__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

CHICO’S FREE NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY VOLUME 42, ISSUE 33 THURSDAY, APRIL 11, 2019 WWW.NEWSREVIEW.COM

local

MUSIC Taking stock of a scene

issue

rocked by wildfire Page

20 2019

MUSIC FESTIVAL See special pull-out section

8

CHICO’S NEW SHELTER

12 MEASLES: NOT JUST FOR KIDS

24 ART CIRCUS


Donate • Shop • Volunteer Save 50-75% off building materials • Appliances • Doors • Building Supplies Stop in for a delicious breakfast, lunch or dinner at our restaurant and bar. Stay in one of our beautifully appointed private cottages and suites. Explore the many outdoor adventures in the park and surrounding mountains. Or simply relax on the deck and enjoy the spectacular views of Childs Meadow and Lassen Park. It’s the perfect mountain getaway! 530.595.3388 highlandsranchresort.com 41515 Hwy 36E, Mill Creek, CA 96061

• Windows • Paint • So much more!

The Village

At CHilds MEAdow The Village Inn features 19 newly renovated rooms • RV park with 22 spaces • Tent camp sites Horse camping with outdoor boarding • Mountain bike, cross country ski and snowshoe rentals Across the highway from Highlands Ranch Resort

530-595-3383 | thevillageatchildsmeadow.com

2

CN&R

A P RIL 1 1 , 2 0 1 9

220 Meyers St Chico (530) 895–1271


CN&R

INSIDE

Vol. 42, Issue 33 • April 11, 2019 OPINION

4

Editorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Guest Comment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Second & Flume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 This Modern World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Streetalk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

NEWSLINES

32

8

Downstroke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Sifter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9

HEALTHLINES

12

Appointment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Weekly Dose. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

GREENWAYS

16

Eco Event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS

19

15 Minutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 The Goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

19

COVER STORY

20

ARTS & CULTURE

24

Arts Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 This Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Fine Arts listings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Scene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Nightlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Reel World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Chow. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Arts DEVO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Brezsny’s Astrology . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39

CLASSIFIEDS

39

REAL ESTATE

42

ON THE COVER: PHOTO OF MAURICE “BIG MO” HUFFMAN BY JASON CASSIDY DESIGN BY TINA FLYNN

Our Mission: To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. Editor Melissa Daugherty Managing Editor Meredith J. Cooper Arts Editor Jason Cassidy Contributing Editor Evan Tuchinsky Staff Writer Ashiah Scharaga Calendar Editor Neesa Sonoquie Contributors Robin Bacior, Alastair Bland, Michelle Camy, Vic Cantu, Nate Daly, Charles Finlay, Bob Grimm, Howard Hardee, Miles Jordan, Mark Lore, Landon Moblad, Brie Oviedo, Ryan J. Prado, Juan-Carlos Selznick, Ken Smith, Robert Speer, Carey Wilson Managing Art Director Tina Flynn Creative Services Manager Elisabeth Bayard-Arthur Ad Designers Naisi Thomas, Cathy Arnold Publications Designers Katelynn Mitrano, Nikki Exerjian Director of Sales and Advertising Jamie DeGarmo Advertising Services Coordinator Ruth Alderson Senior Advertising Consultants Brian Corbit, Laura Golino Advertising Consultants Adam Lew, Jordon Vernau Office Assistant Jennifer Osa Distribution Director Greg Erwin Distribution Manager Matt Daugherty Distribution Staff Ken Gates, Bob Meads, Pat Rogers, Larry Smith, Placido Torres, Jeff Traficante, Bill Unger, Lisa Van Der Maelen, David Wyles

President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Director of Nuts & Bolts Deborah Redmond Director of People & Culture David Stogner Director of Dollars & Sense Debbie Mantoan Nuts & Bolts Ninja Norma Huerta Payroll/AP Wizard Miranda Hansen Accounts Receivable Specialist Analie Foland Developer John Bisignano System Support Specialist Kalin Jenkins N&R Publications Managing Editor Laura Hillen N&R Publications Writers Anne Stokes, Thea Rood Marketing & Publications Consultants Greta Beekhuis, Steve Caruso, Joseph Engle, Elizabeth Morabito, Traci Hukill, Celeste Worden 353 E. Second St., Chico, CA 95928 Phone (530) 894-2300 Fax (530) 892-1111 Website newsreview.com Got a News Tip? (530) 894-2300, ext 2224 or chiconewstips@newsreview.com Calendar Events cnrcalendar@newsreview.com Calendar Questions (530) 894-2300, ext. 2243 Want to Advertise? Fax (530) 892-1111 or cnradinfo@newsreview.com Classifieds (530) 894-2300, press 2 or classifieds@newsreview.com Job Opportunities jobs@newsreview.com Want to Subscribe to CN&R? chisubs@newsreview.com Editorial Policies: Opinions expressed in CN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons, or other portions of the paper. CN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or review materials. Email letters to cnrletters@newsreview.com. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form and to edit them for libel. Advertising Policies: All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes the responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. CN&R is printed at PressWorks Ink on recycled newsprint. Circulation of CN&R is verified by the Circulation Verification Council. CN&R is a member of Chico Chamber of Commerce, Oroville Chamber of Commerce, Downtown Chico Business Association, CNPA, AAN and AWN. Circulation 38,650 copies distributed free weekly.

APRIL 11, 2019

CN&R

3


OPINION

Send guest comments, 340 words maximum, to gc@newsreview.com or to 353 E. Second St., Chico, CA 95928. please include photo & short bio.

SECOND & FLUME

EDITORIAL

Declaration does prioritize safety During the Chico City Council meeting last Tuesday

(April 2), as a storm and flooding aptly punctuated talk of a climate emergency, a flippant remark from a conservative on the dais brought a disconnect in our city into tragicomic relief. First, the setup: A public commenter discounted the resolution on climate change while invoking a 36-year-old passage in the municipal code that, in her words, “declared a nuclear-free zone.” (Chico indeed has a prohibition on nuclear weaponry, adopted in 1983, when locals still recalled Titan I missiles siloed outside of town two decades earlier.) Councilman Karl Ory, mayor in ’83, drew cheers after calling the ban “probably the most effective ordinance ever passed.” Councilman Sean Morgan delivered the punch line: He injected into the deliberation that, “with all due respect,” he agreed with Ory, and then went on to say that the “plastic bag ban” also was one of the best ordinances because “not one Chico sea turtle has been proven to have choked on a plastic bag.” Cue the snare drum. Morgan—another former mayor, from the opposite end of the political spectrum—referred to the city’s 2013 ordinance barring single-use sacks, which wound up becoming state law the same year. Never

mind that the ban addresses trash, not turtles, and has reduced litter at the landfill. (We confirmed as much with the Neal Road Recycling and Waste Facility.) The pot shot fit a narrative. With growing rancor, a segment of the community fixated on crime harps that Chico’s progressives ignore public safety. That issue, these residents say, is paramount. Anything else wastes time. Government can accomplish multiple aims at once. In this instance, climate change and public safety inexorably intertwine. Morgan may have referred to the declaration of a climate emergency—which passed, over his dissent—as “another feel-good initiative,” but the deluge outside City Council chambers proved its merit. The Camp Fire also proved its merit. Extreme weather and disasters exacerbated by climatic conditions affect public safety. Who responds to fires and floods? Firefighters, paramedics, law enforcement—public safety personnel. Chico and other communities neighboring burn zones continue to grapple with new norms since Nov. 8. The climate-emergency declaration calls on city officials to incorporate the big picture in their vision, reality in their plans. There’s nothing “feelgood” or funny about that. Ω

GUEST COMMENT

The implications of spiraling medical fees Iquick hearing-aid vendor sent me to an ear doctor to take a look at my eardrums before selling the aids—a ’m getting old. My hearing is deteriorating. The

five-minute visit. No problem. Medicare covered about half of the $370 bill. Medical care in the United States is suspiciously expensive. Insurance premiums and co-pays continue to rise. Patients expect to be charged for office staff, exams, tests and procedures. I didn’t realize that using the Enloe Ear, Nose & Throat clinic—one of about 20 outpatient offices owned by the nonprofit hospital—would generate by a separate “facility fee” of $188. Jim Brobeck The second bill arrived weeks after The author, a Chico the doctor bill. Only clinics owned resident, is a water by a hospital are allowed to charge policy analyst for this fee. Medicare paid about half AquAlliance. of the facility fee bill, too. Independent physician practices don’t charge the fee until they are bought out by large hospital administrations. Patients at hospital-owned clinics

4

CN&R

April 11, 2019

are being double billed without improving quality or patient outcomes. Organizations like the Association of Independent Doctors have emphasized facility fees add “zero value” for the additional cost. Hospital executives explain that the fee payments allow them to provide charitable treatment to uninsured patients. But consumers should not be burdened with extra costs when no additional benefits are delivered. These spiraling fees deter us from getting the preventative care we need and result in escalating insurance premiums, swollen co-payments and raised taxes. Excessive fees endanger the viability of Medicare. When doctors surrender their independence to become employees of hospital conglomerates, charges go up and service is diluted. Patients have to pay both the doctor and the corporation she works for. The powerful hospital lobby has swayed legislators to go along with the facility fee scam for now. Choosing autonomous North State doctors and clinics that are not employed or owned by the Enloe monopoly will save money, make medical insurance payments more efficient, and encourage physicians and medical providers to remain independent. Ω

by Melissa Daugherty m e l i s s a d @ n e w s r e v i e w. c o m

Debunked It’s been more than a dozen years since I first heard the myth that autism is caused by vaccines—specifically, the one used to protect people from measles, mumps and rubella (MMR). I was a daily newspaper reporter with several years’ experience under my belt when Robert F. Kennedy Jr. imparted that narrative during a speech at Chico State. He was on a tour for his then-new book, Crimes Against Nature, and delivered a wide-ranging talk. Much of it focused on the environmental degradation being committed by the administration of George W. Bush. This was 2006. Other subjects included faulty voting machines; the political and corporate machinations that polarize the country; and a muchneeded return of the Fairness Doctrine, a defunct Federal Communications Commission policy requiring TV and radio broadcasters to provide balanced reporting on controversial issues of public importance. Somewhere in there, Kennedy dropped the bombshell about vaccines and autism. I don’t remember his spiel in great detail, but I do recall him alleging it had something to do with mercury. When I returned to my office to bust out a story for the next day’s paper, I decided to exclude those comments. My editor, who had a relative with autism and attended the talk, asked me about the omission. I said I’d covered the most interesting discussion points. Moreover, I couldn’t find what I considered legitimate sources backing up the claim. Years later, I delved into this dangerous myth and its origins. What I learned was that in 1998, eight years before Kennedy’s talk in Chico, a British doctor named Andrew Wakefield published research charging a causal relationship between autism and a mercury-based preservative in the MMR vaccine. In response, the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, among other health agencies, conducted research and found no such link. Still, as a precaution, the additive was either greatly reduced or entirely removed from vaccines recommended for infants and young children in the early aughts. What was Wakefield’s motive? In 2004, a newspaper reporter’s investigation revealed his bias and major financial conflicts of interest. For starters, some of the children in his study had been recruited by attorneys attempting to sue MMR manufacturers. Furthermore, Wakefield had been paid hundreds of thousands of dollars by the lawyers. Additionally, prior to his study, he’d filed for a patent for an alternative measles vaccine. In 2010, after an investigation by the U.K.’s General Medical Council discredited his research, Wakefield lost his ability to practice medicine there. The journal that had published the study retracted it. Still, in spite of a mountain of evidence debunking his work, it’s a veritable Pandora’s box. The result of the misinformation and the parroting by prominent people like Kennedy: a dangerous resurgence of measles, a virus all but eradicated almost 20 years ago, that triggered a public health emergency in New York City just this week. It’s also active in Butte County (see Healthlines, page 12). As for Wakefield, the disgraced former physician has found the United States a great place for bearing false witness—in Texas, unsurprisingly—and has made it his home base for spreading antivaxx propaganda to pseudoscience groups and nervous parents.


LETTERS

ATTENTION BOOMERS

Send email to cnrletters@newsreview.com

Congressman in denial

More on LaMalfa

Missing the irreplaceable

Re “Drastic measures” (Cover story, by Judy Lin, April 4): Thanks for your [cover story]. Unfortunately, it’s clear we should expect more fires in the state, if not Rep. Doug LaMalfa’s district. As a climate crisis denier (akin to a flat-earther), he will want us to label the next fire LaMalfa #5. I trust he also will invite his fellow climate crisis denier Sen. Mike Lee, and stand beside him as Lee mocks the Green New Deal. Rep. LaMalfa can hold up Lee’s Star Wars posters and President Sexual Predator’s rake to make his “science” clear to the folks battling the fire and losing their homes behind them.

Re “Learning from the land” (Greenways, by Ashiah Scharaga, April 4): I enjoyed the article on rice farming by Ashiah Scharaga. I appreciate the hard work by farmers to help feed us all. I enjoy rice especially with my salmon and would point out they both need water. We are entering an interesting time here in America, and it seems socialism versus capitalism, and their definitions will be an issue in the coming election. I feel the need to point out that California rice farmers received $2.7 billion in subsidies from 1995-2017 and Arkansas $6.9 billion, just to mention a few. I would ask Doug LaMalfa: Are these taxpayer subsidies capitalism or socialism? Or corporate welfare?

Re “No Kondo, no thanks” (Second & Flume, by Melissa Daugherty, April 4): We fire survivors got a Marie Kondo special, all clutter removed in an instant. When I moved into my house in old Magalia in 2007, I had a futon and my beloved garage setup. It took me 11 years just to furnish the house—pots and pans, couch, etc. Anyone who visited over the years often remarked, “Kind of Spartan, eh, George?” I liked it that way. But now, with my stuff just this side of nothing and although never having been a pack rat, these days, five months after the fire, I do miss some of my stuff, my 11-year-old stuff, much of which I’ll never be able to replace.

Beau Grosscup Cohasset

Howard Myrick Chico

George Gold Willows

New to Medicare? Turning 65? Leaving an employer plan? Looking for a competitive quote?

I can help with your medicare options. With over 400 customers served, I can help you to: Save money on Healthcare expenses WE S MA HOP Reduce your prescription drug costs CARRJOR IERS Call today for your free consultation. All agent fees & commissions paid by insurance companies.

Bruce A. Jenkins | CA License #0B86680 530.781.3592 | www.BruceJenkinsInsurance.com

SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY & SSI “We help YOU through the System” We assist with paperwork! Attorney at Law

LAw OffIC ES Of BETSY H. A LBERTS LETTERS C O N T I N U E D

O N PA G E 6

Over 35 years of experience.

976 Mangrove, Chico • 530.893.8387

Disability

Support Group

Are you interested in joining a support group for people living with disabilities? Please come check out our new disability support group! nd WHEN: 2Every otherof Monday, 2:30-4:00 Monday each month, 2:30pm-4pm, 4th Wednesday of each month, 10:30am-12pm

WHERE: Disability Action Center office, Formerly ILSNC 1161 East Ave, Chico 95926 QUESTIONS? Contact ContactSandra Anna Morales at 893-8527 or at 893-8527 x 104 anna.smith@ILSNC.org or sandra@actionctr.org

$5 OFF

any purchase of $20 or more

GOOd at all arC StOreS!

www.thearcstore.org

Chico 2020 Park Ave. • 530.343.3666 Oroville 2745 Oro Dam Blvd E • 530.532.1272

CNR coupon expires 05.11.19 Excludes ARCoffee & consignments. Not valid with other specials. One coupon per visit. APRIL 11, 2019

CN&R

5


HAVE LYME? Think you might have Lyme?

Monthly Support Group Monday, April 15 5:30-7:30pm CALL FOR LOCATION. • Patients Helping Patients • We Share Facts/Information

Help Line: (530) 877-6666

www.thelymecenter.org

Acupuncture

Chinese Herbs & Massage Pain Management, Weight Loss, Digestive Issues & Allergies

Jennifer Conlin L.Ac. Elinore Schafer L.Ac. Most insurance accepted

LETTERS

c o n t i n u e d f r o m pa g e 5

‘A basic human right’ Re “Demand people come first” (Guest comment, by Paul O’Rourke-Babb, April 4): Right on, Paul O’Rourke-Babb! Why aren’t the U.S. people asking why our country can spend trillions on war-making after all these years, yet we aren’t allowed to have universal, governmentfunded health care? Most countries determined long ago that it’s more moral and much less expensive to provide health care for all people than to have medical funds tied up in private businesses that pick and choose who gets what health care and how much, litigate the justifications, and pay for fancy buildings, CEO salaries/bonuses, and highend advertising to draw in paying customers (preferably healthy ones). Surely health care for all people is a basic human right. Linda Furr Chico

1209 Esplanade Ste 1 530.342.2895 • AmericanChi.net Mon & Thur 10am-6pm • Tues & Wed 9am-6pm Friday 9am-2pm • Sunday Noon- 4pm

• Hair Care Products

Hair • Wigs • Cosmetics

2175 Baldwin Ave Oroville 95966 (530) 533-7720

NO.

It Is A Complete sentenCe

Serving Butte, Glenn & Tehama Counties

342-RAPE

24 hr. hotline (Collect Calls Accepted) www.rapecrisis.org 6 

CN&R 

april 11, 2019

Mr. O’Rourke-Babb relies on logical fallacies and demonizing to introduce Medicare for All (MFA). He incorporates the bandwagon and half-truth fallacies in his statement that the “majority of your friends and neighbors— Republicans, Democrats and independents—want Medicare for All.” The hoped-for reactions is, “Gosh golly, everyone’s wants it, even Republicans! It must be good. Let’s get on board!” But it’s horse crap. So let’s back up those horses. When specifics are applied, such as, Would you support MFA if it meant delays in access, higher taxes, a loss of access to private health insurance, etc.?, we find that MFA only garners minority support. The whole truth is the bandwagon has few riders, and I doubt many are Republicans or independents. He goes on to demonize “Insurance … and big pharma.” Yet, insurance doesn’t create costs, it covers them. Yes, big pharma wants big prices. But other countries negotiate lower prices, while American politicians take bribes to keep costs high. The documentary Fix It states too many insurance choices equals high costs. Bull crap. It states Medicare for seniors, which is unsustainable, is a good model. Bull crap.

Why didn’t the people responsible for the tree-removal incident act in a manner expected of highranking, well-paid professionals?

while the president gives 60 percent of the American people the middle finger while disregarding the conduct expected of a commander in chief, then take your bankrupt morals to the polls and vote for him.

—lee Hirschbein

Roger S. Beadle Chico

We’re open to ideas. Try introducing yours without a commentary that rodeo workers have to follow around with a shovel. Peter Bridge Ord Bend

Accountability is key Re “Mark of austerity” (Second & Flume, by Melissa Daugherty, April 4): Recently, at a meeting of the Bidwell Park and Playground Commission, employees of the Chico Public Works Department claimed that the senseless cutting down of at least 27 valley oak trees by a crew of inadequately supervised chainsaw-wielding workers with no knowledge of trees was a mistake. That is wrong. More accurately, the hacking down of those majestic trees resulted in at least 27 mistakes—one for each tree. Those mistakes created an environmental disaster that will take at least 50 years to mitigate. An extensive investigation of all parties involved is imperative. Serious questions must be answered. Why didn’t the people responsible for the tree-removal incident act in a manner expected of high-ranking, well-paid professionals? Do the people who allowed at least 27 perfectly healthy valley oak trees to be removed have the necessary background, knowledge and experience to correctly manage Bidwell Park? If so, why did they allow such a dreadful action to occur? If not, do personnel adjustments need to be made? A monumental environmental disaster of this extent cannot be swept aside by a presentation and apology at a public meeting. Bidwell Park and those massacred trees deserve much more. Accountability is imperative. Lee Hirschbein Chico

A vacuous response The other night, the evening news included a story about a man complaining to the Chico City

Council members that they were putting crime-fighting on the back burner. As a follow up, the reporter asked Councilwoman Ann Schwab what she thought about the man’s complaint. Her response was absurd. She said climate change was a threat to our security, too. And if we can prevent the need for public safety personnel to respond to floods and fires, they will be more available to fight crime. So, let me get this straight, Schwab believes that the people of Chico can do enough about climate change to improve the availability of Chico cops to fight crime? I can’t imagine a more vacuous response. I think she’s ready to move on to higher elected office! Tony St. Amant Chico

Dumbed-down America  Following Trump’s primary victory in Nevada in 2016, he declared, and I quote, “I love the poorly educated.” Unfortunately, this has come to exemplify a significant percentage of his base. We see the adoration and the anger as Trump magnifies his vindictive presence to validate a self-love, a delusional self-image of greatness that is really just a sham. So how did we get to the place where rabid behavior is the norm and three-word chants are the foundation of intellectual inadequacy? Recall: Lock her up; drain the swamp; build the wall. We witness roars of approval when he uses profane tirades to threaten journalists and those he judges to be his political enemies. Well, there has been a dumbing-down of the American educational system in the last 50 years, where graduating from high school now means you can still breathe; long on feelings but short on critical thinking, civics, economics and reading comprehension. Support for Donald Trump is not necessarily akin to being a rally-goer. But if you stay silent

Poetic justice? I understand why the RNC hatemongers are out in force doing their best to undermine Beto O’Rourke. For some warped reason, nervous Trump campaign personnel like referring to Beto as “Robert Francis O’Rourke.” I’m assuming they feel his birth name is somehow demeaning. If O’Rourke can flip his home state of Texas, and go on to win the same states Hillary Clinton won in 2016, he’ll be president elect in 2020 with 270 Electoral College votes. Judging by his Senate race against Rafael Cruz in November 2018, he might just “flip” ruby red Texas? Unfortunately, true to form, the DNC has so many no-name, unqualified, over-the-hill, controversial, weak, 2016 reruns, with virtually no ideas. They’ll hand Trump the White House unopposed. The DNC has not brains enough to reject the old socialist Bernie Sanders from running again on their ticket, and stop creating mischief against supposed candidates like Joe Biden, rather than taking on the filthy Trump. I guess it’s poetic justice on display? Ray Estes  Redding

Speaking of Joe Joe Biden says he gets it. That is not specific enough. If Joe Biden does not get that it was never OK to fondle the shoulders of a stranger and kiss her hair, then he does not get it.

