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CHICO’S FREE NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY VOLUME 42, ISSUE 35 THURSDAY, APRIL 25, 2019 WWW.NEWSREVIEW.COM

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DISASTER ECONOMY

POT PENALTIES

CAMP FIRE ART SHOW


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CN&R

INSIDE

Vol. 42, Issue 35 • April 25, 2019 OPINION

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Editorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Guest Comment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Second & Flume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 This Modern World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Streetalk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

NEWSLINES

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Downstroke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Sifter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9

HEALTHLINES

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Appointment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Weekly Dose. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

GREENWAYS

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Eco Event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS

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15 Minutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 The Goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

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COVER STORY

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ARTS & CULTURE

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Arts Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 This Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Fine Arts listings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Nightlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Reel World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Chow. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Arts DEVO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Brezsny’s Astrology . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47

CLASSIFIEDS

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REAL ESTATE

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ON THE COVER: DESIGN BY TINA FLYNN

Our Mission: To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. Editor Melissa Daugherty Managing Editor Meredith J. Cooper Arts Editor Jason Cassidy Contributing Editor Evan Tuchinsky Staff Writer Ashiah Scharaga Calendar Editor Neesa Sonoquie Contributors Robin Bacior, Alastair Bland, Michelle Camy, Vic Cantu, Nate Daly, Charles Finlay, Bob Grimm, Howard Hardee, Miles Jordan, Mark Lore, Landon Moblad, Brie Oviedo, Ryan J. Prado, Juan-Carlos Selznick, Ken Smith, Robert Speer, Carey Wilson Managing Art Director Tina Flynn Creative Services Manager Elisabeth Bayard-Arthur Ad Designers Naisi Thomas, Cathy Arnold Publications Designers Katelynn Mitrano, Nikki Exerjian Director of Sales and Advertising Jamie DeGarmo Advertising Services Coordinator Ruth Alderson Senior Advertising Consultants Brian Corbit, Laura Golino Advertising Consultants Adam Lew, Jordon Vernau

President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Director of Nuts & Bolts Deborah Redmond Director of People & Culture David Stogner Director of Dollars & Sense Debbie Mantoan Nuts & Bolts Ninja Norma Huerta Payroll/AP Wizard Miranda Hansen Accounts Receivable Specialist Analie Foland Developer John Bisignano System Support Specialist Kalin Jenkins N&R Publications Managing Editor Laura Hillen N&R Publications Associate Editor Derek McDow N&R Publications Writers Anne Stokes, Thea Rood Marketing & Publications Consultants Greta Beekhuis, Steve Caruso, Joseph Engle, Elizabeth Morabito, Traci Hukill, Celeste Worden 353 E. Second St., Chico, CA 95928 Phone (530) 894-2300 Fax (530) 892-1111 Website newsreview.com Got a News Tip? (530) 894-2300, ext 2224 or chiconewstips@newsreview.com Calendar Events cnrcalendar@newsreview.com Calendar Questions (530) 894-2300, ext. 2243 Want to Advertise? Fax (530) 892-1111 or cnradinfo@newsreview.com Classifieds (530) 894-2300, press 2 or classifieds@newsreview.com Job Opportunities jobs@newsreview.com Want to Subscribe to CN&R? chisubs@newsreview.com Editorial Policies: Opinions expressed in CN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons, or other portions of the paper. CN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or review materials. Email letters to cnrletters@newsreview.com. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form and to edit them for libel.

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APRIL 25, 2019

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OPINION

Send guest comments, 340 words maximum, to gc@newsreview.com or to 353 E. Second St., Chico, CA 95928. Please include photo & short bio.

SECOND & FLUME

EDITORIAL

Countless lives lost in the shuffle Eighty-five people died as a direct result of the Camp

Fire. But that’s not the end of the story—far from it. The wildfire also is indirectly responsible for the deaths of many others, including frail elderly folks and people who already were medically fragile. The effects of the fire—smoke and stress, for example—sent them into a downward health spiral that ultimately claimed their lives. The CN&R learned about several such victims by scouring death notices and obituaries—in some cases finding references to heart attack and pneumonia—but we hardly know the scope of the situation. As we reported last week (see “Indirect victims,” by Meredith J. Cooper), a complete tally will be hard to come by. That’s because none of the agencies charged with public health and safety in Butte County appears to be tracking these types of fatalities. Neither are the agencies at the state and federal levels. That bears repeating: No public agency—not the Federal Emergency Management Agency, not the California Office of Emergency Management, and not even our county government, including Sheriff/ Coroner Kory Honea—is attempting to keep track of the overall death count related to the deadliest fire in California’s history. The result: an underreported disaster mortality rate.

This is a vital piece of the puzzle when it comes to learning from the catastrophe. Just a few items of interest: identifying at-risk groups and the lead causes of death. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, “better data help public health officials and emergency response and recovery workers plan for future events, determine risk factors, monitor national trends, and save lives.” To wit, such data support funding for strategies to prevent similar future scenarios, notes the CDC. This omission does not inspire confidence that our region will be better prepared for wildfires to come. We could belabor the agencies’ short-sightedness. Instead, we’ll offer a few suggestions. Post-haste, Butte County ought to scour the CDC’s Community Assessment for Public Health Emergency Response toolkit. Among other things, it offers tips for tracking and certifying disaster-related deaths. As noted, the county will need to establish partnerships with out-ofarea coroner’s offices and medical examiners, as well as hospital directors and other agencies to collect this info. We’d also suggest the county set up a portal to allow the families of victims to report such information. This won’t be an easy undertaking, since thousands of Camp Fire survivors have scattered, but the collection of this data is critical to saving lives. Ω

GUEST COMMENT

Chico’s man-made, post-Camp Fire disaster Sis lodged and $90,000 in rent. Every memory my son has somewhere in this house, and the happi-

ixty-day notice. Feels inadequate for eight years

est years of my own life framed within its walls. However, we, like so many renters, are having our tenancy terminated. It’s called “no fault,” but the real reason is that we stand as the last bulwark to windfall profits to be gained in this disaster economy. My landlords never provided upkeep or repairs. This house was purchased as a rental and had been unencumbered revenue for decades. It won’t qualify for conventional financing due to disrepair. These by Clancy Callahan days, it’s “worth” whatever the landlord can extort from a desperThe author is ate Camp Fire refugee, flush with a Chico native, bankruptcy paralegal insurance proceeds. and parent. Census figures place 45 percent of Californians as renters. We have only the most basic protections, and as fires and floods upend California, we are among the most vulnerable populations. The Camp Fire was a natural disaster, but

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the one taking shape today is completely man-made and within our means to control. We don’t have to allow rapacious greed and speculation to take the reins in our recovery. Let’s acknowledge that disaster is not bounded by geography, and extend protections and help to the proxy victims whose lives are being devastated. Short-term solutions: The City Council should limit the number of no-fault evictions/terminations allowed per month. Long-term: Establish a rent board for the city of Chico and provide no-fault evictions with 120-day notices and relocation money, among other provisions. The generosity of this community was a model of what it looks like to love your neighbor. But does that spirit stop at a property line? Instead of asking if someone’s property was burnt, let’s ask, “Did your life implode from the Camp Fire? Do you face insurmountable odds to keep even a modicum of the life you cherished and worked to preserve?” Many in Paradise will rebuild, but can we say the same for those renters pushed out without assistance or compassion? My house was not damaged in the Camp Fire, but my home has been destroyed by it. Ω

by Melissa Daugherty m e l i s s a d @ n e w s r e v i e w. c o m

Maddog I’ve been playing with Twitter recently. I’ll be the first to acknowledge I’m still getting the hang of it. Though I’ve had an account since February 2009, I’ve tweeted very little. That changed after the Camp Fire. It was only then, when faced with the dynamic nature of the disaster, that I realized first-hand how useful the platform is for getting a lot of eyes on information quickly. I learned that lesson after posting a video of Bille Road in Paradise a few days after the blaze, as the region continued to smolder. It’s been viewed more than 27,000 times. I’d originally kept my account private and used it occasionally to communicate with friends, mostly about journalism, music or personal stuff. Had I known a decade ago that I’d later use it professionally—or had read anything about Gen. James “Mad Dog” Mattis—I wouldn’t have made my handle @MaddogDaugherty. Granted, the combination of my seven-letter given name and my nine-letter anglicized Gaelic surname is too long for the platform. So, Maddog it was. Lately, a few readers have asked me about its origin, so I figured I’d write about it. It’s a nickname from my years as a young reporter. Back in the early aughts, I earned a reputation for being a bit of a bulldog. I’d often volunteer for assignments that other Chico EnterpriseRecord reporters were loath to take on. One that immediately springs to mind stems from a grand jury report that alleged the county’s then-auditor/controller was a tyrannical department head. Nobody wanted to interview the guy, but I relished the thought of asking him why he was known for yelling at employees and slamming his door in their faces. He denied doing either. Someone in the office—I can’t remember who—started calling me Maddog. But what truly solidified the nickname was my reaction to a guy who assaulted me while I was walking downtown one evening with a couple of my work colleagues—former E-R city beat reporter Ari Cohn and photographer Glenn Fuentes. It was daylight when the three of us twentysomethings headed to a certain corner pub after work, so what happened was quite unexpected. A drunken stranger walking toward us swung around and violently slapped my derriere. The shock wore off in a millisecond. That’s about how long it took me to pivot and shove the neanderthal into the side of a building, giving him a piece of my mind in language I was sure he could understand. When the man pulled back his fist, Ari took him down with a couple of good thumps and Glenn dragged him off a ways. The guy’s embarrassed friends then hauled him to the far end of the block. He’d lost his keys and a shoe in fray, and I may have taunted him for a second or two by holding them up. I was pretty peeved. In fact, those keys ended up in the gutter—the shoe on a nearby roof. A couple of police officers had been nearby and came over to suss out the situation. It was immediately clear who’d been in the wrong. I declined to press charges, and went about my night. The next day, Ari, a great storyteller, regaled the whole office with the tale, and the nickname stuck. The end.

Melissa Daugherty is editor of the CN&R


LETTERS

ATTENTION BOOMERS

Send email to cnrletters@newsreview.com

Remembering Jonathan Re “Larger than life” (Healthlines, by Ashiah Scharaga, April 18:) We were all inspired by Jonathan Studebaker. Thank you for his story. Bob Mulholland Chico

A human rights question Re “Chico State wary of shelter” (Downstroke, April 18): Whether we locate a homeless shelter in our downtown is a human rights question: Are we the kind of society, having failed to house our least competitive people, that will at least accept them among us? Or, are we the kind of society that drives an entire class of people into the shadows—stigmatizing, coercing, punishing and, ultimately, hiding the poor and disabled in some acceptably remote facility? In recent years, an array of local homeless human rights issues have come to the fore, at our council meetings and in our public spaces: restroom access, park access, right

to rest (sleep), sit-lie laws, right to secure possessions, access to survival gear/emergency shelter, relentless police profiling, “failure to appear” warrants, “social crime” prosecutions, etc. Had more than a microscopic number of Chico State staff and students meaningfully engaged on these issues, the lack of university support for a downtown shelter might be surprising. Despite the on-campus, self-congratulatory talk of social justice and diversity, human rights violations on our streets meet with apathy, or worse: When the CSUC president found a voice, it was a bigoted voice and an all too perfect example of what right-wingers call “liberal elitism.” Seek support elsewhere. Patrick Newman Chico

More on homelessness I have worked in and around downtown Chico for 40 years. What has happened in the last few years breaks my heart. So much

more conspicuous abject poverty. Conspicuous because so many Chicoans can’t afford an apartment. What is going on is referenced in U.S. Census Bureau, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Haver Analytics, and Council of Economic Advisers calculations. The data show that, since 1980, rents are up 140 percent, incomes up about 10 percent, and our income’s buying power is down nearly 20 percent. What do you suggest I tell the frail 70-year-old homeless man at the market who got teary asking when Simplicity Village would be open? He said he felt desperate. What do you tell the woman who was 10 minutes late going to a local shelter, couldn’t get in, and got raped on her way to find a hiding place to sleep in the bushes? We’re in the most urgent, tragic human crisis to hit the streets of Chico in my lifetime! With the issue of homelessness, the answer is more new low-income homes ASAP. Chico Housing Action Team’s LETTERS c o n t i n u e d

o n pa g e 6

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LETTERS c o n t i n u e d f r o m pa g e 5 Simplicity Village proposal is the only plan before the city for just such housing this year. Charles Withuhn Chico

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The persistent presence of the Chico area music scene is the essence of a community coming together in response to planet Earth’s most devastating disaster of 2018. The musicians bring hope, love and a way for us all to set our differences aside and dance. The CN&R and its Arts DEVO certainly made a dent in the sadness of loss and grief with their no-dough CAMMIES show Saturday night at the Sierra Nevada Big Room. Everyone in the house shared something vital to the communities’ health and safety—a way to sit, talk and smile with their neighbor without a care but the sweet music in their ears. Thank you, Jason Cassidy and crew, and to all of the musicians, sound peeps, promoters, bookers and venues that bring such joy and love to our lips.

On the good presidents I recently had the pleasure of reading Doris Kearns Goodwin’s Leadership: In Turbulent Times. A narrative masterpiece, Goodwin explores the lives of four former presidents who embraced the obligations of being president, and the leadership they displayed while confronting a national crisis of their time: Abraham Lincoln—the Civil War; Teddy Roosevelt—the Anthracite Coal Strike of 1902; Franklin D. Roosevelt—the Great Depression; and Lyndon B. Johnson—civil rights upheaval and wretched poverty. These men possessed an ability to recognize the leadership abilities within themselves, and were recognized for such by others, be them friend or foe. Their styles were different in nature, but extremely effective in overcoming the darkness they faced: their transformational strengths overcame their weaknesses; knew the importance of corralling political support for policies; rarely resorted to pettiness when dealing with adversaries; preferred olive branches over childish mockery. Lincoln said it best when he exclaimed, “I have

not willingly planted a thorn in any man’s bosom.” When we reflect upon presidential history, we realize we have been fortunate to have had leaders who strove to bring out the best in the American people. When reflecting on where we are today, it’s enough to make a grown person cry. Roger S. Beadle Chico

Lemmings no more The cunning President of the United Base of America gave a false impression of Bernie Sanders’ recent town hall meeting in Bethlehem, Penn., hosted by FOX News. “Very strange the audience liked Bernie,” quipped the shifty, amoral, unscrupulous Trump. In “reality,” Trump salivates over the mischief Sanders creates among Democrats. Along with the Russians, Sanders stood alone as the man most responsible for comrade Trump’s shockingly dreadful Electoral College win in 2016. Comrade Trump voters are joined at the hip with “Bernie backers,” make no mistake about it. The complete naivety of the DNC and its mass movement lemmings, never ceases to amaze. Please folks, don’t enroll in another Trump University course in 2020. Ray Estes Redding

Corporate stooge rep Once again Congressman Doug LaMalfa voted against us constituents. His no vote on Save the Internet Act (House Resolution 1644) supports a corporate takeover of the internet. LaMalfa and his fellow Republicans are invoking harm to current and future internet users. Larry S. Jackson Chico

Before the course opens Peregrine Point Disc Golf Course has been closed since the Stoney Fire last July. The city of Chico’s ongoing, required mitigation for operation of the course needs completion including: 1) split-rail fencing for out-of-bounds areas to protect Butte County checkerbloom and concentrating fairway foot traffic to protect wildflower fields; 2) wood chips around baskets and tee pads throughout the course to forestall erosion and protect

roots of oak trees; 3) relocation of baskets away from oak trees to lessen damage to branches; 4) tree protective devices to lessen impact to oak tree trunks; 5) interpretive signs at tee pads to encourage play that lessens ecological impacts; and 6) annual biological monitoring of the big four: oaks, Butte County checkerbloom, Bidwell’s knotweed and wildflower fields. Implementation of these requirements should be done prior to reopening the course, so implementation is incentivized and their purpose is effected. Woody Elliott Chico

On helping Earth On Easter, I reflected upon the central messages of Christianity. Love, forgiveness and mercy. How does that affect our worldview today in this polarized political world? So many just keep doing what they’ve always done, rather than make necessary changes to protect our children’s future world. Can they be forgiven? Hard to say, but none of us is perfect. We travel, we eat foods shipped from Italy and Asia. We buy clothes produced in slave-like conditions in foreign lands. We keep using ridiculously inefficient incandescent lightbulbs, and we run them nonstop even with natural light pouring in our windows. Let’s all reflect on the nature of what we are doing to create an excruciating world for our children will live in. What have we already done? Then ask: What can I do now, going forward, to deserve their forgiveness for that? What actions will I take to help? Julie Heath Chico

Correction Last week’s cover story (“Surveying the destruction,” by Meredith J. Cooper) incorrectly named Zeke Lunder as owner of Deer Creek Resources. He is its founder, but the wildfire consulting firm is owned by Chico-based Firestorm Wildland Fire Suppression Inc. We apologize for the error, which has been corrected online. —ed.

More letters online:

We’ve got too many letters for this space. please go to www.newsreview.com/chico for additional readers’ comments on past cn&r articles.


STREETALK

What’s Bike your dream bike?

Just Approved! by City of Chico and Butte County to place on Your Property as a secondary unit and/or Move it to Paradise and Live on Your Homesite while you Rebuild!

Bike

Asked at Campus Bicycles

Kelsey Taylor bicycle mechanic

Bike

I just purchased my dream bike, the All-City Gorilla Monsoon. It is all-roads capable, trail-friendly, fast-rolling and really comfortable. It has a mountain drivetrain capable of rougher terrain, but [is] still fast and efficient.

Daniel Solors student

I actually have my dream bike I call “the banana boat.” It’s a hideous yellow beach cruiser, so nobody is ever going to steal it. Whenever I ride it, I get looks no matter what time of day or where I go.

Elie Wyllie student

My dream bike would be bamboo with a leather back basket, leather seat and white trim tires. I’ve never seen anything like it. It’s just something I’ve made up in my head.

Steve Reeds musician

The Trek electric one on display here. I can go much farther in my spare time. They are back-ordered until July. I enjoyed my last Trek Navigator— nonelectric—but it burned up in the fire.

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NEWSLINES DOWNSTROKE MEASLES CASES CLIMB

Five more cases of measles have been identified in Butte County in the past week, bringing the total to 11 people infected locally. In the U.S. so far this year, there have been 626 confirmed cases—including a second in Shasta County last week. The additional cases all are adults and are linked to the original outbreak announced on March 24, according to Butte County Public Health press releases. In fact, most of the local cases have been adults; only one is a child. Additional exposure locations include the offices of the Butte County Assessor and ClerkRecorder (April 9), Dr. Madelyn Holzman’s office in Chico, 572 Rio Lindo, Ste. 201 (April 9), and Enloe Medical Center (April 10-17). A full list can be found at tinyurl.com/ ButteMeaslesExposureList01. Butte County also posts updates at buttecounty.net/ph/ measles.

MISSING MAN FOUND DEAD

Last week (April 19), Glenn County detectives announced they’d found the body of an Orland man who had been missing for a little over a month. Brandon Dawson, 26, disappeared on March 8, according to a Glenn County Sheriff’s Office press release. His mother, Kelli Skidmore, and pregnant girlfriend had reported his disappearance and offered a $10,000 reward for information that could bring him home. After a multiple-county search, cadaver dogs found Dawson’s body in the Walker Ridge area of Colusa County. Glenn Investigative Task Force detectives allege Dawson was killed over a drug-related dispute. The investigation is ongoing.

