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CHICO’S FREE NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY VOLUME 42, ISSUE 34 THURSDAY, APRIL 18, 2019 WWW.NEWSREVIEW.COM

Ground

4 SYMPATHY WANES

BY MEREDITH J. COOPER PAGE

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INSIDE

Vol. 42, Issue 34 • April 18, 2019 OPINION

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Editorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Guest Comment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Second & Flume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 This Modern World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Streetalk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

NEWSLINES

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Downstroke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Sifter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9

HEALTHLINES

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Appointment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Weekly Dose. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

GREENWAYS

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Eco Event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS

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15 Minutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 The Goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

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COVER STORY

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ARTS & CULTURE

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Music Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 This Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Fine Arts listings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Scene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Nightlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Reel World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Chow. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Arts DEVO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Brezsny’s Astrology . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35

CLASSIFIEDS

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REAL ESTATE

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ON THE COVER: PHOTO OF CONCOW RIDGE BY MEREDITH J. COOPER

Our Mission: To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. Editor Melissa Daugherty Managing Editor Meredith J. Cooper Arts Editor Jason Cassidy Contributing Editor Evan Tuchinsky Staff Writer Ashiah Scharaga Calendar Editor Neesa Sonoquie Contributors Robin Bacior, Alastair Bland, Michelle Camy, Vic Cantu, Nate Daly, Charles Finlay, Bob Grimm, Howard Hardee, Miles Jordan, Mark Lore, Landon Moblad, Brie Oviedo, Ryan J. Prado, Juan-Carlos Selznick, Ken Smith, Robert Speer, Carey Wilson Managing Art Director Tina Flynn Creative Services Manager Elisabeth Bayard-Arthur Ad Designers Naisi Thomas, Cathy Arnold Publications Designers Katelynn Mitrano, Nikki Exerjian Director of Sales and Advertising Jamie DeGarmo Advertising Services Coordinator Ruth Alderson Senior Advertising Consultants Brian Corbit, Laura Golino Advertising Consultants Adam Lew, Jordon Vernau

President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Director of Nuts & Bolts Deborah Redmond Director of People & Culture David Stogner Director of Dollars & Sense Debbie Mantoan Nuts & Bolts Ninja Norma Huerta Payroll/AP Wizard Miranda Hansen Accounts Receivable Specialist Analie Foland Developer John Bisignano System Support Specialist Kalin Jenkins N&R Publications Managing Editor Laura Hillen N&R Publications Associate Editor Derek McDow N&R Publications Writers Anne Stokes, Thea Rood Marketing & Publications Consultants Greta Beekhuis, Steve Caruso, Joseph Engle, Elizabeth Morabito, Traci Hukill, Celeste Worden 353 E. Second St., Chico, CA 95928 Phone (530) 894-2300 Fax (530) 892-1111 Website newsreview.com Got a News Tip? (530) 894-2300, ext 2224 or chiconewstips@newsreview.com Calendar Events cnrcalendar@newsreview.com Calendar Questions (530) 894-2300, ext. 2243 Want to Advertise? Fax (530) 892-1111 or cnradinfo@newsreview.com Classifieds (530) 894-2300, press 2 or classifieds@newsreview.com Job Opportunities jobs@newsreview.com Want to Subscribe to CN&R? chisubs@newsreview.com Editorial Policies: Opinions expressed in CN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons, or other portions of the paper. CN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or review materials. Email letters to cnrletters@newsreview.com. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form and to edit them for libel.

Office Assistant Jennifer Osa

Advertising Policies: All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes the responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message.

Distribution Director Greg Erwin Distribution Manager Matt Daugherty Distribution Staff Ken Gates, Bob Meads, Pat Rogers, Larry Smith, Placido Torres, Jeff Traficante, Bill Unger, Lisa Van Der Maelen, David Wyles

CN&R is printed at PressWorks Ink on recycled newsprint. Circulation of CN&R is verified by the Circulation Verification Council. CN&R is a member of Chico Chamber of Commerce, Oroville Chamber of Commerce, Downtown Chico Business Association, CNPA, AAN and AWN. Circulation 38,650 copies distributed free weekly.

APRIL 18, 2019

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OPINION

Send guest comments, 340 words maximum, to gc@newsreview.com or to 353 E. Second St., Chico, CA 95928. please include photo & short bio.

EDITORIAL

Chico’s waning Camp Fire sympathy The CN&R watched Chicoans come together to support

those in need following Nov. 8. Money was raised, supplies were donated, doors were opened to friends and strangers alike. The generosity heartened us. At the same time, our cynical inner voices wondered when the good will would end. Sympathy has waned here and there—especially vile are the greedy landlords cashing in on the disaster by putting rentals on the real estate market for exorbitant prices—but we were caught off guard by one recent case of NIMBYism. Nearly five months to the day after the Camp Fire, we watched with jaws agape as several Chico residents appeared before the City Council (last Tuesday, April 9) to appeal a woman’s plan to let a handful of displaced residents temporarily reside in RVs on her Royce Lane property, as allowed by special emergency ordinance permitting. The gripes varied. Some were concerned trenching for power lines might harm old-growth walnut trees or that additional vehicular traffic would further deteriorate the private roadway already in disrepair. Others

worried about potential septic issues and noise, and charged that the permit lasted far too long. In general, they feared a decline in quality of life. “Please don’t put the needs of temporary residents above the needs of longtime Chico families,” implored one neighbor. They lost the appeal on a vote along party lines (5-2). The project’s applicant, a local doctor who lives on-site, appeared responsive to her neighbors’ complaints and ably defended the plan to share her 1-plus acre lot with up to four families. One prospective occupant is a longtime Chicoan—a nurse displaced when the house she rented was put on the market. Will her and others’ presence pose an inconvenience to existing neighbors? Perhaps. Is it severe enough to outweigh the merits of the project? We think not. This is precisely the sort of temporary housing Chico desperately needs for the greater good—which is the reason the council approved them in the first place. If anything, we encourage other Chicoans with the means to consider embarking on similar projects. Let’s remember, we’re in this together. Ω

GUEST COMMENT

Tax system skewed to the rich, powerful Tandsystem is fair, whether it raises the revenue we need, whether it promotes economic growth and equality. his year, we should be asking whether our tax

The answer to all three questions is, unfortunately, no. The tax code, already full of loopholes for the wealthy and corporations, was laden with even more by the new tax law. That law also will add nearly $2 trillion to the national debt, endangering services like Medicare, Medicaid and education, as well as vital new initiatives like lowering health care costs and improving roads and bridges. Over 20 percent of the TrumpGOP tax cuts are estimated to have gone to the wealthiest 1 percent of by Americans last year. And once the Frank Clemente law is fully in effect eight years from The author is now, the imbalance will get even executive director of worse: 83 percent of the benefits will Americans for Tax Fairness. go to 1-percenters. Big profitable corporations got a 40 percent cut in their tax rate. Republicans assured the American people the cuts would pay for themselves. Wrong. The federal budget deficit jumped by almost $100 billion in the first quarter of the current fiscal year alone compared with the same period last year, before

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the Republican tax law went into effect. Republicans want to make up the shortfall by cutting public services working families rely on—while, incredibly, cutting taxes for the wealthy even more. In his recently released budget, President Trump proposed slashing $1.4 trillion from Medicare, Medicaid and the Affordable Care Act (ACA), while cutting taxes by $1.1 trillion, once again mostly to the benefit of the rich. President Trump promised workers would benefit from the corporate tax cuts, guaranteeing that working families would get a $4,000 boost in wages. According to a tally by Americans for Tax Fairness, only 4 percent of employees have seen any increase in their compensation tied to the tax cuts, and the great majority of those payouts have been one-time bonuses. A review of our tax system yields troubling results. But we can fix that. Congress can begin by repealing the tax cuts for the rich and corporations in the recent GOP tax law. Then it can start closing all the other special loopholes inserted in our tax code over the years by the wealthy and well-connected. Those cost us trillions of dollars in public revenue we need to fulfill solemn promises we’ve made to ourselves, like Social Security and Medicare, as well as invest in our future through bold new investments. Once those loopholes are closed, on some future Tax Day we can count ourselves proud participants in a fair share tax system. Ω

SECOND & FLUME by Melissa Daugherty m e l i s s a d @ n e w s r e v i e w. c o m

Trusty locals A few weeks after the Camp Fire ignited, yours truly wrote about the influx of parachute reporters and groused about how they’d eventually bail from covering the disaster. That would leave the reporting largely to local journalists. Sure, there are occasional flyovers from regional and national newspaper, TV and radio folk, but the aftermath primarily is in the hands of Chico’s trusty newspapers, this one and the EnterpriseRecord (including the Paradise Post insert). Speaking of the latter, someone over at its operations at East Park Avenue and MLK Parkway submitted a package of the Chico E-R’s early Camp Fire reporting for consideration for a Pulitzer Prize—the nation’s premier journalism contest named in honor of Joseph Pulitzer, the late newspaper publisher and founder of the Columbia School of Journalism. It was entered in the category of Local Reporting, but the Pulitzer jury moved it to a more appropriate one, Breaking News. The E-R’s excellent efforts in the initial weeks were buoyed by reports and photos by its big Bay Area sister papers. The submission didn’t win, but it was one of the finalists, which is pretty great for Chico’s scrappy little daily. All of the stories—dated between the day the Camp Fire started, Nov. 8, and Dec. 18—can be found at pulitzer.org. (The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette won for its reporting on the mass shooting at the city’s Tree of Life synagogue.) The entries were written during the tenure of former Chico E-R Editor David Little, who left the paper at the end of the year. He’s since been working part-time in a public relations role for the North Valley Community Foundation, the Chico nonprofit distributing tens of millions of dollars of charitable donations for short- and longterm disaster relief. That sounds like a fulfilling gig following his resignation from the newspaper, where he’d sat in the chief’s seat for just under 20 years. However, I was happy to hear this week that Little’s back in the journalism realm: He’s now serving as the adviser to Chico State’s student newspaper, The Orion. As I’ve written before, I have a soft spot for The Orion and the E-R, where, in that order, I cut my teeth. But I have a greater affection for the CN&R, obviously, and I’m more aware at this time than ever before of its function in Chico and the surrounding communities to provide critical in-depth coverage of important issues, such as Meredith J. Cooper’s latest Camp Fire cover story in this issue. There are countless other examples that also set our work apart. To wit, earlier this week, as I scanned the headlines, I came upon a national story by one of those aforementioned parachute reporters about the water situation on the Ridge; how residents are moving back there in spite of contamination throughout a water system that may take years to address. It’s a short version of a story first told in the pages of the CN&R three months ago—when nothing had been reported about that crisis and the agencies charged with public health had failed to issue warnings. Our role in the community is indeed unique—complementary to the Chico E-R’s daily coverage—and Butte County is the beneficiary.

Melissa Daugherty is editor of the CN&R


LETTERS

Cesar’s

Send email to cnrletters@newsreview.com

‘Business as usual’ Re “Drastic measures” (Cover story, by Judy Lin, April 4): CN&R’s recent cover story on the coming wildfire season included comments by California Public Utilities Commission President Michael Picker. His comments were so incredibly casual and stupid they should have activated the CN&R editor to write something about the role and power of the CPUC and how strong CPUC leadership could force PG&E to be more responsible so that their equipment sparks fewer horrendous fires. PG&E’s equipment was responsible for 17 of the 21 major fires in 2017. And PG&E said that its equipment probably caused the Camp Fire. The state Public Utilities Commission has the responsibility to regulate services and utilities, protect consumers, safeguard the environment, and assure Californians’ access to safe and reliable utility infrastructure and services. The CPUC is known for enabling PG&E’s focus on profits

and its lax safety culture. With Picker president of the CPUC, it is likely business as usual, and people should care, unless they just want to accept wildfire tragedies as inevitable. I doubt that the large majority of people blaming climate change for the Camp Fire acknowledge their role in climate change, nor are they willing to make the sacrifices to stop climate change. Blaming climate change for the Camp Fire is just too easy. Lucy Cooke Butte Valley

CSUC pres disappoints  Re “Unbelievable opportunity” (Newslines, by Ashiah Scharaga, April 11): As a 20-year employee of Chico State, I have been proud of the efforts the university has made toward transparency and progressive engagement with the community. President Gayle Hutchinson’s bombshell letter opposing the location of a homeless center on Orange Street leaves me questioning that progress.

After a week spent promoting “courageous conversations” and community engagement through Great Debate events, this administration, without campus consultation as far as I am aware, has shamed us all, with this NIMBY condemnation of the efforts to provide a safe and dignified alternative to sleeping on the streets, in the name of public safety. Clearly, the homeless are not the population whose safety is of concern. I have close family and friends who volunteer their time and energy at the Safe Space Winter Shelter, and I know from them that those needing these services pose no more danger to the community than do other citizens. I am appalled that despite the claim to not “disparage a population as criminals,” this is exactly what this letter does. Demonizing the homeless for society’s problems is no solution. The homeless are here, they live in our neighborhoods, the need is present, but alas compassion is not. George Thompson Chico

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Action News ran a hit piece last week intended to raise fear within our community by conjuring dangers to local schools with having a low-barrier shelter near downtown. Meanwhile, every location mentioned to alarm residents is located in the midst of low-barrier frat houses, dormitories and residential housing. This was a thinly guised mob attack on community members based on economic status and the disabilities many of them endure. Plain and simple. You see, when a mob sends its people, it is not sending its best. It’s sending people with lots of xenophobia and rhetoric, and they’re bringing those callous, unclean and unsafe, views with them. They’re bringing lies, they’re bringing innuendos. They’re pawns. And some, I assume, thought they were do-gooders. I’m reminded of The Poseidon Adventure, where well-intended people angrily dismissed the heroes who had calmly and accurately figured a way to safety. The way forward and off the sinking postCamp Fire ship is the Orange Street Shelter. Thank you, Safe Space, the Jesus Center and the city of Chico, for leading the way. Bill Mash Chico

Speaking of the Camp Fire Understandably, survivors of the Camp Fire want to rebuild fast, those with money that is. However, if we are to learn from our past mistakes of the previous fire footprints where building standards were always lowered to rebuild faster, we really need to slow down and get it right this time: fireproof concrete, steel frames, six-lane evacuation routes are what’s needed. Paradise could be the model Green New Deal city. Instead, Assembly Bill 430 (aka Camp Fire Housing Assistance Act of 2019), introduced by climate denier Assemblyman James Gallagher, is another one of those hurry-up-and-lower-buildingstandards mistakes. It is an end-run attempt around CEQA, which puts environmental screening standards on all proposed projects. “Since 1999, 13 large wildfires burned within the footprint of the Camp Fire,” said Chris Folkman, a disaster analyst. “I think there needs

to be a frank conversation about rebuilding and fire resilience. The good news is there are measures to be taken to make a house less susceptible to a wildfire. In the end, we have to face the fact that the climate is changing and a lot of houses are built in dangerous areas.” Mary Kay Benson Chico

Editor’s note: For more on AB 430, see Ashiah Scharaga’s report on page 9.

Beware of mail snatchers If your mail is delivered to a multi-address mailbox in Chico (typical for an apartment complex or newer subdivision), beware of mail thieves. Someone either has a USPS key or a tool that can pop open those boxes. Although all mailboxes of that type are equally vulnerable, the USPS doesn’t stop delivering mail to your box until it’s actually broken into. Then, besides possibly losing something valuable, deliveries cease, and you must start picking up your mail at the Vallombrosa post office. Our box was hit early, and we’ve been doing that for the past six weeks. If your box hasn’t been hit yet, some recommendations: pick up your mail every day to minimize your loss when it does happen; don’t use the box for your outgoing mail; be careful ordering valuable merchandise that might be delivered by the USPS; and keep an eye out for any strange activity at your mailbox. The USPS doesn’t seem to have the capability or the will to solve this problem, or even inform other patrons that a problem exists. Steve Kennedy Chico

Correction Last week’s Second & Flume (see “Debunked,” by Melissa Daugherty) conflated Robert F. Kennedy’s conspiracy theory about vaccines causing autism with that of Andrew Wakefield, a British man who falsified research on the subject and was stripped of his ability to practice medicine. The column has been corrected online. —ed.

More letters online:

We’ve got too many letters for this space. please go to www.newsreview.com/chico for additional readers’ comments on past cn&r articles.


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NEWSLINES DOWNSTROKE OROVILLE ADDRESSES BLIGHT

Seeking a remedy to blight, the Oroville City Council unanimously passed an urgency ordinance that temporarily expands the city’s Nuisance Code to include significant public health and safety hazards on private properties. (See “Southside’s plight,” Newslines, April 4.) The ordinance, adopted Tuesday night (April 16), takes effect immediately and lasts 45 days. Interim City Administrator Tom Lando told the CN&R by email Wednesday morning that the council will permanently change the code within that period. Urgency ordinance provisions give city staff immediate right of entry onto private property to remedy code violations specified as hazards.

CHICO STATE WARY OF SHELTER

Chico State’s administration isn’t on board with the proposed location of the Orange Street Shelter, a low-barrier facility proposed by Safe Space Winter Shelter and the Jesus Center in the south campus neighborhood, at 388 Orange St. President Gayle Hutchinson said as much in a letter addressed to the City Council dated April 11. Among other things, the correspondence said a low-barrier shelter would introduce “an element over which both our campus and our city can exercise limited control.” Organizers told the CN&R that they had previously had a positive meeting with Chico State representatives, but Hutchinson was not present. Angela McLaughlin, president of Safe Space’s board of directors, said the organizers have a safety plan and Safe Space has “effectively and safely run a lowbarrier shelter in a dozen locations per year for the past five years.”

PARADISE MAYOR FACES RECALL

Jody Jones—the face of Paradise following the Camp Fire—risks ouster from the Town Council after a resident notified the town of his intent to file a recall petition Wednesday (April 17). Jones (pictured), the mayor, and Greg Bolin, the vice mayor, were served with notices at Tuesday night’s council meeting. Town Clerk Dina Volenski told the CN&R she certified the noticeof-intent filing Wednesday morning. Resident Loren Harvey had served Jones and Bolin at the previous meeting, but when he came to the Town Hall to file Tuesday (April 16), Volenski informed him he needed more signatures of support—20, versus the 10 he’d gotten—for his application to be valid. On the recall petition, he’ll need 2,836 signatures. 8

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APRIL 18, 2019

Indirect victims Nobody seems to be tracking those who perished in the days and months following the Camp Fire

ECamp Health Feather River Hospital when the Fire hit Nov. 8. “She sadly lost her linor Williams was a patient at Adventist

life while they were attempting to evacuate,” a GoFundMe page by for her family reads. Meredith J. Eighty-five-yearCooper old Oran Crumley had been successfully resm ere d i t h c @ n ew srev i ew. c o m cued from his home in Paradise before it burned to the ground, according Tell your story: to Crumley’s obituIf you have a loved one ary. He died at Oroville you believe died due to the Camp Fire but Hospital of cardiac arrest was not included on on Nov. 14. official lists, we want Dan Jurgens had to hear your story. survived the fire but was Email meredithc@ newsreview.com or hospitalized for smoke call 530-894-2300, inhalation, according to ext. 2224. GoFundMe. “He loved history. He was an avid craftsman and coin collector,” it reads. On Nov. 18, however, “the family sadly had to pull the plug.” And for Ida Flores, of Magalia, “[t]he stress of losing her home was too much,” her granddaughter writes on a GoFundMe page. She died on Nov. 28. Two days later, Sydney Zimmerman went to check on her father, Sandy

Zimmerman, who she says was staying in a hotel room in Sacramento provided by the Federal Emergency Management Agency. The whole family had been displaced from their Paradise homes by the Camp Fire. He hadn’t been in contact and they were worried. When they arrived, he was dead. “[H]e was also a victim of this tragedy,” Sydney wrote on a GoFundMe page. Alice Cummings was staying at the Red Cross shelter at the Silver Dollar Fairgrounds on Jan. 5 when she fell ill and was rushed to the hospital. The 61-year-old evacuee from Magalia had developed pneumonia. She died at the hospital, according to the Butte County Sheriff’s Office. The stories go on and on. And yet, for these Ridge residents who were forced to leave their homes—some of them in a panic, some of them needing assistance to reach safety—there are no crosses at a memorial display on the Skyway in remembrance of their lives. Despite the fact that some health professionals might categorize them as victims of the Camp Fire disaster, nobody is officially labeling them as such. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, however, tracking deaths both directly and indirectly related to a disaster is important in developing strategies to avoid such deaths in the future.

