals that perished in the wildfire. And those blue and green 24

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THU

Special Events THE “NOT-SO SENIOR” PROM: Cut a rug with The Paradise Big Band and The Classigals. There will be refreshments, prizes and a

photo booth. Dress formal or in a Hawaiian theme. Thu, 5/16, 6:30pm. $8-$10. Lakeside Pavilion, 2565 California Park Drive.

explosions? Were those Pakbatz’s reflection of all the propane tanks that turned into bombs? Pakbaz manipulates her medium to render a transparent watercolor effect, unafraid to let the wood grain peek through or be completely exposed, as in “Hope and Spring.” In the piece, a deer pokes through a cloud of smoke, with greenery serving as its headdress, in the middle of an otherwise naked wood panel. Amid Pakbaz’s ghosts and dancers moving through the haze, this piece’s hopeful scene offers the promise of a restorative future. Over at the Chico Art Center, the

recently opened Uncovering a Resistance exhibit features works by Kyle Campbell, Oni Dakini, Gini Holmes and Ryan Ramos, four local artists with “limited exposure” united under one theme. As juror Jacob Meders put it in his show statement, it’s “art as resistance or as artists having critical conversations with their community.” Through Dakini’s expressionist palette of mixed-media on canvas, a woman stares out from “Dakini Dances,” defiant and tough, with a poignant wariness and surrounded by flora, snakes, skulls and other female profiles. In the center, a collaged scrap with an explanation of

the symbolic nature of the sacred dakini female spirit is juxtaposed with a plain scrap with a penciled rifle, offering a contradiction of color and imagery. In “Briefcase Full of Guts,” Campbell has placed a dozen white lead-crystal hand grenades in a protective black case, deeming them a precious commodity despite their deathly impact. And in “Fortifying the American Dream (Gates),” he has four powder-coated castiron picket fences suspended by ceiling wires, raising this symbol of life’s success beyond the grasp of many. Ramos’ finely drawn colored pencil on paper “Amor” offers a tongue-incheek rendering of a Mexican man whose come-hither look beckons from underneath a blue sombrero. Lastly, Holmes voices her take on women’s issues and politics in “Three Jobs.” For the piece, she has embroidered over a heat-transferred image on handmade paper and then attached it to a dinner plate for a multitextured effect. The image is of a woman working in a field from an 1888 etching, “The Portionless Girl,” and it’s encircled with a quote from a comment former President George W. Bush once made to a divorced Nebraska mother of three: “You work three jobs? ... [t]hat is fantastic that you’re doing that.” Sarcastic? Oh, yes. And an effective example of pointed resistance. Ω

895-4015. chicorec.com

SUMMER BAZAAR: Fair trade gifts from around the world: clothing, jewelry, decor. Funds raised support the museum’s free exhibitions, programs and events. Thu, 5/16, 10am. Valene L. Smith Museum of Anthropology, Chico State. csuchico.edu/ anthmuseum

THURSDAY NIGHT MARKET: Local produce, fresh flowers, music, arts and crafts, and food trucks. Thu, 5/16, 6pm. Downtown Chico. 345-6500. downtownchico.com

SLEEPING BEAUTY Friday-Saturday, May 17-18 Paradise Performing Arts Center SEE FRIDAY-SATURDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS


FINE ARTS ON NEXT PaGE

Theater THE MADAM AND THE MAYOR’S WIFE: See  Thursday.  Fri, 5/17, 7:30pm. $15. Blue Room  Theatre, 139 W. First St.

PUBLIC READING OF VINCENT: Dramatic reading of  Leonard Nimoy’s stage play about Vincent  Van Gogh, presented by local theater artists Loki Miller and Olivia Cerullo. Discussion  follows.  Fri, 5/17, 7pm. 1078 Gallery, 1710 Park  Ave.

ROCK OF AGES THE MUSICAL: Birdcage Theatre  brings the wild musical production featuring  all your favorite ’80s hair-band hits to the  State Theatre stage.  Fri, 5/17, 7:30pm. $15$20. State Theatre, 1489 Myers St., Oroville.  birdcagetheatre.org

THE MOONDOGGIES Music KYLE GASS BAND: One half of Tenacious D brings  his other band and signature style of earthshattering rock to Chico. Local duo Hank  Duke & Big Uncle Steve opens.  Thu, 5/16, 9pm. $12-$15. Lost on Main, 319 Main St.  jmaxproductions.net

VOCAL MUSIC CONCERT: Inspire School of Arts  and Sciences presents its New Beginnings  concert.  Thu, 5/16, 7pm. $5-$8. Chico First  Baptist Church, 850 Palmetto Ave.

Theater THE MADAM AND THE MAYOR’S WIFE: Travel back  to 1901 in Nevada County, where shady  characters with a few secrets get into some  trouble. Written by local playwright Hilary  Tellesen. Live original music by Lisa Marie  and Heather Ellison.  Thu, 5/16, 7:30pm. $15.  Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St.   blueroomtheatre.com

17

FRI

Special Events BIKE IN MOVIE NIGHT: Sierra Nevada presents the  ’80s sci-fi favorite E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial,  plus beer, yard games and food. Pat Hull  plays a pre-show set.  Fri, 5/17, 7:30pm. $5.  Hop Yard at Sierra Nevada, 1075 E. 20th St.  sierranevada.com

CHICO STATE GRADUATION: Four ceremonies  over three days for graduating students  from various departments.  Fri, 5/17, 7pm. University Stadium, Chico State  University, csuchico.edu

FAMILY MOVIE NIGHT: Roald Dahl’s classic, James  and the Giant Peach.  Fri, 5/17, 7pm. Chico  Mall, 1950 E. 20th St.

FORK IN THE ROAD: More than a dozen local 

Saturday, May 18 Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. SEE SaTURDay, MUSIC

food trucks, a playground, beer garden,  and ’80s tunes by Esplanade.  Fri, 5/17, 5:30pm. Degarmo Park, 199 Leora Court.

NO COST/LOW COST DROP-IN HEALING CLINIC: Donation-based health care offering ear  needles, Moxa pressure and acupressure/ massage therapy hosted by local acupuncturist Michael Turk.  Fri, 5/17, 11am. Chico  Kodenkan, 254 E. First St.

18

SaT

Special Events

bring refuse to the parking lot of Chapman  Elementary where six dumpsters will be  waiting.  Sat 5/18, 8am. Chapman Elementary  School, 1071 16th St.

CHICO STATE GRADUATION: See Friday.  Sat 5/18, 8:30am and 7pm. University Stadium, Chico  State University, csuchico.edu

CHOCOLATE THUNDER MOTORCYCLE RUN: Ride  through beautiful Feather River Canyon up  to Paradise for a barbecue, music, and lots  of chocolate. All proceeds to support youth  organizations on the Paradise Ridge.  Sat 5/18, 9am. $20-$30. Sierra Steel Harley  Davidson, 1501 Mangrove Ave. 893-1918

CREANDO MI FUTURO FUNDRAISER: Unique and  beautiful clothing made from recycled  traditional Guatemalan fabric for sale to  fund families supported by single mothers  in San Pedro la Laguna, Guatemala. Music  provided by Jim Brobeck & Diane Suzuki  and Stevie Cook & Diane Garner.  Sat 5/18, 12pm. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

LIFE BY MOONLIGHT NIGHT HIKE: Discover Bidwell 

ALEX RAMON’S “IMPOSSIBLE”: World-famous  master magician has plans to blow your  mind.  Sat 5/18, 3pm. Red Bluff State Theatre,  333 Oak St., Red Bluff.

BIRDING THE PINE CREEK UNIT: Explore the  Sacramento River Wildlife Area for otters,  beavers, great blue herons and more.  Optional lunch at Scotty’s Landing after.  Contact Joyce Bond at chantedor@gmail. com for more info.  Sat 5/18, 9am. Free. Pine  Creek Unit, Highway 32. 519-4724.

Park under a full moon with a certified  naturalist. See website for details.  Sat 5/18, 9:30pm. Chico Creek Nature Center, 1968 E.  Eighth St. chicorec.com

SLEEPING BEAUTY: See Friday.  Sat 5/18, 2pm and 7pm. Paradise Performing Arts Center, 777  Nunneley Road, Paradise. paradiseperform  ingarts.com

CHAPMANTOWN CLEAN-UP: One-day event to 

THIS WEEK CONTINUED ON PaGE 26

POTLUCK, OPEN MIC AND JAM: Bring a dish to  share, an acoustic instrument, your voice,  a song or your favorite joke. Small donation requested.  Fri, 5/17, 5pm. Feather River  Senior Center, 1335 Meyers St., Oroville.

SLEEPING BEAUTY: Northern California Ballet  presents the classic love story.  Fri, 5/17, 7pm. Paradise Performing Arts Center, 777 

EDITOR’S PICK

Nunneley Road, Paradise. paradiseperform  ingarts.com

VOLUNTEER FRIDAYS: Pick up litter and pull weeds  in various spots throughout the park. For  more info call Shane at 896-7831.  Fri, 5/17, 9am. Bidwell Park.

