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CHICO’S FREE NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY VOLUME 42, ISSUE 36 THURSDAY, MAY 2, 2019 WWW.NEWSREVIEW.COM

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CN&R

INSIDE

Vol. 42, Issue 36 • May 2, 2019 OPINION

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Editorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Guest Comment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Second & Flume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 This Modern World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Streetalk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

NEWSLINES

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Downstroke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Sifter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9

HEALTHLINES

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Appointment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Weekly Dose. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

GREENWAYS

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Eco Event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS

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15 Minutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 The Goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

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COVER STORY

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ARTS & CULTURE

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Music Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 This Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Fine Arts listings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Scene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31 Nightlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Reel World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Chow. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Arts DEVO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Brezsny’s Astrology . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38

CLASSIFIEDS

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REAL ESTATE

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ON THE COVER: DESIGN BY TINA FLYNN

Our Mission: To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. Editor Melissa Daugherty Managing Editor Meredith J. Cooper Arts Editor Jason Cassidy Contributing Editor Evan Tuchinsky Staff Writer Ashiah Scharaga Calendar Editor Neesa Sonoquie Contributors Robin Bacior, Alastair Bland, Michelle Camy, Vic Cantu, Nate Daly, Charles Finlay, Bob Grimm, Howard Hardee, Miles Jordan, Mark Lore, Landon Moblad, Brie Oviedo, Ryan J. Prado, Juan-Carlos Selznick, Ken Smith, Robert Speer, Carey Wilson Managing Art Director Tina Flynn Creative Services Manager Elisabeth Bayard-Arthur Ad Designers Naisi Thomas, Cathy Arnold Publications Designers Katelynn Mitrano, Nikki Exerjian Director of Sales and Advertising Jamie DeGarmo Advertising Services Coordinator Ruth Alderson Senior Advertising Consultants Brian Corbit, Laura Golino Advertising Consultants Adam Lew, Jordon Vernau Office Assistant Jennifer Osa Distribution Director Greg Erwin Distribution Manager Matt Daugherty Distribution Staff Ken Gates, Bob Meads, Pat Rogers, Larry Smith, Placido Torres, Jeff Traficante, Bill Unger, Lisa Van Der Maelen, David Wyles

President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Director of Nuts & Bolts Deborah Redmond Director of People & Culture David Stogner Director of Dollars & Sense Debbie Mantoan Nuts & Bolts Ninja Norma Huerta Payroll/AP Wizard Miranda Hansen Accounts Receivable Specialist Analie Foland Developer John Bisignano System Support Specialist Kalin Jenkins N&R Publications Managing Editor Laura Hillen N&R Publications Associate Editor Derek McDow N&R Publications Writers Anne Stokes, Thea Rood N&R Publications Editorial Assistant Nisa Smith Marketing & Publications Consultants Greta Beekhuis, Steve Caruso, Joseph Engle, Elizabeth Morabito, Celeste Worden 353 E. Second St., Chico, CA 95928 Phone (530) 894-2300 Fax (530) 892-1111 Website newsreview.com Got a News Tip? (530) 894-2300, ext 2224 or chiconewstips@newsreview.com Calendar Events cnrcalendar@newsreview.com Calendar Questions (530) 894-2300, ext. 2243 Want to Advertise? Fax (530) 892-1111 or cnradinfo@newsreview.com Classifieds (530) 894-2300, press 2 or classifieds@newsreview.com Job Opportunities jobs@newsreview.com Want to Subscribe to CN&R? chisubs@newsreview.com Editorial Policies: Opinions expressed in CN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons, or other portions of the paper. CN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or review materials. Email letters to cnrletters@newsreview.com. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form and to edit them for libel. Advertising Policies: All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes the responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. CN&R is printed at PressWorks Ink on recycled newsprint. Circulation of CN&R is verified by the Circulation Verification Council. CN&R is a member of Chico Chamber of Commerce, Oroville Chamber of Commerce, Downtown Chico Business Association, CNPA, AAN and AWN. Circulation 38,650 copies distributed free weekly.

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OPINION

Send guest comments, 340 words maximum, to gc@newsreview.com or to 353 E. Second St., Chico, CA 95928. Please include photo & short bio.

EDITORIAL

Have faith in the Orange Street Shelter Word this week that the Jesus Center had backed out

of the plan to help establish and run a low-barrier shelter in Chico is a bad-news, good-news situation. The bad news: The Jesus Center would have had an opportunity to learn from its involvement and be better prepared to open its planned Renewal Center. The good news: The organization’s partner on the project, Safe Space Winter Shelter, is determined to see it through. Frankly, Safe Space is the more experienced organization when it comes to this endeavor. We’ve chronicled the nonprofit’s work in this newspaper numerous times over the five years it has operated a low-barrier seasonal shelter in local churches. Moreover, for several consecutive years, the CN&R has seen things up close by volunteering to cook for and serve a meal to roughly 60 guests. What we’ve witnessed from what heretofore has been an all-volunteer organization is a well-oiled machine. Considering the shelter will have full-time staff and security personnel, and partnerships with social service agencies, we have no doubt that this project will be a safe space that goes beyond providing folks with a roof over their heads. Furthermore, because it includes a day center and storage facilities,

the community stands to benefit as well. One of the main concerns of the proposed location in an industrial section of Orange Street is its proximity to students at Chico State and a couple of elementary schools. From our perspective, however, the site is ideal. It’s close to multiple modes of public transportation— the Amtrak Station and the city’s B-Line Transit Center. Any potential threat to the schoolchildren is negligible; one of the aforementioned campuses is across Nord Avenue. None of the shelter’s immediate neighbors are residences, though, yes, the facility is about half a block from the edge of the south campus neighborhood. This is a highly traveled pedestrian thoroughfare—one already used by many in the population the shelter would serve. The building essentially backs up to Depot Park, where many homeless folks spend their days and nights already. As for the Jesus Center backing out at the eleventh hour … oh, ye of little faith. The nonprofit’s executive director told us it was a unanimous decision by the members of its board of directors. We’re disappointed to see them shirk their No. 1 core value—being “Christ-centered.” We highly doubt the good shepherd would have been cowed by NIMBYs. Ω

GUEST COMMENT

Voting is a fundamental right—for everyone Lamended groups in Florida to pass a ballot measure that the state constitution and restored voting ast year, the ACLU worked with many in-state

rights to 1.4 million people with felony convictions. The prior law, a Jim Crow-era relic intended to disenfranchise black people, meant that even after completing probation and parole, people still weren’t restored as full members of our citizenry. As we looked toward the 2020 presidential race to create a Rights for All platform, we wanted to push candidates to create a country where the right to vote is permaby nent, where no citizen is deprived Bobby Hoffman of the right to vote because of a The author is conviction, whether or not they are advocacy and policy counsel, voting rights, incarcerated. That’s why we’re asking all for the ACLU. presidential candidates to end unjust laws that strip citizens of their fundamental right to vote due to criminal convictions, because we all—including those who are currently incarcerated— must have a voice in how we shape our society.

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Voting is a fundamental right and the cornerstone of our democracy. Denying the right to vote to an entire class of citizens undermines our democracy and makes our society less inclusive. That is why we’re advocating that the right to vote should never be taken away from citizens as punishment. We also know that voting plays an important role in helping individuals with felony convictions return to society. Studies have shown that when individuals with a felony conviction participate in the democratic process, they have a lower rate of subsequent arrest. By denying people even the basic right to vote, we are only preventing them from having a stronger stake in their community and making it harder for them to successfully return to society. This policy is not new. We already let those who are incarcerated vote in two states—Maine and Vermont. As the presidential race heats up, our volunteers are fanning out across the country to ask candidates if they support this policy. We will continue to question and push candidates to be bolder to ensure our next president will protect and advance the civil liberties and civil rights guaranteed to all of us in the Constitution, especially the right to vote. Ω

SECOND & FLUME by Melissa Daugherty m e l i s s a d @ n e w s r e v i e w. c o m

Sleepless in Chico I’ve had a pretty bad bout of insomnia since the Camp Fire. Actually, to be precise, the trouble sleeping began on Nov. 9, the day after the state’s deadliest wildfire began in remote Butte County. That Friday is when Meredith J. Cooper and I headed up to Paradise to get a first-hand look at just a sliver of what ended up being more than 150,000 acres charred by the firestorm. We had a couple of janky masks—not the N95 variety we’ve come to associate with the toxic air quality that followed the blaze—and drove through the haze with the windows down. Clearly, we weren’t prepared. The last time I covered a wildfire was one near Cherokee in 2004. I remember driving around that rural region alone—a paper map my only guide—and hoping the flames on the side of the road wouldn’t turn into an inferno. Prior to that, my experience with fire was an ag burn run amok that nearly torched my old house in the country. That time, I climbed a ladder with a hose to douse the roof—and my body—as falling embers hit the wood shingles and me. But the Camp Fire bowled me over. Among the many stops Meredith and I made in the days following the blaze was the Safeway shopping center on Clark Road. There, we watched the last of the flames lick what had been reduced to a massive pile of twisted metal. As we stood in the parking lot, we heard propane tanks exploding nearby. Many of the scenes were surreal—one I’ll never forget is a wheelchair next to an abandoned white Chevy Suburban. A few others seared into my mind are too ghoulish to describe. Meredith and I were fairly speechless that entire first trip. That was true when we returned to Chico, too. We ended up at Gordo Burrito, inside the Valero gas station on Eighth Street, and didn’t realize we were still wearing our press badges when we went in to grab the first bite we’d eaten all day. The folks there were incredibly sweet as we stood wide-eyed and tried to describe the scene. I began having a recurring nightmare about fire in the weeks that followed. It changes a bit, but the basic narrative is me pushing against a throng of evacuating people to try to get to my family. It’s on a hillside at a place that resembles a concert venue, UC Berkeley’s Greek Theatre. I think I’m still processing it all—hence the insomnia, which comes and goes. For some reason, this was a particularly bad week. Based on our other post-fire reporting, and conversations with co-workers, what I’m experiencing is “textbook” post-traumatic stress disorder. I haven’t written about this before, probably because I’ve been in denial. I also don’t fully understand it. I mean, I was safe in Chico when the Camp Fire overtook the eastern foothills. I didn’t have to outrun the flames. If I’m struggling with aftereffects—simply from reporting on the early days and weeks of the disaster—imagine what it’s like for the thousands of people who barely made it out with their lives.

Melissa Daugherty is editor of the CN&R


LETTERS

Send email to cnrletters@newsreview.com

Commentary comeback Re “Chico’s man-made, post-Camp Fire disaster” (Guest comment, by Clancy Callahan, April 25): You can’t slight anyone for needing a home and moving into a less-than-desirable rental. But to pay an average of $935 a month for eight years? That says more about the renter than the rental. She blames the 60-day notice to vacate, due to the sale of the rental, on “rapacious greed.” What if it was ordinary greed? Or need? Or one of the “D’s”—divorce, death, disease or drugs? FYI, rapacious landlords can sell the rental, enter escrow, and give just 30 days’ notice. If good luck is being prepared when opportunity knocks, perhaps bad luck is being unprepared when misfortunes arise. They do arise. Expecting the nanny state to protect you from every misfortune is sacrificing freedom for security. She doesn’t just want cheese with her whine, she wants force-fed government cheese. People make decisions based

Your plumbing

on incentives. Require a 120-day notice with payment to the renter to relocate and I’ll guarantee two things. Owners will raise rents to cover the expenses or sell. You’ll have fewer rentals with higher rents. I’d have given her moving expenses, because I think it’s the right thing to do. Make it mandatory and all tenants will realize the Law of Unintended Consequences. Peter Bridge Ord Bend

Editor’s note: In the state of California, landlords are required by law to give 60 days’ notice to tenants who’ve lived in a rental for at least a year.

Where’s the will? Re “Chico State wary of shelter,” Downstroke, April 18: Homelessness is a symptom of many health conditions that require a health approach versus a criminal one. Concurrent and accessible services are necessary, and yet each proposed location is met with

resistance. Fear from victimization and stereotypes understandably motivates their actions, but the crimes of few do not justify the overgeneralization of the entire homeless population and denial of services. There is a direct health connection between the complications of mental illness (depression, drug abuse, anxiety, social disorders, etc.), socioeconomic status (money, employment and shelter), the struggles and barriers (transportation, belongings, pets, history and ability) and their ability to regain healthy living. Missing in our community is the willingness to support lowbarrier shelters that can help heal. Needle-exchange programs are a health resource that is there to reduce the transmission of disease, like hepatitis and HIV, and keep areas safe. Helping them helps everyone. Jesica Giannola Chico

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The insecure demeanor that epitomizes Donald J. Trump’s anxietydriven presidency simply can’t be ignored, or worse yet, condoned. We shouldn’t fool ourselves into thinking any good will come from this chaotic circus masquerading as a functioning government; the very foundation of the principles of America is being undermined, discounted or marginalized. Leadership with clarity of purpose defines effective governing. A Trump quote conveys the opposite: “The biggest problem with Mueller … he didn’t mention Strzok and McCabe and Comey and the lies and the leaks and overthrow and the whole thing with the Hillary Clinton got a win 100 million to one, two lovers, two sick lovers, especially the one. I mean, these were like children.” Mental impairment laid bare. We don’t have the luxury of complacency. Choosing to support a corrupt and damaged individual who cares not for you, or your country’s welfare—well, that’s your burden, not mine. Will enough people who care about the well-being of future generations reject a president whose policies are wreaking havoc on the environment, denounce tax policies that favor the haves over the have-nots, and condemn divisive rhetoric and thoughtless behavior that divides a country in need of healing? Our choice. Roger S. Beadle Chico

PG&E’s outrageous plan Very recently, PG&E announced plans to shut down the power to 5 million people in Northern California for up to five days as a way to prevent fires. This is something that is utterly outrageous that will also cause severe harm to many people! This will also be very costly to businesses and devastating to our economy. It is the PG&E CEOs, through neglect at best, who caused the Camp Fire. It is certainly not the fault of the employees who worked so hard to fix lines and restore power. PG&E’s job is to provide power to the people in a safe manner. It must not be the company’s job to shut people’s power down. PG&E needs to install better insulation devices, like ones that don’t break

and cause fires. Better yet, PG&E must be taken over by the state. Nothing makes the case for expropriation better than PG&E’s outrageous announcement. California’s governors have been much too favorable to PG&E by appointing CPUC commissioners who are too friendly to the utility. This has to change now! Walter Ballin Chico

Students slam smoking Alondra Pompa, Jack Lazzaretto and myself are members of the Students Working Against Tobacco (SWAT) youth coalition at Orland High School. Our coalition focuses on highlighting the injustice tobacco causes in our community and worldwide. We have learned how to bring awareness and shed light on the negative impacts of tobacco within our community. As veteran members of SWAT, we are proud to be a part of the advocacy work we do that helps make the city of Orland a better place. We are making changes in our community by advocating against tobacco, and educating younger students and community members about the destruction tobacco causes. Our time in SWAT has been rewarding and it has helped us in developing and refining important skills, such as leadership, public speaking and advocacy. The people of the city of Orland do not deserve to be continuously exposed to tobacco products and tobacco product advertisement at all the local retail stores. The city of Orland could be a much healthier place if tobacco product advertising and tobacco product usage were reduced to a minimum. We hope the work we do and have done in SWAT can help the people of Orland live healthier and happier lives. Rogelio Martinez Orland

The Marsh Junior High KLEAN team is working on raising awareness about the dangers of nicotine and enforcing laws about smoking in parks. Our KLEAN team recently participated in cigarette litter cleanups in Bidwell and 20th Street parks. What we found was horrible. We collected 680 butts in three days. We found them in parking lots, near picnic tables and even by the playgrounds where children play every day. Our entire team was

disappointed. Smoking is the leading cause of preventable deaths—480,000 people die from nicotine use every year, and 41,000 of those deaths are from second-hand smoke. Tobacco laws have often been ignored. This is very concerning due to the fact that we are finding so many cigarette butts at the parks. We would like to see a change in these numbers. Putting up more “no smoking” signs in the park would be useful. We already found one sign in Bidwell Park, and it was not very visible. Another suggestion is to have more park security to help enforce the law. There could also be clear consequences or a fine for people who get caught smoking in the parks. KLEAN team wants to help protect people and animals from these dangers. J.T. James Chico

No more double-parking In the past week or so, I’ve been shocked by inconsiderate, unsafe and illegal “parking”—actually, simply stopping in the traffic lane—in front of Aca Taco on Broadway. (This is one of my favorite restaurants downtown, by the way.) Cars have double-parked in the left lane while the driver waited inside Aca Taco for a to-go order. I have witnessed at least one nearmiss due to this behavior. I didn’t understand this until I visited Aca Taco for lunch recently. Apparently, Aca Taco is supporting some food pick-up and delivery apps, according to the signs inside. Now, there’s nothing I can do to punish the Silicon Valley companies that are dangerously disrupting traffic here in Chico, and I doubt I can convince users to not order food from Aca Taco via [delivery apps], so my only recourse is to boycott Aca Taco until they quit encouraging this grossly inappropriate behavior. So, I’ve had my last Aca Taco burrito for now, but I’ll be back when the “pick up here” [drivers] are gone and this absurd behavior stops. Martin Wallace Chico

More letters online:

We’ve got too many letters for this space. please go to www.newsreview.com/chico for additional readers’ comments on past cn&r articles.


STREETALK

Does Chico need a low-barrier homeless shelter? Asked in downtown Chico Dan Hammer solutions architect

Yes. It would be good to offer help to people who need it, and help them transition to a more permanent situation.

Gail Clickner retired

Absolutely. We must help people who don’t have a place to go. We must take them as they are. [The proposed site on] Orange Street is a great location since it’s ready and available.

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I’m on both sides of the fence. I know we need a low-barrier shelter, and everybody needs shelter, but I’m not sure about the safety of the Orange Street location. They don’t screen people for drugs and alcohol, yet it’s close to all the sororities and Chico State.

Jill Fidler business consultant

Absolutely. It isn’t going to solve the homeless problem, but it can help with symptoms like open drug use and human defecation on the streets. Orange Street is a great spot. I live nearby, and it has industrial areas and a bunch of drunk people lying all over the street already.

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NEWSLINES DOWNSTROKE SURVEY FOR STANDING HOMES

A team from Purdue University and Manhattan College, working on solutions for the water contamination issue following the Camp Fire, has launched an online survey for anyone with a standing home within the burn area. Thus far, most of the emphasis has been on collecting data from customers in the Paradise Irrigation District, where testing has shown the presence of the known carcinogen benzene, among other chemicals. Wednesday (May 1), the team initiated the survey of all standing homes, including those in other districts and those with private wells. It will gauge such factors as public perception of water safety, individuals’ perceived needs, and messaging from state and local agencies regarding water since the fire. The survey (tinyurl.com/campfirewater survey) will be open through May 15.