“During a disaster, it is important to conduct surveillance to determine the extent and scope of the health effects on the affected populations. Surveillance is the systematic collection, analysis, and interpretation of deaths, injuries, and illnesses which enables public health to track and identify any adverse health effects in the community,” the CDC’s website reads. Furthermore, the agency has put together a toolkit for gathering this surveillance. “By documenting and raising awareness of risks associated with certain types of disasters, we can potentially prevent unnecessary deaths through refinement of strategies to prepare for, respond to, and recover from future disasters,” the toolkit reads. But no agency in Butte County, the state or

the nation appears to be tracking deaths indirectly related to the Camp Fire. In response to a CN&R query, an unnamed FEMA spokesperson responded with a statement: “FEMA does not determine deaths after a disaster. Determining whether someone’s death was directly or indirectly related to a disaster is always difficult to do, and the decision ultimately rests with the professional judgment of the attending physician, medical examiner, or coroner. State, Tribal, or Territorial governments may provide


On the Skyway: Eighty-five crosses for 85 victims, but none for those whose deaths were indirectly related to the Camp Fire. PHOTO BY MELISSA DAUGHERTY

guidance to hospitals, health care providers, and medical examiners on reporting disaster-related deaths.” The California Office of Emergency Management referred this reporter to the Butte County Department of Public Health or the Coroner’s Office as the first places to look for local data. Neither is tracking that information, the CN&R was told. Butte County spokeswoman Casey Hatcher, Sheriff’s Office spokeswoman Miranda Bowersox and Public Health spokeswoman Lisa Almageur referred the CN&R to local hospitals. When asked about indirect death and injury data related to the Camp Fire, Nicole Johansson at Enloe Medical Center said via email that “that isn’t something we are tracking. You may contact the Sheriff/Corner’s Office.” Phone and email messages to Oroville Hospital spokesman Jonathan Miceli went unanswered. UC Davis Medical Center spokeswoman Karen Finney said her organization is tracking injury data and said that 12 patients were admitted to UC Davis with burns: “They arrived with conditions ranging from fair to critical, and one died,” she said. “One patient is currently in the hospital in serious condition.” That one patient, Larry Smith, is listed among the 85 official Camp Fire deaths. “As far as indirect deaths—things like people who may have been in a frail condition to begin with and this was the last straw, or they lost everything and gave up the will to live—I don’t have a good way of accounting for those. In some cases, they might not even be reported to us,” said Butte County Sheriff Kory Honea. The sheriff did confirm that Williams, who died during the evacuation from Feather River Hospital, was not counted among the 85 Camp Fire victims. A man who committed suicide as the fire approached, however, was, despite the fact that the fire likely precipitated both deaths. When asked about the CDC’s recommendation and toolkit, Honea said, “That’s something that’s on our radar. But given the gravity and scope of this [disaster], we’re still in the process of finishing up the cases of those people who were direct victims—there are 11 individuals we are still working on identification for.” Ω

Dramatic exit Polarizing topics at lengthy council meeting cause early dismissal

There has been a palpable sense of fatigue in the

Chico City Council chambers lately. Tuesday (April 16) was the panel’s fifth consecutive weekly meeting, and the last two clocked in at more than five hours due to packed agendas and polarizing topics with lengthy discussion. It appeared to all come to a head with an early shutdown of Tuesday’s meeting, which featured discussions on the budget, housing and public safety. The meeting ended before closed session, just past midnight. Most public speakers showed up to voice support of Assembly Bill 430, introduced by Assemblyman James Gallagher, a Republican from Yuba City. Also known as the Camp Fire Housing Assistance Act, the bill would streamline development throughout Butte County up to 2030. Councilwoman Kasey Reynolds asked her colleagues to send to the state Legislature a letter of support for the bill, which she said would “allow building in Chico to happen as quickly as possible, so we can keep prices down and get people housed.” Her liberal colleagues were apprehensive. Some noted that the final version of the bill has yet to be drafted. Councilwoman Ann Schwab called the proposed legislation an “overreach,” and added that rebuilding homes in Paradise should be the priority. Reynolds replied by noting that some Chicobased employers have lost an estimated 7 percent

to 15 percent of their workforce due to the Camp Fire, and the city has a responsibility to help displaced employees get housed. Public speakers in favor of the bill echoed Reynolds’ points. “Either you want to help people in emergency housing situations and are willing to overlook environmental regulations to get it done, or you’re not,” Kami Denlay told the panel. In contrast, those against it said they felt it was tailored in the interest of developers. Attorney Richard Harriman, who often represents environmental advocates, called it a “wide-open Trojan horse” exemption to the California Environmental Quality Act. Ultimately, the discussion fizzled—a vote for staff to provide input on the bill’s language failed 3-4, with Schwab, Mayor Randall Stone, Vice Mayor Alex Brown and Councilman Karl Ory against. Tuesday marked the first of several budget

discussions for the 2019-20 fiscal year, as well. Though the city should remain sol-

SIFT ER Eyes on the road, please

April is National Distracted Driver Awareness Month, and in an effort to learn how distracted the country’s drivers are, DriversEd.com commissioned a study. The 2019 Distracted Driving and Social Media Report revealed that 55 percent of Americans check social media while driving, while 68 percent have witnessed drivers doing so. Here are the results broken down by the distraction.

Checked Facebook . . . . . . 30 percent Checked Instagram . . . . . 20 percent Checked Snapchat . . . . . . 17 percent Watched a video . . . . . . . . 26 percent Recorded a video . . . . . . . 25 percent Noticed Uber, Lyft or other rideshare driver checking social media. . . .19 percent

Erica Traverso, a longtime Justice for Desmond Phillips advocate, called on the city to defund its police department. As she spoke, others held up signs for safety, in protest. PHOTO BY ASHIAH SCHARAGA

vent the next two years, Administrative Services Director Scott Dowell painted a bleak picture down the road. He estimates that city revenues will stagnate by 2022-23. At the same time, its debt to the California Public Employees’ Retirement System (aka CalPERS) will grow. By 2020, the city’s annual payment will be nearly $10 million, and by 2025, nearly $13 million—it was around $6 million in 2017. Either the city has to generate more revenue (e.g., pursue a tax increase) to the tune of at least $1.2 million, Dowell said, or “will have to do some major reductions.” City Manager Mark Orme already noted in his opening comments to the council that all departments, aside from Chico Police, are at 2013 staffing levels—since then, PD has grown by approximately 14 positions (five are grant-funded) and received the lion’s share of the general fund. About $26 million is proposed for CPD in 2019-20. The topic was one of the more popular that night, with eight speakers. During public comment on the item, Chicoan Mat Bacior approached the council stupefied. While everyone wants a safer city, continuing to direct more money to law enforcement staffing is “short-sighted,” he said. “This city, the infrastructure is falling apart. It’s obvious,” he said. “I don’t think throwing more money at [public safety] is going to be the panacea we keep claiming it’s going to be.” Following the budget discussion, the council took a step toward entertaining a sales tax. The panel provided direction to staff and consultant EMC Research for a voter survey. It will ask Chicoans if they’d pass a 1-cent sales tax to fund public safety and roads. The vote fell along party lines. The council also decided to talk about pubNEWSLINES C O N T I N U E D APRIL 18, 2019

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Rebuilding the Ridge Supporting Local Businesses on the Ridge and Surrounding Communities RE-opEnEd aftER thE camp fiRE NortherN CaliforNia Ballet

soul Posse daNCe BaNd

633 Pearson Road, Paradise (530) 872-1719

341 Broadway #308, Chico (530) 828-8040

earl’s PlumBiNg

summit fuNdiNg

2264 Park Avenue, Chico (530) 343-0330

siNClair automotive & towiNg 6475 Skyway, Paradise (530) 519-6766

Paradise mediCal grouP 277 Cohassett Road, Chico (530) 872 - 6650

Paradise reCreatioN aNd Park distriCt

1388 Longfellow Ave, Chico (530) 514-7082

Draper & KraMer MorTgage corp

nanny goaTs closeT, llc

terri’s hair desigN, reoPeNiNg as Paradise saloN

(530) 877-8800

5430 Sawmill Road, SPC 1, Paradise (530) 327-4763

Jenn BrooKs, arBonne inTernaTional consulTanT

liBerTy Tax service

1600 Mangrove Ave #140, Chico (530) 399-0777

(530) 345-8550

raNCho eNgiNeeriNg, iNC.

moll’s legal doC PreP

645 Normal Avenue, Ste 100, Chico (530) 872-1738

seleCt ProPerty maNagemeNt 1101 El Monte Avenue, Chico (530) 872-6807

Michael viale, DDs 650 Rio Lindo Avenue, Suite 10, Chico (530) 872-5233

1388 Longfellow Avenue, Chico (530) 520-6475

sCott shaw PaiNtiNg

(530) 762-7238

(530) 877-7387

world graPhiCs

1074 East Avenue, Suite S, Chico (530) 877-7661

arT house

anDy’s Bullseye repair

2561 California Park Dr, #110, Chico (530) 877-4111

Ron Wilson DDs - GeneRal deNtistry

sweDe’s sMall engine repair

teresa muNjar / maiN eveNt saloN

ProsPerity iNvestmeNt maNagemeNt, iNC.

(530) 872-8338

730 Main Street, Chico (530) 877-8721

Mobile service (530) 990-5676

westerN heatiNg & raiN gutters

re CoNstruCtioN

wilson prinTing anD signs

(530) 386-2616

300 Salem Street, Chico (530) 413-0072

564 Rio Lindo Avenue, Suite 102, Chico (530) 872-6393

330 Wall Street #40, Chico (530) 877-3700

Dr. Mac apple Technician anD Training Business

Contact for Information (530) 864-1211

6848 Skyway Suite V, Paradise (530) 872-1876

Magneson TracTor service, inc.

paraDise ceMeTery DisTricT

Operating Remotely (530) 961-3171

980 Elliott Rd, Paradise (530) 877-4493

cenTury 21 selecT inc, sue Mawer

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1101 El Monte Ave, Chico (530) 520-4094

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cenTury 21 selecT real esTaTe, susan g. ThoMas

gary Bess assoCiates

1101 El Monte Ave, Chico (530) 518-8041

6931 Skyway, Paradise (530) 877-3426

heartshiNe fouNdatioN

cenTury 21 selecT, paTTy g. McKee, realTor®

Red Bluff (530) 762-2219

1101 El Monte Avenue, Chico (530) 518-5155

Chatfield deNtal

paraDise genTle DenTisTry, BrenT e parroTT, DDs

(530) 877-9308

Paradise gardeN CluB, iNC. (530) 877-3435

adam aNd eves saloN (530) 872-1890

2014 5th Avenue, Oroville (530) 877-2313

Tax soluTions 1803 Mangrove Ave., Suite D, Chico (530) 877-9014

6626 Clark Rd, Suite M, Paradise (530) 872-5090

paraDise luTheran church 780 Luther Drive, Paradise (530) 877-3549

sweDe’s sMall engine repair 8279 Skyway Rd, Paradise (530) 990-5676

eye liFe insTiTuTe 5889 Clark Road, Paradise (530) 877-2020

hegenBarT sepTic TanK cleaning PO Box 243, Magalia , Ca 95954 (530) 877-7261

linTronics elecTrical (530) 518-3003

SPonSoRed by

Check back next week for more businesses and organizations that have re-opened. Listings provided by Paradise Ridge Chamber of Commerce. paradisechamber.com 10

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NEWSLINES C O N T I N U E D F R O M PA G E 9

lic safety at a later date. Reynolds initially wanted to discuss the declaration of a public safety emergency, but her colleagues took issue with that classification. The vote fell 4-3, with Schwab, Brown and Stone against. Also, final appointments to the Commercial Cannabis Citizen Advisory Committee were made: Jessica MacKenzie/cannabis expert; Mike Waltz/local business representative; Carrie Welch/real estate representative; and community members Danelle Campbell and Vincent Villegas. Brown was chosen as the council appointee in a vote along party lines. Chico State chose Juanita Mottley, Student Health Center director, as its appointee. The most speakers of the night,

about 24, showed up for business from the floor, which is when the meeting came to a halt. Many argued for the council to prioritize public safety and declare such an emergency. Ashley Atkinson mentioned a rash of recent robberies and said citizens are “living in fear.” Others, like Erica Traverso, a longtime Justice for Desmond Phillips advocate, called on the city to defund its police department, which she called “poorly trained [and] overly aggressive.” Kat, also with Justice for Desmond Phillips, said people possess a “privileged state of mind” when calling for a crime-free city without addressing systemic issues with the police department, which she said “includes military-style defense tactics” and lacks de-escalation and implicit-bias training. “The officers will murder again,” she said. During her impassioned comments, Kat cursed multiple times, causing a stir. When fellow attendee Jaime Jin retorted something indecipherable from her seat, Stone asked her to not “disturb the hearings or we’ll ask you to leave.” Jin stormed off, calling out, “You’re a joke!” Others joined her chant and exited the chambers. In the cacophony, Stone pounded his gavel and shut down the meeting. Several audience members lingered, a few yelling insults at one another, before being ushered out the doors. —ASHIAH SCHARAGA ashiahs@ n ewsr ev i ew. com

Taxing biology Legislators in Sacramento push for gender-equity by arguing against ‘period tax’ Annie Wang remembers the panic she felt being a

freshman in a 500-person chemistry class at UC Davis when her period arrived and she didn’t have a tampon or pad. There was nowhere nearby to go, and leaving to find something meant missing class. So she tried to focus on the lecture instead. “I stayed in my seat and prayed it would not be too bad. When I got up I had left a mark on UC Davis in a very bold way,” she said. “It was a very embarrassing moment for me.” She knew she couldn’t be the only one in this predicament—that “a lot of my classmates had experienced similar situations where they were in class or going to class and suddenly got their period and were not able to go to class or had to scramble,” she said. Now she’s one of many student activists, advocates, experts and officials working toward what they call “menstrual equity.” In California, that means exempting period products from state sales tax and ensuring that tampons and pads are provided as freely as toilet paper in public schools and universities, government buildings and prisons. It’s part of a global movement—partially funded by feminine hygiene product manufacturers—to bring periods into the consideration of mainstream policymakers. A documentary about “period poverty”—the reality that some women miss work and some girls miss school About this story: because of cultural It’s an abridged version of a taboos or because story published by CALmatters. org, an independent public they can’t afford perijournalism venture covering od products—won an California state politics and Oscar this year. government. Already in California, public schools in low-income areas are required to provide free period products, and college students are petitioning for free products in state universities. And an ongoing state Superior Court case claims the state is violating the 14th Amendment equal protection clause by taxing the sales of period products, arguing that tampons and pads are not luxuries. But the most closely watched effort is underway in the state Capitol, where lawmakers expect to advance a bill to end that sales tax. A few years back, there were a lot of eye rolls and snickers when Democratic Assemblywoman Cristina Garcia of Bell Gardens carried such a bill. Embracing the novelty of it all, she dubbed herself “Tampon Queen” and propped a huge pad and tampon in her office window. “It allowed a conversation to happen that was more than a tax—it’s about menstrual equity and

our biology,” she said. Her bill cleared the Legislature in 2016, but Gov. Jerry Brown vetoed it, saying it should have been addressed within the state budget and that “tax breaks are the same thing as new spending.” With a new governor in place, she’s at it again. This time her colleagues have been so eager to back her Assembly Bill 31 that it has more co-authors than any other this session. Brown isn’t alone. Editorials in newspapers such

as the Los Angeles Times have contended that it’s unwise to carve out exemptions from state sales tax in such a random fashion—especially when the state taxes items equally as essential, such as toilet paper, diapers and toothpaste. The California Tax Reform Association criticized the bill for drawing a line new to the state sales tax: “gender necessity…. The problem with drawing such a line is that many possibilities for exemption follow the logic of gender specificity. Clothing, cosmetics, over-the-counter and pharmaceuticals are all examples of products that can be construed as both gender-based and necessary,” the association noted. And the California State Association of Counties also opposes the idea. “After the past 30 years of changes to sales and use tax collections, counties have come to depend on those revenues to balance their budgets and specifically offset the costs of providing realigned services, including criminal justice, health, mental health and social services,” the association wrote. “I respect the need for California to be fiscally sound,” Garcia countered, “but the state budget should not be balanced by a tax of a person’s uterus. The same goes for local governments; our tax codes should be gender-neutral.”