WOMEN’S COMEDY SHOWCASE: Local female comedians, plus improv artists from Chico Live  Improv Comedy, and MC Becky Lyn perform  to raise money to help the Women’s Club  go solar. With a bar, plus food from Tender  Loving Coffee.  Fri, 5/17, 7pm. Chico Women’s  Club, 592 E. Third St. chicowomensclub.org.

Music WEBSTER: Live music and brews.  Fri, 5/17, 1pm. The Exchange, 1975 Montgomery St.,  Oroville. theexchangeoroville.com

TURN ON yOUR HEaRTLIGHT WOMEN’S COMEDy SHOWCaSE Friday, May 17 Chico Women’s Club

SEE FRIDay, SPECIAL EVENTS

FREE LISTINGS! Post your event for free online at www. newsreview.com/calendar, or email the CN&R calendar editor at cnrcalendar@newsreview.com. Deadline for print listings is Wednesday, 5 p.m., one week prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

Fun fact: Neil Diamond’s song “Heartlight” (written by Diamond, Carole Bayer Sager and Burt Bacharach) was inspired by E.T.’s glowing heart in Steven Spielberg’s insanely successful ’80s sci-fi tearjerker (“Gonna take a ride across the moon, you and me”). This Friday (May 17), Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. will put up a big screen by its Hop Yard outdoor bar and screen the classic E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial during its Bike-In Movie Night. There will be plenty of bike parking, the usual yard games, Sierra Nevada beers for sale and even an pre-film performance by local troubadour, Pat Hull. Tickets available at the gift shop or sierranevada.com. M ay 1 6 , 2 0 1 9

CN&R

25


THIS WEEK continued froM page 25

on

sweet meals! $5 Value, You pay $3.00

FINE ARTS

Music CHAT’S GOT TALENT: Local musicians perform 

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to support Chico Housing Action Team and  help create housing for families in crisis.  There will be ice cream, a silent auction  and a wide variety of musical styles.  Sat, 5/18, 7pm. $10-$20. Trinity United Methodist  Church, 285 E. Fifth St. 518-9992.

THE MOONDOGGIES: Folk-rock and woodsy 

Americana from popular Seattle band.  Sat, 5/18, 7pm. $15. Hop Yard at Sierra Nevada,  1075 E. 20th St. sierranevada.com

Cnrsweetdeals.newsreview.Com

Buy online anytime with a credit card or in person with cash, check or credit card M-F 9am – 5pm at 353 E. Second Street, Downtown Chico.

O.B.E.: Easy brunch tunes.  Sat, 5/18, 11am. La  Salles, 229 Broadway St. lasalleschico.com

Theater THE MADAM AND THE MAYOR’S WIFE: See  Thursday.  Sat, 5/18, 7:30pm. $15. Blue Room  Theatre, 139 W. First St.

ROCK OF AGES THE MUSICAL: See Friday.  Sat, 5/18, 7:30pm. State Theatre, 1489 Myers St.,  Oroville. birdcagetheatre.org

Butte County

W NE Week

19

Sun

Special Events

A celebration of all things wine, from vineyard tours and winemaker dinners to champagne brunches and sake tastings. Do you have a fun event you want to be part of Wine Week? Send details/questions to wineweek@newsreview.com or go to buttecountywineweek.com for more info. For more information about advertising in this special issue, call 530-894-2300

FREE MOVIE: Free movie every week, call 8912762 for title.  Sun, 5/19, 2pm. Butte County 

Music ALLDRIN FAMILY CONCERT: Touring family of nine  perform uplifting concert for community.  Sun, 5/19, 6pm. Evangelical Free Church  of Chico, 1193 Filbert Ave. with an R&B vibe by Paradise singer/songwriter.  Sun, 5/19, 11am. Tender Loving Coffee,  365 E. Sixth St. 433-0414.

Theater ROCK OF AGES THE MUSICAL: See Friday.  Sun, 5/19, 2pm. State Theatre, 1489 Myers St., Oroville.  birdcagetheatre.org

21

tue

Special Events LIBRARIES, COLLECTIONS, AND COMMUNITY: Dean  of Chico State’s Meriam Library, Dr. Patrick  Newell, will share his insights for the future  of library services in our society.  Tue, 5/21, 7pm. Free. Butte County Library, 1108  Sherman Ave. 521-4402.

22

Wed

Special Events word hosted by Bob the Poet and Travis  Rowdy.  Wed, 5/22, 5:30pm. Blackbird, 1431  Park Ave.

for More MUSIC, See NIGHTLIFE on page 28

26

CN&R

M ay 1 6 , 2 0 1 9

See art

Library, 1108 Sherman Ave.

OPEN POETRY READING: Poetry and spoken 

PRESENTED BY:

Shows through June 9 Museum of Northern California Art

University, csuchico.edu

SKIP CULTON: Vegan brunch featuring live music 

JUNE 7-16, 2019

WorLd of coLor

CHICO STATE GRADUATION: See Friday.  Sun, 5/19, 8:30am. University Stadium, Chico State 

Art 1078 GALLERY: Something Not Yet Made,  works by local artist Mariam Pakbaz .   Through 6/2. 1710 Park Ave. 1078gallery.org

BEATNIKS COFFEE HOUSE & BREAKFAST JOINT: Portrait and Figure Drawing, drawings and paintings by Chico Art Center  artists. Through 6/28. 1387 E. Eighth St.

BLACKBIRD: Introspection, featured art by  Rianne Thomas, Gisela Ramirez, Eunjoo  Joo, Benjamin Echeverria and Autumn  Robertson. Through 5/25. 1431 Park Ave.

CHICO ART CENTER: Uncovering A  Resistance, featured work by artists Kyle  Campbell, Oni Dakini, Gini Holmes, Ryan  Ramos. Through 5/31. 450 Orange St.,  895-8726.

HEALING ART GALLERY - ENLOE CANCER CENTER: Antonio Ramirez, photography  by late Northern California artist. The  Enloe Cancer Center Healing Art Gallery  features artists whose lives have been  touched by cancer. Through 7/19. 265  Cohasset Road, 332-3856.

MUSEUM OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA ART: Tend, Chikoko presents an exploratory multimedia exhibit that utilizes  found, broken, burnt and re-purposed  items with a focus on textiles to examine the meaning of home. Plus, Trapeze  Acrobats featuring paintings of acrobats,  divers, gymnasts and dancers by Clay  Vorhes. Closing event Saturday, May 25,  6-8pm. Through 5/26. Also, World of Color,  featuring artists Evan Warzybok, Owen  Smith, David McMillan and Naomi Griffith.  Through 6/7. 900 Esplanade. monca.org

ORLAND ART CENTER: Witty and Wild and  Whimsical, featuring the works of Gary  Baugh, Marilynn Jennings and Paula  Busch, ranging from collages to encaustic  painting. Through 5/25. 732 Fourth St.,  Orland. orlandartcenter.com

UPPER CRUST BAKERY: Beth Bjorklund, local  artist’s work showcasing fruits and vegetables. Through 5/31. 130 Main St.

VALENE L. SMITH MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY: Altar States Spirit Worlds  and Transformational Experiences, The  Works of Peter Treagan, interactive tech  art complete with 3D glasses and hidden  imagery. Through 5/17. Chico State.

Museums BOLT’S ANTIQUE TOOL MUSEUM: Unique museum  has over 12,000 hand tools on display,  charting cataloging the evolution and  history of tools. Closed Sundays. Through  6/15. $3-$0. 1650 Broderick St., Oroville.

CHICO CHILDREN’S MUSEUM: Featuring tons of  cool stuff for kids to explore, including a  miniature city, complete with a junior vet  clinic, dentist, cafe and farmer’s market,  a giant fish tank, multi-sensory room,  imagination playground and much more.  Check the website for hours and admission information. Through 8/3. $7-$9. 325  Main St. chicochildrensmuseum.org

CHICO CREEK NATURE CENTER: Living Animal  Museum & Nature Play Room, learn all  about local critters, plants and wildlife.  Through 5/25. $2-$4. 1968 E. Eighth St.  chicorec.com

PATRICK RANCH MUSEUM: Working farm and  museum with rotating exhibits open every  Saturday and Sunday from 11am to 3pm.  Through 5/26. 10381 Midway, Durham.   patrickranchmuseum.org

VALENE L. SMITH MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY: Remarkable Lives, exploring the intertwined worlds of birds and  humans, in partnership with the Altacal  Audubon Society and Snow Goose Festival.  Exhibits include bird songs and behaviors,  local photography and a robotic recreation of the late Jurassic Archaeopteryx.  Through 7/31. Chico State.


MUSIC

friday

May 17th @ 6-9pm

A sparkle of hope

DeGarMo Park 199 Leora ct.