Roderick Gray Chico

Write a letter  tell us what you think in a letter to the editor. Send submissions of 200 or fewer words to cnrletters@ newsreview.com. deadline for publication is noon on the tuesday prior to publication.


STREETALK

Best concert you’ve been to?

Just Approved! by City of Chico and Butte County to place on Your Property as a secondary unit and/or Move it to Paradise and Live on Your Homesite while you Rebuild!

Asked at Chico Mall Gemina Lopez caregiver

Best concert I’ve ever been to was the Made in America [Festival] with Beyoncé and Jay-Z in Philadelphia. Super fun, exciting, lasted hours and had lots of artists come on.

Chase Sarr packager

Waking the Cadaver, a hardcore metal show when I was 18 at the Rialto Theatre in Arizona. Some “bros” didn’t like them and threw a canister of tear gas into the crowd. I saw it sail in and the whole crowd started surging. I think they got one song off then everybody had to leave. But it was the best concert I ever saw!

More pictures and floor plans at canterburycabins.com Model Home on Display at 15 Commerce Ct, Suite 100 (off Meyers) Model Home Shown by Appointment

15 Commerce Ct, Suite 100, Chico, CA

530.899.8297 | canterburycabins.com

Children's Faire

At Redding City Hall & Sculpture Park

April 20th 11 AM

student

Jessica Burns

Amazing Activities

Downtown City Plaza in Chico

for ALL AGES!

Saturday, April 13, 2019 10AM - 2PM Children’s Activities including: Facepainting • balloon animals magician • juggling perFormances music & much more! Presented by

student

Bruno Mars for my 16th birthday in San Jose in 2015. He put on a really awesome performance and huge laser show. I was in the nosebleed seats, but just being in the same room with him was really awesome.

5 PM

FREE Event!

Julia Maldonado Alex Aiono, an up-and-coming viral pop artist. I saw him in Santa Rosa at the Luther Burbank Center for the Arts. I actually got to meet him and he was really nice. He was really high-energy and had good chemistry with the other artist [on the bill], Sabrina Carpenter.

to

Presenting Sponsor

Over 150 Exhibitors Local Food & Craft Beer Live music all day Free RABA Shuttle Keynote THEATER Eco-Fashion Show Whole Earth Children’s Zone STEM + Arts Tent Climbing Wall Guarded Bike Corral

Sponsored by

April 11, 2019

CN&R

7


NEWSLINES DOWNSTROKE HOUSING TOPS NEEDS SURVEY

Reinforcing the depth and extent of the local homelessness crisis, the Butte County Department of Behavioral Health found housing assistance to be the top need during the annual Mental Health Services Act (MHSA) community input process. Moreover, results posted online Tuesday (April 9) indicated greatest support for Simplicity Village, a proposed tiny house community in Chico for homeless seniors, among four innovative concepts under consideration. Behavioral Health receives around a third of its funding under the state MHSA, which requires public input. The county received 201 survey responses. By a 2-to-1 margin, respondents listed housing assistance as the most-needed mental health-related program or service in the community, and most-needed program or service that would enhance wellness and recovery. Visit tinyurl.com/ButteMHSA for the full results.

HATE CRIME ON CAMPUS

Chico State appears to have been the site of a hate crime over the weekend, now under investigation by the University Police Department. Butte Hall was tagged with “racist and homophobic graffiti” sometime between 12:30 p.m. on Saturday (April 6) and 10:30 a.m. Sunday (April 7), according to a UPD bulletin provided to the CN&R. A UPD email to students in light of the incident reads: “The University celebrates the diversity of its staff and faculty. Threats, graffiti and vandalism targeting specific groups fly in the face of university values and highlight the importance of our diversity work.” No suspects have been identified. Those with information should call UPD at 898-5555.

QUARTER-MILLION QUARTER

Chico-based congressional candidate Audrey Denney announced last week that she’s raised more than $250,000 for her 2020 campaign. Denney, a Democrat with a background in agriculture, says the money came from over 2,000 individual contributions. In an email announcing the total from the first quarter of fundraising, Denney noted that she refuses to accept donations from corporate political action committees. Denney (pictured) announced her candidacy in late February (see “Round two,” Newslines, Feb. 28). It’s her second time vying for the District 1 seat held by Rep. Doug LaMalfa, a Republican from Richvale. She and LaMalfa were the top two votegetters in the June 2018 primary. In that year’s general election, she lost 45.1 percent to 54.9 percent—but she beat LaMalfa by about eight points in Butte County. 8

CN&R

APRIL 11, 2019

‘Unbelievable opportunity’ Safe Space, Jesus Center set sights on June opening for low-barrier Orange Street Shelter

Awatching the many storms that have whipped through Chico the past month and ngela McLaughlin has felt heartbroken

half. That’s because she’s the president of Safe Space Winter Shelter’s board of direcstory and photo by tors, and the seasonal Ashiah operation shut down Scharaga early, the last weekend of February. as h i a h s @ n ew sr ev i ew. c o m “A lot of people I got to know pretty well … I know they’re out there right now,” she told the CN&R. “So many of them are sleeping in the channels and in the creeks [of Chico].” But McLaughlin is hopeful that will soon change. She’s part of the efforts by Safe Space and the Jesus Center to open the Orange Street Shelter, a 24/7 low-barrier homeless facility that has been in the works since November. “I know a lot of those folks will definitely be ready to come in as soon as we have something [open],” McLaughlin said of the year-round facility. “This really is an unbeliev-

able opportunity. We feel so lucky about it.” The CN&R spoke with McLaughlin on Monday (April 8). The next night, during a special meeting of the Chico City Council, she was among the organizers who gave the public and the council an overview of the project and its proposed location at 388 Orange St. The panel took no action that evening, as the item was informational in nature, but several council members expressed support (see “Naysayers’ concerns nixed,” page 11). In the wake of the Camp Fire—after a tent and RV community popped up in the Chico Walmart’s parking lot and a vacant, neighboring field—the giant retailer’s charitable arm, the Walmart Foundation, gave the organizations a $1 million donation to establish a shelter. The intent: to support local service providers and “help address the increased needs of the local homeless population,” including displaced Camp Fire survivors and the chronically homeless. The search for a location began shortly thereafter and hasn’t been easy. McLaughlin cited numerous obstacles: a lack of avail-

able land, costly renovations needed at some properties, and landlords who were uneasy about the project. Funding was another significant hurdle. However, last month, the Butte Countywide Homeless Continuum of Care awarded the Jesus Center $450,000 for the shelter from the Homeless Emergency Aid Program (see “$4.9 million conundrum,” Newslines, March 21), making this location financially feasible. Now, five months after the Walmart gift, a few of the final formalities include approvals from the city and signing a lease—18 months with the possibility of six-month extensions. Sheltering is an ongoing issue in the region that was exacerbated by the Camp Fire, said Jesus Center Executive Director Laura Cootsona. The Orange Street Shelter likely will provide a space for some of the folks who were “already living on the edge and the very poor that were coming off the Ridge,” she said. As it stands, Chico doesn’t have adequate facilities to meet the need. “We feel like we’re really missing beds


Angela McLaughlin, president of Safe Space, says she’s hopeful the Orange Street Shelter will help increase community safety by decreasing the amount of abandoned belongings and trash left along creeks and city streets; providing 24-hour restrooms; and getting people out of the elements.

for the most vulnerable and the most complicated folks that are experiencing homelessness,” Cootsona said. “If we do nothing, and we don’t add any more shelter beds and we don’t address some of the most complicated folks … their lives are going to continue to deteriorate and our community is going to continue to suffer because they feel like it’s affecting their quality of life. I think we can [address] both of those concerns in this kind of a facility.” The Orange Street building is impossible

to miss because of its size—15,000 square feet and two stories—and its brick-red color. The location, formerly home to Woof & Poof’s manufacturing operations, is next door to the Chico Art Center and a few blocks from Chico State’s Wildcat Recreation Center. If all goes according to plan, Jesus Center and Safe Space personnel will open the doors on June 15 and be able to accommodate 100 to 120 people. The organizations will operate the shelter collaboratively but manage their specialties, with the Jesus Center taking on daytime operations and Safe Space overseeing nighttime sheltering. Notably, the facility will not require sobriety for admittance, but guests are expected to follow a code of conduct that prohibits violence, threats, use and possession of drugs and alcohol on the premises, and damaging of property. In addition to providing guests a place to sleep—with separate quarters for single women and families—the shelter will offer meals and storage for personal items. The facility will include a day center with a computer lab and an outreach desk where outside agencies, like shelter partners Butte County Behavioral Health and Butte/Glenn 211, can set up and provide assistance. Individual case management will be required, and the shelter also will offer housing and employment resources, life skills classes and vocational training, and substance abuse counseling and support groups. McLaughlin said she is hopeful the shelter will increase community safety by decreasing the amount of abandoned belongings and trash left along creeks and city streets, providing 24-hour restroom access and getting people out of the elements. “We want this to make a difference in the community,” she said. Ω

Riled allies Supervisor, Oroville group challenge dam relicensure Robert Bateman recalls the moment he first

became concerned about Oroville Dam. With winter rain amassing, he received a call that his manufacturing business, Roplast Industries, would need to evacuate as a precaution. As he locked the door, Bateman told himself: “One time, you can understand this sort of thing—if it happens again, I’m going to stick with it till the problem’s solved.” That was during the New Year’s floods of 1997, when the worst storm in 90 years inundated 250 square miles of the Sacramento Valley. Even as the dam spillway offloaded large volumes from Lake Oroville, water levels grew so high that officials nearly needed to utilize the emergency spillway—an undeveloped Alliance’s actions: hillside. Visit notjustaspill Of course, 20 years way.com or later, the Oroville Dam facebook.com/ crisis struck. High water NotjustaSpillway in February 2017 forced for updates on the Feather River 188,000 people in the dam’s Recovery Alliance. shadow to evacuate. The main spillway fractured, and a portion of the terrain of the emergency spillway washed away under the force of the flow directed there. Only last Tuesday (April 2), after a billion-dollar reconstruction, did the primary spillway return to service. “In 2017, I felt very guilty about not having taken action after [’97], because the writing was on the wall,” Bateman told the CN&R. “So I said, ‘This is it.’”

SIFT ER Kids these days ... It looks as if Generation Z, those born after 1996, could be the most liberal, diverse and socially accepting age group in America. The Pew Research Center analyzed U.S. Census Bureau data and found that the “post-millennial” generation is the most racially and ethnically diverse—nearly half (48 percent) are nonwhite. Here are the highlights of two recent surveys the center conducted related to Gen Z. • About 30 percent of Gen Zers and millennials approve of President Trump’s performance (compared with 38 percent of Gen

Having given up day-to-day management of Roplast, he joined other business owners to form Oroville Strong, a group affiliated with the Oroville Area Chamber of Commerce that aimed to promote the city. The businesspeople spun off from the chamber last year into a new nonprofit, the Feather River Recovery Alliance, to focus on issues with the dam. Alliance members assert that the spillway failure could be the tip of an iceberg of safety problems. They also endorse the notion that the city and county do not receive due compensation for the dam’s impacts on the area—a cause long championed by Bill Connelly, the Butte County supervisor whose district encompasses Oroville. They’re pressing their case with a united front. Last Thursday (April 4), during the county’s annual legislative trip to Washington, D.C., Connelly hand-delivered

Xers and 43 percent of baby boomers). • Gen Zers (62 percent) and millennials (61 percent) also are most likely to believe that increasing racial and ethnic diversity is good for society, compared with 52 percent of Gen Xers and 48 percent of Boomers. • 70 percent say the government should do more to solve the country’s problems, compared with 64 percent of millennials, 53 percent of Gen Xers and 49 percent of boomers.

The Oroville Dam spillway returned to operation last Tuesday (April 2 with its first water flows since the February 2017 disaster. PHOTO COURTESY OF CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF WATER RESOURCES

a letter and documentation to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) expressing opposition to the dam’s relicensure. That followed an electronic filing by the alliance. In submitting this notice of protest, which also indicates their intent to intervene in the proceedings, the local parties informed FERC and the dam’s operator, the California Department of Water Resources (DWR), that the agencies could face a formal challenge if concerns aren’t addressed. Connelly’s letter cites a petition signed by nearly 9,500 people. DWR, contacted by email, declined to comment. Oroville Dam’s 50-year license expired in 2006.

Since 2007, DWR has operated the facility on a series of one-year extensions. Butte County has taken the state to court, most recently for damages from the spillway incident (see “DA sues DWR over dam,” Downstroke, Feb. 18, 2018). In this action, Connelly isn’t acting as a county official per se. He told the CN&R that “the county’s official position is parallel” to his—that is, the lack of recreational tourism opportunities exacerbates the financial drain on local government—but he’s waging his fight “out of a passion to help the local people.” In the FERC filing, which he’s posted online (see infobox), Connelly excerpted state and federal documents dating as far back as 1961, when construction began. Work finished in 1967, with the dam opening in 1968. “It’s a little bit boring reading,” he told the CN&R, “but anyone who reads the history of the facility will understand, from NEWSLINES C O N T I N U E D APRIL 11, 2019

O N PA G E 1 0

CN&R

9


NEWSLINES c o n t i n u e d f r o m pA g e 9

Make a

difference. California MENTOR is seeking individuals and families who have an extra bedroom and want to make a difference in the life of an adult with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Special Needs Adult(s) live with you in your home and you Mentor them toward a brighter future. Receive ongoing support and a generous monthly payment (Approx. $1100/ mo - $4400/mo). Requirements: *Valid drivers license *Vehicle *Must be at least 21 years of age *A spare bedroom *Clean criminal record

as a Mentor, you become a teacher, an advocate and a friend. Information Sessions are held weekly. Please call now to R.S.V.P. Sarah Lucas (530) 221-9911 10

CN&R

April 11, 2019

the beginning, how they boondoggled us. ‘Hey, if you vote for this [project’s water bonds], you’ll have Disneyland, you’ll have all these tourists, you’ll make all this money.’” Promises have included a monorail, a train, a restaurant and snack bar in the visitor center—none ever built. “I’m not asking for a monorail or a steam engine or anything they mentioned or promised,” Connelly said. “I’m just looking for something comparable, like a great trail system, or [to] increase our camping, or fix the roads.” Bateman and Richard Harriman, an attorney working with the Feather River Recovery Alliance, cited concerns about structural integrity and durability of the dam, which both noted was built with 60-year-old construction principles. They base their claims in substantial part on the Independent Forensic Team Report released Jan. 5, 2018, in response to the spillway incident (see tinyurl. com/DamReport2018), which delineates trouble spots in “the dam safety culture and program within DWR.” The alliance seeks an inspection and oversight from an entity outside the influence of DWR, and revised operating procedures. “If you don’t have a demonstrably robust safety protocol,” Harriman said, “you can’t bring any economic development to Oroville, because nobody’s going to locate their business below a dam that isn’t provably safe.” Financial recompense, he continued, can come from recreational facilities and/or a surcharge on customers who don’t pay for the water from Oroville (they pay just the agencies’ costs of storage and conveyance). “If you really look at it,” Harriman said, “all the expenses that the county of Butte incurs to service the people that are brought in by the dam, those costs are charged to the Butte County taxpayers…. The county of Butte is subsidizing the water users in Southern California, the State Water Contractors [association of public water agencies] and the agricultural industry using the water in the San Joaquin Valley. “Why are we subsidizing them? It makes my blood boil.” —Evan Tuchinsky eva ntu c h insk y @ newsr ev iew.c o m


Nerissa Prieto will bring in up to four RVs at her property on Royce Lane to house people displaced by the Camp Fire. An appeal filed by her neighbors was denied by the City Council. PHOTO BY ASHIAH SCHARAGA

it is a private street, and that repairs already are needed. The city’s urban forester has volunteered to be present for any utility trenching to ensure the walnut trees are not harmed. Ultimately, the appeal was denied along party lines (Councilmembers Kasey Reynolds and Morgan voted in favor). The ordinance governing disaster recovery permits, such as Prieto’s, also was extended— from six months to five years. It will expire April 16, 2024. So far, nine permits have been approved since the emergency ordinance went into effect on Dec. 4. The most polarizing item of the night was the

Naysayers’ concerns nixed Temporary RV, shelter projects moving forward After the Camp Fire, Suzanne Hart took in her

brother and mother. But more upheaval was to come for the family: Three weeks later, Hart received an eviction notice for her Chico rental. Hart, a registered nurse, purchased an RV for her family and moved into Meriam Park’s temporary community. Their time there is almost up, too. Though Hart said she loves working at Enloe Medical Center, she prepared to move by acquiring her nursing license in two other states. Then, another opportunity to stay local surfaced: A colleague, Dr. Nerissa Prieto, shared her plan to take in up to four RVs at her property on Royce Lane. She would do so by way of the city of Chico’s emergency disaster recovery housing ordinance, which allows for temporary housing to be set up on vacant or developed property in certain zoning districts. Those plans could have been dashed at the latest special City Council meeting Tuesday (April 9). Prieto’s permit was appealed by her neighbors, who argued that the project would generate too much noise and harm the private roadway and its black walnut trees. The appeal was among two items on the agenda related to the Camp Fire that drew a fair amount of criticism from the public. Discussion of the proposed Orange Street Shelter (see “‘Unbelievable opportunity,’” page 8), a Jesus Center and Safe Space Winter Shelter collaboration, proved to be most contentious, drawing nearly 60 speakers. In response to her neighbors’ resistance, Prieto said she intends to offer a stable, quiet,

safe space to small business owners and health care professionals, where they can stay until it’s time to rebuild or save enough money for a new home. “It behooves us at this point to cling desperately onto all of those [workforce] resources and accommodate them to the greatest degree possible,” she said, addressing the council. Hart also spoke before the dais: “When Dr. Prieto heard of my situation … she said, ‘I can’t believe this. I have to do something,’” she said. “I would potentially be somebody that would be [living] there.” For Prieto’s project, at 650/660 Royce Lane,

several neighbors argued for a shorter length of the permit—one year, instead of three to five. Roxanne Garcia was one such neighbor. She argued that the property has limited space— Prieto lives there and has a pool and an accessory dwelling unit, she noted. “A three- to five-year timeline is not very temporary,” Garcia said. “Who will ensure that those tenants are really Camp Fire victims and not revenue generators? Who will be there to ensure the safety and integrity of our neighborhood and street stays intact?” Councilman Sean Morgan, who stated that he grew up on the street, argued that the project didn’t fit the neighborhood and “puts the burden of what happens to that road squarely on the residents, who are saying, ‘We don’t want this here.’” City staff said that road maintenance would need to be worked out by the residents, since

Orange Street Shelter, with nearly 60 speakers addressing the panel (75 cards originally were turned in). Discussion was agendized as informational only, so no council action was taken. The 24/7 low-barrier shelter is proposed in a temporary capacity at 388 Orange St. It is funded by the $1 million Walmart Foundation donation made after the Camp Fire and a $450,000 Homeless Emergency Aid Program grant awarded by the Butte Countywide Homeless Continuum of Care. Most spoke in favor of the shelter and the city’s dire need to provide a safe space for homeless people. Issues that have been shared with the panel over the years—such as public defecation, loitering and abandoned property in streets and waterways—could be addressed by this shelter, many argued. Several Safe Space volunteers shared the positive interactions they have had with homeless folks through the organization. “The people I saw on a daily basis … are not the problem,” Josh Lang told the council. “These people just need help, they need housing, they need a way to get back on their feet.” Those in opposition mostly cited safety concerns or argued that it was the wrong location. “I do support low-barrier shelters, but they need … accountability and actual security,” Casey Croninger said. Similarly, Morgan called it a “no accountability shelter” with no strategic design. Jamie Jin said the shelter would be much too close to her daughter’s school, Notre Dame Catholic School, and would put the health and safety of children at risk. In contrast, Chico Unified School District teacher Eva Horvath spoke in support of the shelter because it could provide more stability for the homeless children in her classroom. Councilman Scott Huber summed up the viewpoints of his liberal colleagues: “What a great example this is of a win-win: The unhoused win by gaining a secure place to lay their heads, and townsfolk win, as those camping in parks and doorways have a better place to go.”

