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ChiCo’s FREE News & eNtertaiNmeNt WEEkly Volume 42, issue 37 thursday, may 9, 2019 www.NewsreView.Com

Crowd Control Page

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Grappling with Chico’s post-Camp Fire population surge

8 RIDGE ER RESUSCITATION

15 WORLD OF WONDER

29 LIFE IN THE WHORE HOUSE


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CN&R

INSIDE

Vol. 42, Issue 37 • May 9, 2019 OPINION

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Editorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Guest Comment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Second & Flume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 This Modern World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Streetalk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

NEWSLINES

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Downstroke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Sifter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9

HEALTHLINES

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Appointment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Weekly Dose. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

GREENWAYS

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Eco Event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS

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15 Minutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 The Goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

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COVER STORY

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ARTS & CULTURE

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Music Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 This Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Fine Arts listings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Scene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Nightlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Reel World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Chow. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Arts DEVO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Brezsny’s Astrology . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35

CLASSIFIEDS

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REAL ESTATE

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ON THE COVER: ILLUSTRATION BY MARK RICKETTS

Our Mission: To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. Editor Melissa Daugherty Managing Editor Meredith J. Cooper Arts Editor Jason Cassidy Contributing Editor Evan Tuchinsky Staff Writers Andre Byik, Ashiah Scharaga Calendar Editor Neesa Sonoquie Contributors Robin Bacior, Alastair Bland, Michelle Camy, Vic Cantu, Nate Daly, Charles Finlay, Bob Grimm, Howard Hardee, Miles Jordan, Mark Lore, Landon Moblad, Brie Oviedo, Ryan J. Prado, Juan-Carlos Selznick, Ken Smith, Robert Speer, Carey Wilson Managing Art Director Tina Flynn Creative Services Manager Elisabeth Bayard-Arthur Ad Designers Naisi Thomas, Cathy Arnold Publications Designers Katelynn Mitrano, Nikki Exerjian Director of Sales and Advertising Jamie DeGarmo Advertising Services Coordinator Ruth Alderson Senior Advertising Consultants Brian Corbit, Laura Golino Advertising Consultants Adam Lew, Jordon Vernau Office Assistant Jennifer Osa Distribution Director Greg Erwin Distribution Manager Matt Daugherty Distribution Staff Ken Gates, Bob Meads, Pat Rogers, Larry Smith, Placido Torres, Jeff Traficante, Bill Unger, Lisa Van Der Maelen, David Wyles

President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Director of Nuts & Bolts Deborah Redmond Director of People & Culture David Stogner Director of Dollars & Sense Debbie Mantoan Nuts & Bolts Ninja Norma Huerta Payroll/AP Wizard Miranda Hansen Accounts Receivable Specialist Analie Foland Developer John Bisignano System Support Specialist Kalin Jenkins N&R Publications Managing Editor Laura Hillen N&R Publications Associate Editor Derek McDow N&R Publications Writers Anne Stokes, Thea Rood N&R Publications Editorial Assistant Nisa Smith Marketing & Publications Lead Consultant Elizabeth Morabito Marketing & Publications Consultants Greta Beekhuis, Steve Caruso, Joseph Engle, Rod Malloy, Celeste Worden 353 E. Second St., Chico, CA 95928 Phone (530) 894-2300 Fax (530) 892-1111 Website newsreview.com Got a News Tip? (530) 894-2300, ext 2224 or chiconewstips@newsreview.com Calendar Events cnrcalendar@newsreview.com Calendar Questions (530) 894-2300, ext. 2243 Want to Advertise? Fax (530) 892-1111 or cnradinfo@newsreview.com Classifieds (530) 894-2300, press 2 or classifieds@newsreview.com Job Opportunities jobs@newsreview.com Want to Subscribe to CN&R? chisubs@newsreview.com Editorial Policies: Opinions expressed in CN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons, or other portions of the paper. CN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or review materials. Email letters to cnrletters@newsreview.com. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form and to edit them for libel. Advertising Policies: All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes the responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. CN&R is printed at PressWorks Ink on recycled newsprint. Circulation of CN&R is verified by the Circulation Verification Council. CN&R is a member of Chico Chamber of Commerce, Oroville Chamber of Commerce, Downtown Chico Business Association, CNPA, AAN and AWN. Circulation 38,650 copies distributed free weekly.

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OPINION

Send guest comments, 340 words maximum, to gc@newsreview.com or to 353 E. Second St., Chico, Ca 95928. Please include photo & short bio.

SECOND & FLUME

EDITORIAL

Chico needs a lifeline In this week’s cover package, we assess the impacts

of the Camp Fire on the city of Chico specifically. Having covered the array of issues that have arisen since Nov. 8, we knew there were too many to delve into in just one issue. But, as we just passed the six-month mark after the fire, and with 19,000 new residents in town, we felt it was an appropriate time to sit down and take a hard look at Chico’s biggest challenges. Some of them may subside as homes are erected and critical services like safe drinking water return to the Ridge and surrounding communities. However, nobody knows what Chico is going to look like in the years to come. Our hope, after all is said and done, is that our collective communities will be stronger for having worked so closely together in this trying time. We must maintain compassion for the long haul, as those who experienced the trauma of evacuating and losing homes, businesses or loved ones are still dealing with the aftereffects. In fact, studies show that right about now—at the six-month mark—those effects take on new life, as people begin to move on from the initial shock and are forced to accept a new reality. Our hearts still go out broadly to everyone

by Melissa Daugherty m e l i s s a d @ n e w s r e v i e w. c o m

affected directly by the fire. But we cannot ignore those caught in the second wave of the disaster. Right now, Chico needs a lifeline. Our city government is struggling to address the needs of a community that grew by 20 percent literally overnight. From a housing shortage that continues to displace people who lived and worked here before the fire to an infrastructure system that was already overburdened and underfunded, the impacts are significant. Finding solutions to these problems won’t be easy. We’re encouraged by the steps City Manager Mark Orme and state lawmakers are taking. We applaud them for their efforts. And, as Chico seeks funding for some of those solutions, we encourage others to think outside the box and bring forth their own creative ideas. Thus far, though, the state and federal agencies responding to the Camp Fire have not come through with adequate aid for the communities dealing with the unprecedented secondary effects of the disaster. That’s not acceptable. We realize there’s no template for responding to such a situation. However, that does not release them from their obligations to act. Ω

GUEST COMMENT

a survivor’s plea for compassion, patience Tto beautiful one. In the morning, as we took our kids school, we saw the same people every day. That

he world that we knew before the Camp Fire was a

includes the spunky yard duty employee who wore superhero socks with capes on them. The love that permeated from her to the kids was unmistakable. She would dance and get to their level and make sure their day started with a smile. That fire took a small community, but one that was large in spirit. Ultimately, it stole our way of life. by Jessica Eggleston We never wanted to wake up one morning and become instantly The author, a homeless. small-business owner I miss going to Rite Aid and and mom, is a former seeing the friendly faces in there Magalia resident. and their genuine conversations of life and happiness. I cling to the memories: the smell of the pine trees after a good rain, marrying my husband in our church, my son’s first steps in our home. 4

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People lived on fixed incomes and low incomes to begin with. So people now stay in their cars, trailers and so forth because they can’t afford anything else. I miss the way my life was. My husband and I worked really hard to make ourselves a home. We were not millionaires and our home may not have been the Hilton, yet it was ours. Since the fire, we have become a community that has had to become a part of other communities— something neither was prepared for. At first, our new homes welcomed us with open arms and made us feel like it was all going to be OK. Now they have turned on us. We keep hearing about how we’ve created traffic jams and spiked crime rates. Today, I have good days and I have bad days. A lot of the survivors have no support—no feeling of family or community. So please remember that this is just as fresh as it was the day it happened. Please don’t tell us to get over it and make a plan. You can’t expect people who have a broken leg to walk it off. This is hard for the people going through it. We need time to heal. We need compassion. So please be patient. Ω

above and beyond For the past six months, the members of the CN&R’s small staff have worked near-obsessively to cover the effects of the Camp Fire. Over that time, we’ve published more than 150 stories related to the disaster. That’s an average of six stories per issue. For a weekly newspaper, that’s an incredible figure. Much of our work is the kind of in-depth, quality reporting that doesn’t appear elsewhere. But you don’t have to take my word for it: Our newspaper colleagues up and down the state read a portion of our coverage and ranked it among the best in California. We took top honors for Breaking News in a statewide contest in a category for the largest-circulated weekly publications. Here’s what one of the judges said about our initial stories about the disaster: “Most complete and multi-faceted coverage of the Paradise fire disaster by far. Strong writing throughout, hard to believe all of these 13 stories were in one issue of the weekly! Above and beyond coverage.” Some of that reporting, plus a bunch since then, earned us second-place honors in the Pubic Service category. “The Chico staff truly captured nearly every aspect of what their readers/neighbors had endured during the great fires of 2018,” a judge noted. I’m most proud of those two awards—part of our haul from the California News Publishers Association’s annual contest, the California Journalism Awards—because it speaks to our commitment to serve Butte County in the wake of the disaster. Big shout outs to Managing Editor Meredith Cooper, staff writer Ashiah Scharaga, and contributing editor Evan Tuchinsky for their stellar work since Nov. 8. A few other wins—two first places in the categories of Columns and Editorial Comment—are classic CN&R entries that speak truth to power. The former includes a piece in which yours truly took then-Mayor Sean Morgan to task for some ugly comments he made about local homeless helpers. Meanwhile, the winning editorial chides the Butte County Sheriff’s Office, including Sheriff Kory Honea, for wasting taxpayer funds on an embarrassing PR stunt at a time when the department faced allegations related to racial harassment in the workplace (a case in which the department settled with the plaintiff), as well as a pending wrongful death lawsuit. The paper took second in the Arts & Entertainment Coverage category for its work guided by Arts Editor Jason Cassidy with help from former Calendar Editor Nate Daly; a third-place honor in the category of Profile for contributor (and former CN&R editor) Robert Speer’s great story about congressional candidate Audrey Denney; and fourth place in the categories of Inside Page Layout & Design (Art Director Tina Flynn’s handiwork) and General Excellence (CN&R’s staff). Our colleagues at the Chico Enterprise-Record, competing against other mid-size daily papers, took home four first-place wins and placed in five other categories mainly for Camp Fire-centric submissions. Wildfire coverage by The Orion, Chico State’s student newspaper, earned that paper fifth-place honors for General Excellence. Additionally, our friends at North State Public Radio recently brought home regional broadcasting honors, an Edward R. Murrow Award for Best Continuing Coverage, for their excellent After Paradise show. I think it’s fair to say none of the aforementioned organizations will rest on our laurels. There’s too much important work ahead of all of us.


LETTERS

ATTENTION BOOMERS

Send email to cnrletters@newsreview.com

‘Fear-based response’ Re “And then there was one” (Newslines, by Ashiah Scharaga) and “Have faith in the Orange Street Shelter” (Editorial, May 2): I am pleased that the low-barrier shelter on Orange Street is moving forward under the direction of Safe Space. Finally, in the near future, comprehensive services will be available to so many people who have been without since the explosion of homelessness began years ago. On the other hand, I am dismayed by the NIMBY position taken by Chico State President Gayle Hutchinson. When she was hired, there was much fanfare about her devotion to diversity and inclusiveness. Well, here it is, embrace the real world, not the ivory tower, Dr. Hutchinson! This is a wonderful opportunity for Chico State students to participate in supporting those among us who are facing the most daunting challenges in our society. Instead of

being an adversary, there are many ways that the university can become a positive partner in this compassionate venture. My mind is racing with the possibilities! Emily Alma Chico

Gayle Hutchinson and Chico State’s fear-based response to the proposed Orange Street Shelter is a missed opportunity for student growth and improved town and gown relations. I suggest she look to Harvard for a better example of how to respond. I quote from the Harvard Square Homeless Shelter website: “The Harvard Square Homeless Shelter serves the community of individuals experiencing homelessness in Cambridge and Boston. The student staff and volunteer network comprised of students and community members work together to provide guests with shelter, food, security, and a supportive environment of mutual respect. In addition to providing these fundamental needs, we work individually with

those who seek our assistance as they strive to attain their own goals and make the transition into independent living.” I suggest having students invested in the Orange Street Shelter would elevate the university. Instead, this administration has chosen to, once again, turn inward and isolate the campus from an active role in improving the surrounding community. I am so disappointed in the Hutchinson administration. I was really hoping for great leadership, but that is not what we got. Barbara Hassig Morris Chico

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“didn’t have to outrun the flames.” You rode, into the fire. And you kept doing that. You know what happens to war correspondents. The same thing is happening to you. And you’re not moving on. Every week, you’re back in the fire. In the stories you write, oversee. Others may play at shiny happy people. You won’t. Because you won’t forget. Or let others, forget. And you’re to be honored. In that. I wish it weren’t so. But it is. You’re one of us. You’re burned. Know that it won’t always be like this. Someday, there will be something, other than the fire. Someday.

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White supremacy is alive and well in Chico, Calif. This is occupied Mechoopda Maidu land. Ali Meders-Knight is a Mechoopda Maidu indigenous woman, a mother of five indigenous girls, and an amazing artist. She is painting a mural celebrating Mechoopda culture at Second and Cedar streets with fellow artist Christian Garcia. Over the weekend someone vandalized their art with racist graffiti including swastikas and “White Power.” Saturday was Chico’s “Pioneer Day Parade.” Romanticizing pioneers is whitewashing the history that colonizers murdered, raped and tortured indigenous people, and stole the land. Sunday was an international day to honor all the countless missing and murdered indigenous women in North America. Native Women are the most likely of any demographic to experience sexual assault, domestic violence, police violence. Today I ask you to think deeply about the systemic and daily terrorism and trauma that native women live with for simply existing. Rain Scher Chico

Twenty-twenty hindsight Re “PG&E’s outrageous plan” (Letters, by Walter Ballin, May 2): Don’t get me wrong, I’m not picking on Walter Ballin, I don’t know the man from Adam. That said, I’d like to ask what he would do if he could turn the clock back a few minutes prior to the time the Camp Fire broke out.

PG&E operators at the Table Mountain substation were aware of a problem—strong winds—in the vicinity of where the fire started. Their choices at the time were to either shut the transmission line down or keep their fingers crossed that no problem would occur, and I’m certain the last thing on their minds was the absolute catastrophe that ensued when they chose the latter. Additionally, the fire started on private property. I know the rugged terrain in the area, and logistics prevented any rapid-response access. Putting myself in the shoes of the operators at the time, I probably would have agreed to keeping power on to what Mr. Ballin refers to as “5 million people in Northern California.” Twenty-twenty hindsight makes geniuses out of all of us. I’m sure that if the operators had realized that even one life was in danger, not to mention the devastation involved, they undoubtedly would have shut the line down. Just something for Walter Ballin to think about. What a horrible disaster. Ray Estes Redding

Retort to a retort Re “Commentary comeback” (Letters, by Peter Bridge, May 2): Mr. Bridge said, [in response to Clancy Callahan’s guest comment on being kicked out of her rental]: “… to pay an average of $935 a month for eight years? That says more about the renter than the rental.” What it really says it that Mr. Bridge must not be aware of rental prices in the Chico area. I, however, am, due to checking rental prices for various family members over the years. Even before the Camp Fire, a mediumquality “studio” apartment started at about $950 to $1,000 and has for several years. (Ever heard of college-town rental marketing? Wonder why there’s been no rental price-gouging since the Camp Fire? No need: Rent prices were already sky high.) So what Ms. Callahan was being charged for rent for a house was not anomalous enough by any means for her to be foolish, as Bridge seems to suggest. (Sure, she might’ve found lower rent prices within commuting distance, like Paradise, for instance.)

Please, Mr. Bridge, consider an apology to Ms. Callahan for your insulting comments about her, and please don’t start bashing Camp Fire evacuees next. I had six family members who had to evacuate and find new places to live. Don’t make me have to write another letter. Lynn Marler Chico

Speak of the devil Ms. Callahan was upset after being given 60-days notice to vacate, after her home of eight years was sold out from under her. I responded that “FYI: rapacious landlords could sell the rental, enter escrow, and give just 30 days notice.” The News & Review followed the letter with this footnote: “Editor’s note: In the state of California, landlords are required by law to give 60 days’ notice to tenants who’ve lived in a rental for at least a year.” However, here’s Ca. Civil Code 1946.1(d) paraphrased. A landlord who is selling his or her house to a person that wants to live in it may wait until entering escrow and then lawfully serve the tenant a 30-day notice. I think my statement was informational and the editor’s note only served to confuse the issue—in more ways than one. Read the note again. By the time you’re 25, you’ve probably lived in “a” rental for at least a year. What if that’s not “the” rental you’ve been living in for only the last nine months? I jest. But please understand. That 30-day notice, even after eight years in the rental, may in fact be lawful. Peter Bridge Ord Bend

Joking about lawyers Just north of Chico, alongside Highway 99, stands a billboard that reads: “Fire Lawyers.” In this particular case, most folks would agree. Kenneth B. Keith Tehama

More letters online:

We’ve got too many letters for this space. please go to www.newsreview.com/chico for additional readers’ comments on past cn&r articles.


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NEWSLINES DOWNSTROKE PG&E SUGGESTS WILDFIRE FUND

PG&E intends to dedicate $105 million to creating a wildfire assistance program, according to legal documents. If the U.S. Bankruptcy Court approves such a fund, it would provide financial relief to California fire victims, most likely those without sufficient insurance or who can prove financial hardship. In other news, a federal judge ordered PG&E’s board to visit Paradise. Last month, 10 new board members were appointed, as well as CEO and President Bill Johnson. He will make $2.5 million annually, more than two times as much as his predecessor. PG&E filed for bankruptcy in January, citing up to $30 billion in liabilities because of wildfires linked to its equipment.

Care urgency

LOCAL PAPERS HONORED

The California News Publishers Association honored the Chico News & Review with eight awards Saturday (May 4) at the 2018 California Journalism Awards gala in Long Beach. The CN&R, which competed in the contest’s largest-circulation category for weekly papers, won first-place awards for Breaking News (Nov. 15 Camp Fire coverage), Editorial Comment (“What were they thinking?” July 26) and Columns (Melissa Daugherty’s “Spot-on, Mr. Mayor,” March 22, and “Heartbreak Ridge,” Nov. 15). It also took second-place honors in the Public Service and Arts & Entertainment Coverage categories, as well as several honorable mentions. Local award winners also included the Chico Enterprise-Record, which earned top honors in four writing categories for dailies with circulations between 15,000 and 50,000, including Breaking News, Feature Story, Editorial Comment and Sports Feature Story. The CN&R, E-R and Chico State’s student newspaper, The Orion, took home honorable mentions for General Excellence.