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North State Symphony conductor Scott Seaton. PHOTO BY SESAR SANCHEZ

Symphony delivers powerfully emotional season finale

Lcaltelevision era, my initial experience hearing classimusic was subliminal. It was that stuff in the back-

ike many people who came of age at the dawn of the

ground of movies and TV shows that telegraphed how viewers were supposed to feel about what was happening on the screen. by Later in life I discovered that— Carey long before TV or radio, or even Wilson records—people listened to music live, as a communal experience. Attending the North State Symphony’s season-capping conReview: North State cert last Sunday (May 12) at Laxson Symphony, Auditorium—and listening to the Masterworks 4: music with an attentive audience and Pathos and Hope, an orchestra of skilled and disciplined Sunday, May 12, at humans applying their craft and sensiLaxson Auditorium, Chico State. bility to create a sonic experience that illuminated universal feelings and our shared humanity—was a testament to the power of live music. The Mother’s Day matinee began with a piece originally scheduled for last November’s symphony program, which was postponed in the wake of the Camp Fire. Beethoven’s 1807 “Overture for Coriolan” was played in collaboration with the Butte Music Teachers Association of California Youth Orchestra, and the piece—written for Heinrich Joseph von Collin’s 1804 tragic play, Coriolan—had a narrative quality that fit seamlessly with the concert’s title of “Pathos and Hope.” Supremely evocative of love and loss, the originally scheduled opening piece, Samuel Barber’s 1936 “Adagio for Strings” (played behind the broadcast announcements of both Franklin D. Roosevelt and John F. Kennedy’s deaths), stripped the orchestra down to nothing but stringed instruments. And the somber, lowvolume presentation gracefully emphasized the “pathos”

aspect of the program’s theme. The centerpiece of the concert, featuring visiting piano virtuoso Yinuo Wang, was Norwegian composer Edvard Grieg’s 1868 Piano Concerto in A minor, Op. 16, which required rearranging the stage to feature a grand piano up front, as well as squeeze in the full orchestra to support the young pianist’s delivery of this well-known piece. The concerto begins with a bombastic kettle drum introduction and soaring strings that go on to complement and enhance piano parts that range from dramatic, full-chord pounding to delicate trilling. It was a fun thrill ride of instrumental virtuosity and raw emotion that resulted in a well-deserved prolonged standing ovation. At that point, it seemed like any follow-up would be an afterthought or an anticlimax, but intermissions are designed to counteract such reductive assessments. A chilled beer, purchased in the theater foyer and quaffed on the outside patio among the well-dressed, mostly senior crowd put me in an open-minded space to enjoy the presentation of Johannes Brahm’s final major symphonic composition, Symphony No. 4 in E minor, Op. 98. In his spoken introduction to the piece, conductor Scott Seaton pointed out that “it really is a journey, searching for something—and for [him] it was pretty much about unattainablity—but for [the audience] there are lots of moments of divine hope in the music.” The four movements of this 41-minute masterwork employ all sections of the orchestra to manifest a range of emotions, from the gentle lament of the strings to the adamant, almost angry assertions of the combined brass and timpani. But my favorite aspect of the piece was the use of the humble triangle as a featured instrument. Its chiming notes scintillated over the entire orchestra, demonstrating by musical metaphor that one tiny voice—a sparkle of hope, perhaps—can alter perception and meaning no matter how loud the world gets. Ω

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NIGHTLIFE

THURSDAY 5/16—WEDNESDAY 5/22 9pm. $12-$15. Lost on Main, 319

Hemwick

Main St. jmaxproductions.net

MYSTIC ROOTS: Chico’s own reggae

stars perform. Thu, 5/16, 6pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

THUMPIN’ THURSDAY ROCK ’N’ BLUES JAM: Hosted by the Loco-Motive Band, plus special guests. All musicians and music enthusiasts welcome. Thu, 5/16, 7pm. Studio Inn Lounge, 2582 Esplanade, (408) 449 2179.

17FRIDAY

SHELTER RED & HEMWICK

BIKE IN MOVIE NIGHT: Sierra Nevada

presents the ’80s sci-fi favorite E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial, plus beer, yard games and food. Pat Hull plays a pre-show set. Fri, 5/17, 7:30pm. $5. Hop Yard at Sierra Nevada, 1075 E. 20th St. sierranevada.com

Friday, May 17 Ike’s Place SEE FRIDAY

EMO NIGHT: DJs will be spinning your

16THURSDAY

AARON LYON: TLC Thursdays series with guitarist and singer from Defcats. Thu, 5/16, 6pm. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St., 433-0414.

EYES LIKE LANTERNS FAREWELL SHOW: Local emo/indie fave is heading to the big city. Come say

2008 Warped Tour favorites. Fri, 5/17, 8pm. The Maltese, 1600 Park

goodbye. Thu, 5/16, 7pm. Argus Bar + Patio, 212 W. Second St.

JAKE CARTER: Piano-bar music. Thu,

5/16, 6pm. Unwined Kitchen & Bar,

980 Mangrove Ave.

KYLE GASS BAND: One half of Tenacious D brings his other band and signature style of earth-shattering rock to Chico. Local duo Hank Duke & Big Uncle Steve opens. Thu, 5/16,

Ave.

FRIDAY NIGHT CONCERT: Local classic rock and country group, The Retrotones. Fri, 5/17, 7pm. Chico Downtown Plaza, 132 W. Fourth St.

HAYSTAK: Country-style rap artist

performs. Fri, 5/17, 9pm. $10-$15. Tackle Box, 379 East Park Ave., 345-7499.

NO ONE ESCAPES THE KGB

Funnyman/rock-god Kyle Gass has made Chico a regular stop in his tour schedule for his bands Trainwreck and the Kyle Gass Band (pictured), but not for that other funny-rock crew with his usual partner in crime, Jack Black (yet!). Tenacious D is still on the road in support of last year’s Post-Apocalypto, but during a spring break the KGB is playing a few dates, including one at Lost on Main tonight (May 16). Local musical/comedy duo Hank Duke & Big Uncle Steve opens the show.

JOHN SEID, LARRY PETERSON, STEVE COOK: An eclectic mix of dinner music. Fri, 5/17, 6pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St.

LOOKING 4 ELEVEN: “The Legends of Rock” tribute with songs from Led Zeppelin, Pink Floyd and more. Fri,

5/17, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls

Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfallscasino.com

OPEN MIC: Bring an instrument. Acoustic/electric guitar and drum set available to use. Sign up at 7:30pm. All ages welcome until 10pm. Fri, 5/17, 8pm. $2. Down Lo, 319 Main St., 966-8342.

PUB SCOUTS: Traditional Irish music for happy hour. Fri, 5/17, 4pm. $1. Duffy›s Tavern, 337 Main St.

ROCKHOUNDS: Groovy classic rock. Fri, 5/17, 8:30pm. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfallscasino.com

SHELTER RED & HEMWICK: Inventive instrumental heaviness from Portland’s Shelter Red and Utah’s Hemwick. Chico’s Shadow Limb and Lyfecoach open. All ages. Fri, 5/17, 7pm. $7. Ike’s Place, 648 W. Fifth St.

SOUL POSSE: Fun dance band play-

WOMEN’S COMEDY SHOWCASE: Local

ing hits from all genres. Fri, 5/17, 6pm. Almendra Winery & Distillery, 9275 Midway Road, Durham.

TYLER DEVOLL: Happy hour music with

talented singer/songwriter. Fri, 5/17, 4pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

female comedians, plus improv artists from Chico Live Improv Comedy, and MC Becky Lyn perform to raise money to help the Women’s Club go solar. With a bar, plus food from Tender Loving Coffee. Fri, 5/17, 7pm. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St. chicowomensclub.org.

CALL FOR

18SATURDAY

CHAT’S GOT TALENT: Local musicians

perform to support Chico Housing Action Team and help create housing for families in crisis. There will be ice cream, a silent auction and

ARTISTS THE CN&R NEWSSTAND ART PROJECT CN&R is seeking artists to transform our newsstands into functional art. To see how you can be a part of this project, please contact rutha@newsreview.com 28

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THIS WEEK: FIND MORE ENTERTaINMENT aND SPECIaL EVENTS ON PaGE 24 SUNDay IRIS aND GaRRETT GRay Saturday, May 18 Tender Loving Coffee SEE SaTURDay

Hop Yard at Sierra Nevada, 1075 E. 20th St. sierranevada.com

SUNDAY IRIS: Soulful folk duo joined by poetic songwriter/musician Garrett Gray for night of locally sourced tunes. Sat, 5/18, 8pm. $7-$12. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St., 433-0414.

Sunday Iris

a wide variety musical styles. Sat, 5/18, 7pm. $10-$20. Trinity United Methodist Church, 285 E. Fifth St., 518-9992.

DRAG SHOW: Drag queens and kings

bring hot fire to the stage. Sat, 5/18, 10pm. $7. The Maltese, 1600 Park

Ave. maltesebarchico.com

FLORIDA MAN: Seattle hardcore punk crew joined by Portland’s Snakes and Chico’s Mr. Bang for a night of ear-splitting fun. All ages. Sat, 5/18, 7:30pm. $7. 1078 Gallery, 1710 Park Ave. 1078gallery.org.

THERAPY: San Diego hardcore with THE FRITZ: Latin, rock and funk for late

night happy hour. Sat, 5/18, 10pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

JOHN SEID, LARRY PETERSON, STEVE COOK: See Friday. Sat, 5/18,

6pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St.