And then there was one

MAIDU EXHIBIT ON HOLD

The proposed Maidu Living Village has experienced a setback after failing to make the cut for grant funding. As reported in the CN&R (“Building a village,” Newslines, Feb. 21), the Mechoopda Indian Tribe partnered with the city of Chico Park Division and Chico Area Recreation and Park District (CARD) to create an interactive outdoor exhibit next to the Chico Creek Nature Center. Their application was among more than 200, totaling $400 million, competing for $37 million in grants through Proposition 68—a bond measure passed last June for parks, water and environmental projects. Linda Herman, city parks and natural resources manager, told the CN&R Wednesday (May 1) that the agencies “will look for funding elsewhere” and “continue to pursue grants” for the project.

FREE MICROCHIPS FOR PETS

Seeking to meet a need revealed by the Camp Fire, local animal advocates will microchip pets for free Sunday (May 5) in Chico. The identification service, from Friends of the Chico Animal Shelter and The Canine Connection, will be offered 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at 10 Seville Court. Shelly Rogers (pictured), shelter group president, said in a news release that the Nov. 8 disaster “was a real-life demonstration in the effectiveness of microchips. Pets that had a microchip could be reunited with their families immediately.” She added that the fire “also showed us that a low percentage of pets in our community are microchipped.” The clinic is open to any pet owner. Dogs must be leashed, cats and other pets in a carrier.

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Jesus Center backs out of Orange Street Shelter, but Safe Space forges ahead

Fworking and Safe Space Winter Shelter have been together to open a 24/7 low-barrier

or the past five months, the Jesus Center

shelter. They launched the effort after receiving a $1 million gift from the Walmart Foundation, story and meant to serve the photo by increased needs of the Ashiah local homeless populaScharaga tion in the wake of the ash i a h s @ Camp Fire. n ew srev i ew. c o m After months of searching, the two groups found an affordable location—and a landlord got on board with the concept—at 388 Orange St., a brick-red, 15,000-squarefoot, two-story building near downtown. They were making progress on finalizing the lease when they announced their plans at a City Council meeting April 9. Public outcry emerged, and on Monday (April 29), the Jesus Center abruptly abandoned its commitment, backing out of the project. A press release from the center stated that its board of directors was concerned about public discord over the proposed shelter and that the nonprofit would instead focus solely on its Renewal Center in south Chico.

“Although current services are at maximum capacity and there are hundreds without shelter, our community is challenged to find the space and the civic will for this kind of project,” the release stated. But Safe Space’s members remain unswayed: They’ve pledged to open the Orange Street Shelter, which would provide 100 to 120 homeless people with a place to sleep, eat and receive health and social services (see “‘Unbelievable opportunity,’” Newslines, April 11). Angela McLaughlin, president of Safe Space’s board of directors, said the shelter team is “confident in our ability to manage” and operate the facility. The goal is to open in August. The concept hasn’t changed: Sobriety is not required, but guests must follow a code of conduct that prohibits violence and the use and possession of drugs and alcohol on the premises. The shelter will require case management and provide a day center, with housing and employment resources, life skills classes and vocational training, substance abuse counseling and support groups. There will be property storage and guests will be

allowed to bring their pets. “We have a stellar team and they bring a lot of experience from a variety of areas,” McLaughlin said. “I think it’s just a matter of adjusting, and we’ll have to do the hiring ourselves rather than rely on the Jesus Center to provide staffing.” That’s not to say the Jesus Center’s withdrawal doesn’t complicate things. While the $1 million from the Walmart Foundation is still secure, she said, it’s uncertain where a $450,000 Homeless Emergency Aid Program (HEAP) grant from the state will end up—it was awarded to the Jesus Center for this project by the Butte Countywide Continuum of Care. In addition, Safe Space’s expertise is in overnight sheltering. It will have to bring on a consultant or another local organization to help with the day center, McLaughlin said. The nonprofit is working on a use permit application—if approved, it will sign an 18-month lease, with the possibility of sixmonth extensions. Since the location was identified last month,

the community has been divided, split between those who believe in the model


Angela McLaughlin said the Safe Space Winter Shelter team is “confident in our ability to manage” and operate the Orange Street Shelter despite losing the Jesus Center’s partnership.

Lesson in statistics

and see the need and others who say they are worried about safety or believe the concept enables drug and alcohol abuse. The spot is blocks from Chico State, Rosedale Elementary and Notre Dame School. Following the public announcement, Chico State President Gayle Hutchinson sent the council a letter urging the panel and the organizations to find a different location. The Jesus Center’s board took those concerns “very seriously,” Cootsona said. “[The location] wasn’t ideal once it got as much pushback as it did.” The press release acknowledges the importance of the project, however: “We worry that without additional services, the lives of our homeless citizens and the overall community’s quality of life will both deteriorate.” The nonprofit still is committed to opening its Renewal Center as soon as possible, Coostona said, but she anticipates at least a three-year timeline. Though McLaughlin said she thinks the Renewal Center will benefit the community, “that’s a long ways down the road. “In the meantime, we’ve got hundreds of folks [who need shelter]. They’re already in the neighborhoods, they’re already downtown. The situation is better managed than ignored.” A lack of shelter beds has been an ongoing issue for the region, and it was exacerbated by the fire. The Torres Community Shelter is full: All 160 spots are claimed and at least 10 people were on a waiting list as of last week, according to Executive Director Joy Amaro. The Torres Shelter effectively opened its own day center after the fire, operating 24/7 with $131,000 from the Walmart donation. The facility, because it serves families with children, is limited when it comes to providing low-barrier access. It’ll continue to operate 24/7 through June 2021 with help from a $377,000 HEAP grant. Amaro said the need for additional shelter beds is vital because “there is no housing at all.” McLaughlin says she sees the project as an opportunity to increase community safety, as it should decrease the amount of abandoned belongings and trash left along creeks and city streets and get people out of the elements. “We still believe strongly that not only can we expand services to where we can actually start to move people out of homelessness, but … this is a win for the community at large.” Ω

Raw numbers don’t tell the whole story of crime in Chico

When Police Chief Mike O’Brien presented the

latest crime stats to the Chico City Council in March, the overall message was that violent crime was a growing problem. In viewing the PowerPoint slides accompanying O’Brien’s talk, however, Mayor Randall Stone and Vice Mayor Alex Brown saw something they felt needed further explanation: the prevalence of domestic violence. “Alex and I looked at each other at the meeting. We were curious, so we inquired further,” Stone told the CN&R. Violent crime, one graph showed, had gone up significantly in 2018. Specifically, it had increased 48 percent over the previous year, while property crimes had dipped 34 percent. (These numbers differ slightly from the ones presented because the Chico PD discovered an error in its original data.) The statistics fit a narrative often repeated by a segment of Chicoans, who latched on to the fact that violence is increasing and started clamoring on social media and in meetings for the council to prioritize public safety and add officers to the police force. That’s not, however, the blanket approach O’Brien and others are hoping to take to tackle the problem.

“Statistics tell a story,” O’Brien told the CN&R, “but not the whole story.” They also can be confusing. A case in point: First, violent crimes were broken down into three categories—homicide, rape and robbery—but the only numbers provided were the percentage of change over 2017. So, homicides decreased by 33 percent, but there was no reference to how many that represented. Numbers supplied to the CN&R by request show that in 2018 there were two homicides, 86 rapes (+1 percent) and 106 robberies (+68 percent). In his PowerPoint presentation, O’Brien further subdivided violent crimes committed last year—but not compared with 2017—into a pie chart. The largest piece— at 32.6 percent—was domestic violence.

SIFT ER Impeach or not? The Mueller report, while damaging, shouldn’t cost President Trump his job before the 2020 election. That’s the prevailing opinion, according to public polling conducted after the release of the special counsel’s findings. A survey by Morning Consult and Politico showed POTUS’ approval rating at 39 percent, the lowest of his presidency, and disapproval rating at 57 percent—yet, only 34 percent of registered voters support impeaching him. Interestingly, at the start of the year, 5 percent more supported impeachment. Here is a breakdown of opinions from the poll (April 19-21, margin of error 2 percent).

Impeach

Don’t*

All ..........34%...............48% Dem. ....59%...............22% Ind. .......31% ...............44% GOP ......7% .................84%

*excludes “don’t know” and “no opinion” responses

Chico Police Chief Mike O’Brien. PHOTO BY MEREDITH J. COOPER

Following O’Brien’s presentation, Stone requested a further breakdown of the crime stats, which revealed that domestic violence went up 111 percent in 2018—from 97 incidents to 205. Those numbers, however, aren’t necessarily indicative of a trend, O’Brien told the CN&R. Part of the increase may be due to a new cataloging system—a change in computer software—which may have inflated those numbers. Overall domestic violence, including nonphysical incidents, increased about 35 percent, he said, which is probably a better representation of the trend. That’s not to say that domestic violence isn’t an issue. The prevalence of it is concerning to many people, including Councilwoman Kasey Reynolds, who suggested declaring a public safety emergency in the wake of O’Brien’s March presentation. “Domestic violence is a public safety issue,” she told the CN&R. “People are being abused in the home, and many times there are children there, who are witnessing these things. Obviously we can’t [just] send police officers into people’s homes—we need to tackle all angles of it.” “The way we typically deal with domestic violence instances is we work closely with community partners,” Stone told the CN&R. “We used to have a domestic violence response team that was funded in large part through the city—by partnering with Catalyst [Domestic Violence Services]. I was part of that—we’d go in and work with NEWSLINES C O N T I N U E D M AY 2 , 2 0 1 9

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the victim. And that would free up our officers from having to address domestic violence cases when there’s a perpetrator out there.” O’Brien said his department already works with counselors to respond to domestic violence calls and that he is committed to looking into expanding those efforts. One of Reynolds’ biggest concerns is

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what she sees as repeat criminals who face no consequences because simply fining them does not deter their actions. “Public safety is supposed to be our No. 1 priority, but we’ve been doing a lot of other things as a council that don’t deal with public safety,” she said. She hinted at a plan she hopes to

“[ W] e can still have a rule of law in our community that raises the level of accountability and gives people a chance to do their time.” —Kasey reynolds

propose that would work with the court system “to change sentencing from being fine-based to requiring community service. “I realize we can’t just prosecute people who don’t have a job,” she said. “But we can still have a rule of law in our community that raises the level of accountability and gives people a chance to do their time.” O’Brien pointed to a major problem with drug addiction as contributing to local crime. Adding police officers won’t solve that issue, either—but a more robust drug court and good local programs for rehabilitation would certainly help, he added. “The last thing we want to do is add 10 or 20 more police officers and have to pay those pensions,” Reynolds said. —MeRedith J. COOpeR me r e d i th c @ newsr ev iew.c o m


Deadly force debated California Legislature eyes compromise on state’s controversial standards for law enforcement The political landscape in California’s debate

over how to curb police shootings shifted last month as law enforcement groups agreed to drop the part of their bill that would lock in the current national standard for justifying the use of deadly force. The move—intended to sustain negotiations on what could be a historic change in law enforcement—would link the police groups’ calls for stronger department policies and officer training to a rival bill that would encourage alternatives to lethal force by making it Learn more: easier to prosecute CALmatters reporter Laurel Rosenhall is tracking California’s police who kill. effort to curb police shootings A state Senate in a new podcast called Force of panel passed the new Law. Find it on calmatters.org/ version of the bill podcasts. last month, ratcheting up pressure on law enforcement and civil rights advocates to compromise on an issue that, nationally and in California, has aroused intense emotions. For the second time in a month, dozens of Californians whose relatives were killed by police lined up to testify in the state Capitol, many of them bearing photos of their loved ones and, in some cases, wailing in grief. “What we are trying to do is create a new opportunity for the different sides to come together again and have a discussion around the changes to the use of force standard in California,” said Sen. Nancy Skinner, the

Berkeley Democrat who chairs the Senate public safety committee and helped negotiate the changes. “Many, many, many people up and down the state and experts … feel that California’s use of force standard should be revised. And so the way this bill is amended at least creates that opportunity for that conversation to continue.” At issue is how to determine legally when police can use deadly force. The U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that police can shoot when a “reasonable officer” in the same circumstances would do the same thing. Law enforcement groups have long supported this standard, while civil rights advocates say it’s made police killings of civilians too easy to justify. The diverging views were laid out in dueling bills that emerged after Sacramento police killed Stephon Clark, an unarmed black man, in his grandparents’ backyard last year. Until the last-minute amendments, the police-backed measure (Senate Bill 230) called for the state to adopt the Supreme Court’s standard. A bill backed by the American Civil Liberties Union (Assembly Bill 392) would further limit when police can shoot, saying it should be lawful only when “necessary” to prevent death or serious injury. With the Senate panel dominated by progressive Democrats from some of the state’s most liberal cities, the earlier version of the law enforcement bill was almost certainly doomed.

The amendments delete the paragraphs saying California would adhere to the reasonable standard established by the Supreme Court, and link SB 230 to AB 392. The maneuver means the police bill requiring more training and stronger department policies can become law only if the bill changing the legal standard for justifying deadly force also does. “That was something that we felt needed to be done in order to have fruitful conversations moving forward,” said Brian Marvel, a San Diego police officer who is president of a statewide federation of police unions called Peace Officers Research Association of California. “The fear is that if we didn’t couple them together, that there wouldn’t be any more continued conversations.” Though he acknowledged that law enforcement groups had to change course, it wasn’t clear if they will embrace the “necessary” standard spelled out in AB 392. Marvel said the coalition hadn’t yet made a decision on that, but speaking for himself, he said he thinks “the Supreme Court got it right.” ACLU lobbyist Lizzie Buchen said she anticipates negotiations now will heat up. “My hope is that this will actually force them to finally come to the table,” she said. “If they really do want to see reform, which is what they are claiming, then they’re going to have to help work on AB 392 to get it through.” Both sides will be pressuring the full Assembly, which must vote on the bill to change the legal standard by the end of May. Though Democrats hold more than 75 percent of the seats, the Assembly typically skews more moderate than the Senate, and a handful of Assembly Democrats have strong ties to law enforcement. —LAUREL ROSENHALL

Celebration of an Extraordinary Life

Bonnie Snow, RN, MSW, LCSW Oct 28, 1943 - Nov 17, 2018 Bonnie Snow’s lifelong commitment to patient centered care, integrity and excellence, compassion, and collaboration continues in those who worked with her. She was instrumental in bringing hospice care to Butte County, developing Hospice on the Ridge/Paradise Hospice (now Feather River Hospice), a true altruistic, community run agency that served as a social service hub for the Paradise/Magalia region. We are saddened by her premature death that was related to the November 8, 2018 devastating Paradise fire.

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$ TAKING THE PLEDGE In a packed El Rey Theater on Saturday (April 27), Congress hopeful Audrey Denney pledges her support for the Green New Deal. The Chico event—hosted by the Sunrise Movement, a social welfare political action organization—was part of a tour around the United States aimed at raising awareness of the Green New Deal. The controversial proposed 10-year stimulus program would create jobs in renewable energy as a way to combat climate change. The same evening, Denney became the first candidate for 2020 to be endorsed by the organization. For more on the Sunrise Movement and the deal, go to sunrisemovement.org. PHOTO BY CHARLES FINLAY

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HEALTHLINES Scientific studies link chlorpyrifos, a pesticide used on strawberries and other crops, to developmental issues in children.

Toxic bite

Almost two decades ago, the EPA, which regu-

California challenges EPA on pesticide affecting kids’ growth by

Ana B. Ibarra

LusedCalifornia—are trying to ban a widely pesticide that the Environmental awmakers in several states—notably,

Protection Agency is fighting to keep on the market. The pesticide, chlorpyrifos, kills insects on contact by attacking their nervous systems. Several studies have linked prenatal exposure of chlorpyrifos to lower birth weights, lower IQs, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and other developmental issues in children. But the EPA in 2017 ignored the conclusions of its scientists and rejected a proposal made during the Obama administration to ban its use in fields and orchards. Hawaii was the first state to pass a full ban last year. Now California, Oregon, New York and Connecticut are trying to do the same. “If California is successful, that’s a big deal because it’s such a big state—the biggest agricultural state,” said Virginia Ruiz, direc-

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tor of occupational and environmental health at the Washington, D.C.-based nonprofit Farmworker Justice. Earlier this year, congressional Democrats also introduced bills to ban the pesticide nationally, but experts believe states are more likely to succeed than Congress. Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.), who is running for president, introduced a separate bill April 17 that would prohibit schools from serving fruits and vegetables sprayed with the pesticide. “I don’t see this as something we should still be debating,” said Irva Hertz-Picciotto, an epidemiologist and director of the Environmental Health Sciences Center at UC Davis. She testified during a California Senate Health Committee hearing April 10 on California’s bill to ban the use of the pesticide. Hertz-Picciotto told lawmakers that more than three dozen studies have demonstrated a connection between prenatal exposure of chlorpyrifos and developmental disabilities, including symptoms of autism. “No study has identified a level at which we can consider it safe,” she said.

lates pesticides at the federal level, ordered chlorpyrifos for residential use off the market. But the chemical still is used on crops— including strawberries, citrus, almonds and grapes—and on golf courses and other nonagricultural settings. Globally, several companies make chlorpyrifos products. In the U.S., the most recognized brand names are Dursban and Lorsban, manufactured by Corteva Agriscience, formerly known as Dow AgroSciences. Under the Obama administration, the EPA in 2015 proposed a complete ban of chlorpyrifos, citing evidence of health risks. But in 2017, President Donald Trump’s EPA administrator, Scott Pruitt, declined to ban it. “Despite several years of study, the science addressing neurodevelopmental effects remains unresolved,” the EPA says on its website. The agency did not return requests for comment. Then the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ordered the pesticide completely off the market last summer. The EPA is fighting that decision. “The EPA is contradicting the findings of its own scientists,” said Aseem Prakash, the director of the Center for Environmental Politics at the University of Washington. Prakash accused the EPA of serving the interests of the chemical industry over people’s health. “It’s bizarre,” he added. “We have the research.”

The manufacturers see it differently. Carol Burns, a retired epidemiologist with the Dow Chemical Company, which began manufacturing chlorpyrifos in 1965, is now a consultant for Corteva Agriscience. Burns said during the California Senate hearing that many studies link neurodevelopmental problems in children with the chemical compounds known as organophosphates, but not chlorpyrifos specifically. “Chlorpyrifos is an organophosphate, but not all organophosphates are chlorpyrifos,” she said. The science, she argued, is not clear-cut. Besides, she added, some of those studies focused on children born in the late 1990s and early 2000s. Since then, children face less exposure to the chemical as a result of increasing restrictions on its use, Burns said. Neither Corteva Agriscience nor the California Farm Bureau Federation would comment for this story. Chlorpyrifos can be inhaled during application and as it drifts into nearby areas, or ingested as residue on food. People also can be exposed through their drinking water if their wells have been contaminated. Brief exposure can result in dizziness, nausea and headaches, while more acute poisoning can cause vomiting, tremors and loss of coordination, according to the National HEALTHLINES C O N T I N U E D

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APPOINTMENT Get your ears checked

Chico State’s Center for Communication Disorders will be holding a Speech and Hearing Fair this Saturday (May 4) from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. behind the Bidwell Mansion Visitor’s Center at 525 Esplanade. Graduate students from the speech pathology program will provide free hearing, language and/or cognition screening for anyone who is interested. Now for the fun part—the event is jungle-themed and there will be free food, games and prizes.