OROVILLE RECALL EFFORT RECALLED

After announcing a plan to unseat Oroville Councilwomen Linda Draper and Janet Goodson, former council candidate Bobby O’Reiley has backed off, citing special election costs. O’Reiley (pictured) told the Oroville City Council at its meeting last Tuesday (April 16) that he’d served the councilwomen. In a notice of intent to circulate a recall petition that was submitted to the City Clerk’s Office (and ultimately lacked enough verified signatures), O’Reiley alleged that Goodson “violated city policies” and “disrespected our community.” He said as much about Draper as well. According to the Butte

County Clerk-Recorder’s Office, a special recall

election for Oroville could cost $35,000 to $40,000. “We have the support, we can vote them out come next elections,” O’Reiley wrote on his candidate Facebook page. 8

CN&R

APRIL 25, 2019

Drowning in debt As Trump rolls back student loan protections, an Obama-era watchdog brings the fight to California

S

eth Frotman was traveling from the East

by

Felicia Mello

About this story:

It was originally produced by CALmatters.org, a nonprofit, nonpartisan media venture explaining California policies and politics. This story and other higher education coverage are supported by the College Futures Foundation.


committee hearing where Stone’s bill passed Monday. The measure now heads to the Assembly’s appropriations committee. Assemblyman Steven Choi, a Republican from Irvine, was among those who chose not to vote on the bill, saying he feared it would encourage frivolous lawsuits. California undergraduates take out small-

er loans on average than those in most other states—in part due to the state’s relatively generous financial aid. But student loan debt in the state still has more than doubled since 2008, and disproportionately affects low-income communities and people of color. A study released Tuesday by the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco and that city’s treasurer found that 1 in 6 Bay Area borrowers had defaulted in the past 15 years. In the neighborhoods with the highest concentration of black and Latino residents, the default rate was 27 percent. California last year began requiring all student loan servicers to be licensed by the state’s Department of Business Oversight. But Stone, who also authored that legislation, said that only some servicers are complying. “They are essentially thumbing their nose,” he said at Monday’s hearing. “They’re operating in their own best interest, not in the interest of borrowers.” The country’s skyrocketing student loan debt has increasingly drawn the attention of national policymakers. Democratic U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren, running for president in 2020, made headlines this week when she proposed canceling student debt for most borrowers and eliminating tuition at public colleges. Rather than upending the student loan system as Warren proposes, the California bill would cope with some of its worst consequences, said Sandy Baum, a fellow at the Urban Institute who studies college access and pricing. “It says, ‘We know students have debt, we know debt is manageable for many students, but we also know students run into problems, and we want a support system for those students.’” If the bill passes, California could once again provide an example for states looking to increase their own oversight powers amid a steep decline in federal enforcement of consumer protection laws. “The federal government is not going to ride to the rescue,” said Frotman. “There is no cavalry on the horizon.” Ω

Hefty price Supervisors fine landowners cited for large pot grows When Carmelo Talamo stepped up to address

the Butte County Board of Supervisors Tuesday (April 23), it was clear she was pleading in vain. Not only had the board’s members, on a series of contentious votes, already decided against property owners such as her, but they also were just about to vote again when Chairman Steve Lambert agreed to let her say her piece. Talamo, an elderly woman from San Jose, reiterated much of what her son had told the supervisors moments earlier. The family bought a home on 5 acres overlooking Lake Oroville, where she and her husband hope to retire. Needing income two years ago, they rented out the house. Their tenants grew marijuana, in excess of what the county allows: according to code enforcement, 58 plants on 900 square feet and a greenhouse full of more plants. Personal users can grow six plants; medicinal users are allowed to plant in a 150-square-foot area. The Talamos, per state law, could not remove the marijuana themselves, so they began eviction proceedings. An administrative law judge agreed to drop their penalty by $22,000. Still, their case was among the seven Tuesday, after 10 at the previous meeting, in which supervisors decided on five-figure property liens. The Talamos faced owing $4,705, plus a $31,500 penalty.

“The whole thing doesn’t seem fair,” Talamo told the supervisors. In their case, like the others, Lambert, Bill Connelly and Doug Teeter voted to levy the full lien, over the dissent— vocalized in unison—by Chico’s first-year supervisors, Debra Lucero and Tami Ritter. The majority approved liens totaling just over $350,000. Including the previous meeting, the county stands to collect $814,407.49 from the 17 property owners—$733,500 from penalties. Because these liens attach to each parcel’s title, the county expects to see the full sum eventually. “Pain and compliance” is how Connelly referred to the program. His district encompasses Oroville and the surrounding foothills. In response to Chico supervisors’ critiques, he said he’s gotten far fewer complaint calls once the county imposed penalties. The supervisors proved more accepting of hemp, the cannabis plant related to marijuana but without the psychoactive compound THC. The 2018 federal farm bill moved hemp off the controlled substance

SIFT ER It pays to ride Perhaps it shouldn’t come as a surprise that riding a bike—versus driving a car—can benefit your bank account as well as your body. But that financial incentive translates beyond individual riders to encompass families, employers and entire communities as well. Take, for instance, the boost cycling gives to the economy in northwest Arkansas—according to three studies conducted by the Walton Family Foundation, which concluded that the activity provided $137 million to the region in 2017. “While the energy generated by trails and paved paths is palpable ... these findings validate cycling as a regional economic engine that supports local businesses, attracts tourists and builds healthier communities,” spokesman Tom Walton said in a press release. Here are some more financial advantages cycling provides, as compiled by People for Bikes.

Bike

• In 2014, Americans were stuck in traffic for 6.9 billion hours, representing 3.1 billion gallons of wasted fuel, which translates to roughly $160 billion. • Proximity to bicycle infrastructure such as protected bike lanes and bike boulevards increases property values. A case in point: The Indianapolis Cultural Trail cost $62.5 million to build, but translated to a $1.01 billion increase in adjacent property values. • Mountain bike tourism in just two national forests in North Carolina generates $30.2 million annually. Source: peopleforbikes.org

Sheriff Kory Honea presents his TRUTH Act report, on requests for cooperation from federal immigration officers, at the county supervisors meeting Tuesday (April 23). PHOTO BY EVAN TUCHINSKY

list and classified it as an agricultural commodity. In addition, California Proposition 64, passed in 2016, which legalized recreational use of marijuana for adults, allows industrial cultivation of hemp. Louie Mendoza, the county’s agricultural commissioner, explained that state regulations for registering and operating hemp farms could be in place by July 1. Supervisors directed Mendoza to continue preparing for implementation once the rules take effect. Before the cannabis items, Sheriff Kory Honea made

his annual report on the TRUTH Act (Transparent Review of Unjust Transfers and Holds). Adopted in 2016, the law sets standards for cooperation by local law enforcement to requests for information and detention of suspects by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE). Butte County Jail processed 13,561 bookings last year, up from 12,329 in 2017. ICE expressed interest in 25 of the 2018 arrests, constituting 22 suspects. Of those, 11 suspects met TRUTH Act criteria for cooperation, and ICE took two into custody. Honea told the CN&R after his presentation that the statistics show “there’s not a significant presence of ICE or interest from ICE in people being booked in our jail. But that said … [state law has] limited our ability to communicate and cooperate with ICE.” To get information from the agency, he gets referred to its public affairs office—partly due to bureaucracy, he said, but also because “you can’t deny the fact that it’s such a politically charged situation, where there might have been in the past a tendency or a willingness to interact informally.” —EVAN TUCHINSKY eva ntu c h insk y @ newsr ev iew.c o m

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Connecting the dots s Janine Rood looked at the

noon, she admitted that “even for the strong and fearless bicyclists, it’s hair-raising” to pedal in that part of the city. A cacophony of idling and revving engines, and the occasional bleating horn, punctuated her point. Often, bicyclists just avoid areas of Chico where bike infrastructure (or crosswalks) don’t exist or they don’t feel safe, she added. That’s why she’s thrilled about the bicycle and pedestrian bridge slated for construction in 2023. It will connect Bikeway 99, which currently deadends in the Chico Mall parking lot, to the other side of the busy thoroughfare. From there, the bicycle route will wrap behind several restaurants, Walmart and other bigbox stores before connecting to the Skyway. This is a major gap closure for the city’s bike network. Rood focused on connectivity and “wayfinding” when she was given the opportunity to dive into the city’s guiding document for those traveling on two wheels. As the former director of Chico Velo Cycling Club, Rood was a natural choice to spearhead a 2019 update of the Chico Bicycle Plan. She became a part-time city intern/bike and pedestrian coordinator about a year ago. Last Tuesday (April 16), the approximately 50-page updated plan was approved unanimously by the Chico City Council. Overall Look it over: recommendaGo to tinyurl.com/ tions include 2019chicobikeplan to view the Chico closing network Bicycle Plan. gaps and creating more physical separations from traffic, higher-visibility crossings and paved paths. While projects are on the way, there remains a long list of unfunded connections and unmet maintenance needs. 20 years. In that time, she has developed her own methods of navigating the city’s fragmented

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Bike

A intersection of East 20th Street and Highway 99 on a recent after-

Rood has been cycling in Chico for

Mon-SAT 8AM-4pM | 2270 fAir STreeT | 343-7615

Bike

City bike plan update focuses on closing gaps, improving navigation

Bike

biking network. As she worked on the bike plan update, she examined the city’s alltoo-familiar streets and bike paths daily and developed a new perspective, spotting “faster and safer” routes she didn’t even realize connected. Cyclists tend to “just go the way we’ve always gone,” she told the CN&R. She began to envision a broader navigational plan for cyclists, and— working with city staff and considering public input—created key north-south and east-west bicycle corridors and established a wayfinding plan. These corridors mark natural, logical places cyclists will want to ride, and correlate with city bike projects. High-priority projects are those that focus on “creating and improving safe routes on lowerstress streets” and developing that wayfinding system, to encourage cyclists to move off of streets where the majority of bike-related collisions take place. This includes completing Bikeway 99 and constructing protected, separated bike lanes on both The Esplanade and Bruce Road. This marks an important change in the bike plan, according to Brendan Ottoboni, city public works director-engineering. While the “backbone” of the network was

Janine Rood stands near where a bike and pedestrian bridge will arch over East 20th Street, connecting Bikeway 99 from where it ends in the Chico Mall parking lot (where she’s standing) to the other side of the thoroughfare. Construction should begin in 2023. PHOTO BY ASHIAH SCHARAGA

already in place—namely, Bikeway 99 and Bidwell Park routes—the connectivity was lacking. Now the city’s bikeways don’t come across as “a hodge-podge of random paths connected in different places.” Wayfinding is a significant part of the update, as well, and listed among the priorities. The goal is to install different signs along the bike corridors: some at intersections that include distance, time and even route difficulty; others to reassure travelers they are headed in the right direction; and others to alert cyclists when they are near key destinations. It isn’t practical to expect people to whip out the city bike map to navigate during a trip, Rood said, and GPS applications aren’t always trustworthy. “The thing that could drive you completely crazy in Chico is trying to figure out what’s the best place to get to where [you] want to go,” Rood said. “With this grid/corridor system we invented, we’re going to do a huge wayfinding project once we can get funding.”


The update was a substantial

undertaking, as the plan, which is focused on developing a comprehensive bikeway network, hasn’t been modified since 2012, according to Ottoboni. A consulting firm was hired in 2015, but the results were lackluster, he added, and the update was placed on hold in 2016 due to a lack of staffing that has since been remedied. Having an updated bicycle plan is essential when applying for grants from Cal Trans’ Active Transportation Program, he wrote in a staff report. This program was created specifically to encourage biking and walking and safety and mobility for non-drivers. Since 2015, the city has taken in $25 million in state and federal grants for multimodal transportation projects. These grants typically cover the bulk of a project’s cost. For example, the city received $14.2 million in state and federal funding to build the bridge over East 20th Street. The remaining $1.3 million of the project’s cost will come from development impact fees. Also on the horizon is a largely grant-funded pedestrian bridge over Little Chico Creek, near Humboldt Avenue and East 10th Street. While public works has made strides in getting outside funding for new bike pathways, Ottoboni said that doesn’t address a key component: maintenance. Local funding is limited. Like its roadways, the city’s existing bike paths are suffering— much of the network was installed decades ago. Encroaching tree roots are outlined in spray paint on popular paths, and Bidwell Park’s thoroughfares—Petersen Memorial Way and South Park Drive—are especially in need of repair. “We lack funding overall for needed maintenance,” Ottoboni said. The city is pursuing an adopt-atrail partnership with Chico Velo, which would address some of the maintenance issues, such as waste cleanup and minor vegetation pruning, as well as alert the city to areas of concern. Rood expressed confidence in the plan and in the cycling community, which provided feedback during the update process through several public meetings, an online survey and a working group of advocates and city staff. “It’s easy to become a bicyclist in Chico, because the community is strong,” she said. —ASHIAH SCHARAGA ashiahs@ n ewsr ev i ew. com

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HEALTHLINES Sheri Marshall, communications supervisor at the Chico Police Department dispatch center, answers a 911 call.

Currently, a first responder suffering from PTSD must prove the diagnosis relates to his or her work. SB 542 would add mental health to the list of “presumptions of an occupational injury” for public safety officers that includes hernias, heart attacks, cancer and biochemical illness. Both Parrott, president of the Chico Police Officers’ Association, and Alexander support the bill, which had a hearing in the Senate Appropriations Committee on Monday (April 22). That panel unanimously forwarded SB 542 to its May 22 session for consideration among bills with significant fiscal impact. They’d also like to see the legislation go a step further and extend the same benefit to dispatchers. Sheri Marshall and Wendy Gebicke vividly

Trauma response Legislators address first responders’ mental health, suicide rates

story and photo by

Evan Tuchinsky

e mail@ newsrev iew. com

W Alexander doesn’t mention a singular memory. What he says strikes him most is hen asked about the Camp Fire, Jesse

the totality of the disaster, to which he was among the first first responders. A division chief with the Chico Fire Department, in his 20th year as a firefighter, Alexander headed toward Concow as the blaze started spreading. He’d wind up seeing the firestorm blow over the Ridge, destroying most of Paradise, as firefighters from numerous agencies doused flames in their attempt to protect evacuating residents. What sticks with him, he said, is “the magnitude in regards to the overall devastation—home after home, business after business, burned-up vehicle after burned-up vehicle, the damage to the roads. That, slowly compounded, builds on you … the Camp Fire is unique in that I don’t know anybody who

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wasn’t directly affected.” When interviewed by National Geographic last Thursday (April 18)—and later that afternoon by the CN&R, in his City Hall office—Alexander found himself choking up unexpectedly. That response isn’t new: Even before November, he said, he’d feel bursts of emotion in unusual instances. For example, a TV commercial with a child, even when the ad doesn’t tug heart strings, may evoke a reaction. Along with fighting fires, he’s responded to 911 calls at vehicle accidents, shootings, stabbings, fights, rescues and medical emergencies, among others—with victims and loved ones of all ages. The sensory impact lingers. “Once you see those images, you can’t scrub them out of your head,” Alexander said. “One may not be catastrophic, but it’s the cumulative effect, year after year after year after year.” Law enforcement officers have similar exposure, plus other stressors. Chico Police Det. Jim Parrott told the CN&R that he thinks officers are able to handle “the day-to-day

aspect of our job, the things people perceive [as] stressful,” such as pursuing suspects and experiencing violence. “Some of the other aspects create the cumulative stress,” he continued, mentioning “public scrutiny”— particularly criticism of cellphone videos of citizens’ encounters with police—and intradepartmental issues. Many in public safety suffer silently. Parrott and Alexander both described compartmentalization in which the officer or firefighter separates work life from personal life. If buried and ignored, Alexander said, “those accumulations build up” and ultimately release. The most extreme response is suicide. “Suicide leaves more officers and firefighters dead than the line-of-duty deaths combined,” Adrienne Shilton, government affairs director for the Steinberg Institute, said during a phone interview. A Sacramento nonprofit founded by state-legislator-turned-mayor Darrell Steinberg, the institute advocates for public policies that improve mental health. Shilton cited research from the Journal of Emergency Medical Services, which matched findings from a study by the nonprofit Ruderman Foundation. The Ruderman report also found that first responders commit suicide at a rate 20 times greater than the general population. In response, the Steinberg Institute has championed a bill in the California Legislature to address the issue. Senate Bill 542, introduced by Sen. Henry Stern (D-Canoga Park), would expand the state workers’ compensation code to include mental health, notably post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), among the conditions presumed to be job-related for first responders.

recall the morning of Nov. 8. Marshall, a communications supervisor at the Chico Police Department dispatch center, came off night duty as Gebicke, a 25-year dispatcher, started the day shift. Soon after, Marshall “levitated in my bed” when CodeRED phone alerts beckoned her to return. “I’ve never experienced anything like what was happening that day,” Gebicke said. “Just the inconceivableness from our end, at how many calls were coming in and how you couldn’t really help people like we normally can.” “Usually,” Marshall continued, “we have the ability to give them some sort of direction or some kind of guidance....” But people stuck in cars amid flames, “they want you to send something to make that stop,” Gebicke said, “and you can’t. Towards the end, I just kept saying, ‘Do what you can to protect yourself and pray.’” Like front-line officers, dispatchers have unsettling memories. Only, in the case of dispatchers, Marshall said, sights come from the mind’s eye—and the images can grow disturbing when, absent the true picture, imagination runs wild. “The worst part of the job is we don’t get closure,” Gebicke said. Police and fire officials recognize dispatchers’ place among first responders. Federal lawmakers have started to, as well. Rep. Norma Torres (D-Calif.), a former Los Angeles police dispatcher, authored a bill that would “categorize public safety telecommunicators as a protective service occupation.” House Resolution 1629, or the 911 SAVES Act of 2019—Supporting Accurate Views of Emergency Services—has 35 co-sponsors, HEALTHLINES c o n T i n u e d

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HEALTHLINES Democrats and Republicans. It awaits its first hearing in the House Committee on Education and Labor. If passed, HR 1629 won’t automatically incorporate dispatchers into SB 542. According to legislative aides in Stern’s Sacramento office, the state also would need to make a comparable amendment to its occupation code. Alternately, SB 542 would need to change during its approval process. Nonetheless, the dispatchers appreciate progress—as do their colleagues, who see them as more than clerical staff, their current designation. “The reality is dispatchers should be classified as public safety personnel,” Alexander said. “[As a dispatcher] you hear these things, you’re living through these people’s traumatic things, and the line will just die [when] it gets turned over to us arriving on the scene…. “I probably get a small wisp of what those dispatchers are having to handle.” Calling SB 542 “a great step in the

right direction,” Alexander said he “100 percent supports the bill.” State law enforcement and firefighter groups formally endorse its

C O N T I N U E D F R O M PA G E 1 2

Follow the progress:

Visit tinyurl.com/SB542 for the status and details of California Senate Bill 542, relating to workers’ compensation for first responders, and tinyurl.com/HR1629 for House Resolution 1629, the 911 SAVES Act

passage. Most opposition comes from public employer groups such as the League of California Cities and the California State Association of Counties. While PTSD already gets considered for workers’ compensation, Parrott said, changing this mental health diagnosis to a presumptive condition “obviously is a benefit to us.” The burden of proof shifts to the employer, refuting the claim, over the employee, validating the claim. “The difficult issue we face is the time it takes to get that diagnosis,” Parrot continued. “These sort of problems don’t present immediately; sometimes they’re delayed, depending on the accumulated trauma. “If this legislation somehow streamlines that [process], that’s going to work to our benefit…. And if this just lends itself even to an inertia toward a more serious look at the mental health impacts of the job, then I think we’re going in the right direction.” Ω

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GREEN GREENWAYS Steven Marquardt, co-founder of Chico’s Sunrise Movement hub, is hoping to grow his group’s membership.