UC Davis students Annie Wang is working to ensure placement of tampons and pads in UC Davis restrooms as part of a program now supported by volunteers, donations and the university. PHOTO BY MARIA AVILA FOR CALMATTERS

A legislative analysis said the bill, if enacted, would cost the state of California $9 million in lost revenue in the first year and $19 million in the second year. Menstruation is about equity and engagement as much as it is about health, said Jennifer Weiss-Wolf, vice president of The Brennan Center for Justice at New York University who co-founded Period Equity, an organization that is behind the tampon tax campaigns nationwide. It produced a glitzy ad that has model and actress Amber Rose fondling a bezel-set diamond pendant from which a bejeweled locket contains a tampon. She asks, “Where else would you keep something 36 states tax as a luxury?” The ad’s kicker: “Tell the government where to stick this tax.” “The taxes and the challenges of access are unfair and discriminatory toward women,” said Weiss-Wolf. “It’s an enormous distraction and at worst a hindrance to being fully present.” After Wang’s embarrassing moment at school, she started a campus chapter of PERIOD., The Menstrual Movement, a nonprofit that donates products and works on menstrual policy and education, which is petitioning the UC Davis administration to provide free products in all campus bathrooms. The school approved and funded a pilot program to provide free products, stocked by student volunteers, in up to 13 campus bathrooms. The chapter surveyed students and reported that 52 percent of student respondents said they missed class or work in the last school year because they could not access a tampon or pad. —ELIZABETH AGUILERA APRIL 18, 2019

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HEALTHLINES Jonathan Studebaker was quite a fixture of Chico before his death in 2001—he served on the Planning Commission, and advocated for people, like him, with disabilities. CN&R FILE PHOTO

Larger than life Late Chicoan’s autobiography imparts message of strength by

Ashiah Scharaga ashiahs@ n ewsrev i ew. com

JAlden. celebrity. Just ask his older brother,

onathan Studebaker was quite the local

Whenever Alden would visit Chico, he recalled, “people would be driving by in their cars and stop and reach out the window and wave and say, ‘Hey, Jonathan, how are you doing?’ spontaneously.” Jonathan had a larger-than-life personality in a smaller-than-average body. He was born with a rare genetic disease, osteogenesis imperfecta, which caused his brittle bones to break frequently throughout his life. This also meant that Jonathan spent much of his life in

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a wheelchair, in a lot of pain, and in and out of the hospital. But he didn’t see his disease as limiting. In fact, in his autobiography, Not Just Any Bag of Bones, he described it as “a very small part” of who he was on the inside, despite it standing out as a “very visible part” on the outside. Jonathan’s book was published last year, 17 years after his death. Alden saw to it that the manuscript was shared with the world, though Jonathan initially asked him not to publish it, for fear of what the family might think. The autobiography, penned around 1996, paints a portrait of a man who defied the odds and doggedly pursued his dreams, living an extraordinary life. Within its approximately 250 pages, Jonathan not only reflects upon his experiences and accomplishments, but also

encourages others to do the same, inviting the reader to see life as an opportunity to “show the world your work of art.” Years after his brother’s death, Alden said he felt an urge to return to the manuscript and realized it was a treasure. “Every time I read it, I said, ‘This is a story that would appeal to a lot of people,’” whether the reader is living with a disability, loves sports or just enjoys autobiographies, Alden told the CN&R. “His optimism was infectious. It really was. He did not let stuff get in his way.” Jonathan spent much of his childhood in Shriners hospitals, which he called his “second home.” His family moved around a lot— he grew up in Hawaii, San Mateo, Indiana and Michigan. Alden said because the two were eight years apart, they grew much closer in their adult years. Jonathan, the youngest of four, was “kind of the mascot of the family. He was the comedian, even for somebody who was in pain a lot.” The U.S. National Library of Medicine estimates that six or seven people per 100,000 worldwide live with osteogeneisis imperfecta. The disease is classified by types, and Jonathan’s was more severe: He fractured bones before he was born, and over the course

of his nearly 36 years of life, he broke more than 100. Over his lifetime, Jonathan had many attendants who helped him with his daily needs, like getting into and out of the bathtub, mopping the floors, preparing dinner and running errands. He referred to them as “the glue that holds me together.” Though Jonathan’s intelligence was often underestimated, Alden said, he and his parents persisted in advocating for his mental acuity. “It’s amazing he got as good an education as he did,” Alden said. “Particularly in those days, they just wanted to pigeonhole people like him into special ed.” Jonathan arrived in Chico in 1983 to attend Chico State, which he described as “one giant roller coaster, never a dull moment.” He pledged the Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity and, as a fierce football fan, served as the kicking coach for the Wildcat football team. He graduated in 1987 with a degree in communications and decided to call Chico his home. Post-college, he hosted a sports segment called “Chalk Talk” for the local NBC affiliate. For 10 years, he was the honorary head coach of the East-West Shrine Football Classic. Later in his life, Jonathan was an educational and motivational speaker, an advocate for those with disabilities, and passionate about public service. He was responsible for the installation of what became called “Studebaker strips” downtown—the smooth paths in the center of the faux-bricked and HEALTHLINES C O N T I N U E D

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APPOINTMENT Free checkup It’s not unusual these days to get sticker shock from doctor visits, but those appointments give much-needed insight into what is happening inside our bodies. The good news? Friday (April 19), from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., Northern Valley Indian Health is hosting a Community Health Fair at Wildwood Park. The clinic will provide free health screenings, raffles and giveaways. Call 899-5156 for more info.


SEXUAL VIOLENCE HAS NO BOUNDARIES

All Gender Identities, Races, Ages, Social Classes & Ethnicities are Affected • 1 in 5 women will be raped in their lifetime • Nearly 1 in 2 women and 1 in 5 men experience sexual violence victimization other than rape at some point in their lives • Intimate partner sexual assault and rape are used to intimidate, control, and demean survivors of domestic violence • Intimate partner sexual assault is more likely than stranger or acquaintance assault to cause physical injury • 40-50% of women in abusive relationships will also be sexually violated during the course of the relationship • 18% of female survivors of spousal rape say their children witnessed the crime • Only 1 in 10 report being sexually violated. Marital rape is the most under-reported form of sexual assault.

KNOW YOUR RIGHTS about sexual assault. If you, or someone you know, has been sexually assaulted you can receive a free forensic medical examination, regardless of whether or not you choose to participate in the criminal justice process.

WE ARE HERE TO LISTEN

Butte/Glenn: 530-891-1331 Tehama: 530-529-3980 24hr CRISIS LINE: 530-342-RAPE (7273) Collect Calls Accepted Apri l 18, 2019

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REPLACING GUILT AND BURN-OUT WITH GRATITUDE AND STRESS RELIEF

ShERRI SNELLING CEO of Caregiving Club and author – A Cast of Caregivers

Every Family Deserves an Affordable Place to Call Home HAbitAt For HumAnity oF buttE County

is looking for Partner Families who: • Have a need for Affordable Housing (priority will be given to those most vulnerable) • Meet 40-80% of the Area Median Income Guidelines • Are willing to partner with Habitat • Have the ability to pay an Affordable Mortgage

For more information, it is strongly encouraged to attend one of the following orientation meetings. May 2nd - 6:00pm Saint John’s Episcopal Church May 4th - 10:00am Paradise Alliance Church May 6th - 6:00pm Bidwell Presbyterian

S

herri Snelling is founder/CEO of Caregiving Club, a strategic consulting, communications and content company focused on the nation’s 65 million family caregivers. Sherri has done work for AARP, Keck Medicine of USC, UnitedHealthcare, LifeCare, CareLinx, grandPad, First Republic, Wells Fargo and QVC. Shewas the chairman of the National Alliance for Caregivingin Washington, D.C. and is currently a board member of the Alzheimer’s Association – Orange County chapter. She also serves as ambassador for the nonprofit Caregiver Monday campaign and is a nationally sought speaker.

Questions? Call 343-7423 Ext 5

May 7, 2019 • 10 aM - 12 PM Butte Creek Country Club, Chico, CA For more information or to register please call 530-898-5925

FRESHEN UP YOUR STYLE 14

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HEALTHLINES

C O N T I N U E D F R O M PA G E 1 2

His story:

bulbed intersections—to ease the crossing for those in wheelchairs. When Jonathan was born in 1965, the

doctors gave him a week to live. But “[w]ith each passing day, I was defying the experts,” Jonathan writes. He died in 2001 from complications from pneumonia, just shy of 36. At the time of his death, Jonathan still had a lot on his to-do list. He had dreams of being a head football coach and winning the Super Bowl. He wanted to expand his efforts to educate people about individuals with disabilities. “I knew I was doing something right,” he writes. “I had letters from children who shared stories of how they were no longer afraid to play with kids with disabilities.” He was a Chico Planning Commissioner, a member of the city’s Affirmative Action Committee and Transit Board, and president of the local chapter of the Lions Club. He ran for Chico City Council in 1996, finishing ninth in a field of 19 candidates. As the book concludes, Jonathan reflects on the questions “Who am I?” and “Why am I here?” and asks

Jonathan Studebaker’s book, Not Just Any Bag of Bones, can be purchased from Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and the publisher, AuthorHouse. Ten percent of the proceeds will be donated to Shriners International.

his readers to do the same. “I want to be happy. I want to be healthy. I want to live life to the fullest and make the world a better place than when I arrived here on May 20, 1965,” he writes. Alden said his brother definitely accomplished that wish, and his book is a testament to that. Jonathan had a lot of “moxie” and “certainly lived life with a lot of gusto.” “He didn’t hide his light,” Alden said. “He put it out there for everybody to see.” Ω

WEEKLY DOSE

Celebrating Easter In Our Community

Easter!

Palm Sunday Service 10:30am

eaSter Sunday ServiceS 8:30 and 10:30am

Trinity United Methodist Church 285 E 5th St. ChiCo, California (530) 343-1497 • chicotrinity.org

Faith Lutheran

Where Everyone is Welcome Palm Sunday 8:30 & 11am Mon - Wed 10am-2pm: Labyrinth Maundy Thursday 7pm Good Friday 7pm Vigil of Easter 7pm Easter Day 8:30 & 11am Easter Egg Hunt for Children at 9:45am 667 E 1ST AVE, CHICO, CA (530) 895-3754 www.chicofaithlutheran.org

Blame the cavemen Why is a bag of chips so much easier to eat than a bag of carrots? The siren call of pizza and other junk food has less to do with your willpower and more to do with marketing and genetics. To our ancestors, fat, sugar and salt were necessary to survive. Thus, they were built to crave it. The stuff was hard to find, so the self-control part of their brains remained underdeveloped. Today, neither our willpower nor our cravings has changed, but we can find those “bad” calories anywhere. Junk food also triggers happy hormones, leading manufacturers to spend millions to find the perfect ratio of fat, sugar and salt (known as the “the bliss point”) to seduce you. One suggestion is to cut down on sugar, so you become more sensitive to sweetness and, in theory, eat less of it. If that fails here and there, remember to cut yourself a break.

Source: CNN Health

supp rt

real

news Donate to ’s InDepenDent JournalIsm FunD:

InDepenDentJournalIsmFunD.org APRIL 18, 2019

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GREENWAYS Urban Forest Manager Richie Bamlet stands among city street trees waiting to be planted.

Planting a seed Urban forester embarks on city tree master plan story and photo by

Evan Tuchinsky

evantuc hin sk y @ n ewsrev i ew. com

TRichie week. Walking along a tree-lined street, Bamlet slows, looks up, then jots

he scene repeats itself countless times a

notes on his clipboard. A passerby or resident, seeing his city-logo attire and hard hat, approaches. Discussion ensues. He hears the history of an avocado tree in the backyard of a gentleman who says he got the seed from John Bidwell’s gardener (Bamlet takes a look—and a sample). He hears the latest account of limbs falling off valley oaks around Lower Park. He hears residents wax nostalgic about black walnut trees … and gripe about the same species. Bamlet relishes these encounters. He’s been here two years, moving from Roseville to become Chico’s urban forest manager. Input from what he calls “safety jacket

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talks,” he said, is “honest and pure feedback from people who know this city. It’s priceless—I couldn’t pay a consultant $100,000 to get [that].” A few people have mentioned the misfortune with sycamores along Mission Ranch Boulevard. In 2014, the City Council authorized—by denying an appeal—the removal of 25 Yarwood sycamore trees in the neighborhood. The trees had dropped limbs, uprooted sidewalks and damaged irrigation systems. These fellings followed others around town that concerned tree advocates and the Butte Environmental Council (see “A canopy

Public input:

Urban Forest Manager Richie Bamlet wants to hear what people like and dislike about Chico’s trees—plus input on the city tree list. Email richard.bamlet@ chicoca.gov before May 9, the next Tree Committee meeting. (Visit tinyurl.com/ChicoTreeList for the committee agenda report that includes the current list.)

imperiled,” cover story, Dec. 4, 2014). Bamlet said those sycamores didn’t need to go. Arborists have techniques to trim trunks and roots in a manner that looks extreme but, performed correctly, can save both the tree and the paving. Coincidentally, the day he spoke with the CN&R—last Wednesday (April 11), before a city Tree Committee meeting—he’d attended a Sacramento Tree Foundation session about sidewalks and trees. Through the Tree Committee, incorporating public input, Bamlet is developing a framework he hopes will forestall situations like the one on Mission Ranch Boulevard. That framework: an urban forest management plan, with a 50-year horizon. It’s similar to the Bidwell Park Master Management Plan—in fact, members of the Bidwell Park and Playground Commission compose the Tree Committee—and Bamlet also compares it to the city’s general plan, which sets a blueprint for development. Bamlet’s predecessor, Denice Britton, started drafting a master plan in 2011 but retired in 2013. A key “tool” for developers, designers and city officials who sign off on projects is a list of street trees approved for medians, parkway strips and parking lots. Updating that list constitutes a key part of the process (see infobox) and began at last Wednesday’s meeting. Bamlet has a citywide tree inventory set to commence within two months and finish by the end of the year. The master plan also will codify planting, pruning and tree care—its crafting will run into 2020. He expects to revisit the tree list every few years. Committee Chair Garrett Liles, a soil and plant sciences professor at Chico State, told the dozen attendees: “We’re a city of trees— we want a city of diverse trees.”

“It’s an ecological issue,” Liles said, “not just an urban street issue.” Climate change is another factor. “Whether you believe it’s man-made or it’s natural phenomenon, it’s getting hotter— that’s undisputed,” Bamlet said. “And it’s hotter than the sun in Chico during the summer! So we need to be looking at trees that grow in this Mediterranean climate.” Does that mean native species only? Bamlet thinks not. He says other varieties do well here, and limiting the “palette” would be counterproductive. Woody Elliott, a Chicoan who serves as conservation chair of the Mount Lassen chapter of the California Native Plant Society, said he’d “encourage the use of native plants whenever appropriate.” He cited as a good example the valley oaks within the Highway 32 median between Highway 99 and Forest Avenue. However, he added, his group isn’t opposed to other species, in the right context. “That’s part of the planning process,” Ellliott said, “that Bidwell Park is for the natives and street trees are more heterogeneous.” Robin McCollum of Chico Tree Advocates also prefers natives. He supports the push for diversity—and large trees, which he said last longer, provide more shade and remove more greenhouse gases from the air. Yet, with 4,000 trees removed but not replaced (by Bamlet’s count), McCollum told the CN&R: “Any tree is better than no tree.” Ω

ECO EVENT

Diversity represents a consideration more

significant than aesthetic. Bamlet explained before and during the meeting that bugs, both insects and pathogens, pose a serious threat to tree species. “It’s not a matter of if, but when” Chico will face an arborial plague, he said. A beetle, the polyphagous shot hole borer, infests trees including California sycamores and has migrated north from Los Angeles to Ventura. Gypsy moth larvae feast on valley oak leaves; two were found in Butte County in 2010, indicating to Bamlet they could return. Based on a decade-old study, Chico has 38,000 trees in public rights of way. Seventy percent come from just six families: maple, sycamore, oak, pistache, walnut and crape. Maples hold the highest proportion, at 18 percent of the canopy. While not as unbalanced as some cities—Portland, for instance, has 40 percent of one species, Norway maple—Chico’s breakdown raises concerns.

Find your way If you’re planning to spend time in the wilderness, it’s wise to learn simple strategies to orient yourself in unfamiliar territory. Chico Creek Nature Center has the goods on that front. Head to the center (1968 E. Eighth St.) at 10 a.m. this Saturday (April 20) for Find Your Way: Orienteering. During this kid-friendly event, you’ll learn how to use that trusty compass to orient a map and negotiate a course using bearings and paces. Expect to discover some cool navigational tricks, including using the north star. For more info, visit ccnaturecenter.org.


EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS phoTo By AShiAh SchArAgA

15 MINUTES

THE GOODS

caffeinated legacy

The Kettle is on

Oziel Magaña is an attentive shop owner. During a recent interview at Mondos Coffeehouse, he checked in with a regular who’d taken the last drip of coffee in a dispenser and thanked a couple of students on their way out the door. He gushed about his team of 14 part-time workers, seven of whom participate in a work training program through Far Northern Regional Center, which serves individuals with developmental disabilities. Magaña, who has a background as a social worker, gave himself “a major crash course” in business ownership when he purchased Mondos in 2009 with his brother, Esteban (the pair closed their former shop, Euro Cafe, to run Mondos). Now, as the brothers celebrate 10 years in business, Magaña is pursuing his master’s in business administration. He’s also dedicated to nurturing what he sees as a legacy business in Chico—Mondos was founded in 1997 by Tim and Brandee Hamor. The shop, at 995 Nord Ave., Ste. 100, is known for its cozy atmosphere and lush display of indoor plants— along with its coffee and delicious breakfast sandwiches.

How have things evolved over a decade? We really have changed the business quite a bit. A lot of it was,

by

Meredith J. Cooper meredithc@newsreview.com

we had to offer what students were looking for but still honor our locals. We had to make sure we were different from [Starbucks]. So the coffee bar was a huge part of it for us. We got a super automatic [espresso machine], so we got the speed up. We decided to mix our own sauces [like chocolate sauce]. A lot of [drinks] we actually go back and grind chocolate bars [for flavor]. The other thing was the food. We went from selling one [sandwich] a day to last Saturday [April 6], before noon, we sold 67.

What are you most proud of? You have to be a little bit crazy to do food service. Your margins are super thin, there’s always something breaking, there’s always a competitor. I would always look at it like, I owe it to myself to have this place for individuals with disabilities to have that place where they can come to and actually be

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a part of a team that doesn’t just say, “You have a disability.” You’re a peer to us. You pay taxes, just like anyone else … customers get to be a little bit snarky to you. Not only do we want you here, but you’re [also] needed here.

What’s next for Mondos? At some point—I’m not eternal— I’m not going to be here. And it’s really important for me that this continues. I really want it to be a legacy … to be there and grow … for it to continue having that identity, being a place where people can come to and they can be themselves, and be considered a part of the community. I’m glad that [the] family that we’ve grown here has been not just behind the counter but also customers. We have this little, unique group of people that are like, “We’re Mondos.” —ASHiAH SCHArAGA as h i a h s @new srev i ew. c o m

Kevin Jaradah is building up quite a portfolio of businesses here in Chico, in a short amount of time. In fact, this Friday (April 19) marks the one-year anniversary of The Lab Bar & Grill, the science-themed pub off of Cohasset Road that boasts a variety of beers on tap and quite possibly the best chicken sandwich in town (I might, however, need to sit down for a side-by-side comparison with the version at Bill’s Towne Lounge). As if running the Lab and Spike’s Bottle Shop weren’t enough, Jaradah’s got a new venture. Last Saturday (April 13), I stopped in to check out The Brew Kettle, on Nord Avenue across from Safeway. What a cool little place! It’s a combination craft brew bar/liquor store/lounge and like nothing else currently in Chico. When I got there, a handful of people were occupying futons along a wall and a table in the center of the space. I ordered a half-pint of a blonde ale and sat on a futon in one of about half a dozen groupings, each of them facing its own bigscreen TV. The reggae on the stereo was a refreshing break from the seemingly constant pop noise everywhere else. “I just want this to be a chill spot,” Jaradah told me. So far, it’s working. At the moment, in terms of food, he’s just serving tamales—from the infamous Mary, who also makes tamales and fried chicken for the Durham Country Market—but hopes to expand the kitchen offerings. And, with an alcohol license that allows him to sell solely beer, he hopes to attract an all-ages crowd. The bonus: You can buy beer to go. Best of luck!

SAndAl SeASon Just in time for the warm weather, Baker’s Birkenstock is celebrating its 43rd anniversary. Stop by the Chico shop, on Broadway—which currently also houses the Paradise store—now through the end of April and enter to win $100 credit to the store. The shop has super cute sandals and an awesome selection of socks. I can’t bring myself to get on board with combining the two, though! Sign SAved I had no idea until earlier this week that local homeless advocate/tree hugger Charles Withuhn also happens to be a woodworker. Apparently, he carved the iconic sign that hangs outside Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. back in the 1980s. Sadly, it was hit recently by a truck and broken into several pieces—but do not fear, it’s been rehung after some TLC from Withuhn, who gifted the roughly $2,500 job to Ken Grossman as a way to thank him for all the generosity he’s shown since the Camp Fire. How’s that for good karma? BAcK in Town After abruptly shutting down the Tesla Energy operations in Chico last summer and laying off 30 employees there, the company is poised to reopen its Huss Lane office in another capacity: as a service station. As far as I’m concerned, the company owned by Elon Musk has some work to do reputation-wise locally, so let’s hope it treats its new employees better than its old ones.