BEC DIRECTOR DEPARTS

Natalie Carter has stepped down as executive director of the Butte Environmental Council, indicating she is taking on a new role at the Abbey of New Clairvaux, a BEC spokesman told the CN&R this week. Carter (pictured) led the nonprofit environmental watchdog group for three years. She previously had served as general manager at the Chico Certified Farmers’ Market. Her exit came Saturday (May 4), following the 40th anniversary of the Endangered Species Faire, which was organized by BEC and held in Lower Bidwell Park. The organization’s board of directors will decide what to do with the leadership position moving forward, said Craig Wilcox, BEC’s business manager. 8

CN&R

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Emergency room for Ridge gets legislative push, though hospital in no rush

A Jones has heard an array of concerns from residents assessing what the com-

s the town rebuilds, Paradise Mayor Jody

munity needs. Foremost are the basics of existence—housing, safe water—but her conby stituents also talk about Evan Tuchinsky access to health care. evan t u c h i ns k y @ Six months ago, on n ew srev i ew. c o m Nov. 8, the Camp Fire blew through Adventist Health Feather River Hospital en route to destroying 90 percent of Paradise. Portions of the Pentz Road campus didn’t survive; many hospital buildings remained standing but suffered damage. Feather River closed for just the second time in its 68-year history; still shuttered, most of its affiliated physicians left the area (see “Medical migration,” Cover story, March 14). Adventist Health—the Ridge’s largest employer before the fire—laid off 798 of 1,205 employees and has not committed to reopening the hospital. In conversations and at public meetings, Jones told the CN&R, Paradisians have expressed the importance of addressing medical services in the town’s planning process.

“I can’t say it’s on the top of people’s minds right now, but it’s on the list of things that they’re looking for to be able to come back, rebuild and live in Paradise,” Jones said by phone. “Most people do not want to live in a town where there are no medical services.” Adventist Health did reopen the Feather River Health Center, a clinic building on lower Skyway. It offers primary care, a pharmacy and certain specialists. However, there’s no emergency room— nowhere for people to go, 24/7, whatever their medical and financial condition. For life-or-death situations, time is of the essence. Ambulances must take patients off the Ridge—to Enloe Medical Center (16 miles from centrally located Paradise High) or Oroville Hospital (21 miles)—instead of to Feather River (3.5 miles). Jones said that “it is very important” to have critical care in the immediate vicinity. State Sen. Jim Nielsen feels the same way. A Republican whose district includes Butte County, Nielsen has visited the burn zone repeatedly and, like Jones, spoken with constituents. An emergency room may not be the first thing they mention, he said, but its absence is conspicuous.

“From the moment the fire started, we began assessing courses of action each step along the way,” Nielsen said by phone from Sacramento. “When that hospital was hit, then we knew that we were going to be having to do something about it—to try to save some service up there on the Ridge.” Toward that end, Nielsen authored Senate Bill 156. Co-authored by Assemblyman Jim Gallagher, Nielsen’s bill would revise the state’s Health and Safety Code to allow Adventist Health to operate an emergency room in Paradise without a full hospital. The state would grant a twoyear special permit with the potential for two renewals, totaling six years. The bill applies only to Adventist Health and Paradise. “This is needed,” Nielsen said. “Even the [California] Hospital Association is very supportive of it. We’ve narrowed it, so we’re not making it a precedent or applicable to anything other than this very limited circumstance, so I don’t think we’re going to have any trouble with it.” SB 156 passed unanimously in the Senate Health Committee late last month and awaits action by the Appropriations Committee, which meets Monday (May 13). The committee could forgo a hearing and


Adventist Health Feather River’s emergency room, shown Nov. 9, may get a temporary dispensation to reopen without the hospital operating fully. CN&R FILE PHOTO

send it straight to the full Senate. “The goal is to get this done quickly and get some service up there,” Nielsen added. Adventist Health, which sponsored the bill,

is not rushing to reopen. Feather River’s parent organization, headquartered in Roseville, told the CN&R via written responses to questions that adoption of SB 156 “[would] enable Adventist Health to explore the option of possibly providing emergency care services in Paradise.” If Adventist Health moves forward, it “will consider the former Emergency Department” at the Pentz Road campus but may select another location. A helicopter pad would be a decision point. For support services, “the site could include its own diagnostic equipment, including full radiological facilities, CT scanners and ultrasonography equipment, which are needed for rapid diagnostics. It may also have lab services, which can support providers in obtaining blood counts, blood typing and critically important toxic screenings.” The license framework, two to six years, “allows Adventist Health to consider opening [e]mergency services while it continues to assess the next steps in the longer term recovery efforts.” With all this uncertainty, the organization offered no timetable for opening an emergency room. Dr. Richard Thorp, an internal medicine physician who’s president of Paradise Medical Group, expressed disappointment in the apparent lack of urgency but said he understands the hesitancy. Now based in Chico, his practice just reopened an office PMG renovated at its fire-damaged site. He’s been on the hospital’s medical staff for 38 years, serving 20 on its executive committee. “They are being careful about what they’re promising,” Thorp said by phone. “They don’t want to overpromise and underdeliver.” From the business side, he said he appreciates the risk of investing heavily in a place with an uncertain population. “But there’s a community perspective, like a chicken before the egg kind of thing,” Thorp added. “If somebody goes in, plants a flag and says, ‘We’re going to be here, we’re going to provide a service here so that there’s going to be care for this community,’ that’s going to give people confidence to come back and re-establish.” Ω

Another long night Council addresses array of items, including climate action, emergency shelter and budget Sisarie Sherry lies awake at night contemplating

dozens of what-ifs. What if sea levels continue to rise, or if the permafrost melts? Without addressing climate change, those “ifs” become “whens,” Sherry told the Chico City Council Tuesday night (May 7). “When is the next fire going to roll through and destroy the next town?” Sherry isn’t alone in her concerns. Alongside 18 others, many of them Chico State students, she called on the city to reconfigure the city’s Sustainability Task Force into a climate action commission with the same staff support as other city boards. The majority of the panel replied in support, creating the seven-member body, which will be geared toward implementing the city’s Climate Action Plan and responding to its declaration of a climate emergency, made last month the same night a storm cut that meeting short (see “Nature speaks, council heeds,” Newslines, April 4). That agenda item drew the most speakers of the night, even though the 2019-20 budget and emergency housing regulations also were on the docket. When it came to the budget, Fire Chief Steve Standridge had good news to report for his department: City staff is proposing adding a firefighter. “Without a doubt, staffing is my most critical need,” Standridge told the panel. That one position will bring daily staffing to 15, enough to operate an additional fire engine. From Sept. 1 to Dec. 15 last year, Standridge utilized spare overtime funds to staff another fire engine. As a result, response time improved by

4 percent. That being said, Standridge reminded the council that 17 firefighters per day is ideal, and that was before 19,000 more residents settled in Chico after the Camp Fire. Following the public safety theme, Chico Police Chief Mike O’Brien also made a budget presentation. His department will add six officers—two will be grant-funded school resource officers (see “Back to school,” Newslines, Aug. 23, 2018). The remaining four, including one sergeant, will make up the Street Crimes Unit. Those positions already have been created—the council voted in October to make the unit a permanent fixture, directing $186,000 in police overtime to pay

SIFT ER For Mom Americans plan to shell out more than ever—$25 billion total, about $200 each—to shower their moms with love this year, according to the National Retail Federation. The trade association has tracked the holiday’s spending since 2003. While greeting cards and flowers still dominate when it comes to the most popular Mother’s Day gifts, less conventional choices have popped up in the past decade—such as personal services, like massages, and special outings, like Mother’s Day brunch. Here are the top 10 gifts people plan to buy (according to 7,321 adults surveyed for the retail federation by Prosper Insights & Analytics).

Gift

Percent

Avg. cost

Greeting card ........75 ...........$6.64 Flowers ....................67 ...........$20.31 Special outing ........55...........$36.41 Gift card/ certificate..........45...........$20.65 Clothing/ accessories............38 ...........$18.07 Jewelry ....................35...........$40.87 Personal service ..24...........$15.80 Housewares/ garden tools...........20...........$8.82 Books/CDs ..............20...........$4.28 Electronics .............15 ...........$17.15

Chico Fire Chief Steve Standridge says it is significant that city staff is proposing adding a firefighter in the 2019-20 fiscal year. CN&R FILE PHOTO

for four academy recruits. The question remains, however, as to how their salaries will be funded. Administrative Services Director Scott Dowell said city staff has suggested using $350,000 from the wastehauling franchise agreement funds, which the council originally earmarked for road improvements, and $350,000 from Chico PD overtime. The council will finalize the budget at its first meeting in June. Like most agendas in the past several

months, there was plenty for the council to cover. Perhaps the most contentious item of the night involved the adoption of state regulations crafted for cities that made shelter crisis declarations, as the council did late last year. It provides requirements for emergency housing facilities—such as tents, lofts, manufactured houses, mobile homes and cabins—related to drinking water, waste disposal, toilet and bath services and kitchen space, among other things. Chico Housing Action Team (CHAT) volunteers showed up to advocate for the service provider’s tiny home community, Simplicity Village, planned for Notre Dame Boulevard. Charles Withuhn, who has long championed the effort, told the city that the project is “enjoying very broad community support.” Four of the homes already have been built, and 16 financed, he said. While Councilman Sean Morgan offered praise for CHAT, he criticized the state regulations. He argued that California always will have a homeless NEWSLINES C O N T I N U E D M AY 9 , 2 0 1 9

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crisis, implying that the city would thus essentially establish permanent, substandard housing and attract more homeless people to the area. Chico’s declaration specifies an end date of June 30, 2021. Mayor Randall Stone had the last word, speaking fervently in support. The median household income of Chico is $45,000, and the median home price is out of reach. The city’s lowest-income residents can’t afford base-level rent. That is, in part, because city fees for new development were historically the same for small and large homes, encouraging developers to build bigger. “We couldn’t provide housing for our residents in this community before the Camp Fire,” he said. “We have to build for the entire community … that includes people that are making $800 a month and that includes people that are making $8 million a month.” The vote to adopt the state regulations passed 5-2, with Morgan and Councilwoman Kasey Reynolds against. In addition, it looks likely that the council’s meeting procedures could change, even if the length of its meetings does not. Morgan motioned to end the meeting at 10 p.m., just as the clock struck that hour. He and fellow conservative Reynolds were outvoted. “I can’t imagine going to bed at 10 o’clock if we could go till midnight to address these issues that are so pertinent,” Stone said, reiterating the city’s need to address Camp Fire-related issues. Morgan replied that while he understands the point, “when we’re going into closed session at midnight and doing personnel reviews or litigation … we’re not doing the public a good service.” The council unanimously agreed to discuss several items at future meetings related to meeting protocol, including length, the timing of business from the floor and responses to pending litigation. In other council news: The panel also reviewed the city’s Diversity Action Plan for the first time since 2013, and adopted goals. This includes increasing outreach to underrepresented groups, having departments make annual workforce diversity reports, and scheduling presentations from cultural groups. —AshiAh schArAgA ash ia h s@ newsr ev iew.c o m


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CN&R

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HEALTHLINES Jessica Kamph, principal of Marsh Junior High, stands on the campus plot that soon will become a garden where students can relieve stress through horticulture.

their room,” Snyder said. “That [electronic] device is still a portal, they’re still vulnerable, and so I think that’s been a huge contributor to some of the anxiety, the stress, the depression, the self-harm that we’re seeing.” What about those who’ve lost their home? Marsh is one of numerous schools across Butte County with Camp Fire refugees. Forty-two Marsh students lost their homes in the Nov. 8 firestorm that swept from Pulga over the Ridge into Butte Creek Canyon. Another 20 newly enrolled after their families relocated to Chico. All told, the Chico Unified School District accepted 321 students displaced from the burn area (see “Coming together for the kids,” cover story, page 19). In the aftermath, Kamph said, many have found themselves “in really tight living quarters,” sharing a bedroom, “and they’re not used to not having the things around them that they had every day. They don’t feel like anything’s theirs—that identity, ‘my home’—and kind of feel like they’re floating out there.” Soon, they’ll have a place at school to find grounding. Marsh received a grant from the Camp Fire Relief Fund, administered by the North Valley Community Foundation, to create a calming room. Also known as reset rooms,

“We’re trained as a staff to give them an opportunity to calm themselves before anything more serious happens.” —Sheila Snyder

School refuge Calming rooms give traumatized kids places to decompress

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story and photo by

Evan Tuchinsky

evant u c h i ns k y @new srev i ew. c o m

M cumstances, represent a time of transition. Students enter adolescence while facing

iddle school years, even in the best of cir-

increased pressures, socially and academically. Internet images, videos and comments add heat to the crucible. Jessica Kamph and Sheila Snyder—principal and counselor, respectively, at Marsh Junior High in Chico—see the signs every day. Emotional issues permeate campus. Beyond their angst and tension, kids all too frequently resort to self-injuring practices such as cutting as psychological mechanisms to cope. “The safest place in the world, hopefully, will be in their own home with their family in

these spaces provide a quieting environment where students can seek a brief respite to ease agitation. Pleasant Valley High has a place set aside inside its learning center; Chico Junior High has its “Zen Den,” a room dedicated fully to calming; and Bidwell Junior recently set up a room. Chapman Elementary, whose counselor devotes part of her office to a calming space, last year had “the Blue Room.” That served as a model for the Palermo School District, another beneficiary of Camp Fire Relief funding. Serving kindergarteners through eighthgraders south of Oroville, the Palermo district received grants for calming rooms and additional counseling staff. “When we look at what interventions are best for these children who’ve experienced trauma, we find that giving them strategies and space to self-regulate really is the best

APPOINTMENT

Canine celebration The annual Bidwell Bark Fun Run & Festival is back with a full day of dog-friendly activities and family-style entertainment at Sycamore Field in Lower Bidwell Park. The festivities take place Saturday, May 11, from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. and include contests for you and your pup, adorable costumes, food vendors and lots of free goodies. Last year’s event raised more than $30,000 for the Butte Humane Society. If you would like to participate in the 5K run or 2K walk, visit bidwellbark. com/register. Registration includes an official Bidwell Bark T-shirt and breakfast snacks and drinks to keep you and your furry friend fueled up.

thing,” Rainbow Walker, Palermo’s district counselor, said by phone. “They know they can’t spend the whole day in there—it’s not going to be a chance for them to get out of class and miss work. They have 10 minutes to go in if they’re having a rough morning, or something happened throughout the day, so they can go back and learn.” Marsh actually will have two calming spaces—a

room and a garden—for which NVCF awarded the school $5,000. The calming room will subsume the current staff room. Cabinetry and the copier will remain, but other furniture will make way for various types of seating and equipment befitting the new use. Ann Murphy, counselor at Chico Junior, describes the Zen Den in much the same way Snyder envisions the Gator Getaway (named after Marsh’s mascot). Murphy’s space has places with privacy and spots for stress-relieving activities such as Legos, raking sand and a punching bag. She or a colleague supervises. After around 15 minutes, the student either says he (or she) is ready to return to class or talks out the issue with the counselor. “Whatever the need is for the child to reset, recharge, we’ve got them all,” Murphy said by phone. “We teach them coping skills to put in their tool belt.” She said 98 percent of students who come to the Zen Den finish out the school day without incident—resulting in a decrease of disciplinary actions, including suspensions, and an increase in attendance. Walker said her


district’s calming rooms, at Helen Wilcox Elementary and Palermo Middle School, have yielded comparable results. By fall, Marsh also will have the Gator Garden. Planned for a grassy triangle near the multipurpose room, the plot will feature planter boxes for produce to be used in cooking classes. Students who prefer physical, tactile experiences outside will—weather-permitting—calm via gardening, supervised by a counselor or trained instructor. Between the two spaces, and including all forms of trauma and emotional issues, Snyder expects hundreds to benefit. “We can hopefully intervene with kiddos before they have a total meltdown,” she said. “We see a kid’s a little agitated, we’re trained as a staff to give them an opportunity to calm themselves before anything more serious happens.” The Palermo district draws families with low socioeconomic backgrounds, which studies have linked to adverse health conditions. The connection is adverse child-

Visit nvcf.org for information on the Camp Fire Relief Fund. Contact Jessica Kamph via mjhs.chicousd.org to support the Gator Garden.

hood experiences, or ACEs; Butte County leads the state in exposure to these specific traumas—neglect, violence, sexual abuse—that tend to be more prevalent in lower-income households (see “Lasting effects,” Healthlines, Jan. 12, 2017). That’s on top of what fire refugees must process. Twenty-five came to Palermo campuses. The district received $1,000 for Palermo Middle School’s room, $4,500 to transform a meeting room into a calming room at Golden Hills Elementary, almost $10,000 for an instructional aide and $25,000 toward a new counselor. Walker, who teaches traumainformed practices through her consulting firm, Over the Rainbow PBI Consult, said the additions are “things I knew worked well, but because we didn’t have the funding to get the resources and the manpower, they were hard to make happen. Now we have the funding.”`Ω

WEEKLY DOSE

Mom power

1. Schedule an annual visit with your doctor for important screenings, counseling and immunizations. 2. Mammograms matter. One in eight American women will get a breast cancer diagnosis at some point in her lifetime, and most cases are detected by a mammogram before symptoms appear. 3. Practice self-care by eating well, exercising, reducing stress and getting enough sleep. 4. Know your rights. If you work full-time and plan to return to your job after your baby is born, look into your employer’s maternity leave policy and the policies of the federal Family and Medical Leave Act.

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Mother’s Day kicks off during National Women’s Health Week—the perfect time to honor the women we love by supporting their wellness through awareness and education. (Surprisingly, the U.S. infant and maternal mortality is among the worst of those in developed nations.) Here are a few tips for keeping happy and healthy, whether you are expecting or not.

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CN&R

13


GREENWAYS Mary Muchowski got hooked on birding locally during an Altacal Audubon outing in Bidwell Park.

Bird’s-eye view Local Audubon chapter elevates longtime volunteer to first executive director

story and photo by

Evan Tuchinsky

evantuc hin sk y @ n ewsrev i ew. com

TsheMary Muchowski vividly recalls the day fell in love with birding in the North hough she may not remember the date,

State. It was mid-December in the mid-1990s. Muchowski, a Chico State grad, returned to town in 1995 after traveling to eight sites as a wildlife biologist for the U.S. Forest Service. The Altacal Audubon Society, Chico’s chapter of the national birding organization, had its Christmas Bird Count coming soon. She’d signed up for the section in Upper Bidwell Park. The Christmas Bird Count is an annual tradition, dating to 1900. Birdwatchers around the country converge on predetermined areas and tally each avian seen and heard. Muchowski considered herself an “intermediate birder” at that point and welcomed the chance to spot local species. If only the weather had cooperated … “It was raining all day long,” Muchowski told the CN&R last week, chuckling. The chapter’s then-president, Richard Redmond, was guiding her group and “was soaked to his bone. I didn’t have waterproof binoculars, and even the people who did, there was so much moisture that you could barely even use the binoculars because it was just so wet—and you’d see one little bird huddling under a branch because it was windy and rainy. “And, somehow, I got hooked.” She began volunteering with Altacal Audubon. For most of the Snow Goose

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Festival’s 20 years—when her job hasn’t taken her out of Chico—she’s led field trips and excursions. The past decade, she’s coordinated the Christmas Bird Count and served as an at-large member on the chapter’s board of directors. Now, Muchowski has a new role: executive director—the group’s first. Altacal Audubon hired her to expand its educational and outreach programs, according to board President Steve Overlock, as

“We knew we could fill the position with work; it was just a matter of finding someone, because there’s so much going on in Chico.”