15th Street

f a C é

Your Neighborhood Place for Coffee, Food & More

~

Featuring Specialty Coffees Pastries Breakfast & Lunch Local Wines and Craft Beers 7am to 3pm Monday through Saturday 8am to 2pm Sunday 1414 Park Ave, Ste 120 Chico 530-809-1087 ~

—ASHIAH SCHARAGA ash ia h s@ newsr ev iew.c o m

APRIL 11, 2019

CN&R

11


HEALTHLINES

Age-old illness Measles outbreak hits adults hard, defying reputation as childhood malady

by

Evan Tuchinsky evantuc hin sk y @ n ewsrev i ew. com

TAnofoverseas epidemics began in the usual manner. traveler brought the virus back he measles outbreak that heralded a year

to a community in which many parents do not vaccinate their children. The disease spread within the cloister before radiating outward. In this case, in January, a visitor to Eastern Europe returned to southwest Washington state, where a large number of SlavicAmericans reside. Unvaccinated children circulated the illness, and with their county just across the state line from Portland, the contagion carried to Oregon, too. Including other exposures—notably here in the North State, New York and New Jersey—this year marks the second-worst for measles since it was declared eradicated in 2000, with around 465 cases reported nationwide as of the CN&R’s deadline.

12

CN&R

APRIL 11, 2019

Butte County Public Health announced the sixth local case Monday (April 8). This patient, like the first four diagnosed, is an adult—only one is a child. In fact, most of California’s measles patients this year have been adults, 12 of 19. That’s unusual; most years since 2013, the numbers have split comparably between youths and adults. (In 2017, the last year of state statistics, California had 54 patients ages 19 and under versus 47 ages 20 and over.) The disease is virulent but preventable. As Dr. Linda Lewis, epidemiologist for Butte County Public Health, explained, “the measles vaccine is one of our most effective vaccines.” MMR—a combination vaccine for measles, mumps and rubella—has 97 percent effectiveness with two doses and 93 percent with one dose at preventing measles, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. It dates to 1963, and in 1968 was improved. People got vaccinated for three decades with little controversy until a study suggested MMR caused autism. Long since

debunked, that 1998 report authored by former British physician Andrew Wakefield sparked a 21st century anti-vaxx movement, which has contributed to measles outbreaks among schoolchildren. (Wakefield is prohibited from practicing in the UK.) That doesn’t account for people over 20, though, who predate the Wakefield hype. So, who are these adult measles patients, and why aren’t they protected? First, let’s dispense with a stereotype. Just

because measles comes from abroad, carriers are not necessarily undocumented immigrants, as certain political partisans push. Dr. James Watt, chief for the Division of Communicable Disease Control of the California Department of Public Health, told the CN&R that travelers often account for measles in the state. Californians may bring it from countries where it’s still active, such as the Philippines. Tourists to California may bring it when visiting. Some may be vaccinated, some not. “There are some people who get vaccinated and do not develop immunity,” Watt explained. “No vaccine is 100 percent effective. Somewhere around 2 [percent] or 3 percent of people who get vaccinated may be susceptible to measles.” That percentage could be higher in middle-aged adults. In 1990, with more than 55,000 cases reported over two years, the medical community re-examined the measles vaccine schedule. The recommendation for MMR doubled to two doses that decade.

“With a single dose, there’s a larger proportion of people who will not respond to the vaccine,” Watt said. “So [adult patients] may be some folks who are in their 40s now … or may have been children at a time when there were some access issues.” Medical conditions prevent certain people from receiving vaccinations, such as those with deficiencies of the immune system. For others, traditional beliefs hold sway. “If you’re talking about people who are foreign-born,” Lewis said, “in different countries, [there can be] a distrust of vaccines and of government, and that was the situation in the Washington state recent outbreak [of 78 cases]. And they were not illegal immigrants—they were legal immigrants. New York state [with 167 cases this year]—that was members of an ultraOrthodox Jewish group; the [overarching religious] organization does not eschew vaccines, but subgroups within it do. “The common denominator is some kind of mistrust of vaccines that’s based in nonscientific information.” In any case, the disease is highly contagious. The virus lives in mucous membranes of the nose and mouth. It spreads through sneezing and coughing—and can survive two hours in the air after a sneeze or cough. Symptoms can take 14 days to show. The illness typically starts with a fever HEALTHLINES C O N T I N U E D

O N PA G E 1 5

APPOINTMENT

Put the ‘fun’ in fundraiser Start your Saturday morning off right with a leisurely 3-mile walk through the park and a family carnival, all for a great cause. The eighth annual Chico Walks for Autism event at One-Mile Recreation Area begins at 8:30 a.m. and ends with live music, a sensory activities center, food trucks and a complimentary barbecue for participants. Sponsored by The Yellow Door and The Little Red Hen, this popular fundraiser has collected more than $100,000 to fund programs that support individuals with autism and their families. All people of all abilities are welcome to join in the fun. Email Josie at theyellowdoorchico@gmail.com for info.


APRIL 11, 2019

CN&R

13


Sex without consent is a crime. Being forced into any unwanted sexual situation can do lasting emotional damage.

BUSINESS OFFICES HOURS: Monday – Friday (excluding Holiday) 10a-6pm Butte/Glenn: 530-891-1331 or 877-452-9588 @ 2889 Cohasset Road, Suite 2 Chico, CA 95973 Tehama: 530-529-3980 Calling from Corning: 530-824-3980 @ 725 Pine Street, Red Bluff, CA 96080

14  

CN&R 

A P RIL 1 1 , 2 0 1 9


HEALTHLINES

c o n t i n u e d f r o m pA g e 1 2

Learn more:

that, after several days, progresses into a cough, runny nose, rash and pink eye. Measles can prove fatal and has no treatment. At highest risk for infection and serious complications are children under 5, adults over 19, pregnant women and anyone with an immune deficiency. “The disease is definitely of much greater risk to somebody’s health than the vaccine,” Lewis said. Epidemiologists consider measles

“eliminated” in the United States— getting that designation in 2000. This doesn’t mean the disease has been totally eradicated, like smallpox, which doesn’t exist anywhere. Rather, measles doesn’t occur continuously here, only breaking out when imported. “Most people in America have not seen measles,” Lewis said. “And, so, there’s this kind of notion that everybody used to get it and it’s no big deal. But it can be a big deal, especially for the very young and those who are immunocompromised.”

Visit buttecounty.net/publichealth/measles for updates on the measles outbreak.

The concept of herd immunity resonates for Lewis. That refers to the percentage of the population needing to develop immunity to a disease in order to prevent its spread. For measles, that’s 93 percent to 95 percent, according to the World Health Organization. A segment of adults—and children—have no choice about vaccination because of their health. Also, immunized patients with lifethreatening diseases such as cancer take medications (e.g., chemotherapy) that weaken their immune systems. “We all have some responsibility to our community,” Lewis said, “and we have an increasing number of people who are immunocompromised, because medicine has gotten better at keeping people alive with underlying conditions…. They rely on the people around them being vaccinated and interrupting transmission to protect them from measles.” Ω

WEEKLY DOSE

Celebrating Easter In Our Community

Easter!

Palm Sunday Service 10:30am

eaSter Sunday ServiceS 8:30 and 10:30am

Trinity United Methodist Church 285 E 5th St. ChiCo, California (530) 343-1497 • chicotrinity.org

Faith Lutheran

Where Everyone is Welcome Palm Sunday 8:30 & 11am Mon - Wed 10am-2pm: Labyrinth Maundy Thursday 7pm Good Friday 7pm Vigil of Easter 7pm Easter Day 8:30 & 11am Easter Egg Hunt for Children at 9:45am 667 E 1ST AVE, CHICO, CA (530) 895-3754 www.chicofaithlutheran.org

Prescription for inner peace If your stress level sits at an 11 while your energy matches that of a hibernating bear, you aren’t alone—research shows that many urban dwellers suffer from a bad mix of lethargy and anxiety. But according to a new study performed at the University of Michigan, the outdoors could be a free and accessible remedy to these woes. There is even a catchy name for it: nature pills, or the “nature experience” (abbreviated as “NE”). The study focused on the relationship between two physiological biomarkers of stress and NE duration. Results showed a drop in both stress markers with just 20 minutes of quality nature time. The jury is still out on how much and how often to take your nature pill, but evidence suggests 20 to 30 minutes of sitting or walking in a place that provides you with a sense of the outdoors as a reliable dose.

Cnrsweetdeals.newsreview.Com

Source: Health Medicine Network April 11, 2019

CN&R

15


GREENWAYS Dave Schlom, a closing panelist at Chico State’s This  Way to Sustainability conference, has gone beyond  the North State with Blue Dot.

Out of the blue North State radio host expands his platform

story and photo by

Evan Tuchinsky

evantuc hin sk y @ n ewsr ev i ew. com

Lpelled evening, Dave Schlom found himself comto get on the air. The program, I-5 Live, istening to North State Public Radio one

featured a discussion on global warming—as climate change was called then, in the early 2000s—between an environmental activist and a Chico State geography professor. “You could tell they were both on the same side trying to have a debate,” he told the CN&R. “It just wasn’t coming across that well to me, so I called in.” A Corning High School science teacher since 1991, with articles on astronomy published nationally, Schlom long had been a go-to expert for local broadcasters. His expertise also extends to earth sciences (notably, the history and geography of Lassen Volcanic National Park, where he’s recorded audio guides). That Monday edition of I-5 Live, he gave his “standard presentation” on global warming by describing Earth’s bookend neighbors, Mars and Venus—diametrically different planets that “tell us a story about climate.” Schlom explained that “on one planet, Mars, the climate went terribly wrong … and it turned into a hostile, desert environment incapable of supporting life. And, then, Venus has a runaway greenhouse effect where its atmosphere is [over] 90 percent carbon dioxide—and we’re talking about percentages of 1 percent [on Earth], and worrying about that—

16  

CN&R 

April 11, 2019

so on Venus it’s 900 degrees Fahrenheit.... “As Carl Sagan said, that’s a cautionary tale.” His phone-in prompted the host, Lorraine Dechter, longtime former NSPR news director, to invite Schlom as her interviewer for science subjects. “My concern,” she recalled, “was, ‘Am I going to be smart enough and knowledgeable enough not to get the wool pulled over my eyes?’ So, for me, it was a godsend to have him there.” In 2007, the station offered Schlom a weekly segment, called Blue Dot Report, during Morning Edition and All Things Considered. That four-minute spot grew in 2016 to the half-hour program Blue Dot, which expanded into an hour-long format two years later, as part of “Science Friday.” National Public Radio picked up Blue Dot as a podcast. “I’m so proud of him,” said Dechter, now a TV producer/editor for Action News Now. The title Blue Dot nods to 1994’s “Pale Blue Dot” speech and book by Sagan—the late astrophysicist, author and TV star— describing our place in the cosmos. Remotely, from his home base in Red Bluff, Schlom draws guests of international renown in sciences from astronomy to geology to, yes, climate change. March 29—the day he moderListen up:

Blue Dot airs Fridays at 10 a.m. and Sundays at 3 p.m. on North State public radio (KCHO/91.7 FM in Chico). Visit mynspr.org/programs/blue-dot for previous shows.

ated the capstone panel at Chico State’s This Way to Sustainability conference—Schlom and TV meteorologist Rob Elvington spoke with climatologist Michael Mann, whose work buoyed the Oscar-winning documentary An Inconvenient Truth. “I’m glad he’s getting more and more national recognition, but he’s already a local hero,” said Chico State professor Mark Stemen, who helped coordinate the conference programming. He’s listened to each Blue Dot incarnation over the years. “Coming from an academic who reads too much and spends 24/7 thinking about these things,” Stemen added, “I always come away from Dave’s show learning something and having a new appreciation for the things I already knew. Your understanding grows as he talks through his show.” Participating in Chico State’s conference,

which he’d attended but never addressed, held full-circle significance for Schlom. He graduated from the university, where he studied under an early adopter of global warming science, professor James Regas. “I just glommed onto that, tried to learn all I could about the carbon cycle and the role of carbon dioxide in Earth history,” Schlom said. “I became extremely concerned, back in the ’80s, about this—and I’ve been teaching about this in my classes and to anyone who would listen to me, for years—saying this is going to be dire in about 2020. “Here we are.” Climate change effects hit him squarely in the heart last year. A Paradise native with

children—and, just before the Camp Fire, a grandchild—born at Adventist Health Feather River Hospital, Schlom experienced the devastation of his hometown that came soon after the Carr Fire whipped by his vicinity in July. He contributed to North State Public Radio’s recovery series, After Paradise, and co-host Sarah Bohannon linked him with Stemen for the conference keynote, “Bringing It All Home: North State Strong.” Prefacing Audrey Denney and #ClimateUprising’s Nirvan Mullick, Schlom interviewed survivors who’d met congressional leaders in Washington, D.C. (See “Hashtag movement,” Greenways, March 14.) “It was kind of funny how many people didn’t know who he was until he started talking and then recognized his voice,” Stemen said. “Those of us who have been listening to Blue Dot over the years already knew what we were getting.” Dechter credits Schlom’s attributes as a teacher and connections across the scientific community as reasons the show has blossomed. “If it interests me, and I find it an interesting story, that’s what I pursue,” Schlom said. “I basically take it as whatever I’m interested in, I think my audience will enjoy.” Ω

ECO EVENT

The story behind the story This Wednesday (April 17), the El Rey Theater is hosting a free screening of the eye-opening documentary Waking Up to Wildfires. The film chronicles inspiring stories of survival and service during the 2017 North Bay wildfires by interviewing survivors, firefighters, public health officials and scientists working hard to recover and better prepare for the future. Following the film will be a Q&A with Emmy-winning filmmaker Paige Bierma and a variety of public service members and scientists. Seating is first come, first serve and doors open at 5:30 p.m. (RSVP online at elreychico.com).


SEXUAL VIOLENCE HAS NO BOUNDARIES

All Gender Identities, Races, Ages, Social Classes & Ethnicities are Affected • 1 in 5 women will be raped in their lifetime • Nearly 1 in 2 women and 1 in 5 men experience sexual violence victimization other than rape at some point in their lives • Intimate partner sexual assault and rape are used to intimidate, control, and demean survivors of domestic violence • Intimate partner sexual assault is more likely than stranger or acquaintance assault to cause physical injury • 40-50% of women in abusive relationships will also be sexually violated during the course of the relationship • 18% of female survivors of spousal rape say their children witnessed the crime • Only 1 in 10 report being sexually violated. Marital rape is the most under-reported form of sexual assault.

KNOW YOUR RIGHTS about sexual assault. If you, or someone you know, has been sexually assaulted you can receive a free forensic medical examination, regardless of whether or not you choose to participate in the criminal justice process.

WE ARE HERE TO LISTEN

Butte/Glenn: 530-891-1331 Tehama: 530-529-3980 24hr CRISIS LINE: 530-342-RAPE (7273) Collect Calls Accepted APRIL 11, 2019

  CN&R 

17


Rebuilding the Ridge Supporting Local Businesses on the Ridge and Surrounding Communities RE-opEnEd aftER thE camp fiRE Gray Matter CoMputinG 3006 Esplanade # F, Chico (530) 521-1894

paradise GenealoGiCal soCiety 2683 Hegan Lane, Chico 530-877-2330

Baker enerGy teaM

15013 Emma Mine Way, Magalia (916) 740-4550

d.W. stuerMer landsCape 15040 Vorheis Lane, Magalia (530) 873-1248

paradise druG 195 Cohasset Road, Chico (530) 877-4981

paradise MediCal Group 277 Cohassett Road, Chico (530) 872 - 6650

paradise reCreation and park distriCt 564 Rio Lindo Avenue, Suite 102, Chico (530) 872-6393

prosperity investMent ManaGeMent, inC. 2561 California Park Dr, Ste 110, Chico (530) 877-4111

ranCho enGineerinG, inC. 330 Wall Street #40, Chico (530) 877-3700

re ConstruCtion (530) 872-8338

Ron Wilson DDs - GeneRal dentistry 1074 East Avenue, Suite S, Chico (530) 877-7661

sCott shaW paintinG 645 Normal Avenue, Ste 100, Chico (530) 872-1738

seleCt property ManaGeMent 1101 El Monte Avenue, Chico (530) 872-6807

soul posse danCe Band 341 Broadway #308, Chico (530) 828-8040

suMMit FundinG 300 Salem Street, Chico (530) 413-0072

1600 Mangrove Ave #140, Chico (530) 399-0777

Western heatinG & rain Gutters

arT house

Mobile service (530) 990-5676

(530) 762-7238

Michael viale, DDs

anDy’s Bullseye repair

650 Rio Lindo Avenue, Suite 10, Chico (530) 872-5233

Jenn BrooKs, arBonne inTernaTional consulTanT Contact for Information (530) 864-1211

Magneson TracTor service, inc. Operating Remotely (530) 961-3171

(530) 345-8550

cenTury 21 selecT inc, sue Mawer

World GraphiCs 1388 Longfellow Avenue, Chico (530) 520-6475

1101 El Monte Ave, Chico (530) 520-4094

Moll’s leGal doC prep

cenTury 21 selecT real esTaTe, susan g. ThoMas

1255 E. Vista Way #109, Vista (530) 520-7360

1101 El Monte Ave, Chico (530) 518-8041

Gary Bess assoCiates 6931 Skyway, Paradise (530) 877-3426

heartshine Foundation Red Bluff (530) 762-2219

ChatField dental (530) 877-9308

paradise Garden CluB, inC.

(530) 872-1890

sweDe’s sMall engine repair

(530) 877-8800

terri’s hair desiGn, reopeninG as paradise salon

adaM and eves salon

730 Main Street, Chico (530) 877-8721

Draper & KraMer MorTgage corp

1388 Longfellow Ave, Chico (530) 514-7082

wilson prinTing anD signs

(530) 386-2616

(530) 877-7387

teresa Munjar / Main event salon

(530) 877-3435

Dr. Mac apple Technician anD Training Business

cenTury 21 selecT, paTTy g. McKee, realTor®

nanny goaTs closeT, llc 5430 Sawmill Road, SPC 1, Paradise (530) 327-4763

liBerTy Tax service 6848 Skyway Suite V, Paradise (530) 872-1876

paraDise ceMeTery DisTricT 980 Elliott Rd, Paradise (530) 877-4493

paraDise FiTness 6626 Clark Rd, Suite M, Paradise (530) 872-5090

paraDise luTheran church 780 Luther Drive, Paradise (530) 877-3549

sweDe’s sMall engine repair 8279 Skyway Rd, Paradise (530) 990-5676

eye liFe insTiTuTe 5889 Clark Road, Paradise (530) 877-2020

1101 El Monte Avenue, Chico (530) 518-5155

hegenBarT sepTic TanK cleaning

paraDise genTle DenTisTry, BrenT e parroTT, DDs

PO Box 243, Magalia , Ca 95954 (530) 877-7261

2014 5th Avenue, Oroville (530) 877-2313

linTronics elecTrical

Tax soluTions

paraDise syMphony orchesTra

1803 Mangrove Ave., Suite D, Chico (530) 877-9014

(530) 518-3003 Paradise (530) 513-1507

SPonSoRed by

Check back next week for more businesses and organizations that have re-opened. Listings provided by Paradise Ridge Chamber of Commerce. paradisechamber.com 18  

CN&R 

A P RIL 1 1 , 2 0 1 9


EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS photo by nAte DAly

15 MINUTES

THE GOODS

olé, Chico!

Fried chicken and fare-thee-wells

Anna Isaacs fell in love with flamenco early, attending her first class at age 12. The Louisville, Ky., native was immediately hooked. Later, while attending college in Washington, she would ride the bus 90 minutes away to take classes from the closest teacher she could find. She also has studied at the National Institute of Flamenco in Albuquerque. Now a Chicoan, the 30-year-old launched Flamenco Chico last year, molding it in the likeness of the venerable New Mexico institution. While there is a small flamenco scene in town, Isaacs’ goal is to form a hub that will promote the art form with an online presence, organize events and public performances, and teach lessons at Downtown Dance (163 E. Third St.). Her Sunday classes are offered as part of eightweek sessions focusing on technical and artistic aspects of the dance. You can find more information about lessons, upcoming performances and opportunities to play guitar for the dancers at chicodancesflamenco.com.

Flamenco is an intense performing art. How do you encourage people who are interested, but perhaps a little intimidated? Flamenco isn’t one thing. Flamenco is the name given to the folk music, dance and singing of Andalusia, in southern Spain. There are many forms, or palos. In formal performance settings, you’re going to see the most intense palos. But in a family setting or just hanging out, there are other palos, where you jump in, do a little sassy thing and jump

meredithc@newsreview.com

Anyone who’s stepped foot inside Chicago’s Pizza With a Twist in the Safeway shopping center at West Sacramento and Nord avenues is in for a shock next time, as the already quirky pizza parlor has introduced yet another twist (the first: it’s a mashup of Indian and Italian cuisines). As of last Thursday evening (April 4), its front counter now features a large display of fried chicken. I happened to drive by the place on Friday as they were hanging a sign for Krispy Krunchy Chicken alongside the one advertizing pizza. I decided to stop in, as I’d been meaning to check out the place anyway. It’s, shall we say, eclectic. On one side of the L-shaped counter is fried chicken and several digital menu boards with various combos, sides and other offerings. On the other is pizzaby-the-slice and additional menu boards with the wide range of toppings (from tikka sauce to butter chicken), as well as pastas (curry chicken penne, chicken alfredo), calzones and samosas. It’s a little overwhelming, but the clerk—who was very friendly and attentive—informed me they hoped to increase business by increasing their offerings. Judging by the traffic the day I was there, which included several groups of afterschool kids, the plan was working. About half ordered chicken; the other half, pizza. I have yet to try the latter, but the former was good—similar to Popeye’s, a step above Safeway. (Krispy Krunchy’s headquarters are in Louisiana, as is Popeye’s). And it’s super affordable, to boot. I wish ’em luck.