THE KELLY TWINS DUELING PIANOS: Popular piano bros play your requests. Sat, 5/18, 9pm. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

THE MOONDOGGIES: Folk-rock and woodsy Americana from popular Seattle band. Sat, 5/18, 7pm. $15.

ATTENTION DOWNTOWN CHICO BUSINESSES: Your Guide to All Things Downtown

CHICO’S DOWNTOWN DIRECTORY

Filled with complete listings for shopping, dining, and specialty services, this easy-to-carry compact guide helps our community navigate the cultural and business hub of Chico.

2019/2020 edition hits the stands July 19. To place an ad in the Downtown Directory please contact your CN&Radvertising representative today: 530-894-2300 Want to make sure you are listed? Contact Katie Valenzuela, DCBA Membership Services Director at 345-6500 or katie@downtownchico.com 353 E. Second Street, Chico 530-894-2300 www.newsreview.com

The Choice and Dorothy Vallens. All ages. Sat, 5/18, 8pm. $7. Ike’s Place, 648 W. Fifth St.

TOM BLODGET AND THE KITES: 1960s

and ’70s pop, plus originals. Sat, 5/18, 6:30pm. Farm Star Pizza, 2359

Esplanade.

TYLER DEVOLL: Snappy guitar

tunes. Sat, 5/18, 7:30pm. The Exchange, 1975 Montgomery St., Oroville. theexchangeoroville.com

UPTOWN FUNK: Funk and R&B in the

style of Bruno Mars. Sat, 5/18, 8:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfallscasino.com

19SUNDay 22WEDNESDay

NOT YOUR MOTHER’S IMPROV SHOW:

Special monthly show featuring sketches, long-form improv and short-form games. Sun, 5/19, 7pm. Chico Live Improv Comedy, 561 E. Lindo Ave.

OPEN MIC COMEDY: Your weekly dose of free comedy with experienced and first-time comedians. Sign ups start at 8pm. Wed, 5/22, 9pm. Studio Inn Lounge, 2582 Esplanade.

OPEN POETRY READING: Poetry and spoken word hosted by Bob the Poet and Travis Rowdy. Wed, 5/22, 5:30pm. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

STEVE COOK, JOHN SEID, LARRY PETERSON: An eclectic mix of dinner music. Wed, 5/22, 6pm. Izakaya Ichiban, 2000 Notre Dame Blvd.

OPEN MIC COMEDY NIGHT: Working on a bit? See if it’s a hit or heckle-worthy, and enjoy cheap beer specials. Sign-ups start at 8pm. Sun, 5/19, 9pm. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave. maltesebarchico.com

20MONDay

COOL BANANA & MR. CLIT AND THE PINK CIGARETTES: Fun Ween-style weirdness from Salt Lake City’s Cool Banana, plus Indianapolis rockers Mr. Clit and the Pink Cigarettes. Chico’s WRVNG and Astronaut Ice Cream share the bill. Mon, 5/20, 8pm. $7. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

JAZZ JAM: Once a month jazz performance (7:30pm) and open jam (8:15), always all ages, always free. Mon, 5/20, 7:30pm. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St., 433-0414.

CUTE SHOW aLERT

Dang! This is some potently hip local-band action for a Monday night (May 20) at The Maltese. Two intriguing new Chico crews conveniently on one bill—electro-disco-pop duo Astronaut Ice Cream, plus all-cool-chick quartet WRVNG (pictured). Sharing the bill are Salt Lake City weirdo rocker Cool Banana and grimy garage-rockers Mr. Clit & The Pink Cigarettes from Indianapolis, Ind. This is a good’un!

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Lost in space A provocative interstellar journey into the nature of humanity

Iitsitsfar-flung array of peculiarities, and much else. In a way, oddness is what I liked most, but with

can’t say I really liked this film, but I do admire it for

the added proviso that, in this case, the film’s liveliest moments have only a glancing relationship with likeability, in the by usual sense of the term. Juan-Carlos Selznick High Life is the work of French auteur Claire Denis (Beau Travail, Chocolat), an English-language production that ventures into the territory of absurdist sci-fi and dystopian misadventure. Its chief setting is a rattletrap spaceship, an interplanetary ship of fools with a crew High Life of convicts sent on an experimental Ends tonight, May mission to explore the innards of a 16. Starring Robert very, very distant black hole. Pattinson and Juliette The key figures on board are Binoche. Directed by Claire Denis. Pageant a convicted killer named Monte Theatre. Rated R. (Robert Pattinson, in full, cool, derelict fury mode) and the mystifying Dr. Dibs (Juliette Binoche), the ship’s physician and freelance “sex witch.” Monte dotes on his daughter Willow, who was born on board the spaceship and serves as a kind of de facto captain among the increasingly demoralized crew. Dr. Dibs distributes medications to the crew, actively manages the ship’s sperm bank, and serves as a near-mythical sexual athlete. Echoes of more conventional sci-fi adventures are scattered throughout High Life, but Denis and her cowriters take care to strew the film’s low-key narrative

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events in distinctly nonchronological order. The result is a kind of poetic puzzle, the parts of which viewers can reassemble and link via dialogue references and salient details that recur. The film is richly evocative in a number of ways. The epic journey toward that black hole carries with it something like a Garden of Eden to which some of the characters occasionally retreat. Visually, Denis’ film can feel a little like an inversion of Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey, a journey away from the Earth and human time, and back to primal gardens and fire. Binoche’s Dr. Dibs might be taken as a wondrously radical variation, or reinvention, of sci-fi’s generic mad doctors and rogue scientists. There may be a touch of the original Alien as well, except this time the monsters are hairy robots wielding stainless steel dildos. It’s all an exceptionally interesting mix. Even the odd fits and starts seem to contribute some wild zest to the film’s crumpled, drifting narrative. It’s also a mixed bag, and maybe a weirdly furnished mess, but I wouldn’t mind at all seeing it again, and sorting through that strangely electric clutter some more. And by the way, the growling electronic score, by Stuart Staples and Tindersticks, is a wonder all by itself. Ω

1 2 3 4 5 Poor

Fair

Good

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Excellent


Reviewers: Bob Grimm and Juan-Carlos Selznick.

expected from a Marvel movie before he started showing up in them. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13 —B.G.

Opening this week

4

Amazing Grace

Sydney Pollack’s lost documentary on the recording of Aretha Franklin’s 1972 live album, Amazing Grace, finally sees the screen. Pageant Theatre. Rated G.

A Dog’s Journey

Like the persistent soul that lived in the succession of dogs from the 2017 film A Dog’s Purpose, the premise is reincarnated in the form of this tear-jerking/feel-good sequel about more dogs and their unified spirit teaching us about the meaning of it all. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

John Wick: Chapter 3 – Parabellum

In part three of the film series, “retired” super-assassin John Wick (Keanu Reeves) is in big trouble as a guild of elite killers hunts him down to claim the $14 million price placed on his head. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

The Sun Is Also a Star

A teen love story based on Nicola Yoon’s 2016 bestselling book of the same name about a college-bound young man who falls for an undocumented Jamaican immigrant teen whose family is being deported. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

Now playing

4

Avengers: Endgame

There are tons of questions this movie needed to answer: Is everybody really dead? Where’s Thanos (Josh Brolin)? Where’s Hawkeye (Jeremy Renner)? Is Tony Stark/ Iron Man (Robert Downey Jr.) doomed in space? Does Star-Lord (Chris Pratt) still have his Walkman in the great beyond? And, how can I really talk about anything specific in this film without becoming the Spoiler King? I can say that the movie answers many of the questions everyone’s been asking, and more, thanks to another well-balanced screenplay and a crack directorial job from the team of Anthony and Joe Russo. I can also tell you that the movie borrows a lot from Back to the Future Part II, and that the Hulk undergoes a fantastic wardrobe change. Despite a three-hour running time, all of this zips by in spectacularly entertaining fashion and very rarely misses the mark. And in the midst of all the action, Downey Jr. delivers another soulful, endearing performance, well beyond anything you would’ve

High Life

A sci-fi/fantasy with a nonlinear narrative starring Robert Pattinson as a man stranded in space with his baby daughter as the last survivors of a mission led by a doctor (Juliette Binoche) with sinister motives. Pageant Theatre. Rated R —J.C.S.

The Hustle

A female-centered remake of Dirty Rotten Scoundrels with Anne Hathaway and Rebel Wilson taking over the roles of the high-rent/ low-rent scam artists out to get revenge on the “dirty rotten” men who’ve wronged them. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

The Intruder

A psychological thriller about a married couple (Michael Ealy and Meagan Good) being terrorized by the previous owner (Dennis Quaid) of the Napa Valley dream home they just purchased. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13.

Long Shot

Seth Rogen stars as an unemployed journalist who gets hired as a speechwriter by his first crush (Charlize Theron)—who is now U.S. secretary of state and a presidential candidate—sparking an unexpected romance. Cinemark 14. Rated R.