—Steve Overlock

well as upgrade fundraising and organizational efforts. Of the 19 applicants, Overlock said Muchowski clearly distinguished herself as “the best.” She resigned from the board and started in February, in time for the Snow Goose Festival. “It seemed like there were more and more programs we were doing and we wanted to do,” Overlock, in his sixth year as president, said by phone. “I work full-time, and I felt like we needed more of our face Get connected:

Visit facebook.com/altacalaudubon to learn more about altacal audubon Society.

out there. We knew we could fill the position with work; it was just a matter of finding someone, because there’s so much going on in Chico.” Altacal Audubon got a push from an unex-

pected source. Last spring, a woman in Paradise, Elizabeth Brown, bequeathed the chapter $500,000. Members didn’t remember her being actively involved, but she’d paid dues and, in talking to a friend, the board discovered more about her. “She was a wonderful quilter and she had a beautiful bird garden,” Overlock said. “She was a very reserved person, a very quiet person—and she had a secret love for birds and Altacal.” The bequest funds, among other things, the new position. Altacal Audubon long has wanted an executive director, akin to Plumas Audubon Society, which recently hired Lindsay Wood to succeed its founding executive director. Wood, coincidentally, previously worked with Muchowski at the Butte Environmental Council (BEC). Muchowski was a late applicant for the Altacal job. When it posted in September, she didn’t have time to devote to volunteering with the nonprofit. In December, she asked the board if the position was still open and applied then. “We really needed someone who had experience with nonprofits and birds,” Overlock said, adding: “This was a long process, because we’re all volunteers [on the board].” One board member lost her home in the Camp Fire, and with it a computer that contained financial records. Muchowski is reconstructing that documentation, along with reorganizing other operations and pro-

cesses. She has experience from stints as office manager and events coordinator, then educational outreach coordinator, at BEC. Muchowski works 10 hours a week for Altacal Audubon, though she’ll up her commitment in winter, when she’ll have much to do for the Snow Goose Festival. That coincides with her off-season for the Forest Service, for whom she conducts wildlife surveys in the Feather River Ranger District of the Plumas National Forest. Education—for youth and adults—is her passion. She hopes to expand such offerings overall but feels the Snow Goose Festival is the right size at five days: “I’ve seen some festivals burn out when they try to get too big, so keeping that going at the level it’s at now would be great.” She’s also excited about advocacy. The board recently added John Merz as conservation chair. Merz, former director of the Sacramento River Preservation Trust, has championed local environmental causes for decades. “Advocacy is not in our mission statement,” Muchowski said, “except for education about conservation. We pretty much take the lead off national Audubon or Audubon California on advocacy issues. [But] we have a new conservation chair I would hope to work closely with.” Ω

ECO EVENT

It takes a village The thought of bettering your community may sound like an overwhelming concept, but thanks to a number of dedicated Chico folks, there are plenty of easy volunteer events where you can make a difference in just a few hours. Friday (May 10) and Saturday (May 11) offer two group opportunities to clean up garbage and invasive plants throughout Chico. Volunteer Fridays take place each week at Caper Acres at 9 a.m., and Block Party with a Purpose convenes Saturdays at 9 a.m., this month at Bidwell and Nord avenues, with free coffee and snacks for the early birds. Doing good feels great!


EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS photo by ashiah sCharaga

15 MINUTES

THE GOODS

Creating wonder

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Oscar Magaña Jr. knows Hollywood. He worked there for four years as a regular extra in television and film series (e.g., Bones, Iron Man 3). The Biggs native has been back in Butte County for several years, but for the past 2 1/2 has been working on the next chapter of his career: as the owner, producer and director of Wünderworks Multimedia & Hispanic Marketing. He creates and edits photo and video for businesses and special events, such as weddings, as well as for budding performers, actors and those seeking athletic scholarships. Magaña continues to act in local theater productions as well. For examples of his work or to inquire about the services he offers, find him on Facebook @WunderworksMultimedia or email wunderworkscalifornia@gmail.com.

How did you come up with your business name? It’s an homage to Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory and Mr. Magorium’s Wonder Emporium. I think of a giant toy factory, but instead of just making toys we make all things wonderful. Things that wouldn’t normally happen on the outside world happen inside Wünderworks Multimedia studios.

What sets you apart? What I’m offering is $150 [per hour] packages. In the session, you get the photos—I have a white, black and green [screen]—but you’re also going to get video if you want a reel. And you get the basic directorial coaching from me. I’m teaching you what to expect, so that you’re ready and you kind of get over the fear of the camera, too.

Why do this in Butte County? [Butte County] is home. I knew that I had this talent pool that nobody else is using [outside of theater]. I lived inside the Emerald City for years. Now I’m coming back and I’m saying, “Hey, guys, let me show you what I learned.” I felt like if I did that, then we would have this base of Chico people and we could all take control of our own careers and we make

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the shows, we don’t let Hollywood dictate. Like me: “You’re too tall. And you’re Mexican? Oh, no, we can’t use you.” ‘Cause in their world, Mexicans don’t look like me. That’s tough. I felt like if I was ever going to make a breakthrough that I needed to take some control. It’s like, OK, so then, I guess I gotta make my own show. We get people to invest in us, talent-wise. Those people down there are not any more talented than people here.

What’s your goal? Someday I just hope to go and make TV shows and movies. But right now, Wünderworks is the bigger picture. I want to … collaborate with people … and maybe get a creation space. [It] would be great to have a studio or stages where not only we’re producing stuff, but they’re [also] for rent. If you’re a member, you can go in and use the green screen anytime you want, use the audio booth and the recording rooms for bands. I think that would help people do more stuff: You build a playground, someone’s going to come play.

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by

Meredith J. Cooper meredithc@newsreview.com

I try to take advantage of any opportunity I can to get out of Chico and explore some of the smaller nearby cities and towns and discover new getaways. So, a couple of weeks ago, I jumped at the chance to head south for the North Sierra Wine Trail. As I’d traveled the trail before—some five or so years ago—as well as the Sierra Oro Farm Trail, which includes some of the same stops, I already was somewhat familiar with a few of the wineries taking part in the festivities. So, in planning my adventure, I chose to start in Oregon House, at the Frenchtown Inn—one of the farthest locations on the trail and one I’d never been to. Turns out, the inn was a good place to begin, as multiple area wineries were pouring there, including my favorite of the day, Renaissance Vineyard & Winery. (All of their selections were top-notch, but the best—and the one I purchased—was a 2012 Cabernet reserve.) The folks pouring expounded on the terroir in Renaissance wines. That’s partially due to the Sierra foothills winery’s low-yield farming practices that infuse the grapes with the flavor and nutrients from the earth. My other purchase of the day happened at the inn as well, as the fabulous Apollo Olive Oil folks were also on-hand. The oils have a similarly distinct terroir— they also are farmed at the Renaissance estate—but I’d been craving Appollo’s sweet yet full-bodied Balsamic Condiment. It’s sweet, tangy and truly unique— and only available directly through the company (apollooliveoil.com). From there, I visited a few additonal locations—Lucero Vineyards & Winery in Dobbins, and Bangor Ranch Vineyard and Winery and Spencer-Shirey Wines in Bangor. I was disappointed to learn that several spots on the map, including the Renaissance estate, weren’t actually open that weekend and instead were pouring elsewhere. That, plus an infuriating drive through Dobbins due to my GPS sending me to the wrong place, rendered me out of time to hit any other spots. Lucero was notable for its tasting-room food and delightful covered patio, Spencer-Shirey for its wine-food pairings, and Bangor Ranch for its impressive grounds. They’re all worth a visit—and they’ve all been invited to participate in Butte County Wine Week next month, June 7-16. Speaking of, any area wineries, restaurants, bars and retailers that wish to list an event in the Chico News & Review’s Wine Week calendar should go to buttecountywineweek.com for more info. Hope to see all you wine lovers then!

Expansion tiME One of Chico’s biggest companies, Lulus, is getting even bigger. The online fashion retailer announced last month that it’s opening a 250,000-squarefoot warehouse in Palmer Township, Penn. It plans to hire hundreds of employees at the new facility, which will help improve shipping times to customers on the East Coast. Congrats!

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SeCondary effeCtS

Finances and economy

City, businesses struggle with wildfire fallout, from population growth to fleeing workforce Chico’s new normal six months after the Camp Fire

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lot has transpired in the six months since the Camp Fire ravaged Butte County’s foothills communities. As residents from those regions face the daunting task of rebuilding—or starting over elsewhere—nearby cities are doing their best to absorb those displaced. Recent numbers released by the state tell us that the population of Paradise alone dropped to under 5,000 after the fire (the town’s population was about 27,000 before the blaze). Many of the people who lost their homes there or in the other burned areas have made new or temporary homes in Chico. No community is prepared to grow so tremendously overnight—Chico gained over 19,000 residents, more than a 20 percent increase. So, this week, we look at the biggest secondary impacts of the Camp Fire on this community—on education, on housing, on infrastructure like roads and sewage, and on local finances and the economy.

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hico City Manager Mark Orme is grappling with a million-dollar question—or perhaps a multimillion-dollar question—that there’s no template for answering. How can a municipality adequately serve a population that surges by more than 20 percent literally overnight? In the early weeks following Nov. 8, during public meetings and in interviews with the press, Orme and other city administrators estimated 15,000 to 20,000 people displaced by the Camp Fire had resettled in Chico. At the time, folks were crammed into hotels, motels, RVs, homes, apartments, short-term rentals such as Airbnbs, the temporary Red Cross shelter at the fairgrounds, and even tent cities, like the one that sprang up immediately in the City Manager Mark Orme, pictured outside of the City Council chambers about a week  parking lot of Walmart. after the Camp Fire, across the street from smoke-shrouded City Plaza, where the flag  The city based the estimate on numerous factors, including a flew at half-staff in honor of those who lost their lives.  spike in traffic and sewer volumes, but Orme acknowledged that Photo by ashiah scharaga it wasn’t an exact science. Last week, however, just prior to postdisaster life hitting the six-month mark, stats released by the state What most Chicoans didn’t know at the time was that Department of Finance backed up the figures. Based on year-overOrme had been working behind the scenes for months to try to year analysis, Chico had gained more than 19,000 residents as of get additional resources to support the unprecedented aftereffects. Jan. 1. That’s a 20.7 percent increase. For context, under normal During a recent interview at City Hall, he told the CN&R about circumstances, the city expected to see that level of growth somesome of his efforts. At the end of December, for example, he contime in the 2030s. tacted the California Office of Emergency Services and the Federal Orme gave a breakdown of the situation during a City Council Emergency Management Agency—or “raised a red flag,” as he meeting in March. Among the segments of the community under put it—underscoring the many ways in which the city is struggling. great stress: public infrastructure (such as roads and sewer systems), “Realizing that there’s no perfect playbook on this incident (lospublic safety, mental health providers, refuse collection, Enloe ing virtually an entire city and having the majority of it move into Medical Center, housing. Of course, when it comes to the city another for an unknown period of time), we need your help in being addressing the things in its purview, money is the major holdup. iconoclasts of classic models of recovery efforts to help ensure the “Usually, in a devastating event, there’s a population shift that welfare of this wonderful city,” Orme wrote to the agencies. occurs. These survivors usually relocate to a place that can supThe city is participating in long-term recovery groups run by port and manage the impacts of the those state and federal agencies—the hope population increase while the incident is that they will help “find access to funding is being mitigated and cleaned up,” pools” such as grants, Orme said. City staff Orme said while standing in front PoPulation groWth also has been collecting quantitative data of the dais. “Typically, this is done the state Department of Finance ranked on things such as traffic volumes that are within or adjacent to the jurisdiction worsening already deteriorated roadways where the disaster occurred and where the city of chico No. 1 in a list of the page 22). adequate funding and support mecha10 fastest-growing cities with populations (seeMeanwhile, Orme is working with state nisms are available. over 30,000, as of Jan. 1. it grew in one and federal lawmakers who might be able “Well, as we’ve all seen, this situto tap government coffers through legislaation is atypical, and the vast impacts year by 19,250—or 20.7 percent— means. On that front, Assemblyman have engrossed our fine city, and so reaching 112,111. the next fastest-growing tive James Gallagher (R-Yuba City) is asking I’m here tonight to voice, in public, city in that category was Dublin—clocking for a budget request intended to bring Chico’s sincere desire to have access to funding to help the city overcome in with a 4.4 percent increase. Meanwhile, $3 million and $2 million to Chico and Oroville, respectively. the dramatic impacts of this disaster the city of oroville also saw a population According to a letter from Gallagher on the city’s resources and infrastrucsurge in excess of 20 percent. ture.”


addressed to Assemblyman Jim Cooper, chairman of a Budget Subcommittee on State Administration, the one-time general fund appropriation request aims to help the municipalities address the “significant and ongoing impacts that are currently not accounted for with existing disaster response mechanisms.” Orme told the CN&R the city already has spent over $1 million thus far to address the explosive Camp Fire-related growth. However, he estimated the city needs in the ballpark of $6 million annually to sufficiently staff city services to meet the population’s needs. The bulk of such funding would go to public safety operations, both police and fire. Orme noted that Gov. Gavin Newsom backfilled property taxes for three years. Chico otherwise would have been looking at a loss of about $800,000 this year alone, since mid-year changes in such revenues are spread proportionally among the county agencies that are recipients of such funding. Another bright spot: Transient occupancy taxes haven’t dipped as much as predicted, Orme said, as there has been higher-than-expected turnover in local hotels, motels and other short-term lodging.

HOUSING

One of the chief concerns that remains is the stability of the

local workforce—and businesses in general, including retail operations, which bring in the largest portion of the city’s general fund revenue. At issue is the dearth of housing (see this page). Many displaced by the fire worked in Chico, where the market was tight prior to the disaster. Now, finding a place to live is next to impossible. That’s true not only for those directly affected by the fire, but also for the countless Chico renters who’ve lost their homes because landlords are selling them at inflated prices. Officials at the Chico Chamber of Commerce are especially concerned about the exodus. They have captured a snapshot of the problem by polling the organization’s members. Seventy-six of them responded representing 13,929 employees. “What we heard across the board was between 10 percent to 12 percent of the workforce of Chico was affected,” said Associate Vice President Kelsey Torres. The most recent figures from the Camp Fire Workforce Impact Survey—conducted in March, after an initial poll in December—concludes that of the 1,399 employees affected by the blaze, 232 have not secured long-term housing. Thirty have relocated out of the area, while 45 are “at risk” of leaving the region. Employers also are having trouble recruiting. “The labor issue is significant, because when these employees leave and these companies are recruiting to replace them, there’s nowhere for these [prospective employees] to live,” added Katy Thoma, chamber president and CEO. Thoma came aboard the chamber about a month ago, and while the post-fire effects are overwhelming, she said she’s been heartened by the collaboration in the business community. Six months out, the chamber board’s Task Force on City Revenues and Expenditures continues to discuss the aftereffects. It also supports Assembly Bill 430, Assemblyman Gallagher’s controversial effort to exempt residential projects in Butte County—and portions of Glenn County—from the California Environmental Quality Act. The disaster, Thoma noted, was ruthless and widespread. “It affects all different people. It’s people who are making minimum wage, it’s people making $40,000 a year, and people making a lot of money,” she said. Orme explained that, though the Camp Fire immediately strained Chico’s resources, he chose to hold off on speaking publicly about the burden on Chico for many months out of respect for those directly affected by the disaster, including the local government officials in the burn-scar region. “And I know so many people in this community were desirous of really understanding it—they’re seeing it, they’re bearing witness, but they want to hear their public officials acknowledge the fact that we have been impacted,” he said. Now that he’s acknowledged the effects on Chico, and sought relief, Orme says locals must keep the bigger picture in mind. “We need to attempt to open our arms with compassion, love and understanding and try to balance the same quality of life we had [before the fire] with the population growth … that exists within our community today,” he summed up. —MELISSA DAUGHERTY m e l i ss ad@ n ew srev i ew. c o m

An already tight market compounded by sudden need for liveable spaces

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efore the Camp Fire hit on Nov. 8, Chico already was experiencing a shortage of housing options, particularly for those in the lower income brackets. A vacancy rate of 1 percent to 2 percent, as the CN&R reported a year and a half prior, was already inadequate. All of a sudden, the scarce available housing stock was needed by people not wanting to relocate— but needing a place to live. “On the day of the fire, there were roughly 225 homes for sale in Chico,” local real estate agent Brandi Laffins told the CN&R. “Within 10 to 14 days, that number dropped to 50. It was a frenzy. … The drastic decrease of inventory and the rise in home values concerned many, including the local realtors. Finding a home for those who had lost [theirs] seemed impossible.” Now, six months later, things aren’t much better in Chico’s housing market. While the frenzy, as Laffins called it, may have subsided, the pickings are still slim. And the average price has risen dramatically and disproportionately to the rest of the California: Statewide, sales prices are down 6.3 percent over last year, but in Chico, they’re up 13 percent, according to Zillow, said Laffins,

SELLER’S MARKET The average sale price of a house in Chico, post-Camp Fire, is $365,200—compared with the average home price in California, which is $565,000. In Chico, a home now stays on the market an average of one month.

president of the Sierra North Valley Realtors group. “The average home price in California is $565,000 and the supply is 3.6 months of inventory,” she said, “while Chico’s average price is $365,200 and inventory supply is less than one month.” For comparison, in 2016, the average Chico home sold for $310,000 (see “Squeezed out,” cover story, March 9, 2017). It’s not just the real estate market that’s been affected, either. While rental prices are somewhat protected by anti-price-gouging laws (Chico extended its for one year after the fire) that prohibit increases of more than 10 percent, many landlords are simply selling. Some were themselves displaced by the Camp Fire; others are taking advantage of the seller’s market. For that reason, even Chico renters are finding themselves suddenly in search of housing. “There are vacancies out there, but they turn quickly and it is a bit of a search to find them in a timely manner,” said Jennifer Morris, executive director of the North Valley Property Owners Association, which launched campfirehousing.com following the fire to connect property owners with those searching for a place to live. With little additional housing currently under construction, the problem is sure to continue. “My gut says we will have a housing shortage for a few years to come,” Laffins said. —MEREDITH J. COOPER me r e d i th c @ newsr ev iew.c o m

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s Travis Elliott walked around the Chico Water Pollution Control Plant on a recent morning, he pointed to one of the facility’s three sedimentation tanks (where waste settles as part of the waterpurifying process), which was empty and in need of repair. It’ll be out of service temporarily, “until we can catch up” on maintenance, Elliott, the plant’s lead operator, told the CN&R. “Normally, we’d repair that right away.” Moments later, Erik Gustafson, city public works director of operations and maintenance, climbed a ladder to peer into the bed of a massive truck that can hold 24 tons of biosolids, which are taken to a compost facility. Instead of filling it every two days as was the norm a year ago, he said, the plant has been processing enough waste to fill it nearly every day. Those are just two examples of changes the plant has seen since Nov. 8. As people from the Ridge and other