How did you get started with Flamenco Chico? About a year and a half ago, I quit my full-time job, and started doing shows and teaching lessons. It’s a very community-driven thing. We have a few guitarists, we have a few dancers and we have a lot of dance students, from high-school-age to people in their 60s. Flamenco is very family-oriented. This month has been very busy. We had a touring artist [Savannah Fuentes] come, and I’m going to be at Red Tavern with the group that performs there regularly [April 11-12].

by

Meredith J. Cooper

Sweet FArewellS Entrepreneur Jesse Smith sent out a note to customers last

out. Or there’s sevillana, a party dance. So there are lots of styles wrapped up into one, from beginner to very serious, advanced levels. Flamenco comes from the gitano Roma people who originated in India, traveled into Europe and contributed to many Gypsy traditions. In Spain, that happened to be flamenco. It’s an art form that is about suffering and repression, but within that, there is a sense to find strength, beauty and joy.

How do you hope to promote flamenco in the community? We have the performance troupe and we have the beginner class happening. The next move is to formalize the guitarist community to have them coming in and playing for students, and helping to grow the improv aspect of performance. As we grow, we’ll probably also start separating classes into skill levels. Flamenco takes a lifetime to master because there are so many palos. It’s endless learning. —NaTe Daly

week informing us that, after seven years in the business, he’s closing Five by Five Tonics, a mostly wholesale outfit headquartered in Chico. I’d tasted some of his creations at local brewers’ events and they were unique and delicious—think flavored bitters and a killer tonic syrup. His online shop (fivebyfivetonics.com) will be up through the month of April, so go snag a final bottle or three. He also has a book in the works, in case you want to try your hand at starting your own likeminded business. Bitter Startup will be on shelves soon. Sadly, Hooker Oak Distillery, one of the first establishments in the so-called Booze District along South Park Avenue, also is closing. It sold its last bottles of locally made rum Saturday (April 6). The apple pie flavor was truly something different— and delicious! I’m sorry to see it go.

inSpirAtion This year’s Home and Garden Show—set for this weekend, April 13-14,

at the Silver Dollar Fairgrounds—promises cool new ideas, especially for those affected by the Camp Fire. There’ll be fire-safe supplies and a chance to meet builders who specialize in quick home rebuilds in fire-stricken areas. I’m particularly interested in checking out the tiny homes, which will be set up for walk-throughs, plus the specialty food hall. And, I look forward to perusing the Chico Horticultural Society’s always-impressive display—maybe this will be the year I finally start a garden! For more info (and $2 off admission), go to chicohomeshow.com.

April 11, 2019

CN&R

19


Play on, Butte County

Post-fire blues

CN&R’s annual look at our music community

T

he CN&R’s annual Local Music Issue is normally an opportunity to give a shout out to our wide and varied musical community, but in the wake of the Camp Fire, a big part of the scene is simply gone. This year, we are celebrating a couple of local groups that have captured our imaginations with their unique sounds—experimental hip-hop crew Pervert and “mom rock” fourpiece Susurrus. But we also catch up with one of Butte County’s favorite sons, Paradise bluesman Maurice “Big Mo” Huffman, who opens up about his life post-fire. It’ll be years before we see how the recovery plays out, and what will become of the area’s music scene. In the meantime, we support those who’ve lost everything—and encourge them to keep playing great songs.

CAMMIES Music Festival

A celebration of and benefit for musicians and others affected by the Camp Fire. Saturday, April 20, 7-10 p.m. (doors at 6 p.m., preshow at 6:30). See special CAMMIES pull-out section for details. Sierra Nevada Big Room 1075 E. 20th St. sierranevada.com

Vote for Best Local Act!

Visit newsreview.com/ cammies to vote for your favorite.

20

CN&R

APRIL 11, 2019

Big Mo and other local musicians grieve over a decimated scene

T

he dinosaur survived the fire. How’s that for irony? A large more than “just stuff.” metal sculpture of an extinct species was still standing at Maurice “Everybody says, ‘Oh, you got out with your life.’ And [that’s] really “Big Mo” Huffman’s Swiss Link military surplus business, while great,” Huffman said. “But people can’t forget that it was horrible, and it every other item marking the time the local bluesman has lived in Butte sucks, and it’s going to suck for a while. And it’s OK.” County was wiped out by the Camp Fire. Huffman already has gotten to work rebuilding (he Big Mo is probably the most recognizbought a home in Corning and has put his employees to able musician in the county, and he is one work stocking a temporary warehouse in Chico), but his of many in the local music scene who was grieving process is just beginning. Like a true bluesman, burned out on Nov. 8. he doesn’t shy away from addressing life’s heartbreaks Gone is the home Huffman shared with and tragedies, and his advice to fellow musicians and his wife, Robin, as well as his two busiothers dealing with the wildfire aftermath is to not stuff nesses—Mo Sound and all of its live-music the feelings down. sound equipment, and Swiss Link and the “It’s OK to tell people that it sucks,” he said. contents (save the dinosaur mascot and old jet fuel tank) of its 40,000-square-foot Huffman moved to America in 1989. Born and raised in warehouse filled with gear collected over 40 Germany, he left behind careers as a diving instructor years. He also lost three rental properties, and a professional musician to start a new chapter in his one of which his son, Miles, and daughterlife in the States with Robin. The plan was to tour the in-law, Huan, had just moved into; a studio country in a motorhome until the money ran out, saving and all master recordings of his music since one $5,000 cashier’s check to use as start-up money for 1979; and a rehearsal studio and every piece wherever the couple landed. of music equipment he owned. Thanks to a minor highway accident, Huffman “Who would have ever dreamt everyspent the last of his travel funds in Chico repairing the thing you ever did and ever owned, in vehicle’s busted septic tank. He dropped his wife at a one hour, is gone,” Huffman said during a local hotel, and as planned, went into a bank to cash the recent interview, “everything I ever built in check, which he’d forgotten in the motorhome, where it 30 years up there.” was chewed up by a dog they’d picked up during their Though he’s grateful for any efforts peotravels. ple have made to offer comfort, Huffman He pleaded his case with the bank manager, showing Maurice Huffman’s son, Miles, and the dinosaur mascot in says he doesn’t want to gloss over the pain him the scrap of check that remained and asking for a front of the family’s Swiss Link military surplus business of losing everything, because the collection pre-Camp Fire. line of credit to tide him over. But inexperience in speakof things that his life revolved around was ing American English, and an unfortunate use of the PHOTO COURTESY OF MAURICE HUFFMAN


Left: Maurice “Big Mo” Huffman sings his heart out with his Full Moon Band at a Camp Fire benefit concert at the Sierra Nevada Big Room. PHOTO BY KEN PORDES

word “transient” to describe himself, led to him being kicked out of the building and into a situation where the now-penniless couple were forced to bide time waiting in the motorhome, living off leftover canned goods. As they waited for a replacement check from Germany, Huffman talked his way into a sales job at the newly built Wittmeier Auto Center on Forest Avenue. And after the couple got on their feet and moved to Paradise, he decided to use his new sales skills in combination with his ties to Europe to start the military-surplus business. The steady income from the business was needed to supplement his musical endeavors, as he quickly discovered that playing in a band in Paradise was not the viable career option it was back in Germany. “I had to keep a 10-piece band going,” he said with a laugh. With that, his Full Moon Band and Swiss Link grew simultaneously. The band racked up fans and awards (including several Chico Area Music Awards for Best Blues Act), and as the internet and online ordering grew, Swiss Link expanded its client list all over the Big Mo is here: world. Big Mo & The Full Moon Band “I never lived perform in the Friday Night Concert series, May 3, anywhere this long,” 7-8:30 p.m., at the Chico the 59-year-old City Plaza. Huffman said of his three decades on the Online: bigmoblues.com Ridge. “Paradise is my home. My business, my future, everything was built there.”

And down in Butte Creek Canyon, Sally and Bruce MacMillan, owners of the Music Connection in Chico, lost their family’s home as well. Bruce is a longtime local guitarist and lifelong collector of vintage music gear, all of which is now gone. Despite the personal losses for the couple and their three children, they’ve kept the shop open. In the aftermath of the fire, the place has become a meeting place for musician refugees. “It’s just like this therapy group,” Sally said. To aid the therapy, the Music Connection has helped get instruments back into the hands of those who’ve lost theirs, with more than 1,000 donated items passing through their doors and to players—from pros to kids in band classes. Sally says that as horrible as the tragedy is, she finds hope in the fact that instruments are among the first things people seek to replace. “I’m encouraged to see how important people’s musical instruments are to them,” she said. “That’s what they needed—their music.” Huffman can relate. Though he has been able to purchase some replacement gear (thanks to the online fundraising efforts of a friend) and play a few shows, there’s at least one piece that is irreplaceable. “I wrote every song I’ve ever written and ever recorded on this one particular guitar—this 1960 Martin acoustic,” Huffman said. “That Martin had something living in it, because I would just touch it and write another song. “I haven’t written a song since [the fire]. I just can’t do it. I don’t know what’s going on. I never used to have to try.” —JASON CASSIDY j aso nc @new srev i ew. c o m

Huffman will be in Europe for the entire month

of April, playing a few gigs with old friends, but mostly driving 5,000 miles to meet with and reassure military-surplus suppliers. Staying busy may help keep some of the feelings of grief at bay, but things definitely will be in the “it sucks” stage for a while for him and the rest of a music scene that has been decimated by the fire. An assessment of musicians burned out by the Camp Fire reads like a who’s-who of the Butte County music scene, and each has a story. Singer/songwriter David Zink managed Paradise’s musical hub, the now-destroyed Norton Buffalo Hall, which he aims to rebuild with the help of that community. Saxophonist/ vocalist Jonathan Arthur, who fronted blues outfits Sapphire Soul and Karma Kings, has relocated to Utah. The four members of heavy metal crew Aberrance lost their home/practice studio/performance space, aka the “Fortress of Duditude,” and are now spread out all over Nor Cal. Wayne Charvel, founder of Charvel guitar company, and his son, Michael, lost their custom-guitar shop and homes. Both have relocated out of the area.

MORE

Gather round Help musicians affected by the Camp Fire KZFR community radio has partnered with the Music Connection, California Bluegrass Association and the “Chico open-mic scene” to help replace instruments destroyed in the Camp Fire. For more info and to donate, visit kzfr.org/ musicaroundthecampfire. As this special Local Music Issue recognizes some of the musicians who lost their equipment in the fire, the CN&R is dedicating this year’s CAMMIES Music Festival & Awards Show to them. Register for tickets at sierranevada.com and any amount you give will be donated to the fund. If you are a musician who lost an instrument to the wildfire, contact the Music Connection at themusicconnection@gmail.com or KZFR at gm@kzfr.org.

MUSIC C O N T I N U E D O N PA G E 2 2

Paradise band Aberrance in front of ruins of the “Fortress of Duditude,” the house/practice space the members shared before the Camp Fire. PHOTO BY JAKE HOLLINGSWORTH

APRIL 11, 2019

CN&R

21


All the flavors

Energetic experimental hip-hop crew Pervert leaves it all on the stage

T

he average musician wouldn’t introduce him or herself onstage by saying, “Hey, everybody! I’m a stupid moron with a big butt and my butt smells and I like to kiss my own butt.” But that’s how local rapper DMT did it during a performance at Cafe Coda back when his band, Pervert, was starting out about two years ago. And that’s just the tip of a very deep and strange iceberg, and a clue that this is not your average band. In fact, there is no band in Chico even remotely like Pervert, a five-piece that hits the stage hard with a mindmelting mixture of experimental noise, punk, metal and signature aggressive off-the-wall raps courtesy of DMT (real name Rami Rodriguez) and co-frontman Esquire Ali. “Me and this asshole go completely off the top of our heads,” DMT said of Ali in a recent interview. “We’re idiots when we get together, but I love his face and just want to keep talking to him.” During a group interview with the CN&R, all members of Pervert— rounded out by instrumentalists Sean Raeside (drums), Dorian Rohlfes (guitar), Trevor Whitney (bass)—took turns talking over each other, sidestepping serious questions and laughing hard at their own jokes. One member of the band claimed to be the actual Master P; another said that the band improvises all of its sets and plays “100 percent by feel”; there was a brief but agitated rant about Mötley Crüe as well as a suggestion for a double-blind taste test of butter and I Can’t Believe It’s Not Butter!— with no stated purpose. Playing it straight for a moment (or

maybe not?), Ali spelled out the band’s aesthetic: “We’re just some dudes who don’t like a lot of stuff everybody else does. Here’s the thing: Have you ever tried to cook? And have you tried to cook with five people? It just gets messed up. That’s pretty much what [Pervert] is—every soda at McDonald’s in one cup, every color mixed together. And for some reason people think that’s cool and, like, avant garde.” A mix of musicians from Chico and the Bay Area who met at Chico State, Pervert started as a hip-hop project that warped into something much broader. The band has one, self-titled, EP (with more recordings on the way), but the music is best consumed live. The band reaches hysterical peaks that are far more intense than typical angsty rock shows, and also dives into the subterranean depths of its members’ own minds. In place of popular song devices like verses and choruses, they plug in disorienting layers of vocal improvisations, free-form grooves, blasts of noise as harsh as metal on metal, and dissonant chords trailing off into the ether. The instrumental trio of Raeside, Rohlfes and Whitney—who had been playing together for years prior to forming Pervert—is alternatively abstract, straight-up groovy and bone-crushingly heavy. “These three boys have insanely good

Pervert is ...

Live on April 27, at 7 p.m., at Argus Bar + Patio (212 W. Second St.), with Steaksauce Mustache and Calvin Black as part of the Valley Fever festival. Online at lilpervymane.bandcamp.com

22

CN&R

APRIL 11, 2019

C

P R (l P

P th P

c “ s th te a d

f o

[ s o

d b o s th c f a p a e r

s p n a a


Susurrus is a musical escape for badass moms

Clockwise from top left:

Pervert (from left): Trevor Whitney, Esquire Ali, Sean Raeside, Dorian Rohlfes and Rami “DMT” Rodriguez lying down). HOTO BY CLEO TIU

Pervert in its sweaty element—Chico house shows at he Raw Haus (above) and the Chumbucket. HOTOS BY BRYAN HANNAH

chemistry as musicians,” DMT said. “They’ve just been playing together for so long, they’ve been friends for so long, here’s that deep bond. They’re all super echnical and extremely fucking talented, and they know how to play together. It’s dope.” DMT and Ali, meanwhile, somehow find head-nodding flows while rapping over the most abstract rhythms. “I’m the greatest emcee alive, and [DMT] is the greatest emcee alive,” Ali said. “You can throw a fucking quarter on the ground and I’ll rap to it.” Such a devilish concoction might be difficult to imagine as crowd-pleasing, but Pervert’s audiences drink deeply of the band’s all-flavor soda. There’s something for everybody in the cup, and he originality mixed with the band’s committed, sometimes unhinged, performance style has struck a chord with a wide range of local music fans—from punks and metalheads to hip-hoppers and indie-rockers. Even they can’t explain what kind of alchemy is occurring. “It just kind of comes out,” DMT said. “We use our live shows as, like, a platform for community and togetherness. That’s basically the point of it all—we’re here to support each other and have a good fucking time.” —HOWARD HARDEE

B

Susurrus (clockwise, from left): MaryRose Lovgren, Anna Adams, Linda Dunn and Becky Brown. PHOTO BY JASON CASSIDY

‘mom-rock’ sisterhood

and practice is sacred. This is especially true for a self-professed “mom rock” band. With four working mothers in the group, Susurrus’ rehearsals are a time for its members— vocalist/guitarist Becky Brown, keyboardist/ Chico group, Royal Crown. vocalist MaryRose Lovgren, bassist Anna Just last month, Susurrus released its first Adams and drummer Linda Dunn—to get a album, the six-song Let Your Sisters In. The break from their busy lives. sound isn’t easy to categorize; the music is Whenever the folk/punk/indie-rock fourboth catchy and fun, and dark and challengpiece gets together, the room is filled with ing, with evocative and intense vocals with laughter and in-depth conversation—about lyrics that touch on politics, feminism and anything and everything: relationships, relationships. politics, work—but their rehearsals are more For example, the album’s closing track, than just a supportive and fun gathering for “Sisters,” is an anthem for female solidarity: the women. The time together also offers an “Let your sisters in/You don’t have to tame opportunity for them to freely express themyour flash to do that/Answer when they call … selves and act on their creative impulses. Doesn’t mean you’re small if you’re scared to “For all of us, our main job in life is do that.” managing other people’s emotions—in our Though Brown is the band’s lyricist, families and our jobs,” Brown told the CN&R Susurrus’ music is created collaboratively. “If during a recent group interview. “What music carves out for me is this place to feel emotions you have an idea, no one takes it the wrong way,” Lovgren said. “It’s not a one-person that are not attached to anyone else’s. And I show.” And they have a lot of love for one can feel, like, philosophical, or I can feel, like, another, too. Brown said creating and performing horny, or enraged, or silly.” in an all-female ensemble, especially with these Since its debut show in December 2017, women, has been like nothing else she’s experiSusurrus has performed a handful of shows at enced. “There’s no drama, there’s no ego,” she local venues. In addition to their jobs (three said. “I just feel entirely free in this band.” of them are educators, while Dunn owns her Susurrus was formed, in part, as a way for own pest-control business), Adams lives in Brown to cope after the 2016 election. “I was Alameda and commutes for practice. so full of fear and rage,” she said. “I But despite the infrequent shows, needed to do something that was posithe band’s sound is polished, tive and creative and empowering.” which isn’t a surprise given the She reached out to fellow musifact that three of the members cians and friends she’d long were active in the local music looked up to—Lovgren, Adams scene back in the 1990s/early and initially drummer Shoko 2000s. Lovgren played organ Horikawa (of Chico disco-punks in the popular instrumental crew XDS)—to form a new band. Antfarm, Brown was in Red The sounD: Dunn came aboard later, after Bluff-based Pan Pan with Hear Susurrus’ just-released debut, Let Your Sisters In, at Horikawa stepped down. Dunn Adams and fronted her own soundcloud.com/susurrus.

has been taking lessons for seven years, and Susurrus is her first band. The group’s name is an obscure word that means “a whispering or rustling sound.” Lovgren became enamored with it after stumbling across it in a friend’s book. “We lure you in with the idea that it’s gentle music by all ladies,” she joked. “Watch out!” The “mom rock” label is tongue-in-cheek. But it also speaks to the fact that the mothers are trying to reach an audience they feel is under-represented in music. “To me, it’s not like we’re singing about changing diapers and stuff,” Adams said to laughter from her bandmates. They are combating the perception, she continued, that youthfulness has to be given up at a certain point. “It can still be really vital and generative to be creative in a fun way as you age.” Brown also frequently features feminist themes in her songs, and that is, in part, because she has daughters. In “Black Boots,” she sings: “All I wanted was more/Wanted to get off on the top floor/In an office downtown/ Without clutching my gown/Like some dime novel paramour.” “I want them to … approach the world with strength and confidence and be creative in it and be judged for what they can bring, rather than what they look like,” Brown said about her daughters. The band members expressed excitement at the fact that their music is stirring up the interest of younger generations, too. While the women do vent about the demands of motherhood, they also reflect on how supportive their families, and their children, have been. Dunn was thrilled to share that her girls have posted pictures online of her drumming, with captions like, “I have the coolest mom.” —ASHIAH SCHARAGA ash ia h s@ newsr ev iew.c o m

APRIL 11, 2019

CN&R

23


Arts &Culture The museum aglow during Cirque du MONCA. Below: Chikoko stiltwalkers Nel Adams (left) and Sara Rose Bonetti.