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CN&R

17


SURVEYING the DESTRUCTION

After two major fires, specialists and planners chart a new course for Concow

story and photos by

Meredith J. Cooper me re d i thc @ n ew sr ev i ew. com

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^^ 18

ive-plus months after California’s deadliest and most destructive wildfire wreaked havoc on Butte County’s foothills communities, experts are still pondering a complicated, but critical question: How do we avoid another Camp Fire? The answers are far from simple. But for the two dozen local stakeholders who got together April 4 in Concow to survey what’s left of that community, one thing was certain: Whatever we do, we must abandon the status quo. CN&R

APRIL 18, 2019

The group, assembled by the Butte County Fire Safe Council, represented a wide range of local experts—from Cal Fire, the U.S. Forest Service, the Butte County Resource Conservation District, the Konkow Maidu tribe, among others—who, together, possess a vast amount of knowledge and experience when it comes to fires, the landscape and topography, and planning. They gathered in Concow because of the historical context it provides. It has, after all,

burned before—most recently during the devastating Butte Lightning Complex fires of 2008. Strangely enough, the blaze that leveled Concow that time also was dubbed the Camp Fire. So history does have a way of repeating itself. Had wind conditions mirrored those of last Nov. 8, the day the 2018 Camp Fire ignited, Paradise may have seen destruction a decade earlier as well. “This is one of the largest high-severity burn zones

“This used to be lush forest,” says Calli-Jane DeAnda, executive director of the Butte County Fire Safe Council. She’d assembled a group of stakeholders to discuss the region’s future. From left: Eric Josephson, Ryan Bauer, DeAnda, Tim Snellings, Dan Breedon, and Peggy and Pete Moak.

in California, one of the most devastated ecosystems in our state,” said Calli-Jane DeAnda, executive director of the Butte County Fire Safe Council, who was leading the day’s discussion. “The Camp Fire was the deadliest and largest fire—and I think Concow has [taken] the brunt of that ecologically. We are all dealing with something that has never necessarily been

tackled before.” “This used to be lush forest,” DeAnda explained. “But the ’08 fire burned so much, and the Camp Fire burned so hot, that now it looks like the Nevada desert.” For the next four hours, the group identified problems that contributed to the recent Camp Fire—too much dead wood and brush, poorly planned communities, difficult terrain, climate change. The solutions weren’t clear-cut, but could be whittled


^^

down to a few key ideas: thoughtful planning of the wildland-urban interface (aka WUI, pronounced “wooey”) and continual maintenance of it, to include forest thinning and prescribed burning. Any solution will require partnerships that have, thus far, been difficult to forge. Other fire-stricken regions of the state are dealing with similar scenarios on a smaller scale. So, while the group focused its discussion on the local landscape, they did so with the understanding that whatever the decision-makers do right now has much broader implications. Indeed, lawmakers and scientists across the state—and even the world—are watching and learning from what’s happening here. DeAnda believes the first area of attack should be Concow, as the level of devastation in that community is so massive—before the Camp Fire, there were some 500 people living there; now locals count about 30. “We basically have a clean slate, although there’s a lot of work to be done out here,” offered Eric Josephson, of the Konkow Maidu Cultural Preservation Association. “Concow is part of what makes Paradise burn,” added Zeke Lunder, owner of wildfire consulting firm Deer Creek Resources, based in Chico. A pyrogeographer, he specializes in mapping and analyzing wildfires.

The infrared map to the right shows the heat concentration of the Camp Fire, early on, while the satellite image (above) shows the actual blaze. MAPS COURTESY OF ZEKE LUNDER, DEER CREEK RESOURCES

‘It’s burned here forever’ “Concow has burned the entire existence of my tribe,” Josephson told the group. “When Concow burned in history, two little boys went down into the sweat house and threw some pitch pine onto the fire. And it leaped up … and from there, it spread everywhere, killing all the Konkow but two. “So, how’d we survive? Most of ’em didn’t! All but two died one time—at least, that’s the story from my tribe.” But until 2000, the community had lived peacefully without burning for decades. On Sept. 19 of that year, a resident hit a rock in a crawler tractor and a spark set the dry grass ablaze, according to a Cal Fire report on the incident, dubbed the Concow Fire. That blaze destroyed 14 homes and spread over 1,845 acres. One woman refused to leave her dogs inside her house and died. Eight years later, the Butte Lightning Complex fires—57 of them—were much more destructive. Sparked by lightning storms, they roared through the region, covering nearly 60,000 acres and destroying 212 residences, 50 of them in Concow, where again one civilian was killed. Dry weather and a series of lightning events across Northern California that summer were deemed responsible for a total of 2,000 fires spanning 1.2 million acres. “In California’s modern fire suppression era, this many fires starting early in

the season, and burning simultaneously over such a long a period of time is unprecedented,” a Cal Fire summary reads. In both 2000 and 2008, incident summaries indicated that while the vegetation provided much of the fuel, homes and other buildings also contributed. As the frequency of fires in the WUI has increased, the need to enforce defensible space around structures has grown as well. “It’s burned here forever,” Josephson reiterated. “People should know that and build accordingly.” His wife, Kate Hedges, suggested looking at alternatives to wooden frames and even considering building semi-subterranean homes in the hopes that “the fire will just roll right over the tops.” Sticking with the old ways won’t work, she said, because that doesn’t take modern technologies or issues into account. “We’ve gotta talk about climate change,” she said frankly. “We have to adapt or leave.” Others echoed her. “We had a fire in 2000, we had a fire in 2008 …. We have a lot of fire [here],” said Tim Snellings, director of development services for the county. “People and fire are not a good match. We have a planning discussion ahead of us .... It’s not just a reforestation, growthstabilization process—we have a discussion about repopulation ahead of us. We need to have a serious conversation about that.” Pete Moak, a Concow resident who, with the help of his family,

Pete Moak and his family successfully defended their home from the Camp Fire when it came through Concow. Part of that was because Moak clears the property religiously—with goats and prescribed fires.

successfully defended his property, along with the neighboring Cal Fire station, agreed. More than once, officials referred to Moak not as a landowner but as a “land manager.” So, beyond planning the community—including where people should and shouldn’t live—with the understanding that fire will inevitably return, it’s incumbent upon residents to work together to ensure the next fire is less ferocious and deadly. “You need to be independent up here, to take care of yourself,” Moak said. “And that’s gotta be something—how do you tell people that they can’t take care of themselves? They retire somewhere, they come up into these beautiful areas. They want to enjoy the timber, the woods …. But in order to do that, you’ve got to be able to say to yourself, ‘Yes, I’m selfsufficient.’ A lot of ’em aren’t. They don’t have a clue. When fire comes that close, it’s a scary situation. And we had people die that weren’t prepared.”

Managing the landscape After the fire rolled through in 2008, the U.S. Forest Service surveyed what was left on its parcels in the Concow basin, Ryan Bauer, a fire management specialist for the agency, told the group. They were standing in a rough circle on a patch of land along Concow Road overlooking the region’s reservoir of the same name. The landscape looked more like a moonscape, someone commented, to nods of agreement. “The place we’re standing right now is national forest land. It was masticated after the 2008 fire,” Bauer said, referring to the mechanical process of chewing up brush to reduce fuels. “A 20-acre chunk of mastication in a sea of brush isn’t successful at doing anything. It didn’t perform. It burned how you expect a brush field to burn.” In fact, on another USFS parcel, which is too steep to use masticating machinery, it burned exactly the same, he said. That’s because that process may cut down fuel—but it doesn’t remove it. Now, with an estimated 600,000 dead or dying trees in the Camp Fire burn zone, it’s imperative that those responsible for that land do something

CONCOW C O N T I N U E D O N PA G E 2 0 APRIL 18, 2019

CN&R

19


“There is a paradigm shift occurring across the Sierra Nevada region which

shi bo int im

demonstrates that a diverse group of stakeholders, agencies and individuals recognize that the forest is overgrown

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and in jeopardy of continued catastrophic wildfires.”

CONCOW C O N T I N U E D F R O M PA G E 1 9 different, he said. First, the trees must be removed. Second, he said: prescribed burning. “What we need to be thinking about when we think about fuels treatments is they need to be designed to put more fire on the landscape, to allow us to live with fire,” Bauer said. “Because we know it’s going to continue to happen.” A century of aggressive firefighting has left the state of California with dense, and in many areas dying, forests. Bauer’s views on introducing fire to the landscape are shared by many across the state, as tactics have shifted in recent years toward accepting fire as a natural occurrence in nature rather than something to be suppressed. At the same time, people who have long fought against forest thinning are beginning to come to terms with the practice—for fire safety as well as wildlife and watershed protection. “There is a paradigm shift occur-

This photo was taken overlooking Concow Lake two months after the Butte Lightning Complex fires in 2008.

20

CN&R

APRIL 18, 2019

ag Re

—Calli-Jane DeAnda

ring across the Sierra Nevada region which demonstrates that a diverse group of stakeholders, agencies and individuals recognize that the forest is overgrown and in jeopardy of continued catastrophic wildfires,” DeAnda told the CN&R. Cal Fire Battalion Chief Gus Boston also understands the value of controlled burning, part of his agency’s strategy for combating wildfires. As head of the Butte Unit’s vegetation management program, however, he took it a step further. He suggested forest thinning projects—like two in Magalia managed by the Fire Safe Council, which have been credited with slowing the Camp Fire’s spread. “There was also work completed last year at the Pine Ridge School in Magalia, which was very helpful in firefighters’ ability to protect the school during [the] Camp Fire,” DeAnda told the CN&R. Boston also emphasized bringing in plant species that will protect the landscape versus allowing whatever is now growing—or might sprout naturally—to flourish. “There was standing timber here that survived the 2008 impact—that

no longer exists,” Boston said. “Now you can see, overall, the landscape has completely changed. There are some places that had a timber fuel component, and that’s now gone. What’s going to come in behind it? That’s what we’re concerned about.” To avoid allowing the accumulation of dead trees and brush— perfect fuel for a fire—as was the case pre-Camp Fire, everyone agreed, there must be a combination of either mechanical mastication or livestock and prescribed burns. Moak, whose house the group visited as a prime example of how to survive a blaze, uses goats and fire to keep his property clear. “Possibly we haven’t had enough fire [in recent years],” he said. “Because in the old days, they did burn it. Intentionally. Maybe we need to plant trees that can withstand that. And have slow-burning fall fires, with cattle grazing and livestock grazing ….” Goats have become increasingly popular in culling tough brush like manzanita, which grows rapidly and burns well. Plus, Moak added, they stamp down the ground while they’re munching. “You can see it, right down on Concow Lake, where they did have goats this last summer, they grazed all of Concow Road along [there],” he said. “It didn’t burn.” What’s more, at least one person with property by the water was able to survive the fire by jumping into the reservoir. He wouldn’t have

Cal Fire Battalion Chief Gus Boston (left) and Ryan Bauer, a fire management specialist with the U.S. Forest Service, discuss how to manage the landscape in Concow after the Camp Fire.

been able to do that if the woods there had been overgrown, Jim Hautman, of the Fire Safe Council, told the CN&R. “If we look at the history of what we’ve accomplished with cutting brush, as far as affecting the size of the fires we’ve had, we haven’t been effective at all,” said pyrogeographer Lunder, in addressing the bigger picture of how fire moves through the landscape. “There are scant opportunities for a fuel break to be effective. And, when the wind’s blowing, there’s no opportunity for a fuel break to be effective. “We can’t really vegetationmanage our way out of the problem. Fire belongs here and we need to live with it,” he added. “We need to start with not making the problem worse when we come and clean up after it.” Everyone agreed that no one approach will solve the problem of vegetative fuel in the Concow basin, particularly when considered within the bigger context of the vast forests that surround it. Going forward, DeAnda said the group had formed a Forest Health and Wildlands Task Force Committee, which plans to meet next on Wednesday, April 24 (see infobox). “This is a very large project,” Boston said. “What we do in the next 36 months with that vision is going to be how this landscape unfolds in the future.”

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All together now One of the biggest obstacles to putting together a large-scale effort such as improving the fire safety of Butte County’s communities and forests—as well as putting them in the larger context of California and even the nation—is the fact that no one entity oversees it all. In Concow alone, portions of the land are owned by private citizens like Moak; by Native American tribes like the Konkow Maidu; by governmental bodies like the U.S. Forest Service; by private corporations like Sierra Pacific Industries; and by special districts like Thermalito Water and Sewer District, which owns Concow Lake, and Paradise Recreation and Park District, which owns the nearby Crain Memorial Park. So, how to get everyone on the same page, and who should be in charge? Those are additional questions stakeholders have been asking themselves—and having fits over. Large agencies often have the ability to get grant and other funding to do projects, but without partner-

Get involved:

The newly formed Forest Health and Wildlands Task Force Committee will meet Wednesday (April 24) to create an action plan. Those interested in finding out more should email firesafe@buttefiresafe.net or call 877-0984 to be put on the email list for the group.

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ips with nonprofits and other oots-on-the-ground types, welltentioned plans tend not to get mplemented, the group agreed. “I’m sick of planning for the ke of planning,” Lunder said. John Hunt, conservation manger for the Northern California egional Land Trust, echoed him. “When you’re talking about liance upon agencies or, rather, e relinquishment of our obligaons or responsibilities, etc., [to gencies]—it creates a bottleeck,” he said. “Essentially, agenes ... are driven by these large ureaucracies with point people. nd our communities are loaded ith people who are badasses— ey’re knowledgeable, they’re xperienced—who are underutized and underintigrated.” Any plan that has a chance of eaningful, timely follow-through has got to be led by people in e community who … have the xperience,” he continued. “And has to be enabled, it has to be mpowered. It can’t be just left up the agencies.” Moak piped in: “We can have e knowledge on the ground, but e can’t do the paperwork,” he id, referring to processes like pplying for grants that take time nd expertise. One tool that will soon be vailable to address those conraints comes from a watershed ant just obtained by the Butte ounty Resource Conservation istrict—a special district whose ission is to “protect, enhance, nd support Butte County natural sources and agriculture” by orking with public and private ndowners. The grant will, in art, help launch a local preribed burn association (PBA). he concept is fairly new—only umboldt County has an active BA, though Plumas recently unched one, too—and would ovide support for partnerships etween public and private enties, plus work- and equipmentare opportunities. “So, someone like Pete Moak], who has a lifetime of nowledge—it will allow people ho aren’t Pete but want to be ke Pete get the backup support ey need,” explained Wolfy ougle, conservation project coornator for the district. “It’s not ir to just expect normal people

to volunteer forever. There needs to be ... some framework for people to fall back on, a place to park the trailer with the gear in it.” Legislation is being crafted to help individuals become certified in prescribed burns, Lunder added, because the idea of having private citizens perform risky maneuvers is a scary prospect if they’re not fully confident and trained in what they’re doing. The grant, Rougle said, hopefully will get the ball rolling. DeAnda, of the Fire Safe Council, also has an idea she hopes to implement sooner than later. It requires participation from public- and private-sector stakeholders and would empower them all. “I feel like the next big thing that needs to happen is to have a collaborative map that everybody can be working off of,” she said, speaking specifically in regard to Concow. “It would show, at parcel-level, where the burn severity was the highest, where we’re anticipating the most brush regrowth, where we would want to replant oak versus conifers, where we would need strategic fuel breaks, where we want to have cultural information—just the go-to vision going out 10 years in the future. It would encompass “the bulk of the WUI,” she continued, “everything we see here where homes used to be that’s going to be influenced by fire.” The county should look at zoning to reduce population density—which could save lives while reducing fuel on the landscape—and also consider mandates regarding defensible space, some suggested. Fines for noncompliance, and even a lien process, could improve the entire region’s ability to avoid future catastrophic blazes. In looking at the bigger picture of how the USFS and other agencies can learn from the fires in Concow, Bauer summed it up: “We’re going to have to accept that we’re going to have large, long-duration wildfire events in there that are actually going to ultimately benefit the landscape. Because otherwise we’re setting up a situation where we’re keeping fire out of there for 50 years and then the big one comes rolling down the canyon.” Ω

Wide open spaces Paradise parks leader sees opportunity to increase fire safety while offering more outdoor activities

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round 10:45 a.m. on the morning of Nov. 8, 2018, as vehicles fleeing the Camp Fire were caught in gridlock on the Skyway leading out of Paradise, about 75 people found themselves driving another direction, toward Bille Park. They took refuge from the flames, wind and flying embers under the shelter of the metal pavilion until Cal Fire crews came in with tractors to clear the roads and allow them safe passage. “Their best chance wasn’t trying to make it out at that point, so they went back, into the park,” said Dan Efseaff, director of the Paradise Recreation and Park District (PRPD). “Here’s a park we managed as a recreation resource—and it saved lives.” Bille wasn’t the only one, either. In Concow, fire personnel ushered people to the open space at Crain Memorial Park, as it was safer than trying to escape through the flames. Efseaff now looks at parks a little differently. With his background in restoration ecology, he appreciates the value of nature, as well as humans’ impact on it. He also sees the benefits people can gain from getting outside. Now he’s got some big ideas when it comes to increasing the number of parks and open spaces within PRPD’s jurisdiction with a dual purpose in mind: to increase the health and vibrancy of the area, and to create community defensible space in the event of a future fire. To that end, he says he’s building partnerships with people and organizations such as the Paradise Irrigation District, Butte County Fire Safe Council and Bureau of Land Management.

Dan Efseaff, director of the Paradise Recreation and Park District, hopes to add acreage to create more parks that also can serve as community defensible space.