MORE WASTE The Chico Water Pollution Control Plant has seen an influx of wastewater to the tune of 1 million additional gallons per day, according to data from the Public Works Department. City staff compared November through January with the same months the year prior and discovered average daily flows jumped from about 5.98 million gallons to 6.94 million gallons per day. That number has remained steady nearly six months later.

burn-scarred areas settled in Chico, the average daily flow passing through the facility—from sinks and toilets across the city—began to climb. City staff compared average daily flows from November through January with the same months the year prior and discovered they have increased dramatically: 16 percent, from about 5.98 million gallons to 6.94 million gallons per day. That amount of growth is what the city expected to see “over several decades”—not overnight, Gustafson said. While the treatment plant has enough capacity to handle the influx—the facility can process up to 12 million gallons each day—it is creating issues for the plant’s budget. It’s increasing the staff’s workload and the demand for supplies (such as the chemicals to treat the biosolids), electricity and maintenance. A case in point: The plant’s small staff of 10—


operators, waste inspectors, lab technicians and an electrician—has been slammed. The facility has to be monitored 24/7, and with a more intensive workload and no extra bodies (in fact, the city has had trouble recruiting for three vacant positions), staff has been using a rotating mandatory overtime schedule, Elliott said. Noncritical maintenance has been deferred for the time being, he added. For now, added costs have been absorbed into the operations budget, but that is “not sustainable,” Gustafson said. The facility already needed infrastructure upgrades. There are some wastewater pipes in Chico, for example, that are almost 100 years old. In 2008, the city took out a state loan to expand the plant’s capacity. The idea at the time was that plenty of development was on the way and sewer connection fees would help pay off the loan. Then the recession hit. Since then, the plant’s operating budget largely has been covering those loan payments, rather than necessary upgrades, Gustafson said. Before the fire, the city hired a consultant to analyze the condition of the facility, Gustafson said, which should determine whether a rate increase may be necessary to address its needs. Whether the post-fire capacity will be considered is uncertain, because there’s no way to tell how long the increased demand will last, Gustafson said. “The issue we’re wrestling with is a bulk of this flow is from people doubling up in households,” Gustafson said. “We don’t have the added monthly sewer fees to compensate for the increase.” Any fee increases would have to be approved by the City Council, California Public Utilities Commission and, ultimately, ratepayers. But Gustafson said it’s safe to assume that a 16 percent increase in flows represents a 16 percent increase in cost—which translates to nearly half a million dollars ($497,451). “Long-term, if this is sustained, we’re going to have to raise rates,” Gustafson said. Currently, the fee is set at $22.98 per month per household. The analysis will be completed later this year, and Gustafson anticipates bringing the results to the council in the fall. Until then, city staff will continue to operate on a leaner model—deferring noncritical maintenance, keeping certain facilities off-line and working those longer hours. —ASHIAH SCHARAGA ashiahs@n ew sr ev i ew. com

EDUCATION

Coming together for the kids

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early a month after the Camp Fire, when smoke had cleared and schools reopened, campuses in Chico and across Butte County welcomed students from the burn zone. They arrived with the disaster still fresh; most were uncertain about how long they’d stay. The adults—teachers and staff in the Chico Unified School District (CUSD) and independent schools—faced challenges as well. A number of these staff and students had lost homes to the fire. And, with a disaster of this scale striking a region this rural, already short on mental health professionals, educators lacked much of the trauma support they’d have gotten in a metro area. Nonetheless, Chico schools have absorbed more displaced students than other Butte County communities and found the means to address their needs. For instance, several CUSD schools have calming rooms—spaces where students can reset emotions—and another is on the way (see “School refuge,” Healthlines, page 12.) The challenge now, as Superintendent Kelly Staley sees it, is momentum. Families have hit a new phase in disaster recovery, she said, when fatigue and discouragement often root. “As time goes on and that [post-disaster] reality doesn’t change, what all the experts say is people start falling apart … in months three through six,” she said. “We really are seeing—adults more than kids; I think kids are pretty resilient—people struggle. “There are lasting impacts,” Staley added. “Some of the physical things will sort themselves out, but these emotional issues—the trauma impacts—these kids and families are going to have for years, not just months.” Where they’ll cope represents the biggest question for schools. Both Staley and Mary Cox, executive director of CORE Butte Charter School, said this summer will mark a pivotal point for displaced families, who they anticipate will make major decisions once their kids are done with classes. “I do worry about the future of our community, and I fear that many will have to leave the area due to lack of housing,” said Cox, who has several staff members living in RVs on other staff members’ properties. “That will absolutely affect every school and every community entity out there.” CORE, a home-study/classroom hybrid with 900 students in kindergarten through 12th grade, lost its Paradise site. It’s accommodating another displaced charter on one of its two Chico campuses. Almost a third of CORE’s students lost homes, yet only one family has

left and 30 new students enrolled. At Inspire School of Arts and Sciences, a charter senior high in Chico that draws students from beyond the city, a fifth of its 425 students were displaced, though just a dozen have left. Achieve Charter School has kept its K-8 enrollment since moving to Chico but suspended operations of its new high school (see “Lesson plans,” Newslines, March 28). CUSD, with a total enrollment of almost 12,000, took in 321 students for spring semester. The net gain was around 240 because the Chico district lost 80 students whose families were affected by the fire. Most of CUSD’s new enrollees are kindergarteners through eighth-graders—and among the 45 high-schoolers, most had enrolled immediately for academic reasons such as advanced placement exams and college applications. “This is a tragedy,” Staley said, “but we made sure it doesn’t impact the rest of their

SCHOOL ENROLLMENT Chico Unified School District welcomed 321 new students for the spring semester, but it also lost 80 whose families were impacted by the disaster. Most of the new students are kindergarteners through eighth-graders—45 are high-schoolers.

Superintendent Kelly Staley says the Chico Unified School District had space for hundreds of fire-displaced students. PHOTO BY EVAN TUCHINSKY

lives moving forward.” Spread across district schools with openings, the additional students fit into existing classes, so CUSD didn’t need to hire teachers. Assistant Superintendent Kevin Bultema, who oversees business and finance, told the CN&R by email that the district “increased expenditures to support the increase in students” but gained about $1 million in funding. To address the dearth of trauma experts, Staley said CUSD brought in mental health professionals “to work with our staff so they in turn have skills to work with our kids.” Cox said CORE’s staff also underwent “extensive trauma training” and bolstered counseling personnel through the county education office. “It’s devastating,” Cox said. “I’m from Paradise, so I have [my] heart there as well—I have 11 family members who lost their homes, places of work, grocery stores, restaurants, all of that. “Unity comes with tragedy,” she added. “This is a horrible event that of course we all wish never happened. Through this all, Butte County is here for all students, and I feel the whole school community has really come together during this time.” —EVAN TUCHINSKY eva ntu c h insk y @ newsr ev iew.c o m MORE

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ROADS

Increased traffic compounds condition of deteriorating streets

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month after the Camp Fire, city staff set up 34 traffic counters across Chico to determine average daily traffic volumes. Using data from the same locations collected a year prior, they were able to compare that with December 2018. The results? An overall 25 percent increase. In some parts of the city, the impact was much less, as low as 4 percent on East Avenue. But on other roadways, traffic surged greatly—by as much as 77 percent on East 20th Street and 63 percent on Eaton Road. That represents a 15- to 20-year projected increase in traffic volumes essentially overnight, said Brendan Ottoboni, city public works director of engineering. The question now is whether that trend has continued. The traffic counters, which collect data as cars drive over thin black tubes, were set up in the same locations last month, and Ottoboni anticipates updating the numbers every six months. The best practice for such an increase is to widen the roads, Ottoboni told the CN&R, which would improve safety and decrease congestion. “But we realize that takes a long time and a lot of money,” he said. That’s why Ottoboni is hoping to receive funding from the state and federal government—the California Office of Emergency Services (CalOES) and Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)—to pay for projects that would help address this massive increase in traffic directly related to the disaster. One such improvement is an intelligent transportation system, which would create a connected wireless network between all the traffic signals within the city. The city could then manage signal timing from a computer within City Hall in a matter of minutes, rather than the hours it takes to manually reprogram each traffic signal.

TRAFFIC ACCIDENTS Statistics from the Chico Police Department show that the number of traffic collisions in town has increased significantly since Nov. 8. The third week of December, for example, showed a 106 percent uptick in accidents, with 64 reported collisions in 2018 compared with 31 the previous year. 22

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Jeff Schwein sees Broadway Street as a roadway in the city that could benefit from protected bike lanes. PHOTO BY ASHIAH SCHARAGA

Right: The most recent pavement condition index rates 43 percent of Chico’s roads as poor. Pictured here is a mega pothole on Centennial Avenue near Upper Bidwell Park. PHOTO BY MELISSA DAUGHERTY

“It becomes an adaptive network,” Ottoboni explained, “so it responds to traffic demands to improve circulation at intersections so you’re not getting as much delay and backup.” The price tag for that system isn’t cheap—$12 million—but Ottoboni said it beats construction costs. That same amount of money would widen 2 miles of road, tops. For private transportation planner Jeff Schwein, the solution to thinning traffic on Chico’s crowded roadways is simple: Build more bike paths. Take Broadway and Main streets in downtown Chico, for example. Remove a lane and reserve it for bicyclists, Schwein suggested, and widen the sidewalks for pedestrians to accommodate more people during downtown’s busy weekly events and more restaurant patio seating. Schwein supported “radical” solutions like this before the Camp Fire—he owns Green DOT Transportation Services, a firm that focuses on creating infrastructure that incentivizes people to walk, bike or ride public transit, rather than drive. But he thinks this out-of-the-box, nonautocentric perspective has taken on urgency since the city took in approximately 19,000 more people.

“Chico is perfectly positioned for a whole new paradigm for mobility,” Schwein said. “If you build the facilities to cater to those alternative modes of transportation, and make it convenient and enjoyable and comfortable, maybe there’s a nexus for improving everything about Chico: the congestion relief, the quality of life, the health and the social interaction.” It’ll take a while to determine exactly

how the city’s roadways have been impacted, Ottoboni said—it depends on how long the increased traffic is sustained, as well

as how many of those trips are from heavy trucks. Typically, 5 percent of trips can be attributed to such vehicles, Ottoboni said. His staff is estimating that number is as high as 30 percent for some areas of the city, like the Skyway, because of debris removal operations on the Ridge. “What we’ve been trying to communicate [to CalOES and FEMA] is … when you add it all up, they’re big impacts, and it causes congestion … it causes additional traffic collisions. Those are statistically driven facts.” The city’s list of infrastructure project priorities hasn’t changed. The wildfire “just exacerbated the problem” along those more heavily trafficked corridors, Ottoboni said. A Bruce Road widening and bike lane project continues to be the No. 1 priority in terms of “capacity-enhancing projects.” Other priority roadways include East 20th Street, Eaton Road and the Midway. But, like other departments within the city, Ottoboni’s team has been overwhelmed with work. A reconstruction of The Esplanade from Lindo Channel to East Avenue, for example, was supposed to start this summer. It’s been delayed until next year because of the additional work load from the Camp Fire. Construction engineering company Harris & Associates is working with the city on recalculating its pavement condition index, which was last updated in 2015. Based on that report, staff estimates that 43 percent of the city’s roads are in poor or very poor condition. It indicated the city would need a $7 million annual budget just to maintain its roads; $10 million to actually improve them. About $3 million is currently budgeted, factoring in gas tax funds and waste-hauling franchise fees. “You could throw a dart at the wall and you’re not going to miss. There are so many roads out there that need to be fixed,” Ottoboni said. “Due to the lack of funding over a very long period of time, those deferred items of preventative maintenance are now becoming more costly repairs.” —ASHIAH SCHARAGA ash ia h s@ newsr ev iew.c o m


ma y 9, 2019

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23


Arts &Culture PARTS

as great as THE SUM

The Wild Reeds (from left): Nick Phapiseth, Sharon Silva, Kinsey Lee, Mackenzie Howe and Nick Jones. PHOTO COURTESY OF THE WILD REEDS

THIS WEEK 9

THU

Special Events CHICO COPWATCH: Community organizing for police accountability. Thu, 5/9, 6pm. Free. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave. COMEDY NIGHT: Comedian Keith Barany, local funny guy Bob Backstrom opens. Thu, 5/9, 6pm. $20-$25. Canyon Oaks Country Club, 999 Yosemite Drive.

FEED YOUR SOUL: Bacio fundraising dinner for Chico Housing

Three frontwomen shine in The Wild Reeds

A

s much as individuality is a positive

trait in artists, the business side of the music industry tends to favor sticking to labels over an eclectic approach to songwriting. This is a conundrum that has long resonated for the members of The Wild Reeds, an L.A.-based five-piece led by three singer/songwriters—Sharon Silva, Mackenzie Howe and Kinsey Lee. “Over the years, we’ve created boundaries for [ourselves] that we thought by were put in place by Robin Bacior the industry, like we have to have a genre— Preview: and having three The Wild Reeds perform Friday, songwriters and singMay 10, 8 p.m. ers is something you Jenny O opens. don’t see very often, Tickets: $15 so how do we become Sierra Nevada cohesive as a band Big Room and not three separate 1075 E. 20th St. entities?” Lee said in a 892-4647 recent phone interview. sierranevada.com The band formed

24

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M AY 9 , 2 0 1 9

roughly a decade ago when Lee met Silva at a Lisa Hannigan concert. The two had their own solo projects and decided to fuse them together, eventually adding Howe and a rhythm section, drummer Nick Jones and bassist Nick Phapiseth. The Wild Reeds’ 2014 self-released debut pegged the group as a harmonydriven Americana act. As the band gained some acclaim, releasing The World We Built in 2017, the members felt held down by the pressure to align their songwriting styles to fit into a clearcut sonic package. So, for their new album, Cheers, they decided to let go of those expectations and their inhibitions, and leaned into their songwriting differences to create something textured and distinct. “With this record, we stopped putting ourselves in a box and saying, ‘Well, this is a Wild Reeds record, so we have to put harmony on every inch of every song,’” Lee said. “People get it. We sing harmonies, we don’t have to use that as our front identity anymore. It was cool to take the shackles off ourselves and lean really hard into a pop realm, or the experimental or rock realm, and not just hold on to our roots as hard.” Some of that sonic exploration came from working with producer Dan Molad (drummer/producer for Lucius), who brought a more polished pop approach and encouragement to home in on contrasting ideas.

“Working so many years with each other, we’ve had to compromise on a lot of sounds, and we [now] had a producer that was excited to chase down even strange, strange ideas till the end,” Lee said. “It was cool to give each other space enough to be like, ‘That’s a weird idea, but let’s not shoot it down until we try it.’ Usually, it turned out to be something really fresh to our sound.” The result is a kaleidoscopic yet cohesive group of songs, ranging from the more familiar feel of rich Americana as on “Run & Hide,” to punchy, sing-along pop numbers like “Telepathic Mail.” While the thickly braided harmonies are still at the forefront, there’s more personality coming through, which the harmonies accent instead of hide. The songwriters initially were drawn to each other because they were fans of of each other’s music, and Lee says that allowing for the individual voices to stand out has taken a lot of pressure off the group. “Instead of feeling like everyone had to have a fingerprint on every song, we allowed for there to be more space. “Now that we’ve developed more as a band, we’ve realized we don’t have to anchor to one thing,” Lee added. “We’ve actually cultivated an audience that’s used to hearing different genres come from us—where people understand that ‘cohesive’ to The Wild Reeds is different from ‘cohesive’ to another band.” Ω

Action Team. Proceeds go to construction of tiny house village for seniors. Call 345-7787 for info. Thu, 5/9, 6pm. $55. Lakeside Pavilion, 2565 California Park Drive.

HOUSING INSECURITY SHELTER CRISIS: Slow Theatre hosts its latest Chico Speaks public discussion on the topic of homelessness, with Robert Jones, Angela McLaughlin, Patrick Newman and others. Light refreshments will be served, call 898-6372 for info. Thu, 5/9, 5:30pm. Chico State, ARTS 112.

MOTOSHI KOSAKO

Saturday, May 11 Museum of Northern California Art SEE SATURDAY, MUSIC


FINE ARTS ON NEXT PAGE

SECRET TRAIL SPRING FEST

Saturday, May 11 Secret Trail Brewing Co. SEE SATURDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS

America’s fight to improve the lives of people affected with HD and their families. Sat 5/11, 9am. $10-$25. Cedar Grove, Bidwell Park. (707) 416-6002. hdsa.org

LOGGING DAYS IN STIRLING CITY: Pete Cuming presents exhibit and lecture on historic Stirling City and the old lumber mill. Refreshments provided, $5 donation suggested. Sat 5/11, 10am. Chico History Museum, 141 Salem St.

PAULY SHORE: Legend of screen and stage per-

5/11, 12pm. Free. Alex Marshall Studios, 1095 Nelson St., Ste. 120 487-7080. SECRET TRAIL SPRING FEST: Parking lot party with games, face painting, brews, music and local food trucks. Performers include: Barrel Aged, Lo & Behold, and Smoky Knights. Sat, 5/11, 11am. Secret Trail Brewing Company, 132 Meyers St., Ste. 120.

Music

forms stand-up at the Box. Frank Castillo and Sandy Danto open. Sat, 5/11, 9pm. $22. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave.

ERIC PETER & KEZIRAH BRADFORD: Local guitarist and vocalist perform for brunch. Sat, 5/11, 11am. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

PARADISE CHOCOLATE FEST GALA BENEFIT DINNER: An

MOTOSHI KOSAKO: Internationally renown jazz

evening of chocolate, wine and brews. Live music by Holly Taylor and Backyard Boyz & Friends. Call 342-4896 for info. Proceeds benefit youth organizations on the Ridge. Sat 5/11, 5pm. $85. Gold Country Casino & Hotel, 4020 Olive Highway, Oroville.

harpist is joined by local jazz pianist and composer Shigemi Minetaka. For more info call 762-1490 or email nortonbuffalohall@ gmail.com. Sat, 5/11, 7pm. $20. Museum of Northern California Art, 900 Esplanade. monca.org

PRAIRIE SESSIONS: More than 40 local makers’ THURSDAY NIGHT MARKET: Local produce, fresh flowers, music, arts and crafts, and food trucks. Will continue every Thursday through September. Thu, 5/9, 6pm. Downtown Chico. 345-6500. downtownchico.com

Theater THE MADAM AND THE MAYOR’S WIFE: Travel back to 1901 in Nevada County where a cast of shady characters with a few secrets get into some trouble. Written by local playwright Hilary Tellessen. Live original music by Lisa Marie and Heather Ellison. Thu, 5/9, 7:30pm. $15. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. blueroomtheatre.com

10

FRI

select local retailers to raise money for students, faculty and staff affected by the Camp Fire. For more info call 895-2404. Fri, 5/10, 6pm. $7-$25. Butte College Black Box Theatre, 3536 Campus Drive, ARTS Building, Oroville.