Pokémon Detective Pikachu

A part real-life/part animated fantasy flick set in a world where people collect Pokémon to do battle against each other, with Ryan Reynolds starring as the voice of Pikachu, a Pokémon and budding detective who helps a human track down a missing person. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

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Poms

A group of inspired women in a retirement community form an unlikely all-senior cheerleading squad. Starring Diane Keaton and Pam Grier. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

Tolkein

Nicholas Hoult stars as author J.R.R. Tolkien in this biopic on the life of the creator of The Lord of the Rings/The Hobbit fantasy novels. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13.

UglyDolls

A superstar cast—including Kelly Clarkson, Nick Jonas, Janelle Monáe and Pitbull—provides the voices for this computer-animated musical based on the UglyDolls line of plush toys. Cinemark 14. Rated PG.

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Where are the organic beers? Brewers offer few options, and drinkers don’t seem to care

Sierra Nevada Brewing Co.’s Estate Homegrown series features some of the few organic options in the beer aisle. PHOTO BY JASON CASSIDY

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Adelivery brewer Ted Vivatson made a to a small organic grocery bout 10 years ago, organic

store in Davis. As he says he sometimes does, he took the opportunity to by observe customers Alastair browsing the beer Bland aisle. He recalls seeing a young woman carrying a basket filled with organic produce and organic packaged foods step up to the wall of craft beer bottles. “My beer was right in front of her, but she took a six-pack of Sierra Nevada,” says Vivatson, who helped establish Eel River Brewing Co., in Fortuna, in 1994. He says he asked the woman why, since she clearly preferred organic foods, she had bought a non-organic beer when an organic option was immediately available. “And what she said has stuck with me ever since—she said, ‘Well, I know that what I’m buying now is bad for me anyway,’” he recalls. That, in a few words, could be one explanation for the near absence of organic beer from the otherwise thriving craft beer industry. Of the 7,000-plus breweries in the United States, just a handful— a dozen or so, near as I can tell— make only organic beer, and one of the best known examples, Bison

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Brewing, in Berkeley, folded last year after 29 years in business. There are many breweries that make some organic beers—those brewed with 95 percent organic ingredients, including only organic hops—but they are a small percentage of each brewery’s total production. For example, Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. grows organic ingredients on its premises, and the brewery’s Estate Homegrown ales are certified organic. Deschutes also makes an organic beer—its Green Lakes Organic Ale. The beer industry is so sparsely populated with all-organic breweries, in fact, that the Brewers Association, which tracks so many aspects of the industry’s growth and trends, isn’t even counting. Bart Watson, the association’s chief economist, says there never has been enough demand from brewers for organic hops to generate a supply, and without readily available organic hops, brewers who may consider making organic beer simply can’t. “It’s kind of a chicken and egg process,” he said via email. Few people, it seems, are angry enough about all this. In fact, even in the wealthy Bay Area, consumers seem more concerned with saving a buck here and a couple of bucks there than with buying

healthier, safer beer. Daniel Del Grande, founder of Bison Brewing, learned this the hard way when he closed down last year. He says consumers weren’t willing to pay the extra cash that it takes to make beer with the esteemed USDA Organic label. “People just wouldn’t pay an extra 50 cents a six-pack for organic, much less the $1 it cost me,” he wrote via email. When Whole Foods Markets stopped carrying his beer, “I just gave up,” he said. My take on all this? People who buy organic produce when possible still happily buy beer made from conventionally farmed ingredients because of a mind-trick they are playing on themselves. Specifically, when they buy a relatively pricey craft beer rather than a cheaper mainstream brand, like Budweiser or Coors, they feel they have already made the “right” choice, the “responsible” and “sustainable” and “ethical” choice—the same way they feel they have made the right purchase by buying organic foods instead of conventional. So, they go happily home with their organic salad makings and their craft beer, thinking that the one is the other’s equal counterpart, even if the beer is not organic. Ω


Ma y 16, 2019

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ARTS DEVO by JASON CASSIDY • jasonc@newsreview.com

NINETEEN EIGHTY-FOUR Oh, man, simpler times—those junior high/early

high school years in my hometown of Redding, when tween Arts DEVO followed MTV closely for all his social cues and fashion moves. Trends shifted constantly in the early 1980s, and so did my allegiances. One month, I begged my mom to sew me a shiny black suit like Michael Jackson’s in “Billie Jean” (she did!). The next month, Def Leppard’s “Pyromania” hit the airwaves and I was off to the Mt. Shasta Mall to try and find a muscle shirt (pink checkerboard was my jam). Joan Jett gave me my hairstyle, until Duran Duran took over. And I went from parachute pants during my breakdancer period (two months?) to Frankenstein pants when I saw what Eddie Van Halen rocked in the “Jump” video. But I was on my own trying to replicate his jeans covered in leather patches, and my version featured a bunch of mismatched pieces of fabric scraps sloppily sewn to the legs. The coup de grâce, however, was when I removed the seam along the outside of one leg, took a hole punch to the jeans, and then re-threaded them Eddie Van Halen’s inspiring britches with two different colors of shoe laces. Cool, right? Of all the trends I tried on in those halcyon years—roughly 1983 to 1985—the one I rode the hardest was probably the hair bands. Most of my buds at the time leaned more toward the metal side of the spectrum, but I was all about the pop, the anthems and power ballads by Poison, Quiet Riot, Scorpions, Twisted Sister, and so on. It was easy to sing along with while I daydreamed about being onstage. Plus, the videos made it seem like girls were really into fluffy heads. (I had moved on to something different by the time my hair would have been long enough to go big. All I was ever able to cultivate at the time was a creepy-looking rat tail.) This nostalgic ramble is brought to you by the play Rock of Ages, which the Birdcage Theatre will present at the Oroville State Theatre this weekend—May 17-19. I’ve never seen the stage or movie version of the musical, and I had no clue until I started looking into what the show was about how killer the song selection is. It’s all of my favorite glam-metal/and ’80s-rock crowd-pleasers from those hair-band glory days: “Nothin’ But a Good Time,” “Sister Christian,” “Here I Go Again,” “Harden My Heart,” “Every Rose Has Its Thorn.” And there are three dozen songs! It doesn’t even matter what the show is about. That playlist alone will make for a great party! For more more info see the This Week calendar (page 24) or visit birdcage theatre.org.

RAISE THE ROOF … FUNDS For the past year, the Chico Women’s Club has

been trying to raise money to repair the roof of its 87-year-old building and install an 8,700-watt solar system. The repairs and upgrades are much needed and will save the club money over time as well as keep it cooler during events (if you’ve ever sweated through a summertime concert there, you know how important this is). This Friday (May 17), 7-10 p.m., is the latest in a series of spring fundraisers, a Women’s Comedy Showcase, with Becky Lynn as the host of a variety show featuring standup from local women and skits from Chico Live Improv Comedy. Tickets are only $5! Come show some love for this important community hub, and throw a little extra in the till if you can.


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY For the week oF May 16, 2019 ARIES (March 21-April 19): According

to humorist Dave Barry, “The method of learning Japanese recommended by experts is to be born as a Japanese baby and raised by a Japanese family, in Japan.” As you enter an intensely educational phase of your astrological cycle, I suggest you adopt a similar strategy toward learning new skills and mastering unfamiliar knowledge and absorbing fresh information. Immerse yourself in environments that will efficiently and effectively fill you with the teachings you need. A more casual, slapdash approach just won’t enable you to take thorough advantage of your current opportunities to expand your repertoire.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): I think it’s

time for a sacred celebration: a blowout extravaganza filled with reverence and revelry, singing and dancing, sensual delights and spiritual blessings. What is the occasion? After all these eons, your lost love has finally returned. And who exactly is your lost love? You! You are your own lost love! Having weaved and wobbled through countless adventures full of rich lessons, the missing part of you has finally wandered back. So give yourself a flurry of hugs and kisses. Start planning the jubilant hoopla. And exchange ardent vows, swearing that you’ll never be parted again.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): The Louvre

in Paris is the world’s biggest art museum. More than 35,000 works are on display, packed into 15 acres. If you wanted to see every piece, devoting just a minute to each, you would have to spend eight hours a day there for many weeks. I bring this to your attention because I suspect that now would be a good time for you to treat yourself to a marathon gaze-fest of art in the Louvre—or any other museum. For that matter, it’s a favorable phase to gorge yourself on any beauty anywhere that will make your soul freer and smarter and happier. You will thrive to the degree that you absorb a profusion of grace, elegance and loveliness.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): In my as-

by rob brezsny LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “All human

nature vigorously resists grace because grace changes us and the change is painful,” wrote author Flannery O’Connor. I think that’s an observation worth considering. But I’ve also seen numerous exceptions to her rule. I know people who have eagerly welcomed grace into their lives even though they know that its arrival will change them forever. And amazingly, many of those people have experienced the resulting change as tonic and interesting, not primarily painful. In fact, I’ve come to believe that the act of eagerly welcoming change-inducing grace makes it more likely that the changes will be tonic and interesting. Everything I’ve just said will especially apply to you in the coming weeks.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): There’s

a certain problem that has in my opinion occupied too much of your attention. It’s really rather trivial in the big picture of your life, and doesn’t deserve to suck up so much of your attention. I suspect you will soon see things my way and take measures to move on from this energy sink. Then you’ll be free to focus on a more interesting and potentially productive dilemma—a twisty riddle that truly warrants your loving attention. As you work to solve it, you will reap rewards that will be useful and enduring.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec.