Together for a change Climate urgency spawns new group, local alliances

story and photo by

Evan Tuchinsky

evantuc hin sk y @ n ewsrev i ew. com

LandMarquardt came to Chico with a dream. He a friend from Chico State planned to start ike many idealistic young adults, Steven

a food truck serving vegan and insect-based dishes. They aimed to introduce creations such as cricket tacos and meal worm ceviche to patrons here and cities within driving distance, notably San Francisco and Portland. “We’d make these really cool products that we thought would be a great way to start to help people transition from beef, and the traditional meat resources that are destroying our planet, toward a more sustainable source,” he said. Marquardt, 24, graduated from UC Santa Barbara with a degree in political science and arrived here last August after a year of AmeriCorps service in Miami. To gain kitchen experience, he worked at the Banshee, moving up from dishwasher to prep cook. Experimenting in the kitchen and honing the business plan yielded an epiphany: The food industry really didn’t appeal to him. “I realized I don’t want to spend the time, money and effort on this project that I now see as a very indirect way to address the climate crisis—and, in fact, too slow,” Marquardt said. “This situation that we’re in [environmentally] calls for urgent action and systemic change.”

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Visiting his hometown of Oceanside, he heard from a friend about a national organization geared toward youth and young adults. The Sunrise Movement champions the Green New Deal, a set of policies centered on clean energy and broad-based economic opportunity that, as House Resolution 109, has 92 congressional co-sponsors. Back in Chico, he talked with friends about forming a “hub,” or group chapter. A co-worker at the Banshee—“the last place I thought I’d meet an organizer”—replied, “Let’s do it.” So, with Casey Parks, Marquardt started the Chico hub in late February. They held their first meetings in vacant rooms on campus; now recognized as a Chico State student organization, the Sunrise hub meets weekly: Wednesday evenings, 6 p.m., Butte Hall 309. A dozen members attend regularly. He anticipates a surge after Saturday— when Chico hosts Sunrise Movement national leaders at the El Rey Theater (see infobox). Marquardt, who will co-emcee the evening, learned Chico had a spot on the limited tour even before he’d launched the group. The reason, of course, is the Camp Fire—which is why Sunrise leaders, local and national, have fingers crossed for a Event info:

The Sunrise Movement’s “Road to a Green New Deal” tour comes to Chico’s El Rey Theater on Saturday (April 27), 7 p.m. Visit sunrisemovement.org/tour or facebook.com/SunriseChico for tickets and other information.

special guest. Sen. Bernie Sanders told local Ridge fire survivors with the group #ClimateUprising that he’d come to the community. That was in December, though, before announcing his second presidential bid. (See “Hashtag movement,” Greenways, March 14.) “We’ll see,” Marquardt said last week. “We’re hoping. It’s going to be great regardless. It’s going to be fun regardless.” Of the eight cities on the “Road to a Green New Deal” tour, Chico is by far the smallest. The tour started last Thursday (April 18) in Boston and hits Los Angeles, the other Western stop, Friday. The Sunrise Movement also chose Detroit; Des Moines, Iowa; New Orleans; Lexington, Ky.; and Washington, D.C. At the El Rey, North State congressional candidate Audrey Denney and Mechoopda artist/activist Ali Meders-Knight will take the stage with Varshini Prakash, Sunrise Movement’s executive director, and national organizers. “This event not only is a call to action … but also a celebration of the coalition that’s been forming,” Marquardt said. “We’ve created partnerships in just two short months— I’m excited for people to see that.” Around the same time he connected with

Sunrise, Marquardt discovered Chico 350. The local affiliate of 350.org, a global organization dedicated to replacing fossil fuels, Chico 350 has united with other environmentalists to rally for common causes. Those allies include #ClimateUprising and local

members of Citizens Climate Lobby (see “Paying dividends,” Greenways, Feb. 21). Marquardt added his name to Chico 350’s online list of endorsements for a climate emergency declaration in Chico, which the City Council ultimately enacted, earlier this month. The next day, Jan. 19, at the Chico Women’s March, he serendipitously encountered the group’s table. He joined. Chico 350 supports his Sunrise hub and, with #ClimateUprising, Saturday’s event. The local and parent groups for 350.org—plus the Sierra Club and Sunrise, among others—promote the Green New Deal. Citizens Climate Lobby, as an organization, focuses on a single solution for carbon emissions: a tax and dividend program, contained in a bill moving through Congress, House Resolution 763. Locals in the group participate with others—Chico 350, #ClimateUprising and, now, Sunrise. Mary Kay Benson, Chico 350’s steering committee manager, appreciates the coalescence. She said it started gradually in recent years but intensified after the fire. Ecoactivists have put aside points of disagreement that previously kept them siloed. “Everybody preferred their own little groups for all kinds of different reasons,” she said. “It’s more open [now] than I’ve ever seen it. It’s no longer like fraternities and sororities. After the fire, and other disasters around the world, it just became so real for everybody. “I’ve never felt more of a community spirit,” Benson added, “and that we can do it collectively. You can call it an evolution—or a revolution.” Ω

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No more trash days Zero waste is a philosophy: Send nothing to the landfill, reduce what you need, reuse what you can, send little to be recycled and compost the rest. Ultimately, it’s about redefining a system built upon consuming products and producing waste. But where do you start? Try Chico State. Drop by the Zero Waste Lobby Take Over at the Valene L. Smith Museum on Sunday (April 28) from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. to get the basics. Learn the history and life cycle of garbage, the difference between good and bad plastics, how to make your own to-go ware, bulk bags and more.


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is looking for Partner Families who: • Have a need for Affordable Housing (priority will be given to those most vulnerable) • Meet 40-80% of the Area Median Income Guidelines • Are willing to partner with Habitat • Have the ability to pay an Affordable Mortgage

For more information, it is strongly encouraged to attend one of the following orientation meetings. May 2nd - 6:00pm Saint John’s Episcopal Church May 4th - 10:00am Paradise Alliance Church May 6th - 6:00pm Bidwell Presbyterian

Questions? Call 343-7423 Ext 5 18

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EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS photo by Vic cANtu

15 MINUTES

THE GOODS

rock concerts and recycling

meet the autocycle In 2015, Harley-Davidson enthusiast Stephen Adams purchased the local motorcycle dealership and renamed the place Sierra Steel Harley-Davidson. That shop has done steady business, selling and renting bikes as well as organizing rides. Last year, Adams was approached by Vanderhall Motor Works, a relative newbie on the scene (the company was founded in 2010) whose three-wheeled “autocycles” are an automobile-motorcycle hybrid, with two wheels in front and one in back. He was so impressed he decided to open up a Vanderhall dealership next door to his Harley shop. Check out Vanderhall of Chico online at vanderhallofchico.com or visit in person at 590 E. Fifth St.

What do people like best about your Vanderhalls? Most enjoy the classic 1930s roadster look, the exhilarating, open-air ride, the heated seats, and the many options. But don’t judge them by the description— you have to ride it.

How many models are there? We have two. The biggest production one is the two-seater Venice. It has a four-cylinder, turbo engine, six-speed automatic transmission and 18-inch wheels. It also has a Bluetooth-

by

Meredith J. Cooper meredithc@newsreview.com

When I think back to the best outdoor concerts I’ve ever been to, my mind wanders to watching Jimmy Page (and his theramin!) with the Black Crowes at the Greek Theatre in L.A., or to the first time I saw my beloved Pearl Jam at Riverport Amphitheatre in St. Louis (it’s since been renamed). And then there was Soundgarden and Nine Inch Nails at the Toyota Amphitheatre in Wheatland—my first official date with my boyfriend, Chuck. What memories! Compared with other places I’ve lived—St. Louis; L.A.; Riverside; Boulder County, Colo.—Chico has few outdoor venues within an hour’s drive. Well, things are about to be kicked up a notch. Rolling Hills Casino and Resort is putting the finishing touches on its new outdoor stage—named, simply, The Amphitheater. Owned by the Paskenta Band of Nomlaki Indians, the Corning casino will have its first show in the new 3,000-capacity venue June 9, when War plays there. Can’t wait to see what other groups stop through. For more info, go to rollinghillscasino.com.

enabled sound system. The other model is the silver, single-seat Speedster, of which only 250 were made.

What sparked your interest in these machines? I read about them last year, and the founder and chairman, Steve Hall, invited me to tour their plant and take a ride in Provo, Utah. I saw a unique opportunity. When I was growing up, I saw small, exotic sports cars made by the British and Italians. The Vanderhalls have all that image but with modern manufacturing, fuel-injection and turbo engines. I’m a local business that wants to populate the West Coast with Vanderhalls.

How much are they? The Venice is $29,950, and we just have one Speedster left, for $26,950. They are totally unexpected, completely out-of-the-

ordinary, and ridiculously fun. Plus, you’ll use it way more than a boat.

Where can people take them for repairs? They are very reliable and easy to work on since they have a four-cylinder GM turbo motor. We’re a full-service repair dealer, or in an emergency you can take them to any GM dealer. One customer lost his in the Camp Fire, and we replaced it since he had insurance.

Any new models in the works? Yes, later this year we’ll have the Edison, which will be all-electric. The other upcoming one is the Carmel, which will be 7 inches wider, a little faster and has suicide doors. It will be out by the end of June, and is getting lots of publicity. —VIC CANTU

reuse, recycle In the hopes of cutting back on waste as we head into camping and grilling season, U-Haul Moving & Storage of Chico is launching a reusable propane tank program. Funded through a grant from CalRecycle, and administered through the California Product Stewardship Council, the company will be selling 1-pound propane tanks that can be refilled at its store. This Saturday (April 27), head over to 600 Country Drive between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. for a free tank (while supplies last) in exchange for an empty single-use one. The U-Haul program is part of a larger, nationwide effort—dubbed ReFuel Your Fun—to cut back on small single-use propane tanks. Retailers can sign up to sell/ exchange the tanks and/or to refill them (refill stations require on-site propane). To round out the effort, many parks have been outfitted with recycling bins specifically for single-use tanks. The closest to us, according to a handy map at refuelyourfun.org, are at Black Butte Lake and Woodson Bridge state recreation area. Free mArket OK, so the market itself isn’t free, but once again Tractor Supply is hosting a local Market Day (May 18), which is free for vendors to join. What’s particularly cool is that it’s open to everyone, from newbie crafters and bakers to professional tradespeople. And, there’s no fee to join—all you have to do is sign up at tsceventpartners.com by May 15. (Held at both Chico and Oroville locations.) I’ve been getting back into crafting mode, so I might just see you out there! New url The website LivingInChico.com has long been “making apartment search-

ing funner,” at least for anyone looking to rent from the Hignell Companies. Last week, the local rental giant announced a virtual move—to HignellRentals.com. The site itself hasn’t changed much—you’ll still find blog posts, available rentals and a resident portal. But with properties as far afield as Sacramento and Redding (and nothing currently available in Chico, or even Butte County), I certainly see why a URL change was in order.

Teresa Larson

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Apri l 25, 2019

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Bikeissue

! n o e Bike Rid

‘The spirit of

Celebrating life on two wheels

Bike

T

he CN&R is officially into our second decade celebrating local bike culture and news. Sure, we’ve written about life on two wheels in the regular issues for decades, but this is our 11th annual Bike Issue. Time sure flies. This year, our aim was to highlight how much fun it is to ride. First, we reached out to Women on Wheels. That local cycling group with a spectacular acronym (WOW) started as a way to encourage more women to ride, but the camaraderie that developed as a result has blossomed into lasting friendships. We also checked in with the folks at Silver Dollar BMX, the local nonprofit that provides a competitive and recreational biking outlet for kids of all ages and abilities. The organization has big plans in store—including a move and likely an expansion—and is gearing up to find the funds needed for that effort. In addition, we take a look at the upcoming Chico Bicycle Music Festival— the long-running event that pairs biking with live music and an environmental message during a leisurely multistop ride around our fair city. Lastly, be sure to check the rest of this issue for other bike-centric content. Enjoy the ride!

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APRIL 25, 2019

adventure’ Cycling group creates fun, active space for (mostly) women

W

hen Betsy Ingram joined Women on Wheels about a year and a half ago, she wasn’t a beginner cyclist. She’d just moved to Chico from the Bay Area, where she was a ride leader in an Alameda-based cycling club. However, she still had a hard time keeping up on her first day: She fell behind during a ride on Cohasset Road. “I was like, ‘Oh, my gosh, I’m such a loser. I can’t keep up,” Ingram told the CN&R. She recalled ride leader Pam Plemmons riding up to her. “Pam said, ‘Y’know what, how about you do this one hill, and then you can turn around and go home?’” Ingram continued. “We get to the top of the hill, and she said, ‘See, I knew you could do it. How about the next hill?’ I was like, ‘Are you serious?’” Plemmons encouraged Ingram: “I’ll stay right here with you,” Ingram said. Sure enough, Ingram kept climbing and finished the ride, with Plemmons by her side. “I texted her that night and said, ‘Y’know what? Thank you. Because now I know I can do it,’” Ingram said. “That’s the kind of camaraderie you want in a team.” That support is the foundation of Women on Wheels (WOW), a women-led cycling group. It’s part of the North Valley Ride Club, a newly launched collective of local biking groups that coordinates rides. WOW alone has about 60 active members. Now, Ingram not only keeps up during weekly


Clockwise from far left: Women on Wheels (WOW) bicyclists on a recent trip to Table Mountain. WOW ride leaders pedal up Neal Road during a recent ride. Betsy Ingram (left) and Pam Plemmons bundle up during a winter excursion. Becky Warren meets with group members at One-Mile Recreation Area before leading a weekly ride. PHOTOS BY SUSEN HILLE FREEMYERS

Wednesday outings, but also leads her own intermediate-level fitness ride on Saturdays. WOW hosts weekly rides of a variety of difficulty and speed levels (see infobox). Ride leaders create predetermined routes and regroups, and the rules are simple: Participants must wear a helmet and bikes must be in good working order. Plemmons and fellow ride leader Becky

Warren joined WOW when it was formed in 2016, by cyclist and bike safety advocate Karen Goodwin. She left the pair in charge when she moved to Eugene, Ore., a little over two years ago. “I was trying to get more women on bikes,” Goodwin told the CN&R by phone, “to really just make women feel comfortable by having a women’s only [group] … and give them a nonintimidating place to ride.” The goal is mostly the same today. “We allow men to join us, but they just have to know we’re in charge!” Plemmons said with a laugh. What the women have found is that WOW has not only been beneficial for their physi-

cal health, but also their social lives. The fun continues after rides: They often grab coffee and plan other group outings. Recently, some members attended the Banff Mountain Film Festival World Tour at Chico State. Others formed a bocce ball team. Though the group’s leaders stay focused on having fun, they also emphasize safety and skill-building. “We’re all about empowering women to be self-sufficient on their bikes,” Plemmons said. They teach new riders how to show intention, Warren added, “how to be courteous when you’re riding … how to be safe when you’re riding in groups, all those things pop up as we go.” The Wednesday rides aren’t for beginners, but Plemmons and Warren love bringing new members into the fold. They will take new riders out one-on-one, Plemmons said, to coach them on how to participate in group rides and get a sense of which weekly ride they should join first. Goodwin still keeps in touch with Warren and

Plemmons, whom she described as a pair of “dynamite” women. Though WOW has attracted faster, more advanced riders than Goodwin first imagined, she’s proud of how the group has grown. Last fall, she joined WOW on the Giro D’ Vino ride, a 48-mile stretch with winery visits in Lodi, and said it was comforting to see the group of about 18 women “all wearing their jerseys and excited to be together.” “They’ve really created a women team spirit,” Goodwin said. And that team spirit has fostered trust as well. One year, about eight WOW members got lost while bicycling in Lake Almanor. They ended up taking a 40-minute detour—the women pedaled down a rocky dirt road and at one point had to carry their bikes through a creek. Nobody got worked up. Everyone just rolled with it. Now, it’s a story that makes

Ride forth:

Women on Wheels leaders offer rides every week—and membership is free. Visit tinyurl.com/NVRCWOW for a schedule and more information.

Plemmons laugh when she retells it. “That’s the general attitude of the groups—the spirit of adventure,” Warren said. “Being open to that adventure, and accepting that sometimes things don’t go the way you planned, but it can be fabulous,” Plemmons added. “We’re happy, fun people. No drama.” For her, though WOW is a great way to stay fit, the most important part of the group is the supportive community it has created. “We’re friends and we support each other, and not just with athletic stuff, [but also] heart stuff, health stuff, financial stuff,” Plemmons said. That bond, for Warren, is unlike any others she’s experienced in other cycling groups. “In general, the riders are welcoming, they want people out riding, they want to help each other,” she said. “That’s what I think is so awesome and what motivates us to keep going.” —ASHIAH SCHARAGA as h ia h s@ newsr ev iew.c o m

MORE

BIKES C O N T I N U E D

O N PA G E 2 4

APRIL 25, 2019

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Bikeissue

On the move

Lack of funds stall BMX group’s relocation, potential expansion

V

ince Enserro views BMX racing as an alternative physical outlet for kids who aren’t interested in the highpressure pursuits of youth football, basketball, baseball and soccer. Some kids are serious racers, while many others just want to hit dirt jumps and speed around burmed turns for fun, and both types of riders are welcome at the Silver Dollar BMX track in south Chico. “It’s a sport for those kids who don’t play ball sports,” he said. “You can go ride around the track for fun and nobody’s going to say you can’t be out there. That’s the cool part about it. It’s kind of a hidden treasure.” Enserro is president of the Silver Dollar BMX board of directors, a nonprofit organization run entirely by volunteers, and he acknowledges he probably wouldn’t know about the track off Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway if his son, Evan, hadn’t gotten into competitive bike racing about six years ago. (Speaking of serious racers, Evan will compete in the UCI BMX World Championships in July.) But

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Enserro has come to believe the BMX track is an important community gathering place, and wants to preserve that aspect of the facility when it moves across town. The Jesus Center’s relocation and homeless-services expansion project—called the Renewal Center—eventually will force the biking group to move to an 8-acre, city-owned parcel at 1550 Marauder St., near the Chico Municipal Airport. The City Council has approved two extensions on Silver Dollar BMX’s lease at its current location, most recently on Tuesday, April 16, when the panel voted unanimously to move the termination date from April 30 to Oct. 31. City Manager Mark Orme told the council that city staff is still working on an environmental impact report for the Marauder Street site, and that postponing the move will not interfere with progress on the Renewal Center. Additionally, the

Family affair:

Learn more about Silver Dollar BMX at facebook.com/sdbmx.

latest extension will give Silver Dollar BMX more time to raise the money to build a new facility. “They just want a home,” Orme said, “and this will allow us to continue to work on that new home.” Paying for the project is the big holdup. “The scary piece of the puzzle is that I have no idea where the money is going to come from,” Enserro said. “I’ve been honest with the city from day one—we don’t have the money.” He said the projected $500,000 cost of building the new track is well beyond the means of an organization with an annual operating budget of about $20,000, and he personally doesn’t have experience with major fundraising efforts. “The problem is that we can’t take any of it with us, you know? You can’t take the restrooms, the concrete hill, the asphalt turns— things that cost a ton of money in the first place,” he said. “The only things we can take are some shade structures, the [hydraulic starting] gate and some timing lights. … We’ve pretty much got to start from scratch.”