Still, there is a challenge inherent in the rebuilding process—as residents and businesses are clamoring to move back onto their properties, no one has yet presented a comprehensive goal for the community that doesn’t involve going back to what was there before. “Paradise needs some leadership, to think radically in regard to planning,” Zeke Lunder, a wildfire expert and mapper based in Chico, told the CN&R. “Now is the time. Consolidate parcels, create big parks. If we rebuild on the same footprint, we’re insane.” That’s just what Efseaff has in mind. Through a combination of easements, property purchases and land donations, he hopes to grow trail networks and bike paths, and to create spaces for additional recreational activities like rock climbing, kayaking and even zip-lining. “We want to have programs that will take advantage of where we are in the landscape,” he said. “There’s so much therapeutic value in recreation—our community needs that.” At the same time, introducing more open space within the communities PRPD covers—

“If we rebuild on the same footprint, we’re insane.” —Zeke Lunder

PHOTO BY EVAN TUCHINSKY

which is nearly the entire Camp Fire burn area, Efseaff noted—will serve as defensible space. And paths and trails can offer emergency vehicles access to otherwise hard-toreach areas. So far, Efseaff said, people have been receptive to discussing out-of-the-box ideas. “There’s a really positive collegial atmosphere,” he said. “Egos are gone.” Working together is the key to reimagining life in such a fire-prone region. It’s no longer acceptable to stay isolated. “In our area, property rights are very important,” Efseaff said. “But this episode, this catastrophe, opened some eyes. What happens on your neighbor’s property could have a huge impact on yours. Pre-fire, people in Paradise would say, ‘Concow is across the canyon—it doesn’t have an impact on me.’ But we’re much more connected than we thought before the fire. We need all the partners on board to tackle these tasks that seem insurmountable right now.” Efseaff is also cognizant that the direction Paradise—and the rest of the Camp Fire zone—takes will inform communities across the state and beyond. “I’m excited about this,” he said. “A lot of the solutions that happen in Paradise will have huge implications for our future. Paradise [will be] our model, an outdoor lab for the rest of California.” —MEREDITH J. COOPER me r e d i th c @ newsr ev iew.c o m

APRIL 18, 2019

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Arts &Culture SCUZZY

SONGS

Flat Worms: (from left) Will Ivy, Tim Hellman and Justin Sullivan. PHOTO BY DAVID EVANKO

THIS WEEK 18

THU Making beautiful noise with LA’s Flat Worms

Special Events CHAMPIONS OF THE ARTS: The Chico Arts and Culture Foundation

Making beautiful noise with LA’s Flat Worms

Fattitude give some weight to his screw-off as the vocalist for his garage-

rontman Will Ivy’s huge guitar tones

rock trio, Flat Worms. It’s kind of like a brawny henchman backing up the wiseass ringleader of a neighborhood gang. He uses three effects on the floor—a couple of overdrive pedals by and a chorus—and Howard does so with little Hardee subtlety. “I’m fairly tasteless,” he said. Preview: “When it comes to Flat Worms performs settings, they’re all Friday, April 26, 9 p.m., at Duffy’s maxed out at 10.” Tavern, as part of the Los AngelesValley Fever festival based Flat Worms (April 25-27). is a supergroup Warm Drag and Bad of sorts featuring Mana open. Ivy—a member Tickets: $10 for of Dream Boys individual shows; and a successful $25 for all-inclusive solo artist in his wristband (available in advance at Duffy’s). own right—bassist More info at Tim Hellman (Oh valleyfeverchico.com. Sees) and drummer Justin Sullivan Duffy’s Tavern (Night Shop, Kevin 337 Main St. Morby). The trio 343-7718 facebook.com/ plays at Duffy’s duffschico Tavern on Friday (April 26, as part

22

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APRIL 18, 2019

of the Valley Fever festival), in support of the band’s new six-song EP, Into the Iris, which was recorded in LA at the home studio of psych-rocker extraordinaire Ty Segall. The band members are ruthlessly efficient with their studio time, Ivy said. Rather than recording in separate booths and nitpicking details, they get together as a group and just rock out, rarely taking more than a couple of days to track an album’s worth of material. “We work really efficiently because we try to have the songs as tight as we can before we go into the studio,” Ivy said. “We set up the mics in a room and just play through them all. Sometimes I’ll do guitar overdubs, and Tim will maybe track a second bass overdub, but we don’t want to go too crazy because we want to present what we are without extra bells and whistles. “I think the best thing you can do, when you’re recording your project, is to document how it sounds live.” That said, the band allowed Segall to work his magic in key moments, like during the intro of the EP’s first single, “Shouting at the Wall,” which features a warped version of a guitar lick that reappears in the bridge. For the effect, Ivy and Segall collaborated on some “tapemanipulation stuff to make that section as weird-sounding as possible, speed-

ing it up and slowing it down, adding some extras,” Ivy said. And that’s just one example; sonic freakouts abound throughout the EP, breaking up otherwise straightforward scuzzy pop songs. “We like to make it so our songs aren’t so stock,” he said. “We enjoy tossing in noisy parts, but there’s a spectrum for us. There’s the noisy, weird end of the spectrum and the pop end of the spectrum. You can get too far out, but keeping something memorable and hooky in the songs is also important.” Working within those parameters, Flat Worms is able to create songs spontaneously from jamming during practice sessions. Though Ivy has resisted jam-based songwriting in his previous bands, something clicks when he’s making noise with Hellman and Sullivan. Without much verbal communication, their parts just fall into place. “When we’re playing together, it just works,” Ivy said. “We’ll be messing around with something and it it will become one of our favorite songs on the new record. You never know, when you start a project, the chemistry that you’ll have with each other. I think we’re lucky that we all sort of fit, and I love the three-piece dynamic—it’s so lean Ω and streamlined.”

will host a guest speaker, Jonathan Richman will perform, and awards will be handed out to local arts heroes. Thu, 4/18, 5:30pm. Light snacks and drinks provided. 900 Esplanade. monca.org

THURSDAY NIGHT MARKET: Local produce, fresh flowers, music, arts and crafts, and food trucks. Will continue every Thursday through September. Thu, 4/18, 6pm. Downtown Chico. 345-6500. downtownchico.com

Theater THE BOOK CLUB PLAY: A comedic play that explores life, love, literature and reading between the lines. Thu, 4/18, 7:30pm. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Road, Paradise. totr.org

19

FRI

FORK IN THE ROAD: More than a dozen local food trucks, a playground, beer garden and live music by The Alice Peake Experience. Fri, 4/19, 5:30pm. Degarmo Park, 199 Leora Court.

TEEN WOLF: Chico Mall Family Movie Nights presents the ’80s classic with food court meal deals. Fri, 4/19, 7pm. Free. Chico Mall, 1950 E. 20th St. Ste. 727., 530-343-0706. chicomall.com

RUN4SALMON FUNDRAISER Saturday, April 20 The Pageant Theatre

SEE SATURDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS


FINE ARTS ON NEXT paGE

FOrK iN THE rOaD Friday, April 19 DeGarmo Park

SEE FriDaY, SPECIAL EVENTS

Salmon Home. Winnemem Wintu tribe members will be in attendance to speak about the  Shasta Dam and their sacred sites.  Sat 4/20, 1pm. $5-$10. Pageant Theatre, 351 E. Sixth St.  pageantchico.com 

SPRING JAMBOREE - EASTER EGG HUNT: Children  under 8 are invited to meet the Easter  Bunny. There will be pictures, an Easter egg  hunt, craft-making and a bounce house. See  website for age-specific start times.  Sat 4/20, 10am. Caper Acres Park, 500 South  Park Drive. 895-4711. chicorec.com 

Box Office or call 898-6333.  Sat, 4/20, 7:30pm. Harlen Adams Theatre, Chico State,  PAC 144. csuchico.edu/soa

CAMMIES FINALE & AWARDS SHOW: Fifteenth  annual Chico Area Music Festival & Awards  Show featuring performances by more than  a dozen local acts on two stages. This year’s  event will also benefit Butte County musicians impacted by the Camp Fire. Tickets  are free, but registration at website is  required.  Sat, 4/20, 7pm. Sierra Nevada Big  Room, 1075 E. 20th St. sierranevada.com

KURT CAMERON: Guitar tunes and brunch.  Sat, 4/20, 11am. La Salles, 229 Broadway St. 

Music ART AND MUSIC: Symphonic Winds Ensemble 

lasalleschico.com

conductor Royce Tevis directs his last  show before retiring. Concert will pair art  to music and feature guest artist Alycia  Coleman. Purchase tickets at the University 

COMMUNITY HEALTH FAIR: Northern Valley Indian  Health-sponsored event with free health  screenings and education, raffles and giveaways. Contact Lisa Huerta 899-5156.  Fri, 4/19, 11am. Wildwood Park.

VOLUNTEER FRIDAYS: Join in the cleanup of various spots throughout the park. Pick up litter  and pull weeds. For more info call Shane at  896-7831.  Fri, 4/19, 9am. Bidwell Park.

GUYS AND DOLLS JR.: Kids performance of  award-winning musical-comedy classic. Presented by California Regional  Theatre.  Fri, 4/19, 7pm. $10. CUSD Center for  the Arts, 1475 East Ave. crtshows.com

20

SaT

Music

Special Events

DEAD WINTER CARPENTERS: KZFR presents the 

BLAZE N J’S 21ST ANNIVERSARY 420 CELEBRATION: All-day festival with live music, 

popular five-piece alt-country band. Partial  benefit for the Sierra Nevada Camp Fire  Relief Fund. See website for ticket info.  Fri, 4/19, 6:30pm. $15-$20. Chico Women’s Club,  592 E. Third St. 895-0706. kzfr.org 

Theater THE BOOK CLUB PLAY: See Thursday.  Fri, 4/19, 7:30pm.  Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal  Road, Paradise. totr.org 

glass blowing, food trucks, games and giveaways.  Sat, 4/20, 10am. Blaze N J’s, 236 W.  Ninth St.

BREAK BREAD WITH A FARMER: Fundraiser for  museum includes dinner and live music. See 

website or call 342-4359 for tickets.  Sat 4/20, 6pm. $35. Patrick Ranch Museum, 10381 

EDITOR’S PICK

Midway, Durham. patrickranchmuseum.org 

GRILLED-CHEESE FESTIVAL: A variety of grilledcheese samples, a bounce house, face  painting, games, music and vendors. Plus,  special all-you-can-eat-and-drink adult  hours. Benefit for the Chico Area Swim  Association.  Sat 4/20, 11am. $10-$70. Picnic  Area at Manzanita Place, 1705 Manzanita  Ave. 518-1598. chicoswims.ticketleap.com 

FIND YOUR WAY ORIENTEERING: Learn how to  use a compass to orient a map along with 

some simple tricks of navigation.  Sat 4/20, 10am. Chico Creek Nature Center, 1968 E.  Eighth St. chicorec.com 

IRON CANYON HIKE: Easy, 4- to 5-mile loop hike  with great views of the Sacramento River  and the coast range. Contact Alan at 8918789 or ajmendoza777@comcast.net.  Sat 4/20, 9:30am. sierraclub.org 

DEaD WiNTEr CarpENTErS

NSPR 50TH ANNIVERSARY PARTY: An afternoon 

SEE FriDaY, MUSIC

LIFE BY MOONLIGHT NIGHT HIKE: Discover Bidwell 

Friday, April 19 Chico Women’s Club

THIS WEEK CONTiNUED ON paGE 24

of music, food trucks and station tours in  celebration of the public-radio stations  birthday.  Sat, 4/20, 11am. North State Public  Radio - KCHO, 35 Main St. Park under a full moon with a certified  naturalist. See website for details.  Sat, 4/20, 9:30pm. Chico Creek Nature Center, 1968 E.  Eighth St. chicorec.com

NORTH TABLE MOUNTAIN ECOLOGICAL RESERVE HIKE: Mount Lassen Chapter, California  Native Plant Society leads a rugged 4-plusmile hike to Coal Canyon and Phantom Falls.  Call Woody at 588-2555 for more info.  Sat 4/20, 9am. North Table Mountain Ecological  Reserve. mountlassen.cnps.org 

RECLAIM OLD HUMBOLDT WAGON ROAD: Monthly  cleanup hosted by Respect the Walls. Long  pants and closed-toed shoes are a must.  Bring snacks and water, equipment will  be provided.  Sat 4/20, 8am. Old Humboldt  Wagon Road.

RUN4SALMON FUNDRAISER: Matinee showing of  award-winning documentary film Dancing 

FrEE liSTiNGS! post your event for free online at www. newsreview.com/calendar, or email the CN&r calendar editor at cnrcalendar@newsreview.com. Deadline for print listings is Wednesday, 5 p.m., one week prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

FOND FarEWEll Royce Tevis has been teaching music and conducting at Chico State for almost 20 years. The much-loved music director is retiring this semester, and his last concert with the university’s Symphonic Winds ensemble will take place on Saturday (April 20) at 7:30 p.m. in the Harlen Adams Theatre on campus. Art and Music will pair classic works of art with the music they inspired, giving the audience a rare glimpse into the process of composing. Tevis chose the music for its technical difficulty and visual flare, and has invited soprano Alycia Coleman for a guest performance. april 18, 2019

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“It’s all about the Dirty Sauce” Vegan options aVailable

show l❤ ve thrift Mon/Sat Tues Wed Thurs Fri Sun

Buy 1 get 1 free (clothing) 50% off 30% off everything 30% off for seniors & students 50% off 30% off everything

Veterans 20% off 648 West 5th St. | Chico 530.924.3171 ILikeIkesPlace.com

open 7 days a week | donations appreciated 1405 Park Ave. Chico, (530) 892-9198 www.facebook.com/ShowLoveThrift

THIS WEEK CONTINUED FROM PAGE 23

FINE ARTS

Theater THE BOOK CLUB PLAY: See Thursday. Sat, 4/20, 7:30pm. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Road, Paradise. totr.org

GUYS AND DOLLS JR.: See Friday. Sat, 4/20, 2pm. $10. CUSD Center for the Arts, 1475 East Ave. crtshows.com

21

SUN

Special Events CHICO CITIZENS’ CLIMATE LOBBY MEETING: Nonpartisan group of grassroots

volunteers. Open for new members. Sun, 4/21, 4pm. Gateway Science Museum, 625

SALLY DIMAS ART GALLERY Presents

Please bring a friend!

PANCAKES FOR PEACE: The Chico Peace and Justice Center hosts its annual all-youcan-eat pancake breakfast with a silent auction and activities for kids. Call 893-9078 or visit website for more info. Sun, 4/21, 8am. $6-$15. CARD Center, 545 Vallombrosa Ave. chicopeace.org

Spring Fling iS Here! Artist reception Friday, April, 26th 4 to 7 Pm Show thru end of May

Esplanade. citizensclimatelobby.org

Music “Art is something everyone needs in their life” —Sally Dimas Gallery Hours Tues - Sat. 11AM - 4PM

SETH BRAND LIVE MUSIC: Singer/songwriter from North Carolina joined by wife on percus-

sion for a set of Americana originals. Sun, 4/21, 3pm. Secret Trail Brewing Company, 132 Meyers St., Ste. 120,. (314) 640-9888. secrettrailbrewing.com

Theater THE BOOK CLUB PLAY: See Thursday. Sun, 4/21, 2pm. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Road, Paradise. totr.org

23

TUE

Special Events BUTTE COUNTY JOB FAIR: Meet as many as 50 Butte County employers with open jobs to fill in retail, construction, skilled trades, administrative/executive, medical, hotel/ hospitality and more. See website or call 961-5125 for more info. Tue, 4/23, 12pm. Free. Manzanita Place, 2357 Fair St. afwd.org

COMMUNITY CONVERSATION: Butte County Library hosts conversation about how our community can grow. Light refreshments provided. Tue, 4/23, 7pm. Chico Branch Library, 1108 Sherman Ave.

WELCOME TO MEDICARE: This free workshop is designed for “Boomers” and those who will be new to Medicare this year and want to understand how it works. To register call 898-6716. Tue, 4/23, 1pm. Red Bluff Community Center, 1500 S. Jackson St., Red Bluff.

Music JAZZ II AND CONCERT BAND DOUBLES: Evening will include overtures and marches, big band and swing featuring Bach, Count Basie and more. For info call 898-6333. Tue, 4/23, 7:30pm. Free. Harlen Adams Theatre, Chico State, PAC 144. csuchico.edu

FOR MORE MUSIC, SEE NIGHTLIFE ON PAGE 30

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APRIL 18, 2019

Shows through May 7 BMU 3rd Floor Gallery SEE ART

PAT HULL: Stellar tunes for brunch. Sun, 4/21, 11am. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

493 East Ave Ste 1 & 3, Chico • 530.345.3063 www.SallyDimasArtGallery.com

24

ART EDUCATION SHOW

Museums BOLT’S ANTIQUE TOOL MUSEUM: This fascinat-

Art 1078 GALLERY: Peter Jodaitis – The Color of Water If There Were No Sky, showcase of a life’s work, featuring watercolor and drawing. Through 4/21. 1710 Park Ave. 1078gallery.org

BMU 3RD FLOOR GALLERY: Art Education Show, 12th annual juried show. Award ceremony Thursday, May 2, 5pm, at Rowland-Taylor Hall, followed by 7pm reception in the gallery. Through 5/7. 400 W. First St.

CHICO ART CENTER: Creative Fusion, an exhibition of student artwork selected and prepared by Chico Art teachers. Through 4/26. 450 Orange St. chicoartcenter.com

HEALING ART GALLERY: Beth Bjorklund, oil paintings by Northern California artist. The Enloe Cancer Center gallery features artists whose lives have been touched by cancer. Through 4/19. 265 Cohasset Road, 332-3856.

MAIN EVENT GALLERY: Views of the West, gallery member artists and photographers depict ranch life, cowboys, round-ups, animals and the scenic beauty that surrounds the North State. Featured are works by Suzanne Bears, Karen Roy-Crockett, Debbie Carlisi and Clare Jones-Carbonell. Through 5/4. 10 S. Main St., Red Bluff, 391-3259.

ORLAND ART CENTER: Witty and Wild and Whimsical, featuring the works of Gary Baugh, Marilynn Jennings, and Paula Busch showcasing a range of techniques including collage and encaustic painting. Through 5/25. 732 Fourth St., Orland. orlandartcenter.com

PROVISIONS GALLERY: Grand Opening & First Group Art Show, artwork from local artists. Through 5/9. 122 W. Third St. provisionsgallery.com

VALENE L. SMITH MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY: Altar States Spirit Worlds and Transformational Experiences, The Works of Peter Treagan, interactive tech art complete with 3D glasses and hidden imagery so visitors can participate in the show. Through 5/17. Chico State, 400 W. First St.

ing, unique museum has over 12,000 hand tools on display, charting cataloging the evolution and history of tools. Closed Sundays. Through 6/15. $3-$0. 1650 Broderick St, Oroville.

CHICO CHILDREN’S MUSEUM: Featuring tons of cool stuff for kids to explore including a miniature city, complete with a junior vet clinic, dentist, cafe and farmer’s market, a giant fish tank, multi-sensory room, imagination playground and much more. Check website for hours and admission information. Through 8/3. $7-$9. 325 Main St. chicochildrensmuseum.org

CHICO CREEK NATURE CENTER: Living Animal Museum & Nature Play Room, learn all about local critters, plants and wildlife. Through 5/25. $2-$4. 1968 E. Eighth St. chicorec.com

GATEWAY SCIENCE MUSEUM: From Here to There, explore the science of how things move by land, sea and air. Also on display are The Foothills, and America’s Wolves: From Tragedy to Inspiration. Through 5/12. $5-$7. Also: Museum Without Walls lecture series, Wednesdays at 7:30pm. This week: “All Creatures Great and Small,” by Sarah J. Blackstone. 625 Esplanade. csuchico.edu

MUSEUM OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA ART: Tend, Chikoko presents an exploratory multimedia exhibit that utilizes found, broken, burnt and re-purposed items with a focus on textiles to examine the meaning of home. Also, Trapeze Acrobats, featuring paintings of acrobats, divers, gymnasts and dancers by Clay Vorhes. Closing event Saturday, May 25, 6-8pm. Through 5/25. 900 Esplanade. monca.org

PATRICK RANCH MUSEUM: Working farm and museum with rotating exhibits open every Saturday and Sunday from 11am to 3pm. Through 5/26. 10381 Midway, Durham. patrickranchmuseum.org

VALENE L. SMITH MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY: Remarkable Lives, exploring the intertwined worlds of birds and humans, in partnership with the Altacal Audubon Society and Snow Goose Festival. Exhibits include bird songs and behaviors, local photography and a robotic recreation of the late Jurassic Archaeopteryx. Through 7/31. 400 W. First St.


Sex without consent is a crime. Being forced into any unwanted sexual situation can do lasting emotional damage.

BUSINESS OFFICES HOURS: Monday – Friday (excluding Holiday) 10a-6pm Butte/Glenn: 530-891-1331 or 877-452-9588 @ 2889 Cohasset Road, Suite 2 Chico, CA 95973 Tehama: 530-529-3980 Calling from Corning: 530-824-3980 @ 725 Pine Street, Red Bluff, CA 96080

Apri l 18, 2019

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ap ril 1 8, 2 0 1 9


SCENE

THE WILD REEDS

listenersupported

W/ JENNy O LIVE AT

THE BIG ROOM

KCHO celebrates 50 years of public radio in Chico

BNorthhis first day as general manager at State Public Radio last August,

FRIDAy, MAy 10, 2019 SIERRA NEVADA BREWING CO.