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May 7, 2019 10 aM - 12 PM Butte Creek Country Club, Chico, Ca For more information or to register please call 530-898-5925

Ma y 2, 2019

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HEALTHLINES

c o n t i n u e d f r o M pa g e 1 2

About this story:

Pesticide Information Center. But long-term exposure, even at low levels, is considered more harmful, especially for young, developing brains. A 2014 study by HertzPicciotto and other UC-Davis researchers found that pregnant women who lived near fields treated with chlorpyrifos, primarily during their second trimester, had an elevated risk of giving birth to a child with autism spectrum disorder. But farmers have told lawmakers that chlorpyrifos is a “last-resort” pesticide, one that’s important for them to have in their toolbox in case of a disease outbreak. They pointed to the Asian citrus psyllid, a tiny insect that feeds on citrus leaves and can transmit disease known as Huanglongbing, or citrus greening, which poses a serious threat to the citrus industry. Chlorpyrifos is the most effective treatment for that pest, they said. Farmers also testified that the state already restricts the use of chlorpyrifos through the Department of Pesticide Regulation. Any additional restrictions should be left to the department, they urged. Based on the department’s

this is an edited version of a story produced by Kaiser Health news, which publishes california Healthline, a service of the california Health care foundation. Visit californiahealthline.org for the unabridged article.

recommendations, all California counties this year agreed to set strict restrictions on chlorpyrifos’ application. They include a ban on aerial spraying. For ground-based applications, farmers cannot apply the pesticide within 150 feet of houses, businesses and schools. The department considers the pesticide a “toxic air contaminant” and believes the new restrictions will reduce its use, said spokeswoman Charlotte Fadipe. The use of chlorpyrifos in the state has declined by half in the past decade, she said. Angel Garcia, a community organizer in Tulare County with the group Californians for Pesticide Reform, said the new restrictions aren’t tough enough. Those who face the most risk are largely the low-income people of color who live in agricultural areas, he said. The restrictions “fall short of creating significant health protections.” Ω

WEEKLY DOSE Rest for the weary The latest in sleep research suggests we have been misleading ourselves. A new study published in Sleep Health noted our tendency to believe in unsubstantiated notions about good sleep habits have been bad for our health. Researchers at NYU Langone Health’s School of Medicine presented a list of the most commonly held beliefs about sleeping to a team of sleep medicine experts who set the record straight: 1) Seven to 10 hours a night is essential. 2) TV will delay your ability to fall asleep. 3) Alcohol prevents deep sleep. 4) A regular sleep schedule is key to syncing your biological rhythm. 5) Remembering your dreams means you slept poorly. 6) If you can’t get to sleep, don’t just lie there—you will associate your bed with insomnia. Get up and do something mindless instead.

Source: CNN Health

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GREENWAYS Puppets galore are shown off during the Procession of the Species (2004 shown here), one of the favorite faire traditions.

Festive festival

PHOTO COURTESY OF BUTTE ENVIRONMENTAL COUNCIL

Endangered Species Faire celebrates 40th ‘life-affirming tribute’ by

Robert Speer rober tspeer@ newsrev i ew. com

TGrove—started March 22, 1980, in Bidwell Park’s Cedar out in the same joyous man-

he first Endangered Species Faire—held on

ner thousands of people have since experienced over the years. Writing in the CN&R’s March 28, 1980, issue, reporter Kevin Jeys described the faire as “an event that must be one of the finest, gentlest, most life-affirming tributes ever seen in Northern California.” There was music and dancing and colorful art and bright clothing under a springtime sun on a grassy meadow surrounded by trees. The event was an uplifting response to one of the great global tragedies of our time: the die-off of so many plant and animal species because of unchecked development. It served as well as a validation of popular support for the Endangered Species Act of 1973, which already had saved hundreds, if not thousands, of species. Besides being a celebration of Chico’s many environmental groups, whose information booths ringed Cedar Grove, the faire was an enriching educational experience— especially for the many children who got to see and, in some cases, pet and hold wild animals. Not everyone saw it in such a positive way, however. Shortly after noon, someone

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phoned one of the faire’s coordinators to report that a bomb had been planted at the site and was set to go off at 2. “There was no choice but to evacuate,” said Pat O’Reilly, one of the founders. But the coordinators didn’t call off the event, choosing instead to entertain everyone with nature walks and other activities away from the faire site until 2 p.m. had come and gone and they knew the bomb threat was a hoax. Nothing similar has happened in the 40 years since then—a fact that speaks to organizers’ skill at balancing their powerful message about the rapid disappearance of plant and animal species with a joyful celebration of the once-endangered species that have survived and thrived. The three men who founded the Endangered

Species Faire—O’Reilly, Paul Vittori and Rich Silver—didn’t know each other before they decided to start the event. Their paths crossed at the Bidwell Nature Center (now the Chico Creek Nature Center), where in casual conversation they discovered a mutual interest in organizing a nature festival. “It was like we were birds of a feather,” Silver said. “Pat had the idea to do someEvent info:

The Endangered Species Faire will be held Saturday (May 4), 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., at Cedar Grove in Lower Bidwell Park. Visit becnet.org for more details.

thing, and that’s where it all began.” From the start they realized that the faire’s mission was mainly educational and they needed to get children involved. So they began going into elementary school classrooms, where they encouraged the kids to make endangered-species puppets while explaining what was happening to their animals in the wild. Expectations for the success of the faire were subdued: “Yeah, we can probably get 75 people,” O’Reilly said at one point. As it turned out, more than a thousand showed up. Since then it has attracted 3,000 to 5,000 attendees every year, according to Natalie Carter, executive director of Butte Environmental Council, which is now the sole organizer of the event. The faire has grown apace, thanks in large measure to the many volunteers who have brought their creativity to the event. Among them are the creators of such wonderful elements as the Celebration of All Species (later the Procession of the Species)— fabulous 11-foot-tall puppets representing the animal kingdom, who parade around the meadow accompanied by music from the Earth Band and children holding their handmade puppets. That ad hoc group, organized each year by veteran local musicians Gordy Ohliger and Mark McKinnon, is the “house band” of each festival, but Ohliger notes that other groups participate as well. A person who has contributed greatly

to the artistic side of the event is Kathleen Faith, who as a home school teacher was skilled in making puppets. For several years she helped kids at the faire make their own puppets. She also encouraged them to write plays, with titles such as “The Fantastic Forest Meets the People of Greed,” and present them at the faire. More recently, Susan Tchudi and her husband, Stephen, have picked up the mantle, organizing a new generation of children in the puppet-making endeavor. Susan reports that this year about 350 kids are creating puppets at Little Chico Creek Elementary, Sherwood Montessori and Wildflower Open Classroom. “We are also building two giant puppets this year,” she added, “a great blue heron and a giant California spotted owl.” This year the faire is expanding its footprint onto the neighboring Chico Creek Nature Center campus and adding a stage, called the Bear’s Lair, for acoustic musicians and poets. There will, of course, be another, larger stage in the Cedar Grove meadow to accommodate the Earth Band and other electrified groups. Now gearing up for the 40th anniversary celebration, organizers invite the public to once again witness this faire that has meant so much to the community—especially the children. Ω

ECO EVENT

Get dirty Did you know that the folks at From the Ground Up Farms Inc. grow organic food for our community and give it away? Also free are their workshops on gardening, harvesting, nutrition and more. Since the Camp Fire, they have been gathering donations and distributing items to those in need. If you want to give back and help them get some plants in the ground, they are having a planting party this Saturday (May 4) at their Kentfield Gardens site from 10 a.m. to noon. Visit fromthegroundup farms.org for more info.


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Check back next week for more businesses and organizations that have re-opened. Listings provided by Paradise Ridge Chamber of Commerce. paradisechamber.com 18

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EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS phoTo by NaTe daly

15 MINUTES

THE GOODS

Taste of home

Revving up for summer

Joining Butte County’s fleet of mobile eateries, Lola’s Filipino Cuisine was opened in January by Jasmine Suarez and her fiancé, Lehi Gange. Suarez tackles the marketing side of the operation and Gange is a food-industry veteran who also works at Japanese Blossoms in Chico. Gange had a vision of opening a Filipino food truck to share his mom’s recipes and his family’s culinary heritage with the community. Lola’s offers a handful of entrees, including soy-marinated, thin-sliced beef tapa; pork longanisa sausages; and the national dish of the Philippines, chicken adobo—a flavorful vinegarbraised dish that’s sweet, sour and salty. They also hand-roll lumpia, aka Filipino egg rolls. Based in Oroville, the food truck travels throughout the county. Find upcoming locations and times at facebook.com/lolasfilipinocuisine1418 or @lolas filipinocuisine on Instagram. The CN&R recently caught up with Suarez outside of The Commons Social Empourium to find out more.

Who is Lola? Lola is my fiancé’s mom. Lola means grandmother in Tagalog. She’s a tough critic, too. She’ll let us know if we get her recipe wrong and give us approval when our flavors are good to go. She approves.

What is your signature dish and what would you recommend for someone who has never tried Filipino food before? You can’t go wrong with our lumpia. It’s the one thing I always tell people if they’re a little hesitant to give our food a try. I also recommend our chicken adobo. It’s a staple in the Filipino community. My favorite item would be our chicken cheese lumpia. It’s my go-to. I would go crazy whenever Lola would make lumpia, and I actually told her a couple days ago, “You know, I used to get so excited for your lumpia, but now I’m rolling it every single week and I’m getting kinda tired of it!” But the taste ... I love it.

option for people that don’t have time to eat out or would prefer to cook themselves. You just heat up a little bit of oil and pan fry all sides of the egg roll until they are brown and crispy.

What have been the most rewarding and difficult aspects of operating a food truck? Probably battling time. Time management is stressful, but it’s also the most fun for me because I like meeting deadlines. Needing to have stuff done in time for an event and getting it accomplished is rewarding. As far as difficulties, it has been a little bit of a challenge to find good places to park the truck, besides the breweries that have given us an opportunity. It’s been hard to get permission from businesses and find ideal locations for serving lunch, but we’re working on it.

What future plans do you have for Lola’s?

You also offer pre-packaged food that people can cook at home. Tell me about that.

We’d like to open up a small family restaurant to serve traditional kamayan dinners laid out on banana leaves, with food in the middle. People come in, eat with their hands and share a meal. That’s definitely the goal.

Yes, we sell frozen lumpias by the dozen, which is an

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Every year around this time, Chicoans inexplicably start complaining about the heat—as if we’ve never experienced it before. All of a sudden, I’m seeing farmers tans from people over-exposing their winter-pale arms and legs. It’s time to break out the sunscreen and mosquito repellant, folks—this is the nicest it’s going to be pretty much all year. And with these clear skies comes a never-ending schedule of fun. Thursday Night Market is now in full swing. And there’s Fork in the Road every third Wednesday at DeGarmo Park. Friday Night Concerts at the City Plaza are starting up this week (May 3) and Oroville celebrates First Fridays at downtown businesses. Given these springtime conditions, Cycle Gear chose the perfect season to open up a new shop in Chico. It couldn’t be more appropriately placed, either, conveniently off Highway 99 on South Whitman Place, a few doors down from the Tackle Box Bar & Grill. Cycle Gear was opened in 1974 in Richmond and now has stores all over the U.S. It specializes in motorcycles and the associated gear. Find ’em on Facebook for store hours and special event info—their first bike night looked like a blast!

New foodies A couple new mobile food businesses opened up over the past few

months in the Chico area. The first one I came across was The Hot Box, as I saw it was feeding folks at Cycle Gear’s grand opening on March 30. It appears to still be in its beginning stages, as its web presence is pretty minimal at this time, but from what I can tell, it’s a hot dog cart that offers an eclectic variety of toppings. Find it on Facebook @thbfoodcart. I also came across Pizza Riot, as it’s joined the rotating cast of food trucks at The Commons Social Empourium. The pizzas look pretty delicious in the photos I scrolled through and—get this—they’re 100 percent vegan. Pizza Riot’s motto is, “plant-based, organic and non-GMO.” Pretty cool. On Facebook @veganpizzariot. Also check out this week’s 15 Minutes feature on Lola’s Filipino Cuisine, based in Oroville.

speakiNg of filipiNo food I’m a little bit bummed to report that from here on

out, satisfying my craving for Inday’s Filipino Restaurant’s pork adobo and mango smoothies will be relegated to weekends. Owners John and Inday Geiger announced last week that they have decided to scale back in order to spend more time with their kids. I can’t blame them—between running a restaurant and a mobile kitchen and organizing the Fork in the Road food truck rallies, the Geigers are awfully busy. Generally speaking, you can find the Inday’s cart at Thursday Night Market, while the brick-and-mortar is open Friday-Sunday, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Check Facebook for schedule updates—this Saturday and Sunday, for instance (May 4-5), they’ll be at Sierra Nevada’s Beer Camp instead of at their West Eighth Street eatery.

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Worsening wildfires 101

A guide to the complexities of California’s blazes— from air pollution to building restrictions by

Julie Cart and Judy Lin

I

f it seems that wildfires are burning nearly all the time these days, that there’s no longer a definable fire season in California, you’re right. Fourteen of the 20 most destructive fires in state history have occurred since 2007, and California has 78 more annual “fire days” now than it had 50 years ago. When 2018 became the worst fire year on record, we accepted a new reality. Now each year could surpass the last, setting records for the size, destruction, cost and loss of life. A state-commissioned report—California’s Fourth Climate Change Assessment—makes the harrowing projection that under current emissions trends, the average burn area in California will increase 77 percent by the end of the century. The state has spent, conservatively, more than $4.7 billion from its emergency fund in the last 10 years to fight fires. Cal Fire, the state’s firefighting agency, has been chewing through its firefighting budget only months into a year, leaving little to pay for thinning California’s overgrown forests and helping rural communities protect their infrastructure and water supplies. California’s fires are disruptive long after they are put out, displacing homeowners and even entire communities for months or years. About this story: Even as the charred wood decays, it proIt’s an abridged version of a story published by duces emissions that set back the state’s CALmatters.org, an independent public journalism efforts to combat climate change—only venture covering California state politics and governworsening the wildfires to come. ment.

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More destructive and deadly A changing climate A warming climate complicates everything. Hotter and drier seasons mean that big fires in December, once almost unheard of, are now common. In earlier decades, fires late in the year might have sputtered out after hitting hillsides wet with winter rain. More recent blazes feasted on vegetation that has been sucked of moisture by persistent drought. Even years of plentiful rain harbor dangers. Post-fire precipitation, especially very wet winters, can usher in the growth of non-native shrubs and grasses that burn quickly and spread fires faster than native species.

More homes at risk California’s bigger, more frequent fires are endangering more residents—85 perished in the 2018 blaze that destroyed the Northern California town of Paradise. Forest fires are increasingly a misnomer as flames race across landscapes dotted with subdivisions and communities that have been carved out where trees once stood. The trend of more Californians living in harm’s way complicates firefighting efforts and ramps up the danger fires pose.

Epidemic of dead trees California’s forests, which cover a third of the state, are now choked with some 150 million dead trees. Weakened by a prolonged drought, which scientists link to climate change, California’s ubiquitous pines and oaks are vulnerable to insect infestation and disease. Those giants crash to the forest floor and, unless they are removed, provide ready fodder for the next voracious fire.

The die-off is catastrophic, beyond the reach of state foresters to remedy. In many communities of the central and southern Sierra Nevada, “80 percent of trees are dead,” said Ken Pimlott, former director of Cal Fire.

Fire-prone federal forests The state owns only about 3 percent of California’s wooded acreage. Some land is owned by cities, counties, Native American tribes and private entities. On Jan. 9, via Twitter, President Trump criticized California’s fire management: “Billions of dollars are sent to the State of California for Forest fires that, with proper Forest Management, would never happen. Unless they get their act together, which is unlikely, I have ordered FEMA to send no more money. It is a disgraceful situation in lives & money!” But in fact, the biggest forest landlord in California, by far, is the federal government, which manages 18 national forests in the state. The U.S. Forest Service has a longtime policy of putting out every fire, and quickly, which has packed the federal land with fuel to burn. And its budget falls short of the cost of needed work to reduce that fuel.

The electricity factor Hundreds of thousands of miles of transmission lines and other electrical equipment are strung across California, drawing little attention—until


Burning trees release black carbon, which is much more damaging than greenhouse gases. On top of that, even after the flames are extinguished, decaying trees continue spewing pollutants.

Harming California’s environment Floating umbrellas of horrid air

authorities name utility equipment as the cause of a wildfire. One in 10 California wildfires is related to energy equipment, according to the state’s chief utility regulator. Lawmakers have ordered that utility

companies put safety measures in place, hoping to ensure that their equipment won’t spark future fires. Among the firms’ strategies: more aggressively clearing brush and trees around transmission lines; swapping

FIREFIGHTING BUDGET FAILS TO KEEP UP U.S. f ire-suppression funding

Billions

* Years in which cost exceded annual U.S. fire budget

• Years with additional funding Source: U.S. Forest Service

When fires burn in uninhabited wildlands, their corrosive effects can be carried hundreds of miles by the wind, causing stinging eyes, burning throats and severe coughing. Local air districts issue warnings to residents to wear masks and avoid outside exercise. Hospital emergency rooms report increased numbers of patients seeking help for respiratory problems, and school closures can keep as many as a million children home as even indoor air quality deteriorates. More than 250 fires erupted in six Northern California counties in October 2017, burning for weeks and cloaking the region in smoke. Thousands of residents went to emergency rooms in respiratory distress, a condition that can linger for months.

Undercutting climate goals No state has done as much as California to reduce its output of planet-warming greenhouse gases. Yet the smoke produced by major fires is so potent that a single weeks-long blaze can undo a year’s worth of carbon-reduction efforts. State officials are concerned that what’s pumped into the air during fires could impair California’s ability to reach its stringent greenhouse-gas reduction goals. A single wildfire can spew more pollutants into the air than millions of cars. Moreover, as more trees die, another weapon to combat climate change is lost: the prodigious ability of healthy trees to absorb carbon from the atmosphere. That process is reversed if the trees burn.