21): Author Hélène Cixous articulated a poetically rigorous approach to love. I’ll tell you about it, since in my astrological opinion you’re entering a phase when you’ll be wise to upgrade and refine your definitions of love, even as you upgrade and refine your practice of love. Here’s Cixous: “I want to love a person freely, including all her secrets. I want to love in this person someone she doesn’t know. I want to love outside the law: without judgment. Without imposed preference. Does that mean outside morality? No. Only this: without fault. Without false, without true. I want to meet her between the words, beneath language.”

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

trological opinion, you now have a manMay 16 to exercise your rights to free speech with acute vigor. It’s time to articulate all the important insights you’ve been waiting for the right moment to call to everyone’s attention. It’s time to unearth the buried truths and veiled agendas and ripening mysteries. It’s time to be the catalyst that helps your allies to realize what’s real and important, what’s fake and irrelevant. I’m not saying you should be rude, but I do encourage you to be as candid as is necessary to nudge people in the direction of authenticity.

Capricorn author Henry Miller wrote that his master plan was “to remain what I am and to become more and more only what I am—that is, to become more miraculous.” This is an excellent strategy for your use. The coming weeks will be a favorable time to renounce any tendency you might have to compare yourself to anyone else. You’ll attract blessings as you wean yourself from imagining that you should live up to the expectations of others or follow a path that resembles theirs. So here’s my challenge: I dare you to become more and more only what you are—that is, to become more miraculous.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): During summers in

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): London’s

the far northern land of Alaska, many days have 20 hours of sunlight. Farmers take advantage of the extra photosynthesis by growing vegetables and fruits that are bigger and sweeter than crops grown further south. During the Alaska State Fair every August, you can find prodigies such as 130-pound cabbages and 65-pound cantaloupes. I suspect you’ll express a comparable fertility and productiveness during the coming weeks. You’re primed to grow and create with extra verve. So let me ask you a key question: To which part of your life do you want to dedicate that bonus power?

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): It’s time

for you to reach higher and dig deeper. So don’t be a mere tinkerer nursing a lukewarm interest in mediocre stories and trivial games. Be a strategic adventurer in the service of exalted stories and meaningful games. In fact, I feel strongly that if you’re not prepared to go all the way, you shouldn’t go at all. Either give everything you’ve got or else keep it contained for now. Can you handle one further piece of strenuous advice? I think you will thrive as long as you don’t settle for business as usual or pleasure as usual. To claim the maximum vitality that’s available, you’ll need to make exceptions to at least some of your rules.

British Museum holds a compendium of artifacts from the civilizations of many different eras and locations. Author Jonathan Stroud writes that it’s “home to a million antiquities, several dozen of which were legitimately come by.” Why does he say that? Because so many of the museum’s antiquities were pilfered from other cultures. In accordance with current astrological omens, I invite you to fantasize about a scenario in which the British Museum’s administrators return these treasures to their original owners. When you’re done with that imaginative exercise, move on to the next one, which is to envision scenarios in which you recover the personal treasures and goodies and powers that you have been separated from over the years.

CLASSIFIEDS Call for a quote. (530) 894-2300 ext. 2 Phone hours: M-F 9am-5pm. Deadlines for print: Line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Display ad deadline: Friday 2pm

All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. Further, the News & Review specifically reserves the right to edit, decline or properly classify any ad. Errors will be rectified by re-publication upon notification. The N&R is not responsible for error after the first publication. The N&R assumes no financial liability for errors or omission of copy. In any event, liability shall not exceed the cost of the space occupied by such an error or omission. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes full responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. *Nominal fee for some upgrades. A Unique Touch by Deja. Full-Body Shower and Massage. $140 per 1hr & 20min session. Ask 4 special rates 4 fire victims (530) 321-0664

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PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): “I hate it

when people tell me that I should ‘get out of my comfort zone,’” writes Piscean blogger Rosespell. “I don’t even have a comfort zone. My discomfort zone is pretty much everywhere.” I have good news for Rosespell and all Pisceans who might be inclined to utter similar testimony. The coming weeks will feature conditions that make it far more likely than usual that you will locate or create a real comfort zone you can rely on. For best results, cultivate a vivid expectation that such a sweet development is indeed possible.

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BIG 8 CONFERENCE at 666 Grafton Park Drive Chico, CA 95926. MICHAEL ALAN LIDDELL TRUSTEE OF BIG 7 CONFERENCE 666 Grafton Park Drive Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Trust. Signed: MIKE LIDDELL Dated: April 4, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000430 Published: April 25, May 2,9,16, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as IMPERIAL HOME INSPECTION SERVICES at 25 Vincent Lane Cohasset, CA

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95973. TREVOR REED MAY 25 Vincent Lane Cohasset, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: TREVOR MAY Dated: April 9, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000458 Published: April 25, May 2,9,16, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as COMANCHE CREEK FARMS, HAND IN GARDEN INC at 200 Speedway Ave Chico, CA 95928. HAND IN GARDEN, INC. 260 Speedway Ave Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: SEAN MINDRUM OWNER Dated: April 5, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000442 Published: April 25, May 2,9,16, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following persons have abandoned the use of the fictitious business names COMANCHE CREEK FARMS, HAND IN GARDEN INC at 260 Speedway Avenue Chico, CA 95928. HAND IN GARDEN INC 260 Speedway Avenue Chico, CA 95928. JAMES GAYL MILLER 260 Speedway Avenue Chico, CA 95928. GWENDOLYM M MILLER 260 Speedway Avenue Chico, CA 95928. This business was conducted by a Corporation. Signed: JAMES G. MILLER PRESIDENT Dated: April 5, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000132 Published: April 25, May 2,9,16, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ALMOND ASPHALT MAINTENANCE at 1050 B Lisa Lane Paradise, CA 95969. DANIEL JOHNSON PO Box 564 Magalia, CA 95954. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: DANEL S JOHNSON Dated: April 8, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000447 Published: April 25, May 2,9,16, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following person has abandoned the use of the fictitious business name ALMOND ASPHALT MAINTENANCE at 1050B Lisa Lane Paradise, CA 95969. FREDRICK S. YANNER 6644 Dolores Lane Paradise, CA 95969. This business was conducted by an Individual. Signed: FREDRICK S. YANNER Dated: April 8, 2019 FBN Number: 2016-0000242 Published: April 25, May 2,9,16, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are

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doing business as NORTH VALLEY HOME CARE at 2260 St George Ln Suite 2 Chico, CA 95928. CLEVERDON CARE SERVICES LLC 2590 California Park Drive #24 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: SPENCER C. ROGERS, PRESIDENT Dated: April 12, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000475 Published: April 25, May 2,9,16, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as FEATHER RIVER CRAGS APARTMENTS at 1200 Washington Ave Oroville, CA 95965. JADE EHRET 261 Via Del Sol Vacaville, CA 95687. TODD ANTHONY GAYLORD 261 Via Del Sol Vacaville, CA 95687. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: TODD A. GAYLORD Dated: April 5, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000444 Published: April 25, May 2,9,16, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following persons have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name FEATHER RIVER CRAGS APARTMENTS at 1200 Washington Ave. Oroville, CA 95965. TODD GALYLORD 3120 Oak Rd, Apt 422 Walnut Creek, CA 94597. MARCUS BONESS 956 John Murray Way Folsom, CA 95630. This business was conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: TODD A. GAYLORD Dated: April 5, 2019 FBN Number: 2014-0001100 Published: April 25, May 2,9,16, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as HAYDEN’S STUMP GRINDING at 4914 Pentz Road Paradise, CA 95969. WILLIAM H RITCHEY 4914 Pentz Road Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: WILLIAM H. RITCHEY Dated: April 4, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000427 Published: April 25, May 2,9,16, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as THE MAST FAMILY RANCH at 12269 1/2 Andy Mtn. Road Oroville, CA 95965. SANDRA H MAST 1090 Dundee Ave Ben Lomond, CA 95005. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: SANDRA H. MAST Dated: March 29, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000405 Published: April 25, May 2,9,16, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing

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business as BOYD SOAPS AND DESIGNS at 443 Stilson Canyon Road Chico, CA 95928. LIZZIE MCDONALD 443 Stilson Canyon Road Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: LIZZIE MCDONALD Dated: April 11, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000468 Published: April 25, May 2,9,16, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CHICO FLIGHT TRAINING at 900 Fortress St Chico, CA 95973. GLOBAL AVIATION CENTER INC 702 Mangrove Ave Ste 335 Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: DUANE PONTIUS, CEO Dated: April 9, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000457 Published: April 25, May 2,9,16, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as PARADISE TINY HOMES, TINY PARADISE at 1321 W. 7th St. Chico, CA 95928. JAMIE MARIE AUSTIN 11911 Hwy 70 E Lenoir City, TN 37772. RANDAL WHEELER AUSTIN 11911 Hwy 70 E Lenoir City, TN 37772. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: RANDAL WHEELER AUSTIN Dated: March 25, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000384 Published: April 25, May 2,9,16, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BLOOM PORTRAITURE, STEWART AND CULLEN PHOTOGRAPHY, TREATS FOR UNICORNS at 1155 Ceres Manor Ct Chico, CA 95926. WENDY STEWART 1155 Ceres Manor Ct Chico, CA 95926. WEDNY STEWART PHOTOGRAPHY, LLC 1155 Ceres Manor Ct Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: WENDY STEWART, OWNER Dated: March 21, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000366 Published: May 2,9,16,23, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CAMP FARETA GUINEA at 4944 Will T Road Chico, CA 95973. IMELDA MIRANDA MATA 4944 Will T Road Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: IMELDA MATA Dated: April 17, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000503