11

THU

MONCA shines with two new exhibits and circus-themed gala

M were treated to a fantastical sight: the massive Veterans Memorial Hall—home of MONCA, the Museum of Northern otorists on The Esplanade last Saturday night (April 6)

California Art—awash from top to bottom in bright red, yellow and orange. story and The spectacular visual treatment was the photos by Robert Speer literal highlight of MONCA’s 2019 fundraising gala, held that evening in the museum. rober tspee r@ The event was attended by nearly 150 people, newsrev i ew.c om who spilled out into a big tent set up for a bufReview: fet dinner. Inside the museum, there was a variety of Trapeze Acrobats and Tend, now showing entertainment over the course of the evening. through May 25. Collectively, they composed a kind of Gypsy Museum hours: circus, the “Cirque du MONCA,” as it was Thursday-Sunday, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. called. There was some wildly beautiful solo Admission: $5 dancing by Mylee Francisco, tarot readings by Kozmic Kev, a photo booth, a couple of Museum of Chikoko stiltwalkers standing very tall amid Northern California Art the crowd, and, following dinner, music by the 900 Esplanade terrific Jeff Pershing Band 487-7272 that got people dancing. monca.org Nobody throws a party better than the folks at MONCA, led by their imaginative and tireless board president, Pat Macias, and powered by her army of volunteers. This one was all the more remarkable for having come on the heels of two new exhibits whose opening reception had been held just two days prior (Thursday, April 4). An equally large number of people—again, nearly 150—showed up for that event. The two exhibits can’t be less alike. Let’s start with Sacramento artist Clay Vorhes’ Trapeze Acrobats, in the Phillips Gallery. It’s a carefully constructed series of about two dozen oil-on-canvas paintings that feature 24

CN&R

APRIL 11, 2019

THIS WEEK Special Events BANFF FILM FESTIVAL WORLD TOUR: Adventure Outings and Chico Performances present two evenings of film devoted to outdoor adventures featuring extreme athleticism and nature at its most beautiful. Thu, 4/11, 7:30pm. $10. Laxson Auditorium, Chico State. 898-6333. chicoperformances.com

small images of trapeze artists—or, in at least one case, trapeze dogs—suspended precariously on lines that cross the paintings’ planes in multiple directions, forming colorful geometric shapes. My friend Alan Carrier, who’s a local sculptor, art teacher and gentleman farmer, told me he saw the influence of another Sacramento-based painter, Wayne Thiebaud, in Vorhes’ work, and I had to agree. This is especially true with regard to Thiebaud’s colorful and geometrically designed aerial views of Sacramento Valley landscapes. Individually, Vorhes’ paintings are intriguing and entertaining, and I would have taken one home had the price ($22,500 in most cases) not been a bit out of my range. Exhibited as a group, however, they suffer from a certain sameness and—to this viewer, at least—become duplicative after a while. Not so with Tend, the other exhibit that opened on April 4 (it occupies both the Headley and Ginochio galleries). The work of four members of the terrifically creative local costuming group Chikoko—Muir Hughes, Nel Adams, Sara Rose Bonetti and Christy Seashore—it’s a collection of fabrications using repurposed glass, sticks (some of them burnt, in a nod to the fire gods), found objects and, yes, fabric to create fantastical figures. Many of those figures are suggestive of nests, others of baskets, flowers, birds and insects—and of home. They all have a rich organic quality, as if they are growing right out of the walls on which they are mounted. There is nothing “artsy” about these pieces; they seem instead simply to be the creations of four women who love to make fun figures using materials at hand. They have a delightfully playful quality to them. That’s why Tend is more successful than the more sophisticated Trapeze Acrobats. The sheer variety of its pieces—some large, some small, some sturdy, others delicate—makes each of them a fresh experience. Ω

SPANISH NIGHTS: Spanish tapas, paella and the art of flamenco. Thu, 4/11, 6pm. Red Tavern, 1250 Esplanade. redtavern.com

THURSDAY NIGHT MARKET: Local produce, fresh flowers, music, arts and crafts, and food trucks. Will continue every Thursday through September. Thu, 4/11, 6pm. Downtown Chico. 345-6500. downtownchico.com

Theater THE BOOK CLUB PLAY: A comedic play that explores life, love, literature and reading between the lines. Thu, 4/11, 7:30pm. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Road, Paradise. totr.org

HIGH SCHOOL MUSICAL 2: Family-friendly musical production with a live band. Thu, 4/11, 7pm. $12-$15. Pleasant Valley High School, 1475 East Ave. pvhs.chicousd.org

NUNSENSE: Chico Theater Company brings back this zany musical about the misadventures of five nuns putting on a talent show in a high school gym. Thu, 4/11, 7:30pm. $16-$22. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. chicotheater company.com

OLLI PLAY FESTIVAL – APRIL FOOLS AND FOLLIES: Four comic plays written, acted and directed by members of Chico State’s Osher Lifelong Learning Institute. Thu, 4/11, 7:30pm. $10. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. 895-3749. blueroomtheatre.com

BANFF FILM FESTIVAL Thursday-Friday, April 11-12 Laxson Auditorium

SEE THURSDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS


FINE ARTS ON NEXT PAGE

CHICO BREWFEST & WINE EVENT Saturday, April 13 Manzanita Place

SEE SATURDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS

13

SAT

Special Events ANNUAL CHILDREN’S FAIRE: Hosted by Valley Oak Children’s Services with music, face painting, entertainment, dancing and more. Sat 4/13, 10am. City Plaza, downtown Chico. valleyoakchildren.org

AUTISM AWARENESS FAIR AND CHILDREN’S CARNIVAL: Hosted by the Little Red Hen, activ-

12

FRI

Special Events BANFF FILM FESTIVAL WORLD TOUR: See Thursday. Fri, 4/12, 7:30pm. $10. Laxson Auditorium, Chico State. 898-6333. chicoperformances.com

CHICO COMEDY FESTIVAL – OPENING NIGHT: The twonight comedy festival kicks off at the Big Room with Kellen Erskine, featured on both Jimmy Kimmel and Conan O’Brien’s shows; and Amy Miller, a regular at SF’s Punch Line. A handful of North State stand-ups open. Fri, 4/12, 8pm. $25. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St. sierranevada.com

HIGH NOON: The Gary Cooper/Grace Kelly masterpiece about a small-town former marshal who faces down a bad guy set on revenge. Part of the theater’s classic film series. Ticket includes popcorn, water and a badge. Fri, 4/12, 7pm. $15. Oroville State Theatre, 1489 Myers St., Oroville. oroville statetheatre.com

QUEER AND TRANS CONFERENCE: Keynote speakers, workshops and a panel dedicated to celebrating the diverse identities and experiences of trans and queer individuals. Featuring queer undocumented immigrant, poet and activist Yosimir Reyes. For more info visit the GSEC office located in MLIB 171, call 898-5724 or email gsec.inclusivity@ csuchico.edu. Fri, 4/12, 12pm. BMU Auditorium, Chico State.

SPRING BLOWOUT PLANT SALE: Butte College’s Environmental Horticulture Nursery presents its annual plant sale with major discounts. Student-grown annuals, perennials, houseplants, shrubs and veggies

SPRINGTIME IS SWINGTIME Saturday, April 14 Harlen Adams Theatre SEE SATURDAY, MUSIC

available. Fri, 4/12, 9am. Butte College Environmental Horticulture Nursery, 3536 Butte Campus Drive, Oroville. 895-2515.

TRAXXAS MONSTER TRUCK TOUR: Witness 10,000pound car-crushing giants compete in racing and wheelie contests. Fri, 4/12, 7:30pm. $10-$20. Silver Dollar Speedway. silverdollarspeedway.com

VOLUNTEER FRIDAYS: Join in the clean-up of various spots throughout the park by picking up litter and pulling weeds. For more info call Shane at 896-7831. Fri, 4/12, 9am. Bidwell Park.

Music CLAUDE BOURBON: Classically trained guitarmaster plays Latin-influenced gypsy jazz and delta blues. Fri, 4/12, 7pm. $20. Chico Guild Hall (aka Norton Buffalo Hall West), 2775 Nord Ave., 762-1490. nortonbuffalohall.com

REESE WEIL: Soulful sounds for end-of-the-week happy hour. Fri, 4/12, 4pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St. lasalleschico.com

Theater THE BOOK CLUB PLAY: See Thursday. Fri, 4/12, 7:30pm. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Road, Paradise. totr.org

HIGH SCHOOL MUSICAL 2: See Thursday. Fri, 4/12, 7pm. $12-$15. Pleasant Valley High School, 1475 East Ave. pvhs.chicousd.org

NUNSENSE: See Thursday. Fri, 4/12, 7:30pm. $16$22. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. chicotheatercompany.com

OLLI PLAY FESTIVAL – APRIL FOOLS AND FOLLIES: See Thursday. Fri, 4/12, 7:30pm. $10. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. 895-3749. blueroomtheatre.com

ities will include a bounce house, sensory activities and games. All proceeds to benefit programs serving children with autism. Sat 4/13, 10am. Sycamore Field, Lower Bidwell Park.

CHICO BREWFEST & WINE: More than 40 beers on tap along with wine from the area and food provided by local restaurants. Proceeds will benefit local charities. Sat 4/13, 1pm. $60$85. Manzanita Place, 1705 Manzanita Ave. 570-2385. chicobrewfest.com

CHICO COMEDY FESTIVAL – DAY TWO PRE-SHOW: First stop of the comedy marathon is a free early evening show featuring 10-plus comics. Sat, 4/13, 6pm. City Plaza, downtown Chico.

CHICO COMEDY FESTIVAL – DAY TWO MARATHON: Hop around between four different venues—The Maltese, Duffy’s Tavern, LaRocca Tasting Room and Tender Loving Coffee—and try and catch all 35 visiting and local comics. Find “Chico Comedy Festival” on Facebook for more info. Covers range from free to $10. Sat, 4/13, 7:30-10:30pm. Multiple venues.

CHICO COMEDY FESTIVAL – DAY TWO LATE SHOW: Three comedians riff live as the most terrible of cult classics, Plan 9 From Outer Space, plays on the screen. Featuring Helen Erskine, Amy Miller and Anthony K. Sat, 4/13, 10:30pm. $7. Pageant Theatre, 351 E. Sixth St.

CHICO HOME AND GARDEN SHOW: Celebrate spring with all things home and garden. Sat 4/13, 10am. $6-$7. Silver Dollar Fair Grounds.

QUEER AND TRANS CONFERENCE: See Friday. Sat 4/13, 12pm. BMU Auditorium. SPRING BLOWOUT PLANT SALE: See Friday. Sat 4/13, 9am. Butte College Main Campus Environmental Horticulture Nursery, 3536 Butte Campus Drive, Oroville. 895-2515.

SPRING WILDFLOWER HIKE: Hike through the Big Chico Creek Ecological Reserve to identify flowers and learn their natural history. For more information or to reserve a spot email jaull@csuchico.edu. Sat 4/13, 9am. $5. Big Chico Creek Ecological Reserve, Forest Ranch. 898-5010. csuchico.edu

STORYTAIL TUTORS: Reluctant, struggling, and beginning readers can read to a therapy dog. For children of all ages. Sat 4/13, 2pm. Chico Branch Library, 1108 Sherman Ave. buttecounty.net

TRAXXAS MONSTER TRUCK TOUR: See Friday. Sat, 4/13, 7:30pm. $10-$20. Silver Dollar Speedway. silverdollarspeedway.com

Music FAIR OAKS YOUTH CHOIR: Free performance by local choir of more than 50 high school and college-aged singers. Sat, 4/13, 7pm. Youth With A Mission Chico, 15850 Richardson Springs Road.

HOUSE CATS: Jazzy for brunch. Sat, 4/13, 11am. La Salles, 229 Broadway St. lasalleschico.com

SPRINGTIME IS SWINGTIME: Chico State’s Jazz X-Press presents a night of swing with guest artists Greg Gisbert on trumpet and Paul Romaine on drums. Sat, 4/13, 7:30pm. $6-$18. Harlen Adams Theatre, Chico State, PAC 144, 898-5152. csuchico.edu/soa

Theater THE BOOK CLUB PLAY: See Thursday. Sat, 4/13, 7:30pm. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Road, Paradise. totr.org

NUNSENSE: See Thursday. Sat, 4/13, 7:30pm. $16$22. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. chicotheatercompany.com

OLLI PLAY FESTIVAL – APRIL FOOLS AND FOLLIES: See Thursday. Fri, 4/12, 7:30pm. $10. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. 895-3749. blueroomtheatre.com

14

SUN

Special Events BMX CRUISER RIDE: Bike ride hosted by Paradise bikes. Meet at the pool, roll out at noon. Sun, 4/14, 11am. Sycamore Pool, Lower Bidwell Park.

CHICO HOME AND GARDEN SHOW: See Saturday. Sun, 4/14, 10am. $6-$7. Silver Dollar Fair Grounds. chicohomeshow.com

GREEN BOOK: Free screening of the Academy Award-winning movie. Sun, 4/14, 2pm. Chico Branch Library, 1108 Sherman Ave.

JOE MURPHY BOOK RECEPTION: Celebrate the release of Murphy’s debut novel, Elegy of the Shade, with a free reception in the back bar. Ken the Revelator provides the music. Sun, 4/14, 7pm. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St.

REDESIGN PARADISE PUBLIC FORUM: A gathering of organizations, individuals and agencies dedicated to emergency preparedness working together to rebuild Paradise. Speakers, live music and a potluck. Sun, 4/14, 3pm. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St.

THIS WEEK CONTINUED ON PAGE 26

chicohomeshow.com

CHICO WALKS FOR AUTISM 2019: The Yellow Door hosts annual 3-mile walk through Bidwell Park with a carnival and barbecue. Proceeds to benefit individuals with autism and their families. Visit website for more info. Sat 4/13, 8:30am. One Mile Recreational Area, Lower Bidwell Park. yellowdoorchico.com

EDITOR’S PICK

CONTRA DANCE: Traditional folk dancing with a live caller. Newcomers are welcome. Sat 4/13. $5-$10. Chico Guild Hall, 2775 Nord Ave. HILARITY FOR CHARITY: Soroptimist fundraiser featuring SF comedian Sandra Risser. Proceeds go to Camp Fire Alzheimer’s survivors and research to end the disease. Sat 4/13, 6pm. $10. Pleasant Valley High School, 1475 East Ave. 514-3352. soroptimistchico.org

NEVERLAND BALL: Live music by Decades with dinner, drinks and silent auction. Fundraiser for the Inspire Foundation. Sat 4/13, 5pm. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St. sierranevada.com

NORCON HACKER CONVENTION: One-day event for security professionals, hobbyists, and

FREE LISTINGS! Greg Gisbert

anyone interested in security. Will feature lectures and interactive training aimed at varying skill levels. Sat 4/13, 9am. $10. Idea Fab Labs Chico, 603 Orange St. 693-0864. norcon.io

Post your event for free online at www. newsreview.com/calendar, or email the CN&R calendar editor at cnrcalendar@newsreview.com. Deadline for print listings is Wednesday, 5 p.m., one week prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

THE COMEDIANS ARE COMING Roughly 60 comedians will descend upon Chico to perform at multiple venues around town for the fifth annual Chico Comedy Festival on Friday and Saturday (April 12-13). It all begins with an opening-night show at the Sierra Nevada Big Room hosted by Chico ex-pat and comic impresario, DNA. On Saturday, things kick off at the City Plaza with a free show at 6 p.m. and then continue on to a marathon of simultaneous shows at Duffy’s Tavern, The Maltese, Tender Loving Coffee and LaRocca Tasting Room, followed by comedians riffing over cult classic Plan 9 From Outer Space at the Pageant Theatre. Both local and visiting comedians get in on the act, including Keller Erskine (America’s Got Talent), Last Comic Standing contestant Amy Miller, and Bay Area favorites Feel Woods and Emma Haney. APRIL 11, 2019

CN&R

25


THIS WEEK COnTinuEd frOm pAgE 25

FINE ARTS

SENSORY FRIENDLY BUNNY PHOTO EVENT: People  within every spectrum of special needs and  their families are invited to a private photo  session with the Easter Bunny. Visit website  to reserve a spot.  Sun, 4/14, 9am. Chico Mall,  1950 E. 20th St. ChicoMall.com 

WILDFLOWER SHOW AND NATIVE PLANT SALE: Native  plants suitable for the garden will be available for sale, as well as books, t-shirts, and  posters.  Sun, 4/14, 12pm. CARD Community  Center, 545 Vallombrosa. chicorec.com 

Music HOT POTATO TRIO: European gypsy jazz and  songs from 1930s dance clubs, silly musicals  and cartoons.  Sun, 4/14, 11am. Tender Loving  Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St. 487-2636.

MOZART REQUIEM: Palm Sunday matinee with  North Valley Chamber Chorale. Pre-concert  lecture for ticket holders at 1pm.  Sun, 4/14, 2pm. $10-$30. Laxson Auditorium, Chico  State. 898-6333. csuchico.edu/soa

cn&r is Looking for

SUNDAY IRIS: Local indie/acoustic folk duo  playing originals and covers.  Sun, 4/14, 3pm. Secret Trail Brewing Company, 132  Meyers St., Ste. 120.

Theater THE BOOK CLUB PLAY: See Thursday.  Sun, 4/14, 2pm. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Road,  Paradise. totr.org 

NUNSENSE: See Thursday.  Sun, 4/14, 2pm. $16-

• advertising consuLtant • staff writer

$22. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Rd.,  Ste. F. chicotheatercompany.com 

OLLI PLAY FESTIVAL – APRIL FOOLS AND FOLLIES:   See Thursday.  Fri, 4/12, 2pm. $10. Blue Room  Theatre, 139 W. First St. 895-3749.   blueroomtheatre.com 

15

mOn

Special Events JAPAN IN WINTER – CRANES AND EAGLES: Altacal 

Do you love Chico? Do you want to help local businesses succeed? So do we! The Chico News & Review is a family owned business that has been part of the Chico community since 1977. Our mission is to publish great newspapers which are successful and enduring, create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow while respecting personal welfare, and to have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. If you want to make a difference and do something that matters then keep reading.

Audubon presents experienced local birder  John “JT” Lewis who will share his travels  through Japan studying exotic birds.  Mon, 4/15, 6:30pm. Free. Chico Creek Nature Center,  1968 E. Eighth St. 519-4724. chicorec.com 

17

WEd

Special Events BEYOND THESE WALLS RETHINKING CRIME AND PUNISHMENT IN THE UNITED STATES: Q & A  with author Tony Platt who will discuss  his book about America’s criminal justice  system.  Wed, 4/17, 6:30pm. Blackbird, 1431  Park Ave.

MUSEUM WITHOUT WALLS: This installment of  the lecture series features a presentation  on the lives and habits of cute little pikas  with Katie Andrea Solari of the Program  for Conservation Genomics at Stanford  University.  Wed, 4/17, 7pm. Gateway Science  Museum, 625 Esplanade.

WAKING UP TO WILDFIRES: Free screening of 

for more information, visit www.newsreview.com/chico/jobs

equal OppORTuNITy emplOyeR

26

CN&R

April 11, 2019

TrApEZE ACrOBATS

documentary that follows the story of those  affected by the 2017 North Bay wildfires.  There will also be a Q&A with the filmmaker,  scientists, firefighters and others helping  survivors recover from California wildfires.  Doors at 5:30pm.  Wed, 4/17, 5:30pm. El Rey  Theater, 230 W. Second St. elreychico.com

fOr mOrE MUSIC, SEE NIGHTLIFE On pAgE 30

Art

Shows through May 25 Museum Of Northern California Art SEE ArT

1078 GALLERY: Peter Jodaitis – The Color of  Water  If There Were No Sky, showcase of  a life’s work, featuring watercolor and  drawing. Through 4/21. 1710 Park Ave.  1078gallery.org

BMU 3RD FLOOR GALLERY: Art Education  Show, juried  group exhibition. Award  ceremony Thursday, May 2, 5pm, in the  Rowland-Taylor Recital Hall followed by a  reception at 7pm at the gallery. Through  5/7. 400 W. First St.

BLACKBIRD: Now showing, works by Maya 

PROVISIONS GALLERY: First Group Art Show,  artwork from more than nine artists  at Chico’s newest white wall art gallery located in the back of Upper Park  Clothing. Through 5/9. 122 W. Third St.  provisionsgallery.com

VALENE L. SMITH MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY: Altar States Spirit Worlds  and Transformational Experiences – The  Works of Peter Treagan, interactive tech  art. Through 5/17. Chico State.

Ellis. Through 4/30. 1431 Park Ave. 

CHICO ART CENTER: Creative Fusion, a presentation of student artwork selected and  prepared by Chico Art teachers. Through  4/26. 450 Orange St. chicoartcenter.com

ENLOE CANCER CENTER: Beth Bjorklund, oil  paintings in Healing Art Gallery by  Northern California artist. The Enloe  Cancer Center, Healing Art Gallery  features artists whose lives have been  touched by cancer. Through 4/19. 265  Cohasset Road, 332-3856.

JANET TURNER PRINT MUSEUM: Regional  Collective, a juried exhibition featuring works by the California Society of  Printmakers. Through 4/13. Chico State,  400 W. First St. theturner.org

MAIN EVENT GALLERY: Views of the West, gallery member artists and photographers  depict ranch life, cowboys, round-ups,  animals and the scenic beauty that surrounds the North State. Featured works  by Suzanne Bears, Karen Roy-Crockett,  Debbie Carlisi and Clare Jones-Carbonell.  Through 5/4. 710 S Main St., Red Bluff.,  391-3259.

MUSEUM OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA ART: Tend, an  exploratory multimedia exhibit from the  Chikoko collective that utilizes found,  broken, burnt and re-purposed items  with a focus on textiles to examine the  meaning of home. Also: Trapeze Acrobats,  featuring paintings of acrobats, divers,  gymnasts and dancers by Clay Vorhes.  Closing event Saturday, May 25, 6-8pm.  Through 5/25. 900 Esplanade. monca.org

ORLAND ART CENTER: Witty and Wild and  Whimsical, featuring the works of Gary  Baugh, Marilynn Jennings, and Paula  Busch. Through 5/25. 732 Fourth St.,  Orland. orlandartcenter.com

Museums BOLT’S ANTIQUE TOOL MUSEUM: Unique museum  has over 12,000 hand tools on display,  charting cataloging the evolution and  history of tools. Closed Sundays. Through  6/15. $3. 1650 Broderick St., Oroville.