The lingering villain: black carbon Fire-suppression funding for the U.S. Forest Service has not kept pace with the increased frequency, size and cost of wildfires.

Trees release a powerful pollutant, black carbon, as they burn. Black carbon is many thousand times more damaging

2017 emergency room visits and hospitalizations for respiratory distress

wooden power poles for metal ones; and maintaining a network of remote cameras to keep watch on wind, smoke and other dangers. None of these or other fire-mitigation efforts will come cheaply. When a judge proposed sweeping new safety measures for Pacific Gas & Electric, the company said the work could cost an eye-popping $150 billion. And consumers can be expected to foot much of the fire-mitigation bill as utility companies pass costs along to them.

WILDFIRES SEND HOSPITAL VISITS SOARING

Source: California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development; data from hospitals in Butte, Lake, Mendocino, Napa, Solano and Sonoma counties

than greenhouse gases. And the damage doesn’t cease once flames are snuffed out; decaying forests continue to emit harmful pollutants. (For an in-depth look at this issue, see “Coughing up carbon,” CN&R, June 28, 2018.) If a burned-out forest is replaced by chaparral or brush, that landscape loses more than 90 percent of its capacity to take in and retain carbon.

Erosion danger When fires rage in California’s mountains, the system that stores and cleans water, feeds streams and rivers, supports fish and other wildlife and literally holds the hillsides together burns up. Forests are watersheds, a critical component of California’s water supply. • Trees hold water in their limbs, roots and soil and draw it into underground aquifers, a source of drinking water. • Meadows on lower slopes filter and clean water. • Tree loss after fires fosters soil erosion; the runoff clogs waterways. • Unstable hills can threaten public safety with landslides and mudslides.

Regrowth is not all good It has to be said that fires are not always bad. Naturally occurring fires clear overgrown forests, creating space for some plants and trees to revitalize. Researchers say less-dense forests are more natural and healthy. But more often in California, wildfires ignite a furious competition for life. FastWILDFIRES 101 C O N T I N U E D M AY 2 , 2 0 1 9

O N PA G E 2 4

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WILDFIRES 101 C O N T I N U E D

F R O M PA G E 2 1

growing and opportunistic non-native plants rush in after fires, with the potential to wholly supplant native species. This phenomenon doesn’t just erase an aspect of California’s botanical history; it affects its fire future. Invasive grasses and weeds often burn more readily, fanning hotter and more frequent fires.

The cost to California Lives lost Wildfires took scores of lives in California in 2018, the deadliest fire year in the state’s recent history. Most of those deaths were related to the Camp Fire. The numbers include people responding to the fires.

Toll on state finances Not surprisingly, the wildfire tab is growing. The state has exceeded projected fire suppression costs in seven of the last 10 years. In 2018, California spent nearly $1 billion on fire suppression and emergency response, far exceeding the budgeted $450 million. For comparison, the state spent just under $12 million in 1980. In 1990, that climbed to $39 million. In 2000, the figure was $178.5 million. In 2010, the tab was $274 million. Cal Fire boasts one of the largest, if not the largest, firefighting air fleets in the world, including S-2T air tankers and Huey helicopters. The state will start upgrading the Hueys to Black Hawks and begin to add C-130 Hercules cargo planes. And rather than waiting to respond to a wildfire, emergency personnel have shifted to pre-positioning strike teams before a fire even starts. It’s a strategy that costs more.

Financial toll for private citizens

in reviewing prices in a portion of San Bernardino County. It was up 12 percent in the same period in the Sierra foothills east of Sacramento. The Santa Monica-based nonprofit research firm conducted the study as part of California’s Fourth Climate Change Assessment and was funded by the California Natural Resources Agency. RAND researcher Lloyd Dixon found the higher prices were influencing purchasing patterns: Policyholders are buying less coverage, low-balling the cost to fully replace their belongings and tending to elect for higher deductibles. But are insurers canceling policies? This is harder to say. A December 2017 survey by the California Department of Insurance found an uptick in renewal complaints in areas designated by Cal Fire as having the greatest risk of wildfire. The department received 41 complaints in 2010 but 143 in 2016. And the insurance department found that insurer-initiated cancellations went up from 8,796 in 2015 in high fire areas to 10,151 in 2016. However, those figures are a fraction of the more than 36,000 cancellations initiated by policyholders. In fact, RAND’s study found more insurers are actually offering in high-risk areas. At the same time, insurance policies of last resort written for brush and wildfire areas have increased from 22,397 policies to 33,898 policies, a 51 percent increase over five years. This suggests people are more likely to be priced out and taking on more risk. Property owners in fire-threat areas can

WILDFIRE DEATHS EACH YEAR

Seven of the 10 most destructive wildfires in California have occurred in the last five years. The financial toll for homeowners, renters and businesses in the past two fire seasons has topped $10 billion in insured losses each year. Of course, the figures don’t tell the whole story. We know many wildfire victims lived in high-threat areas without insurance.

24

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The utilities debacle PG&E filed for Chapter 11 reorganization in U.S. Bankruptcy Court on Jan. 29, 2019, in the aftermath of the 2017 and 2018 wildfire seasons, the two most destructive in state history. The utility, which provides natural gas and electricity to 16 million people in northern and central California, cited up to $30 billion in liabilities since many blazes have been linked to its equipment. Legal experts say it could take two to three years to rehabilitate PG&E, a process that could leave energy goals hampered and wildfire victims shortchanged. But even before PG&E’s bankruptcy, there was debate about who bears the costs as wildfires become more frequent and destructive.

The debate over solutions Detection and prevention California’s wildfire season is essentially year-round now. And with wildfires expected to get worse, residents, utilities and the state play a role in minimizing the impact of the wildfire seasons.

Rising insurance rates and canceled policies

Residents 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

Insurance in fire-prone areas is getting more expensive. The RAND Corp. found the average premium for high-risk areas was up 15 percent between 2007 and 2014

expect insurance prices to keep rising. In areas with the highest risk, people can expect their premiums to go up 18 percent by 2055.

Source: Cal Fire

Residents have a responsibility to create a defensible space around their property and “harden” homes to make them fire resistant. California law requires creating a

State Sen. Bill Dodd (D-Napa), who represents thousands of residents affected by the 2017 wine country fires, has introduced numerous bills in the Legislature to better protect life and property in the blaze-prone state. PHOTO COURTESY OF SEN. DODD

buffer by clearing out trees, brush and grass within 100 feet around homes in wildfireaffected areas. Fire officials say it can increase the likelihood of a house surviving a wildfire eight-fold. In addition, homes with wood or shingle roofs are at high risk of being destroyed. Consider materials such as composition, metal or tile. Utilities

Under new law, investor-owned utilities must prepare wildfire mitigation plans that describe what they are doing to prevent, combat and respond to wildfires. The three largest utilities—PG&E, Southern California Edison and San Diego Gas & Electric—all plan to spend millions clearing brush and trees away from transmission lines, insulate or underground power lines, install or maintain a network of remote cameras and weather stations to detect wind, smoke and other dangers. PG&E and SCE are now following in the footsteps of SDG&E in expanding the use of public safety power shutoffs, also known as de-energization. The practice of shutting off electric power during dangerous weather conditions is viewed as a publicsafety measure of last resort because it can cut off internet access and make communication difficult for hospitals, firefighters and emergency personnel.

The state

On March 22, 2019, Gov. Gavin Newsom declared a wildfire state of emergency for California and waived environ-


on

mental regulations to speed up forest management projects aimed at reducing the fuel load for the upcoming wildfire season. By removing dead trees or clearing brush, the programs aim to reduce the threat of wildfires by creating fuel breaks, defensible space and safe travel corridors around vulnerable communities. Some environmental groups, however, question whether logging would damage ecosystems and suggest it’s more effective to clear vegetation around homes.

Restrictions on where and how to build Even when fires threaten homes and no help is in sight, all is not lost. There is much homeowners can do to prepare and protect their property in the face of wildfire, beginning with clearing trees, brush and wood piles around their houses. The manner of construction and the types of materials used can help give structures a fighting chance against the advance of flames. California building codes for new homes require forgoing wooden roofs and decks in favor of fire-resistant materials, among other things. Among the actions homeowners can take to protect their property: • Install double-paned windows. • Detach garages and storage sheds from the main house.

BUILDING HOMES IN RISKY LOCATIONS

• Put ember-resistant vents in attics and elsewhere. • Consider fire-resistant cladding such as stucco or stone. There are, however, places where the risk is so great that fire scientists say homes simply should not be built—even in a state where housing shortages have reached crisis levels. In California from 1990 to 2010, an estimated 45 percent of new housing units were constructed in the “wildland-urban interface”— where suburbia and rural towns back up onto wild, and combustible, landscapes. With more residences sprouting on the edge of wildlands or deep in narrow canyons, fires become an inevitability and firefighters have a tougher and larger territory to defend. What to do? State lawmakers already have extended some state restrictions to local lands, and some have talked about possible rebates or other subsidies for residents who cannot afford to “harden” their homes. But essentially legislators are grappling with an unpalatable reality: Require even more extensive and expensive upgrades to existing homes, or ban building altogether in some areas. That discussion is as potentially explosive as the fires themselves.

Bills to watch in 2019 While Gov. Newsom is monitoring PG&E bankruptcy developments, state lawmakers have turned their focus toward prevention. Here are some key proposals for the 2019 legislative session: • Senate Bill 190 (Sen. Bill Dodd of Napa) would direct the State Fire Marshal to develop a defensible space ordinance for local governments to adopt and enforce. • Senate Bill 209 (Sen. Dodd) establishes the California Wildfire Warning Center in order to better predict weather conditions and share information around the state. Requires that utilities install additional weather monitoring equipment in high fire threat areas. • Senate Bill 290 (Sen. Dodd) is sponsored by Insurance Commissioner Ricardo Lara and Treasurer Fiona Ma. It would authorize the state to explore purchasing a policy to cover wildfires, earthquakes, floods and other disasters.

• Homes in lower-risk areas • Fire-zone homes backing up to dense vegetation • Fire-zone homes within 1.5 mi of dense vegetation

Nearly 1 in 3 California homes lies in the wildland-urban interface—in or near dense vegetation. Some 4 million are in zones especially vulnerable to wildfire.

• Assembly Bill 235 (Assemblyman Chad Mayes of Yucca Valley) would create the California Wildfire Catastrophe Fund Authority financed by participating utilities to reimburse the utility for liability costs that exceed their established insurance levels. • Assembly Bill 281 (Assemblyman Jim Frazier of Fairfield) has early-stage language that proposes to have California utilities relocate underground or otherwise enhance the safety of transmission and distribution lines in high fire-threat areas. Ω

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Butte County

W NE Week

JUNE 7-16, 2019 A celebration of all things wine, from vineyard tours and winemaker dinners to champagne brunches and sake tastings. Do you have a fun event you want to be part of Wine Week? Send details/questions to wineweek@newsreview.com or go to buttecountywineweek.com for more info. For more information about advertising in this special issue, call 530-894-2300

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25


Arts &Culture Festivals worth your time (and money) this summer

Best of the

Fests

A in Northern California, you can hear the sound of drums beginning to beat in s soon as it feels too hot to be spring

the distance, luring crowds to fairgrounds and parks for weekend-long music festivals that continue, one after the other, through the end of by Jason Cassidy summer. Instead of running down the entire j aso nc@ list, I’ve taken a critical newsrev i ew.c om look at the artists, locations and prices (sorry BottleRock and Outside Lands; can’t afford to spend the night!). Here are my recommendations for your 2019 festival season: Wildflower Music Festival: May 4, End of Normal. A fun all-day fest in Chico! (See “Editor’s Pick” on facing page.) Tickets: $45. wildflowermusicfest.com Huichica Music Festival: June 7-8, Gundlach Bundschu Winery, Sonoma. Set in the scenic foothills, Huichica is a chill scene. Billed as a “micro-fest,” and featuring a broad range of mostly up-and-coming or below-the-radar indie acts, it doesn’t attract your typical crowds looking for megastars or to twirl in the dirt to a never-ending jam. This year’s headliners include New Jersey dream-pop crew Real Estate and R&B mainstay Lee Fields and his band the Expressions. Lodging might be pricey in Sonoma, but tickets aren’t that bad and you can get a free one by signing up at the website for a four-hour volunteer shift! Tickets: $55-$110 (single day) to $155 (two days). huichica.com Vans Warped Tour: July 20-21, Shoreline Amphitheatre, Mountain View. In 2018, the long-running pop-punk/metalcore/ska/skate-punk cross-country tour called it quits. But it’s returning this year 26

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for a series of shows at three locations in celebration of what would have been its 25th anniversary. For the occasion, the caliber and selection of bands is largely improved, with the likes of Andrew W.K., Jawbreaker, Fishbone, Ozomatli, The Vandals and The Offspring on the roster for the Shoreline shows. Tickets: $71 (single day) to $141 (two days). vanswarpedtour.com Kate Wolf Music Festival: June 27-30, Black Oak Ranch, Laytonville. Kate Wolf isn’t the biggest name in summer fests, but the quality of its offerings across four stages is better than most. This year, the ranch/hippie commune in Humboldt County will host an impressive selection of music legends—Kris Kristofferson, Los Lobos, Booker T, John Hiatt—and a wide range of Americana, folk and rock acts, including Poor Man’s Whiskey, Rainbow Girls and locals Joe Craven & The Sometimers. Tickets: $75-$110 (single day, no camping) to $230-$330 (two- to four-day passes, camping included). Parking extra. katewolfmusicfestival. com Burger Boogaloo: July 6-7, Mosswood Park, Oakland. John Waters hosting anything is worth a drive to the Bay Area, but John Waters hosting two days of high-energy punk and garage-rock shenanigans is almost too much to handle. For its 10th anniversary, the event will bring in some true legends to headline— Australian garage-punks The Scientists and kings of reverb-drenched distortion The Jesus and Mary Chain—and fill the rest of the schedule with the likes of King Tuff and Shannon and The Clams. Tickets: $69 ($49 if you buy three together). burgerboogaloo.com

High Sierra Music Festival: July 4-7, Plumas-Sierra County Fairgrounds, Quincy. The party-weekend in the Sierra Nevada foothills is filled with typical groovy Americana and jam crews of the festival scene, including Greensky Bluegrass, Umphrey’s McGee, Leftover Salmon and Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe. Tickets: $75.75-$99.75 (single day) to $200.75-$290.75 (for two- to four-day passes, with camping). Parking extra. highsierramusic.com California WorldFest: July 11-14, Nevada County Fairgrounds, Grass Valley. The premiere world music festival in the North State has an especially stacked lineup that includes reggae legends Toots and the Maytals, Mexican singer/songwriter Lila Downs and the spectacular Trombone Shorty from New Orleans. Tickets: $75 (one day) to $125$195 (two to four days). Camping: $40. worldfest.net Guitarfish Music Festival: July 25-28, Cisco Grove Campground & RV Park, Cisco Grove. If you’re looking to dance and groove into the night, but you want to avoid the crowds of High Sierra, consider making the trek into Tahoe National Forest for the more intimate Guitarfish. This year’s funk/jam/world lineup includes SambaDá, the California Honeydrops and energetic Mexican rockers Kinky. Tickets: $50-$90 (single day) to $180 (four days). Camping included; parking extra. guitarfishfestival.com For the Funk of It: Aug. 10-12, Belden. The locally produced all-funk fest has a tight lineup that includes Matador! Soul Sounds, Five Alarm Funk, Mojo Green with Hornmageddon and locals Lo & Behold. Tickets: $125 (three days, with camping). Parking extra. ftffest.com Ω

The cozy Huichica Music Festival at Gundlach Bundschu Winery in Sonoma. Photo courtesy of huichica

THIS WEEK Special Events THURSDAY NIGHT MARKET: Local produce, fresh flowers, music,  arts and crafts, and food trucks. Will continue every  Thursday through September.  Thu, 5/2, 6pm. Downtown  Chico. 345-6500. downtownchico.com

Music BUTTE MTAC YOUTH ORCHESTRA SPRING CONCERT: Features the beginning, intermediate, and advanced string orchestras. Concert  supports music for families and students displaced by the  Camp Fire.  Thu, 5/2, 7pm.  St. John›s Episcopal Church, 2341  Floral Ave

DEVIN DAWSON: Nashville country artist famous for the 2018 hit  “All on Me.”  Thu, 5/2, 7pm. $17. Senator Theater, 517 Main St. KEEP CHICO CREATIVE MUSIC & ARTS FESTIVAL: Free event with local  bands, kid-friendly booths, a dance team and the North State  Symphony. Also, live music by Pat Hull, The Velvet Starlings,  The Walsh Brothers and more.  Thu, 5/2, 6pm. City Plaza,  downtown Chico.

STORM LARGE AND & LE BONHEUR: Pink Martini’s Storm Large and  her band perform classics from the American Songbook and  Broadway.  Thu, 5/2, 7:30pm. $15-$35. Harlen Adams Theatre,  Chico State, PAC 144, 898-6333. chicoperformances.com

Theater BEAUTY AND THE BEAST: School of the Arts’ elaborately staged and  costumed adaptation of the Academy Award-winning classic.  Includes both old and new songs.  Thu, 5/2, 7:30pm. $8-$20.  Laxson Auditorium, Chico State, 898-6333.

THE MADAM AND THE MAYOR’S WIFE: Travel back to 1901 in Nevada  County where a cast of shady characters with a few secrets  gets into some trouble. Written by local playwright Hilary  Tellesen. Live original music by Lisa Marie and Heather 

PioNeer Day ParaDe Saturday, May 4 Downtown Chico

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FINE ARTS ON NEXT PaGE

THE MaDaM aND THE MayOR’S WIFE Thursday-Saturday, through May 18 Blue Room Theatre

CHICO SHRINERS’ HAMBURGER AND BEAN FEED: Buy 

SEE THURSDay-SaTURDay, THEaTER

a burger, beans and a beverage to contribute to Shriner programs helping children. To  purchase in tickets in advance, call 342-3422  or email ChicoShriner@yahoo.com.  Sat 5/4, 11am. $8. Chico Masonic Family Center, 1110  W. East Ave. 342-3422.

COPPELIA BALLET: See Friday.  Sat 5/4, 1pm & 6pm. $15-$20. CUSD Center for the Arts, 1475  East Ave.

ENDANGERED SPECIES FAIRE: Free event for all  ages, includes music, a rescued animal  show, educational booths and a puppet  parade.  Sat 5/4, 11am. Chico Creek Nature  Center, 1968 E. Eighth St.

KENTUCKY DERBY DAY: Race-day fun with specials, hat competitions, stick horse relay  and more.  Sat 5/4, 11am. Almendra Winery &  Distillery, 9275 Midway Road, Durham.