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CHICO TRUE VALUE, HOLIDAY POOLS RETAIL AND SERVICE at 230 West Ave Chico, CA 95926. GAAMA ENTERPRISES, INC. 971 East Ave Ste C Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: GARY POWERS, PRESIDENT Dated: April 17, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000495 Published: May 2,9,16,23, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as HILLSKEMPER CONSTRUCTION at 620 Lakeridge Dr Lake Almanor, CA 96137. BRIAN HILLSKEMPER 620 Lakeridge Dr Lake Almanor, CA 96137. This business is conducted by an Indivdual. Signed: BRIAN HILLSKEMPER Dated: April 18, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000507 Published: May 2,9,16,23, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as SKYVIEW AG DATA at 230 C Walnut St 115 Chico, CA 95928. JOHN MCKNIGHT 2709 Illinois Ave Corning, CA 96021. JOSEPH SANTOS MENDONCA 230 C Walnut St 115 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: JOE MENDONCA Dated: April 23, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000526 Published: May 2,9,16,23, 2019

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as HEEL AND SOLE SHOES at 708 Mangrove Ave Chico, CA 95926. ADRIANA COVARRUBIAS 1197 Ravenshoe Way Chico, CA 95973. GLORIA COVARRUBIAS 2366 Alba Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: GLORIA COVARRUBIAS Dated: April 11, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000470 Published: May 2,9,16,23, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as NORTH VALLEY WATER MANAGEMENT at 15317 Forest Ranch Way Forest Ranch, CA 95942. JODY LYNN CORNILSEN 15317 Forest Ranch Way Forest Ranch, CA 95942. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JODY L. CORNILSEN Dated: April 10, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000460 Published: May 2,9,16,23, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ALLIANCE APIARIES at 1009 Raven Lane Chico, CA 95926. TIMOTHY DANIEL HILL

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1009 Raven Lane Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: TIMOTHY HILL Dated: April 18, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000508 Published: May 2,9,16,23, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following persons have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name NORTH STATE NATIONALS at 14 Westerdahl Ct Chico, CA 95973. CLAUDIA VALLE 14 Westerdahl Ct Chico, CA 95973. CODY HOISER 2431 El Paso Way Chico, CA 95926. ANGELA PEACOCK 3441 Hackamore Ln Chico, CA 95973. This business was conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: CLAUDIA VALLE Dated: April 5, 2019 FBN Number: 2018-0000983 Published: May 2,9,16,23, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ELIJO’AN PUBLISHING, NORTH STATE EDITING, TE CHING at 466 Panama Avenue Chico, CA 95973. LYNN MARIE TOSELLO 466 Panama Avenue Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: LYNN MARIE TOSELLO Dated: April 17, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000502 Published: May 2,9,16,23, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as LIVING LIGHT MICRO FARM at 1387 Hawthorne Ave Chico, CA 95926. CRAIG ALAN PERRY 1387 Hawthorne Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: CRAIG PERRY Dated: April 26, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000541 Published: May 2,9,16,23, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as THE CREATIVE COYOTE at 5250 Mallard Estates Road Chico, CA 95973. LYNETTE CORNING 5250 Mallard Estates Road Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: LYNETTE CORNING Dated: April 19, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000516 Published: May 2,9,16,23, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATMENT The following persons are doing business as THE WATCHMAN at 130 W. 3rd St. Chico, CA 95928. THE WATCHMAN THE ORIGINAL LLC 130 W. 3rd St. Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: KIM JAMISON, OWNER Dated: March 25, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000386 Published: May 9,16,23,30, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS

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NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as C AND C UTILITY, INC at 632 Entler Avenue Chico, CA 95928. C & C UTILITY, INC. 632 Entler Avenue Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: KIMBERLY CABRAL, CEO Dated: April 30, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000549 Published: May 9,16,23,30, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATMENT The following person is doing business as ATLAS ENGRAVING at 432 Nord Avenue Chico, CA 95926. JACOB CURTIS OLSEN 432 Nord Avenue Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JACOB OLSEN Dated: May 2, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000558 Published: May 9,16,23,30, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as WOFCHUCK FAMILY FARM at 1725 Dayton Road Chico, CA 95928. COLLEEN BRIDGET WOFCHUCK 1725 Dayton Road Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: COLLEEN WOFCHUCK Dated: April 30, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000551 Published: May 9,16,23,30, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as IN AND OUTBOARDS at 864 Inyo Street Chico, CA 95928. MICHAEL NEVENS 864 Inyo Street Chico, CA 95928. NICHOLAS ANTHONY TOGNERI 857 Inyo Street Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: NICHOLAS TOGNERI Dated: May 2, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000559 Published: May 9,16,23,30, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as THE LOTUS CENTER at 6268 Skyway Paradise, CA 95969. WILLAIM RAY POE 6499 Toadtown Way Magalia, CA 95954. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: WILLIAM POE Dated: April 30, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000550 Published: May 9,16,23,30, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as D & E AUTO CORPORATION at 3328 Esplanade, Suite D Chico, CA 95973. D & E AUTO CORPORATION 3328 Esplanade, Suite D Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Corporation.

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Signed: AARON WEBER, CEO Dated: April 25, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000535 Published: May 16,23,30, June 6, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CHICO FACE PAINTING at 314 West 16th Street #A Chico, CA 95928. NORA MACHADO 314 West 16th Street #A Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: NORA MACHADO Dated: May 7, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000574 Published: May 16,23,30, June 6, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as RPM MARINE at 5656 Pentz Rd Paradise, CA 95969. MICHAEL THEADORE OMARY 5656 Pentz Rd Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: MICHAEL T O’MARY Dated: May 8, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000583 Published: May 16,23,30, June 6, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following persons have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name RPM MARINE at 5656 Pentz Road Paradise, CA 95969. LOGAN JEFFREY CUSEO 15192 Coutolenc Road Magalia, CA 95954. MICHAEL THEADORE OMARY 5656 Pentz Road Paradise, CA 95969. This business was conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: MICHAEL T O’MARY Dated: May 8, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000377 Published: May 16,23,30, June 6, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ARTISANS FAIRE, BAH HUMBUG FESTIVAL OF CRAFTS, CHRISTMAS FAIRE, CYRCLE PRODUCTIONS, ROONEY ENTERPRISES at 1429 W 7th Street Chico, CA 95928. STEPHEN M ROONEY 1429 W 7th Street Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: STEPHEN ROONEY Dated: April 16, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000485 Published: May 16,23,30, June 6, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CHICO YARD GAMES at 739 Dias Dr Chico, CA 95926. SEAN PATRICK CASTLEMAN 739 Dias Dr Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: SEAN CASTLEMAN Dated: May 8, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000577 Published: May 16,23,30, June 6, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are

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doing business as BILLY GOAT BRAND at 1178 Filbert Ave Chico, CA 95926. TAYLOR AYOSE ANDERSON-NILSSON 1178 Filbert Ave Chico, CA 95926. SHAUN ERIC BOYER 866 Vallombrosa Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: SHAUN BOYER Dated: May 10, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000594 Published: May 16,23,30, June 6, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as STELLER BLIND REPAIR at 1068 Lupin Ave Chico, CA 95973. KEVIN HIROSHI STELLER 1068 Lupin Ave Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: KEVIN STELLER Dated: May 10, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000591 Published: May 16,23,30, June 6, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BCCAC, BUTTE COUNTY CANNABIS ART CLUB at 1618 Nord Avenue, #11 Chico, CA 95926. CHRISTOPHER PATRICK HOWELL 3341 Neal Road Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: CHRIS HOWELL Dated: May 10, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000590 Published: May 16,23,30, June 6, 2019

NOTICES NOTICE OF LIEN SALE Pursuant to CA Business Code 21700, in lieu of rents due, the following units contain clothes, furniture, boxes, etc. 256SS TODD J JOHNSTON 7x10 (Boxes, Totes, Furniture) 227SS STEVENS TONETTE 6x12 (Furniture, Boxes) 038CC1 SANTANA SANDRA 6x12 (Patio furniture, Boxes) 239SS RENFRO RICHARDS 5x12 (Boxes, Household Items, Furniture) 205SS MAYS CARA 6x12 (Boxes, Furniture) 482cc MICHELLE CONLEY 6x12 (Boxes, Totes) 238SS ARTEAGA JOSE 6x10 (Couches, Boxes) Contents to be sold to the highest bidder on: Saturday May 25, 2019 Beginning at 1:00pm Sale to be held at: Bidwell Self Storage, 65 Heritage Lane, Chico, CA 95926. (530) 893-2109 Published: May 9,16, 2019