1075 E. 20TH ST., CHICO. TICKETS ON SALE NOW! $15 AVAILABLE IN THE GIFT SHOP OR ONLINE AT WWW.SIERRANEVADA.COM/BIGROOM

In the booth at NSPR with (from left) reporter Marc Albert, News Director Sarah Bohannon and General Manager Phil Wilke.

y the time Phil Wilke arrived for

the Carr Fire had destroyed one of the station’s transmitters, sending its Redding-area listeners into radio darkness for five by months at a time Jason when the need for Cassidy information was j aso nc@ critical. newsrev i ew.c om A few months later, however, Preview: when the Camp NSpr 50th Birthday Fire broke out, party, Saturday, April the station got a 20, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., chance to fulfill its outside in the parking lot. live music by The promise as a comBidwells, Sunday iris munity resource. and Michael russel “I was very proud Duo, plus food trucks, of what we could kids activities and offer,” Wilke said station tours. about his team’s North State around-the-clock Public Radio efforts to keep the 35 Main St. public informed. 858-6100 mynspr.org “We were parsing out information as quickly as we were able to confirm it.” As the National Public Radio affiliate for 13 counties—from Sutter to the Oregon border, and from Trinity to the Nevada state line—NSPR is part of a daily ritual for some 40,000 listeners, and a trusted source for news every morning (on Morning Edition) and evening (All Things Considered). Station call signs—KCHO 91.7 FM in Chico and KFPR 88.9 FM Redding—as well as the familiar names and voices of the program hosts have become ingrained in lis-

teners’ consciousness. This week marks 50 years that NSPR has been on the air, and its place in the community today is as a cultural and informational cornerstone. The station imports some of the finest radio programming into our little corner of the world—from the NPR slate to This American Life, Radiolab and The Moth Radio Hour. Plus, the station’s staff and stable of freelance producers and volunteer hosts fill out the schedule with shows that have become institutions in their own right: Mike Fishkin’s daily explorations of the world of classical music on Afternoon Classics; Dave Schlom’s science/environment/astronomy program, Blue Dot; and Nancy Weigman’s long-running author spotlight, Nancy’s Bookshelf, to name a few. On April 22, 1969, however, the station was simply KCHO, a radio training ground for Chico State communications students that debuted with a mere 10-watt signal emanating in a 14-mile radius from Ayres Hall. In 1975, the station moved to the basement of Meriam Library, and it wasn’t until 1982 that it started broadcasting NPR content. After federal regulators sided with KCHO over Jefferson Public Radio for the rights to broadcast in Shasta and the surrounding counties, a transmitter was installed on the Shasta Bally peak, and Redding’s KFPR went live in November 1993, joining sister station KCHO under

phoTo By JASoN hAlley, ChiCo STATe CoMMuNiCATioNS

the NSPR banner. A decade later, in 2004, the station moved into its current downtown location and new digitally upgraded digs with professional production studios and the promise of more locally produced shows. That’s still a mission, Wilke said, though he acknowledges the staff (six full-time; five part-time) is stretched thin. “I want to reinforce local programming, especially the local news,” he said. “The region deserves longer, more, and in-depth news. In the wake of the Camp Fire, NSPR was able to add After Paradise to its rotation. Created with visiting journalist Tess Vigeland, a veteran public-radio reporter/producer (All Things Considered, Marketplace), the show was initially a daily program focused on recovery efforts. After Vigeland left two and a half weeks in, After Paradise morphed into a weekly series produced by News Director Sarah Bohannon with reporter Marc Albert. This week, the station is hosting a 50th birthday party in the KCHO parking lot. Wilke says the event is an opportunity for NSPR to show its appreciation for the supporters who keep the station going (to the tune of roughly $500,000 in pledges a year), and for the community to “meet the people who you listen to.” Ω

SierraNevadaBeer

@SierraNevada

@SierraNevadaChico

C H I CO P E R F O R M A N C E S Upcoming Events

STORM LARGE CINDERELLA Opera Grand & LE BOHNEUR SF Cinema Series May 2

May 5

TICKETS NOW ON SALE

MORE INFO AT: WWW.CHICOPERFORMANCES.COM 898-6333

April 18, 2019

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27


A celebration of and benefit for musicians and others affected by the Camp Fire

PRESENTS :

s i e m m a C 2019

CHICO AREA

MUSIC FESTIVAL

Saturday, April 20 7-10 p.m.

SPONSORED BY:

Sierra Nevada Big Room 1075 E. 20th St., Chico

FREE TICKETS!

see details at right ➜

28

CN&R

APRIL 18, 2019


Schedule for:

CHICO AREA

MUSIC FESTIVAL 2019

Saturday, April 20, 7-10 p.m. at Sierra Nevada Big Room 1075 E. 20th St., Chico (doors at 6 p.m., pre-show at 6:30)

T

he Chico News & Review presents the finale for the 15th annual Chico Area Music Festival & Awards Show, an all-ages musical variety show featuring performances by more than a dozen local acts on two stages, plus the presentation of the 2019 CAMMIES awards. This year’s event also will be a celebration of and benefit for Butte County musicians affected by the Camp Fire. Roughly half of the night’s performers are from Paradise, Magalia or Concow. In addition to a dozen or so Critics’ Choice Awards, the CN&R will hand out the Readers’ Choice Award for Best Local Act, the favorite you voted for!

Main Stage

Mezzanine Stage

Surrogate Lo & Behold Aberrance Mark McKinnon & The Strolling Rogues Leonard Cohen Tribute Orchestra Sunny Acres John-Michael Sun Himp C Astronaut Ice Cream

Pre-show (6:30 p.m.): Chico Open-Mic All-Star Revue, hosted by Andan Casamajor Intermission: Paradise Open-Mic All-Star Revue, hosted by Susan Dobra

Free Tickets Admission is free, but donations to the Music Around the Camp Fire Fund are encouraged. Pre-registration for tickets is required. For details visit sierranevada.com or facebook.com/chicocammies

Donations encouraged for Music Around the Camp Fire Fund

APRIL 18, 2019

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29


NIGHTLIFE Noise-A-Tron

THUrSDAY 04/18—WEDNESDAY 4/24

19FriDAY

BIG SMO: Popular country-rap star

HOT FLASH: Local six-piece rock ’n’

BOB KIRKLAND TRIO: Smooth mando-

JUDGEMENT FOR KINGS: Metalcore

joined by the Good Ol’ Boyz. Fri, 4/19, 9pm. $15-$20. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave. tackleboxchico.com lin jazz for happy hour. Fri, 4/19, 6:30pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St.

BRADLEY RELF: Local singer/guitarist

serenades. Fri, 4/19, 6pm. Almendra Winery & Distillery, 9275 Midway Road, Durham. almendrawinery.com

NOiSE-A-TrON, MEriDiAN ArC, BONE MArrOW & GUEST NO. 66 Wednesday, April 24 1078 Gallery

18THUrSDAY

COMEDY NIGHT: Popular Sacramento

comic John Morris Ross IV and friends bring the laughs. Thu, 4/18, 8pm. $15-$20. Unwined Kitchen & Bar, 980 Mangrove Ave., 520-0119. unwinedchico.com

MCBRIDE BAND: Roots rock and

blues on the patio. Thu, 4/18, 6pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

lasalleschico.com

CREAM OF CLAPTON: A night of Clapton’s hits performed by Kevin Russell. Fri, 4/19, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

THE DEAD WINTER CARPENTERS: Popular

SEE WEDNESDAY

THUMPIN’ THURSDAY ROCK ’N’ BLUES JAM: Hosted by the Loco-Motive Band plus special guests. All musicians and music enthusiasts welcome. Thu, 4/18, 7pm. Studio Inn Lounge, 2582 Esplanade., (408) 449 2179.

WEBSTER MOORE: Local composer and

musician plays piano originals. Thu, 4/18, 6pm. Tender Loving Coffee, 365

E. Sixth St.

FUNNY BUNNY

five-piece alt-country band. Partial benefit for the Sierra Nevada Camp Fire Relief Fund. See website for ticket info. Fri, 4/19, 6:30pm. $15$20. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St., 895-0706. kzfr.org

FRANKIE AND THE DEFENDERS: Nor Cal band performs high energy roots rock. Fri, 4/19, 9:30pm. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfallscasino.com

GESTURES & SOUNDS: LA folk rockers on tour with SF’s The Y Axes. Locals 5 Mile Myth and Similar Alien open. Fri, 4/19, 7pm. $7. Ike’s Place, 648 W. Fifth St.

roll band plays the hits. Fri, 4/19, 8pm. Unwined Kitchen & Bar, 980 Mangrove Ave. unwinedchico.com madness, Lightfinder and Nail the Casket fill the bill. Fri, 4/19, 8pm. $10. The Spirit, 2360 Oro Quincy Highway, Oroville.

What good is an Easter party without helpings of politics and religion on the menu? For Chico Live Improv Comedy, taboo means laughs. The troupe has gained a devoted following, putting on weekly shows and workshops for the public with both local and out-of-town ensembles. You can catch an original production titled The Last Temptation of Improv this Sunday (April 21), where traditional religious themes will be bravely reimagined.

PARTY FAVOR LAYERS EXPERIENCE: EDM DJ and producer joined by Iam Geo, iMullinati, and Gesp. Fri, 4/19, 8pm. $15-$20. El Rey Theater, 230 W. Second St. elreychico.com

SHORELINE MAFIA - OFF THE X TOUR: California hip-hop collective

presents a night of trap-rap. Fri, 4/19, 7pm. $22. The Senator, 517 Main St. senatortheatrechico.com

SNEEZE ATTACK: Sacramento-based fuzzy power-pop duo joined by locals Panther Surprise and The Empty Gate. Fri, 4/19, 9pm. $7. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave. m

TRAPEZECIC “NIP LE BUD” WHIRLED TOUR: Cabaret and speakeasy-style

dance party and burlesque show. Fri, 4/19, 9pm. $12. Lost On Main, 319 Main St. lostonmainchico.com

TYLER DEVOLL: Soulful melodies for

happy hour. Fri, 4/19, 4pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St. lasalleschico.com

TYLER DEVOLL: Smooth late night

20SATUrDAY

tunes. Fri, 4/19, 7:30pm. The Exchange, 1975 Montgomery St., Oroville. theexchangeoroville.com

YOLANDA DEL RIO: Mexican ranchera

420 PARTY WITH PATO BANTON:

singer performs mariachi. Fri, 4/19, 8pm. $50-$80. Gold Country Casino & Hotel, 4020 Olive Highway, Oroville. goldcountrycasino.com

Axiom Repertory Theatre & The Cascade Theatre Present

The Mother of All Musicals

International reggae band headlines fundraiser to help rebuild the Concow Campground. Opening acts include Maker’s Mile, Northern Traditionz and more. Sat, 4/20,

15th Street

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Featuring Specialty Coffees Pastries Breakfast & Lunch Local Wines and Craft Beers

April 25 – May 5

7am to 3pm Monday through Saturday 8am to 2pm Sunday

Tickets at

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April 18, 2019

1414 Park Ave, Ste 120 Chico 530-809-1087 ~


THIS WEEK: FIND MORE ENTERTAINMENT AND SPECIAL EVENTS ON PAGE 22

Sneeze Attack

NOCHE LATINA: Put on your nice clothes and head to Lost for a night of dancing to a wide range of Mexican beats. Sat, 4/20, 9pm. Lost on Main, 319 Main St. lostonmainchico.com

OBE & LOKI: Popular duo plays ’60s and ’70s hits. Sat, 4/20, 10pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St. lasalleschico.com

PAPERBACK WRITER: Beatles faves per-

7pm. $15-$20. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave.

BLACKOUT BETTY 420 WAYS TO ROCK: A night of high-octane rock with local favorite. Sat, 4/20, 9pm. Studio Inn Lounge, 2582 Esplanade.

CAMMIES FINALE & AWARDS SHOW: 15th annual Chico Area Music Festival & Awards Show featuring performances by more than a dozen local acts on two stages. This year’s event will also benefit Butte County musicians impacted by the Camp Fire. Tickets are free, but registration at website is required. Sat, 4/20, 7pm. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St. sierranevada.com

DRAG SHOW: Drag, drinks & dancing

with your favorite performers. Sat, 4/20, 10pm. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave. maltesebarchico.com

SNEEZE ATTACK, PANTHER SURPRISE & THE EMPTY GATE Friday, April 19 The Maltese SEE FRIDAY

JOSH HEGG TRIO: Jazzy happy hour

tunes. Sat, 4/20, 6:30pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St. diamondsteakhousechico.com

KELLY TWINS DUELING PIANOS: Chico’s famous duelers take your requests. Sat, 4/20, 9pm. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfallscasino. com

MUDCREEK MISFITS: Americana band for weekend tunes with pizza pie. Sat, 4/20, 6:30pm. Farm Star Pizza, 2359 Esplanade.

formed by popular tribute band. Sat, 4/20, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfallscasino.com

POEMS OF RELATIONSHIPS IN MOTION: Join Chico/Butte County poets Wren Tuatha, Patrick Napoco, Susan Wooldridge, Bob Garner and more for an evening dedicated to the messiness of love. Open mic on theme follows. Sat, 4/20, 6pm. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

QUEER PROM: A night of celebration free from discrimination or prejudice. Event is open to everyone regardless of sexual orientation or gender identity. Call 898-5724 for details. Sat, 4/20, 7pm. $5-$10. BMU Auditorium, Chico State.

ROCKING FOR PARADISE: Boston and Styx tribute bands close-out benefit concert series for Paradise. Sat, 4/20, 6:30pm. $15-$20. El Rey Theater, 230 W. Second St. elreychico.com

SYMPHONIC WINDS ART AND MUSIC: Symphonic Winds Ensemble

conductor Royce Tevis directs last show before retiring. Tickets at the University Box Office or call 898-6333. Sat, 4/20, 7:30pm. Harlen Adams Theatre, Chico State, PAC 144. csuchico.edu/soa

21SUNDAY

THE LAST TEMPTATION OF IMPROV:

featuring works of Bach, Count Basie and more. For info call 8986333. Tue, 4/23, 7:30pm. Free. Harlen Adams Theatre, Chico State, PAC 144., csuchico.edu/soa

24WEDNESDAY

MILITARY HEROES BENEFIT SHOW: Kappa

Sigma hosts fundraiser for veterans

and their families with local beatmixers Hrna, Clone, and Dirty Jack. Wed, 4/24, 8pm. El Rey Theater, 230 W. Second St. elreychico.com

NOISE-A-TRON: Seattle band on tour with Meridian Arc. A night of noise rock that also includeds Chico’s Bone Marrow and Guest No. 66. All ages. Wed, 4/24, 7pm. $7. 1078 Gallery, 1710 Park Ave. 1078gallery. org

Easter-themed comedy and musical production. 16 and older recommended, BYOB. Sun, 4/21, 7pm. Chico Live Improv Comedy, 561 E. Lindo Ave. chicolivecomedy.com

22MONDAY

CLIMATE ACTION FUNDRAISER: Climate activists benefit with 5 Mile Myth, Toofless Sean, and Garrett Gray. Mon, 4/22, 6pm. $6-$10. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

THIRD MONDAY JAZZ JAM: Once a month jazz performance and open jam. Mon, 4/22, 7:30pm. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

23TUESDAY

JAZZ II AND CONCERT BAND DOUBLES: Evening will include overtures and marches, big band and swing

SEIZE THE NIGHT A small but powerful group of Catholic Workers broke into Enbridge Energy last February and shut off the flow to two oil pipelines cutting through Native American land. They now face prison time and thousands in fines. Blackbird is hosting a Climate Action Solidarity fundraiser on Earth Day, Monday (April 22), to raise funds for legal fees. There will be drinks, baked goods and music by 5 Mile Myth, Toofless Sean and Garrett Gray.

APRIL 18, 2019

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31


REEL WORLD

FILM SHORTS How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World

Reviewers: Bob Grimm and Juan-Carlos Selznick.

Opening this week Breakthrough

A Christian faith-based film adapted from the 2017 biography The Impossible, a truelife story of a mother’s faith being put to work in service of her teen son who falls through the ice of a frozen lake and ends up in a coma. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

Little

A fantasy-comedy about an overbearing and ruthless corporate mogul (Regina Hall) who, after wishing to be young again, turns into a 13-year-old version of herself (Marsai Martin) and still has to run her company—with a lot of help from her assistant (Issa Rae). Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

The Curse of La Llorna

A social worker and her children are haunted by an evil ghost. The sixth film in The Conjuring Universe series of films (The Conjuring, Annabelle, The Nun, etc.) that are adapted from real-life paranormal investigation cases. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

Missing Link

Gloria Bell

Chilean director Sebastián Lelio’s Englishlanguage reimagining of his 2013 film Gloria, this time with Julianne Moore in the lead role as a middle-aged divorcée who loves to dance and gives in to a new romance and all its complications. Also starring John Turturro. Pageant Theatre. Rated R.

Fugitive hunters

Penguins

An impressive period piece from lawmen’s point of view

T

he Highwaymen, now streaming on Netflix, is centered on the tale of Bonnie and Clyde, the much storied outlaws of the 1930s and the Great Depression, but it tells that story from the point of view of two former Texas Rangers who were assigned to track down by Juan-Carlos the famously elusive couple and Selznick bring their criminal escapades to a full, dead stop. The two aging ex-Rangers, Frank Hamer and Maney Gault, are ably played here by Kevin Costner and Woody Harrelson, The Highwaymen Starring Kevin respectively, and the story of their Costner and Woody pursuit of the outlaw pair runs parHarrelson. Directed allel to events portrayed in director by John lee Hancock. Arthur Penn’s iconic 1967 Bonnie Netflix. rated r. and Clyde with Faye Dunaway and Warren Beatty in the title roles. Here, until the final showdown, Bonnie and Clyde are seen only in fleeting glimpses, if at all, while Hamer and Gault frequently share the foreground with an intriguing array of historical figures who played important roles in the wide-ranging pursuit. As written by John Fusco and directed by John Lee Hancock, The Highwaymen functions as a kind of flip-side counterpart to Penn’s wild humored outlaw ballad. But it’s also a richly textured and unexpectedly haunting film that stands quite impressively on its own. It lingers in the memory as a kind of modernday western, as an astutely understated period piece, as a subtly convoluted crime story, as a stingingly ironic hero tale, and more. There’s a deep bond of hard-earned friendship between Hamer and Gault, but they’re aging ex-

4

lawmen leading very separate lives when the state of Texas brings them back together as the two old-school “man-killers” needed to catch Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow. Federal and state lawmen write them off as “old cowboys” and there is a streak of dark comedy running through several episodes in which the ex-Rangers’ tracking methods clash with the modern investigative practices of FBI agents and state lawmen. The film celebrates the two men’s friendship in mostly understated ways, but gradually also brings out an abiding sense that the bond between them is something like the tragic brotherhood of deeply haunted warriors. A signal event in both men’s pasts as Texas Rangers involves the massacre of 54 Mexican “bandits,” and both men (but especially Hamer) are ferociously dedicated to their jobs as lawmen, but neither has any illusions about any glory that might override the guilt that goes with the killing. A major motif in Fusco’s screenplay sets up ironic parallels between the outlaw couple and the two aging ex-Rangers: Both are traveling long distances in fast cars with a load of firearms in the back seat; Hamer and Gault have to run through a police roadblock to continue their pursuit of a gang notorious for crashing through roadblocks; Hamer has a conversation with Clyde’s father that seems to put them both outside the law in the usual senses of the term. Kathy Bates does strong work as Miriam “Ma” Ferguson, the boldly proactive governor of Texas. William Sadler is very good as Clyde’s sorrowful father. Josh Caras is very good as the ill-fated Wade McNabb, a furloughed prisoner whose death aggravates Gault’s sense of guilt. And Kim Dickens dazzles early on as Hamer’s well-to-do wife, Gladys. Ω

Ed Helms narrates this documentary that follows the life journey of a penguin named Steve. Cinemark 14. Rated G.