LABYRINTH WALK: Celebrate World Peace  Ellison.  Thu, 5/2, 7:30pm. $15. Blue Room  Theatre, 139 W. First St., 895-3749, blueroomtheatre.com

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Special Events COPPELIA BALLET: The North State Ballet presents classic romantic comedy of foolish  fantasies and mistaken identities.  Fri, 5/3, 6pm. $15 - $20. CUSD Center for the Arts,  1475 East Ave.

NIGHT AT THE MUSEUM: Visit the museum after  hours and use your mental muscle to solve  puzzles, decode fossils and meet some cool  living dinosaurs..Geared toward ages 5-12,  pizza dinner included.  Fri, 5/3, 6pm. $25.  Valene L. Smith Museum of Anthropology,  Chico State. 898 5397. csuchico.edu/ anthmuseum

POTLUCK, OPEN MIC AND JAM: Bring a dish to 

share, your acoustic instrument, your voice,  your song or your favorite joke. Small donation requested.  Fri, 5/3, 5pm. Feather River  Senior Center, 1335 Meyers St., Oroville.

THE PUMP AND DUMP SHOW: Raucous evening of  comedy and music designed for parents who  want to laugh and remember what it was  like before having kids.  Sat, 5/4, 8pm. $25$45. Gold Country Casino & Hotel, 4020 Olive  Highway, Oroville.

VOLUNTEER FRIDAYS: Join in picking up litter and  pulling weeds in the park. For more info call  Shane at 896-7831.  Fri, 5/3, 9am. Bidwell  Park.

Music BIG MO & THE FULL MOON BAND: Big Mo and his  blues, Southern rock and funk band play the  opening show of the Friday Night Concert 

BEaUTy aND THE BEaST Thursday-Sunday, May 2-5 Laxson Auditorium

SEE THURSDay-SUNDay, THEATER

series.  Fri, 5/3, 7pm. City Plaza, downtown  Chico.

FUNDRAISER CONCERT: Celebrate the 40th annual  Endangered Species Faire with performances by Stevie Cook and Friends, Beyond  the Pale, Earth Band, and the Alice Peake  Experience.  Fri, 5/3, 7pm. $10-$12. Chico  Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St., 891-6424.

Theater BEAUTY AND THE BEAST: See Thursday.  Fri, 5/3, 7:30pm. $8-$20. Laxson Auditorium, Chico  State, 898-6333.

THE MADAM AND THE MAYOR’S WIFE: See  Thursday.  Fri, 5/3, 7:30pm. $15. Blue Room  Theatre, 139 W. First St., 895-3749,   blueroomtheatre.com

MAY THE FOURTH IMPROV SHOW: Chico Live Improv  Comedy presents long- and short-form  improv with local talent.  Sat, 5/4, 7pm. $10.  Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road,   Ste. F., 894-3282. chicotheatercompany.com

SUMMERTIME & WINTERTIME: Butte College  Drama Department presents two whimsical  plays about truth and love from playwright  Charles Mee. Plays alternate each night.  Check site or call for schedule.  Fri, 5/2, 7:30pm. $10-$15. Butte College Black Box  Theatre, 3536 Campus Drive, 895-2994.   butte.edu/drama 

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Special Events ARC IN THE PARK: Chico Down Syndrome  Connection hosts family and dog-friendly  walk in the park.  Sat 5/4, 8pm. $10-$15.  Bidwell Park at Sycamore Picnic Area.

BIDWELL BAR DAY: Free gold-panning and pioneer  craft-making for all ages, with live entertainment throughout the day.  Sat 5/4, 12pm. Bidwell  Canyon Recreation Area, Tollhouse and  Suspension Bridge entrance, Oroville. 

FREE LISTINGS! Post your event for free online at www. newsreview.com/calendar, or email the CN&R calendar editor at cnrcalendar@newsreview.com. Deadline for print listings is Wednesday, 5 p.m., one week prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

Labyrinth day by walking a labyrinth  meant to provide energy and healing after  the Camp Fire. Call Laurel at 370-3335 for  details.  Sat 5/4, 1pm. Chico Guild Hall, 2775  Nord Ave.

MOMENTUM SPRING 2019 SHOWCASE: Student  dancers and choreographers will present what they have been working on all  semester.  Sat 5/4, 2pm & 7pm. $5-$7. BMU  Auditorium, Chico State.

PIONEER DAY PARADE: A Chico tradition, this  year’s late-morning parade celebrates the  bicentennial of John Bidwell’s birth.  Sat, 5/4, 10am-noon. Downtown Chico.

PLANTING PARTY: From the Ground Up Farms  needs help getting some planting done.  Sat 5/4, 10am. Kentfield Gardens, 1125 Kentfield  Road.

12pm. $20. Fourth and Main St., in parking lot  across from City Plaza. SPEECH AND HEARING FAIR: Get a free hearing,  language, and/or cognition screening. There  will be free food, games, and prizes with a  jungle theme and all ages are welcome.  Sat 5/4, 10am. Center for Communication  Disorders, Chico State.

TRANSFORMING TRAUMA: Trauma expert Laura  van Dernoot Lipsky will speak on how a  deeper understanding of trauma exposure  and the tools for navigating systems will  enable those who bear the task of caring,  healing and rebuilding to do their work  better. Includes full day of workshops  and collaboration.  Sat 5/4, 8am. $15. BMU  Auditorium, Chico State. rce.csuchico.edu

Theater BEAUTY AND THE BEAST: See Thursday.  Sat, 5/4, 2pm & 7:30pm. $8-$20. 898-6333. Laxson  Auditorium, Chico State.

THE MADAM AND THE MAYOR’S WIFE: See  Thursday.  Sat, 5/4, 7:30pm. $15. Blue Room  Theatre, 139 W. First St., 895-3749, blueroomtheatre.com

SUMMERTIME & WINTERTIME: See Friday.  Sat, 5/4, 7:30pm. $10-$15. Butte College Black Box  Theatre, 3536 Campus Drive, 895-2994. butte. edu/drama 

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SUN

Special Events PIONEER DAY PARADE: A Chico tradition, this 

SIERRA NEVADA BEER CAMP: Adult day camp with  fun and games and lots of beer. Costumes  are encouraged.  Sat 5/4, 11am. $30-$45.  Sierra Nevada Brewery, 1075 E. 20th St.   sierranevada.com

year’s late-morning parade celebrates  the  bicentennial of John Bidwell’s birth.  Sat, 5/4,  10am-noon.  Downtown Chico.

SIP, SAVOR & SUPPORT FUNDRAISER: Sample  signature drinks and dishes from local restaurants. All proceeds go to the rebuilding of  the Paradise Gold Nugget Museum.  Sat 5/4,

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EDITOR’S PICK

Day-DaNCING It’s the season of the festival (see “Best of the Fests” on previous page) and one in our own backyard has it all. With live music by visiting and local performers, food trucks, beer, and stuff for kids to do, the Wildflower Music Festival, the annual benefit for Wildflower Open Classroom school, has stepped up its game this year. Performers include countrysoul singer Nicki Bluhm, veteran groove band ALO and local jammers Electric Circus, Triple Tree, Hot Flash and Wolf Thump. Boogie all day under the blue sky this Saturday (May 4) at The End of Normal. M ay 2 , 2 0 1 9

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We Deliver to Your Door in Minutes!

THIS WEEK CoNTINuEd fRoM pagE 27

FINE ARTS

CINCO DE MAYO FIESTA: Margarita tasting flights,  tostadas, a pinata and more.  Sun, 5/5, 11am. Almendra Winery & Distillery, 9275  Midway Road, Durham.

CINDERELLA BY GIOACHINO ROSSINI: San Francisco  Grand Opera Cinema Series presents masterful performance of the classic opera in  high-definition.  Sun, 5/5, 2pm. $10-$18. Zingg  Recital Hall, Chico State, ARTS 279. 898-6333.

COPPELIA BALLET: See Friday.  Sun, 5/5, 3pm. $15$20. CUSD Center for the Arts, 1475 East Ave.

Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner 240 Broadway St. Chico, CA | 530.899.2847 | www.pitapitusa.com

Help Wanted! Service Technician Starting at

$15 an Hour Benefits Available

SIERRA NEVADA BEER CAMP: See Saturday.  Sun, 5/5, 11am. $30-$45. Sierra Nevada Brewery,  1075 E. 20th St. sierranevada.com

WATER-WISE AND HABITAT-FRIENDLY GARDEN TOUR: Mt. Lassen Chapter of the California  Native Plant Society and Altacal Audubon  Society present a tour of beautiful home  gardens around Chico. Sun, 5/5, 9am. $7-$10.  521-4402. mountlassen.cnps.org

Music

Symphony Orchestra performs works by  Mozart, Copeland and John Williams. Young  Artist competition winners featured.  Sun, 5/5, 7pm. $15-$20. Paradise Performing Arts  Center, 777 Nunneley Road, Paradise.

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST: See Thursday.  Sun, 5/5, 2pm. $8-$20. Laxson Auditorium, Chico  State, 898-6333.

SUMMERTIME & WINTERTIME: See Friday.  Sun, 5/5, 2:30pm. $10-$15. Butte College Black 

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Special Events HEALTHY SOILS WORKSHOP: Soil expert Nicole  Masters shares the biological aspects of  soil and regenerative farming. Workshop  will cover analysis of soil and plant tissue,  on-farm evaluations and more.  Mon, 5/6, 8am. $50. Chico State University Farm, 311  Nicholas C. Schouten Lane.

NATURE ABC’S: Families of children ages 1-5  can enjoy an hour of free fun at the nature  center. Activities include an animal visit,  story time, an art project, nature walk and  more.  Mon, 5/6, 10am. Chico Creek Nature  Center, 1968 E. Eighth St.

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Special Events POETRY READING: An evening of poetry with Lara  Gularte, Bob Garner and Linda Serrato,  long-time friends and regional writers.  Wed, 5/8, 7pm. 1078 Gallery, 1710 Park Ave.   1078gallery.org.

POETRY READING: Listen to local poets and  bring your own poetry to read at this  monthly meeting of creative minds.  Wed, 5/8, 5:30pm. 15th Street Cafe, 1414 Park Ave.,   Ste. 120. 760-898-0825.

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Art BMU 3RD FLOOR GALLERY: Art Education Show, 

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SEE aRT

TWINKLE WITH THE STARS CONCERT: Paradise 

Box Theatre, 3536 Campus Drive, 895-2994.  butte.edu/drama 

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Shows through May 11 The Turner

St. 433-0414.

Theater 1-800-767-8276 Ask for Rosa!

INK & CLay

BOGG: Jazz by Bogg and a vegan brunch.  Sun, 5/5, 11am. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth 

featuring student works. Award ceremony  Thursday, May 2, 5pm, at Rowland-Taylor  Recital Hall, followed by reception at 7pm  in the gallery. Through 5/7. Bell Memorial  Union, Chico State.

CHICO ART CENTER: The Discovery Show  Series, juried exhibition featuring work by  artists who have had limited local exposure. Reception Friday, May 3, 5-7 pm.  Through 5/31. 450 Orange St.

GREAT NORTHERN COFFEE: Home a  Photographic Diary, exhibit chronicles  local artist Isabel Dresler’s experiences  in Northern California. Opening reception  5/4. 434 Orange St., 321-7163.

HEALING ART GALLERY: Antonio Ramirez, photography by late Northern California  artist. The Enloe Cancer Center Healing  Art Gallery features artists whose lives  have been touched by cancer. Through  7/19. 265 Cohasset Road, 332-3856.

JACKI HEADLEY UNIVERSITY ART GALLERY: Annual  Juried Student Exhibition, featuring  works by Chico State art students and  includes a range of approaches, concepts  and media. Through 5/11. Chico State,  ARTS 121. csuchico.edu

JANET TURNER PRINT MUSEUM: Ink &  Clay, annual exhibition showcases student  work in printmaking, complemented by  works in ceramics. Awards ceremony,  Thursday, May 2, 5pm at the RowlandTaylor Recital Hall. Through 5/11. Chico  State, 400 W. First St. janetturner.org

MFA GALLERY, ARTS AND HUMANITIES BUILDING: Fraigaist, the American Museum  of Foreign Philosophical Science celebrates Freya Vogela with a collection of  sculptures, drawings, photographs and  personal belongings. Through 5/4. Chico  State.

MUSEUM OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA ART: Tend, Chikoko presents an exploratory multimedia exhibit that utilizes  found, broken, burnt and re-purposed  items with a focus on textiles to examine the meaning of home. Also, Trapeze  Acrobats  featuring paintings of acrobats,  divers, gymnasts and dancers by Clay  Vorhes. Closing event Saturday, May 25,  6-8pm. Through 5/26. 900 Esplanade.  monca.org

PROVISIONS GALLERY: Group Art Show, with  artwork from nine-plus local artists.  Through 5/9. 122 W Third St. provisionsgallery.com

VALENE L. SMITH MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY: Altar States Spirit Worlds and  Transformational Experiences, The Works  of Peter Treagan, interactive tech art  complete with 3D glasses and hidden  imagery. Through 5/17. Chico State.

Museums BOLT’S ANTIQUE TOOL MUSEUM: Unique museum  with more than 12,000 hand tools on  display, charting cataloging the evolution and history of tools. Closed Sundays.  Through 6/15. $3. 1650 Broderick St,  Oroville.

CHICO CHILDREN’S MUSEUM: Tons of cool stuff  for kids to explore including a miniature  city, complete with a junior vet clinic,  dentist, cafe and farmer’s market, a giant  fish tank, multi-sensory room, imagination playground and much more. Through  8/3. $7-$9. 325 Main St. chicochildrens  museum.org

CHICO CREEK NATURE CENTER: Living Animal  Museum & Nature Play Room, learn all  about local critters, plants and wildlife.  Through 5/25. $2-$4. 1968 E. Eighth St.  chicorec.com

GATEWAY SCIENCE MUSEUM: From Here to  There, explore the science of how things  move by land, sea and air. Also on display  are The Foothills and America’s Wolves:  From Tragedy to Inspiration. Through  5/12. $5-$7. 625 Esplanade. csuchico.edu

PATRICK RANCH MUSEUM: Working farm and  museum with rotating exhibits open every  Saturday and Sunday, 11am-3pm. Through  5/26. 10381 Midway, Durham.   patrickranchmuseum.org

VALENE L. SMITH MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY: Remarkable Lives, exploring the intertwined worlds of birds and humans, in  partnership with the Altacal Audubon  Society and Snow Goose Festival. Exhibits  include bird songs and behaviors, local  photography and a robotic recreation of  the late Jurassic Archaeopteryx. Through  7/31. 400 W. First St.


Mother’S DAy Special hours Noon - 8pm

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345 West 17 Fifth Street18| Chico, CA 95928 | (530) 891–6328 Please call for reservations 16 Open Fridays for Lunch: 11:30am–2:30pm | Join us for Happy Hour: Every Day 4:30–6pm

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Gift Cards Available Online www.5thstreetsteakhouse.com M ay 2 , 2 0 1 9

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SCENE

less talk, more love Butte students elevate Mee’s Summertime

Ffeaturing College Drama Department is two plays on that most

or its spring production, the Butte

complicated of themes: love. And, with Charles Mee’s Summertime and Wintertime—presented in rotating repertory—things are especially complicated. Both plays revolve around the same characters in the same setting—a vacation beach house on Martha’s Vineyard—but each obviously takes place at a different time of year. I visited for a matinee of Summertime on Sunday (April 28) and upon entering the Black Box Theatre was impressed with designer Robert Pickering’s ambitious set. An enormous molded beach by with curved contours and staggered Jason Cassidy wood landings slopes down into the audience to form its own thrust stage. j aso nc@ newsrev i ew.c om In the background, several large white birch trees extend nearly to the ceiling, and scattered about the scene On stage: sit a variety of outdoor couches and Wintertime (thursday, chairs, half-filled wine glasses, an May 3, 7:30 p.m. acoustic guitar, and other summer& Sunday, May home miscellany. 5, 2 p.m.) and The play opens with the arrival Summertime (Friday, May 4, 7:30 p.m.). of James (David Loperena), a young tickets: $15 man who has been directed to this ($10 students) house with hopes of hiring someone to translate the captions in a book of Butte College Black Box Theatre photographs from Italian to English. arts building The first inhabitant he encounters butte college is the young and beautiful Tessa 3536 campus Drive, (Devyn Cusick), and he’s immedioroville butte.edu/drama ately smitten. After a few awkward and unrequited advances on James’ part, a second man, Francois (Jarrod Jackson), enters the scene to music and literally sweeps Tessa off her feet. Francois, it turns out, is the lover of Maria (Florence Ives), who is Tessa’s mother, but his swashbuckling doesn’t seem so scandalous when you consider that Maria is married to Frank (Bryce Corron), who has his own lover, Edmund (Ryan Shallenberger)—or that Francois also has been in a relationship with painter Mimi (Bailey Martin), who herself comes on to Tessa and is revisited by a past love, Natalie (Meghan Helms), who sneaks off for a rendezvous with the

One of Summertime’s  love triangles, from left:  Frank (Bryce Corron),  Maria (Florence Ives) and  Francois (Jarrod Jackson).

Photo by Davin SchreinDl neighbor boy, Gunter (Joseph Slupski). This is the convoluted scenario that James has fallen into, and if it all sounds like a potentially volatile yet fun mix of seduction and betrayal, that’s because, in one way, it is. Judged solely on the committed shenanigans of the courageous players (especially the charismatic Jackson), Butte’s production does provide a lot of engaging screwball action, with plenty of physical comedy, melodramatic overreactions and impassioned pontifications on life and love. (One good example is a freakout scene led by Jackson, wherein he and other frustrated house guests thrash the set to the tune of Nirvana’s “Stay Away.”) But Mee’s dialogue is another matter. His characters don’t converse so much as they monologue on the ideas behind human relationships, talking past each other and at the audience. While some of these scattered, loosely connected speeches might contain big ideas worth considering, they feel removed from the action at hand. At the beginning of the play, Tessa is asked the same question she is at the end: “Do you believe in love at first sight?” Her answer changes, and while that might suggest a resolution of a story arc, there wasn’t sufficient character interaction for the transformation to make any sense, much less be believable. To be sure, Mee didn’t intend for Summertime to be be a neat, conventional narrative. In his directions in the script, he suggests, “There is not so much a set for a play, as an installation piece in which a performance occurs.” His piece comes across a bit like a live art exhibit introducing a lot of ideas. I felt as though I was being read one artist statement after another, when all I wanted to do was to watch the characters and figure it out for myself. Jesse Merz, who directs both productions, deserves credit for challenging his young actors with a nontraditional play like this. The source material might not have appealed to me (and for what it’s worth, Wintertime seems to be more well-liked), but that doesn’t mean a work by a prominent contemporary American playwright isn’t a worthwhile piece of art to explore—for performers and audiences alike. Ω

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NIGHTLIFE

THURSDay 5/2—WEDNESDay 5/8 The Velvet Starlings, The Walsh  Brothers and more.  Thu, 5/2, 6pm. City Plaza, downtown Chico.