Clockwise from left: Carlos Orbe (left) and Evan Enserro race on a recent afternoon at the Silver Dollar BMX track. Vince Enserro (center) at the track with his wife, Hollis, and son, Evan. He is president of the Silver Dollar BMX board, an all-volunteer nonprofit organization. The Enserros and Orbe, an exchange student from Ecuador, are ready to roll at the track gate. PHOTOS BY ASHIAH SCHARAGA

Laura Cootsona, executive director

of the Jesus Center, told the CN&R via email that Silver Dollar BMX won’t face the daunting task of raising half a million dollars alone. “Vince and I have a great relationship and our projects are intricately intertwined,” she wrote. “I trust the resources are in the community to bring about the ends we seek. I have offered to help and so has the city.” Assuming that the funding materializes, Enserro believes moving the BMX track away from the big-box stores and associated traffic congestion of south Chico will be a positive change in the long run. “It’s going to be amazing,”

he said. “The piece of property is about two times bigger than what we have now, and we’re talking about putting in two tracks.” That would allow Silver Dollar BMX volunteers to make changes to the courses—kids get bored quickly—without totally shutting down the facility. Two tracks could also potentially attract nationallevel races to Chico, which would increase the nonprofit’s revenue stream many times over. In the shorter term, Enserro hopes that moving the BMX track won’t disrupt a vital outlet for kids and their parents. “Nobody drops their kid off and comes back two hours later,” he said. “This is family time. My son is almost 15 years old, and we’re at the track four days a week. All the other families are there with their kids, cooking food or bringing food from home. It’s just a really important piece of the community.” —HOWARD HARDEE

MORE

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O N PA G E 3 0


_

_ _

Wildflower Wildflower Fun Fun Ahead Ahead Enjoy these local businesses in and around Butte County Support Local Business | Support our Community

IZAKAYA ICHIBAN ·

Pages 25-28

Best Pad Thai in Town

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Lunch SpeciaLS Mon - Fri 11-3 Dinner Sun - Thu 5-9 Fri & Sat 5-9:30

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117 W 2nd Street, Suite B Downstairs from Brooklyn Bagel

Apri l 25, 2019

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Your Shopping and Dining _ E 15th Street H T E _ WHER O! Map to Chico _ LOCALS G Downtown Chico afé

C

1. 15th Street Cafe 1414 Park Avenue, Ste. 120 (530) 809-1087 2. 5th Street Steakhouse 345 W 5th Street (530) 891-6328 3. Aca Taco 133 Broadway (530) 894-0191 4. Aca Taco 1000-D W. Sacramento Avenue (530) 343-0909 5. Anika Burke Eclectic Boutique 211 Main Street (530) 918-8850 6. Big Tuna 1722 Mangrove Avenue (530) 345-4571 7. Birkenstock 333 Broadway (530) 345-4880 8. Chada Thai Cuisine 117B W. 2nd Street (530) 342-7121 9. Chico Bicycle Music Festival www.becnet.org 10. Duffy’s Tavern 337 Main Street (530) 343-7718

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Your Shopping and Dining Map to Chico

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11. Explore Butte County www.explorebuttecounty.com 12. Franky’s 506 Ivy Street (530) 898-9948 13. Greenline Cycles 515 Main Street (530) 894-7885 14. Italian Cottage 2234 Esplanade (530) 343-7000 15. Italian Cottage 2525 Dominic Drive (530) 342-7771 16. Izakaya Ichiban 2000 Notre Dame Boulevard (530) 342-8500 17. KZFR 341 Broadway, Ste 411 (530) 895-0131 18. La Salles 229 Broadway (530) 487-7207 19. Mountain Sports 176 E. 3rd Street (530) 345-5011 20. Orient & Flume 2161 Park Avenue (530) 893-0373

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21. Riley’s 702 W. 5th Street (530) 343-7459 22. Shubert’s Ice Cream & Candy 178 E. 7th Street (530) 342-7163 23. Shubert’s Ice Cream & Candy 1950 E. 20th Street (530) 809-4151 24. Sweet Chico Confections 121 W. 3rd Street (530) 332-9866 25. The Roost Cafe 1144 Park Avenue (530) 892-1281

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april 25, 2019

Gift Cards Available Online www.5thstreetsteakhouse.com


Rebuilding the Ridge Supporting Local Businesses on the Ridge and Surrounding Communities RE-opEnEd aftER thE camp fiRE BoBBi’s Boutique

J&J oPtical, inc.

Roxanne Design stuDio

paRaDise iRRigation DistRiCt

6264 Skyway, Paradise (530) 876-0877

6153 Center Street, Paradise (530) 876-1586

6612 Rosewood Drive, Magalia (530) 521-5913

6332 Clark Road, Paradise (530) 877-4971

Paradise symPhony orchestra

lake oroville marina

Paradise (530) 513-1507

rite aid, Paradise 6007 Clark Road, Paradise (530) 872-2700

a stitch aBove emBroidery & shirt Printing 2050 Lincoln Street, Oroville (530) 413-9887

achieve charter schools of Paradise 771 Elliott Rd, Paradise (530) 872-4100

cW electric 55 Tuscan Drive, Paradise (530) 872-3443

hood orthodontics 2755 Esplanade, Chico (530) 343-7021

Blue team realty 1051 Mangrove Ave, Chico (530) 961-3400

alarm alliance

the Depot MuseuM

yony’s RoasteD CoRn

3428 Pentz Road, Paradise (530) 877-2883

5570 Black Olive Dr, Paradise (530) 877-1919

(909) 247-5398

Paradise airPort

town of paRaDise

4405 Airport Road, Paradise (530) 521-2289

5555 Skyway, Paradise (530) 872-6291

Paradise Performing arts center

tRilogy ConstRuCtion, inC 7054 Skyway, Paradise (530) 877-1180

777 Nunneley Road, Paradise (530) 872-8454

us Bank

1520 Bader Mine Road, Paradise (530) 876-8800

AmericAn cApitAl corp ken hunt 7020 Skyway Suite H, Paradise (530) 877-8800

6817 Skyway, Paradise (530) 877-9373

edwArd JoneS - donnA BuzzaRD, finanCial aDvisoR

14211 Wycliff Way, Magalia (530) 873-1114 X16

white JanitoRial

6311 Skyway, Paradise (530) 872-7000

Paradise rotary cluB

BaCkyaRD solutions

Paradise Pines ProPerty oWners assoc.

(530) 518-7468

P.O. Box 820, Paradise (530) 413-7725

1950 East 20th Street, Suite B240, Chico (530) 521-3112

Paradise symPhony society, inc.

Design BuilD solutions 410 East Street, Orland (530) 966-6823

P.O. Box 1892, Paradise (530) 809-0799

integRity BuilDeRs

Preferred Professionals 1001 Bille Road, Paradise (530) 876-8616

6627 Clark Road, Paradise (530) 828-9265

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ridge telePhone directory - Upstart pUblishing inc.

9100 Skyway. Paradise (530) 872-1219

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1001 Bille Road, Paradise (530) 876-8616

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1117 Noffsinger Lane, Paradise (530) 877-6258

edwArd JoneS inveStmentSshannon huRte 676 East First Avenue, Suite 11, Chico (530) 872-4339

law offiCe of ChRistian a. atheRton 2112 East 5th Avenue, Oroville (530) 877-6332

MaDe in paRaDise 2255 Fair Street, Chico (530) 343-7994

MCkeRnan,lanaM,Bakke & williaMs, llp 55 Independence Circle Suite 106, Chico (530) 877-4961

MiD valley title & esCRow Co.

6553 Skyway, Paradise (530) 680-9457

14115 Lakeridge Circle, Magalia (530) 873-0800

Jiffy luBe 6081 Clark Road, Paradise

601 Main Street, Chico (530) 877-4471

holiday market

roPP Painting comPany

paRaDise allianCe ChuRCh

MilleR glass, inC

6848-L Skyway, Paradise (530) 877-7621

13949 Andover Dr., Magalia (925) 872-8278

6491 Clark Rd, Paradise (530) 877-7069

745 Cherry Street, Chico (530) 877-9300

SPonSoRed by

Check back next week for more businesses and organizations that have re-opened. Listings provided by Paradise Ridge Chamber of Commerce. paradisechamber.com Apri l 25, 2019

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Bike Bikeissue

Pedal power

Bike Nonprofit promotes

environmentalism through local music, biking

‘I

t’s so much fun to just hop on your bike, and there is such a feeling of community and empowerment riding your bicycle through the city with that many other people,” gushed Danielle Baxter, who will soon gear up to volunteer for the Chico Bicycle Music Festival (CBMF). The free, annual event—featuring a completely pedal-powered mobile concert—is designed as a great day outside while sidestepping the fossil fuel industry. Its organizers understand that the human race’s climate catastrophe can be difficult for many to comprehend, much less combat, so the goal is to create an accessible and fun event that shows how bicycling helps make a difference. “People think of sustainability and environmentalism as something that may cause you to miss out on certain pleasures of life,” Baxter explained. “This event shows that it doesn’t have to be that way. It can be a super-rad time, while directly resisting a problem that seems so huge.” “We can still have fun and enjoy our lives without burning excessive fossil fuels. The festival is a way for people to realize the possibilities of sustainable energy,” added CBMF organizing partner Scott Grist. Baxter and Grist realized the potential of that power in 2016, after completing a bicycle tour from Chico to the Canadian border, a journey of about 900 miles. In Eugene, Ore., they saw Bicicletas por la Paz (Bicycles for Peace) perform. The Oakland-based band travels to gigs on bicycles to share pedal-powered politics and dance music. That bike tour and musical

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APRIL 25, 2019

experience helped turn Baxter and Grist on to the bicycle music festival already happening in their own community. The CBMF was started in 2008 by Samantha Zangrilli and Cheetah Tchudi, who worked at GRUB CSA Farm at the time and currently operate TurkeyTail Farm. After being the lead organizer for several years, Zangrilli was ready to pass the reins last year and began looking for a local group to take the lead. Grist knew Zangrilli from GRUB and had become co-chair of the Butte Environmental Council’s board in 2017. To him, it made perfect sense to shepherd the festival under the environmental advocacy group’s umbrella, working with the veteran volunteers who have been helping over the last decade. This year’s festival takes place on June 8 and includes a packed lineup of local talent. Soulful singer Nikki Sierra will kick off the progressive concert in the parking lot at Third and Flume streets, followed by a ride into Bidwell Park while Thunder Lump performs live from the back of a pedicab. At Cedar Grove, singer/songwriters Bran Crown and Kyle Williams will perform as a crew of cyclists power the sound system through an ingenious generator hooked up to stationary bikes. Back on the road, the caravan will travel to the End of Normal (2500 Estes Road), serenaded by Cameron Ford en route on the pedicab “stage.” At that final location, attendees will find food trucks, beer from Sierra Nevada Brewing Co., and water misters to help cool down. Ants in My Eyes Johnson, Mookatite, Triple Tree, Bungo and the Pat Hull Band will perform through the bike-powered system, and guests are invited to

The audience at the Chico Bicycle Music Festival fuels the amplified sound via a pedal-powered generator. Performers at the 2018 event included funky dance bands Smokey the Groove (far left) and Black Fong (above). PHOTOS BY KEN PORDES

sprawl out on the lawn or dance the evening away. Artists Quinn Troster and Ava Moon have lent their talents to the cause, creating artwork to promote the event, and muralist Molly Keen is making a banner to carry along on the ride. Raffles include a new bike from Greenline Cycles and bicycle-inspired furniture by Ron Toppi (Chico Bikesmith), and attendees can take part in bike limbo and ride unique, hand-built bicycles through the festival grounds. Pedal Press screen printing will ride along, creating custom T-shirts to memorialize the event. The main focus is to open people’s imagination to the possibilities of what they can do with a minimal carbon footprint, and all funds raised


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through the festival go toward BEC’s environmental advocacy. “It has to do with resisting fossil fuels. It’s really a radical movement, at its heart,” said Baxter, who considers herself a direct action environmentalist. “We don’t need electricity to have a badass time. We can use our legs, we can use bicycles. There is a lot of empowerment that comes from powering a concert with your legs.” Participants may not necessarily be thinking about the environment Join the ride:

Lean more about the Chico Bicycle Music Festival at facebook.com/ ChicoBicycleMusicFestival. This year’s celebration begins at 11 a.m. on June 8 at Third and Flume streets.

Among the five rules for those who want to power the generator: Have fun! PHOTO COURTESY OF CHICO BICYCLE MUSIC FESTIVAL

as they pedal through town, enjoying music with their friends, but Grist hopes that they do and put that into action by donating to or volunteering with BEC. “This is an environmental nonprofit that has been in Butte County for over 43 years,” Grist said. “BEC has been at the forefront of all environmental issues in this area. Their mission is to protect the land, air and water of Butte County, and I’d love for the Bicycle Music Festival and BEC to be synonymous. This is a great organization.” —NATE DALY

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Arts &Culture The healing

Rebecca Shelley’s colored-pencil re-creation of a Paradise family’s happy place.

arts

THIS WEEK

Artists and survivors collaborate after Camp Fire

25

THU

Special Events EXTERNAL FIRST-AID WORKSHOP: Learn how to make herbal remedies to heal yourself naturally. Arrive early, workshop starts at 6:30pm sharp. Thu, 4/25, 6:30pm. $10. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

Alongstand of beloved fruit trees, a 5-footsnake named Bob; the list of what

n uncle’s handmade suit of armor, a

was lost in the Camp Fire continues to grow. Like grief, by it evolves as time Neesa passes, adjusts as Sonoquie items are recovered and remembered. neesas@ newsrev i ew.c om The aforementioned items are just a few of Preview: the things that artists Remembered: Art have paid tribute to honoring loss from for Remembered: Art the Camp Fire Friday-Saturday, April Honoring Loss from 26–27; reception the Camp Fire, a colSaturday, 6-8pm laborative, multimedia art exhibit opening 1078 Gallery 1710 Park Ave. this weekend at the 433-1043 1078 Gallery. 1078gallery.org Local artists Rebecca Shelley and Rebecca Wallace wanted to help those who lost so much to the wildfire, but at first they weren’t sure how. “I had to do something, but I didn’t have any financial means. I figured I could offer what I did have—my art skills,” Wallace said. The two women are friends and colleagues. Shelley is an associate professor of art at Butte College, Wallace an adjunct fine art teacher at Yuba College. “Separately we each had our own kind of epiphany,” Shelley said. “We both 32

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APRIL 25, 2019

wanted to create art for people based off of things that were lost.” They decided to create a Facebook page for people to share their stories and then invited artists from all over the world to adopt one story and create a piece of art in tribute. More than 30 artists and survivors participated, with pieces being shipped in from as far away as Oslo, Norway. Shelley delegated much of the responsibility for the planning and execution of the project to her gallery production class. “It was an amazing opportunity for students to connect directly with the community and learn the process of setting up a show,” she said. “They helped with everything from making the poster to connecting artists with volunteers to hanging the show and collecting the work. Without them, it couldn’t have happened.” Many of the artists involved are strangers to the community, but all have been excited to contribute and grateful for the opportunity to help. “For me, as an artist, I wanted to create a visual for somebody, something they could hold onto and could connect with that they could no longer see,” Shelley said. “That’s how art can be really impactful—it can give a little bit of something to somebody who has lost everything.” The response from survivors started slowly, as many people are still expe-

riencing deep trauma. “I think this has taught me a little about the process of grief—that it takes a while for people to start filtering it,” Wallace said. “The drawing that I did for one family was of trees in their front yard that they used to take photos in front of,” Shelley said. “The mom is so caring for her children, and her house in Paradise was something that she wanted to make such a happy place. I tried to re-create that for them.” Wallace made a drawing of a man’s four cherished dogs lost in the fire. The process was difficult, she says, and she cried her way through it. “For me, I was drawn to people who had lost their pets. I felt so horrible.” Each piece in the two-day show will be accompanied by the story that inspired it and the name of the artist. Donations are being accepted to help get the artwork to the participants after the show, as many of the survivors have relocated since the fire. With the project coming to an end, Shelley said, “It’s been a lot of work, but I keep telling myself that this is bigger than me.” “I can’t speak for victims,” Wallace added, “but as an artist I just wanted give survivors something meaningful to bring to their new home, to remind them of where they came from.” Ω

THE SERENGETI RULES: Sierra Nevada presents a free screening of the award-winning documentary about a band of young scientists that discovers a radical new theory about the natural world. Food and drinks will be available. Thu, 4/25, 6pm. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St.

SPRING PLANT ID WALK IN THE PARK: Learn to identify herbs in the park and understand their medicinal, culinary and folklore uses with the Elderberry Apothecary. Email theelderberry apothecary@gmail.com for more info. Thu, 4/25, 5:30pm. $10. Bidwell Park, Five-Mile recreation area.

TAKE BACK THE NIGHT: An opportunity for students and community members to come together against violence toward women. Event will include a series of workshops and presentations and a silent candlelit march through the downtown. Email gsec.inclusivity@csuchico.edu or call 898-5724 for schedule of events. Thu, 4/25, 6pm. Gender and Sexuality Equity Coalition, Chico State.

THURSDAY NIGHT MARKET: Local produce, fresh flowers, music, arts and crafts and food trucks. Will continue every Thursday through September. Thu, 4/25, 6pm. Downtown Chico. 3456500. downtownchico.com

ZERO WASTE LOBBY TAKEOVER: Drop-in workshop to learn from the experts about how to go waste-free. Thu, 4/25, 11am. Valene L. Smith Museum of Anthropology, Chico State.

JOHN VANDERSLICE & MEERNAA Friday, April 26 Sierra Nevada Big Room SEE FRIDAY, MUSIC


FINE ARTS ON NEXT PAGE

QUARTETO NUEVO

Saturday, April 27 Museum of Northern California Art SEE SATURDAY, MUSIC days and include projected photographs. Refreshments will be served. Sat 4/27, 10am. Chico History Museum, 141 Salem St.

321-3117.

THE ROAD TO THE GREEN NEW DEAL TOUR: Community leaders discuss the climate crisis and the Camp Fire and the promise of the Green New Deal. Music provided by Smokey the Groove. Donation-based admission, see website for details. Sat 4/27, 7pm. El Rey Theater, 230 W. Second St. elreychico.com

SPRING CARNIVAL: Family fun with food trucks, face painting, games and a bounce house. Sat 4/27, 3pm. Chico Nature Center, 1968 E Eighth St. 895-4711. apm.activecommunities.com

SPRING OPEN HOUSE & ANNIVERSARY PARTY: Kickoff for riding season with test rides, barbecue live music, giveaways and prizes. Sat 4/27, 12pm. Sierra Steel HarleyDavidson, 1501 Mangrove Ave

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FRI

Special Events GOLD NUGGET DAYS: Live music, food, craft fair, beer, wine and cheese tasting, donkey derby, and a hoedown with Northern Traditionz. Proceeds donated to Camp Fire relief efforts. See website or call 826-6560 for event locations and info. Fri, 4/26, 4pm. Paradise & Magalia. goldnugget museum.com

KEEPING DANCE ALIVE ’19: Chico Community Ballet and Chico Creek Dance Centre presents a showcase of various styles of dance including ballet, hip-hop, Irish dance and more. Call 893-9028 for more info. Fri, 4/26, 7:30pm. $15. CUSD Center for the Arts, 1475 East Ave. tututix.com

TAKE BACK THE NIGHT: See Thursday. Fri, 4/26, 11am. Gender and Sexuality Equity Coalition, Chico State.