OROVILLE GOLD RUSH SHOW ’N’ SHINE: Hot rods, cool rides and a poker walk. Fri, 5/10, 12pm. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

POTLUCK, OPEN MIC AND JAM: Bring a dish to share, an acoustic instrument, your voice, a song or your favorite joke. Small donation requested. Fri, 5/10, 5pm. Feather River Senior Center, 1335 Meyers St., Oroville.

VOLUNTEER FRIDAYS: Join in picking up litter and pulling weeds in the park. For more info call Shane at 896-7831. Fri, 5/10, 9am. Bidwell Park.

Special Events

Music

BLACK BUTTE LAKE CAMP AND BIRD: Three days

GUITARCHESTRA!: Chico State Guitar Ensemble

of camping, birding, hiking, and kayaking at Black Butte Lake. Limited campsites reserved. Email jpchico@sbcglobal.net to reserve your spot. Fri, 5/10, 12pm. Free. Black Butte Lake, Campground, Orland. 519-4724.

BUTTE COLLEGE SPRING FASHION SHOW: Butte in Bloom. a fashion show fundraiser showcasing designs from students and

GUITARCHESTRA! Friday, May 10 Zingg Recital Hall SEE FRIDAY, MUSIC

highlights new original works. Evening will include a balance of solos and small ensembles. Fri, 5/10, 7:30pm. $6-$15. Zingg Recital Hall, Chico State, ARTS 279. 898-5152. csuchico.edu/soa

POOR MAN’S WHISKEY: KZFR presents popular Bay Area bluegrass/Southern rock band performing originals and a set of Allman

Brothers favorites. Fri, 5/10, 7:30pm. $20. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St. kzfr.org.

THE WILD REEDS: Female-fronted, Los Angelesbased indie-folk band known for beautiful harmonies and thoughtful lyrics. Jenny-O opens. Fri, 5/10, 8pm. $15. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St. sierranevada.com.

wares on display for Mother’s Day shopping, eating and drinking. Plus, photo booth, live music, fashion show and more. Sat

THIS WEEK CONTINUED ON PAGE 26

EDITOR’S PICK

Theater THE MADAM AND THE MAYOR’S WIFE: See Thursday. Fri, 5/10, 7:30pm. $15. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. blueroomtheatre.com

11

SAT

Special Events BIDWELL BARK: Fun run/walk in Lower Bidwell Park for animal lovers and their dogs. There will be food trucks, kids carnival games, a dog fun zone and more. Fundraiser for Butte Humane Society. Sat 5/11, 8am. Sycamore Field, Lower Bidwell Park. bidwellbark.com

BLACK BUTTE LAKE CAMP AND BIRD: See Friday. Sat 5/11, 12pm. Free. Black Butte Lake, Campground, Orland. 519-4724.

BLOCK PARTY WITH A PURPOSE: A community cleanup hosted by the Butte Environmental Council. Snacks and coffee provided. Sat 5/11, 9am. Next to Thai Express, Corner of Nord and Bidwell avenues.

HDSA CHICO TEAM HOPE WALK: Fundraising event to support Huntington’s Disease Society of

FREE LISTINGS! Post your event for free online at www. newsreview.com/calendar, or email the CN&R calendar editor at cnrcalendar@newsreview.com. Deadline for print listings is Wednesday, 5 p.m., one week prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

RAMBLIN’ MEN KZFR is bringing one of Nor Cal’s premier festival bands to the Chico Women’s Club stage Friday (May 10). Poor Man’s Whiskey is a beast that combines bluegrass and old-time Southern rock for barn-burning shows that get everyone on their feet. With six studio albums of material to choose from, the band’s able to bring something new to every performance. And this tour adds a special twist: A second set will feature a tribute to the Allman Brothers Band in PMW’s signature style. These self-described “outlaw music bards” have been selling out venues, so get your tickets before the bottle goes dry.

M AY 9 , 2 0 1 9

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THIS WEEK CONTINUED FROM PAGE 25

We Deliver to Your Door in Minutes!

FINE ARTS

Theater THE MADAM AND THE MAYOR’S WIFE: See Thursday. Sat, 5/11, 7:30pm. $15. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. blueroomtheatre.com

12

SUN

Special Events BLACK BUTTE LAKE CAMP AND BIRD: See Friday. Sun, 5/12, 12pm. Free. Black Butte

Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner

Lake, Campground, Orland. 519-4724.

240 Broadway St. Chico, CA | 530.899.2847 | www.pitapitusa.com

FREE MOVIE: Free showing every week; call 891-2762 for title. Sun, 5/12, 2pm. Chico Branch Library, 1108 Sherman Ave.

Good Food, GReAt enteRtAinMent,

MERRY STANDISH MOTHER’S DAY MATINEE: Comedians Aaron Standish, Liz Merry, and piano man Roland Allen perform new material and a few classics. Expect stand-up, sketches, songs and satire. Sun, 5/12, 2pm. $5. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St. 474-3824.

GRAnd tiMe!

Delicious Hot Wings & Nachos! Nightly Drink Specials!

1672

n Smar A Hammonto

Mar ysvill tville Road,

89 Ne 530-443-20

e

its Showgirls

xt to City Lim

SOMETHING NOT YET MADE Shows through June 2 1078 Gallery SEE ART

MOTHER’S DAY TEA IN THE ROSE GARDEN: Tea, sandwiches, treats and a stroll in the rose garden to celebrate the holiday with your loved one. Sun, 5/12, 2pm. $20$35. Rose Garden at CARD Community Center, 545 Vallombrosa Ave. 895-4711. chicorec.com

Music AN AFTERNOON OF JAZZ: Sundays at Two series continues with Rocky Winslow, guests and faculty for an afternoon of jazz to celebrate spring commencement. Sun, 5/12, 2pm. Zingg Recital Hall, Chico State, ARTS 279.

LOKI MILLER: Chico musician and thespian performs at a special Mother’s Day brunch. Sun, 5/12, 11am. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St. 433-0414.

NORTH STATE SYMPHONY: Masterworks 4: Pathos and Hope—the symphony’s season finale showcases Brahms’ final work. Free pre-concert talk at 1pm. Sun, 5/12, 2pm. $21-$40. Laxson Auditorium, Chico State. 898-5984. northstate symphony.org

14

TUE

Special Events PRISONER LETTER WRITING: The North Valley Prisoner Support crew gathers to write letters to incarcerated individuals. Tue, 5/14, 6pm. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

15

WED

Music KALEO PHILLIPS: KZFR presents Hawaiian music and Hula dancers with popular Maui-based musician. Wed, 5/15, 6:30pm. Chico Women›s Club, 592 E. Third St. kzfr.org

Art 1078 GALLERY: Something Not Yet Made, local artist Mariam Pakbaz. Reception Saturday, May 11, 6-8pm. Through 6/2. 1710 Park Ave.

BEATNIKS COFFEE HOUSE & BREAKFAST JOINT: Portrait and Figure Drawing Group Art Show, drawings and paintings by Chico Art Center artists. Through 6/28. 1387 E. Eighth St.

CHICO ART CENTER: The Discovery Show Series, juried exhibition featuring work by four artists who have had limited local exposure. Through 5/31. 450 Orange St.

HEALING ART GALLERY - ENLOE CANCER CENTER: Antonio Ramirez, photography by late Northern California artist. The Enloe Cancer Center Healing Art Gallery features artists whose lives have been touched by cancer. Through 7/19. 265 Cohasset Road, 332-3856.

JACKI HEADLEY UNIVERSITY ART GALLERY: Juried Student Exhibition, works submitted by Chico State art students with a wide range of approaches, concepts, and media. Through 5/11. Chico State, ARTS 121. headleygallerycsuchico.com

JANET TURNER PRINT MUSEUM: Ink & Clay, annual exhibition showcases student work in printmaking and ceramics. Through 5/11. Chico State, Arts & Humanities Building. janetturner.org

MAIN EVENT GALLERY: California’s Girl of the Golden Sunshine, Tehama County Arts Council presents retrospective exhibit of late California artist Babette Fickert Dowell’s work. Reception on Friday, May 10, 5-8 pm. Through 7/6. Free. 710 Main St., Red Bluff., 391-3259.

MUSEUM OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA ART: Tend, Chikoko presents an exploratory multimedia exhibit that utilizes found, broken, burnt and re-purposed items with a focus on textiles to examine the meaning of home. Also, Trapeze Acrobats, featuring paintings of acrobats, divers, gymnasts and dancers by Clay Vorhes. Closing event Saturday, May 25, 6-8pm. Through 5/26. 900 Esplanade. monca.org

ORLAND ART CENTER: Witty and Wild and

FOR MORE MUSIC, SEE NIGHTLIFE ON PAGE 30

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M AY 9 , 2 0 1 9

Whimsical, featuring the works of Gary Baugh, Marilynn Jennings, and Paula Busch showcasing a range of techniques including collage and encaustic painting. Through 5/25. 732 Fourth St., Orland. orlandartcenter.com

PROVISIONS GALLERY: Group Art Show, first show for Chico’s newest white wall art gallery with artwork from local artists. Through 5/9. 122 W. Third St. provisionsgallery.com

VALENE L. SMITH MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY: Altar States Spirit Worlds and Transformational Experiences, The Works of Peter Treagan, interactive tech art complete with 3D glasses and hidden imagery so visitors can participate in what is described as a transformational visionary art experience. Through 5/17. Chico State, Meriam Library. csuchico. edu/anthmuseum

Museums BOLT’S ANTIQUE TOOL MUSEUM: Unique museum has over 12,000 hand tools on display, charting cataloging the evolution and history of tools. Closed Sundays. Through 6/15. $3. 1650 Broderick St, Oroville.

CHICO CHILDREN’S MUSEUM: Tons of cool stuff for kids to explore including a miniature city, complete with a junior vet clinic, dentist, cafe and farmer’s market, a giant fish tank, multi-sensory room, imagination playground and much more. Check the website for hours. Through 8/3. $7-$9. 325 Main St. chicochildrensmuseum.org

CHICO CREEK NATURE CENTER: Living Animal Museum & Nature Play Room, learn all about local critters, plants and wildlife. Through 5/25. $2-$4. 1968 E. Eighth St. chicorec.com

GATEWAY SCIENCE MUSEUM: From Here to There, explore the science of how things move by land, sea and air. Also on display are The Foothills, and America’s Wolves: From Tragedy to Inspiration. Through 5/12. $5-$7. 625 Esplanade. csuchico.edu

PATRICK RANCH MUSEUM: Working farm and museum with rotating exhibits open every Saturday and Sunday from 11am to 3pm. Through 5/26. 10381 Midway, Durham. patrickranchmuseum.org

VALENE L. SMITH MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY: Remarkable Lives, exploring the intertwined worlds of birds and humans, in partnership with the Altacal Audubon Society and Snow Goose Festival. Exhibits include bird songs and behaviors, local photography and a robotic recreation of the late Jurassic Archaeopteryx. Through 7/31. 400 W. First St.


Ma y 9, 2019

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27


Rebuilding the Ridge Supporting Local Businesses on the Ridge and Surrounding Communities RE-opEnEd aftER thE camp fiRE Dove’s Gypsy Heart Boutique 1950 East 20th St, Ste. G 713, Chico (530) 872-2200

aDventist HealtH FeatHer river 5974 Pentz Rd, Paradise (530) 877-9361

DutcH Bros. coFFee 6901 Skyway, Paradise (530) 872-3194

M&s Wesley tree service 5106 Cliffhanger Lane, Paradise (530) 343-6809

MeeHo’s

6808 Skyway, Paradise (530) 877-7031

tHoMas ace HarDWare 5720 Clark Rd, Paradise (530) 877-4442

real estate proFessionals 205 Pearson Road, Paradise (530) 872-1600

paraDise Bikes 6282 Skyway, Paradise (530) 877-3992

paraDise coin anD GiFt

rieBes auto parts

Wells Fargo Bank 6930 Skyway, Paradise (530) 872-0813

remaX oF ParaDIse

5990 Clark Road, Paradise (530) 877-6511

save Mart

Century 21 seleCt real estate

tlC groomIng By CanDICe

Farmers InsuranCe, DaWn Foster

ParaDIse travel

sierra central creDit Union (atM only) 5175 Skyway, Paradise 800-222-7228

silver scissors pet GrooMinG 3024 Wild Iris Lane, Paradise (530)877-5046

sMalley General contractinG

6344 Skyway, Paradise (530) 876-1486

t-Mobile

paraDise auto BoDy

tHe nail stuDio

1122 Elliot Road, Paradise (530) 872-8060

770 Birch Street, Paradise (530) 872-0887

Positive – i Dance & circus center

tHeatre on tHe riDGe

618 Castle Drive, Paradise (530) 872-8338

luCIto InsuranCe agenCy

5309 Skyway Road, Paradise (530) 413-7785

6848 Skyway, #U, Paradise (530) 872-3363

re construction

P.O. Box 3104, Paradise (530) 966-1684

skyWay Mart

starBucks

3735 Neal Road, Paradise (530) 877-5760

uniteD states postal service - ParaDise 6469 Clark Road, Paradise (800) 275-8777

golD BonD PlumBIng

laW oFFICe oF Joel massae

6400 Skyway, Paradise (530) 872-9000

3101 Sunnyside Lane, Paradise (530) 521-5645

6445 Skyway, Paradise (530) 876-8604 8645 Skyway, Paradise (530) 321-4203

siMplistic realty

6616 Clark Rd. Ste. A, Paradise (530) 876-4446

8935 Skyway, Paradise (530) 327 - 7913

5350 Skyway, Paradise (530) 872-7653

6636 Clark Road, Paradise

5923 Clark Rd Suite E, Paradise (530) 877-2200

moak’s Dog groomIng

6635 Clark Road, Paradise (530) 872-5880 Operating Remotely (530) 877-1464

1001 Bille Road, Paradise (530) 872-0285

a gooD Dog Day BeHavIor anD traInIng 13699 Endicot Circle, Magalia, CA (530) 459-8767

A-1 And Son HAndymAn servICes 14737 Wildfire Dr, Magalia (530) 519-4680

amPla HealtH 14137 Lakeridge Circle, Magalia (530) 674-4261

5796 #16 Clark Road, Paradise (530) 588-1958

aPPle rIDge CarPet & uPHolstery CleanIng

ParaDIse assoCIatIon oF realtors

14687 Tyler Court, Magalia (530) 873-4304

(530) 809-3809

Beary suDsy soaP ComPany

ParaDIse HearIng & BalanCe ClInICs, InC

6130 Lambert Lane, Magalia (530) 520-5051

5500 Clark Road, Paradise (530) 872-5500

ParaDIse sanItatIon Co.

BlaCk oak traInIng InC. PO Box 1731, Magalia (530)624-1562

PO Box 3815, Paradise (530) 877-3207

CHuCk’s PlaCe Fast strIP

allan’s Custom BlInDs

JakI’s HIlltoP CaFe

Call for Appointment (530) 877-9299

14112 Skyway, Magalia (530) 873-1275

gaBrIella’s eatery

orovIlle HosPItal

Open Remotely (530) 514-4540

2767 Olive Highway, Oroville (530) 533-8500

14618 Skyway, Magalia

SPonSoRed by

Check back next week for more businesses and organizations that have re-opened. Listings provided by Paradise Ridge Chamber of Commerce. paradisechamber.com 28

CN&R

m ay 9, 2 01 9


SCENE

Same as we ever were

One of the ladies of the Homestead Brothel (played by Alyssa Larson) entertains the sheriff (Zac Yurkovic) as the town drunk (Steve Staples) looks on in The Madam and The Mayor’s Wife. PHOTO BY JOE HILSEE

Local playwright explores roles of the sexes through the lens of the oldest profession

Sa dismissive we may well roll our eyes, snort derisively, and utter “duh” under our breath. And yet, for most

ex sells. It’s a truism so trite that, when hearing it,

people, the actual selling of sex is still regarded as fairly taboo. In fact, I’ll bet that most audience by Carey Wilson members—even regulars who’ve been desensitized by the Blue Room Theatre’s history of edgy programming—will gasp in response to the Review: The Madam and the central point of conflict at a late-Wild Mayor’s Wife shows West-era brothel in the theater’s curThursday-Saturday, rent production. The reaction of the 7:30 p.m., through crowd last Saturday night (May 4) was May 18. Tickets: $15 palpable. This daring production is the (Thursdays, pay what you can) world premiere of The Madam and the Mayor’s Wife, an original play Blue Room Theatre 139 W. First St. by local playwright Hilary Tellesen. 895-3749 Her wonderfully detailed, characterblueroomtheatre.com driven and multilayered script is set in Grass Valley at the dawn of the 20th century, and it delivers a fully realized portrait of people living through a crisis of morals, economy and personal ethics. There are quite a few heartfelt laughs woven into the fabric of the drama as well. In addition to creating a richly detailed setting and style for the play, designer, scenic artist and costumer Amber Miller makes one of her rare but always rewarding appearances on the boards as the hard-drinking, profanity-hurling Madame Pearl. She’s the proprietor of the Homestead Brothel, an establishment that’s been ensuring that “men’s cocks get attended to” for so long that it’s become a fixture in the town. Providing couture for the ladies is dressmaker Fannie (Leesa Palmer), whose business puts her at the uneasy junction between “respectable” women and the ladies of the brothel (including Alice and Cat, played with verve by Blake Ellis and Alyssa Larson, respectively) who provide her

with much of her business. Representing the male contingent are the town drunk (Steve Staples), the sheriff (Zac Yurkovic), the doc (Richard Cross) and Mayor Quincy (Joe Hilsee). Yurkovic’s lawman is a good-time Charlie who enjoys the benefits and drinks of the Homestead while also appearing to sympathize with the need to maintain law and order, while Cross’ character is a sentimental weeper who does his best to administer health care to the ladies of the house. Hilsee’s mayor is the epitome of conflicted affection, morals, lust and political aspiration, a man torn between his past love of Pearl, his politically motivated commitment to his wife, and his passion to deflower the whorehouse orphan, Addie (Sierra Hall). Tellesen herself takes the role of Mrs. Quincy, the mayor’s wife. And it is through her character that the interaction between womanly outrage at masculine selfishness and denial (as manifested in her husband), and feminine shrewdness and compassion (as manifested by Pearl), is explored with much humanistic insight. Tellesen’s script, aided by the direction of Lara Tenckhoff, skillfully reveals each character’s depth and personal history through realistic conversation and interaction. And two of the dramaturgically interesting and successful aspects of the staging are the use of complementary secondary scenes in the shadows of the main action, and the presence of musicians—a powerful duo made up of local singer/songwriters Lisa Marie Hiatt and Heather Ellison—playing gorgeous, original, period-evoking music live in the brothel. By setting her play more than a century ago, Tellesen has created a distance of perspective that allows a contemporary audience to laugh at the outdated foibles of Victorian morality. But through her insightful rendering of these characters’ very personal conflicts of affection, loyalty and desires, Tellesen gives the audience a chance to identify and maybe contemplate the nature of the male and female roles we play. Ω

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NIGHTLIFE

THURSDAY 5/9—WEDNESDAY 5/15

MALTESE’S NINTH ANNIVERSARY SHOW

SHIBA SAN: Award-winning house DJ

from France. Thu, 5/9, 8pm. $20. El Rey Theater, 230 W. Second St.