Velvet Starlings

THE LOWEST POINT: Live music by The  Lowest Point.  Thu, 5/2, 7pm. The  Commons Social Empourium, 2412  Park Ave.

NOOGY: Dallas old-school punk band  joined by Helicopter Kids, Snuff,  and Fall Children. All ages.  Thu, 5/2, 7:30pm. $5. Ike’s Place, 648 W.  Fifth St.

STORM LARGE AND & LE BONHEUR: Pink 

2THURSDay

ALICE PEAKE EXPERIENCE: Dance 

band plays classics covering all  genres.  Thu, 5/2, 6:30pm. Farm Star  Pizza, 2359 Esplanade, 343-2056.

THE ASCENDERS & MORRISON/ FRANKLIN: Grateful Dead-influenced  jam band is joined by Living  Karaoke Band’s Van Morrison/ Aretha Franklin tribute.  Thu, 5/2, 8pm. $7-$10. Lost On Main, 319 Main  St. facebook.com/lostonmain

CHANNEL 66: Local powerhouse folk/

rock project.  Thu, 5/2, 6pm. Tender  Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.,  487-2636.

KEEP CHICO CREaTIVE Tonight, May 2 City Plaza SEE THURSDay

DEVIN DAWSON: Nashville country  artist famous for the 2018 hit “All on  Me.”  Thu, 5/2, 7pm. $17. The Senator  Theater, 517 Main St. jmax  productions.net.

ESPLANADE: 1980s party on the 

patio. Thu, 5/2, 6pm. La Salles, 229  Broadway St.

KEEP CHICO CREATIVE MUSIC & ARTS FESTIVAL: Free event with local  bands, kid-friendly booths, a  dance team and the North State  Symphony. Also, music by Pat Hull, 

Martini’s Storm Large and her band  perform classics from the American  Songbook and Broadway.  Thu, 5/2, 7:30pm. $15-$35. Harlen Adams  Theatre, Chico State, PAC 144, 8986333. chicoperformances.com

THUMPIN’ THURSDAY ROCK ’N’ BLUES JAM: Hosted by the Loco-Motive  Band plus special guests. All musicians and music enthusiasts  welcome.  Thu, 5/2, 7pm. Studio Inn  Lounge, 2582 Esplanade.

3FRIDay

5 MILE MYTH & IVY STREET: Local band  night. All ages.  Fri, 5/3, 7:30pm. $5.  Ike’s Place, 648 W. Fifth St.

BEE GEES GOLD: Bee Gees tribute.  Fri,

5/3, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino  & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

BIG MO & THE FULL MOON BAND: Big Mo  and his blues, Southern rock and  funk band play the opening show of  the Friday Night Concert series.  Fri, 5/3, 7pm. City Plaza, downtown  Chico.

CHUCK EPPERSON & ERIC WEBER:

OUI OUI

Three strong female punks from Paris will descend upon the 1078 Gallery tonight (May 2) with their noisy art-rock band, Gomme (pictured). The sound blends screeching guitar with dark and lonely lyrics and a powerful feminist vibe. Chico’s own goth-pop band The Empty Gate will give you something to dance to and Panther Surprise will bring the Nor Cal hesh.

Smooth tunes by a local favorite.  Fri, 5/3, 6:30pm. Diamond  Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St.

FUNDRAISER CONCERT: Celebrate the  40th annual Endangered Species  Faire with performances by Stevie  Cook and Friends, Beyond The Pale,  Earth Band, and the Alice Peake  Experience.  Fri, 5/3, 7pm. $10-$12.  Chico Women›s Club, 592 E. Third St.,  891-6424.

THE KOOL SHIFTERS: Vintage country 

and blues you can dance to.  Fri, 5/3, 8:30pm. Feather Falls Casino &  Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

OPEN MIC: Bring an instrument, acoustic/electric guitar and drum set  available to use. Sign up at 7pm, all  ages welcome until 10pm.  Fri, 5/3, 7:30pm. $1. Down Lo, 319 Main St.,  513-4707.

PUB SCOUTS: Traditional Irish music  for happy hour.  Fri, 5/3, 4pm. $1.  Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St.

SPRING SENIOR DANCE: Fun dance  music from the 1950s to present  day with Soul Posse. Refreshments  will be available.  Fri, 5/3, 7pm. $8. 

Southside Community Center, 2959  Lower Wyandotte Road, Oroville.,  828-8040.

SUNDAY IRIS: Local folk duo per-

forms. Fri, 5/3, 6pm. Almendra  Winery & Distillery, 9275 Midway  Road, Durham.

TYLER DEVOLL: Soulful melodies 

to start the weekend.  Fri, 5/3, 4pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.  lasalleschico.com

ZACH WATERS BAND: Blues/rock trio 

from Sacramento.  Fri, 5/3, 9pm. $5.  Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave.

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THIS WEEK: FIND MORE ENTERTaINMENT aND SPECIaL EVENTS ON PaGE 26 ERIC PETER AND KEZIRAH: Relaxing 

tunes for the weekend.  Sat, 5/4, 6pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W.  Fourth St.

JAHNY WALLZ: Pop, rock and soul for  late night happy hour.  Sat, 5/4, 10pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

THE KOOL SHIFTERS: Vintage, country 

and blues you can dance to.  Sat, 5/4, 8:30pm. Feather Falls Casino & 

VELVET STARLINGS VIDEO-RELEASE PARTY: Star Wars-themed party  for band’s new video. Also, live  performances by Little Black Cloud  and The Walsh Brothers.  Sat, 5/4, 7pm. $5. 1078 Gallery, 1710 Park Ave.

YUPPIE LIBERATION FRONT: Grooveoriented jazz quartet joined by the  Shigemi Zach Ethan Trio.  Sat, 5/4, 8pm. $7-$12. Tender Loving Coffee,  365 E. Sixth St., 433-0414.

8WEDNESDay

OPEN MIC COMEDY: Your weekly 

Wednesday dose of free comedy  with experienced and first-time  comedians. Signups start at  8pm.  Wed, 5/8, 9pm. Studio Inn  Lounge, 2582 Esplanade.

THE ROCKETZ: Three-piece power 

rockabilly group with special guests  iHorrible and Jimmy Reno & The  Re-Notes.  Wed, 5/8, 8:30pm. $7. The  Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

SOUL POSSE: Fun dance music from 

the 1950s to present day.  Wed, 5/8, 6pm. Red Tavern, 1250 Esplanade.

Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

NOCHE LATINA: Banda La 8tava  Maravilla album release party  with Junior’s and DJ Lil 50 and DJ  Hec$.  Sat, 5/4, 8pm. $20. El Rey  Theater, 520-3676.

THE PUMP AND DUMP SHOW: Raucous 

4SaTURDay

BLACKOUT BETTY: High-energy, high-

octane rock from local favorite.  Sat, 5/4, 9pm. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave.

CONDOR: Chico Area Punks presents  thrash metal band from France,  joined by Sacramento’s Class  System and locals The Choice and  Rogue Squadron. All ages.  Sat, 5/4, 8pm. $7. Ike’s Place, 648 W. Fifth St.

DRINK, TALK, LEARN: Sign up to give  3-minute PowerPoint presentation 

MaRIaCHI MIXTECO DE CHICO Saturday, May 4 Duffy’s Tavern SEE SaTURDay to a bar full of people. There will be  awards and penalties, witty banter  is encouraged.  Sat, 5/4, 7pm.   The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.   maltesebarchico.com

DRIVER: Early Cinco de Mayo party  with local classic rock, rhythm and  blues band.  Sat, 5/4, 9pm. Studio Inn  Lounge, 2582 Esplanade.

evening of comedy and music  designed for parents who want to  laugh and remember what it was  like before having kids.  Sat, 5/4, 8pm. $25-$45. Gold Country Casino  & Hotel, 4020 Olive Highway, Oroville.

ROBBER’S ROOST: Swing-time, ragfolk band from Washington joined  by Crow Cavalier and the Boulder  Creek Bandits. All ages.  Sat, 5/4, 7pm. The Spirit, 2360 Oro Quincy  Highway, Oroville.

TRUE WILLIE: Tribute to the legend’s 

life and music.  Sat, 5/4, 9:30pm. $5.  Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3  Alverda Drive, Oroville.

5SUNDay

DEAD THRALL: Oregon metal band  joined by Ancient Burials,  Aberrance, and Bullet Lobotomy  for a full night of thrashing. All  ages.  Sun, 5/5, 7pm. $10. The Spirit,  2360 Oro Quincy Highway, Oroville.

OPEN MIC COMEDY NIGHT: Working on  a bit? See if it’s a hit or heckleworthy. Signups start at 8pm.  Sun, 5/5, 9pm. The Maltese, 1600 Park  Ave. maltesebarchico.com

TWINKLE WITH THE STARS CONCERT: Paradise Symphony Orchestra  performs works by Mozart,  Copeland and John Williams.  Young Artist competition winners  featured.  Sun, 5/5, 7pm. $15-$20.  Paradise Performing Arts Center,  777 Nunneley Road, Paradise.

NaTURaL PHENOMENON A shining star of both theater and cabaret, Storm Large, is stopping through town on her Kiss! Kiss! Bang! Bang! tour tonight (May 2) at Chico State’s Harlen Adams Theatre. She and her band, Le Bonheur, will perform a diverse set of originals and classics in her signature unfiltered style. Be prepared for stage banter to make you blush and fiery renditions of your favorite hits from the Great American Songbook and Broadway.

M ay 2 , 2 0 1 9

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REEL WORLD FILM SHORTS Reviewers: Bob Grimm and Juan-Carlos Selznick.

Opening this week El Chicano

A superhero movie with an all-Hispanic cast, starring Raúl Castillo as an L.A. detective who changes into the masked El Chicano to hunt down members of a dangerous drug cartel. Cinemark 14. Rated R.

The Intruder

A psychological thriller about a married couple (Michael Ealy and Meagan Good) being terrorized by the previous owner (Dennis Quaid) of the Napa Valley dream home they just purchased. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

To infinity … and beyond

Little Woods

A modern-day western starring Lily James and Tessa Thompson as sisters facing impossible circumstances and the temptation of operating outside the law to overcome their crises. Pageant Theatre. Rated R.

An excellent conclusion to one saga in the Marvel Cinematic Universe

TAvengers: grandiose chapter with the 22nd film of the series, Endgame. It’s a fitting successor to last year’s he Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) gets its most

Avengers: Infinity War and a gift to those of us who like our movies with super-heroes in them. by When last we saw Tony Stark/ Bob Grimm Iron Man (Robert Downey Jr.), he had just survived the dreaded finger bg r i mm@ newsrev i ew.c om snap of cosmic supervillain Thanos (Josh Brolin), a universe-altering occurrence that took out half its living creatures and provided for the tear-jerking moment when SpiderMan (Tom Holland) and many othAvengers: ers turned to dust. Endgame Endgame picks up where that Starring Robert Downey Jr., Josh film left off, with Stark floating in Brolin, Scarlett space and recording a video journal Johansson, Chris of his seemingly inevitable demise. Evans and Brie Larson. Captain America (Chris Evans), Directed by Anthony and Joe Russo. Black Widow (Scarlett Johansson), Rated PG-13. the Hulk (Mark Ruffalo), Thor (Chris Hemsworth) and Rocket the raccoon (voice of Bradley Cooper) are among the superhero survivors who are having to deal with the repercussions of so much death on Earth. There are tons of questions this movie needed to answer: Is everybody really dead? Where’s Thanos? Where’s Hawkeye (Jeremy Renner)? Is Tony Stark doomed in space? What’s been going on with Ant-Man (Paul Rudd) during all of this? Does Star-Lord (Chris Pratt) still have his Walkman in the great beyond? And, how can I really talk about anything specific in this film without becoming the Spoiler King? I can say that the movie answers many of the questions everyone’s been asking, and more, thanks to another well-balanced screenplay and a crack directorial job from the team of Anthony and Joe Russo. When you leave Endgame, your belly will be

4

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M AY 2 , 2 0 1 9

Long Shot

full of cinematic satisfaction. I can also tell you that the movie borrows a lot from Back to the Future Part II, and that the Hulk undergoes a fantastic wardrobe change. Despite a three-hour running time, all of this zips by in spectacularly entertaining fashion and very rarely misses the mark. There are a few moments when it’s evident that all of the stars on screen weren’t filmed at the same time in the same place. This is a forgivable offense. No chance you are going to get this many characters into one room together without the help of CGI. In the midst of all the action, Downey Jr. delivers another soulful, endearing performance, well beyond anything you would’ve expected from a Marvel movie before he started showing up in them. Evans continues to rock, and Hemsworth and Ruffalo explore even more humorous variations of their characters. Are the Marvel movies anywhere near over with Endgame? Don’t be silly. This is just the end of “The Infinity Saga” portion of the MCU. James Gunn just got his job back as the director/commander of the Guardians of the Galaxy series, Captain Marvel is just getting started, and Spider-Man: Far From Home will be in theaters in just a couple of months (July 2). That’s not even counting the other Marvel Studios ventures, such as the non-MCU X-Men franchise, which has two new features scheduled to come out before year’s end—Dark Phoenix (June 2) and The New Mutants (Aug. 2). Have some of the more popular story arcs within the Universe reached their conclusions? Maybe. I’m not telling. Set aside an eighth of one of your days and sit yourself down at the theater and get some answers. Ω

1 2 3 Poor

Fair

Good

4 Very Good

5 Excellent

Seth Rogen stars as an unemployed journalist who gets hired as a speechwriter by his first crush (Charlize Theron)—who is now U.S. secretary of state and a presidential candidate—sparking an unexpected romance. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

UglyDolls

A superstar cast—including Kelly Clarkson, Nick Jonas, Janelle Monáe and Pitbull— provides the voices for this computeranimated musical based on the UglyDolls line of plush toys. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

Now playing

2

Avengers: Endgame

See review this issue. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13 —B.G.

Breakthrough

A Christian faith-based film based on the 2017 biography The Impossible, a true-life story of a mother’s faith being put to work in service of her teen son who falls through

the ice of a frozen lake and ends up in a coma. Cinemark 14. Rated PG.

2

Captain Marvel

Despite the fact that she’s playing a superhero who has the power to shoot electrical bursts from her hands, Brie Larson’s Captain Marvel suffers from a disappointing lack of energy. Larson’s turn as the title character, aka Carol Danvers (aka Vers), is plagued by lethargy and bizarre line deliveries, and she gives off a detached vibe that she doesn’t want to be in the movie. Had the film around her been really good, the lead’s bored disposition might’ve been forgiven, but this cosmic superhero origin story and intergalactic war movie is also riddled with some haphazard storytelling and awful special effects. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13 —B.G.

The Curse of La Llorna

A social worker and her children are haunted by an evil ghost. The sixth film in The Conjuring Universe series of films (The Conjuring, Annabelle, The Nun, etc.) that are adapted from real-life paranormal investigation cases. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

1

Dumbo

The decline of Tim Burton continues with this wasteful remake of the 1941 animated classic that amounts to one big nothing—for kids and adults alike. The original was a little more than an hour long, while this one lasts for nearly two hours that feel like 40. A bunch of unnecessary subplots and added characters take away time from one of the lone bright spots, the title character, an admittedly cute CGI achievement. Instead of the original’s Timothy Q. Mouse, we get the requisite precocious children, one of them played by Thandie Newton’s daughter, Nico Parker, who absolutely cannot act. Colin Farrell appears as Holt, the precocious kids’ dad, and like most of the human actors in this movie, he seems lost. And V.A. Vandevere, the villain of the film, is played by Michael Keaton, who is at his sneering worst. Cinemark 14. Rated PG —B.G.

Shazam!

The first big-screen treatment of the classic DC Comics character, the alter ego of troubled teen Billy Batson (played by Asher Angel), who turns into a buff adult (Zachery Levi) full of superpowers when exclaims, “Shazam!” Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13.

El Chicano


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Sandwiches, Wraps & Salads

Come for the chips and salsa, stay for the atmosphere

M late at night, half an hour before it closed, and all I ordered was chips and salsa and a 32-ounce bomber

y first trip to La Perla Taqueria Mexican Grill was

of Pacifico. I’ve been half a dozen times since and even if I’d never tasted any of the restaurant’s other fine menu options, I would go back story and photo by just for the tortilla chips. They are Jason Cassidy delicately crispy and a little greasy, and are kept in a big stainless-steel j aso nc@ self-serve warmer (refills are free) newsrev i ew.c om next to a cold bar stocked with a La Perla nice assortment of salsas and pickled Taqueria vegetables. Washing down the salt and Mexican Grill 450 Broadway spices with a cold beer and sitting 487-7075 among the other diners winding Hours: Open 8:30 down at the end of a long day made a.m.-10 p.m. (until for a memorable scene. During 11 p.m. Fridays and subsequent visits, the welcoming Saturdays) atmosphere has sold me on La Perla as much as anything else. The restaurant opened last September in the spot where (the excellent and under-appreciated) Enjoy Teriyaki used to be, and the place has been completely revamped. The new owners opened the space up with exposed ceilings, polished concrete floors and, best of all, they removed the giant posters that had been pasted to all the windows, letting in wonderful natural light. Whenever I’ve visited—during lunch and dinner time—the place has been packed with an eclectic mix of people. With a variety of traditional and popular Mexican music on the sound system, and sports on TVs around the dining room, the taqueria is lively and social and a great fit for downtown. As for the food, the menu is enormous and wide-ranging, featuring everything from taqueria staples (tacos, burritos, enchiladas) to breakfast items (chilaquiles, huevos rancheros, etc.), to mixed seafood

cocktails (with octopus and shrimp). La Perla features an impressive selection of meats, with lengua (beef tongue), buche (pork stomach) and tripe in addition to the standards, and also offers fresh-squeezed orange and carrot juices, as well as wine, beer, wine margaritas and beer micheladas. The standouts for me so far have been the pork tacos—both pastor and carnitas—and the Mojarras a la Diabla (spicy tilapia). The street-style tacos with choice of meat, salsa, onions and cilantro on grilled corn tortillas are $1.99 each. The carnitas was especially tasty (though fairly salty), shredded and refried yet still tender. Mojarra plates are $12.99 (other options include plain, with garlic, and with grilled vegetables) and come with rice, refried beans, avocado, tomatoes and tortillas. The diabla option gets a healthy dose of mildly spicy tomato sauce ladled over the top of a whole fried tilapia. The skin on my fish was crisped nicely and the boney flesh was tender and enhanced greatly by the sauce and accompanying citrus—lime and orange slices—which brightened the flavor of the otherwise plain meat. The whole-fish plates are probably the most eyecatching items, but La Perla’s kitchen is obviously focused on presentation across the menu. Seafood cocktails come out in enormous clear goblets and all of the various plates and combos (ranging from $10.99 to $12.99) are impressive in their bountifulness. Other items I’ve tried include the chile relleno (with an incredible creamy red sauce), crunchy tacos (with meat, lettuce, cheese and pico de gallo) that weren’t as good as the soft, and the Alambre plate with carne asada, chorizo, grilled veggies and, best of all, a couple of mini cheese quesadillas. My only complaint is that the beef has been inconsistent—just flavorless carne asada on a couple of occasions. I’ll probably wait a while before I try beef there again. In the meantime, bring on the carnitas … and the chips and salsa! Ω

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Ma y 2, 2019

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ARTS DEVO by Jason Cassidy • jasonc@newsreview.com

The Beard I hate James Harden. That’s what arts dEVo is supposed to say. My

heart belongs to the sacramento Kings (I said, lifting my chin with pride after the team’s first respectable season in 13 years), and Harden plays for the Houston Rockets. But he’s also an artist who this season has changed the beautiful game forever, so as a basketball fan, I kind of love him, actually. I know this is an arts column, and it’s in the spirit of creation—of inventing something that the world hadn’t seen before someone dreamed it up— that I write about the man called The Beard and the revolution of movement he’s started with his mastery of the step-back three. I’m not exaggerating when I say “revolution.” His move is all over the sports pages and the lips of the talking heads. No less than the new yorker joined the discussion in January with a breathless essay by Thomas Beller titled “James Harden’s Transcendent Step-Back.” A step-back shot is, of course, nothing new. Everyone from Larry Bird to Arts DEVO has it in their arsenal. James Harden, artist. In an effort to evade the defender’s iMage courTeSy of devianTarT.coM/Michaelherradura outstretched arms, you simply take a step back and jump away from them as you shoot the ball. What Harden has done, however, to add an ingenious interpretation of an existing rule, the so-called “gathering provision,” which says that a player who is in motion and dribbling is allowed to finish their step when gathering the ball to shoot, then take another two steps before releasing the ball. You see it all the time on drives to the hoop. But Harden has taken that notion and gone backward, literally. Imagine it: long bushy beard, sleepy eyes … dribble, dribble, dribble, step back and gather, two more steps back, and now he’s in another time zone shooting. The best athletes on planet Earth literally trip over themselves giving chase, often fouling Harden on the way down. It’s an elegantly simple ballet, virtually unguardable, so new it looks wrong, and a revolution in the making.