CHICO CHILDREN’S MUSEUM: Tons of cool stuff  for kids to explore including a miniature  city, complete with a junior vet clinic,  dentist, cafe and farmer›s market, a giant  fish tank, multi-sensory room, imagination playground and much more. Check  the website for hours and admission  information. Through 8/3. $7-$9. 325 Main  St. chicochildrensmuseum.org

CHICO CREEK NATURE CENTER: Living Animal  Museum & Nature Play Room, learn all  about local critters, plants and wildlife.  Through 5/25. $2-$4. 1968 E. Eighth St.  chicorec.com

GATEWAY SCIENCE MUSEUM: From Here to  There, explore the science of how things  move by land, sea and air. Also on display  are The Foothills and America’s Wolves:  From Tragedy to Inspiration. Through  5/12. $5-$7. 625 Esplanade. csuchico.edu

PATRICK RANCH MUSEUM: Working farm and  museum with rotating exhibits open  every Saturday and Sunday from 11am  to 3pm. Through 5/26. 10381 Midway,  Durham. patrickranchmuseum.org

VALENE L. SMITH MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY: Remarkable Lives, exploring the intertwined worlds of birds and  humans, in partnership with the Altacal  Audubon Society and Snow Goose Festival.  Exhibits include bird songs and behaviors,  local photography and a robotic recreation of the late Jurassic Archaeopteryx.  Through 7/31. 400 W. First St.


APRIL 11, 2019

CN&R

27


r o f s u n i o j

r u o h y p p ha m p 0 0 : 6 0 3 : 4 y a d y r eve

13

13 16

15

17

345 West Fifth Street 16 Chico, CA 17 95928 (530) 891–6328

18 15

18

Please call for reservations Open Fridays for Lunch 11:30am – 2:30pm Join us for Happy Hour Every Day 4:30–6pm 28  

CN&R 

A P RIL 1 1 , 20 1 9


SCENE

Blue Room Young Company in The Secret Garden.

Theater in bloom

PHOTO BY JOE HILSEE

TELEKINESIS W / SONTALK LIVE AT

THE BIG ROOM

WEDNESDAy, MAy 1, 2019 SIERRA NEVADA BREWING CO.

1075 E. 20TH ST., CHICO. TICKETS ON SALE NOW! $13 AVAILABLE IN THE GIFT SHOP OR ONLINE AT WWW.SIERRANEVADA.COM/BIGROOM

Young cast delivers beautiful rendition of The Secret Garden

Tthisproduction of The Secret Garden past weekend was a perfect he Blue Room Young Company’s

fit for spring. Last Friday (April 5), the young actors—under by the direction of Carey Julia Rauter on Wilson a minimalist but beautifully painted Review: set by Amber Blue Room Young Miller—brought Company’s the story’s varied The Secret Garden cast of characters Friday, April 5 Blue Room Theatre and its seasonal theme of rejuvenation and rebirth to charming life. Based on Frances Hodgson Burnett’s 1911 novel, this stage version was adapted for young audiences by Pamela Sterling in 1991. The Secret Garden tells the complex story of the life of spoiled orphan Mary Lennox, and her transformational time among the titular garden on the property of her wealthy widower uncle Archibald Craven’s manor in northern England. Filled with melodrama and allegory, it’s an uplifting tale of personal and spiritual discovery. When introduced, Mary (played by Chloe Starkey) is under the tyrannical rule of the manor’s chief housekeeper, Mrs. Medlock (Lola

Parks), a woman obsessed with orderliness and discipline, entirely unsuited to the care of young children. Soon Mary meets the antithesis of Mrs. Medlock, the servant girl Martha (Sophia Fadale). Despite Mary’s initial imperious rudeness, Martha treats her with compassion and genuine friendliness, and encourages her to explore the manor’s vast gardens, and she soon enough finds her way into the late Mrs. Craven’s private refuge. Given that the book has nearly limitless settings in the vast landscape of the Yorkshire moors— acres of formal gardens and the huge interior of the manor house— one might be forgiven for thinking this story would be impossible to convey on a black box theater stage, especially one as cozy as that in the Blue Room. But theater is about the people within the setting, and the emotions within those people, and in this production the young actors succeeded admirably. The wonders of the imagined garden are beautifully conveyed by a combination of Joe Hilsee’s sound design and musical choices, and Eva Hilsee’s skillful manipulation of lighting effects. The casting choices may have been limited by the number of kids auditioning, but I found it interesting that two of the most prominent

male roles went to female actors, without the script being altered to suit the gender of the character being played. The heartbroken head of the manor Archibald Craven was played by Phoebe Parks. And Dickon, a sort of nature mystic, is played by Lila Chavira. Along with his sister, Martha, Dickon guides Mary out of her isolation and alienation by demonstrating that compassion and friendliness are attainable and worthwhile qualities achieved through humility, patience, attentiveness and hard work. As Mary discovers and cultivates her own sense of connection to others, she and Dickon endeavor to pull her isolated and frightened cousin, Cravin’s neglected son Colin (an excellent Ronin Heal), from his confinement in bed and into his mother’s secret garden. With its exploration of the sources of human sorrow, alienation, family dysfunction, class divisions and the healing power that comes from working harmoniously with natural forces, The Secret Garden is a story well-suited to any time and place. As this production worked slowly toward its predictable and welcome happy ending, the Blue Room proved that a vast and multifaceted story can be cultivated and blossom even on a tiny stage. Ω

SierraNevadaBeer

@SierraNevada

APRIL 11, 2019

@SierraNevadaChico

CN&R

29


NIGHTLIFE

THURSDAY 04/11—WEDNESDAY 04/17

CLAUDE BOURBON

BILL PARNELL: Groovy acoustic tunes

Friday, April 12 Norton Buffalo Hall West

and beer. Fri, 4/12, 7pm. The Commons Social Empourium, 2412 Park Ave.

SEE FRIDAY

11THURSDAY

Lavish and Luxx celebrate the release of their new EP with a live performance. Fri, 4/12, 8pm. The Spirit, 2360 Oro Quincy Highway, Oroville.

KCSC RADIO DJ NIGHT: Boogie in the

basement of the BMU to a curated bill of student DJs. Free with Wildcat ID. Thu, 4/11, 5pm. BMU Auditorium, Chico State.

PAT HULL CD-RELEASE PARTY: Celebrate the release of Hull’s newest LP. Sera. M. Lockwood Porter from SF opens and Outpatient Records will DJ after. Thu, 4/11, 8pm. $7-$10. Argus Bar + Patio, 212 W. Second St.

SOUL POSSE: Happy hour tunes with local five-piece band playing hits from the 1950s to present day. Thu, 4/11, 6pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St. lasalleschico.com

THE SWETTET: North State jazz

PUB SCOUTS: Traditional Irish music for happy hour. Fri, 4/12, 4pm. $1. Duffy›s Tavern, 337 Main St.

RADIO RELAPSE: Alt-rock cover band plays 1990s hits and is joined by funk/reggae band Manimals and blues rockers Barrel Aged. Fri, 4/12, 8pm. $7. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave. maltesebarchico.com

CLAUDE BOURBON: Classically trained quartet featuring some of the most prolific and talented players and improvisers in the area. Thu, 4/11, 6pm. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth Street., 433-0414.

THUMPIN’ THURSDAY ROCK ’N’ BLUES JAM: Hosted by the Loco-Motive Band plus special guests. All musicians and music enthusiasts welcome. Thu, 4/11, 7pm. Studio Inn Lounge, 2582 Esplanade, (408) 449-2179.

12FRIDAY

ALEX VINCENT: Chill tunes with guitar and vocals. Fri, 4/12, 7pm. The Exchange, 1975 Montgomery St.,

guitar master plays Latin-influenced

gypsy jazz and delta blues. Fri, 4/12, 7pm. $20. Chico Guild Hall (aka

Norton Buffalo Hall West), 2775 Nord Ave., 762-1490. nortonbuffalohall.com

STRAIT COUNTRY: Tribute band showcases George Strait’s style of western swing and honky-tonk. Fri,

HERD ON THIRD: Local band playing

4/12, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls

songs from the ’60s, ’70s and ’80s with a blues and jazz bent. Fri, 4/12, 6pm. Almendra Winery & Distillery, 9275 Midway Road, Durham. almen drawinery.com

JOHN SEID, LARRY PETERSON AND BOB LITTELL: Smooth tunes by local veteran musicians with Barbara Lamb as special guest. Fri, 4/12, 6:30pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St.

MOONSHINE BANDITS: Popular country-

Like a cool breeze wafting across the sands of the Sahara, Tuareg guitar rock star Mdou Moctar’s appearance in Chico is a rare one. The fact that this will be his second show here in the past year makes missing this one inexcusable. Moctar has amplified traditional Tuareg sounds into a sear-yourears-off psychedelic experience. Clear your Wednesday (April 17) evening schedule for his show with guitarist/composer Marisa Anderson at the Argus Bar + Patio.

NML EP-RELEASE PARTY: Oroville MCs

CHICO COMEDY FESTIVAL – OPENING NIGHT: The two-night comedy festival kicks off at the Big Room with Kellen Erskine, featured on both Jimmy Kimmel and Conan O’Brien’s shows; and Amy Miller, a regular at SF’s Punch Line. A handful of North State stand-ups open. Fri, 4/12, 8pm. $25. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St. sierranevada.com

DESERT SOUNDS

Tour. Northern Traditionz open. Fri, 4/12, 9pm. $20-$25. 379 E. Park Ave. tackleboxchico.com

Oroville. theexchangeoroville.com

Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfallscasino.com

Mdou Moctar

13SATURDAY

late-night happy hour. Sat, 4/13, 10pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

CHICO COMEDY FESTIVAL – DAY TWO MARATHON: Hop among four differ-

lasalleschico.com

ent venues—The Maltese, Duffy’s Tavern, LaRocca Tasting Room and Tender Loving Coffee—and try to catch all 35 visiting and local comics. Find “Chico Comedy Festival” on Facebook for more info. Covers range from free to $10. Sat, 4/13, 7:30-10:30pm. Multiple venues.

3PINTS DOWN: Country, rock and

CHICO COMEDY FESTIVAL – DAY TWO PRE-SHOW: The first stop of the

gospel sing-a-long tunes from local trio. Sat, 4/13, 7pm. The Commons Social Empourium, 2412 Park Ave.

comedy marathon is a free early evening show featuring 10-plus comics. Sat, 4/13, 6pm. City Plaza, downtown Chico.

ABANDON THEORY: NorCal band plays

rap duo stops by on its Gold Rush

rock, reggae, folk and funk for

50% off

20

! y e n o m u o y s e v a s

G LOVIN TENDEERE COFF T. OM TH S EE.C 365 E 6 GCOFF LOVIN TENDER

$

abide by required to California iew is re with News & Revin accordance wi rs, but offers lishing dba munity Pub ates do not expire other discounts andcredit. n, Chico Com certific d with gigiven as store ia corporatio may be use ulations. Gift As a California Civil Codes and reg .6. This certificate from purchase will be all Californ Sections 1749.45-1749 change remaining Civil Code used for gratuity. Any cannot be

35%

Tender Loving Coffee $20 Value...You pay $10!

off

Pita Pit $10 Value...You pay $6.50!

10

$

15th Street Cafe $10 Value...You pay $5!

240 Bro Pita Pit adway St | 53 0.899.2 847

As regulations. a California corporatio n, Chico Com Gift certificates munity with other disc do ounts and offenot expire in accordancPublishing dba News & e with Review rs, but cannot be used for California Civil Code Sec is required to abide by all Ca gratuity. Any tion Calilifor fornniaia Civil Cod change rem s 1749.45-1749.6. This es and aining from cer c tific purchase will w be given ate may be used as store cre dit.

ATE IC IF T R E C T off GIF

50%

10

Cnrsweetdeals.newsreview. Com

Buy online anytime with a credit card or in person with cash, check or credit card M-F 9am – 5pm at 353 E. Second Street, Downtown Chico. 30

CN&R

APRIL 11, 2019

CAFE 9.1087 15TH STREET 0 | 530.80 . Not redeemable for cash. AVE SUITE 12 .45-1749.6 credit. 1414 PARK not expire according to California Civil CodeChanSectigeonswill 1749 be given as store icate and does used for gratuity. This is a gift certif offers. Cannot be other discounts and Can be used with


Greg Belisle-Chi

GREG BELISLE-CHI & DAVID DVORIN Wednesday, April 17 Tender Loving Coffee SEE WEDNESDAY

MIXTAPE: Cover band playing hits from yesterday and today. Sat, 4/13, 9pm. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave. OVERDRIVE: Classic rock band playing songs from the 1970s and ’80s. Sat, 4/13, 8am. Unwined Kitchen & Bar, 980 Mangrove Ave. unwinedchico. com

CHICO COMEDY FESTIVAL – DAY TWO LATE SHOW: Three comedians riff live as the most terrible of cult classics, Plan 9 From Outer Space, plays on the screen. Featuring Helen Erskine, Amy Miller and Anthony K. Sat, 4/13, 10:30pm. $7. Pageant Theatre, 351 E. Sixth St.

DOUBLE TROUBLE: Tom Petty and Bob Seger tributes. Sat, 4/13, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfalls casino.com

FAIR OAKS YOUTH CHOIR: Free performance by local choir of more than 50 high school and college-aged young adults. Sat, 4/13, 7pm. Youth With A Mission Chico, 15850 Richardson Springs Road.

HILARITY FOR CHARITY: Soroptimist fundraiser featuring SF comedian

Sandra Risser. Proceeds go to Camp Fire Alzheimer’s survivors and research to end the disease. Sat, 4/13, 6pm. $10. Pleasant Valley High School, 1475 East Ave., 514-3352. soroptimistchico.org

JEFF PERSHING BAND: Long-time local favorite playing rock, funk, blues, and reggae to get you on your feet. Sat, 4/13, 8:30pm. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfallscasino.com

JOHN SEID, LARRY PETERSON AND BOB LITTELL: See Friday. Sat, 4/13, 6:30pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St.

KYLE WILLIAMS: Mellow tunes with local singer songwriter. Sat, 4/13, 7pm. The Exchange, 1975 Montgomery St., Oroville. theexchangeoroville.com

THE RISE AND FALL: Local “gloryrockers” with Bungo and Brotherr for a night of psychedelic magic. All ages. Sat, 4/13, 7pm. $5. Ike’s Place, 648 W. Fifth St.

SOUL POSSE: Chico favorite plays sultry R&B and love songs. Sat, 4/13, 7pm. Wine Time, 26 Lost Dutchman Drive.

SPRINGTIME IS SWINGTIME: Chico State’s Jazz X-Press presents a night of swing with guest artists Greg Gisbert on trumpet and Paul Romaine on drums. Sat, 4/13, 7:30pm. $6-$18. Harlen Adams Theatre, Chico State, PAC 144, 898-5152. csuchico.edu/soa

SYMBLANCE: Local three-piece rock band playing originals and heavy ’80s hits. Sat, 4/13, 9pm. Studio Inn Lounge, 2582 Esplanade.

THIS WEEK: FIND MORE ENTERTAINMENT AND SPECIAL EVENTS ON PAGE 24 TAINTED LOVE: Popular ’80s cover band. Sat, 4/13, 8:30pm. $10. Gold Country Casino & Hotel, 4020 Olive Highway, Oroville. goldcountryca sino.com

TEMPO REGGAE PARTY: Day and night party featuring reggae, dancehall, dub and roots, plus a delicious $20 buffet. Sat, 4/13, 5pm. Sipho’s, 1228 Dayton Road, (805) 801-3844.

TRIBUTE TO JOHNNY CASH: James Garner and band’s tribute to the Man in Black is a fundraiser for Paradise Fire Adopt A Family. Sat, 4/13, 7:30pm. $30. Paradise Performing Arts Center, 777 Nunneley Rd., Paradise. paradiseperformingarts.com

14SUNDAY

JOE MURPHY BOOK RECEPTION: Celebrate the release of Murphy’s debut novel, Elegy of the Shade , with a free reception in the back bar. Ken the Revelator provides the soundtrack. Sun, 4/14, 7pm. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St.

OPEN MIC COMEDY NIGHT: Working on a bit? See if it’s a hit or heckle-worthy, and enjoy cheap beer specials. Signups start at 8pm. Sun, 4/14, 9pm. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave. maltesebarchico.com

16TUESDAY 17WEDNESDAY

OPEN MIC: Hosted by veteran

GREGG BELISLE-CHI: Traditional western

Chico singer/songwriter Andan Casamajor. There’s always a guitar to borrow and a house cajón for frisky fingers, so come on down and get on the list. Tue, 4/16, 6pm. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

SOB X RBE: Rap collective’s Strictly Only Brothers Tour with Sneakk & Peacoat Gang. Locals Squid Squad & Bread Squad open. See website for info. Tue, 4/16, 8:30pm. $27.50-$30. Senator Theatre, 517 Main St. senatortheatrechico.com

harmony and improvisation from popular jazz composer. Chico State music professor/guitarist David Dvorin joins. Wed, 4/17, 8pm. $7-$12. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St., 433-0414.

MDOU MOCTAR: Niger-based master of electric Tuareg guitar music plays with Oregon composer/guitarist Marisa Anderson. Wed, 4/17, 8pm. $13/advance (eventbrite.com); $15/door. Argus Bar + Patio, 212 W. Second St.

OPEN MIC: Music, storytelling, poetry and more. Wed, 4/17, 7pm. Butte County Library, Chico Branch, 1108 Sherman Ave.

NEWBORN MUSIC

The man with the golden voice, Pat Hull (pictured), and his band have birthed a fresh LP full of sun-kissed harmonies wrapped in a jangly chorus of strings and keys. The grand debut of Sera will be marked with a release party at Argus Bar +Patio tonight (April 11). Heartland rocker M. Lockwood Porter and the DJs of Outpatient Records join the party.

APRIL 11, 2019

CN&R

31


Need a CoNtraCtor? REEL WORLD General / Plumbing / Electrical Contractor

Wild horses

Full / Partial Home Remodels Ground Up Construction

A tangled tale of redemption

Design Consultation

limeNt CC oNstruCtioN

34 Years of Experience

530.370.5086 License #998460

New Priced Medicare Plans WITH or WITHOUT Deductibles Medical Solutions

John Warwick Insurance 1907 Mangrove Ave, Suite B

any HOspITal any DOCTOr

*Who accepts Medicare

Across Street from S&S Produce

530-891-5433 John Warwick

Certified Senior Advisor

Call nOW fOr an appOInTmenT

Authorized to Offer Endorsed

Medicare Plans from

CA Lic. # 0294026 Covered CA Lic. #2000001613

The Mustang Tthingsimple right from the beginning, but there’s somepeculiar, mysterious and fascinating about it, he storyline of

seems obvious and

too, from start to finish. Writer-director Laure De Clermont-Tonnerre, a French actress making an impressive debut as a feature-film director, wastes no by time setting up the story’s central Juan-Carlos premise—the relationship of an Selznick imprisoned man and a wild horse, in circumstances rife with the promise of some kind of redemption. The Mustang keeps that promise, but the process of getting there is more The Mustang intriguingly tangled than you might have guessed, as is the end result. Starring Matthias Schoenaerts, Jason The film maintains a plain-spoken Mitchell and Bruce directness throughout, and yet it also Dern. Directed by proves a richly effective mixture of laure De Clermontgenres—western, prison film, horse Tonnerre. pageant Theatre, rated r. story, saga of redemption and rebirth, robustly sentimental psychodrama, etc. Clermont-Tonnerre’s shrewdly evocative directorial style has much to do with the smoldering emotional power the film generates from its seemingly simple and obvious elements. In a scene where a man rages at a horse as a “dumb animal,” we see the horse and the man as well in terms that suggest the awakening of another kind of awareness altogether. And in another, a prison official gives a prisoner directions for a particularly significant escape without ever making explicit mention of anything other than the absurdity of the prisoner’s predicament.

4

32

CN&R

April 11, 2019

The Belgian actor Matthias Schoenaerts (Rust and Bone) plays Roman Coleman, a deeply withdrawn convict with a history of violence who is the tale’s chief human character. Coleman is in a Nevada prison that has a rehabilitation program in which select convicts can work at capturing and taming wild mustangs. It’s there that Coleman first encounters the dangerously rebellious mustang with whom he’ll form a perilously restorative bond. That horse and the Nevada outback are, in effect, major characters in the story as Coleman gradually recovers from the emotional degree zero in which he is stuck at the outset. And a number of other characters bring life to the drama of resurgence. Bruce Dern, still bristling at age 82, is particularly impressive as the crusty old rancher/horse trainer who supervises the mustang rehab operation. Jason Mitchell is especially lively as the convict named Henry, a black cowboy and trick rider who figures crucially in some key plot twists. Gideon Adlon is sharp as Coleman’s profoundly alienated daughter, Martha; her emotionally fraught prison visits help spark her father’s renewal while also bringing the depths and costs of her father’s failings more fully into view. Connie Britton, meanwhile, plays a prison psychologist in ways that serve both as nuanced portrait and rueful caricature. Ω

1 2 3 4 5 Poor

Fair

Good

Very Good

Excellent


FILM SHORTS Reviewers: Bob Grimm and Juan-Carlos Selznick.