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April 18, 2019

A stop-motion animated feature from Laika (the studio behind Coraline and ParaNorman) that tells the story of a monster/myth investigator (voiced by Hugh Jackman) and an adventurer (Zoe Saldana) and their quest to find a particular Bigfoot named Mr. Link (Zach Galifianakis). Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

Pet Sematary

Jason Clarke, Amy Seimetz and John Lithgow star in this latest adaptation of Stephen King’s horror novel about a family’s terrifying dealings with a mysterious burial ground. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

Shazam!

The first big-screen treatment of the classic DC Comics character, the alter ego of troubled teen Billy Batson (played by Asher Angel), who turns into a buff adult (Zachery Levi) full of superpowers when exclaims, “Shazam!” Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

Now playing After

A love story based on Anna Todd’s youngadult novel about a good girl who falls for a bad boy during her first semester of college. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

4

Us

2

Captain Marvel

Despite the fact that she’s playing a superhero who has the power to shoot electrical bursts from her hands, Brie Larson’s Captain Marvel suffers from a disappointing lack of energy. Larson’s turn as the title character, aka Carol Danvers (aka Vers), is plagued by lethargy and bizarre line deliveries, and she gives off a detached vibe that she doesn’t want to be in the movie. Had the film around her been really good, the lead’s bored disposition might’ve been forgiven, but this cosmic superhero origin story and intergalactic war movie is also riddled with some haphazard storytelling and awful special effects. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13 —B.G.

Five Feet Apart

Film adaptation of Rachel Lippincott’s young-adult novel of the same name about two teens whose newfound love for one another is complicated by the fact that their respective life-threatening illnesses keep them from coming into physical contact. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13.

A young girl in a 1980s flashback drifts away from her father at an amusement park on the Santa Cruz pier and finds herself in a darkened and frightening hall of mirrors. Things then jump to the present day, where Adelaide and Gabe (Lupita Nyong’o and Winston Duke) are taking their children, Zora and Jason, to the beach. It’s the same beach we saw in the flashback, and we find out that Adelaide was that young girl. She’s not happy about revisiting the place. The family excursion quickly becomes the worst vacation ever, as another family shows up at night. A quick examination of the intruders reveals what the commercials for this movie have already told you: The family outside is a darker mirror image of the stunned family inside the house. They aren’t coming over to borrow the lawn mower. They intend to kill. Writer-director Jordan Peele follows up the success of Get Out with another mind bender, one that is also an efficient, bareknuckled horror-thriller, plus a comedy and a brutal social satire. It’s the whole package. Cinemark 14. Rated R —B.G.

Still here

Hellboy

Another film adaptation (a reboot of the original Guillermo del Toro two-film series) of the Dark Horse character, the halfdemon superhero fighting to save the world from an undead sorceress. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

1

Dumbo

Cinemark 14. Rated PG —B.G.

1 2 3 4 5 Poor

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The third entry in the animated franchise picks up a year after the events in the previous film, with Hiccup the dragon (voice of Jay Baruchel) searching for a dragon utopia. Cinemark 14. Rated PG.

Fair

Good

Very Good

Excellent


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Size matters Trend of small fillets threatens fish population

Bcatching, selling and eating fish. For certain snappers, in fact, a market preference igger isn’t necessarily better when it comes to

for plate-size whole fillets is driving fishermen to target smaller fish. For some wild fish populations, this is a recipe for collapse. “The preferred size of a fillet in the U.S. market corresponds to juvenile fish that haven’t had a chance to reproduce,” said conservation biologist Peter Mous, director of The Nature Conservancy’s Indonesia Fisheries Conservation Program. “A lot of species here are heavily overfished, and this demand for small fillets is making things by Alastair worse.” Bland Of particular concern for conservationists are such species as Malabar snapper. Mous said this fish becomes sexually mature at 4 pounds and can grow as large as 29 pounds—but global restaurant and retail markets prefer to buy it at 2 pounds and as small as 1 pound. “For a large species like giant ruby snapper, the differences are even more extreme,” Mous wrote in an email. “The trade buys them at 1 pound, but they only become adults at nine pounds, while [they] can grow to 73 pounds.” The reproductive patterns and growth rates of these fish vary widely, but with virtually all species, the market prefers what are essentially baby fish. He says many snapper species already have been depleted to an estimated 10 percent of their unfished biomass—a term that refers to a population’s total mass, rather than the number of individuals. Mous’ organization is trying to change the industry by encouraging seafood buyers and exporters to commit to purchasing only fish greater than a certain minimum size. This would motivate fishermen to catch bigger snappers and leave the juveniles in the water, allowing the fish to eventually reproduce and help replenish their population. The campaign is gaining some traction. Norpac Fisheries Export, which sells to Safeway, Costco and other companies, signed on to the campaign in January, and a few weeks later, Netuno USA, the largest importer of frozen snapper in the U.S., followed suit.

Rachel Winters, associate director of media relations for The Nature Conservancy, said eight more distributors have since announced their commitment to the fishery plan, including five that made the pledge March 17, in Boston, Mass., on the first day of Seafood Expo North America. The demand for smaller fish seems to be coming mainly from the American retail and restaurant market, where many chefs and large-scale caterers tend to prefer not only whole intact fillets, but fillets that, on their own, perfectly constitute a single portion. “Chefs prefer fish where the fillet size is ready to serve,” explained Christian Monchâtre, a Paris-born chef who has worked for more than 20 years at restaurants in Europe, Mexico and California. “It’s cost-effective—you don’t have extra scraps where you have to develop other recipes in order to use them.” Monchâtre said chefs who wind up with larger-thanoptimal fillets “lose money with every serving.” While whole fillets are a visually appealing and very popular serving style, so is a whole fish, said Andre Brugger, the sustainability compliance and quality assurance manager at Netuno USA. “A lot of places serve a whole snapper, and to fit it on the plate and for it to serve two people, it can’t be a huge fish,” Brugger said. He added that the demand for small and uniform fish fillets is strongest in situations in which a chef or restaurant is serving large numbers of people, as on cruise lines or in hotel restaurants. Thomas Kraft, founder of Norpac Fisheries Export, says “standardization makes industries more costeffective.” But in the case of wild fish, breaking away from industry norms could be critical for sustaining the Indonesian snapper industry. Kraft expects that chefs, acting as role models and even celebrities, will be pivotal in changing the market and, eventually, motivating fishermen to try to catch more mature snappers. “This needs to come down from the top,” he said. Brugger sees the same path forward. Eventually, a shift in demand from chefs and retailers will reach the water level, and fishermen, he says, will respond. “They’ll go somewhere else to catch bigger fish,” he said. Ω

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ARTS DEVO by JASON CASSIDY • jasonc@newsreview.com

A BURNING HOLE IN THE CENTER OF EVERYTHING Right in the center of the French region of Île-de-France (“Island of France”) is the city of Paris. And right in the center of Paris is the Île de la Cité (“Island of the City”). The centerpiece of that island in the middle of the river Seine is Notre Dame Cathedral. It sits in the spot where the city was born and is the central point from which all distances from Paris are measured. Right there, during a vacation several years ago, while Mrs. DEVO was inside the cathedral attending mass, Arts DEVO posted up at an outdoor table along the large public square out front and drank in the scene. For a good hour, I was completely alone. The square was quiet and all the chairs on every patio nearby were empty. It was very easy in that moment, as I studied the features of this weird, old, Gothic wonder—its two massive bell towers out front, the impressive stained-glass rose window above, and the row of gargoyle-shaped rain spouts lining the side—to feel a strong connection to history while I nursed my espresso. It’s a feeling I get whenever I’m around anything that has a history—whether it’s as young as Bidwell Mansion or as old as Via Sacra, Ancient Rome’s main street. Of course, some locations contain more juice than others, and Paris’ Notre Dame—like many Catholic churches around the world—is bursting with the art and the blood of history. Other than a brief change of hands during the French Revolution (to the Cult of Reason and then the Cult of the Supreme Being!), Notre Dame has belonged to the Catholic Church since ground was broken on the site in 1163. (Technically, France owns the place and lets the church run it.) But its importance isn’t merely a Catholic or even a Christian thing. Sanctuary? Many Parisians never set foot in Notre Dame or any church. The building itself, however, is a monument to the city’s and the world’s history over the last eight centuries—the violence, oppression and world wars, as well as the resilience, beauty and imagination of humanity. Millions of tourists and modern Parisians still revolve around this massive, centuries-oldyet-still-breathing piece of history. Bearing witness to Notre Dame Cathedral on that day was one of the most powerful art experiences I’ve ever had, one that was nearly matched in intensity by my visceral reaction to the images of flames shooting out of the iconic structure that appeared on my Facebook feed on Monday (April 15). I’m not a Catholic or even a Christian (or anything really), but the news that most of the art and sacred artifacts (including Jesus’ crown of thorns! Who knew?) made it out safely and the damage to the cathedral—the most monumental work of art of them all—wasn’t complete had me praising Jah or Jehovah or Jeebus, or whomever. Notre Dame will be repaired and rebuilt, just as it has been many times during its history. And no matter what form it takes, life around it will continue—the good and the bad—and the art will live on. 34

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APRIL 18, 2019


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY For the week oF April 18, 2019 ARIES (March 21-April 19): French

writer Simone de Beauvoir sent a letter to her lover, Aries author Nelson Algren. She wrote, “I like so much the way you are so greedy about life and yet so quiet, your eager greediness and your patience, and your way of not asking much of life and yet taking much because you are so human and alive that you find much in everything.” I’d love to see you embody that state in the coming weeks. In my astrological opinion, you have a mandate to be both utterly relaxed and totally thrilled; both satisfied with what life brings you and skillfully avid to extract the most out of it; both at peace with what you already have and primed to grab for much more.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): The Beat

Generation of American poets arose in the late 1940s as a rebellion against materialistic mainstream culture and academic poetry. It embraced sexual liberation, Eastern spirituality, ecological awareness, political activism and psychedelic drugs. One of its members, Jack Kerouac, tweaked and ennobled the word “beat” to serve as the code name for their movement. In its old colloquial usage, “beat” meant tired or exhausted. But Kerouac re-consecrated it to mean “upbeat” and “beatific,” borrowing from the Italian word beato, translated as “beatific.” I bring this to your attention because you’re on the verge of a similar transition: from the old meaning to the new.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “Scattered

through the ordinary world, there are books and artifacts and perhaps people who are like doorways into impossible realms, of impossible and contradictory truth.” Argentinian author Jorge Luis Borges said that, and now I’m passing it on to you—just in time for your entrance into a phase when such doorways will be far more available than usual. I hope you will use Borges’ counsel as a reminder to be alert for everyday situations and normal people that could lead you to intriguing experiences and extraordinary revelations and life-changing blessings.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): The

Free Will Astrology Committee to Boldly Promote Cancerians Success is glad to see that you’re not politely waiting for opportunities to come to you. Rather, you’re tracking them down and proactively wrangling them into a form that’s workable for your needs. You seem to have realized that what you had assumed was your fair share isn’t actually fair; that you want and deserve more. Although you’re not being mean and manipulative, neither are you being overly nice and amenable; you’re pushing harder to do things your way. I approve! And I endorse your efforts to take it even further.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Many experts who

have studied the art and science of running fast believe that it’s best if a runner’s legs are symmetrical and identical in their mechanics. But that theory is not supported by the success of Leo champion sprinter Usain Bolt. Because he has suffered from scoliosis, his left leg is a half-inch longer than his right. With each stride, his left leg stays on the track longer than his right, and his right hits the track with more force. Some scientists speculate that this unevenness not only doesn’t slow him down, but may in fact enhance his speed. In accordance with current astrological variables, I suspect you will be able to thrive on your asymmetry in the coming weeks, just as Bolt does.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Virgo

adventurer Jason Lewis traveled around the world using transportation powered solely by his own body. He walked, bicycled, skated, rowed, pedaled and swam more than 46,000 miles. I propose that we make him your role model for the next four weeks. You’re primed to accomplish gradual breakthroughs through the use of simple, persistent, incremental actions. Harnessing the power of your physical vitality will be an important factor in your success.

by rob brezsny LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Curcumin is

a chemical found in the plant turmeric. When ingested by humans, it may diminish inflammation, lower the risk of diabetes, support cardiovascular health and treat digestive disorders. But there’s a problem: The body is inefficient in absorbing and using curcumin—unless it’s ingested along with piperine, a chemical in black pepper. Then it’s far more available. What would be the metaphorical equivalent to curcumin in your life? An influence that could be good for you, but that would be even better if you synergized it with a certain additional influence? And what would be the metaphorical equivalent of that additional influence? Now is a good time to investigate these questions.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “I have

the usual capacity for wanting what may not even exist,” wrote poet Galway Kinnell. How about you? Do you, too, have an uncanny ability to long for hypothetical, invisible, mythical and illusory things? If so, I will ask you to downplay that amazing power of yours for a while. It’s crucial for your future development that you focus on yearning for actual experiences, real people and substantive possibilities. Please understand: I’m not suggesting you’re bad or wrong for having those seemingly impossible desires. I’m simply saying that for now you will thrive on being attracted to things that are genuinely available.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

“Sometimes I have kept my feelings to myself, because I could find no language to describe them in,” wrote Sagittarian novelist Jane Austen. I’m guessing you’ve had that experience—maybe more than usual, of late. But I suspect you’ll soon be finding ways to express those embryonic feelings. Congrats in advance! You’ll discover secrets you’ve been concealing from yourself. You’ll receive missing information whose absence has made it hard to understand the whole story. Your unconscious mind will reveal the rest of what it has thus far merely been hinting at.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): All

over the world, rivers and lakes are drying up. Droughts are becoming more common and prolonged. Why? Mostly because of climate change. The good news is that lots of people are responding to the crisis with alacrity. Among them is an engineer in India named Ramveer Tanwar. Since 2014, he has organized efforts leading to the rejuvenation of 12 dead lakes and ponds. I propose we make him your role model for the coming weeks. I hope he will inspire you to engage in idealistic pursuits that benefit other people. And I hope you’ll be motivated to foster fluidity and flow and wetness everywhere you go. The astrological time is ripe for such activities.

CLASSIFIEDS Call for a quote. (530) 894-2300 ext. 2 Phone hours: M-F 9am-5pm. Deadlines for print: Line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Display ad deadline: Friday 2pm

some upgrades.

www.RealAstrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888.

U VISUALIZE & I’LL CUSTOMIZE Anything masonry brick work stone work concrete driveways patios fireplaces & so much more. License# 810329 Phone (916) 826-9796 Attention Viagra users: Generic 100 mg blue pills or Generic mg yellow pills. Get 45 plus 5 free $99 + S/H. Guaranteed, no prescription necessary. Call Today 1-844-879-5238

Claudia’s Relaxing Massage 10am-7pm by appt. only 530-893-0263 You can Google me Ultra Soothing Massage. Expert senior care. Outcall service available. M-Su. 10-6 Michelle CMT (530) 566-6477 A Unique Touch by Deja. Full-Body Shower and Massage. $140 per 1hr & 20min session. Ask 4 special rates 4 fire victims (530) 321-0664

318 Flume St Chico, CA 95928. KEVIN MARK HENDREN 318 Flume St Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: KEVIN HENDREN Dated: February 28, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000270 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as SWEET T’S at 803 Burgess Lane Chico, CA 95973. BRANDON BLIZMAN 803 Burgess Lane Chico, CA 95973. TARYN BLIZMAN 803 Burgess Lane Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: BRANDON BLIZMAN Dated: February 20, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000233 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2019

Senior Citizen needs place to live out in the Country. Can do yard work, mowing, have riding mower & push mower, & minor repair remodeling. Willing to work off part rent. Will 353-7154

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS

The following person is doing business as SARAH RICHARDSON’S CANINE CONNECTION, THE CANINE CONNECTION at 10 Seville Court Chico, CA 95928. SARAH LUCILE RICHARDSON 22 Sunland Drive Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: SARAH RICHARDSON Dated: March 8, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000308 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

The following persons are doing business as CHICO PEACE, CHICO PEACE AND JUSTICE CENTER, CHICO PEACE ENDEAVOR, CPJC at 526 Broadway Chico, CA 95928. CHICO PEACE ENDEAVOR 526 Broadway Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: ARAMENTA HAWKINS, DIRECTOR Dated: March 19, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000353 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as LOOK AHEAD VETERINARY SERVICES at 1451 Clark Rd Oroville, CA 95965. MICHELE C WEAVER, DVM AND CRAIG A BROWN, DVM, INC. 1451 Clark Rd Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: MICHELE WEAVER PRESIDENT

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as HENDREN DISABILITY ADVOCATES, SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY ADVOCATES at 341 Broadway, Suite 402 Chico, CA 95928. MARY GALVIN

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The following persons are doing business as GEI, GONZALES ENTERPRISES at 495 Ryan Ave. Chico, CA 95973. GONZALES PARK, LLC 495 Ryan Ave. Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: CLINT L SMITH, DIRECTOR Dated: March 21, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000360 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2019

The following person is doing business as PALM TO PALM at 1321 Palm Avenue Chico, CA 95926. ALEXANDRIA MULLER 1321 Palm Avenue Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ALEXANDRIA MULLER Dated: March 19, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000347 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

The following persons are doing business as SQUYRES FIRE PROTECTION, INC. at 166 East Third Street Chico, CA 95928. SQUYRES FIRE PROTECTION, INC. 166 East Third Street Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: BRANDON SQUYRES PRESIDENT Dated: March 26, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000390 Published: April 4,11,18,25, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

The following persons are doing business as RPM MARINE at 5656 Pentz Road Paradise, CA 95969. LOGAN JEFFREY CUSEO 15192 Coutolenc Road Magalia, CA 95954. MICHAEL THEADORE OMARY 5656 Pentz Road Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: MICHAEL T O’MARY Dated: March 25, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000377 Published: April 4,11,18,25, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as D AND J PROFESSIONAL MOVERS at 1621 Sheridan Avenue Chico, CA 95926. DAVID GLENN BRACY 1621 Sheridan Avenue Chico, CA 95926. JAMES RAYMOND DAVID ROBERTSON 26152 Walch Avenue Orland, CA 95963. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: JAMES ROBERTSON Dated: April 3, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000418 Published: April 11,18,25, May 2, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ANYTIME AIRPORT SHUTTLE at 3166 Godman Ave Chico, CA 95973. LINDA MYERS 3166 Godman Ave Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: LINDA MYERS Dated: March 15, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000336 Published: April 4,11,18,25, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

The following persons are doing business as AGS CONSTRUCTION SERVICES at 6150 Center Street Paradise, CA 95969. ALPHONSE G SPERSKE 1252 Wagstaff Road Paradise, CA 95969. AMY M SPERSKE 1252 Wagstaff Rd Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: AMY SPERSKE Dated: March 28, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000400 Published: April 4,11,18,25, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as PARKER’S CORNER at 9305 Midway Durham, CA 95938. PARKER’S CORNER, INC. 9050 Lasell Lane Durham, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: ARLITA PURSER, CORP. SECRETARY Dated: March 27, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000396 Published: April 4,11,18,25, 2019

The following persons have abandoned the use of the fictitious business names DEVOLL MUSIC, DEVOLL at 2118 Laurel Street Chico, CA 95928. WILLIAM HEPWORTH 1145 Loser Ave Gridley, CA 95948. TYLER DEVOLL 2118 Laurel Street Chico, CA 95928. ANDREW LOESER 2400 McGie Street Chico, CA 95928. SCOTT CORY 476 Hoopa Circle Chico, CA 95926. REBECCA ANDRES 6343 Rd 200 Sp 71 Orland, CA 95963. This business was conducted by a General Partnership.