STop rolling I got an email last week from Josh Garcia of Electric Plant

studios saying that the recording space has shut its doors. The collaboration between Garcia and longtime Chico audio engineer dale Price ran into finan-

cial roadblocks that forced the duo to call it quits as of April 1. About a year ago, the recording engineers had combined their two separate operations: Price moved his Electric Canyon studio from its Feather River Canyon location into Garcia’s former Energy Plant location in a warehouse on Highway 32 on the north side of town. According to Garcia, the pressures placed on their landlord by the county over “occupancy, usage and compliance of industrial spaces” made it unfeasible to continue operating a studio there. Garcia will still commute to the Bay Area to mix and produce records as well as run his local HeartBurn Records label with partner alex Kokkinakis. And Price will continue recording and doing live-sound work via his Pro sound audio services.

paradiSe queen in The race Got a tip this

week that one of the drag queens competing on this year’s RuPaul’s drag Race is from Butte County! Former Magalia resident and Paradise High School graduate Jesus Martinez lives in New York City now, performs as shuga Cain, and nine episodes into season 11 is still racing! The Maltese bar actually featured Shuga Cain on its stage in December—before participants for the show were announced—and every week the bar hosts a Drag Race viewing party. Tonight (May 2) is episode 10! So get down there and join the crowd (fun starts at 8 p.m.; show at 9 p.m.) and cheer on your local queen. Also, if you’re in the mood for a road trip, Shuga Cain is on tour and will be performing live at Badlands in Sacramento this Saturday (May 5).

Thank you,

CAMMIES sponsors (Sierra Nevada Brewing Co., Rape Crisis Intervention & Prevention), finale performers, and local-music fans who made the 2019 Chico Area Music Festival and Awards Show a huge success.

Additional thanks to those who contributed to the CN&R’s fundraiser. More than $1,700 was raised for the Music Around the Camp Fire Fund.

Winners of the 2019 CAMMIES: Peoples’ Choice Award: Best Local Act: Lo & Behold

Critics Choice Awards:

Best Female Vocalist: Jenise Coon Best Keyboardist: Webster Moore (Lo & Behold, Butcher Shop, Uncle Dads) Best Guitarist: Mike Justice (Sunny Acres) Best Songwriter: Becky Brown (Susurrus) Best New Band: Black Magnet Best Male Vocalist: Pat Hull Best Local Album: Pariah Days, by Severance Package

Best Bassist: Austin Farwell (Smokey the Groove) Best Live Act: Pervert Best Drummer: Sean Raeside (Pervert, Pat Hull) Local Badasses: Sally & Bruce MacMillan (Music Connection) Hogan/West/LaPado Lifetime Achievement Award: Joe Hammons

s i e m m a C CHICO AREA MUSIC FESTIVAL 2019

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY For the week oF May 2, 2019 ARIES (March 21-April 19): “How prompt we are to satisfy the hunger and thirst of our bodies; how slow to satisfy the hunger and thirst of our souls!” wrote Henry David Thoreau. Your first assignment in the coming days is to devote yourself to quenching the hunger and thirst of your soul with the same relentless passion that you normally spend on giving your body the food and drink it craves. This could be challenging. You may be less knowledgeable about what your soul thrives on than what your body loves. So your second assignment is to do extensive research to determine what your soul needs to thrive.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): I invite you to explore the frontiers of what’s possible for you to experience and accomplish. One exercise that might help: Visualize specific future adventures that excite you. Examples? Picture yourself parasailing over the Mediterranean Sea near Barcelona, or working to help endangered sea turtles in Costa Rica or giving a speech to a crowded auditorium on a subject you will someday be an expert in. The more specific your fantasies, the better. Your homework is to generate at least five of these visions.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “We must

choose between the pain of having to transcend oppressive circumstances, or the pain of perpetual unfulfillment within those oppressive circumstances,” writes mental health strategist Paul John Moscatello. We must opt for “the pain of growth or the pain of decay,” he continues. We must either “embrace the tribulations of realizing [our] potential, or consent to the slow suicide in complacency.” That’s a bit melodramatic, in my opinion. Most of us do both; we may be successful for a while in transcending oppressive circumstances, but then temporarily lapse back into the pain of unfulfillment. However, there are times when it makes sense to think melodramatically. And I believe now is one of those times for you. In the coming weeks, I hope you will set in motion plans to transcend at least 30 percent of your oppressive circumstances.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): You can

benefit from always having a fertility symbol somewhere in your environment— an icon or image that reminds you to continually refresh your relationship with your own abundant creativity; an inspiring talisman or toy that keeps you alert to the key role your fecund imagination can and should play in nourishing your quest to live a meaningful life; a provocative work of art that spurs you to always ask for more help and guidance from the primal source code that drives you to reinvent yourself. So if you don’t have such a fertility symbol, I invite you to get one. If you do, enhance it with a new accessory.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): I often speak to

you about your personal struggle for liberation and your efforts to express your soul’s code with ever more ingenuity and completeness. It’s less common that I address your sacred obligation to give back to life for all that life has given to you. I only infrequently discuss how you might engage in activities to help your community or work for the benefit of those less fortunate than you. But now is one of those times when I feel moved to speak of these matters. You are in a phase of your astrological cycle when it’s crucial to perform specific work in behalf of a greater good. Why crucial? Because your personal well-being in the immediate future depends in part on your efforts to intensify your practical compassion.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): “We are whiplashed between an arrogant overestimation of ourselves and a servile underestimation of ourselves,” writes educator Parker Palmer. That’s the bad news. The good news is that you are in prime position to escape from the whiplash. Cosmic forces are conspiring with your eternal soul to coalesce a well-balanced vision of your true value that’s free of both vain misapprehensions and self-deprecating

by rob brezsny delusions. Congrats! You’re empowered to understand yourself with a tender objectivity that could at least partially heal lingering wounds. See yourself truly!

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The country of

Poland awards medals to couples who have stayed married for 50 years. It also gives out medals to members of the armed forces who have served for at least 30 years. But the marriage medal is of higher rank and is more prestigious. In that spirit, I’d love for you to get a shiny badge or prize to acknowledge your devoted commitment to a sacred task—whether that commitment is to an intimate alliance, a noble quest or a promise to yourself. It’s time to reward yourself for how hard you’ve worked and how much you’ve given.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Scorpio

poet Sylvia Plath wrote, “I admit I desire, / Occasionally, some backtalk / From the mute sky.” You’ll be wise to borrow the spirit of that mischievous declaration. Now is a good time to solicit input from the sky, as well as from your allies and friends and favorite animals, and from every other source that might provide you with interesting feedback. I invite you to regard the whole world as your mirror, your counselor, your informant.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): In January 1493, Christopher Columbus was sailing his ship near the land we now call the Dominican Republic. He spotted three creatures he assumed were mermaids. Later he wrote in his log that they were “not half as beautiful as they are painted [by artists].” We know now that the “mermaids” were actually manatees, aquatic mammals with flippers and paddle-shaped tails. They are in fact quite beautiful in their own way, and would only be judged as homely by a person comparing them to mythical enchantresses. I trust you won’t make a similar mistake. Evaluate everything and everyone on their own merits, without comparing them to something they’re not.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “I

want what we all want,” writes novelist Jonathan Lethem. “To move certain parts of the interior of myself into the exterior world, to see if they can be embraced.” Even if you haven’t passionately wanted that lately, I’m guessing you will soon. That’s a good thing, because life will be conspiring with you to accomplish it. Your ability to express yourself in ways that are meaningful to you and interesting to other people will be at a peak.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Using

algorithms to analyze 300 million facts, a British scientist concluded that April 11, 1954 was the most boring day in history. A Turkish man who would later become a noteworthy engineer was born that day, and Belgium staged a national election. But that’s all. With this non-eventful day as your inspiration, I encourage you to have fun reminiscing about the most boring times in your own past. I think you need a prolonged respite from the stimulating frenzy of your daily rhythm. It’s time to rest and relax in the sweet luxury of nothingness and emptiness.

CN&R

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Call for a quote. (530) 894-2300 ext. 2

FBN Number: 2019-0000426 Published: April 11,18,25, May 2, 2019

Phone hours: M-F 9am-5pm. Deadlines for print: Line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Display ad deadline: Friday 2pm

All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. Further, the News & Review specifically reserves the right to edit, decline or properly classify any ad. Errors will be rectified by re-publication upon notification. The N&R is not responsible for error after the first publication. The N&R assumes no financial liability for errors or omission of copy. In any event, liability shall not exceed the cost of the space occupied by such an error or omission. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes full responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. *Nominal fee for some upgrades. Claudia’s Relaxing Massage 10am-7pm by appt. only 530-893-0263 You can Google me

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PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): “The Blue

Room” is a famous Picasso painting from 1901. Saturated with blue hues, it depicts a naked woman taking a bath. More than a century after its creation, scientists used X-rays to discover that there was an earlier painting beneath “The Blue Room” and obscured by it. It shows a man leaning his head against his right hand. Piscean poet Jane Hirshfield says that there are some people who are “like a painting hidden beneath another painting.” More Pisceans fit that description than any other sign of the zodiac. You may even be like a painting beneath a painting beneath a painting—to a depth of five or more paintings. Is that a problem? Not necessarily. But it is important to be fully aware of the existence of all the layers. Now is a good time to have a check-in.

www.RealAstrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888.

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CLASSIFIEDS

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS AIRLINE CAREERS begin here Get started by training as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Mainetenance 800-725-1563 (AAN CAN)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as IZZY’S ASPHALT SOLUTIONS at 2605 Burnap Avenue Chico, CA 95973. ISRAEL TAYLOR 2605 Burnap Avenue Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ISRAEL TAYLOR Dated: April 4, 2019

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as D AND J PROFESSIONAL MOVERS at 1621 Sheridan Avenue Chico, CA 95926. DAVID GLENN BRACY 1621 Sheridan Avenue Chico, CA 95926. JAMES RAYMOND DAVID ROBERTSON 26152 Walch Avenue Orland, CA 95963. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: JAMES ROBERTSON Dated: April 3, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000418 Published: April 11,18,25, May 2, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BIG 8 CONFERENCE at 666 Grafton Park Drive Chico, CA 95926. MICHAEL ALAN LIDDELL TRUSTEE OF BIG 7 CONFERENCE 666 Grafton Park Drive Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Trust. Signed: MIKE LIDDELL Dated: April 4, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000430 Published: April 25, May 2,9,16, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as MIDWAY VINTAGE UPCYCLED AND CONSIGN at 9379 Midway Durham, CA 95938. MELISSA ANN KAUTI 156 Cavalier Way Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: MELISSA KAUTI Dated: March 29, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000408 Published: April 18,25, May 2,9, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as IMPERIAL HOME INSPECTION SERVICES at 25 Vincent Lane Cohasset, CA 95973. TREVOR REED MAY 25 Vincent Lane Cohasset, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: TREVOR MAY Dated: April 9, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000458 Published: April 25, May 2,9,16, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following persons have abandoned the use of the fictitious business names DEVOLL MUSIC, DEVOLL at 2118 Laurel Street Chico, CA 95928. WILLIAM HEPWORTH 1145 Loser Ave Gridley, CA 95948.

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TYLER DEVOLL 2118 Laurel Street Chico, CA 95928. ANDREW LOESER 2400 McGie Street Chico, CA 95928. SCOTT CORY 476 Hoopa Circle Chico, CA 95926. REBECCA ANDRES 6343 Rd 200 Sp 71 Orland, CA 95963. This business was conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: REBECCA ANDRES Dated: April 8, 2019 FBN Number: 2017-0000799 Published: April 18,25, May 2,9, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as COMANCHE CREEK FARMS, HAND IN GARDEN INC at 200 Speedway Ave Chico, CA 95928. HAND IN GARDEN, INC. 260 Speedway Ave Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: SEAN MINDRUM OWNER Dated: April 5, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000442 Published: April 25, May 2,9,16, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following persons have abandoned the use of the fictitious business names COMANCHE CREEK FARMS, HAND IN GARDEN INC at 260 Speedway Avenue Chico, CA 95928. HAND IN GARDEN INC 260 Speedway Avenue Chico, CA 95928. JAMES GAYL MILLER 260 Speedway Avenue Chico, CA 95928. GWENDOLYM M MILLER 260 Speedway Avenue Chico, CA 95928. This business was conducted by a Corporation. Signed: JAMES G. MILLER PRESIDENT Dated: April 5, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000132 Published: April 25, May 2,9,16, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ALMOND ASPHALT MAINTENANCE at 1050 B Lisa Lane Paradise, CA 95969. DANIEL JOHNSON PO Box 564 Magalia, CA 95954. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: DANEL S JOHNSON Dated: April 8, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000447 Published: April 25, May 2,9,16, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following person has abandoned the use of the fictitious business name ALMOND ASPHALT MAINTENANCE at 1050B Lisa Lane Paradise, CA 95969. FREDRICK S. YANNER

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6644 Dolores Lane Paradise, CA 95969. This business was conducted by an Individual. Signed: FREDRICK S. YANNER Dated: April 8, 2019 FBN Number: 2016-0000242 Published: April 25, May 2,9,16, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following person has abandoned the use of the fictitious business name: MIDWAY VINTAGE UPCYCLED DESIGN & CONSIGN at 9379 Midway Durham, CA 95938. LORI RUPPEL 2121 Kennedy Avenue Chico, CA 95973. This business was conducted by an Individual. Signed: LORI RUPPEL Dated: March 29, 2019 FBN Number: 2016-0000434 Published: April 18,25, May 2,9, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as NORTH VALLEY HOME CARE at 2260 St George Ln Suite 2 Chico, CA 95928. CLEVERDON CARE SERVICES LLC 2590 California Park Drive #24 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: SPENCER C. ROGERS, PRESIDENT Dated: April 12, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000475 Published: April 25, May 2,9,16, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as NEAR AND DEAR BAKERY at 703 Salem St Apt B Chico, CA 95926. SYDNEY ANN CARROLL 703 Salem St Apt B Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: SYDNEY CARROLL Dated: April 15, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000481 Published: April 18,25, May 2,9, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as FEATHER RIVER CRAGS APARTMENTS at 1200 Washington Ave Oroville, CA 95965. JADE EHRET 261 Via Del Sol Vacaville, CA 95687. TODD ANTHONY GAYLORD 261 Via Del Sol Vacaville, CA 95687. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: TODD A. GAYLORD Dated: April 5, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000444 Published: April 25, May 2,9,16, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following persons have abandoned the use of the

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fictitious business name FEATHER RIVER CRAGS APARTMENTS at 1200 Washington Ave. Oroville, CA 95965. TODD GALYLORD 3120 Oak Rd, Apt 422 Walnut Creek, CA 94597. MARCUS BONESS 956 John Murray Way Folsom, CA 95630. This business was conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: TODD A. GAYLORD Dated: April 5, 2019 FBN Number: 2014-0001100 Published: April 25, May 2,9,16, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as HABANEROS TAQUERIA at 2156 Pillsbury Rd Chico, CA 95926. RAQUEL FIGUEROA RIZO 3549 Esplanade 420 Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: RAQUEL FIGUEROA Dated: March 21, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000361 Published: April 18,25, May 2,9, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as HAYDEN’S STUMP GRINDING at 4914 Pentz Road Paradise, CA 95969. WILLIAM H RITCHEY 4914 Pentz Road Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: WILLIAM H. RITCHEY Dated: April 4, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000427 Published: April 25, May 2,9,16, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as THE MAST FAMILY RANCH at 12269 1/2 Andy Mtn. Road Oroville, CA 95965. SANDRA H MAST 1090 Dundee Ave Ben Lomond, CA 95005. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: SANDRA H. MAST Dated: March 29, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000405 Published: April 25, May 2,9,16, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BOYD SOAPS AND DESIGNS at 443 Stilson Canyon Road Chico, CA 95928. LIZZIE MCDONALD 443 Stilson Canyon Road Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: LIZZIE MCDONALD Dated: April 11, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000468 Published: April 25, May 2,9,16, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CHICO FLIGHT TRAINING at 900 Fortress St Chico, CA 95973. GLOBAL AVIATION CENTER