Saturday, May 11 The Maltese

TATSUYA NAKANI: Avant-garde sound artist, composer, and master percussionist performs. Local solo acts Wild Plants and Dude Corpse open. Thu, 5/9, 8pm. $7. 1078 Gallery, 1710 Park Ave. 1078gallery.org

SEE SATURDAY

TGTG: Catchy indie rock duo from

XDS

9THURSDAY

COMEDY NIGHT: Comedian Keith Barany, local funny guy Bob

Backstrom opens. Thu, 5/9, 6pm. $20-$25. Canyon Oaks Country Club, 999 Yosemite Drive.

DYLAN’S DHARMA: Hometown superstar jam crew plays its reggae/rock originals. Thu, 5/9, 6pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

OFF THE RECORD: Local cover band plays American Lung Association’s Smoke-Free/Vape-Free Night during Thursday Night Market. Thu, 5/9, 7pm. City Plaza, downtown Chico.

PUDDLE OF MUDD: Nineties alternative rockers are still kickin’! Thu, 5/9, 7pm. $25. The Senator Theater, 517 Main St.

REGGAE NIGHT: Three DJs spinning

the tasty jams. Thu, 5/9, 6pm. The Commons Social Empourium, 2412 Park Ave.

ROCKSTEADY SOCIAL CLUB: DJ Byrdie and King Tommy spin ska, dub and soulful reggae vinyl from the 1960s and ’70s. Thu, 5/9, 8pm. Bill’s Towne Lounge, 135 Main St.

SAMARIA GRACE: TLC Thursdays with popular soul/jazz singer, plus Chico’s newest contemporary jazz ensemble, The Meraki. Thu, 5/9, 6pm. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St., 433-0414.

SCARLET PUMPS SINGLE RELEASE SHOW: Local indie-rockers celebrate new release. Thu, 5/9, 7pm. $7. Argus Bar + Patio, 212 W. Second St.

Nashville traveling the world stop in Chico. Joined by local bands Abstract Blue, Little Black Cloud, and The Walsh Brothers. Thu, 5/9, 7:30pm. Ike’s Place, 648 W. Fifth St.

THUMPIN’ THURSDAY ROCK ’N’ BLUES JAM: Hosted by the Loco-Motive Band plus special guests. All musicians and music enthusiasts welcome. Thu, 5/9, 7pm. Studio Inn Lounge, 2582 Esplanade., (408) 449-2179.

10FRIDAY

AMANDA GRAY: Singer/songwriter

performing bluegrass-inspired country. Fri, 5/10, 7pm. The Exchange, 1975 Montgomery St., Oroville. theexchangeoroville.com

BEN HAGGARD: Merle Haggard’s youngest son has made a name for himself and will be performing with a full band. Northern Traditionz opens. Fri, 5/10, 8pm. $35. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave.

COME TOGETHER!: Beatles tribute to benefit Home & Heart, a homesharing program to benefit older adults in need of affordable housing. Lineup includes Kyle Williams, Little Black Cloud, Sex Hogs III and many more. Fri, 5/10, 7pm. $7-$10. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

ERIC PETER AND LEANN COOLEY DUO: Talented local guitarist and vocalist perform. Fri, 5/10, 6pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St.

GUITARCHESTRA!: Chico State Guitar Ensemble highlights new original works. Evening will include a balance of solos and small ensembles. Fri, 5/10, 7:30pm. $6-$15. Zingg Recital Hall, Chico State, ARTS 279., 898-5152. csuchico.edu/soa

IKE’S FUNDRAISER SHOW: Multigenre show raising funds to pay for music equipment at the all-ages venue. Line-up includes The Velvet Starlings, Sunny Acres and more. All ages. Fri, 5/10, 7:30pm. $7. Ike’s Place, 648 West Fifth St.

KYLE WILLIAMS: Mellow tunes for happy hour with local singer songwriter. Fri, 5/10, 4pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

OPEN MIC: Bring an instrument. Acoustic/electric guitar and drum set available to use. Sign up at 7:30pm. All ages welcome until 10pm. Fri, 5/10, 8pm. $2. Down Lo, 319 Main St., 966-8342.

HEY BU-U-UDDY!

The Weasel has landed. Pauly Shore, ’90s icon of bro cinema and MTV, will be slinging jokes at the Tackle Box this Saturday (May 11). Before starring in Encino Man and The Pauly Show, Shore was a standup working the So Cal circuit, and he comes from true comedic lineage—his mom, Mitzi, co-founded the legendary Comedy Store. LA comics Frank Castillo and Sandy Danto are set to open. Go munch some grindage and enjoy some jokes.

POOR MAN’S WHISKEY: KZFR presents popular Bay Area bluegrass/ Southern rock group performing originals and a second set featuring Allman Brothers favorites. Fri, 5/10, 7:30pm. $20. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St. kzfr.org

PUB SCOUTS: Traditional Irish music

for happy hour. Fri, 5/10, 4pm. $1. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St.

SILENCE AT THE DISCO: You wear a head set and choose which of three DJs

to dance to. 18 and over. Fri, 5/10, 8pm. $5. The Spirit, 2360 Oro Quincy Highway, Oroville.

SOUL POSSE: Live dance music. Fri,

5/10, 6pm. Purple Line Urban Winery, 760 Safford St., Oroville.

SWETTET: North State jazz quartet featuring some of the most prolific and talented players and improvisers in the area. Fri, 5/10, 6pm. Almendra Winery & Distillery, 9275 Midway Road, Durham.

Butte County

W NE Week

JUNE 7-16, 2019

For more information: wineweek@newsreview.com go to buttecountywineweek.com or call 530-894-2300 PRESENTED BY:

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THIS WEEK: FIND MORE ENTERTAINMENT AND SPECIAL EVENTS ON PAGE 24 DETROIT LEGENDS!: Seven-piece band performs the biggest hits from Motown with special tributes to Stevie Wonder, Tina Turner, Gladys Knight and Aretha Franklin. Sat, 5/11, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

THE KELLY TWINS DUELING PIANOS: Popular piano bros play your requests. Sat, 5/11, 8pm. $7. Argus Bar + Patio, 212 W. Second St.

ANDRE NICKATINA

Saturday, May 11 Senator Theatre

KYLE WILLIAMS: Mellow tunes with local singer songwriter. Sat, 5/11, 7pm. The Exchange, 1975 Montgomery St., Oroville.

SEE SATURDAY

MALTESE ANNIVERSARY SHOW: THE WILD REEDS: Female-fronted, LA-based indie-folk band known for beautiful harmonies and thoughtful lyrics. Jenny-O opens. Fri, 5/10, 8pm. $15. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St. sierranevada.com

11SATURDAY

ANDRE NICKATINA: Veteran Bay Area rapper brings his original style and thoughtful lyrics to Chico. Sat, 5/11, 9pm. $20-$25. Senator Theatre, 517 Main St. jmaxproductions.net

CAT DEPOT: Pretty melodies from solo project of guitarist Mathew Houghton. Sat, 5/11, 4pm. Sierra Nevada Hop Yard, 1075 E. 20th St. sierranevada.com

CHANNEL 66: Local folk/rock project featuring covers of the Beatles, Dylan and more. Sat, 5/11, 6pm. Almendra Winery & Distillery, 9275 Midway Road, Durham.

CHUCK EPPERSON & BOBBY D.:

Smooth weekend tunes. Sat, 5/11, 6:30pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St.

LOCALS NIGHT: Chico alternative rock band The Damaged Goods is joined by indie-folksters Eyes Like Lanterns and dirty blues duo Little Black Cloud. Sat, 5/11, 9pm. $5. Naked Lounge, 118 W. Second St.

DANCE NIGHT: DJs J-Ho & U-Yes spin

tunes for your booty. Sat, 5/11, 9:30pm. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St.

Surrogate, XDS, Bungo and Michelin Embers rock the stage to celebrate. Sat, 5/11, 8pm. $7. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

MOTOSHI KOSAKO: Internationally renown jazz harpist is joined by local jazz pianist and composer Shigemi Minetaka. Info: 762-1490 or nortonbuffalohall@gmail.com. Sat, 5/11, 7pm. $20. Museum of Northern California Art, 900 Esplanade. monca.org

PAISANI: Local quartet plays instrumental Italian, Latin and Sicilian jazz. Sat, 5/11, 7pm. Wine Time, 26 Lost Dutchman Drive.

PAULY SHORE: Legend of screen and stage performs stand-up at the Box. Frank Castillo and Sandy Danto open. Sat, 5/11, 9pm. $22. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave.

SKIP CULTON PROJECT: Local band blends R&B, rock, reggae and pop for a unique sound that will get you on the dance floor. Sat, 5/11, 8:30pm. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfallscasino.com

TEMPO REGGAE PARTY: Day and night party featuring reggae, dancehall, dub and roots from Nor Cal’s top DJs and bands, plus a delicious $20 buffet. Sat, 5/11, 5pm. Sipho’s, 1228 Dayton Road, (805) 801-3844.

12SUNDAY

JOHN SEID AND LARRY PETERSON:

Relaxing tunes by local favorites. Sun, 5/12, 6pm. 5th Street Steakhouse, 345 W. Fifth St.

LEEYA SHAW ALBUM-RELEASE PARTY: Local artist celebrates new solo piano album. Michael Bone opens. Sun, 5/12, 8pm. $7-$12. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St., 433-0414.

Bring an instrument and sign up to join. Wed, 5/15, 7:30pm. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfallscasino.com

KALEO PHILLIPS: KZFR presents Hawaiian music and dancers with popular Maui-based musician. Wed, 5/15, 6:30pm. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St. kzfr.org

OPEN MIC COMEDY: Your weekly Wednesday dose of free comedy with experienced and first-time comedians. Sign-ups start at 8pm. Wed, 5/15, 9pm. Studio Inn Lounge, 2582 Esplanade.

SHARING SKIES: Ambient jazz band from So Cal joined by local beatmaker Guttersnipe. Wed, 5/15, 8pm. $7-$12. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St., 433-0414.

RADICAL SOUNDS

The work of legendary percussionist, composer and sound artist Tatsuya Nakatani is a distinct language of music and expression. Merging his own breath with bells, drums, sticks and things, he makes beautiful experimental noise. Transcend the ordinary tonight (May 9) at the 1078 Gallery with Nakatani, plus a couple of local improv/experimental solo projects, one from XDS frontman Jesse Hall (Wild Plants) and one from that tall drummer, Nate Daly (Dude Corpse).

OPEN MIC COMEDY NIGHT: Working on a

bit? Signups start at 8pm. Sun, 5/12, 9pm. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

15WEDNESDAY

FULL HOUSE BLUES JAM: The 6th

anniversary of the jam, with house band, the Southside Growlers.

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REEL WORLD FILM SHORTS Reviewers: Bob Grimm and Juan-Carlos Selznick.

Opening this week High Life

A sci-fi/fantasy with a nonlinear narrative starring Robert Pattinson as a man stranded in space with his baby daughter as the last survivors of a mission led by a doctor (Juliette Binoche) with sinister motives. Pageant Theatre. Rated R.

The Hustle

A female-centered remake of Dirty Rotten Scoundrels with Anne Hathaway and Rebel Wilson taking over the roles of the high-rent/low-rent scam artists out to get revenge on the “dirty rotten” men who’ve wronged them. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

A sisterly bond and two ‘deftly nuanced performances’ at the heart of this modern-day western

L

ittle Woods, a fine indie drama in a mostly rural setting, is full of small but very welcome surprises. The film has a grassroots brand of social realism going for it, and it navigates a veritable obstacle course of topical issues with an earthy sort by of directness and aplomb. Best of Juan-Carlos all, it has a lived-in sense of characSelznick ter and place, and the story’s complex array of social issues emerges through the characters and their lives, and not the other way around. In synopsis, Little Woods might Little Woods sound overloaded with highly Ends tonight, May 9. fraught issues. The main setting is Starring Tessa a small North Dakota town sliding Thompson and Lily into steep decline after a fracking James. Directed by Nia DaCosta. Pageant boom. Drug dealing, abortion, ramTheatre. Rated R. pant alcoholism, predatory business practices, shadow economies, abject poverty and much else figure prominently in this tale. But the central characters and key motive forces in all this are a couple of half-sisters whose mother has just died. Ollie (a fine Tessa Thompson), the adopted sister, is nearing the finish of probation for a drugdealing conviction. Deb (Lily James) is a single mom trying to shed her young son’s deadbeat dad, but also stymied by another pregnancy. In the aftermath of their mother’s death, both are on the verge of homelessness. What transpires in the midst of their respective crises is the renewal of a sisterly bond, a kind of out-

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law sisterhood, in this case. Ollie returns to her drugdealing schemes (she has a source in Canada, originally developed in order to provide affordable medicine for the dying mother). Paying for a place to live is the initial motive, but soon that gives way to Deb’s hopes of financing a clandestine abortion. The film’s distributors tout Little Woods as a kind of a western, and while the setting is resolutely contemporary, the genre-tag makes some real sense: the sisters, after all, are good-hearted outlaws, and their ventures outside whatever home they have include wilderness treks, border crossings, and a whole string of small but intense showdowns with male clods, abusive louts, and vaguely menacing authority figures. In her feature film debut, writer-director Nia DaCosta gets deftly nuanced performances out of her principal players. Thompson is superb in the film’s “hero” role, the multifaceted Ollie. James’ Deb is both silly and sympathetic as she swirls toward some kind of maturity. The “deadbeat dad” (James Badge Dale) has an especially good moment with Deb/James as he plunges toward a piece of his own maturity. Lance Reddick maintains a gentle ambiguity as Ollie’s craftily empathetic parole officer. Even little Charles Ray Reid has a couple of unexpectedly poetic moments as Deb’s son Johnny. Ω

1 2 3 Poor

Fair

Good

4 Very Good

5 Excellent

2

Captain Marvel

A part real-life/part animated fantasy flick set in a world where people collect Pokémon to do battle against each other, with Ryan Reynolds starring as the voice of Pikachu, a Pokémon and budding detective who helps a human track down a missing person. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

Despite the fact that she’s playing a superhero who has the power to shoot electrical bursts from her hands, Brie Larson’s Captain Marvel suffers from a disappointing lack of energy. Larson’s turn as the title character, aka Carol Danvers (aka Vers), is plagued by lethargy and bizarre line deliveries, and she gives off a detached vibe that she doesn’t want to be in the movie. Had the film around her been really good, the lead’s bored disposition might’ve been forgiven, but this cosmic superhero origin story and intergalactic war movie is also riddled with some haphazard storytelling and awful special effects. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13 —B.G.

Poms

The Intruder

Tolkein

4

Pokémon Detective Pikachu

Desperate in the Heartland

rectorial job from the team of Anthony and Joe Russo. I can also tell you that the movie borrows a lot from Back to the Future Part II, and that the Hulk undergoes a fantastic wardrobe change. Despite a three-hour running time, all of this zips by in spectacularly entertaining fashion and very rarely misses the mark. And in the midst of all the action, Downey Jr. delivers another soulful, endearing performance, well beyond anything you would’ve expected from a Marvel movie before he started showing up in them. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13 —B.G.

A group of inspired women in a retirement community form an unlikely all-senior cheerleading squad. Starring Diane Keaton and Pam Grier. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

Nicholas Hoult stars as author J.R.R. Tolkien in this biopic on the life of the creator of The Lord of the Rings/The Hobbit fantasy novels. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13.

Now playing

4

Avengers: Endgame

There are tons of questions this movie needed to answer: Is everybody really dead? Where’s Thanos (Josh Brolin)? Where’s Hawkeye (Jeremy Renner)? Is Tony Stark/Iron Man (Robert Downey Jr.) doomed in space? Does Star-Lord (Chris Pratt) still have his Walkman in the great beyond? And how can I talk about anything specific in this film without becoming the Spoiler King? I can say that the movie answers many of the questions everyone’s been asking, and more, thanks to another well-balanced screenplay and a crack di-

A psychological thriller about a married couple (Michael Ealy and Meagan Good) being terrorized by the previous owner (Dennis Quaid) of the Napa Valley dream home they just purchased. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

Little Woods

Ends tonight, May 9. See review this issue. Pageant Theatre. Rated R —J.C.S.

Long Shot

Seth Rogen stars as an unemployed journalist who gets hired as a speechwriter by his first crush (Charlize Theron)—who is now U.S. secretary of state and a presidential candidate—sparking an unexpected romance. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

UglyDolls

A superstar cast—including Kelly Clarkson, Nick Jonas, Janelle Monáe and Pitbull— provides the voices for this computeranimated musical based on the UglyDolls line of plush toys. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

Pokémon Detective Pikachu


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Mango Mimosa Anyone?

haas not Photo by bindifry (via flickr)

vocados are like gold in California. The rich and

packed with healthy fats, fiber and vitamins (especially pantothenic acid, aka B5). by California is the largest producer Steph of avocados in the United States, Rodriguez with more than 3,000 cultivators, steph r@ predominantly along the coastal newsrev i ew.c om region from Monterey to San Diego. Right now is California’s avocado season, and the West Coast is starting to see more and more homegrown alligator pears at farmers’ markets and local grocery stores. But, according to Jan DeLyser, vice president of marketing with the California Avocado Commission, overall projections for the state’s avocado production are way down for 2019. “We’re dealing with a smaller crop than we had last year. Basically, we’re expecting 175 million pounds of avocados compared to 360 million pounds from the previous year,” DeLyser said. “When you think about the reasons behind the lower volume: Avocados are an alternate bearing crop. The trees work hard and take a bit of a break each season. But we also had extreme heat in the 115- to 120-degree range, which is very, very hot in California.” The good news is that, in early April, California growers began harvesting fairly healthy volumes of avocados. DeLyser said about 9 million to 11 million pounds are being harvested every week, and despite the heat wave, she anticipates avocados to be in good supply through July, in large part due to the fact California’s crop will be made available primarily to West Coast buyers this season.