VOLUNTEER FRIDAYS: Join in the clean-up of various spots throughout the park by picking up litter and pulling weeds. For more info call Shane at 896-7831. Fri, 4/26, 9am. Bidwell Park.

WORDSPRING: Annual creative writing confer-

Music JOHN VANDERSLICE: Indie-rocker of many talents brings his sloppy hi-fi sound to the Big Room stage. The innovative Meernaa out of Oakland opens. Fri, 4/26, 8pm. $12. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St.

OVER THE RAINBOW CHORAL CONCERT: All-female choir, Synergism, performs uplifting songs celebrating hope. Proceeds benefit Hungry Wildcat Food Pantry. Fri, 4/26, 7pm. $10. First Baptist Church, 850 Palmetto Ave. 680-6683.

POTLUCK, OPEN MIC AND JAM: Bring a dish to share, your acoustic instrument, your voice, your song or your favorite joke. Small donation requested. Fri, 4/26, 5pm. Feather River Senior Center, 1335 Meyers St., Oroville.

Theater SUMMERTIME & WINTERTIME: Butte College Drama Department presents two whimsical plays about truth and love from playwright Charles Mee. Plays alternate each night. Check site or call for schedule. Fri, 4/26, 7:30pm. $10-$15. Butte College Black Box Theatre, 3536 Campus Drive, 895-2994. butte.edu/drama

SUPER HERO SHORTS: Blue Oak’s first-ever performance of one-act plays and

SUMMERTIME & WINTERTIME April 26-May 5 Butte College

SEE THURSDAY-SUNDAY, THEATER

monologues. Fri, 4/26, 7:30pm. Free. Blue Oak School, 450 W. East Ave.

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SAT

Special Events AN ELEGANT EVENING: Vintage fashion show to benefit the Centerville Recreation and Historical Association and the Honey Run Covered Bridge Association. There will be music, drinks, dessert and drawings. Sat 4/27, 6pm. $30. Chico Women›s Club, 592 E. Third St. 321-4038.

BRIAN POSEHN: Famous author/actor/comedian does stand-up. Sat 4/27, 8pm. $30. Feather

JAM AT SCOTTY’S: Hosted by The Difference. Musicians and singers welcome. Sat, 4/27, 3pm. Scottys Landing, 12609 River Road.

ence offering workshops in poetry, fiction and screenwriting with professional writers. Sat 4/27, 8am. $30-$60. Butte College, 3536 Butte Campus Drive, Oroville. 895-2935. buttewordspring.org

QUARTETO NUEVO: Masterful guitar ensemble plays Western classical, eastern European folk, Latin and jazz. Sat, 4/27, 7:30pm. $8-$20. Museum of Northern California Art, 900 Esplanade. monca.org

SOUL POSSE TRIO: Fun cover band plays brunch. Sat, 4/27, 11am. La Salles, 229 Broadway St. lasalleschico.com

Theater SUMMERTIME & WINTERTIME: See Friday. Sat, 4/27, 7:30pm. $10-$15. Butte College Black Box Theatre, 3536 Campus Drive. butte.edu/ drama

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SUN

Special Events DEER CREEK HIKE: Enjoy the scenery at this popular fishing spot. Meet at Chico Park ’n’ Ride to carpool at 9am. Call Jeanne at 321-7279 for more info. Sun, 4/28, 9am. Deer Creek.

Music AMY HANAIALI’I: Classically-trained vocalist from Hawaii performs songs rooted in her heritage. Sat, 4/27, 7:30pm. $20. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St.

AND THE EARTH SINGS: Chico State’s A Cappella Choir, Chamber Singers, and University Chorus will sing works by Robert Schumann, the Beatles and more in celebration of Earth Day. Sat, 4/27, 7:30pm. Harlen Adams Theatre, Chico State, 898-6333. csuchico. edu/soa

HIGH TEA: Put on a hat and enjoy a traditional English high tea. Reservations only. Sun, 4/28, 2pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St.

KAYAKING & BIRDING ON THE THERMALITO AFTERBAY: Launching at 9am for a leisurely kayaking trip in search of birds.

THIS WEEK CONTINUED ON PAGE 34

Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

GOLD NUGGET DAYS: See Friday. Sat 4/27, 8am. Paradise & Magalia, Paradise. goldnug-

EDITOR’S PICK

getmuseum.com

HOME AGAIN REBUILDING AFTER THE CAMP FIRE: Learn what it takes to rebuild your home during this one-day, seven-hour seminar covering everything from developing your home plan to construction. For more information visit website or call 898-6105. Sat 4/27, 8am. $45. Regional & Continuing Education, Chico State. rce. csuchico.edu

KEEPING DANCE ALIVE ’19: See Friday. Sat 4/27, 2pm and 7:30pm. $15. CUSD Center for the Arts, 1475 East Ave. tututix.com

ORO-CON: Oroville’s own comic convention returns with a day filled with local and visiting comic creators, vendors and more. Plus, special guests: comedian/actor Brian Posehn, Deadpool author Kenneth Rocafort, Punisher artist Scott Koblish, and many more. Free admission, all ages. Sat 4/27, 10am. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

PARADISE LOST, FOUND, AND LOST AGAIN: Barstool historian Jim Johnson will talk about the Paradise that he knew back in the old

FREE LISTINGS! Post your event for free online at www. newsreview.com/calendar, or email the CN&R calendar editor at cnrcalendar@newsreview.com. Deadline for print listings is Wednesday, 5 p.m., one week prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

STAY GOLD In April of 1859, a 54-pound gold nugget was found in Dogtown, now Magalia. In commemoration of this find, Gold Nugget Days was created. And despite the recent wildfire, this annual celebration will continue Friday and Saturday (April 26-27) in both Paradise and Magalia, with all your favorite events (except for the parade). A wine and cheese fundraiser at Paradise Lutheran Church kicks off the celebrations followed by a good old-fashioned donkey derby at Magalia Community Church and a full day of live music, barbecue and food trucks at Paradise Community Park and a grand finale hoedown with Northern Traditionz at Paradise Elks Lodge. APRIL 25, 2019

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7–8:30 8:30 pm in City Plaza

THIS WEEK conTinued From pAGe 33

FINE ARTS

Call Gaylord Grams at 533-1624 or email  gg2canoe@yahoo.com for info.  Sun, 4/28, 9am. Thermalito Afterbay, Oroville Junction.  altacal.org 

SHOULD CHIMPANZEES BE CONSIDERED PERSONS?: The Valene L. Smith Museum of  Anthropology lecture series continues with  Chico State philosophy professor Dr. Robert  Jones who presents the case for legal rights  of personhood for nonhuman animals.  Sun, 4/28, 4pm. Free. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E.  Third Street. 898-5397.

WALK MS: Raise some funds to end multiple sclerosis with a walk in the park. Call 855-372-1331  for more info.  Sun, 4/28, 8am. Bidwell Park.

WILDFLOWER CENTURY: Annual bicycle ride through  beautiful Butte County in the spring. Event  kicks off day before with a pre-ride party,  12-6pm, with food, beer and live music.  Sun 4/28, 5:30am. Silver Dollar Fairgrounds, 2357  Fair St. wildflowercentury.org 

DATE 5/3 5/10 5/17 5/24 5/31 6/7 6/14 6/21 6/28 7/5 7/12 7/19 7/26 8/2 8/9 8/16 8/23 8/30

BAND Big Mo & the Full Moon Band Dylan’s Dharma The Retrotones Journey’s Edge Mossy Creek The Chuck Epperson Jr. Band GravyBrain Triple Tree Rigmarole

Andre Thierry & The Zydeco Magic

Erin Haley & Firefly The Esplanade Band The Daly Blues The Fritz The Damaged Goods The Jeff Pershing Band Mystic Roots Band Velvet Starlings

Trail Brewing Company, 132 Meyers St., Ste.  120,.

NATALYA SHKODA AND STUDENTS: Classical piano  music featuring various solo and ensemble  selections, including works by Robert  Schumann.  Sun, 4/28, 2pm. Free. Zingg  Recital Hall, Chico State, ARTS 279. csuchico. edu/soa

Theater SUMMERTIME & WINTERTIME: See Friday.  Sun, 4/28, 2pm. $10-$15. Butte College Black Box  Theatre, 3536 Campus Drive. butte.edu/edu

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Special Events ABRUPT CLIMATE CHANGE: Author reading and  discussion with Guy McPherson.  Mon, 4/29, 2pm. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave. LIVING THE CHANGE: Free screening of documentary that shows people working toward a  more sustainable way of living.  Mon, 4/29, 4pm. Chico Guild Hall, 2775 Nord Ave.

1

Special Events POWER OF 100+ WOMEN MEETING: Social time,  wine, and an hour of connection. Shalom  Free Clinic, Valley Oak Children’s Services  and Girls on the Run of the Northstate will  discuss how to make a positive impact in  our community.  Wed, 5/1, 6pm. Butte Creek  Country Club, 175 Estates Drive. facebook. com/100WomenChico

Music TELEKINESIS: Indie power-pop band from  Seattle peforms with heartfelt singer/songwriter Sontalk.  Wed, 5/1, 8pm. $13. Sierra  Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St.

Media Sponsors KRCR CHANNEL 7, KCVU FOX 20, 92.7 BOB FM, Thunder 100.7, Power 102, 106.7 ZROCK, KZFR 90.1 Community Radio, Chico News & Review 34

CN&R

April 25, 2019

Shows through May 4

CHUCK EPPERSON AND LOKI MILLER: Guitar-driven  tunes on the patio.  Sun, 4/28, 3pm. Secret 

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For more MUSIC, See NIGHTLIFE on pAGe 38

MFA GALLERY, CHICO STATE

Art 1078 GALLERY: Remembered – Art Honoring  Loss from the Camp Fire, more than 30 artists from around the world have adopted  stories of possessions, homes, pets, or  loved ones lost in the fire and created a  piece of art for the survivors. One weekend  only. Reception Saturday night 6-8pm.  Through 4/27. 1710 Park Ave. 1078gallery.org

BMU 3RD FLOOR GALLERY: Art Education  Show, 12th annual juried show. Award  ceremony Thursday, May 2, 5pm, at the  Rowland-Taylor Recital Hall followed by  reception at 7pm in the gallery. Through 5/7.  BMU, Chico State.

CHICO ART CENTER: Creative Fusion, an exhibition of  student artwork selected and  prepared by Chico Art teachers. Through  4/26. 450 Orange St. chicoartcenter.com

HEALING ART GALLERY - ENLOE CANCER CENTER: Antonio Ramirez, photography by  late Northern California artist. The Enloe  Cancer Center Healing Art Gallery features  artists whose lives have been touched by  cancer. Through 7/19. 265 Cohasset Road,  332-3856.

JACKI HEADLEY UNIVERSITY ART GALLERY: 64th  Annual Juried Student Exhibition, featuring  works submitted by Chico State art students and includes a range of approaches,  concepts, and media. Through 5/11. Chico  State, ARTS 121. headleygallerycsuchico.com

JANET TURNER PRINT MUSEUM: Ink & Clay, annual  exhibition showcases student work in  printmaking complemented by works in  ceramics. Awards ceremony, Thursday,  May 2, 5pm at the Rowland-Taylor Recital  Hall.. Through 5/11. Arts & Humanities  Building, Chico State. janetturner.org

MFA GALLERY, CHICO STATE: Fraigaist, The  American Museum of Foreign Philosophical  Science celebrates Freya Vogela with a  collection of sculptures, drawings, photographs and personal belongings. Through  5/4. Arts & Humanities Building, Chico  State.

MUSEUM OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA ART: Tend, an  exploratory multimedia exhibit from the  Chikoko collective that utilizes found,  broken, burnt and re-purposed items with  a focus on textiles to examine the meaning  of home. Also,  Trapeze Acrobats, featuring  paintings of acrobats, divers, gymnasts  and dancers by Clay Vorhes. Closing event  Saturday, May 25, 6-8pm. Through 5/25. 900  Esplanade. monca.org

PROVISIONS GALLERY: Grand Opening, artwork  from multiple local artists. Through 5/9. 122  W. Third St. provisionsgallery.com

SALLY DIMAS ART GALLERY: Spring Fling Is  Here!, artist reception in celebration of  spring. Fr, 4/26, 4pm. 493 East Ave., Ste. 1.

VALENE L. SMITH MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY: Altar  States Spirit Worlds and Transformational  Experiences, Peter Treagan’s interactive  tech art complete with 3D glasses and  hidden imagery so visitors can participate  in what is described as a transformational  visionary art experience. Through 5/17.  Meriam Library, Chico State.

Museums BOLT’S ANTIQUE TOOL MUSEUM: Unique museum  has over 12,000 hand tools on display,  charting cataloging the evolution and  history of tools. Closed Sundays. Through  6/15. $3. 1650 Broderick St, Oroville.

CHICO CHILDREN’S MUSEUM:  Tons of cool stuff  for kids to explore including a miniature  city, complete with a junior vet clinic,  dentist, cafe and farmer›s market, a giant  fish tank, multi-sensory room, imagination playground and much more. Check  the website for hours and admission  information. Through 8/3. $7-$9. 325 Main  St. chicochildrensmuseum.org

CHICO CREEK NATURE CENTER: Living Animal  Museum & Nature Play Room, learn all  about local critters, plants and wildlife.  Through 5/25. $2-$4. 1968 E. Eighth St.  chicorec.com

GATEWAY SCIENCE MUSEUM: From Here to  There, explore the science of how things  move by land, sea and air. Also on display  are The Foothills, and America’s Wolves:  From Tragedy to Inspiration. Through  5/12. $5-$7. 625 Esplanade.

PATRICK RANCH MUSEUM: Working farm and  museum with rotating exhibits open every  Saturday and Sunday from 11am to 3pm.  Through 5/26. 10381 Midway, Durham.   patrickranchmuseum.org

VALENE L. SMITH MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY: Remarkable Lives, exploring the intertwined worlds of birds and  humans, in partnership with the Altacal  Audubon Society and Snow Goose Festival.  Exhibits include bird songs and behaviors,  local photography and a robotic recreation of the late Jurassic Archaeopteryx.  Through 7/31. Chico State. 


Apri l 25, 2019

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SEXUAL VIOLENCE HAS NO BOUNDARIES

All Gender Identities, Races, Ages, Social Classes & Ethnicities are Affected • 1 in 5 women will be raped in their lifetime • Nearly 1 in 2 women and 1 in 5 men experience sexual violence victimization other than rape at some point in their lives • Intimate partner sexual assault and rape are used to intimidate, control, and demean survivors of domestic violence • Intimate partner sexual assault is more likely than stranger or acquaintance assault to cause physical injury • 40-50% of women in abusive relationships will also be sexually violated during the course of the relationship • 18% of female survivors of spousal rape say their children witnessed the crime • Only 1 in 10 report being sexually violated. Marital rape is the most under-reported form of sexual assault.

KNOW YOUR RIGHTS about sexual assault. If you, or someone you know, has been sexually assaulted you can receive a free forensic medical examination, regardless of whether or not you choose to participate in the criminal justice process.

WE ARE HERE TO LISTEN

Butte/Glenn: 530-891-1331 Tehama: 530-529-3980 24hr CRISIS LINE: 530-342-RAPE (7273) Collect Calls Accepted 36

CN&R

ap ril 2 5 , 20 1 9


MUSIC Michael Benjamin Lerner is Telekinesis.

THE

photo by rAchel Demy

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1075 E. 20TH ST., CHICO. TICKETS ON SALE NOW! $15 AVAILABLE IN THE GIFT SHOP OR ONLINE AT WWW.SIERRANEVADA.COM/EVENTS WWW.SIERRANEVADA.COM/

The all-encompassing creative process behind Telekinesis

Ividual rock bands to be fronts for indimusic creators who mostly

t’s fairly common these days for

go it alone in the studio and recruit a rotating cast of friends for by tours (see: Tame Howard Impala). In this Hardee manner, Seattlebased indie-pop band Telekinesis is the brainchild Preview: telekinesis performs of Michael Wednesday, may 1, Benjamin Lerner, 8 p.m. Sontalk opens. a drummer and tickets: $13 songwriter who Sierra Nevada produced, recordBig Room ed and mixed 1075 e. 20th St. the outfit’s fifth 892-4647 album, Effluxion. sierranevada.com “It’s not the path I would have chosen, really,” he said of being the band’s only architect. “I wanted to be a drummer in a band, and I did that a bunch in my early 20s and got kind of burned out. I started writing songs mostly for myself, my friends and my family, and then, for whatever reason, someone heard it and that became my job. If I could wave a magic wand, I’d definitely be in a band-band.” There are pros and cons to writing and recording all of the parts himself, Lerner said. For one, it can

feel like he’s creating in a vacuum, without anyone to tell him “whether something’s good or bad, or whether I should go eat some food and drink some water,” he said. “At the same time, it’s really great to have an idea and put it down without any extraneous stuff, so you can do it as quickly as possible. I’m lucky enough to have a recording spot in my house so I can go do that whenever I want to.” Telekinesis is playing—with a full band—at the Sierra Nevada Big Room next Wednesday (May 1), in support of Effluxion. As is his penchant, Lerner has created a collection of highly textured power-pop songs that sound instantly familiar in the best way. Which is to say that Lerner’s music is both original and infectiously catchy; if you like indie-rock artists like The Shins and Death Cab for Cutie, you’re already on board for Telekinesis. (In fact, Telekinesis’ 2008 debut record was produced, mixed and engineered with the help of Chris Walla, formerly of Death Cab. Walla also played instruments on the album.) Effluxion represents something of a return to form for Lerner, who dabbled with synthesizers and drum machines on his last album, Ad Infinitum (2015). His latest

work features the sort of slowbuilding, guitar-based rockers (“Set a Course”) and bright and poppy strolls in the park (“How Do I Get Rid of Sunlight?”) that placed Telekinesis so firmly in the indierock genre in the first place. The songs sound rich and full, which is impressive when you think about Lerner working alone, learning just enough as he goes to execute his ideas—extending to the process of producing his own music, during which he belabors thousands of small decisions. “It’s not ideal,” he said. “When I started doing this 10 years ago, the amount of money a record label would give you up front to make an album was significantly more than it is now, because there’s not a lot of revenue being generated by the sales of media. It was great, because I could work with a producer and that would fit into the budget for the record. Now, it’s difficult to spend that money. It’s kind of a drag, because ultimately I think it’s a more fulfilling way to work.” It turns out that, for Lerner, having a practice and studio space at home is a mixed blessing. “When you’re working on your own, you can take all time you want,” he said. “And that’s not a good thing for me.” Ω

SierraNevadaBeer

@SierraNevada

@SierraNevadaChico

April 25, 2019

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NIGHTLIFE

THURSDAY 4/25—WEDNESDAY 5/1

26FRIDAY

ADAM FAUCETT: Heartfelt and powerful singer/songwriter from Arkansas plays with fellow folkie William Blackart. All ages. Fri, 4/26, 8pm. $8. The Spirit, 2360 Oro Quincy Highway, Oroville, 764-0359.