Opening this week After

A love story based on Anna Todd’s youngadult novel about a good girl who falls for a bad boy during her first semester of college. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

Hellboy

Another film adaptation (a reboot of the original Guillermo del Toro two-film series) of the Dark Horse character, the half-demon superhero fighting to save the world from an undead sorceress. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

Little

A fantasy-comedy about an overbearing tech mogul (Regina Hall) who, after wishing to be young again, turns into a 13-year-old version of herself (Marsai Martin) and still has to run her company—with a lot of help from her assistant (Issa Rae). Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

Missing Link

A stop-motion animated feature from Laika (the studio behind Coraline and ParaNorman) that tells the story of a monster/myth investigator (voiced by Hugh Jackman) and an adventurer (Zoe Saldana) and their quest to find a particular Bigfoot named Mr. Link (Zach Galifianakis). Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

Now playing The Best of Enemies

Historical biopic starring Taraji P. Henson and Sam Rockwell, as a civil rights activist and Ku Klux Klan leader, respectively, who are forced to work with one another on school integration in North Carolina in the early 1970s. Cinemark 14.

2

Captain Marvel

Despite the fact that she’s playing a superhero who has the power to shoot electrical bursts from her hands, Brie Larson’s Captain Marvel suffers from a disappointing lack of energy. Larson’s turn as the title character, aka Carol Danvers (aka Vers), is plagued by lethargy and bizarre line deliveries, and she gives off a detached vibe that she doesn’t want to be in the movie. Had the film around her been really good, the lead’s bored disposition might’ve been forgiven, but this cosmic superhero origin story and intergalactic war movie is also riddled with some haphazard storytelling and awful special effects. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13 —B.G.

1

Dumbo

The decline of Tim Burton continues with this wasteful remake of the 1941 animated classic that amounts to one big nothing—for kids and adults alike. The original was a little more than an hour long, while this one lasts for nearly two hours that feel like 40. A bunch of unnecessary subplots and added characters take away time from one

of the lone bright spots, the title character, an admittedly cute CGI achievement. Instead of the original’s Timothy Q. Mouse, we get the requisite precocious children, one of them played by Thandie Newton’s daughter, Nico Parker, who absolutely cannot act. Colin Farrell appears as Holt, the precocious kids’ dad, and like most of the human actors in this movie, he seems lost. And V.A. Vandevere, the villain, is played by Michael Keaton, who is at his sneering worst. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG —B.G.

“It’s all about the Dirty Sauce”

Five Feet Apart

Film adaptation of Rachel Lippincott’s young-adult novel of the same name about two teens whose newfound love for one another is complicated by the fact that their respective life-threatening illnesses keep them from coming into physical contact. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13.

Superior Services at a Fair Price

Specializing in:

Commercial & Recreational Building Services

4

The Mustang

See review this issue. Pageant Theatre. Rated R —J.C.S.

Offices, Businesses, Schools and More!

Menu of Services to Address Your Unique Needs Eco-friendly Cleaning Products & Methods

Pet Sematary

Jason Clarke, Amy Seimetz and John Lithgow star in this latest adaptation of Stephen King’s horror novel about a family’s terrifying dealings with a mysterious burial ground. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

Shazam!

The first big-screen treatment of the classic DC Comics character, the alter ego of troubled teen Billy Batson (played by Asher Angel), who turns into a buff adult (Zachery Levi) full of superpowers when exclaims, “Shazam!” Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

Supporting us Supports our Mission

648 West 5th St. | Chico 530.924.3171 ILikeIkesPlace.com

supp rt

real

DAILY • WEEKLY • MONTHLY

news

Call today for your fREE consultation!

Donate to ’s InDepenDent JournalIsm FunD:

We are a non-profit affiliate of the Work Training Center. By choosing our cleaning services, you also support our mission of providing work for adults with disabilities.

4

Us

A young girl in a 1980s flashback drifts away from her father at an amusement park on the Santa Cruz pier and finds herself in a darkened and frightening hall of mirrors. Things then jump to the present day, where Adelaide and Gabe (Lupita Nyong’o and Winston Duke) are taking their children, Zora and Jason, to the beach. It’s the same beach we saw in the flashback, and we find out that Adelaide was that young girl. She’s not happy about revisiting the place. The family excursion quickly becomes the worst vacation ever, as another family shows up at night. A quick examination of the intruders reveals what the commercials for this movie have already told you: The family outside is a darker mirror image of the stunned family inside the house. They aren’t coming over to borrow the lawn mower. They intend to kill. Writer-director Jordan Peele follows up the success of Get Out with another mind bender, one that is also an efficient, bareknuckled horror-thriller, plus a comedy and a brutal social satire. It’s the whole package. Cinemark 14. Rated R —B.G.

Vegan options aVailable

SERVING BUTTE COUNTY BUSINESSES 2300 fAIR STREET | 530-343-7994 ExT 3401

InDepenDentJournalIsmFunD.org

on sale until end of july PiNot Noir

CABErNEt SAuViGNoN

Bud Light 8/12/18•Bottles/Cans Reg $9.99 - $15.99 SALE $7.99 - $12.99

Wonder Park

A 3-D animated feature about a young girl (voiced by Brianna Denski) with a wild imagination who works with a cast of talking animals to bring a dream amusement park to life. With Matthew Broderick, Jennifer Garner, Ken Hudson Campbell, Kenan Thompson, Ken Jeong, Mila Kunis and John Oliver. Cinemark 14. Rated PG.

Belle Glos Napa Cellars Reg $57.99 Reg $54.99 SALE $45.99 SALE $43.99

Humboldt St. Supery Napa Valley Quilt Distillery Vodka Reg $22.99 Reg $41.99 Reg $45.99 SALE $15.99 SALE $32.99 SALE $35.99

Largest Selection of Wine Around over 1,000 Wines Available Huge selection of Beer & Spirits, too!

Wild turkey Longbranch Reg $39.99 SALE $31.99

Modelo 12/18 • Bottles/Cans Reg $16.99 - $22.99 SALE $13.99 - $18.99

Knob Creek Reg $36.99 SALE $26.99

958 east avenue (Next to Donut Nook) 530.592.3171• Open Daily 8am–10pm April 11, 2019

CN&R

33


34

CN&R

ap ri l 1 1 , 2 0 1 9


CHOW Hop on over for some

Tasty Treats

Raise a glass to healthier drinking

An Easter Tradition for 81 years

www.shuberts.com

Now Serving Chico at Two Locations! 178 East 7th St (530) 342-7163 | Chico Mall (530) 809-4151

AwArd winning BBQ! PHOTO BY MICHAEL MCSHERRY

Sierra Nevada’s acquisition of fitness-focused brewery highlights new trend in beer

W and cycling in the Marin Headlands was bought in February by Sierra Nevada Brewing Co., it underscored hen a small beer brand inspired by trail-running

a market-wide trend: Brewers big and small are trying to reach a broader audience, or hang onto their existing one, by making beer healthier. For Sufferfest Brewing Co., launched in 2015 by brewer and athlete Caitlin by Landesberg, success came with a unique Alastair perspective on beer. Landesberg was not Bland interested in good beer at any cost. She was interested in a deeper relationship between good beer and personal wellness. This manifested in beers with gluten removed, relatively low alcohol levels, and names that celebrate endurance running and cycling, with sly references to the GPS tracking app Strava, used by many athletes. Sierra Nevada, the third-largest craft brewery in the United States, saw a promising market and partnered with the young brewery. It’s also part of a trend toward healthier beer, or, at least, beer perceived as being healthier. Low-alcohol beers, beers hybridized with kombucha, beers with reduced gluten and beers without any alcohol are gaining popularity. Athletic Brewing Co., in Stratford, Conn., is pursuing a similar marketing tactic as Sufferfest, but more directly. The brewery, aiming to make healthier beer, offers a line of completely alcohol-free beers. Such products were once widely derided as “near-beer,” but the craft brewing industry is beginning to take them seriously. At Iron Springs Pub and Brewery in Fairfax, and its taproom in San Rafael, the tap line always includes a nonalcoholic beer, according to the brewery’s founder, Mike Altman. “We sell a fair amount at both locations,” he said. He says brewers are increasingly focused on “figuring out how to produce a really good nonalcoholic IPA”—something he said his brewing team hasn’t yet mastered. In December, I spoke with Tom McCormick, the

executive director of the California Craft Brewers Association, about beer trends to watch for in 2019. He told me he was seeing an interest in beer with less, or even almost no, alcohol. “The newest generation of LDA”—that’s industry talk for legal drinking age—“are more health-conscious and drinking less,” he said. He said he expected to see more beers with less or no alcohol this year, and that seems to be happening. According to a November article in The Drinks Business, in the three months leading to Aug. 12, 2018, sales of nonalcoholic beer were up 58 percent from the same period a year prior. According to a Nov. 19 article in Brewbound, brewers are applying various technical maneuvers to remove the alcohol from beer “[i]n an effort to attract a growing number of drinkers who are moderating alcohol consumption.” If alcohol is going just slightly out of fashion, what does this say about the beer industry as a whole? Well, beer sales overall are steadily declining, according to numerous market analyses. Sales and production of beer in the United States, in fact, have dipped for five years in a row, with the greatest losses occurring in the category of mainstream lagers. Craft beer sales are on the rise—but, even in this market, customers are veering toward lighter, lower-alcohol beers, such as pilsners, kölsches, session IPAs and brut IPAs (that last one generally contains standard alcohol levels but has no residual sugar and therefore fewer calories). Often, just as society at large embraces a new trend, a conscious and aware person may observe that he or she is riding the same wave. Now, as talk of low-alcohol beers grows louder in the brewing community, I find myself increasingly attracted to beers at the other end of the spectrum, where less may be more. Ω

Steaks, Burgers, Sandwiches & more! Fri/Sat Prime Rib Specials Full Bar + Catering/Venue 23x Award Winner

4945 Hwy 99E, Vina • (530) 839-2838 • Thurs-Sun 11am - 9pm

We Deliver to Your Door in Minutes! Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner 240 Broadway St. Chico, CA | 530.899.2847 | www.pitapitusa.com APRIL 11, 2019

CN&R

35


annUal BiKE issUE Chico is one of the best bike towns in the U.S. and locals and students alike are peddling where they need to go more than ever. Our annual celebration of local bicycle culture is tied with Chico Velo’s Wildflower Century ride, which attracts over 4,000 cyclists to our town. Include your business in this extremely popular issue that will not only reach our nearly 118,000 regular readers, but also the 4,000 Wildflower visitors too!

On stands april 25 For more information, call an advertising representative today at (530) 894-2300

36

CN&R

ap ril 1 1 , 2 0 1 9


ARTS DEVO by JASON CASSIDY • jasonc@newsreview.com

heroes next Thursday (April 18, 5:30-9 p.m.), at the Museum of Northern California Art. A performance by troubadour Jonathan Richman will kick off the ceremony honoring the 2019 Champions of the Arts: watercolor painter/instructor and arts Pat Hull, Sera consultant Amber Palmer, Chico Art Center Director Cameron Kelly, painter/instructor and Studio 561 owner Christine Mac Shane, artist and Butte County Art on Wheels founder Jessie Mercer, Healing Art Gallery coordinator Rebecca McIntyre Senoglu, and longtime Chico Theater Company Executive Director Marc Edson. Congrats!

Cnrsweetdeals.newsreview.Com

ART CHAMPS The Chico Arts and Culture Foundation will celebrate six local arts

This guy saves you money.

PAT AND LARRY You must be talkin’ about steak again, Arts DEVO! Sorry, as much as I love to rhapsodize about a good cut of beef, this is not an homage to that bygone East 20th Street institution, Pat ’n’ Larry’s Steakhouse. Given that this week’s CN&R is the Local Music Issue, I am instead surveying the landscape of the three-plus decades I’ve spent partaking in the Chico music scene—from the CD-release party tonight (April 11, 8 p.m.) at Argus Bar + Patio for the new album by Pat Hull, all the way back to my first local show, a tour-van benefit for Vomit Launch—a band that featured bassist Larry Crane— more than 30 years ago. I have Crane on my mind because of an online post last week by Vintage King (a pro audio retailer Larry Crane for studios and recording engineers) featuring a mini-documentary on “The History of Tape Op” magazine (vintageking.com/ blog/2019/04/tape-op-magazine). Crane is the founder and editor of Tape Op, the long-running publication that started off as a 500-copy run of a handstapled zine in 1996 and grew to a 70,000 circulation glossy that is now the most read recording-arts magazine in the world. It doesn’t hurt the numbers that Tape Op has always been free (seriously, go subscribe at tapeop.com), but the real secret to its success is that it’s not a slimy music-industry rag. Instead, it has always been a well-written love letter to music, with fun long-form stories and interviews by people who are super into talking about how their favorite songs were recorded. In addition to his Tape Op success, Crane is, of course, also well known as the owner/engineer of Jackpot! Recording Studio, in Portland, Ore., where he’s recorded everyone from Sleater-Kinney to Elliott Smith (for whom he’s the official estate archivist). It’s been forever since Crane roamed these parts. The amazing Vomit Launch broke up 30 years ago, and Crane moved to Portland shortly after. But all of us who used to eat tacos and drink pale ales with the guy are proud from afar as he continues to kick so much ass. And Hull, a modern-day Chico favorite son, is on the radar for releasing another new CD, Sera—his fifth album in three years! In addition to several guests (vocalist Evin Wolverton, guitarist Dorian Rohlfes, etc.), the recording features singer/guitarist/pianist Hull’s regular band of locals: Ethan Swett (bass, guitar, and tons more), Sean Raeside (drums), Michael Bone (guitar, bass, vocals) and Webster Moore (organ). The album feels like a continuation of 2018’s Denmark Sessions, with Hull’s light and soulful voice the constant across a varying collection of lush slow- to midtempo folk-rock tunes. More gorgeous music by one of Chico’s best songwriters. Find the album and a video for the single “Water Glass” at pathullmusic.com.

APRIL 11, 2019

CN&R

37


Goin’ ChiCo y your livinG lloCal Guide Starting in June 2019, the Chico News & Review’s Goin’ Chico issue offers unmatched early access to the freshest faces in town with distribution to new students and their parents at Summer Orientation at Chico State. Make sure you connect with these potential new patrons from their first day in town with an ad in Goin’ Chico. For more inFormation, Call an advertisinG representative today at (530) 894-2300.

38

CN&R

ap ril 1 1 , 2 0 1 9


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY For the week oF April 11, 2019 ARIES (March 21-April 19): The Qing

Dynasty controlled China from the mid17th century to the early 20th century. It was the fifth biggest empire in world history. But eventually it faded, as all mighty regimes do. Revolution came in 1911, forcing the last emperor to abdicate and giving birth to the Republic of China. I’m inclined to think of your life in 2019 as having some similarities to that transition. It’s the end of one era and the beginning of another, a changing of the guard and a passing of the torch. The coming weeks will be a favorable time to be very active in deciding and visualizing the empire you want next.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): I hope that sometime soon you’ll acquire a new source of support or inspiration. Now is a phase of your astrological cycle when you’re likely to attract influences that are in alignment with your deep values. This addition might be a person or animal. It could be a vibrant symbol or useful tool. It may even be a fantasy character or departed ancestor that will stimulate vitality you haven’t been able to summon on your own. Be on the lookout for this enhancement.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Poet David

Hinton analyzed the Chinese word for “poetry.” Its etymological meaning is “words spoken at the fertility altar.” Let’s make that your theme, even if you don’t write or read poetry. I suspect the coming weeks will be a favorable time to take a vow or utter a solemn intention in front of a homemade fertility altar. The oath you speak might express a desire to boost your use of your physical vitality: your lust for life, your adoration of the natural world or your power to produce new human life. Or your vow to foster your fertility could be more metaphorical and symbolic in nature: the imaginative intimacy you will explore or the creativity you’ll express in future works of art, or the generous effects you want to have on the world.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Christo-

pher Robin Milne was the son of author A. A. Milne, who wrote the Winnie-the-Pooh stories. He said there are two ways to navigate through life. Either you “take a bearing on something in the future and steer towards it, or take a bearing on something in the past and steer away from it.” So in his view, “There are those who look ahead and pull and those who look behind and push.” I’m hoping that in the coming weeks and months, you will make a delighted commitment to the first option: taking a bearing on something in the future and steering toward it. I think that approach will inspire you toward the most interesting success.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): The national animal

of Finland is the brown bear. The national insect is the ladybug and the national instrument is a stringed instrument known as the kantele. As for the national author, it’s Aleksis Kivi, who produced just one novel that took him 10 years to write. He also published a short collection of odes and a few plays, adding up to a grand total of less than 800 pages of work. I think that the efforts you make in the coming weeks could have a disproportionately large impact, as well, Leo. What you lack in quantity will be irrelevant compared to the sheer quality you generate.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): I follow the

blogger Evanescent Voyager because she makes me cry with sad joy and exultant poignance on a regular basis. One of her other fans wrote her a love note I could have written myself. It said, “Your emotional brilliance and thoughtful passion break me into pieces and then weave me back together with more coherence than I had before reading you. I revere your alchemical talent for undoing me so you can heal me; for lowering my defenses so I can be open to your riches; for demolishing my habitual trance so you can awaken my sleeping genius.” I believe that in the coming weeks, life itself will offer to perform these same services for you. I urge you to accept!

by rob brezsny LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “Love is no

assignment for cowards.” That’s a quote attributed to the ancient Roman poet Ovid. What did he mean? Was he foreshadowing the wisdom of pop singer Pat Benatar, who in 1983 told us, “Love is a battlefield?” Was Ovid implying that to succeed in the amorous arts we must be heroic warriors prepared to overcome fears and risk psychological dangers? Probably. But I will also point out that it takes as much courage to create fun, interesting togetherness as it does to wrestle with the problems that togetherness brings. You need just as much bravura and panache to explore the sweet mysteries of intimacy as you do to explore the achy mysteries of intimacy. Keep these thoughts in mind as you marshal your audacity to deepen and expand your best relationships in the coming weeks.

CLASSIFIEDS Call for a quote. (530) 894-2300 ext. 2 Phone hours: M-F 9am-5pm. Deadlines for print: Line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Display ad deadline: Friday 2pm

All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. Further, the News & Review specifically reserves the right to edit, decline or properly classify any ad. Errors will be rectified by re-publication upon notification. The N&R is not responsible for error after the first publication. The N&R assumes no financial liability for errors or omission of copy. In any event, liability shall not exceed the cost of the space occupied by such an error or omission. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes full responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. *Nominal fee for some upgrades.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): The literal

meaning of the French term jolie-laide is “pretty and ugly.” Bloggers at wordsnquotes.com define it as follows: “It’s a fascinating quirkiness that’s irresistible, like a face you want to keep looking at even if you can’t decide whether it is beautiful or not.” Jolie-laide overlaps with the Japanese term wabi-sabi, which describes a person or thing that is lovely because of its imperfection and incompleteness. I bring these facts to your attention because I think you have extraordinary potential to be a master embodier of both jolie-laide and wabi-sabi in the coming weeks.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec.

21): As Czech playwright Vaclav Havel (1936-2011) matured, he became a political dissident who opposed the Soviet Union’s authoritarian grip on his country. Eventually he was a key player in the Velvet Revolution that banished Communism. When Czechoslovakia emerged as a new democracy, its people elected him president. Havel later thanked Lou Reed and the band the Velvet Underground for fully awakening his liberationist leadership. He said their unruly music stoked his longing to establish a culture where total creative freedom was possible. I mention this because now is a favorable time to identify the music or art or films or literature that might fuel your emancipation in the coming months.

U VISUALIZE & I’LL CUSTOMIZE Anything masonry brick work stone work concrete driveways patios fireplaces & so much more. License# 810329 Phone (916) 826-9796 Attention Viagra users: Generic 100 mg blue pills or Generic mg yellow pills. Get 45 plus 5 free $99 + S/H. Guaranteed, no prescription necessary. Call Today 1-844-879-5238 A PLACE FOR MOM has helped over a million families find senior living. Our trusted, local advisors help find solutions to your unique needs at no cost to you. 1-855-993-2495 (AAN CAN)

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

Capricorn author J.R.R. Tolkien toiled on his masterpiece The Lord of the Rings for 12 years. Once he finished, it wasn’t published for more than five years. So 17 years passed between the time he launched his precious project and the time when it reached an audience. I don’t think you will need that much patience in shepherding your own venture to full expression. But I hope you’ll summon as much faith in yourself as Tolkien had to rouse in himself. To do so will bring out the best in you!

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18):

Released in 1998, The Prince of Egypt is an animated film that tells the story of the Hebrew prophet Moses. In the climactic event, the hero uses magic to part the waters of the Red Sea, allowing his people to run across the sea floor and escape the army that’s chasing them. To make that seven-minute scene, 28 professional animators labored for 318,000 hours. In the coming months, you could create your own version of that marvel. But you’ll need a team to help you, and that team is not yet ready to go. The coming weeks will be a favorable time to get it ready, though.