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It’s a down year for Cali avocados, so make your guac while you can

Asea silky fruit is as good eaten alone with a pinch of salt as it is added to a salad or sandwich, and it’s

IndAy’s FIlIpIno

So when you see avocados at the store or market, grab as many as you can eat—both ripe and unripe. A ripe avocado will have a slight give when held in the palm of your hand (never press avocados with your fingers as it will bruise the fruit, and no one likes to eat those brown spots). That’s when it’s prime for guacamole-making. Leave firm avocados on a kitchen counter, and they should ripen in a day or three. And already ripe uncut avocados will keep for two or three days in the refrigerator. Cut ones need some citrus such as lime or lemon juice squeezed on top. The citric acid helps it keep that bright color. When asked how she prefers to eat avocados, DeLyser said she keeps it simple. “I really love it two ways,” she said. “On a piece of whole wheat toast, or I love avocados with eggs. I just think that’s a combination made in heaven. Whether it’s poached or scrambled with chunks of avocados, I just love it.” On its website (californiaavocado.com), the California Avocado Commission has a ton of recipes, including a ridiculous number of guacamoles—from classic examples to wild variations, including a Korean rendition with kimchi. The recipe here comes from the hip Petty Cash Taqueria in Los Angeles—called the “best guacamole recipe, period,” by LA Magazine. Petty Cash’s famous guacamole

2 large Hass avocados, mashed but chunky 1 serrano pepper, seeded and diced finely 1/2 red onion, diced finely 1 tbsp. cilantro, chopped 1 lime, juiced Kosher salt

Ω

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ARTS DEVO by Jason Cassidy • jasonc@newsreview.com

This guy saves you money. Cnrsweetdeals.newsreview.Com

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Kettle corn and chill arts dEVo saw the sign reading, “Google search Autmuse,” and so he did. Standing in the middle of Fourth Street during

Thursday night Market—devouring a bag of kettle corn like I was mad at it—I typed “autmuse” into my personal supercomputer and landed on autmuse. com and the face on my phone was the same one staring over the large placard from a bench at the City Plaza. The dude’s name is Joe Wesley, aka autmuse, a local musician/songwriter, and after I introduced myself, I asked him, “Why the sign?” He said, because it’s cheaper than buying an advertisement. Fair enough. He went on to explain that Autmuse is short for autism music and that the songs he writes have “the ability to calm people with autism” (though he says he doesn’t know if anyone on the spectrum has tested its effectiveness yet). I went searching through the samples scattered around his website, but found that the easiest way to listen to his music was to pull up his page on youTube (search “Autmuse Wesley”), where you can choose a playlist and experience the instrumental electronic tracks one after the other without clicking around. I’m not that stressed of a person (other than when I’m destroying salty-sweet snacks in public), and intentionally “calming” sounds often have the opposite effect Autmuse on me, but I have to say that Autmuse lulled me into a pretty chill state. My favorite was probably “Full Western Nightmare,” which was less calming than chaotically meditative with layers of chime loops piled atop one another (and with a striking visual of a frozen cartoon dumbo very slowly floating across a forest background). Click on the “Autmuse music videos” playlist to hear his original compositions, or look him up on spotify for an expanded selection.

SongS for a Softer Spring In addition to Autmuse, this past week I’ve also been digging into albums from two of my favorite contemporary bands: Father of the Bride by Vampire Weekend, and UFoF by Big Thief, both released last Friday (May 3). I am just starting to form my thoughts, but in general I already love both recordings. I bring them up now, somewhat prematurely, because this is music I want to recommend to my fellow weary humans. These are two smart, inviting records that offer a soft place to land as well as an opportunity to feel something. I know so many tired people—some exhausted by unrelenting nonsense and nastiness, some overburdened with grief. These records aren’t escapes from any of that. Both address suffering, heartbreak and loss, but they are balanced by a fair amount of love, fun and beauty, and feature narrators— Ezra Koenig for Vampire Weekend and adrianne Lenker of Big Thief—who are each responding to this shared life in engaging ways. The former from the point of view of a man who looks inward after witnessing a messed up world and moves through it all to a breezy beat and sunny melodies (hear the island guitars and hand claps on the ridiculously infectious breakup song, “This Life”: “Baby, I know pain is as natural as the rain/I just thought it didn’t rain in California”). And the latter from someone who’s emerged from the darkness to have an open and intimate conversation about the magic of it all while steeped in rich folk tones (hear the sweetly sad loping march into the great beyond on the incredible “Cattails”: “Middle of the river in a lawn chair/With your wrinkled hands and your silver hair/Leaving here soon and you know where/To where the cattail sways with the lonesome loon ...”). UFOF is the more deeply realized of the two, and in fact, as great as some of its songs are, Father of the Bride is a little thin in a few spots (which is not fatal on a double album with 18 tracks). Big Thief’s album probably will end up being a legitimate masterpiece, but both are here now to offer some connection with art as well as a chance to just be real. Ω


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY For the week oF May 9, 2019 ARIES (March 21-April 19): Time to

shake things up! In the next three weeks, I invite you to try at least three of the following experiments. 1. See unusual sights in familiar situations. 2. Seek out new music that both calms you and excites you. 3. Get an inspiring statue or image of a favorite deity or hero. 4. Ask for a message from the person you will be three years from now. 5. Use your hands and tongue in ways you don’t usually use them. 6. Go in quest of a cathartic release that purges frustration and rouses holy passion. 7. Locate the sweet spot where deep feeling and deep thinking overlap.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Accord-

ing to science writer Sarah Zielinski in Smithsonian magazine, fireflies produce the most efficient light on planet Earth. Nearly 100% of the energy produced by the chemical reaction inside the insect’s body is emitted as a brilliant glow. With that in mind, I propose that you regard the firefly as your spirit creature in the coming weeks. According to my reading of the astrological omens, you, too, will be a dynamic and proficient generator of luminosity. For best results, don’t tone down your brilliance, even if it illuminates shadows people are trying to hide.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Here’s a

message from author Susan J. Elliott: “This is not your week to run the Universe. Next week is not looking so good either.” Now here’s a message from me: Elliott’s revelation is very good news! Since you won’t have to worry about trying to manage and fine-tune the universe, you can focus all your efforts on your own self-care. And the coming weeks will be a favorable time to do just that. You’re due to dramatically upgrade your understanding of what you need to feel healthy and happy, and then take the appropriate measures to put your new insights into action.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): The next

three weeks will be an excellent time to serve as your own visionary prophet and dynamic fortune-teller. The predictions and conjectures you make about your future destiny will have an 85% likelihood of being accurate. They will also be relatively free of fear and worries. So I urge you to give your imagination permission to engage in fun fantasies about what’s ahead for you. Be daringly optimistic and exuberantly hopeful and brazenly self-celebratory.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Leo poet Stanley

Kunitz told his students, “You must be very careful not to deprive the poem of its wild origin.” That’s useful advice for anyone who spawns anything, not just poets. There’s something unruly and unpredictable about every creative idea or fresh perspective that rises up in us. Do you remember when you first felt the urge to look for a new job or move to a new city or search for a new kind of relationship? Wildness was there at the inception. And you needed to stay in touch with the wildness so as to follow through with practical action. That’s what I encourage you to do now. Reconnect with the wild origins of the important changes you’re nurturing.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): I have no com-

plaints about the measures you’ve taken recently to push past unnecessary limits and to break outworn taboos. In fact, I celebrate them. Keep going! You’ll be better off without those decaying constraints. Soon you’ll begin using all the energy you have liberated and the spaciousness you have made available. But I do have one concern: I wonder if part of you is worried that you have been too bold and have gone too far. To that part of you I say: No! You haven’t been too bold. You haven’t gone too far.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “[I] dreamt of

a past that frees its prisoners.” So wrote Meena Alexander in her poem “Question Time.” I’d love for you to have that experience in the coming weeks. I’d love for you be released from the karma of your history so that you no longer have to repeat old patterns or feel weighed down by what

by rob brezsny happened to you once upon a time. I’d love for you to no longer have to answer to decayed traditions and outmoded commitments and lost causes. I’d love for you to escape the pull of memories that tend to drag you back toward things that can’t be changed and don’t matter any more.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “Desire

is a profoundly upsetting force,” writes author Elspeth Probyn. “It may totally rearrange what we think we want. Desire skews plans and sets forth unthought-of possibilities.” In my opinion, Probyn’s statements are half-true. The other half of the truth is that desire can also be a profoundly healing and rejuvenating force, and for the same reasons: It rearranges what we think we want, alters plans and unleashes unthought-of possibilities. How does all this relate to you? From what I can tell, you are now on the cusp of desire’s two overlapping powers. What happens next could be upsetting or healing, disorienting or rejuvenating. If you’d like to emphasize the healing and rejuvenating, I suggest you treat desire as a sacred gift and a blessing.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

“So much of what we learn about love is taught by people who never really loved us.” My Sagittarian friend Ellen made that sad observation. Is it true for you? Ellen added the following thoughts: So much of what we learn about love is taught by people who were too narcissistic or wounded to be able to love very well; and by people who didn’t have many listening skills and therefore didn’t know enough about us to love us for who we really are; and by people who love themselves poorly and so, of course, find it hard to love anyone else. Is any of this applicable to what you have experienced, Sagittarius? If so, here’s an antidote that I think you’ll find effective during the next seven weeks: Identify the people who have loved you well and the people who might love you well in the future—and then vow to learn all you can from them.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

Capricorn fantasy novelist Laini Taylor creates imaginary worlds where heroines use magic and wiles to follow their bliss while wrangling with gods and rascals. In describing her writing process, she says, “Like a magpie, I am a scavenger of shiny things: fairy tales, dead languages, weird folk beliefs, fascinating religions, and more.” She also writes, “I...have plundered tidbits of history and lore to build something new, using only the parts that light my mind on fire.” I encourage you to adopt her strategies for your own use in the coming weeks. Be alert for gleaming goodies and tricky delicacies and alluring treats. Use them to create new experiences that thrill your imagination. I believe the coming weeks will be an excellent time to use your magic and wiles to follow your bliss while wrangling with gods and rascals.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “I was

always asking for the specific thing that wasn’t mine,” wrote poet Joanne Kyger. “I wanted a haven that wasn’t my own.” If there is any part of you that resonates with that defeatist perspective, now is an excellent time to begin outgrowing or transforming it. I guarantee you that you’ll have the potency you need to retrain yourself: so that you will more and more ask for specific things that can potentially be yours; so that you will more and more want a haven that can be your own.

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PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): I’m not a fan of nagging. I don’t like to be nagged and I scrupulously avoid nagging others. And yet now I will break my own rules so as to provide you with your most accurate and helpful horoscope. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you aren’t likely to get what you truly need and deserve in the coming days unless you engage in some polite, diplomatic nagging. So see what you can do to employ nagging as a graceful, even charming art. For best results, infuse it with humor and playfulness.

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BIG 8 CONFERENCE at 666 Grafton Park Drive Chico, CA 95926. MICHAEL ALAN LIDDELL TRUSTEE OF BIG 7 CONFERENCE 666 Grafton Park Drive Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Trust. Signed: MIKE LIDDELL Dated: April 4, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000430 Published: April 25, May 2,9,16, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as MIDWAY VINTAGE UPCYCLED AND CONSIGN at 9379 Midway Durham, CA 95938. MELISSA ANN KAUTI 156 Cavalier Way Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: MELISSA KAUTI Dated: March 29, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000408 Published: April 18,25, May 2,9, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as IMPERIAL HOME INSPECTION SERVICES at 25 Vincent Lane Cohasset, CA 95973.

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TREVOR REED MAY 25 Vincent Lane Cohasset, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: TREVOR MAY Dated: April 9, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000458 Published: April 25, May 2,9,16, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following persons have abandoned the use of the fictitious business names DEVOLL MUSIC, DEVOLL at 2118 Laurel Street Chico, CA 95928. WILLIAM HEPWORTH 1145 Loser Ave Gridley, CA 95948. TYLER DEVOLL 2118 Laurel Street Chico, CA 95928. ANDREW LOESER 2400 McGie Street Chico, CA 95928. SCOTT CORY 476 Hoopa Circle Chico, CA 95926. REBECCA ANDRES 6343 Rd 200 Sp 71 Orland, CA 95963. This business was conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: REBECCA ANDRES Dated: April 8, 2019 FBN Number: 2017-0000799 Published: April 18,25, May 2,9, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as COMANCHE CREEK FARMS, HAND IN GARDEN INC at 200 Speedway Ave Chico, CA 95928. HAND IN GARDEN, INC. 260 Speedway Ave Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: SEAN MINDRUM OWNER Dated: April 5, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000442 Published: April 25, May 2,9,16, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following persons have abandoned the use of the fictitious business names COMANCHE CREEK FARMS, HAND IN GARDEN INC at 260 Speedway Avenue Chico, CA 95928. HAND IN GARDEN INC 260 Speedway Avenue Chico, CA 95928. JAMES GAYL MILLER 260 Speedway Avenue Chico, CA 95928. GWENDOLYM M MILLER 260 Speedway Avenue Chico, CA 95928. This business was conducted by a Corporation. Signed: JAMES G. MILLER PRESIDENT Dated: April 5, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000132 Published: April 25, May 2,9,16, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ALMOND ASPHALT MAINTENANCE at 1050 B Lisa Lane Paradise, CA 95969. DANIEL JOHNSON PO Box 564 Magalia, CA 95954. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: DANEL S JOHNSON

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Dated: April 8, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000447 Published: April 25, May 2,9,16, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following person has abandoned the use of the fictitious business name ALMOND ASPHALT MAINTENANCE at 1050B Lisa Lane Paradise, CA 95969. FREDRICK S. YANNER 6644 Dolores Lane Paradise, CA 95969. This business was conducted by an Individual. Signed: FREDRICK S. YANNER Dated: April 8, 2019 FBN Number: 2016-0000242 Published: April 25, May 2,9,16, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following person has abandoned the use of the fictitious business name: MIDWAY VINTAGE UPCYCLED DESIGN & CONSIGN at 9379 Midway Durham, CA 95938. LORI RUPPEL 2121 Kennedy Avenue Chico, CA 95973. This business was conducted by an Individual. Signed: LORI RUPPEL Dated: March 29, 2019 FBN Number: 2016-0000434 Published: April 18,25, May 2,9, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as NORTH VALLEY HOME CARE at 2260 St George Ln Suite 2 Chico, CA 95928. CLEVERDON CARE SERVICES LLC 2590 California Park Drive #24 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: SPENCER C. ROGERS, PRESIDENT Dated: April 12, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000475 Published: April 25, May 2,9,16, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as NEAR AND DEAR BAKERY at 703 Salem St Apt B Chico, CA 95926. SYDNEY ANN CARROLL 703 Salem St Apt B Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: SYDNEY CARROLL Dated: April 15, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000481 Published: April 18,25, May 2,9, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as FEATHER RIVER CRAGS APARTMENTS at 1200 Washington Ave Oroville, CA 95965. JADE EHRET 261 Via Del Sol Vacaville, CA 95687. TODD ANTHONY GAYLORD 261 Via Del Sol Vacaville, CA 95687. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: TODD A. GAYLORD Dated: April 5, 2019

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FBN Number: 2019-0000444 Published: April 25, May 2,9,16, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following persons have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name FEATHER RIVER CRAGS APARTMENTS at 1200 Washington Ave. Oroville, CA 95965. TODD GALYLORD 3120 Oak Rd, Apt 422 Walnut Creek, CA 94597. MARCUS BONESS 956 John Murray Way Folsom, CA 95630. This business was conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: TODD A. GAYLORD Dated: April 5, 2019 FBN Number: 2014-0001100 Published: April 25, May 2,9,16, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as HABANEROS TAQUERIA at 2156 Pillsbury Rd Chico, CA 95926. RAQUEL FIGUEROA RIZO 3549 Esplanade 420 Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: RAQUEL FIGUEROA Dated: March 21, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000361 Published: April 18,25, May 2,9, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as HAYDEN’S STUMP GRINDING at 4914 Pentz Road Paradise, CA 95969. WILLIAM H RITCHEY 4914 Pentz Road Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: WILLIAM H. RITCHEY Dated: April 4, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000427 Published: April 25, May 2,9,16, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as THE MAST FAMILY RANCH at 12269 1/2 Andy Mtn. Road Oroville, CA 95965. SANDRA H MAST 1090 Dundee Ave Ben Lomond, CA 95005. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: SANDRA H. MAST Dated: March 29, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000405 Published: April 25, May 2,9,16, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BOYD SOAPS AND DESIGNS at 443 Stilson Canyon Road Chico, CA 95928. LIZZIE MCDONALD 443 Stilson Canyon Road Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: LIZZIE MCDONALD Dated: April 11, 2019

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FBN Number: 2019-0000468 Published: April 25, May 2,9,16, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CHICO FLIGHT TRAINING at 900 Fortress St Chico, CA 95973. GLOBAL AVIATION CENTER INC 702 Mangrove Ave Ste 335 Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: DUANE PONTIUS, CEO Dated: April 9, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000457 Published: April 25, May 2,9,16, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as PARADISE TINY HOMES, TINY PARADISE at 1321 W. 7th St. Chico, CA 95928. JAMIE MARIE AUSTIN 11911 Hwy 70 E Lenoir City, TN 37772. RANDAL WHEELER AUSTIN 11911 Hwy 70 E Lenoir City, TN 37772. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: RANDAL WHEELER AUSTIN Dated: March 25, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000384 Published: April 25, May 2,9,16, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as

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BLOOM PORTRAITURE, STEWART AND CULLEN PHOTOGRAPHY, TREATS FOR UNICORNS at 1155 Ceres Manor Ct Chico, CA 95926. WENDY STEWART 1155 Ceres Manor Ct Chico, CA 95926. WEDNY STEWART PHOTOGRAPHY, LLC 1155 Ceres Manor Ct Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: WENDY STEWART, OWNER Dated: March 21, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000366 Published: May 2,9,16,23, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CAMP FARETA GUINEA at 4944 Will T Road Chico, CA 95973. IMELDA MIRANDA MATA 4944 Will T Road Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: IMELDA MATA Dated: April 17, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000503 Publsihed: May 2,9,16,23, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CHICO TRUE VALUE, HOLIDAY POOLS RETAIL AND SERVICE at 230 West Ave Chico, CA 95926. GAAMA ENTERPRISES, INC. 971 East Ave Ste C Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: GARY POWERS,

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PRESIDENT Dated: April 17, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000495 Published: May 2,9,16,23, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as HILLSKEMPER CONSTRUCTION at 620 Lakeridge Dr Lake Almanor, CA 96137. BRIAN HILLSKEMPER 620 Lakeridge Dr Lake Almanor, CA 96137. This business is conducted by an Indivdual. Signed: BRIAN HILLSKEMPER Dated: April 18, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000507 Published: May 2,9,16,23, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as SKYVIEW AG DATA at 230 C Walnut St 115 Chico, CA 95928. JOHN MCKNIGHT 2709 Illinois Ave Corning, CA 96021. JOSEPH SANTOS MENDONCA 230 C Walnut St 115 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: JOE MENDONCA Dated: April 23, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000526 Published: May 2,9,16,23, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as HEEL AND SOLE SHOES at 708 Mangrove Ave Chico, CA 95926.