POLYRHYTHMICS

COMEDY MALFUNCTION: Two out-

SEE FRIDAY

COUNTRY MILE: Country cover band

of-towners and a few locals on stage to make you laugh. Fri, 4/26, 9pm. $7. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

Friday, April 26 Lost on Main

plays hits from the past and present. Fri, 4/26, 9pm. $5. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave. tackleboxchico.com

25THURSDAY

ARIELLE: Singer-songwriter and guitar player’s influences range from Joni Mitchell to Jeff Beck. Thu, 4/25, 8pm. $10-$13. Lost On Main, 319 Main St.

MONSTER TREASURE: Three-day Valley Fever festival kicks off with this selfdescribed “fuzzy mermaid punk” band from Stockton and Chico’s own Sex Hogs and Beehive. Tickets: $10 at door; $25 festival wristbands at Duffy’s Tavern in advance (or at venues day of). Thu, 4/25, 9pm. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

ROCK MOSAIC: Classic rock and country hits on the patio. Thu, 4/25, 6pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St. lasalleschico.com

SHALLOU: LA-based indie-electronic artist stops in town with Slow Magic as part of the Into the Wild tour. Yoste opens. Thu, 4/25, 7pm. $18. El Rey Theater, 230 W. Second St. 5708575. elreychico.com

THE STEVEN GRAVES BAND: Americanastyle classic rock originals with

a Southern rock edge. Thu, 4/25, 6:30pm. $12. KZFR Studio 416, 341 Broadway, Ste. 411, 895-0131. brown papertickets.com

SURF NOIR KINGS: Surf rock on the

patio. Thu, 4/25, 6:30pm. Red Tavern, 1250 Esplanade, 894-3463.

WILL WATJE: Guitarist/saxophonist from Decades plays solo. Thu, 4/25, 7pm. The Commons Social Empourium, 2412 Park Ave.

FLAT WORMS & WARM DRAG: Valley Fever music fest presents a fuzzy garage rock trio and noisy art-rock duo, both from LA. Chico’s Bad Mana opens. Tickets: $10 at door; $25 festival wristbands at Duffy’s Tavern in advance (or at venues day of). Fri, 4/26, 9pm. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St.

FLAURAL: Valley Fever music fest presents expansive art-pop band from Denver joined by locals Bungo and Similar Alien. Tickets: $10 at door; $25 festival wristbands at Duffy’s Tavern in advance (or at venues day of). Fri, 4/26, 7pm. Argus Bar + Patio, 212 W. Second St.

THE HOUSE CATS: Local band plays

hits from all genres. Fri, 4/26, 6pm. Almendra Winery & Distillery,

9275 Midway Road, Durham.

INVINCIBLE: Tribute to Pat Benatar. Fri, 4/26, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls

Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfallscasino.com

JOHN SEID, LARRY PETERSON, STEVE COOK: Eclectic mix of tunes by local

favorites. Fri, 4/26, 6:30pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St.

IT’S GETTING HOT IN HERE

Clear your calendars for three nights and two days of garagerock and punk at four different venues in downtown Chico. Valley Fever 2019 kicks off at The Maltese on Thursday (April 25) and continues through Saturday late-night with both local and out-of-town bands playing your new favorite songs. Other venues include Duffy’s Tavern, Argus Bar + Patio and Blue Room Theatre. This is a music festival, in Chico! Get there.

JOHN VANDERSLICE: Indie mainstay of many talents brings his sloppy hi-fi sound to the Big Room stage with innovative Oakland artist Meernaa. Fri, 4/26, 8pm. $12. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St. sierranevada.com

MAX MINARDI: Folk singer-song-

writer. Fri, 4/26, 7pm. The Exchange, 1975 Montgomery St., Oroville.

MICHAEL RAY: Country heartthrob

plays his hits. Fri, 4/26, 8pm. $29$65. Gold Country Casino & Hotel, 4020 Olive Highway, Oroville.

POLYRHYTHMICS: Popular Seattle soul/ funk/rock band performs with Big Sticky Mess. Fri, 4/26, 9pm. $15-$20. Lost on Main, 319 Main St. loston mainchico.com

ROCK MOSAIC: Celebrate National Richter Scale Day with local classic rock and country band. Fri, 4/26, 8pm. Unwined Kitchen & Bar, 980 Mangrove Ave.

SIGNOR BENEDICK THE MOOR: California hip-hop star joined by NY singersongwriter Olivia Clarke and local heartbreaker Scout. Fri, 4/26, 7:30pm. $5. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

Death Valley Girls

STEINWAY CABARET EXTRAVAGANZA:

TRIBAL SEEDS: Rock-reggae band from

LeAnn Cooley, Holly Taylor and more take turns playing a series of cabaret-style sets on the Steinway grand. Visit website for tickets. Fri, 4/26, 9:30pm. $15. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St. chicowomensclub.org

TANNER RICHARDSON: Singer/song-

writer plays happy hour. Fri, 4/26, 4pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St. lasalleschico.com

San Diego gets spiritual, with guests Eli-Mac & Arise Roots. Fri, 4/26, 8pm. $25-$28. Senator Theatre, 517 Main St.

THE TUNNEL: Valley Fever presents S.F. rockerswith Black Magnet and Severance Package. $10 at door; $25 festival wristbands at Duffy’s Tavern in advance. Fri, 4/26, 7:30pm. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. blueroomtheatre.com

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APRIL 25, 2019


THIS WEEK: FiND MOrE ENTErTAiNMENT AND SpECiAl EVENTS ON pAGE 32 BErNiE & THE wOlF Wednesday, May 1 The Maltese SEE wEDNESDAY

at Duffy’s Tavern in advance  (or at venues day of).  Sat, 4/27, 7:30pm. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W.  First St. valleyfeverchico.com

JAYSON ANGOVE: Singer/songwriter 

plays mellow weekend tunes.  Sat,

4/27, 7pm. The Exchange, 1975  Montgomery St., Oroville.

4/27, 8pm. $30. Feather Falls Casino  & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

DEATH VALLEY GIRLS: Valley Fever  presents LA-based guitar-driven  rock trio, plus garage-pop girl band  Susan and local screamers Trox and  the Terribles. Tickets: $10 at door;  $25 wristbands at Duffy’s Tavern  in advance (or venues day of).  Sat, 4/27, 9:30pm. Duffy’s Tavern, 337  Main St. valleyfeverchico.com

DRIVER: NorCal rock trio playing the 

27SATUrDAY

AMY HANAIALI’I: Classically-trained 

vocalist from Hawaii performs  songs rooted in her heritage.  Sat, 4/27, 7:30pm. $20. Sierra Nevada Big  Room, 1075 E. 20th St. sierranevada. com

BRADLEY RELF: Local singer/guitar-

ist. Sat, 4/27, 6pm. Almendra Winery  & Distillery, 9275 Midway Road,  Durham. almendrawinery.com

BRIAN POSEHN: Famous author/actor/ comedian performs stand-up.  Sat,

hits. Sat, 4/27, 8:30pm. Feather Falls  Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive,  Oroville.

E-40: West coast rap legend performs  in Oroville.  Sat, 4/27, 8pm. $50. Gold  Country Casino & Hotel, 4020 Olive  Highway, Oroville.

THE FUNNELS: Immensely popular  Chico new-wave rock band from the  ’80s reunites.  Sat, 4/27, 10pm. $10$12. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.  lasalleschico.com

THE HEARTLIGHTS: Valley Fever presents Oakland indie-pop band along  with local shoegazers Solar Estates  and Sac rockers Pets. Tickets: $10  at door; $25 festival wristbands 

JOHN SEID, LARRY PETERSON, STEVE COOK: See Friday.  Sat, 4/27,

6:30pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W.  Fourth St. 

MOSSY CREEK: Veteran bluegrass band  plays originals and favorites.  Sat, 4/27, 8pm. $7. Unwined Kitchen &  Bar, 980 Mangrove Ave.

MOTLEY INC.: Cover band performs 

your favorite Crue songs.  Sat, 4/27, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino &  Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

QUARTETO NUEVO: Masterful guitar  ensemble plays Western classical,  Eastern European folk, Latin and  jazz.  Sat, 4/27, 7:30pm. $8-$20.  Museum of Northern California Art,  900 Esplanade. monca.org

SPECIAL GUEST: Newly formed band  featuring members of Blues on the  Rocks, The House Cats, Running in  the Shadows and Spy Picnic will be  playing your favorite hits.  Sat, 4/27, 9pm. $5. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave.  tackleboxchico.com

STEAKSAUCE MUSTACHE: Valley  Fever presents an Oregon band  that describes itself as “chaotic 

partycore.” They are joined by local  hip-hop mind-benders Pervert and  Calvin Black from Redding. $10 at  door; $25 festival pass at Duffy’s  Tavern in advance (or at venues  day of).  Sat, 4/27, 7pm. Argus Bar +  Patio, 212 W. Second St.

SURROUNDED BY GIANTS: Valley Fever  presents Sacramento-based  rhythm-and-punk band, plus locals  Sunny Acres and WRVNG. $10 at  door; $25 festival pass at Duffy’s  in advance (or venues day of).  Sat, 4/27, 3:30pm. Blue Room Theatre, 139  W. First St. valleyfeverchico.com 

and musical poet Propaganda.  Mon, 4/29, 7:30pm. $20. Senator Theatre,  517 Main St.

30TUESDAY

SLUSHII: EDM DJ dance party.  Tue,

4/30, 8pm. $25. El Rey Theater, 230  W. Second St. elreychico.com

0

UP TO 11: Metal up with local head-

bangers playing Ozzy and more.  Sat, 4/27, 9pm. Studio Inn Lounge, 2582  Esplanade.

VIRGINIA MARLO: Piano and vocals  blending pop, alternative, and  hip-hop.  Sat, 4/27, 6pm. Almendra  Winery, 9275 Midway, Durham. 

28SUNDAY

JOHN SEID AND LARRY PETERSON: An 

eclectic mix of dinner tunes.  Sun, 4/28, 6pm. 5th Street Steakhouse,  345 W. Fifth St. 

29MONDAY

1wEDNESDAY

BERNIE & THE WOLF: Chicago-based 

and Mr. Bang.  Wed, 5/1, 8:30pm. $7.  The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave. malte  sebarchico.com

SNOW THA PRODUCT: Bilingual rapper  and singer Claudia Feliciano comes  to town as part of the Goin Off Tour.  CD Ent. & DBRO$ open.  Wed, 5/1, 8:30pm. $18. Senator Theatre, 517  Main St. jmaxproductions.net

TELEKINESIS: Power pop band from  Seattle tours in support of new  album. Singer/songwriter Sontalk  opens.  Wed, 5/1, 8pm. $13. Sierra  Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St.  sierranevada.com

indie rock duo joined by Similar Alien 

DriNK Up

Bay Area rap legend E-40 is doing more than hawking his infamous Category Five Sluricane Hurricane these days—he’s on tour. One of the pioneers of DIY hip-hop hits the stage at Gold Country Casino & Hotel this Saturday (April 27), and after 30 years in the business his voice is still just as sweet.

GUNGOR: Visitining experimental rock  duo, with genre-bending Brilliance 

April 25, 2019

CN&R

39


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A subdued victory for director Terry Gilliam The Man Who Texposed Killed Don Quixote for nearly 30 years. The most and public of his attempts—one that he actuerry Gilliam has been trying to make

ally got to the point of rolling camera—was a 2000 effort starring Johnny Depp and Jean Rochefort. The plug on that producby tion got pulled after Rochefort, cast Bob Grimm as Quixote, turned up with a bad back bg ri m m @ and rain fell on Gilliam’s set with new srev i ew. c o m such a vengeance that the landscape was wrecked and the crew’s equipment washed away. There was even a 2002 documentary on the failed production: Lost in La Mancha. Gilliam’s continued efforts to The Man Who film Quixote in the 18 years since Killed Don Quixote then have been mired in lawsuits and Starring Adam Driver and Jonathan pryce. insurance issues, with many notable Directed by Terry actors—Ewan McGregor, Michael Gilliam. Available on Palin, Robert Duvall, etc.—coming Amazon prime, iTunes and going along the way. and Google play. So, it was with a little bit of shock Not rated. that I found myself recently sitting down for this completed film. And as a Gilliam fan, it’s with a heavy heart that I report that The Man Who Killed Don Quixote is quite the mess; probably the result of too many revamps and adjustments over the years. The problems are not with the performances. Adam Driver does an excellent job stepping in as Toby, a frantic, disillusioned TV commercial director who longs for the days of his not-too-distant filmmaking

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April 25, 2019

past (a character clearly modeled after Gilliam himself). Jonathan Pryce proves to be a perfect choice for Don Quixote, or rather a cobbler given an acting gig who goes so method in his approach that he believes he’s the real Quixote. The film has Toby seeking out Pryce’s character in an effort to bolster a current, commercialized version of the Quixote story. In his travels, he confuses dreams with reality, finds himself being mistaken for Sancho Panza (Quixote’s sidekick) and battles some fat giants. The problem is with the narrative structure of the screenplay, co-written by Gilliam, an ambitious and convoluted work that shoots for satire about our current political atmosphere and the state of filmmaking in general. However, its central device—that being the blurring of reality and the dream world—flat out fails. There’s no true visual distinction between the two, and Gilliam constantly has Toby pointing out when he is in a dream or not. This is the first Gilliam film shot digitally, and the visual richness that has accompanied his previous works is nowhere to be found. Much of this movie is just a spastic, visually flat mess. The inspired giants sequence shows a flash of what the movie could’ve been. Yet given that he had to work with a budget that’s two-thirds of what he had for the same film in 2000, it seems obvious here that the director’s usual ambitious visuals were limited by lack of funds. Gilliam has said in interviews that he just wanted this movie out of his system. Now that Quixote has finally arrived, perhaps it will clear the auteur’s mind and allow him to get on to better things. Ω


FILM SHORTS Reviewers: Bob Grimm and Juan-Carlos Selznick.

Opening this week Avengers: Endgame

Will Captain America, Iron Man, Thor, Black Widow, Hulk and the rest of the surviving superheroes be able to reverse the effects of Thanos’ destruction and restore life to their fallen comrades and the rest of the stricken universe? Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

Emilio Estevez wrote, directed and stars as the head librarian in this story about a standoff between police and a large group of homeless patrons who “occupy” the public library to protect themselves from the cold night. Also starring Alec Baldwin, Jena Malone, Michael K. Williams and Jeffrey Wright. Pageant Theatre. Rated PG-13.

Now playing Breakthrough

A Christian faith-based film based on the 2017 biography The Impossible, a true-life story of a mother’s faith being put to work in service of her teen son who falls through the ice of a frozen lake and ends up in a coma. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

2

Hellboy

Another film adaptation of the Dark Horse character, the half-demon superhero fighting to save the world from an undead sorceress. Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

Little

A fantasy-comedy about an overbearing and ruthless corporate mogul (Regina Hall) who, after wishing to be young again, turns into a 13-year-old version of herself (Marsai Martin) and still has to run her company—with a lot of help from her assistant (Issa Rae). Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13.

Missing Link

A stop-motion animated feature from Laika (the studio behind Coraline and ParaNorman) that tells the story of a monster/myth investigator (voiced by Hugh Jackman) and an adventurer (Zoe Saldana) and their quest to find a particular Bigfoot named Mr. Link (Zach Galifianakis). Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

Penguins

Ed Helms narrates this documentary that follows the life journey of a penguin named Steve. Cinemark 14. Rated G.

Pet Sematary

Captain Marvel

Despite the fact that she’s playing a superhero who has the power to shoot electrical bursts from her hands, Brie Larson’s Captain Marvel suffers from a disappointing lack of energy. Larson’s turn as the title character, aka Carol Danvers (aka Vers), is plagued by lethargy and bizarre line deliveries, and she gives off a detached vibe that she doesn’t want to be in the movie. Had the film around her been really good, the lead’s bored disposition might’ve been forgiven, but this cosmic superhero origin story and intergalactic war movie is also riddled with some haphazard storytelling and awful special effects. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13 —B.G.

A social worker and her children are haunted by an evil ghost. The sixth film in The Conjuring Universe series of films (The Conjuring, Annabelle, The Nun, etc.) that are adapted from real-life paranormal investigation cases. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

1

Dumbo

The decline of Tim Burton continues with this wasteful remake of the 1941 animated classic that amounts to one big nothing—for kids and adults alike. The original was a little more than an hour long, while this one lasts for nearly two hours that feel like 40. A bunch of unnecessary subplots and added characters take away time from one of the lone bright spots, the title character, an admittedly cute CGI achievement. Instead of the original’s Timothy Q. Mouse, we get the requisite precocious children, one of them played by Thandie Newton’s daughter, Nico Parker, who absolutely cannot act. Colin Farrell appears as Holt, the preco-

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Jason Clarke, Amy Seimetz and John Lithgow star in this latest adaptation of Stephen King’s horror novel about a family’s terrifying dealings with a mysterious burial ground. Cinemark 14. Rated R.

Shazam!

The first big-screen treatment of the classic DC Comics character, the alter ego of troubled teen Billy Batson (played by Asher Angel), who turns into a buff adult (Zachery Levi) full of superpowers when exclaims, “Shazam!” Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

4

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cious kids’ dad, and like most of the human actors in this movie, he seems lost. And V.A. Vandevere, the villain of the film, is played by Michael Keaton, who is at his sneering worst. Cinemark 14. Rated PG —B.G.

A young girl in a 1980s flashback drifts away from her father at an amusement park on the Santa Cruz pier and finds herself in a darkened and frightening hall of mirrors. Things then jump to the present day, where Adelaide and Gabe (Lupita Nyong’o and Winston Duke) are taking their children, Zora and Jason, to the beach. It’s the same beach we saw in the flashback, and we find out that Adelaide was that young girl. She’s not happy about revisiting the place. The family excursion quickly becomes the worst vacation ever, as another family shows up at night. A quick examination of the intruders reveals what the commercials for this movie have already told you: The family outside is a darker mirror image of the stunned family inside the house. They aren’t coming over to borrow the lawn mower. They intend to kill. Writer-director Jordan Peele follows up the success of Get Out with another mind bender, one that is also an efficient, bareknuckled horror-thriller, plus a comedy and a brutal social satire. It’s the whole package. Cinemark 14. Rated R —B.G.

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CHOW 35chow Helpful hints for properly dosed homemade cannabis edibles.

Don’t overbake Helpful hints for properly dosed homemade cannabis edibles image sent to Tina by Sac design

Don’t overbake

photo by Ken MAgri

Use a cannabis potency detector to measure THC levels in your homemade edibles.