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INC 702 Mangrove Ave Ste 335 Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: DUANE PONTIUS, CEO Dated: April 9, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000457 Published: April 25, May 2,9,16, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as PARADISE TINY HOMES, TINY PARADISE at 1321 W. 7th St. Chico, CA 95928. JAMIE MARIE AUSTIN 11911 Hwy 70 E Lenoir City, TN 37772. RANDAL WHEELER AUSTIN 11911 Hwy 70 E Lenoir City, TN 37772. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: RANDAL WHEELER AUSTIN Dated: March 25, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000384 Published: April 25, May 2,9,16, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BLOOM PORTRAITURE, STEWART AND CULLEN PHOTOGRAPHY, TREATS FOR UNICORNS at 1155 Ceres Manor Ct Chico, CA 95926. WENDY STEWART 1155 Ceres Manor Ct Chico, CA 95926. WEDNY STEWART PHOTOGRAPHY, LLC 1155 Ceres Manor Ct Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: WENDY STEWART, OWNER Dated: March 21, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000366 Published: May 2,9,16,23, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CAMP FARETA GUINEA at 4944 Will T Road Chico, CA 95973. IMELDA MIRANDA MATA 4944 Will T Road Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: IMELDA MATA Dated: April 17, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000503 Publsihed: May 2,9,16,23, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CHICO TRUE VALUE, HOLIDAY POOLS RETAIL AND SERVICE at 230 West Ave Chico, CA 95926. GAAMA ENTERPRISES, INC. 971 East Ave Ste C Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: GARY POWERS, PRESIDENT Dated: April 17, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000495 Published: May 2,9,16,23, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as HILLSKEMPER

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CONSTRUCTION at 620 Lakeridge Dr Lake Almanor, CA 96137. BRIAN HILLSKEMPER 620 Lakeridge Dr Lake Almanor, CA 96137. This business is conducted by an Indivdual. Signed: BRIAN HILLSKEMPER Dated: April 18, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000507 Published: May 2,9,16,23, 2019

CODY HOISER 2431 El Paso Way Chico, CA 95926. ANGELA PEACOCK 3441 Hackamore Ln Chico, CA 95973. This business was conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: CLAUDIA VALLE Dated: April 5, 2019 FBN Number: 2018-0000983 Published: May 2,9,16,23, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as SKYVIEW AG DATA at 230 C Walnut St 115 Chico, CA 95928. JOHN MCKNIGHT 2709 Illinois Ave Corning, CA 96021. JOSEPH SANTOS MENDONCA 230 C Walnut St 115 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: JOE MENDONCA Dated: April 23, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000526 Published: May 2,9,16,23, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ELIJO’AN PUBLISHING, NORTH STATE EDITING, TE CHING at 466 Panama Avenue Chico, CA 95973. LYNN MARIE TOSELLO 466 Panama Avenue Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: LYNN MARIE TOSELLO Dated: April 17, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000502 Published: May 2,9,16,23, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as HEEL AND SOLE SHOES at 708 Mangrove Ave Chico, CA 95926. ADRIANA COVARRUBIAS 1197 Ravenshoe Way Chico, CA 95973. GLORIA COVARRUBIAS 2366 Alba Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: GLORIA COVARRUBIAS Dated: April 11, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000470 Published: May 2,9,16,23, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as NORTH VALLEY WATER MANAGEMENT at 15317 Forest Ranch Way Forest Ranch, CA 95942. JODY LYNN CORNILSEN 15317 Forest Ranch Way Forest Ranch, CA 95942. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JODY L. CORNILSEN Dated: April 10, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000460 Published: May 2,9,16,23, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ALLIANCE APIARIES at 1009 Raven Lane Chico, CA 95926. TIMOTHY DANIEL HILL 1009 Raven Lane Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: TIMOTHY HILL Dated: April 18, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000508 Published: May 2,9,16,23, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following persons have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name NORTH STATE NATIONALS at 14 Westerdahl Ct Chico, CA 95973. CLAUDIA VALLE 14 Westerdahl Ct Chico, CA 95973.

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as LIVING LIGHT MICRO FARM at 1387 Hawthorne Ave Chico, CA 95926. CRAIG ALAN PERRY 1387 Hawthorne Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: CRAIG PERRY Dated: April 26, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000541 Published: May 2,9,16,23, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as THE CREATIVE COYOTE at 5250 Mallard Estates Road Chico, CA 95973. LYNETTE CORNING 5250 Mallard Estates Road Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: LYNETTE CORNING Dated: April 19, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000516 Published: May 2,9,16,23, 2019

NOTices NOTICE OF LIEN SALE Pursuant to CA. Business Code 21700, in lieu of rents due, the following units contain tools, electronics, furniture, clothes, furniture, boxes, personal items, recreation equipment and tools. Unit A5 NICOLE GARCIA personal items, furniture, boxes etc. Unit A8 DAVID BRAZIL personal items, furniture, boxes etc. Unit A10 JENNIFER MAYNARD personal items, boxes, tools, bikes etc. Unit A11 LORRANIE ROSSON personal items, boxes, home furnishings etc. Unit A14 STEVEN SMITH personal items, boxes, electronics etc. Unit A18 VANESSA WADE personal items, boxes etc. Unit B6 TIFFANY BARNES personal items, boxes electronics etc. Unit B11 CHRISTOPHER HARRISON personal items, boxes, tools etc. Unit D4 JUSTIN STRAEDE

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personal items, boxes, home furnishings etc. Unit D7 SUSAN GANNON personal items, boxes, furniture etc. Unit D12 SUSAN GANNON personal items, boxes, funiture etc. Unit E7 TRINA WASHBURN personal items, boxes electronics etc. Unit F5 ARAUJO ALEXANDER TRINA WASHBURN personal items, boxes etc. Unit F11 TAMBRA HEIDRICH personal items, boxes etc. Contents to be sold to the highest bidder on: Saturday May 11, 2019. Beginning at 3:00 P.M. Sale to be held at: George’s Mini Storage 2701 Burnap Avenue Chico CA. 95973. (530) 960-6010 Published: April 25, May 2, 2019

NOTICE OF LIEN SALE Pursuant to CA. Business Code 21700, in lieu of rents due, the following units contain tools, electronics, furniture, clothes, furniture, boxes, personal items, recreation equipment and tools. Unit 1 JASON GERMAN personal items, furniture, boxes etc. Unit 5 ANITA TRABUCCO personal items, boxes, furniture etc. Unit 7 JOSEPH BELL personal items, boxes, tools, bikes etc. Unit 8 DAVID GUTERREZ personal items, boxes, home furnishings etc. Unit 23, 24 SUSAN JOHNSON personal items, boxes etc. Unit 30 DAVID YOUNG personal items, boxes, electronics etc. Unit 31 NICHOLAS CORTEZ personal items, boxes electronics etc. Unit 32 DUSTIN BARNEWOLT personal items, boxes, tools etc. Contents to be sold to the highest bidder on: Saturday May 11, 2019. Beginning at 1:00 P.M. Sale to be held at: George’s Mini Storage 2801 Burnap Avenue Chico CA. 95973. (530) 960-6010 Published: April 25, May 2, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner MONIQUE MARIE RICHARD filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: MONIQUE MARIE RICHARD Proposed name: MONIQUE SOL SONOQUIE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 29, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM

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Dept: TBA Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: March 28, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00964 Published: April 11,18,25, May 2, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner SALGADO filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: SALGADO Proposed name: ENER ALFRED PICO THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 22, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: April 3, 2019 Case Number: 19CV01005 Published: April 11,18,25, May 2, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner VERONICA VALENZUELA NAVARRETE filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: AIDEN MARTINEZ Proposed name: AIDEN MARTINEZ VALENZUELA THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 22, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928

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Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: March 28, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00931 Published: April 25, May 2,9,16, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner RODGER SHORT filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: RODGER SHORT Proposed name: JERRY RODGER SHORT THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: June 5, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: April 12, 2019 Case Number: 19CV01144 Published: May 2,9,16,23, 2019

PeTiTiON NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE LAWRENCE JAMES CAMPBELL, aka LAWRENCE J. CAMPBELL To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: LAWRENCE JAMES CAMPBELL, also known as LAWRENCE J. CAMPBELL A Petition for Probate has been filed by: KITTIYA K. CAMPBELL in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: KITTIYA K. CAMPBELL be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to

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the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: May 14, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: PR Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: VANESSA J. SUNDIN Sundin Law Office 341 Broadway Street, Ste. 302 Chico, CA 95928 (530) 342-2452 Case Number: 19PR00112 Published: April 18,25, May 2, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE CLIFFORD ALLEN FRAZIER To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: CLIFFORD ALLEN FRAZIER A Petition for Probate has been filed by: DANE FRAZIER in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: DANE FRAZIER be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court.

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The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: May 21, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: TBD Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: MARK JOHNSON 2531 Forest Avenue, Suite 100 Chico, CA 95928 (530) 345-6801 Case Number: 19PR00159 Dated: April 8, 2019 Published: April 18,25, May 2, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE CHARLES ARTHUR HIGGS III aka CHARLES A. HIGGS III To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: CHARLES ARTHUR HIGGS III aka CHARLES A. HIGGS III A Petition for Probate has been filed by: REBECCA A. KOSAK in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate

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requests that: REBECCA A. KOSAK be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: May 14, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: 10 Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: RAOUL J. LECLERC P.O. Drawer 111 Oroville, CA 95965 (530) 533-5661 Dated: April 10, 2019 Case Number: 19PR00167 Published: April 18,25, May 2, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE CRAIG AARON LUOTO To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors,

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and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: CRAIG AARON LUOTO A Petition for Probate has been filed by: KAREN ALEXANDER in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: KAREN ALEXANDER be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: May 14, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: RICHARD S. MATSON Richard S. Matson Law Office, Inc. 1342 The Esplanade, Suite A Chico, CA 95926 (530) 343-5373

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Dated: April 10, 2019 Case Number: 19PR00165 Published: April 18,25, May 2, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE HEIDI PRIVETT CASTRO To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: HEIDI PRIVETT CASTRO A Petition for Probate has been filed by: CHRISTINA LEE NELSON in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: CHRISTINA LEE NELSON be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: May 14, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition

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or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: PETER P. VLAUTIN, III 1020 Suncast Lane Ste 101 El Dorado Hills, CA 95762 (916) 36-9734 Dated: April 10, 2019 Case Number: 19PR00160 Published: April 25, May 2,9, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE JACK W. DAWSON, also known as JACK WILLIAM DAWSON To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: JACK W. DAWSON, also known as JACK WILLIAM DAWSON A Petition for Probate has been filed by: TERESA L. DAWSON in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: TERESA L. DAWSON be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: May 21, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your

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rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: NICOLE R. PLOTTEL 466 Vallombrosa Ave Chico, CA 95926 (530) 893-2882 Dated: April 10, 2019 Case Number: 19PR00184 Published: April 25, May 2,9, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE JOHN DAVID BENNETT aka JOHN D. BENNETT aka JOHN BENNETT To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: JOHN DAVID BENNETT aka JOHN D. BENNETT aka JOHN BENNETT a petition for Probate has been filed by: in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: MARIANNA S. BARRY be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: June 4, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: TBA Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California

this Legal Notice continues

Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: DANA L. CAMPBELL, ESQ. Tyree & Campbell, LLP 1600 Humboldt Road, Suite 4 Chico, CA 95928. (530) 894-2100 Case Number: 19PR00174 Dated: April 16, 2019 Published: May 2,9,16, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE CONNIE MARGARET LAUDER aka CONNIE LAUDER To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: CONNIE MARGARET LAUDER aka CONNIE LAUDER A Petition for Probate has been filed by: VERONICA L. STRAUSS in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: VERONICA L. STRAUSS be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: May 28, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: 10 Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney.

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IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: RAOUL J. LECLERC P.O. Drawer 111 Oroville, CA 95965 (530) 533-5661 Dated: April 23, 2019 Case Number: 18PR00398 Published: May 2,9,16, 2019

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“Can I buy some burn lots in Paradise?” asked John Briscoe, a contractor from the Bay Area. “You can,” said Mike, a local Realtor, “but it’s complicated.” “Are there any lots for sale?” asked Briscoe. “Yes,” said Mike, “but…” “Then how complicated can it be?” said Briscoe. “I want to buy Paradise lots, and you have some for sale. That doesn’t sound too complicated.” Realtor Mike looked over at me and shrugged his shoulders.

3419 Hackamore Lane, cHico Looking for a great home with a large lot, in-ground pool, covered patio, fruit trees, RV Parking and an open floor plan? Look no further than 3419 Hackamore Lane, Chico. Asking price $450,000. Brad Smith realtor Century 21 SeleCt real eState, inC 530.894.4533 530.321.4825

I said to Briscoe, “We’ve been trying to get a straight story from FEMA, and Butte County, and insurance companies, on what kind of liability a buyer or seller take on if they close before the lot clearing and debris removal is finished.” “I hear lot clearing could take a year where I’m looking,” said Briscoe. “Could be,” said Mike. “Out of the question!” said Briscoe. “I hear there are good deals right now, and I don’t want to miss my chance!”

This situation repeats itself in the real estate world these days. Builder buyers are ready to get into the Paradise construction market, but before the lot clearing and debris removal is finished, there could be problems. We’ve been day-by-day, trying to nail this stuff down. Mike handed Briscoe a copy of a new disclosure form we just created to be signed by any client who buys or sells a lot in the Camp Fire “burn scar area” if they intend to close escrow before the lot clearing is done. I said to Briscoe, “We have been told that if an owner sells their lot, FEMA might void their agreement to clear the lot, which costs thousands of dollars. We’ve also been told that an owner’s insurance company might not cover the portion of their policy which must be paid to FEMA as part of the lot clearing agreement. We’ve also been told the buyer might be responsible for the lot clearing bill later, if we close escrow now. That’s what that disclosure form is all about.” “So, I can sign this form, and take my chances?” He looked at us, one to the other. “But you don’t think I should.” Mike said, “We call it the ‘You’re Crazy’ form.”

Doug Love is Sales Manager at Century 21 in Chico. Call 530-680-0817 or email dougwlove@gmail.com License #950289

Homes are Selling in Your Neighborhood Shop every home for sale at www.C21SelectGroup.com

530.345.6618 New ListiNg!

2 bed 2 bath Condo in Chico in a great area. $167,500 1.59 acre double lot with beautiful valley and canyon views. $120,000

3419 Hackamore Lane

4412 County Rd P Orland 3.83 acres, 3/2 house, large shop, mandarin orchard

4/2 Large yard with a pool. Fruit trees abound. RV parking, Must see! ($450,000)

$439,000

676 El Varano Way

Cute 3/1 with fresh paint and a newer AC unit. Nice yard with lots of opportunity. ($249,000)

Alice Zeissler | 530.518.1872

Brad smith | 530.894.4533 DRE #02032624

DRE #01312354

Homes Sold Last Week ADDRESS

TOWN

3263 Summit Ridge Ter 4243 Magness Ct 37 Arminta Ct 19 Five Iron Ct 3171 Cinder Creek Dr 1240 Banning Park Dr 2616 Lakewest Dr 443 Middle Creek Ct 15 Herlax Cir 743 Windham Way 257 Picholine Way

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico

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M ay 2 , 2 0 1 9

PRICE

BR/BA

$827,000 $800,000 $686,500 $660,000 $659,000 $610,000 $601,000 $600,000 $590,000 $549,000 $505,000

3/3 4/3 3/3 4/3 4/4 4/3 3/3 4/3 4/3 4/2 3/3

Newly listed!

Westside property, 65 acre lot, has vintage farmhouse with guest cottage. 3207 sq ft. $599k. Don’t wait!

Jennifer Parks | 530.864.0336 BRE# 01269667

Sponsored by Century 21 Select Real Estate, Inc. SQ. FT. 2620 2839 2258 2627 2802 2309 2530 2172 2195 2357 2055

ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

562 Morgan Dr 1615 Meadow Rd 2370 England St 49 Brenda Dr 1676 Park View Ln 82 Cottage Ave 325 W Frances Willard Ave 2252 Holly Ave 1030 Cordelia Ct 1600 Arcadian Ave 449 Black Oak Dr

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico

$503,500 $495,000 $469,000 $465,000 $450,000 $429,000 $425,000 $425,000 $420,000 $410,000 $406,000

3/2 3/2 5/3 3/2 3/2 4/3 3/2 3/2 3/2 6/3 3/2

SQ. FT. 2538 2115 1628 1776 1616 2104 1584 1402 1621 2025 1472


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How Much is Your Home Worth Today? Ask the Professionals at Century 21 Select

530.345.6618 | www.C21SelectGroup.com Open HOuse

NEW LISTINGS COMING!

Teresa Larson (530) 899-5925 DRE #01177950 chiconativ@aol.com

Many new listings are coming very soon, Chico condo, Chico homes, Durham/home with acreage. Keep an eye on this ad for more information.

6ac Creekside on Butte Creek $249,000 3.4 ac, well, septic & power in place $98,500 2 bed 2 bath, Senior Park $99,900 Duplex! 1 bed 1 bath each $325,000

Sat. 11am-2pm. $1,100 washer/ dryer credit this weekend only! 14855 Klamath Ct, magalia

$269,900

CalDRE #02056059

Olivia Larrabee l (530) 520-3169 Olivia.Larrabee@c21selectgroup.com

Mark Reaman l (530) 228-2229 Lic# 01265853

Mark.Reaman@c21selectgroup.com

The following houses were sold in Butte County by real estate agents or private parties during the week of April 15- April 19, 2019 The housing prices are based on the stated documentary transfer tax of the parcel and may not necessarily reflect the actual sale price of the home. ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

50 Lexington Dr 29 Pebblewood Pines Dr 934 Downing Ave 1424 Heather Cir 16 Hillsboro Cir 918 Ivy St 192 Tonea Way 726 Bidwell Dr 935 Bartlett St 110 Terrace Dr 823 Oak Lawn Ave 752 E 1st Ave

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico

$400,000 $395,000 $390,000 $360,000 $342,000 $305,000 $305,000 $305,000 $300,000 $299,500 $292,000 $288,000

3/2 2/2 3/2 3/1 3/2 4/2 3/2 3/1 5/3 3/1 3/2 2/1

SQ. FT. 1374 1559 1318 1330 1248 1390 1510 1040 2112 1121 1156 984

ADDRESS 675 E 18th St 570 East Ave 13891 Garner Ln 2860 Beaumont Ave 239 Eagle Nest Dr 142 Riverview Dr 6901 Lower Wyandotte Rd 5280 Beverly Glen Ave 6477 Alexander Ct 206 Redbud Dr 1066 Kindig Dr

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Oroville Oroville Paradise Paradise Paradise Paradise

$269,000 $269,000 $200,000 $177,273 $110,000 $591,818 $500,000 $700,000 $496,000 $485,000 $465,000

3/1 3/2 3/3 3/2 2/4 3/3 3/3 5/6 3/3 3/2 3/3

Ma y 2, 2019

SQ. FT. 1117 1260 1555 1628 3442 2793 2092 4093 2059 2187 1794

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