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SUNDAY & MONDAY $10.00 ADMISSION 8:00 PM TO CLOSE TUESDAY TWO FOR ONE LAP DANCES ALL NIghT WEDNESDAY

FREE

ADMISSION ALL ACTIVE MILITARY

City Limits

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howgirl “Taking it to the Limit”

18 years or older

SUNDAY - THURSDAY 8PM TO 2AM FRIDAY & SATURDAY 8PM TO 3AM 1672 HAMMONTON SMARTSVILLE RD Marysville • 530.269.9422 36

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ADRIANA COVARRUBIAS 1197 Ravenshoe Way Chico, CA 95973. GLORIA COVARRUBIAS 2366 Alba Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: GLORIA COVARRUBIAS Dated: April 11, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000470 Published: May 2,9,16,23, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as NORTH VALLEY WATER MANAGEMENT at 15317 Forest Ranch Way Forest Ranch, CA 95942. JODY LYNN CORNILSEN 15317 Forest Ranch Way Forest Ranch, CA 95942. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JODY L. CORNILSEN Dated: April 10, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000460 Published: May 2,9,16,23, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ALLIANCE APIARIES at 1009 Raven Lane Chico, CA 95926. TIMOTHY DANIEL HILL 1009 Raven Lane Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: TIMOTHY HILL Dated: April 18, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000508 Published: May 2,9,16,23, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following persons have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name NORTH STATE NATIONALS at 14 Westerdahl Ct Chico, CA 95973. CLAUDIA VALLE 14 Westerdahl Ct Chico, CA 95973. CODY HOISER 2431 El Paso Way Chico, CA 95926. ANGELA PEACOCK 3441 Hackamore Ln Chico, CA 95973. This business was conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: CLAUDIA VALLE Dated: April 5, 2019 FBN Number: 2018-0000983 Published: May 2,9,16,23, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ELIJO’AN PUBLISHING, NORTH STATE EDITING, TE CHING at 466 Panama Avenue Chico, CA 95973. LYNN MARIE TOSELLO 466 Panama Avenue Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: LYNN MARIE TOSELLO Dated: April 17, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000502 Published: May 2,9,16,23, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as LIVING LIGHT MICRO FARM at 1387 Hawthorne Ave Chico, CA 95926. CRAIG ALAN PERRY 1387 Hawthorne Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: CRAIG PERRY Dated: April 26, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000541

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Published: May 2,9,16,23, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as THE CREATIVE COYOTE at 5250 Mallard Estates Road Chico, CA 95973. LYNETTE CORNING 5250 Mallard Estates Road Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: LYNETTE CORNING Dated: April 19, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000516 Published: May 2,9,16,23, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATMENT The following persons are doing business as THE WATCHMAN at 130 W. 3rd St. Chico, CA 95928. THE WATCHMAN THE ORIGINAL LLC 130 W. 3rd St. Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: KIM JAMISON, OWNER Dated: March 25, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000386 Published: May 9,16,23,30, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as C AND C UTILITY, INC at 632 Entler Avenue Chico, CA 95928. C & C UTILITY, INC. 632 Entler Avenue Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: KIMBERLY CABRAL, CEO Dated: April 30, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000549 Published: May 9,16,23,30, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATMENT The following person is doing business as ATLAS ENGRAVING at 432 Nord Avenue Chico, CA 95926. JACOB CURTIS OLSEN 432 Nord Avenue Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JACOB OLSEN Dated: May 2, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000558 Published: May 9,16,23,30, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as WOFCHUCK FAMILY FARM at 1725 Dayton Road Chico, CA 95928. COLLEEN BRIDGET WOFCHUCK 1725 Dayton Road Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: COLLEEN WOFCHUCK Dated: April 30, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000551 Published: May 9,16,23,30, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as IN AND OUTBOARDS at 864 Inyo Street Chico, CA 95928. MICHAEL NEVENS 864 Inyo Street Chico, CA 95928. NICHOLAS ANTHONY TOGNERI

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857 Inyo Street Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: NICHOLAS TOGNERI Dated: May 2, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000559 Published: May 9,16,23,30, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as THE LOTUS CENTER at 6268 Skyway Paradise, CA 95969. WILLAIM RAY POE 6499 Toadtown Way Magalia, CA 95954. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: WILLIAM POE Dated: April 30, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000550 Published: May 9,16,23,30, 2019

NOTICES NOTICE OF LIEN SALE Pursuant to CA Business Code 21700, in lieu of rents due, the following units contain clothes, furniture, boxes, etc. 256SS TODD J JOHNSTON 7x10 (Boxes, Totes, Furniture) 227SS STEVENS TONETTE 6x12 (Furniture, Boxes) 038CC1 SANTANA SANDRA 6x12 (Patio furniture, Boxes) 239SS RENFRO RICHARDS 5x12 (Boxes, Household Items, Furniture) 205SS MAYS CARA 6x12 (Boxes, Furniture) 482cc MICHELLE CONLEY 6x12 (Boxes, Totes) 238SS ARTEAGA JOSE 6x10 (Couches, Boxes) Contents to be sold to the highest bidder on: Saturday May 25, 2019 Beginning at 1:00pm Sale to be held at: Bidwell Self Storage, 65 Heritage Lane, Chico, CA 95926. (530) 893-2109 Published: May 9,16, 2019

NOTICE OF LIEN SALE Notice is hereby given pursuant to the California Self-Storage Self-Service Act, Section 21700-21716 of the Business & Professions Code, the undersigned intends to sell the personal property described below to enforce a lien imposed on said stored property. The undersigned will sell at public sale by competitive bidding at the location where the said property has been stored. GRIDLEY SELF STORAGE 1264 Highway 99 Gridley, CA 95948 Butte County, State of California Unit No. #A008 JOHN GREEEN Items: Miscellaneous household items, Furniture Unit No. #B032 REBECCA BATTLES Items: Miscellaneous household items, boxes Unit No. #A056 SCOUT YORK Items: Miscellaneous household items, boxes Unit No. #AX318 HENRY BURIS Items: Miscellaneous household items, boxes, Lien Sale will be held: Date: Saturday, May 25, 2019 Time: 10:00am Location: 1264 Highway 99 Gridley, CA 94958 Successful bidders must present a valid form of identification and be prepared to pay cash for purchased items. All items are sold “as is” and must be removed at the time of sale. Sale is subject to cancellation in the event that a settlement is reached between

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the owner and tenant. Published: May 9,16, 2019

NOTICE OF LIEN SALE Notice is hereby given pursuant to the California Self-Storage Self-Service Act, Section 21700-21716 of the Business & Professions Code, the undersigned intends to sell the personal property described below to enforce a lien imposed on said stored property. The undersigned will sell at public sale by competitive bidding at the location where the said property has been stored. G&D MINI STORAGE 2687 Highway 99 Biggs, CA 95917 Butte County, State of California Unit No. #B03 MIKE HERRERA Items: Miscellaneous household items, Furniture Lien Sale will be held: Date: Saturday, May 25, 2019 Time: 11:00am check in at our Gridley office. Location: 1264 Highway 99 Gridley, CA 94958 Successful bidders must present a valid form of identification and be prepared to pay cash for purchased items. All items are sold “as is” and must be removed at the time of sale. Sale is subject to cancellation in the event that a settlement is reached between the owner and tenant. Published: May 9,16, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner VERONICA VALENZUELA NAVARRETE filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: AIDEN MARTINEZ Proposed name: AIDEN MARTINEZ VALENZUELA THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 22, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: March 28, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00931 Published: April 25, May 2,9,16, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner RODGER SHORT filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: RODGER SHORT Proposed name: JERRY RODGER SHORT THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the

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petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: June 5, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: April 12, 2019 Case Number: 19CV01144 Published: May 2,9,16,23, 2019

PETITION NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE HEIDI PRIVETT CASTRO To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: HEIDI PRIVETT CASTRO A Petition for Probate has been filed by: CHRISTINA LEE NELSON in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: CHRISTINA LEE NELSON be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: May 14, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal

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representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: PETER P. VLAUTIN, III 1020 Suncast Lane Ste 101 El Dorado Hills, CA 95762 (916) 36-9734 Dated: April 10, 2019 Case Number: 19PR00160 Published: April 25, May 2,9, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE JACK W. DAWSON, also known as JACK WILLIAM DAWSON To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: JACK W. DAWSON, also known as JACK WILLIAM DAWSON A Petition for Probate has been filed by: TERESA L. DAWSON in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: TERESA L. DAWSON be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: May 21, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the

this Legal Notice continues

court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: NICOLE R. PLOTTEL 466 Vallombrosa Ave Chico, CA 95926 (530) 893-2882 Dated: April 10, 2019 Case Number: 19PR00184 Published: April 25, May 2,9, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE JOHN DAVID BENNETT aka JOHN D. BENNETT aka JOHN BENNETT To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: JOHN DAVID BENNETT aka JOHN D. BENNETT aka JOHN BENNETT a petition for Probate has been filed by: in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: MARIANNA S. BARRY be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: June 4, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: TBA Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of

this Legal Notice continues

either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: DANA L. CAMPBELL, ESQ. Tyree & Campbell, LLP 1600 Humboldt Road, Suite 4 Chico, CA 95928. (530) 894-2100 Case Number: 19PR00174 Dated: April 16, 2019 Published: May 2,9,16, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE CONNIE MARGARET LAUDER aka CONNIE LAUDER To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: CONNIE MARGARET LAUDER

this Legal Notice continues

aka CONNIE LAUDER A Petition for Probate has been filed by: VERONICA L. STRAUSS in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: VERONICA L. STRAUSS be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: May 28, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: 10 Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926.

this Legal Notice continues

IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: RAOUL J. LECLERC P.O. Drawer 111 Oroville, CA 95965 (530) 533-5661 Dated: April 23, 2019 Case Number: 18PR00398 Published: May 2,9,16, 2019

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REAL ESTATE

FOR MORE INFORMaTION aBOUT aDVERTISING IN OUR REaL ESTaTE SECTION, CaLL 530-894-2300

Love’s Real estate

Policy

1940 W Sacramento avenue, chico | $599,000

RARE FIND! Country craftsman w/guest cottage, country setting, but close to town. You will be delighted w/all this property has to offer! The main house is a 1940s farmhouse w/much of its original charm intact, it has an easy floor plan w/original oak floors. Brand new windows recently upgraded w the finest quality wood casement windows & views of the gorgeous yard surround you! The living room has good light & a brick fireplace. Central to the home is the dining area w/ ample room for a long farmhouse table. The wood floors continue into the kitchen which has an eat-in area where you can sip your coffee gazing upon the serene backyard. The main bedrooms are spacious w/good light; the master bath, remodeled last year w/quality appointments is a true spa retreat; the separate tub & shower done w/impeccable tile work. Off the master bedroom is a lg bonus room with many possibilities: dressing room, playroom, craft or art studio, or exercise room. On hot nights bring that fresh country air indoors w the whole house fan. Out the back door you will find the sweet 2 bd/1 bath cottage: make it a guest house, in-law unit or rental unit; it has an open floor plan, a charming vintage vibe & easy entry. This mature .65 acre lot has a dedicated garden area, several producing fruit trees, a chicken coop, and ample off street parking. So many possibilities here! There’s room to add a garage, shop or pool. Both the homes had new heat and air systems installed recently. Don’t wait!

Jennifer Parks, realtor Century 21 seleCt real estate, inC Bre# 01269667 JenParksC21@sBCgloBal.net (530) 864-0336

I got a call from another builder, Al, who wants to come here from Sonoma County and get in on the rebuild of Paradise. Al was referred to me by an old friend over on the coast. “So,” said Al, “I hear you’re the one to talk to about the latest on what’s going on up in Paradise.” I told Al that I’m just fielding a lot of real estate questions, and asking a lot of questions of my own, trying to get answers for people. “I want to build for people who lost their homes in the fire,” said Al. “I want to help them get back to their home town up on that ridge. I built houses for some people after the Santa Rosa fire, and I learned a lot. Working with insurance companies on a rebuild can be a major pain.” “Yeah,” I said, “we know people going through the insurance battle right now. It’s like an offer/counter-offer situation. “Ha!” said Al. “It sure is! Back and forth and back and forth and back again. And that’s just for starters. If you want your hardwood floors back, they give you a replacement budget for plywood. You want your old tile roof they budget you tarpaper.”

“Is it like that every time?” I asked. “No, not really,” said Al. “I’ve actually had some customers who were surprised by the rebuild budget they got. They felt like they lucked out and built a nicer place than they lost in the fire.” “So, what gives?” I said. “It’s all about the fine print in those insurance policies,” said Al. “They’re all different! And some are really lousy.” “You’re good at reading them?” I asked. “Oh, you better believe it,” said Al. “It amazes me that people have never read their own fire insurance policy! Especially people in a high fire area!” “True!” I said. “Are you in high fire zone?” he asked. “Oh, yes,” I said. “I’m out in Butte Creek Canyon. The fire burned to my back property line.” I changed the subject before he could ask me if I had ever read my own fire insurance policy.

Doug Love is Sales Manager at Century 21 in Chico. Call 530-680-0817 or email dougwlove@gmail.com License #950289

Homes are Selling in Your Neighborhood Shop every home for sale at www.C21SelectGroup.com

530.345.6618 3bed 2 bath home N. Chico Owned solar Call today and see 505 Windham Way

Steve KaSprzyK (Kas-per-ziK) You don’t have to spell it for me to sell it! 27 years representing clients in our area Century 21 select Chico California c21falconer@gmail.com (530) 518–4850 License#01145231

14855 Klamath Court Magalia

$269,900

$449,000

CalDRE #02056059

Paul Champlin | (530) 828-2902 Making Your Dream Home a Reality

Olivia Larrabee l (530) 520-3169 Olivia.Larrabee@c21selectgroup.com

Homes Sold Last Week ADDRESS

TOWN

185 Sycamore Valley Rd 424 Stonebridge Dr 343 Weymouth Way 99 Limpach Rd 367 Brookside Dr 5 Creek Cir 91 Elderberry Ct 2353 Holly Ave 1272 Virage Ln 1253 Glenshire Ln 926 Orange St

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico

38

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M ay 9, 2 01 9

PRICE

BR/BA

$745,000.00 $611,000.00 $605,000.00 $601,000.00 $500,000.00 $455,000.00 $440,000.00 $432,000.00 $415,000.00 $395,000.00 $390,000.00

3/4 3/3 3/3 3/2 3/2 2/2 4/2 3/2 3/2 3/2 3/1

Curious about your home’s value in today’s marketplace? Call me, I can help!

FOR SALE

SMILeS ALWAyS!

Lic# 01506350

Joyce Turner

(530) 570–1944 • joyce_turner@ymail.com

Sponsored by Century 21 Select Real Estate, Inc. SQ. FT. 3107 2155 2280 1915 2034 1715 1705 1790 1357 1400 1500

ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

2 Willowbrook Way 1536 Gilbert Ln 21 San Ramon Dr 946 Eaton Rd 26 Redding Ct 2 Harrier Ln 5 Dorset Ct 1143 Stewart Ave 996 Cleveland Ave 11 Capshaw Ct 63 Oak Dr

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico

$380,500.00 $375,000.00 $359,000.00 $354,000.00 $346,500.00 $345,000.00 $345,000.00 $340,000.00 $339,500.00 $325,000.00 $285,000.00

4/2 3/2 3/2 3/2 3/1 3/2 4/2 3/2 5/2 3/2 2/1

SQ. FT. 1424 1666 1160 1167 1050 1287 1407 1104 896 1845 1252


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Chico: 894-2612 • Oroville: 533-2414 Paradise: 877-6262 • Gridley: 846-4005 www.BidwellTitle.com

CN&R Is LookINg FoR AN AdveRtIsINg CoNsuLtANt the Chico news & review is a family owned business that has been part of the Chico community since 1977. our mission is to publish great newspapers which are successful and enduring, create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow while respecting personal welfare, and to have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live.

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if you want to make a difference and do something that matters then keep reading. FoR moRe INFoRmAtIoN, vIsIt www.NewsRevIew.Com/ChICo/jobs

Learn more at Dahlmeier.com Oroville Chico

equal opportunity employer

530.533.3424

License #0680951

530.342.6421

How Much is Your Home Worth Today? Ask the Professionals at Century 21 Select

530.345.6618 | www.C21SelectGroup.com

NEW LISTINGS COMING!

Teresa Larson (530) 899-5925 DRE #01177950 chiconativ@aol.com

Many new listings are coming very soon, Chico condo, Chico homes, Durham/home with acreage. Keep an eye on this ad for more information.

GORGEOUS CUSTOM HOME

In gated community, 2,628 sq ft, built in 2001, 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, 3 car sold garage, family room plus den. Home is beautifully landscaped and has solar, $565,000.00.

Kimberley Tonge l 530.518.5508 Lic# 01318330

2 bed 2 bath Condo in Chico in a great area. $167,500 1.59 acre double lot with beautiful valley and canyon views. $120,000 Alice Zeissler l 530.518.1872 CalBRE #01312354

The following houses were sold in Butte County by real estate agents or private parties during the week of April 22- April 29, 2019 The housing prices are based on the stated documentary transfer tax of the parcel and may not necessarily reflect the actual sale price of the home. ADDRESS 422 W 12th Ave 632 Pine St 2319 Bar Triangle St 2523 Tuolumne Dr 14578 Colter Way 13613 S Park Dr 14531 Carnegie Rd 1180 Mount Ida Rd 167 Riverview Dr 249 Canfield Dr 3229 Orange Ave 1432 Tehama Ave

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

Chico Chico Chico Chico Magalia Magalia Magalia Oroville Oroville Oroville Oroville Oroville

$280,000.00 $253,000.00 $245,000.00 $168,000.00 $390,000.00 $275,000.00 $268,500.00 $330,000.00 $300,000.00 $260,000.00 $231,000.00 $216,000.00

2/1 2/1 2/2 3/3 3/3 3/2 3/2 3/2 3/2 3/2 3/2 3/2

SQ. FT. 720 726 1039 1738 2119 1259 1539 1281 1596 1762 1148 1578

ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

SQ. FT.

2120 Bloor Ave

Oroville

$150,000.00

5/2

2708

1884 6th St

Oroville

$84,000.00

2/1

1500 1140

4085 Faunce Way

Oroville

$80,000.00

3/2

2586 Ludlum Ave

Palermo

$140,000.00

4/2

1850

5083 Lago Vista Way

Paradise

$540,000.00

3/2

2838

5667 Bartels Pl

Paradise

$495,000.00

3/3

2289

2230 De Mille Rd

Paradise

$494,000.00

3/3

2156

2226 De Mille Rd

Paradise

$336,500.00

2/2

1382

216 Wayland Rd

Paradise

$175,000.00

4/3

1921

5207 Scottwood Rd

Paradise

$80,000.00

3/3

3715

Ma y 9, 2019

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EvERy suRvivoR’s jouRnEy is uniquE Healing from INCEST seems impossible, but the guilt and shame one may feel was never theirs to carry.

Insightful Nurturing Self Courageous Empowering Self-Acceptance Triumphant stop the cycle & start the healing

We are here to listen: 530.342.RAPE (7273) ColleCt Calls aCCepted Butte/glenn: 530.891.1331 ¡ tehama: 530.529.3980

all viCtims of sexual assault will reCeive a free forensiC mediCal examination, regardless of whether or not they choose to participate in the criminal justice process.

Know your rights about sexual assault. If you or someone you know has been sexually violated, contact Rape Crisis Intervention & Prevention.

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