Helpful hints for properly dosed homemade cannabis edibles

Thoursproperto kick low dosage. Edibles take as long as two in, and discovering that you ate too

he trick to homemade cannabis edibles is getting a

much THC can cause paranoia, anxiety or panic. But by taking the steps to infuse cannabis into butter or cooking oils, the story and measurements are more accurate, photo by which allows home cooks to get Ken Magri creative with endless possibilities of stoney recipes. Here are some tested and reliable steps for making edibles at home: First decarboxylate: Decarboxylation, or decarbing, is a warming process that activates the THC and increases potency. This first step is optional, but recommended. Prebake finely ground cannabis at 225 degrees on a cookie sheet for 20 minutes or until brown. Green butter: Warm 4 ounces of butter, 1/4 cup of water and 7 grams (1/4 ounce) of decarbed cannabis in a saucepan. Stir well, then let it simmer on the lowest heat setting for three hours. Separate the cannabutter from plant matter by straining it through a cheesecloth, then refrigerate. Once cool, divide the butter into seven sections. Each one should weigh .57 ounces and contain 1,000 milligrams of THC. I used a homegrown Alien Tarantula strain for my batch and relied on a tCheck2 testing device to determine its potency. With just drops of butter, oils or alcohol it accurately measures the strength of the cannabis infusion in less than a minute. Needless to say, it’s highly helpful. Although this home test kit is expensive (nearly $300), it’s portable and works well. My canna-butter batch tested at 18.2 percent potency. For something savory, I put 1/4 teaspoon of

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leftover decarbed cannabis onto water crackers with cheese slices and sour cream and toasted them. A whiff of cannabis scent was there, but the taste and texture got lost in the blend. (Butter recipe from a Dutch medicinal cannabis forum: tinyurl.com/cannabutterrecipe.) Fresh canna oil: Dispensary-bought concentrates are already measured and tested. I used 1 gram of Opus Nectar live resin, labeled 70.7 percent THC, and 707 milligrams. After decarbing at 225 for 10 minutes, the liquefied resin could be blended directly into hot cooking oil. I added a 0.5 grams of live resin to a half-cup of vegetable oil, and used it for a batch of Betty Crocker brownies (yield: 30 canna-brownies, each containing 23.5 milligrams of 70.7 percent THC). I blended the remaining 0.5 grams of live resin into 8 ounces of olive oil, infusing 58.8 milligrams of THC into each fluid ounce (which can be further diluted as needed). With infused olive oil, the culinary possibilities are vast: roasted potatoes, sauteed veggies and marinated meats. As always, be mindful. (Infused oil recipe sourced from The Cannabist magazine.) Feel-good advice: It’s not a good idea to give homemade edibles to others, as tolerance differs greatly from person to person. And store any tempting sweets away from children. Also, it’s important to remember that milligrams and potency percentages are two different measurements. So determine your proper dosage by microdosing and start low and slow (no more than 5-10 milligrams over two hours). The popular cannabis site Leafly has a comprehensive dosing guide (search: “dosing chart”) that is very helpful. Happy baking! Ω

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ARTS DEVO by JASON CASSIDY • jasonc@newsreview.com

NOW THAT WAS A PARTY This past weekend’s Chico Area Music Festival & Awards Show was the 14th edition of the event, and Arts DEVO has been there every single year for the CN&R’s annual celebration of the local music scene. This one was probably the best. With an incredible sound system, huge dance floor and great beer for days, the Sierra Nevada Big Room is an ideal venue for a music party. Plus, the performers—from my new favorite Chico band, electro-pop duo Astronaut Ice Cream, to tuneful indie-rockers Surrogate—all brought it. This year’s event also was dedicated to musicians affected by the Camp Fire (and nearly $1,700 in donations raised for the Musicians Around the Camp Fire fund). The show opened with a screening of the video for John-Michael Sun’s song “Refugee,” featuring the artist singing his fragile, mournful tune among the ashes of his burned-out Paradise home, followed by a live duet performance by Sun and his partner, Susan Dobra. The evening came to an end after a two-song performance by a 16-member supergroup featuring a handful of musicians whose homes were lost in the fire, including ringleader Mark McKinnon. The first tune was an emotional performance of a McKinnon original, “Just Breathe,” a song he wrote in response to the fire. And for the second—which had the group changing its name from Mark McKinnon and The Strolling Rogues to the Leonard Cohen Tribute Orchestra—the choir of singers was put to good work on an uplifting rendition of the late songwriter’s signature work, “Hallelujah.” A very fitting way to close a great night of music and community. Oh, and we also gave out some CAMMIES awards:

Peoples’ Choice Award: Best Local Act: Lo & Behold Critics’ Choice Awards:

Best Female Vocalist: Jenise Coon (Chico High choral/music-theater director) Best Keyboardist: Webster Moore (Lo & Behold) Best Guitarist: Mike Justice (Sunny Acres) Best Songwriter: Becky Brown (Susurrus) Best New Band: Black Magnet Best Male Vocalist: Pat Hull Best Local Album: Pariah Days, by

Astronaut Ice Cream PHOTO BY JASON CASSIDY

Severance Package

Best Bassist: Austin Farwell (Smokey the Groove) Best Live Act: Pervert Best Drummer: Sean Raeside (Pervert, Pat Hull) Local Badasses: Sally & Bruce MacMillan (Music Connection) Hogan/West/LaPado Lifetime Achievement Award: Joe Hammons

RETRO CHICO There wasn’t a CAMMIES in Chico in the 1980s, but if there had been, The Funnels very likely would’ve cleaned up. During the band’s 1980searly 1990s heyday, the party crew was Chico’s favorite thing next to beer (the band was actually sponsored by Budweiser!). Now, nearly 30 years since they last rocked a local stage with their dance-happy new-wave covers and originals, the band will return to one of its favorite haunts, La Salles, this Saturday (April 27) for the third and final show of a mini reunion tour. Tickets are $10 presale (lasalles The Funnels, circa late-’80s chico.com) and $12 at the door.

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY For the week oF April 25, 2019 ARIES (March 21-April 19): In the United

States, the day after Thanksgiving typically features a spectacular shopping orgy. On Black Friday, stores sell their products at steep discounts and consumers spend their money extravagantly. But the creators of the game Cards Against Humanity have consistently satirized the tradition. In 2013, for example, they staged a Black Friday “anti-sale” for which they raised their prices. The coming weeks will be a favorable time for you to try something similar. Is it possible you’re undercharging for your products and services and skills? If so, consider asking for more. Reassess your true worth and seek appropriate rewards.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20):

Whether or not you believe in magic, magic believes in you right now. Will you take advantage of the fancy gifts it has to offer? I guess it’s possible that you’re not interested in seeing deeper into the secret hearts of those you care for. Maybe you’ll go “ho-hum” when shown how to recognize a half-hidden opportunity that could bring vitalizing changes. And you may think it’s not very practical to romance the fire and the water at the same time. But if you’re interested, all that good stuff will be available for you. P.S. To maximize the effects of the magic, believe in it.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): In 1815, the

most ferocious volcanic eruption in human history exploded from Mount Tambora in what’s now known as Indonesia. It flung gas and ash all over the planet, causing weird weather for three years. Sunlight dimmed, temperatures plummeted, skies were tumultuous and intense storms proliferated. Yet these conditions ignited the imagination of author Mary Shelley, inspiring her to write what was to become her most notable work, Frankenstein. I suspect that you, too, will ultimately generate at least one productive marvel in response to the unusual events of the coming weeks.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): For more

than 40 years, Cancerian musician Carlos Santana has made music that blends rock ’n’ roll with Latin and African rhythms. In the early years, his creations sold well, but by the mid-1980s his commercial success declined. For a decade, he floundered. His fortunes began to improve after a spectacular meditation session. Santana says he was contacted by the archangel Metatron, who told him how to generate material for a new album. The result was Supernatural, which sold 30 million copies and won nine Grammy Awards. I mention this because I suspect that you could soon experience a more modest but still rousing variation of Santana’s visitation. Are you interested? If so, the next seven weeks will be a good time to seek it out—and be very receptive to its possibility.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “Expergefactor”

is an old English word that has fallen out of use. In its original sense, it meant something that wakes you up, like an alarm clock or thunderstorm or your partner’s snoring. But I want to revive expergefactor and expand its meaning. In its new version, it will refer to an exciting possibility or beloved goal that consistently motivates you to spring out of bed in the morning and get your day started. Your expergefactor could be an adventure you’re planning or a masterpiece you’re working on, or a relationship that fills you with curiosity and enchantment. In my astrological opinion, the coming weeks will be an excellent time to identify and fine-tune an expergefactor that will serve you well for a long time.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): We live in a

cultural moment when satire, sarcasm, cynicism and irony are prized as supreme emblems of intelligence. If you say that you value sincerity and earnestness, you risk being considered naive and unsophisticated. Nevertheless, the current astrological omens suggest that you will generate good fortune for yourself in the coming weeks by making liberal use of sincerity and

by rob brezsny earnestness. So please try not to fall into the easy trap of relying on satire, sarcasm, cynicism and irony to express yourself. As much as is practical, be kindly frank and compassionately truthful and empathetically genuine. P.S. It’s a strategy that will serve your selfish aims quite well.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “Most people

don’t find their creativity,” mourned Libran author Truman Capote. “There are more unsung geniuses that don’t even know they have great talent.” If that describes you even a little bit, I’m happy to let you know that you’re close to stumbling upon events and insights that could change that. If you respond to the prompts of these unexpected openings, you will rouse a partially dormant aspect of your genius, as well as a half-inert stash of creativity and a semi-latent cache of imagination.

CLASSIFIEDS Call for a quote. (530) 894-2300 ext. 2 Phone hours: M-F 9am-5pm. Deadlines for print: Line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Display ad deadline: Friday 2pm

All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. Further, the News & Review specifically reserves the right to edit, decline or properly classify any ad. Errors will be rectified by re-publication upon notification. The N&R is not responsible for error after the first publication. The N&R assumes no financial liability for errors or omission of copy. In any event, liability shall not exceed the cost of the space occupied by such an error or omission. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes full responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. *Nominal fee for some upgrades.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Do you

know the word sfumato? Its literal meaning in Italian is “smoked.” When used to describe a painting, it refers to blurred borders between objects or fuzzy transitions between areas of different colors. All the forms are soft and hazy. I bring this to your attention because I suspect the coming weeks will be a sfumato-like time for you. You may find it a challenge to make precise distinctions. Future and past may overlap, as well as beginnings and endings. That doesn’t have to be a problem as long as you’re willing to go with the amorphous flow. In fact, it could even be pleasurable and useful. You might be able to connect with influences from which you’ve previously been shut off. You could blend your energies together better with people who’ve been unavailable.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

“You have a right to experiment with your life,” declared author Anaïs Nin. I agree. You don’t necessarily have to be what you started out to be. You can change your mind about goals that you may at one time have thought were permanent. I suspect you could be at one of these pivot points right now. Are there any experiments you’d like to try? If so, keep in mind this further counsel from Nin. It’s possible “you will make mistakes. And they are right, too.”

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): You

have one main task to accomplish in the coming weeks. It’ll be simple and natural if you devote yourself to it wholeheartedly. The only way it could possibly become complicated and challenging is if you allow your focus to be diffused by less important matters. Ready for your assignment? It’s articulated in this poem by Rupi Kaur: “Bloom beautifully / dangerously / loudly / bloom softly / however you need / just bloom.”

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AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): When

the forces of the Roman empire occupied the British Isles from the years 43 to 410, they built 2,000 miles of roads. Their methods were sophisticated. That’s why few new roads were built in England until the 18th century, and many of the same paths are still visible and available today. In this spirit, and in accordance with astrological omens, I recommend that you make good use of an old system or network in the coming weeks. This is one time when the past has blessings to offer the future.

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PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): “I’m not

enigmatic and intriguing enough,” writes a Piscean blogger with the user name RiddleMaster. “I really must work harder. Maybe I’ll start wearing ankle-length black leather coats, billowing silk scarves imprinted with alchemical symbols, and wide-brimmed hats. I’ll listen to Cambodian folk songs and read rare books in ancient Sanskrit. When someone dares to speak to me, I’ll utter cryptic declarations like, ‘The prophecies will be fulfilled soon enough.’” I understand RiddleMaster’s feelings. You need mystery almost as much as you need food. But I believe you should set aside that drive for a few weeks. The time has come for you to show the world who you are with crisp candor.

www.RealAstrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888.

Dated: March 15, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000336 Published: April 4,11,18,25, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as SQUYRES FIRE PROTECTION, INC. at 166 East Third Street Chico, CA 95928. SQUYRES FIRE PROTECTION, INC.

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166 East Third Street Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: BRANDON SQUYRES PRESIDENT Dated: March 26, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000390 Published: April 4,11,18,25, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as RPM MARINE at 5656 Pentz Road Paradise, CA 95969. LOGAN JEFFREY CUSEO 15192 Coutolenc Road Magalia, CA 95954. MICHAEL THEADORE OMARY 5656 Pentz Road Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: MICHAEL T O’MARY Dated: March 25, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000377 Published: April 4,11,18,25, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BURKE COOKIE CO. at 3278 Tinker Creek Way Chico, CA 95973. JENNIFER KAY BURKE 3278 Tinker Creek Way Chico, CA 95973. JOSHUA ALAN BURKE 3278 Tinker Creek Way Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: JENNIFER BURKE Dated: March 22, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000367 Published: April 4,11,18,25, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as TIPSOO HOPE at 151 Tipsoo Peak Rd Berry Creek, CA 95916. CAROLINE LOUISE CLOVER 151 Tipsoo Peak Rd Berry Creek, CA 95916. ANTHONY LOUIS ENGRO II 151 Tipsoo Peak Rd Berry Creek, CA 95916. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: ANTHONY ENGRO II Dated: March 27, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000394 Publsihed: April 4,11,18,25, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ANYTIME AIRPORT SHUTTLE at 3166 Godman Ave Chico, CA 95973. LINDA MYERS 3166 Godman Ave Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: LINDA MYERS

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as AGS CONSTRUCTION SERVICES at 6150 Center Street Paradise, CA 95969. ALPHONSE G SPERSKE 1252 Wagstaff Road Paradise, CA 95969. AMY M SPERSKE 1252 Wagstaff Rd Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: AMY SPERSKE Dated: March 28, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000400 Published: April 4,11,18,25, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as PARKER’S CORNER at 9305 Midway Durham, CA 95938. PARKER’S CORNER, INC. 9050 Lasell Lane Durham, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: ARLITA PURSER, CORP. SECRETARY Dated: March 27, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000396 Published: April 4,11,18,25, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as THE LOFT HAIR AND SKIN CARE at 2535 Forest Ave #110 Chico, CA 95928. BRENDA E BAUREIS Two Ilahee Lane #40 Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: BRENDA E BAUREIS Dated: March 29, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000407 Published: April 4,11,18,25, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as IZZY’S ASPHALT SOLUTIONS at 2605 Burnap Avenue Chico, CA 95973. ISRAEL TAYLOR 2605 Burnap Avenue Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ISRAEL TAYLOR Dated: April 4, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000426 Published: April 11,18,25, May 2, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as D AND J PROFESSIONAL MOVERS at 1621 Sheridan Avenue Chico, CA 95926. DAVID GLENN BRACY 1621 Sheridan Avenue Chico, CA 95926. JAMES RAYMOND DAVID ROBERTSON 26152 Walch Avenue Orland, CA 95963. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: JAMES ROBERTSON Dated: April 3, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000418 Published: April 11,18,25, May 2, 2019

TRUSTEE OF BIG 7 CONFERENCE 666 Grafton Park Drive Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Trust. Signed: MIKE LIDDELL Dated: April 4, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000430 Published: April 25, May 2,9,16, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as MIDWAY VINTAGE UPCYCLED AND CONSIGN at 9379 Midway Durham, CA 95938. MELISSA ANN KAUTI 156 Cavalier Way Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: MELISSA KAUTI Dated: March 29, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000408 Published: April 18,25, May 2,9, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as IMPERIAL HOME INSPECTION SERVICES at 25 Vincent Lane Cohasset, CA 95973. TREVOR REED MAY 25 Vincent Lane Cohasset, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: TREVOR MAY Dated: April 9, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000458 Published: April 25, May 2,9,16, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following persons have abandoned the use of the fictitious business names DEVOLL MUSIC, DEVOLL at 2118 Laurel Street Chico, CA 95928. WILLIAM HEPWORTH 1145 Loser Ave Gridley, CA 95948. TYLER DEVOLL 2118 Laurel Street Chico, CA 95928. ANDREW LOESER 2400 McGie Street Chico, CA 95928. SCOTT CORY 476 Hoopa Circle Chico, CA 95926. REBECCA ANDRES 6343 Rd 200 Sp 71 Orland, CA 95963. This business was conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: REBECCA ANDRES Dated: April 8, 2019 FBN Number: 2017-0000799 Published: April 18,25, May 2,9, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as COMANCHE CREEK FARMS, HAND IN GARDEN INC at 200 Speedway Ave Chico, CA 95928. HAND IN GARDEN, INC. 260 Speedway Ave Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: SEAN MINDRUM OWNER Dated: April 5, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000442 Published: April 25, May 2,9,16, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BIG 8 CONFERENCE at 666 Grafton Park Drive Chico, CA 95926. MICHAEL ALAN LIDDELL

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following persons have abandoned the use of the fictitious business names COMANCHE CREEK FARMS, HAND IN GARDEN INC at 260 Speedway Avenue Chico, CA 95928. HAND IN GARDEN INC 260 Speedway Avenue Chico, CA 95928.

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JAMES GAYL MILLER 260 Speedway Avenue Chico, CA 95928. GWENDOLYM M MILLER 260 Speedway Avenue Chico, CA 95928. This business was conducted by a Corporation. Signed: JAMES G. MILLER PRESIDENT Dated: April 5, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000132 Published: April 25, May 2,9,16, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ALMOND ASPHALT MAINTENANCE at 1050 B Lisa Lane Paradise, CA 95969. DANIEL JOHNSON PO Box 564 Magalia, CA 95954. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: DANEL S JOHNSON Dated: April 8, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000447 Published: April 25, May 2,9,16, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following person has abandoned the use of the fictitious business name ALMOND ASPHALT MAINTENANCE at 1050B Lisa Lane Paradise, CA 95969. FREDRICK S. YANNER 6644 Dolores Lane Paradise, CA 95969. This business was conducted by an Individual. Signed: FREDRICK S. YANNER Dated: April 8, 2019 FBN Number: 2016-0000242 Published: April 25, May 2,9,16, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following person has abandoned the use of the fictitious business name: MIDWAY VINTAGE UPCYCLED DESIGN & CONSIGN at 9379 Midway Durham, CA 95938. LORI RUPPEL 2121 Kennedy Avenue Chico, CA 95973. This business was conducted by an Individual. Signed: LORI RUPPEL Dated: March 29, 2019 FBN Number: 2016-0000434 Published: April 18,25, May 2,9, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as NORTH VALLEY HOME CARE at 2260 St George Ln Suite 2 Chico, CA 95928. CLEVERDON CARE SERVICES LLC 2590 California Park Drive #24 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: SPENCER C. ROGERS, PRESIDENT Dated: April 12, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000475 Published: April 25, May 2,9,16, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as NEAR AND DEAR BAKERY at 703 Salem St Apt B Chico, CA 95926. SYDNEY ANN CARROLL 703 Salem St Apt B Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual.