NOTICE OF LIEN SALE Notice is hereby given pursuant to the California Self-Storage Self-Service Act, Section 21700-21716 of the Business & Professions Code, the undersigned intends to sell the personal property described below to enforce a lien imposed on said stored property. The undersigned will sell at public sale by competitive bidding at the location where the said property has been stored. GRIDLEY SELF STORAGE 1264 Highway 99

this Legal Notice continues

Gridley, CA 95948 Butte County, State of California Unit No. #A008 JOHN GREEEN Items: Miscellaneous household items, Furniture Unit No. #B032 REBECCA BATTLES Items: Miscellaneous household items, boxes Unit No. #A056 SCOUT YORK Items: Miscellaneous household items, boxes Unit No. #AX318 HENRY BURIS Items: Miscellaneous household items, boxes, Lien Sale will be held: Date: Saturday, May 25, 2019 Time: 10:00am Location: 1264 Highway 99 Gridley, CA 94958 Successful bidders must present a valid form of identification and be prepared to pay cash for purchased items. All items are sold “as is” and must be removed at the time of sale. Sale is subject to cancellation in the event that a settlement is reached between the owner and tenant. Published: May 9,16, 2019

NOTICE OF LIEN SALE Notice is hereby given pursuant to the California Self-Storage Self-Service Act, Section 21700-21716 of the Business & Professions Code, the undersigned intends to sell the personal property described below to enforce a lien imposed on said stored property. The undersigned will sell at public sale by competitive bidding at the location where the said property has been stored. G&D MINI STORAGE 2687 Highway 99 Biggs, CA 95917 Butte County, State of California Unit No. #B03 MIKE HERRERA Items: Miscellaneous household items, Furniture Lien Sale will be held: Date: Saturday, May 25, 2019 Time: 11:00am check in at our Gridley office. Location: 1264 Highway 99 Gridley, CA 94958 Successful bidders must present a valid form of identification and be prepared to pay cash for purchased items. All items are sold “as is” and must be removed at the time of sale. Sale is subject to cancellation in the event that a settlement is reached between the owner and tenant. Published: May 9,16, 2019

NOTICE OF LIEN SALE Pursuant to CA. Business Code 21700, in lieu of rents due, the following units contain boxes, personal items, tools, household items, furniture, & miscellaneous. Unit 103 & Unit 104 CYNTHIA PETERSON Personal items, boxes, household items. Contents to be sold to the highest bidder on Saturday June 01, 2019 beginning at 10 am. Sale to be held at: South Chico Mini Storage 426 Southgate Ct Chico CA 95928 530-891-5258. Published: May 16,23, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner VERONICA VALENZUELA NAVARRETE filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: AIDEN MARTINEZ Proposed name: AIDEN MARTINEZ VALENZUELA THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter

this Legal Notice continues


appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 22, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: March 28, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00931 Published: April 25, May 2,9,16, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner RODGER SHORT filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: RODGER SHORT Proposed name: JERRY RODGER SHORT THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: June 5, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: April 12, 2019 Case Number: 19CV01144 Published: May 2,9,16,23, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner SARAH HANSEN filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: BRAYDEN ANDREW MEAD Proposed name: BRAYDEN ANDREW HANSEN THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard

this Legal Notice continues

and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: June 26, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: May 8, 2019 Case Number: 19CV01319 Published: May 16,23,30, June 6, 2019

PETITION NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE JOHN DAVID BENNETT aka JOHN D. BENNETT aka JOHN BENNETT To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: JOHN DAVID BENNETT aka JOHN D. BENNETT aka JOHN BENNETT a petition for Probate has been filed by: in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: MARIANNA S. BARRY be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: June 4, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: TBA Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and

this Legal Notice continues

legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: DANA L. CAMPBELL, ESQ. Tyree & Campbell, LLP 1600 Humboldt Road, Suite 4 Chico, CA 95928. (530) 894-2100 Case Number: 19PR00174 Dated: April 16, 2019 Published: May 2,9,16, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE CONNIE MARGARET LAUDER aka CONNIE LAUDER To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: CONNIE MARGARET LAUDER aka CONNIE LAUDER A Petition for Probate has been filed by: VERONICA L. STRAUSS in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: VERONICA L. STRAUSS be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: May 28, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: 10 Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in

this Legal Notice continues

section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: RAOUL J. LECLERC P.O. Drawer 111 Oroville, CA 95965 (530) 533-5661 Dated: April 23, 2019 Case Number: 18PR00398 Published: May 2,9,16, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE LUELLA ESTHER BITSIE aka LUELLA E. BITSIE aka LUELLA BITSIE aka L. ESTHER BITSIET To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: LUELLA ESTHER BITSIE aka LUELLA E. BITSIE aka LUELLA

this Legal Notice continues

BITSIE aka L. ESTHER BITSIE a petition for Probate has been filed by: GREGORY L. BITSIE in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: GREGORY L. BITSIE be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: June 18, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: TBA Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state

this Legal Notice continues

your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: DANA L. CAMPBELL Tyree & Campbell, LLP 1600 Humboldt Road, Suite 4 Chico, CA 95928. (530) 894-2100 Case Number: 19PR00215 Dated: May 7, 2019 Published: May 16,23,30, 2019

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REAL ESTATE

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Homes Sold Last Week ADDRESS

TOWN

4475 Garden Brook Dr 123 Landmark Dr 49 Chicory Rd 3113 Ceanothus Ave 113 Sterling Oaks Dr 244 Gooselake Cir 23 Morning Rose Way 1295 Glenshire Ln 1580 Borman Way 1377 Lucy Way 1973 Bending Oak Way

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico

38

CN&R

M ay 1 6 , 2 0 1 9

PRICE

BR/BA

$1,100,000.00 $675,000.00 $628,000.00 $556,000.00 $540,000.00 $529,000.00 $467,500.00 $435,000.00 $419,000.00 $395,000.00 $384,000.00

5/3 3/2 3/2 4/3 4/3 3/2 4/4 4/2 3/2 4/2 3/2

Two Homes on one Lot 4bd/2ba 1940s era Farmhouse w/ charm galore PLUS a 2/1 Cottage on Lg Lot $599

Jennifer Parks | 530.864.0336 BRE# 01269667

Sponsored by Century 21 Select Real Estate, Inc. SQ. FT. 3017 1935 2057 2038 2350 2073 2291 1603 1596 1402 1316

ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

79 Herlax Cir 26 Redding Ct 2038 Laburnum Ave 2511 Floral Ave 2224 Leinberger Ln 2520 White Ave 165 E 11th St 512 Pine St 2055 Amanda Way #28 1527 Elm St 1570 Nord Ave

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico

$378,000.00 $359,000.00 $320,000.00 $310,000.00 $310,000.00 $305,000.00 $245,000.00 $229,000.00 $210,000.00 $210,000.00 $207,000.00

4/2 3/1 6/3 2/1 2/3 3/1 2/2 2/1 3/2 3/2 4/2

SQ. FT. 1575 1050 2592 1031 1546 960 1056 812 1008 1250 2034


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The following houses were sold in Butte County by real estate agents or private parties during the week of April 22- May 3, 2019 The housing prices are based on the stated documentary transfer tax of the parcel and may not necessarily reflect the actual sale price of the home. ADDRESS 2099 Hartford Dr #30 9353 Holland Ave 15558 Nopel Ave 6172 Showdown Cir 14343 Carnegie Rd 2910 Table Mountain Blvd 25 Butte Woods Dr 187 Greenbank Ave 52 Old Forbestown Rd 34 Dawn Ct 3197 Oro Bangor Hwy 692 Mount Ida Rd

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

Chico Durham Forest Ranch Magalia Magalia Oroville Oroville Oroville Oroville Oroville Oroville Oroville

$200,000.00 $530,000.00 $307,000.00 $316,500.00 $290,000.00 $680,000.00 $400,000.00 $350,000.00 $299,500.00 $287,000.00 $250,000.00 $250,000.00

3/2 4/3 3/3 3/2 2/2 4/3 3/2 3/2 2/2 3/2 3/2 2/2

SQ. FT. 1375 2505 1580 1696 1634 2326 1852 1175 1453 1418 1340 1463

ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

SQ. FT.

7 Service St

Oroville

$240,000.00

3/2

1370 12th St

Oroville

$235,000.00

3/2

1253 966

25 La Mirada Ave

Oroville

$225,000.00

3/1

1070

766 Thermalito Ave

Oroville

$177,000.00

3/2

1165

2705 Oro Bangor Hwy

Oroville

$167,000.00

4/2

1227

5814 Old Olive Hwy

Oroville

$120,000.00

2/1

1166

5890 N Libby Rd

Paradise

$400,000.00

3/2

2249

1470 Bennett Rd

Paradise

$370,000.00

3/3

2340

928 Wagstaff Rd

Paradise

$280,000.00

3/2

1432

12257 S Stoneridge Cir

Paradise

$192,000.00

2/2

1250

Ma y 16, 2019

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