The following person has abandoned the use of the fictitious business name: MIDWAY VINTAGE UPCYCLED DESIGN & CONSIGN at 9379 Midway Durham, CA 95938. LORI RUPPEL 2121 Kennedy Avenue Chico, CA 95973. This business was conducted by an Individual. Signed: LORI RUPPEL Dated: March 29, 2019 FBN Number: 2016-0000434 Published: April 18,25, May 2,9, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing

The following person is doing business as IZZY’S ASPHALT SOLUTIONS at 2605 Burnap Avenue Chico, CA

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

The following person is doing business as MIDWAY VINTAGE UPCYCLED AND CONSIGN at 9379 Midway Durham, CA 95938. MELISSA ANN KAUTI 156 Cavalier Way Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: MELISSA KAUTI Dated: March 29, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000408 Published: April 18,25, May 2,9, 2019

Signed: REBECCA ANDRES Dated: April 8, 2019 FBN Number: 2017-0000799 Published: April 18,25, May 2,9, 2019

The following person is doing business as THE LOFT HAIR AND SKIN CARE at 2535 Forest Ave #110 Chico, CA 95928. BRENDA E BAUREIS Two Ilahee Lane #40 Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: BRENDA E BAUREIS Dated: March 29, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000407 Published: April 4,11,18,25, 2019

The following persons are doing business as BURKE COOKIE CO. at 3278 Tinker Creek Way Chico, CA 95973. JENNIFER KAY BURKE 3278 Tinker Creek Way Chico, CA 95973. JOSHUA ALAN BURKE 3278 Tinker Creek Way Chico,

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The following persons are doing business as TIPSOO HOPE at 151 Tipsoo Peak Rd Berry Creek, CA 95916. CAROLINE LOUISE CLOVER 151 Tipsoo Peak Rd Berry Creek, CA 95916. ANTHONY LOUIS ENGRO II 151 Tipsoo Peak Rd Berry Creek, CA 95916. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: ANTHONY ENGRO II Dated: March 27, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000394 Publsihed: April 4,11,18,25, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

95973. ISRAEL TAYLOR 2605 Burnap Avenue Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ISRAEL TAYLOR Dated: April 4, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000426 Published: April 11,18,25, May 2, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

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The following persons are doing business as AZTLAN, FIFTH SUN at 495 Ryan Ave Chico, CA 95973. GONZALES PARK, LLC 495 Ryan Ave Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: CLINT L SMITH, DIRECTOR Dated: March 21, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000359 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): You have

been summoning heroic levels of creative intensity. You’ve been working extra hard and extra smart. But it seems that you haven’t been fully recognized or appreciated for your efforts. I’m sorry about that. Please don’t let it discourage you from continuing to express great integrity and authenticity. Keep pushing for your noble cause and offering your best gifts. I’m proud of you! And although you may not yet have reaped all the benefits you will ultimately sow, three months from now I bet you’ll be pleased you pushed so hard to be such a righteous servant of the greater good.

CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: JENNIFER BURKE Dated: March 22, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000367 Published: April 4,11,18,25, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. Further, the News & Review specifically reserves the right to edit, decline or properly classify any ad. Errors will be rectified by re-publication upon notification. The N&R is not responsible for error after the first publication. The N&R assumes no financial liability for errors or omission of copy. In any event, liability shall not exceed the cost of the space occupied by such an error or omission. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes full responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. *Nominal fee for

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): A

blogger named Caramelizee offered her definition of elegance: “being proud of both your feminine and masculine qualities; seeing life as a non-ending university and learning everything you can; caring for yourself with tender precision; respecting and taking advantage of silences; tuning in to your emotions without being oversensitive; owning your personal space and being generous enough to allow other people to own their personal space.” This definition of elegance will be especially apropos and useful for you in the coming weeks.

Dated: March 21, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000348 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2019

CLASSIFIEDS

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April 18, 2019

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business as NEAR AND DEAR BAKERY at 703 Salem St Apt B Chico, CA 95926. SYDNEY ANN CARROLL 703 Salem St Apt B Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: SYDNEY CARROLL Dated: April 15, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000481 Published: April 18,25, May 2,9, 2019

objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 15, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: 10 Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: March 18, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00832 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

The following person is doing business as HABANEROS TAQUERIA at 2156 Pillsbury Rd Chico, CA 95926. RAQUEL FIGUEROA RIZO 3549 Esplanade 420 Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: RAQUEL FIGUEROA Dated: March 21, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000361 Published: April 18,25, May 2,9, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner CHRISTOPHER PEACE DOLAN filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: CHRISTOPHER PEACE DOLAN Proposed name: CHRISTOPHER PEACE MOORE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written

TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: ASHLEE MICHELE HOLMES Proposed name: ASHLEE MICHELE SHULTS THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 8, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM

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NOTICES ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: March 11, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00697 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2019

4,11,18, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner SUSANNA GARRETT PORTER filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: SUSANNA GARRETT PORTER Proposed name: SUSANNA GARRETT BRAVO THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 15, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: March 13, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00788 Published: March 28, April

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May 4th Kagney Linn Karter FeatUre entertainer 2 shows 10pm & 12am available for photo, signing & private dances

sUnDay & MonDay $10.00 aDMission 8:00 PM to CLose tUesDay two For one LaP DanCes aLL night City Limits weDnesDay Free aDMission howgirl aLL aCtiVe “Taking it to the Limit” MiLitary

S

18 years or older

SUNDAY - THURSDAY 8PM TO 2AM FRIDAY & SATURDAY 8PM TO 3AM 1672 HAMMONTON SMARTSVILLE MARTSVVILLE RD Marysville • 530.269.9422

S

TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner TOU XA CHASENGNOU filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: TOU XA CHASENGNOU Proposed name: CHEEMENG CHA THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 1, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: 10 Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: March 12, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00739 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner PETER CHASENGNOU filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: PETER CHASENGNOU Proposed name: PETER KONG CHA THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 1, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: 10 Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: March 13, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00741 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner NICK CHASENGNOU filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: NICK CHASENGNOU Proposed name: NICK CHENG CHA THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard

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and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 1, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: 1 Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: March 11, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00740 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner PANG YANG filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: PANG YANG Proposed name: PA CHUE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 1, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: 1 Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: March 11, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00737 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner MARCIE LYNN MEYERSON filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: MARCIE LYNN MEYERSON Proposed name: MARCIE LYNN THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 1, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: March 21, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00897 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner

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CONNOR MATTHEW TOLLE filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: CONNOR MATTHEW TOLLE Proposed name: JEREMIAH MATTHEWS-TOLLE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 8, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: March 12, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00706 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner COURTNEY M. JOY filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: COURTNEY MICHELLE JOY Proposed name: RACHEL ISABELLE JOY THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 8, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: March 27, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00900 Published: April 4,11,18,25, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner DAVID CASTILLO MARTINES filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: DAVID CASTILLO MARTINES Proposed name: DAVID CASTILLO THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing.

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NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 8, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: March 21, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00887 Published: April 4,11,18,25, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner MONIQUE MARIE RICHARD filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: MONIQUE MARIE RICHARD Proposed name: MONIQUE SOL SONOQUIE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 29, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: March 28, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00964 Published: April 11,18,25, May 2, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner SALGADO filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: SALGADO Proposed name: ENER ALFRED PICO THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 22, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: April 3, 2019 Case Number: 19CV01005 Published: April 11,18,25, May 2, 2019

PETITION NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE

NORMAN B. HOLLAND, also known as NORMAN HOLLAND, NORMAN BRUCE HOLLANDT To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors,

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and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: NORMAN B. HOLLAND, also known as NORMAN HOLLAND, NORMAN BRUCE HOLLAND a petition for Probate has been filed by: DAVID B. HOLLAND in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: DAVID B. HOLLAND be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: April 23, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: NICOLE R. PLOTTEL 466 Vallombrosa Ave. Chico, CA 95926. (530) 893-2882 Case Number: 19PR00141 Dated: March 26, 2019 Published: April 4,11,18, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE

GRACE ANNETTE KING aka GRACE A. KING aka GRACE KING To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: GRACE ANNETTE KING aka GRACE A. KING aka GRACE KING a petition for Probate has been filed by: STEPHANIE M. ADAMS in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte.

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The Petition for Probate requests that: STEPHANIE M. ADAMS be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: May 7, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: TBA Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: DANA L. CAMPBELL, ESQ. Tyree & Campbell, LLP 1600 Humboldt Road, Suite 4 Chico, CA 95928 (530) 894-2100 Case Number: 19PR00140 Dated: March 25, 2019 Published: April 4,11,18, 2019

will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: April 30, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: NICOLE R. PLOTTEL 466 Vallombrosa Avenue Chico, CA 95926 (530) 893-2882 Case Number: 19PR00152 Dated: April 2, 2019 Published: April 11,18,25, 2019

court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: May 7, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: SONYA K. FINN The Law Offices of Leverenz & Finn 515 Wall Street Chico, CA 95928 (530) 895-1621 Case Number: 19PR00158 Dated: April 8, 2019 Published: April 11,18,25, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE

STEVEN J. MOONEY (also known as STEVEN JOHN MOONEY) To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: STEVEN J. MOONEY, STEVEN JOHN MOONEY, STEVEN MOONEY A petition for Probate has been filed by: LISA M. MOONEY in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: LISA M. MOONEY be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority

SHEILA H. SCOTT To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: SHEILA H. SCOTT A petition for Probate has been filed by: LARRY B. SAISE in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: LARRY B. SAISE be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the

LAWRENCE JAMES CAMPBELL, aka LAWRENCE J. CAMPBELL To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: LAWRENCE JAMES CAMPBELL, also known as LAWRENCE J. CAMPBELL A Petition for Probate has been filed by: KITTIYA K. CAMPBELL in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: KITTIYA K. CAMPBELL be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be

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this Legal Notice continues

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NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE

held in this court as follows: Date: May 14, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: PR Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: VANESSA J. SUNDIN Sundin Law Office 341 Broadway Street, Ste. 302 Chico, CA 95928 (530) 342-2452 Case Number: 19PR00112 Published: April 18,25, May 2, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE

CLIFFORD ALLEN FRAZIER To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: CLIFFORD ALLEN FRAZIER A Petition for Probate has been filed by: DANE FRAZIER in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: DANE FRAZIER be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: May 21, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: TBD Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926.

this Legal Notice continues

IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: MARK JOHNSON 2531 Forest Avenue, Suite 100 Chico, CA 95928 (530) 345-6801 Case Number: 19PR00159 Dated: April 8, 2019 Published: April 18,25, May 2, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE CRAIG AARON LUOTO To all heirs, beneficiaries,

this Legal Notice continues

CHARLES ARTHUR HIGGS III aka CHARLES A. HIGGS III To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: CHARLES ARTHUR HIGGS III aka CHARLES A. HIGGS III A Petition for Probate has been filed by: REBECCA A. KOSAK in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: REBECCA A. KOSAK be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: May 14, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: 10 Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance

this Legal Notice continues

may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: RAOUL J. LECLERC P.O. Drawer 111 Oroville, CA 95965 (530) 533-5661 Dated: April 10, 2019 Case Number: 19PR00160 Published: April 18,25, May 2, 2019

creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: CRAIG AARON LUOTO A Petition for Probate has been filed by: KAREN ALEXANDER in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: KAREN ALEXANDER be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: May 14, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave.

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Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: RICHARD S. MATSON Richard S. Matson Law Office, Inc. 1342 The Esplanade, Suite A Chico, CA 95926 (530) 343-5373 Dated: April 10, 2019 Case Number: 19PR00165 Published: April 18,25, May 2, 2019

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REAL ESTATE

FOr MOrE iNFOrMaTiON aBOUT aDVErTiSiNG iN OUr rEal ESTaTE SECTiON, Call 530-894-2300

Love’s Real estate

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14677 Carnegie road, Magalia | 3bd 2ba | 1359 sq ft

Adorable home! This 3 bedroom 2 bath home, checks all the boxes. Upon entering you’ll appreciate high vaulted ceilings, bay window in living room and cozy wood burning stove. Kitchen open to dining room and part of living area, great counter space, ample cabinetry, and breakfast bar. Nice size bedrooms, chair rail in one of the bedrooms and a master bedroom w/bathroom. Sliding door from the dining area opens up to the newer deck and nice fenced back yard. All with an attached garage. Great location in Magalia, well above the burn areas. Once again, this is a great affordable home! $229,000

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“Have you noticed the crazy traffic lately?” asked my Realtor buddy, Cartlin. “I showed property yesterday and got tied up in traffic jams in Chico and Oroville and on the freeway in between. The whole place has gone nuts!” “True!” said Janie, another Realtor buddy. “It’s not like it used to be.” “Yeah,” said Cartlin. “All these people driving around. And have you ever seen crazier drivers?” “I’ve seen you,” said Janie. “That’s crazy enough for me. And could you please slow down? That light turned red before you got to the intersection. I’m in no hurry to get back to the office, and I don’t like the idea of my last meal being that last hot dog.” “Hey,” said Cartlin, “I don’t like wasting time getting around. These days, it takes forever getting anywhere. And I’m driving more than ever. I’m sick of it!” “Well,” said Janie, “I know the reason you’re driving more. Do you?” Cartlin glanced at her suspiciously. This might be another set up which Janie always begins as a question and answer trap. “I’m driving more,” he said, “because my buyers are wanting to see property all over the place. Oroville, Magalia, Gridley.” “And that’s because?” she questioned.

“Because Chico has nothing to look at. Inventory is lower than ever before. And prices have jumped. Obviously.” He rolled his eyes. “Is that news to you, oh wise one?” “Why is inventory low and prices so high?” she pressed. “And slow down, please.” “You know as well as I do. Everything changed after the Paradise fire.” “Aha!” said Janie, “So you’re saying that because of the Paradise fire, you are taking into consideration the needs of your buyers who are having a hard time?” “Obviously,” said Cartlin. “And your buyers are fire victims from Paradise?” “Of course,” said Cartlin. “Then why can’t you take into consideration the needs of all these fire victims driving around who are having a hard time with traffic just like you are?” said Janie. “Oh, I see,” said Cartlin, “so I should change the way I’ve been driving my whole life?” “Everything changed after the fire,” said Janie. “Slow down.”

Doug Love is Sales Manager at Century 21 in Chico. Call 530-680-0817 or email dougwlove@gmail.com License #950289

530-762-1626 | BlueTeamRealTy.com

Homes are Selling in Your Neighborhood Shop every home for sale at www.C21SelectGroup.com

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2 bed 2 bath Condo in Chico in a great area. $167,500 1.59 acre double lot with beautiful valley and canyon views. $120,000

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4412 County Rd P Orland 3.83 acres, 3/2 house, large shop, mandarin orchard

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DRE #01312354

Homes Sold Last Week TOWN

683 Paseo Companeros St 4 Marlin Ct 25 Delaware Dr 2155 La Rocco Dr 2173 Holly Ave 65 Pauletah Pl 3345 Wedgewood Ln 4 Jenny Way 1396 Ringtail Way 10 New Dawn Cir 3005 Sandi Dr

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico

38

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ap ri l 1 8, 2 0 1 9

Recipient of the 2018 Quality Service Pinnacle Award From Century 21

“Building trust one home at a time.”

Alice Zeissler | 530.518.1872

ADDRESS

Congratulations to Jennifer Parks!

PRICE

BR/BA

$595,000 $586,000 $408,500 $389,000 $385,000 $380,000 $367,000 $341,000 $340,000 $325,000 $320,000

2/2 4/3 4/2 3/2 3/2 3/3 3/2 3/2 3/2 3/2 3/2

Jennifer Parks | 530.864.0336 BRE# 01269667

Sponsored by Century 21 Select Real Estate, Inc. SQ. FT. 2490 2343 1727 1482 1120 1914 1179 1360 1126 1396 1356

ADDRESS 1411 Arbutus Ave 380 Yarrow Dr 1735 Elm St 1022 Normal Ave 13891 Garner Ln 1420 Sherman Ave #29 141 W Lassen Ave #2 2330 Notre Dame Blvd #1 716 Victorian Park Dr 1835 Ohio St 6392 Imperial Way

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Gridley Magalia

$309,000 $308,000 $258,000 $235,500 $200,000 $171,000 $149,000 $124,000 $121,000 $344,000 $354,000

3/1 3/2 3/1 3/1 3/3 2/2 2/1 2/1 3/2 4/3 2/2

SQ. FT. 1385 1550 988 880 1555 920 766 864 1286 2093 1592


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Condo! Adorable 3 bed/2 bath, 1,249 sq ft. ..................................................... $259,000 Pending

14855 Klamath Court Magalia

SplaSh into thiS beautiful Saltwater pool! Well maintained 3 bed/2 bath, plus ding e nparking, den/office or possible 4th bed home offering 1,776 sq ft, PRV too! .........$475,000 Teresa Larson (530) 899-5925 DRE #01177950 chiconativ@aol.com

$279,000

beautiful 4 bed/3 bath, 2,512 sq ft, hardwood floors, formal living, dining, plus family Pending room!............................................................................................................. $519,900 updated Gorgeous, custom features in this 3 bed/2 bath, 1,008 sq foot condo. Really Pending special! ...............................................................................................................$215,000

6ac Creekside on Butte Creek $249,000 3.4 ac, well, septic & power in place $98,500 3/2, 2,000 sqdfti n north g Chico en P$429,000 Duplex! 1 bed 1 bath each $325,000

CalDRE #02056059

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The following houses were sold in Butte County by real estate agents or private parties during the week of April 1- April 5, 2019 The housing prices are based on the stated documentary transfer tax of the parcel and may not necessarily reflect the actual sale price of the home. ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

SQ. FT.

ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

SQ. FT.

15170 Jack Pine Way

Magalia

$283,500

2/3

1868

15 Rosemel Ct

Oroville

$145,455

3/2

2042

650 Bird St

Oroville

$575,000

1/1

5110

6230 Jack Hill Dr

Oroville

$132,000

2/2

1512

12 Dorax Dr

Oroville

$441,500

3/3

2876

831 Colusa Ave

Oroville

$130,000

3/1

2268

1115 Hurleton Rd

Oroville

$382,000

4/3

2547

389 Wayland Rd

Paradise

$750,000

5/7

4247

30 Crane Ave

Oroville

$270,000

3/2

1200

3581 Sunview Dr

Paradise

$479,000

3/3

2285

60 La Mirada Ave

Oroville

$259,000

3/2

1440

251 Pinewood Dr

Paradise

$449,000

3/3

2030

77 Canyon Highlands Dr

Oroville

$258,000

3/2

1503

1392 Wagstaff Rd

Paradise

$425,000

2/2

2469

2041 Fogg Ave

Oroville

$250,000

4/4

2244

421 Nathan Ln

Paradise

$350,000

3/2

1530

47 Montrose Dr

Oroville

$250,000

2/2

1488

5848 Nielsen Ct

Paradise

$330,000

2/2

1564

1216 14th St

Oroville

$195,000

4/2

1820

6237 Forest Ln

Paradise

$268,500

3/2

1358

2589 Pinecrest Rd

Oroville

$162,000

3/1

1040

701 Kinsey Way

Paradise

$145,000

4/3

2957

a pri l 18, 2019

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Profile for News & Review

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