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Signed: SYDNEY CARROLL Dated: April 15, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000481 Published: April 18,25, May 2,9, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as FEATHER RIVER CRAGS APARTMENTS at 1200 Washington Ave Oroville, CA 95965. JADE EHRET 261 Via Del Sol Vacaville, CA 95687. TODD ANTHONY GAYLORD 261 Via Del Sol Vacaville, CA 95687. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: TODD A. GAYLORD Dated: April 5, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000444 Published: April 25, May 2,9,16, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following persons have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name FEATHER RIVER CRAGS APARTMENTS at 1200 Washington Ave. Oroville, CA 95965. TODD GALYLORD 3120 Oak Rd, Apt 422 Walnut Creek, CA 94597. MARCUS BONESS 956 John Murray Way Folsom, CA 95630. This business was conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: TODD A. GAYLORD Dated: April 5, 2019 FBN Number: 2014-0001100 Published: April 25, May 2,9,16, 2019

2156 Pillsbury Rd Chico, CA 95926. RAQUEL FIGUEROA RIZO 3549 Esplanade 420 Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: RAQUEL FIGUEROA Dated: March 21, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000361 Published: April 18,25, May 2,9, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as HAYDEN’S STUMP GRINDING at 4914 Pentz Road Paradise, CA 95969. WILLIAM H RITCHEY 4914 Pentz Road Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: WILLIAM H. RITCHEY Dated: April 4, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000427 Published: April 25, May 2,9,16, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as THE MAST FAMILY RANCH at 12269 1/2 Andy Mtn. Road Oroville, CA 95965. SANDRA H MAST 1090 Dundee Ave Ben Lomond, CA 95005. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: SANDRA H. MAST Dated: March 29, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000405 Published: April 25, May 2,9,16, 2019 \

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as HABANEROS TAQUERIA at

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BOYD SOAPS AND DESIGNS at 443 Stilson Canyon Road

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this Legal Notice continues

Chico, CA 95928. LIZZIE MCDONALD 443 Stilson Canyon Road Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: LIZZIE MCDONALD Dated: April 11, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000468 Published: April 25, May 2,9,16, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CHICO FLIGHT TRAINING at 900 Fortress St Chico, CA 95973. GLOBAL AVIATION CENTER INC 702 Mangrove Ave Ste 335 Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: DUANE PONTIUS, CEO Dated: April 9, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000457 Published: April 25, May 2,9,16, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as PARADISE TINY HOMES, TINY PARADISE at 1321 W. 7th St. Chico, CA 95928. JAMIE MARIE AUSTIN 11911 Hwy 70 E Lenoir City, TN 37772. RANDAL WHEELER AUSTIN 11911 Hwy 70 E Lenoir City, TN 37772. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: RANDAL WHEELER AUSTIN Dated: March 25, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000384 Published: April 25, May 2,9,16, 2019

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NOTICES NOTICE OF LIEN SALE Pursuant to CA. Business Code 21700, in lieu of rents due, the following units contain tools, electronics, furniture, clothes, furniture, boxes, personal items, recreation equipment and tools. Unit A5 NICOLE GARCIA personal items, furniture, boxes etc. Unit A8 DAVID BRAZIL personal items, furniture, boxes etc. Unit A10 JENNIFER MAYNARD personal items, boxes, tools, bikes etc. Unit A11 LORRANIE ROSSON personal items, boxes, home furnishings etc. Unit A14 STEVEN SMITH personal items, boxes, electronics etc. Unit A18 VANESSA WADE personal items, boxes etc. Unit B6 TIFFANY BARNES personal items, boxes electronics etc. Unit B11 CHRISTOPHER HARRISON personal items, boxes, tools etc. Unit D4 JUSTIN STRAEDE personal items, boxes, home furnishings etc. Unit D7 SUSAN GANNON personal items, boxes, furniture etc. Unit D12 SUSAN GANNON personal items, boxes, funiture etc. Unit E7 TRINA WASHBURN personal items, boxes electronics etc. Unit F5 ARAUJO ALEXANDER TRINA WASHBURN personal items, boxes etc. Unit F11 TAMBRA HEIDRICH personal items, boxes etc. Contents to be sold to the highest bidder on: Saturday May 11, 2019. Beginning at 3:00 P.M. Sale to be held at: George’s Mini Storage 2701 Burnap Avenue Chico CA. 95973. (530) 960-6010 Published: April 25, May 2, 2019 NOTICE OF LIEN SALE Pursuant to CA. Business Code 21700, in lieu of rents due, the following units contain tools, electronics, furniture, clothes, furniture, boxes, personal items, recreation equipment and tools. Unit 1 JASON GERMAN personal items, furniture, boxes etc. Unit 5 ANITA TRABUCCO personal items, boxes, furniture etc. Unit 7 JOSEPH BELL personal items, boxes, tools, bikes etc. Unit 8 DAVID GUTERREZ personal items, boxes, home furnishings etc. Unit 23, 24 SUSAN JOHNSON personal items, boxes etc. Unit 30 DAVID YOUNG personal items, boxes, electronics etc. Unit 31 NICHOLAS CORTEZ personal items, boxes electronics etc. Unit 32 DUSTIN BARNEWOLT personal items, boxes, tools etc. Contents to be sold to the highest bidder on: Saturday May 11, 2019. Beginning at 1:00 P.M. Sale to be held at: George’s Mini Storage 2801 Burnap Avenue Chico CA. 95973. (530) 960-6010 Published: April 25, May 2, 2019 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner COURTNEY M. JOY filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: COURTNEY MICHELLE JOY Proposed name: RACHEL ISABELLE JOY THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the

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name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 8, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: March 27, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00900 Published: April 4,11,18,25, 2019 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner DAVID CASTILLO MARTINES filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: DAVID CASTILLO MARTINES Proposed name: DAVID CASTILLO THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 8, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: March 21, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00887 Published: April 4,11,18,25, 2019 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner MONIQUE MARIE RICHARD filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: MONIQUE MARIE RICHARD Proposed name: MONIQUE SOL SONOQUIE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 29, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: March 28, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00964 Published: April 11,18,25, May 2, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner SALGADO filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: SALGADO Proposed name: ENER ALFRED PICO THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 22, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: April 3, 2019 Case Number: 19CV01005 Published: April 11,18,25, May 2, 2019 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner VERONICA VALENZUELA NAVARRETE filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: AIDEN MARTINEZ Proposed name: AIDEN MARTINEZ VALENZUELA THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 22, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: March 28, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00931 Published: April 25, May 2,9,16, 2019

PETITION NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE STEVEN J. MOONEY (also known as STEVEN JOHN MOONEY) To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: STEVEN J. MOONEY, STEVEN JOHN MOONEY, STEVEN MOONEY A petition for Probate has been filed by: LISA M. MOONEY in the Superior Court of

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California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: LISA M. MOONEY be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: April 30, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: NICOLE R. PLOTTEL 466 Vallombrosa Avenue Chico, CA 95926 (530) 893-2882 Case Number: 19PR00152 Dated: April 2, 2019 Published: April 11,18,25, 2019 NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE SHEILA H. SCOTT To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: SHEILA H. SCOTT A petition for Probate has been filed by: LARRY B. SAISE in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: LARRY B. SAISE be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions,

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however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: May 7, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: SONYA K. FINN The Law Offices of Leverenz & Finn 515 Wall Street Chico, CA 95928 (530) 895-1621 Case Number: 19PR00158 Dated: April 8, 2019 Published: April 11,18,25, 2019 NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE LAWRENCE JAMES CAMPBELL, aka LAWRENCE J. CAMPBELL To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: LAWRENCE JAMES CAMPBELL, also known as LAWRENCE J. CAMPBELL A Petition for Probate has been filed by: KITTIYA K. CAMPBELL in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: KITTIYA K. CAMPBELL be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested

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persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: May 14, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: PR Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: VANESSA J. SUNDIN Sundin Law Office 341 Broadway Street, Ste. 302 Chico, CA 95928 (530) 342-2452 Case Number: 19PR00112 Published: April 18,25, May 2, 2019 NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE CLIFFORD ALLEN FRAZIER To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: CLIFFORD ALLEN FRAZIER A Petition for Probate has been filed by: DANE FRAZIER in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: DANE FRAZIER be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the

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authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: May 21, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: TBD Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: MARK JOHNSON 2531 Forest Avenue, Suite 100 Chico, CA 95928 (530) 345-6801 Case Number: 19PR00159 Dated: April 8, 2019 Published: April 18,25, May 2, 2019 NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE CHARLES ARTHUR HIGGS III aka CHARLES A. HIGGS III To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: CHARLES ARTHUR HIGGS III aka CHARLES A. HIGGS III A Petition for Probate has been filed by: REBECCA A. KOSAK in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: REBECCA A. KOSAK be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: May 14, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: 10

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Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: RAOUL J. LECLERC P.O. Drawer 111 Oroville, CA 95965 (530) 533-5661 Dated: April 10, 2019 Case Number: 19PR00167 Published: April 18,25, May 2, 2019 NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE CRAIG AARON LUOTO To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: CRAIG AARON LUOTO A Petition for Probate has been filed by: KAREN ALEXANDER in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: KAREN ALEXANDER be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: May 14, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should

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appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: RICHARD S. MATSON Richard S. Matson Law Office, Inc. 1342 The Esplanade, Suite A Chico, CA 95926 (530) 343-5373 Dated: April 10, 2019 Case Number: 19PR00165 Published: April 18,25, May 2, 2019 NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE HEIDI PRIVETT CASTRO To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: HEIDI PRIVETT CASTRO A Petition for Probate has been filed by: CHRISTINA LEE NELSON in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: CHRISTINA LEE NELSON be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: May 14, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney.

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IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: PETER P. VLAUTIN, III 1020 Suncast Lane Ste 101 El Dorado Hills, CA 95762 (916) 36-9734 Dated: April 10, 2019 Case Number: 19PR00160 Published: April 25, May 2,9, 2019 NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE JACK W. DAWSON, also known as JACK WILLIAM DAWSON To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: JACK W. DAWSON, also known as JACK WILLIAM DAWSON A Petition for Probate has been filed by: TERESA L. DAWSON in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: TERESA L. DAWSON be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: May 21, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state

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your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California

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Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an

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inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: NICOLE R. PLOTTEL 466 Vallombrosa Ave Chico, CA 95926 (530) 893-2882 Dated: April 10, 2019 Case Number: 19PR00184 Published: April 25, May 2,9, 2019

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REAL ESTATE

FOr MOrE iNFOrMaTiON aBOUT aDVErTiSiNG iN OUr rEal ESTaTE SECTiON, Call 530-894-2300

Love’s Real estate

More Traffic

4887 Malibu Drive, ParaDise 95969 | $549,000

3 bD, 2 full ba, 1 Partial ba | 2,485 sqft | 34,412 sqft lot | built in 1998 Beautiful custom home in one of Paradise’s most desirable and least affected neighborhoods. End of cul-de-sac with easy access to Chico, Lake Oroville, Lime Saddle Marina, Kunkel Reservoir, flumes and excellent hiking trails. Open, split floor plan. Family room with gas fireplace, formal living room, dining room, laundry room and sink. Large master bedroom with slider to private back patio. Adjoining master bath with soaking tub, double vanity and spacious walk in closet. 10 foot ceilings, arched doorways and stained glass windows. Large 3-car garage. RV parking with full hookups. Large parklike back yard with patio. Freshly landscaped (low maintenance) with mature plants and trees. Recently painted with new roof (2016). Fully inspected, serviced and professionally cleaned with all new insulation in attic, garage and crawl space. Economical Del Oro water.

Larry Knifong team

CALBRE:00913120 7020 SkywAy, PARAdiSE offiCE: 530-872-5400 CELL:530-680-6234 EmAiL: LARRy@knifongtEAm.Com

Speaking of traffic, there’s a lot more of it. “There’s not just more of it,” said Sweeny, “it’s also out of control. It puts you in a bad mood. You gotta white-knuckle it just to drive to the grocery store.” “Ha! Too true,” said Glenda. “A guy shot past me across an intersection yesterday, right to left. Just missed the front of my truck. He was staring at his cell phone. Eyes on the phone!” “Boy, that’s where they are, for sure,” said Carl. “That’s where who are?” said Sweeny. “All eyes,” said Carl. We stared at him. “Are on the phone,” said Clarence. “Too true,” said Glenda. “Phone distraction is epidemic.” “It’s bigger, too,” said Carl. “Bigger?” I said. “Yeah. The traffic,” said Carl. “Big rigs. Ever since the fire.” We were standing on East First Avenue, outside the Association of Realtors office, a block up from the freeway interchange of Highway 99. It was a solid mass of traffic, dominated by big dump trucks, semis, and big trailers hauling big heavy equipment. “Bigger,” I said. “You’re right.”

“Imagine Boyd down there now,” said Carl, nodding toward the freeway interchange. I laughed out loud. Sweeny looked confused. “Good old Boyd,” I said. “A great long-time Realtor.” “Mister Clean,” said Glenda. “He made it his mission to clean up Chico streets,” I said. I recalled Boyd at that same freeway interchange, with his little red truck parked to the side, using his push-broom to gather up loose debris and garbage. A car came down the off-ramp every now and then, and Boyd would smile and wave. I parked on the shoulder of quiet East First Avenue, rolled down the window, and said, “Good work!” “Gotta keep our streets pretty!” said Boyd with a big smile. That was back in 1980-something. “He would be flattened out there now!” said Glenda. “What a mess,” said Sweeny. “It puts everybody in a foul mood!” A few minutes later I met Carl downtown for a cup of coffee. “Look at this place,” I said. It’s packed!” Tables full of people, jabbering away. Carl looked around the place nodding. “Pretty good mood,” he said.

Doug Love is Sales Manager at Century 21 in Chico. Call 530-680-0817 or email dougwlove@gmail.com License #950289

Homes are Selling in Your Neighborhood Shop every home for sale at www.C21SelectGroup.com

530.345.6618 3bed 2 bath home N. Chico Owned solar Call today and see 505 Windham Way

Steve KaSprzyK (Kas-per-ziK) You don’t have to spell it for me to sell it! 27 years representing clients in our area Century 21 select Chico California c21falconer@gmail.com (530) 518–4850 License#01145231

14855 Klamath Court Magalia

$269,900

$449,000

CalDRE #02056059

Paul Champlin | (530) 828-2902 Making Your Dream Home a Reality

Olivia Larrabee l (530) 520-3169 Olivia.Larrabee@c21selectgroup.com

Homes Sold Last Week ADDRESS

TOWN

846 Coit Tower Way 1252 Vallombrosa Ave 15 Marlin Ct 117 Sterling Oaks Dr 112 Estates Dr 136 Gooselake Cir 342 Chestnut Rose Ln 2199 Robailey Dr 4461 Goldenrod Way 1735 Cardinal Ct 7 Sunflower Ct

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico

50

CN&R

ap ri l 2 5 , 20 1 9

PRICE

BR/BA

$660,000 $643,000 $640,000 $580,000 $518,500 $475,000 $425,000 $420,000 $415,000 $410,500 $410,000

4/3 3/3 4/3 4/2 3/2 3/2 3/2 3/2 3/3 3/2 4/2

Curious about your home’s value in today’s marketplace? Call me, I can help!

FOR SALE

SMILeS ALWAyS!

Lic# 01506350

Joyce Turner

(530) 570–1944 • joyce_turner@ymail.com

Sponsored by Century 21 Select Real Estate, Inc. SQ. FT. 2110 2434 2681 2089 1722 1535 1705 1610 1802 1706 1624

ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

1674 Park View Ln 1232 Warner St 1971 Belgium Ave 1737 Flamingo Rd 992 Sarah Ave 888 Kern St 835 Black Walnut Way 1412 Palm Ave 995 Ohio St 2759 Ceres Ave 1264 Howard Dr

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico

$400,000 $370,000 $362,000 $344,000 $341,000 $332,000 $320,000 $315,000 $310,000 $310,000 $301,000

3/2 4/3 3/2 3/2 3/2 3/2 4/2 1/1 3/3 3/2 3/1

SQ. FT. 1616 1564 1406 1446 1563 1008 1250 714 1502 1039 1050


Need a hand with your home purchase?

saves you money! 15th Street Cafe $10 Value

You pay $5

GIFT CERTIF ICATE 15TH STREET CAFE 1414 PARK AVE SUITE 12 This is a gift certif 0 | 530.809 icate and does not expire according .1087 Can be used with to California Civil other discounts and Code offers. Cannot be

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Pita Pit

2847 530.899. ot be used way St | s. Cann location. 240 Broadcash. Can be used with other discountsonlyandbeoffer used at Chico

le for used. Can .6. Not redeemab consumer minus any amount 1749.45-1749 the Code Sections amount paid by to California Civil certificate is equal to the expire according for this e and does not it. Cash value ficat cred certi store gift as a This is ge will be given for gratuity. Chan

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Learn more at Dahlmeier.com Oroville Chico 530.533.3424

License #0680951

530.342.6421

How Much is Your Home Worth Today? Ask the Professionals at Century 21 Select

530.345.6618 | www.C21SelectGroup.com Condo! Adorable 3 bed/2 bath, 1,249 sq ft. ..................................................... $259,000 Pending

GORGEOUS CUSTOM HOME

In gated community, 2,628 sq ft, built in 2001, 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, 3 car sold garage, family room plus den. Home is beautifully landscaped and has solar, $565,000.00.

SplaSh into thiS beautiful Saltwater pool! Well maintained 3 bed/2 bath, plus ding e nparking, den/office or possible 4th bed home offering 1,776 sq ft, PRV too! .........$475,000 Teresa Larson (530) 899-5925

beautiful 4 bed/3 bath, 2,512 sq ft, hardwood floors, formal living, dining, plus family Pending room!............................................................................................................. $519,900

updated Gorgeous, custom features in this 3 bed/2 bath, 1,008 sq foot condo. Really Pending special! ...............................................................................................................$215,000 DRE #01177950 chiconativ@aol.com

Kimberley Tonge l 530.518.5508 Lic# 01318330

2 bed 2 bath Condo in Chico in a great area. $167,500 1.59 acre double lot with beautiful valley and canyon views. $120,000 Alice Zeissler l 530.518.1872 CalBRE #01312354

The following houses were sold in Butte County by real estate agents or private parties during the week of April 8- April 12, 2019 The housing prices are based on the stated documentary transfer tax of the parcel and may not necessarily reflect the actual sale price of the home. ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

SQ. FT.

ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

SQ. FT.

2257 Moyer Way

Chico

$255,000

3/2

1252

2031 Campbell Ave

Oroville

$230,000

3/1

1212

3171 Silverbell Rd

Chico

$220,000

3/2

1317

2028 4th St

Oroville

$229,000

2/1

1130

806 Sequoyah Ave

Chico

$210,000

3/2

1528

1729 Boynton Ave

Oroville

$209,000

3/2

1329

13891 Garner Ln

Chico

$200,000

3/3

1555

5279 Parkdale Ave

Oroville

$169,000

4/2

1179

1253 Parque Dr

Chico

$199,000

3/2

1240

1240 4th Ave

Oroville

$153,000

3/2

1594

138 W 21st St

Chico

$150,000

2/1

597

3355 Roseben Ave

Oroville

$145,000

2/1

768

105 Iron Horse Ln

Oroville

$420,000

3/2

1976

350 Pinewood Dr

Paradise

$651,000

3/3

2364

39 Cobalto Ct

Oroville

$360,000

3/2

1904

4926 Malibu Dr

Paradise

$551,000

4/3

2920

27 Linda Dr

Oroville

$257,000

3/3

1349

471 Tigertail Ln

Paradise

$478,000

3/3

1851

14 Parkwood Dr

Oroville

$250,000

3/2

1260

1395 Delia Way

Paradise

$460,000

3/2

1895

11132 Nelson Bar Rd

Oroville

$240,000

2/2

1594

6036 N Libby Rd

Paradise

$440,000

3/3

1974

april 25, 2019

CN&R

51


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