Claudia’s Relaxing Massage 10am-7pm by appt. only 530-893-0263 You can Google me A Unique Touch by Deja. Full-Body Shower and Massage. $140 per 1hr & 20min session. Ask 4 special rates 4 fire victims (530) 321-0664 Ultra Soothing Massage. Expert senior care. Outcall service available. M-Su. 10-6 Michelle CMT (530) 566-6477

www.RealAstrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as EMINENCE GROUP at 2359 Myers Street, Suite #5966 Oroville, CA 95966. TIANA LYNN HARRISON TRUSTEE 2359 Myers Street, Suite #5966 Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by a Trust. Signed: TIANA HARRISON Dated: February 19, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000229 Published: March 21,28, April 4,11, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as LAURA’S WIG AND BEAUTY SUPPLY at 872 East Ave Chico, CA 95926. KATHLEEN A MCCLYMONT 10116 Jones Ave Durham, CA 95938. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: KATHLEEN MCCLYMONT Dated: March 5, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000296 Published: March 21,28, April 4,11, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following person has abandoned the use of the fictitious business name HEEL AND SOLE SHOES at 708 Mangrove Ave Chico, CA 95926. RICK NORMAN STUELPNAGEL 4730 Songbird Chico, CA 95973. This business was conducted by an Individual. Signed: RICK STUELPNAGEL Dated: March 18, 2019 FBN Number: 2017-0001588 Published: March 21,28, April 4,11, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as SWEET T’S at 803 Burgess Lane Chico, CA 95973. BRANDON BLIZMAN 803 Burgess Lane Chico, CA 95973. TARYN BLIZMAN 803 Burgess Lane Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: BRANDON BLIZMAN Dated: February 20, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000233 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as SARAH RICHARDSON’S CANINE CONNECTION, THE CANINE CONNECTION at 10 Seville Court Chico, CA 95928. SARAH LUCILE RICHARDSON 22 Sunland Drive Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: SARAH RICHARDSON Dated: March 8, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000308 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as MANIFEST GLASS at 818 Salem St Chico, CA 95928. MERRICK JAMES BOYER 972 E 9th St Chico, CA 95928. RYAN PATRICK RODRIGUEZ 1126 Hobart St Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: RYAN RODRIGUEZ Dated: February 25, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000249 Published: March 21,28, April 4,11, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CHICO PEACE, CHICO PEACE AND JUSTICE CENTER, CHICO PEACE ENDEAVOR, CPJC at 526 Broadway Chico, CA 95928. CHICO PEACE ENDEAVOR 526 Broadway Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: ARAMENTA HAWKINS, DIRECTOR Dated: March 19, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000353 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as FRANKLIN RECYCLING at 4405 Airport Rd Paradise, CA 95969.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as LOOK AHEAD VETERINARY SERVICES at 1451 Clark Rd Oroville, CA

this Legal Notice continues

this Legal Notice continues

this Legal Notice continues

chat Livelinks - Chat Lines. Flirt, chat and date! Talk to sexy real singles in your area. Call now! 1-844-359-5773 (AAN CAN)

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Piscean

businessman Steve Jobs testified that taking LSD was “one of the two or three most important things” he ever did in his life. It opened his mind in ways he felt were crucial to his development. What are the three most important things you’ve ever done, Pisces? I invite you to revisit at least one of them, and see if you can take it to the next step of its power to inspire you. What if it has even more to offer you in your efforts to become the person you want to be?

business as KAIT’S SWEET KREATIONS at 1661 Forest Ave #27 Chico, CA 95928. KAITLYN ZANGL 1661 Forest Ave #27 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: KAITLYN ZANGL Dated: March 1, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000277 Published: March 21,28, April 4,11, 2019

JOHN HENRY FRANKLIN 885 E 5th Street Chico, CA 95928. CLARK E GARDNER 6 Abbott Circle Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: JOHN H. FRANKLIN Dated: March 13, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000323 Published: March 21,28, April 4,11, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS

95965. MICHELE C WEAVER, DVM AND CRAIG A BROWN, DVM, INC. 1451 Clark Rd Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: MICHELE WEAVER PRESIDENT Dated: March 21, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000348 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as AZTLAN, FIFTH SUN at 495 Ryan Ave Chico, CA 95973. GONZALES PARK, LLC 495 Ryan Ave Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: CLINT L SMITH, DIRECTOR Dated: March 21, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000359 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as GEI, GONZALES ENTERPRISES at 495 Ryan Ave. Chico, CA 95973. GONZALES PARK, LLC 495 Ryan Ave. Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: CLINT L SMITH, DIRECTOR Dated: March 21, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000360 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PALM TO PALM at 1321 Palm Avenue Chico, CA 95926. ALEXANDRIA MULLER 1321 Palm Avenue Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ALEXANDRIA MULLER Dated: March 19, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000347 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as HENDREN DISABILITY ADVOCATES, SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY ADVOCATES at 341 Broadway, Suite 402 Chico, CA 95928. MARY GALVIN 318 Flume St Chico, CA 95928. KEVIN MARK HENDREN 318 Flume St Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: KEVIN HENDREN Dated: February 28, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000270 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as SQUYRES FIRE PROTECTION, INC. at 166 East Third Street Chico, CA 95928. SQUYRES FIRE PROTECTION, INC.

this Legal Notice continues

166 East Third Street Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: BRANDON SQUYRES PRESIDENT Dated: March 26, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000390 Published: April 4,11,18,25, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as RPM MARINE at 5656 Pentz Road Paradise, CA 95969. LOGAN JEFFREY CUSEO 15192 Coutolenc Road Magalia, CA 95954. MICHAEL THEADORE OMARY 5656 Pentz Road Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: MICHAEL T O’MARY Dated: March 25, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000377 Published: April 4,11,18,25, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BURKE COOKIE CO. at 3278 Tinker Creek Way Chico, CA 95973. JENNIFER KAY BURKE 3278 Tinker Creek Way Chico, CA 95973. JOSHUA ALAN BURKE 3278 Tinker Creek Way Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: JENNIFER BURKE Dated: March 22, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000367 Published: April 4,11,18,25, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as TIPSOO HOPE at 151 Tipsoo Peak Rd Berry Creek, CA 95916. CAROLINE LOUISE CLOVER 151 Tipsoo Peak Rd Berry Creek, CA 95916. ANTHONY LOUIS ENGRO II 151 Tipsoo Peak Rd Berry Creek, CA 95916. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: ANTHONY ENGRO II Dated: March 27, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000394 Publsihed: April 4,11,18,25, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ANYTIME AIRPORT SHUTTLE at 3166 Godman Ave Chico, CA 95973. LINDA MYERS 3166 Godman Ave Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: LINDA MYERS Dated: March 15, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000336 Published: April 4,11,18,25, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as AGS CONSTRUCTION

CLaSSIFIEdS

CONTINUED ON 40

this Legal Notice continues

April 11, 2019

CN&R

39


SERVICES at 6150 Center Street Paradise, CA 95969. ALPHONSE G SPERSKE 1252 Wagstaff Road Paradise, CA 95969. AMY M SPERSKE 1252 Wagstaff Rd Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: AMY SPERSKE Dated: March 28, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000400 Published: April 4,11,18,25, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as PARKER’S CORNER at 9305 Midway Durham, CA 95938. PARKER’S CORNER, INC. 9050 Lasell Lane Durham, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: ARLITA PURSER, CORP. SECRETARY Dated: March 27, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000396 Published: April 4,11,18,25, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as THE LOFT HAIR AND SKIN CARE at 2535 Forest Ave #110 Chico, CA 95928. BRENDA E BAUREIS Two Ilahee Lane #40 Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: BRENDA E BAUREIS Dated: March 29, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000407 Published: April 4,11,18,25, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as IZZY’S ASPHALT SOLUTIONS at 2605 Burnap Avenue Chico, CA 95973. ISRAEL TAYLOR 2605 Burnap Avenue Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ISRAEL TAYLOR Dated: April 4, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000426 Published: April 11,18,25, May 2, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as D AND J PROFESSIONAL MOVERS at 1621 Sheridan Avenue Chico, CA 95926. DAVID GLENN BRACY 1621 Sheridan Avenue Chico, CA 95926. JAMES RAYMOND DAVID ROBERTSON 26152 Walch Avenue Orland, CA 95963. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: JAMES ROBERTSON Dated: April 3, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000418 Published: April 11,18,25, May 2, 2019

NOTICES NOTICE OF HEARING Petitioner: SHARON K. EDWARDS Respondent: GERALD D. EDWARDS To: SHARON K. EDWARDS,

this Legal Notice continues

40

CN&R

Petitioner A Court Hearing will be held as follows: Date: May 15, 2019 Time: 8:15am Dept: 7 Room: TBA Superior Court of California, County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95928 WARNING to the person served with the Request for Order: The court may make the requested orders without you if you do not file a Responsive Declaration to Request for Order (form FL-320), serve a copy on the other parites at least nine court days before the hearing (unless the court has ordered a shorter period of time), and appear at the hearing. (See form FL-320-INFO for more information.) Dated: March 14, 2019 Case Number: FL047985 Published: March 21,28, April 4,11, 2019

NOTICE OF SALE To be sold for cartage, transportation, storage charges, costs of advertisement and sale: Furniture, household goods, cartons, tools, miscellaneous inventory at present stored in warehouse at 251 Boeing ave. Chico Ca 95973. Of Brady’s Moving and Storage, Inc. by, and variously marked, with names as follows: HARRY PHILLIPS TRUST, JAMES PHILLIPS, C/O CYNDI MAXWELL, C/O SUSAN BROWN LOT #6963 MARLENE SCHULTZ. LOT #8000 These goods will be offered for sale to pay past due storage, transportation, cartage, etc. Charges, as is, without inspection, at the location of 251 Boeing Ave, Chico, California 95973. April 22nd, 2019 at 10 A.M. Published: April 4,11, 2019

NOTICE OF LIEN SALE Pursuant to CA Business Code 21700, in lieu of rents due, the following units contain clothes, furniture, boxes, etc. 219SS CANDACE CARBY 6x15 (Clothing, Furniture, Personal items, Misc.) 393CC1 HALEY WALL 6x12 (Clothing, Misc.) 258SS LAVETTE WELSHANS 7x7 (Clothing, Misc.) 067CC MAYELA WICKHAM 12x12 (Art supplies, Camping supplies, golf clubs, misc.) Contents to be sold to the highest bidder on: Saturday April 20, 2019 Beginning at 1:00pm Sale to be held at: Bidwell Self Storage, 65 Heritage Lane, Chico, CA 95926. (530) 893-2109 Published: April 4,11, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner SAMANTHA BRYANT filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: AUBREE AUTUMN-LEE SYNDERGAARD Proposed name: AUBREE AUTUMN-LEE BRYANT THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at

this Legal Notice continues

ap ril 1 1 , 2 0 1 9

least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 8, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: March 11, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00759 Published: March 21,28, April 4,11, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner CHRISTOPHER JOESPH LANE filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: CHRISTOPHER JOESPH LANE Proposed name: CHRISTOPHER JOSEPH NUNES THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 1, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: 1 Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: March 11, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00733 Published: March 21,28, April 4,11, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner DELTA DAWN MORRISSEY filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: WAYLON JOCASH LEE Proposed name: WAYLON JOCASH MORRISSEY THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 8, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is:

this Legal Notice continues

Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: March 12, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00784 Published: March 21,28, April 4,11, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner CHRISTOPHER PEACE DOLAN filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: CHRISTOPHER PEACE DOLAN Proposed name: CHRISTOPHER PEACE MOORE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 15, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: 10 Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: March 18, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00832 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: ASHLEE MICHELE HOLMES Proposed name: ASHLEE MICHELE SHULTS THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 8, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: March 11, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00697 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner SUSANNA GARRETT PORTER filed a petition with this

this Legal Notice continues

court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: SUSANNA GARRETT PORTER Proposed name: SUSANNA GARRETT BRAVO THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 15, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: March 13, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00788 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner TOU XA CHASENGNOU filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: TOU XA CHASENGNOU Proposed name: CHEEMENG CHA THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 1, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: 10 Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: March 12, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00739 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner PETER CHASENGNOU filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: PETER CHASENGNOU Proposed name: PETER KONG CHA THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the

this Legal Notice continues

reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 1, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: 10 Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: March 13, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00741 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner NICK CHASENGNOU filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: NICK CHASENGNOU Proposed name: NICK CHENG CHA THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 1, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: 1 Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: March 11, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00740 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner PANG YANG filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: PANG YANG Proposed name: PA CHUE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 1, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: 1 Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court

this Legal Notice continues

1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: March 11, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00737 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner MARCIE LYNN MEYERSON filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: MARCIE LYNN MEYERSON Proposed name: MARCIE LYNN THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 1, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: March 21, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00897 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner CONNOR MATTHEW TOLLE filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: CONNOR MATTHEW TOLLE Proposed name: JEREMIAH MATTHEWS-TOLLE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 8, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: March 12, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00706 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner COURTNEY M. JOY filed a petition with this

this Legal Notice continues

court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: COURTNEY MICHELLE JOY Proposed name: RACHEL ISABELLE JOY THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 8, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: March 27, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00900 Published: April 4,11,18,25, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner DAVID CASTILLO MARTINES filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: DAVID CASTILLO MARTINES Proposed name: DAVID CASTILLO THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 8, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: March 21, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00887 Published: April 4,11,18,25, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner MONIQUE MARIE RICHARD filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: MONIQUE MARIE RICHARD Proposed name: MONIQUE SOL SONOQUIE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the

this Legal Notice continues


reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 29, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: March 28, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00964 Published: April 11,18,25, May 2, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner SALGADO filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: SALGADO Proposed name: ENER ALFRED PICO THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 22, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: April 3, 2019 Case Number: 19CV01005 Published: April 11,18,25, May 2, 2019

SUMMONS SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: CHARLENE A ALLEE YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: BUTTE COUNTY CREDIT BUREAU A CORP NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose

this Legal Notice continues

the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The Court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Avenue Chico, CA 95928 LIMITED CIVIL CASE The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney is: JOSEPH L SELBY (#249546) Law Office of Ferris & Selby 2607 Forest Avenue Ste 130 Chico, CA 95928. (530) 366-4290 Dated: June 29, 2018 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Case Number: 18CV02133 Published: March 21,28, April 4,11, 2019

PETITION NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE LEE PARKER SHERIDAN, aka LEE P. SHERIDAN, aka LEE SHERIDAN To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: LEE PARKER SHERIDAN, aka LEE P. SHERIDAN, aka LEE SHERIDAN a petition for Probate has been filed by: JUSTYNE SHERIDAN in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: JUSTYNE SHERIDAN be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: April 16, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should

this Legal Notice continues

appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: REBECCA YUHASZ McKernan, Lanam, Bakke & Williams LLP 55 Independence Circle, Suite 106 Chico, CA 95973. (530) 877-4961 Case Number: 19PR00132 Dated: March 18, 2019 Published: March 28, April 4,11, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE NORMAN B. HOLLAND, also known as NORMAN HOLLAND, NORMAN BRUCE HOLLANDT To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: NORMAN B. HOLLAND, also known as NORMAN HOLLAND, NORMAN BRUCE HOLLAND a petition for Probate has been filed by: DAVID B. HOLLAND in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: DAVID B. HOLLAND be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: April 23, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state

this Legal Notice continues

your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: NICOLE R. PLOTTEL 466 Vallombrosa Ave. Chico, CA 95926. (530) 893-2882 Case Number: 19PR00141 Dated: March 26, 2019 Published: April 4,11,18, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE GRACE ANNETTE KING aka GRACE A. KING aka GRACE KING To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: GRACE ANNETTE KING aka GRACE A. KING aka GRACE KING a petition for Probate has been filed by: STEPHANIE M. ADAMS in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: STEPHANIE M. ADAMS be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: May 7, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: TBA Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney.

this Legal Notice continues

IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: DANA L. CAMPBELL, ESQ. Tyree & Campbell, LLP 1600 Humboldt Road, Suite 4 Chico, CA 95928 (530) 894-2100 Case Number: 19PR00140 Dated: March 25, 2019 Published: April 4,11,18, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE STEVEN J. MOONEY (also known as STEVEN JOHN MOONEY) To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: STEVEN J. MOONEY, STEVEN JOHN MOONEY, STEVEN MOONEY A petition for Probate has been filed by: LISA M. MOONEY in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: LISA M. MOONEY be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: April 30, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a

this Legal Notice continues

copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: NICOLE R. PLOTTEL 466 Vallombrosa Avenue Chico, CA 95926 (530) 893-2882 Case Number: 19PR00152 Dated: April 2, 2019 Published: April 11,18,25, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE SHEILA H. SCOTT To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the

this Legal Notice continues

will or estate, or both, of: SHEILA H. SCOTT A petition for Probate has been filed by: LARRY B. SAISE in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: LARRY B. SAISE be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: May 7, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before

this Legal Notice continues

the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: SONYA K. FINN The Law Offices of Leverenz & Finn 515 Wall Street Chico, CA 95928 (530) 895-1621 Case Number: 19PR00158 Dated: April 8, 2019 Published: April 11,18,25, 2019

Best Quality and Best Value! Doctor’s Recommendation Required Medical Cannabis 215/420 Compliant Multple Methods of Payments Accepted

FREE GIFT

420 ExprEss

Limit One per Customer

collEctivE sErvicE in nor cal

on dElIvERy

530.680.2001

#1 MEdical Marijuana

@420ExpressWorld

➡ Apri l 11, 2019

CN&R

41


REAL ESTATE

FOr MOrE iNFOrMaTiON aBOUT aDVErTiSiNG iN OUr rEal ESTaTE SECTiON, Call 530-894-2300

Love’s Real estate

Fast Build

14855 Klamath Ct, magalia 3 Beds 2 Baths 1,505 sq. Ft.

This beautiful 3-bedroom 2-bathroom home is full of upgrades! Enjoy the fresh air on the large deck in the front of the home. Large family room with an open floor plan and recessed lighting! New carpet, windows, freshly painted walls and cabinets! Escape into the master bedroom with a master bathroom and private deck with a beautiful view. This home features an indoor laundry room with backyard access and a spacious front and backyard with plenty of room Olivia larrabee for RV parking. Call now for more info & private realtOr showings! Century 21 SeleCt real eState, inC

CalDre #02056059 Olivia.larrabee@c21selectgrOup.cOm (530) 520-3169

We ran an informal survey about housing in the North State area. We went to the people. It was time to hear anything and everything from anyone and everyone who had something to say about housing in the North State. We conducted the survey in the places where we found the largest congregations of people, mainly in the restaurants and bars. Mainly the bars. Okay, only the bars. Some were restaurant bars.

Heck, the streets aren’t big enough!”

We launched the survey because in the local real estate world, we’ve belabored the statistics about housing to the point of exhaustion. You take all the numbers and stats about houses for sale and houses for rent, you throw those numbers and stats in with the number of people needing houses. You boil it all down, and you get the same result every time: There is not enough housing for people in the North State.

In a quieter bar, but lively still, the bartender, a young enthusiastic guy, poured a complimentary rum. “People are going back up there as fast as they can,” he said. “The owner of this place is a contractor and he already has 65 people signed up to rebuild homes. He’s closing this business down to go to work in Paradise.”

We already know the reason for this local shortage in housing. As one survey respondent put it, “Look man, we lost a whole town up on that ridge. All those houses! We just inhaled all those homeless people! How many thousands?

In a loud and lively bar, one lady said, “The solution to our housing crisis is Paradise. The speed of fixing this problem is in direct proportion to the speed of rebuilding Paradise.” She raised her voice. “But the infrastructure is so poor, it will likely take ten years.” She said that quite well, I thought, considering the loud music and the number of drinks. Mine, not hers.

“Too bad,” I said, “what will you do?” “No worries,” he said, “I’m putting together a line of food carts. We’re going straight up the hill, too.” He flipped me his business card. “People are going to be surprised how fast we rebuild Paradise!”

Doug Love is Sales Manager at Century 21 in Chico. Call 530-680-0817 or email dougwlove@gmail.com License #950289

Homes are Selling in Your Neighborhood Shop every home for sale at www.C21SelectGroup.com

530.345.6618 Steve KaSprzyK (Kas-per-ziK)

(530) 518–4850 License#01145231

2 homes on 1 lot with large shops

14855 Klamath Court Magalia

$279,000

$989,000

CalDRE #02056059

Paul Champlin | (530) 828-2902 Making Your Dream Home a Reality

Olivia Larrabee l (530) 520-3169 Olivia.Larrabee@c21selectgroup.com

Homes Sold Last Week ADDRESS

TOWN

129 Taige Way 2294 Burlingame Dr 35 Covell Park Ave 1608 Oak Park Ave 852 Palo Alto St 2709 Floral Ave 3111 Tule River Way 312 Crater Lake Dr 3536 Shadowtree Ln 1683 Pendant Pl 176 Yellowstone Dr

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico

42

CN&R

ap ril 1 1 , 2 0 1 9

PRICE

BR/BA

$875,000 $742,000 $730,000 $725,000 $620,000 $539,000 $515,000 $494,000 $490,000 $485,000 $450,000

3/3 4/3 4/3 4/4 3/2 4/4 4/3 3/2 3/2 3/2 3/3

Curious about your home’s value in today’s marketplace? Call me, I can help!

FOR SALE

14056 Hereford

You don’t have to spell it for me to sell it! 27 years representing clients in our area Century 21 select Chico California c21falconer@gmail.com

SMILeS ALWAyS!

Lic# 01506350

Joyce Turner

(530) 570–1944 • joyce_turner@ymail.com

Sponsored by Century 21 Select Real Estate, Inc. SQ. FT. 3095 2795 2152 3377 1931 3505 3973 1784 2066 1762 1979

ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

2822 Dolphin Bnd 66 Cottage Ave 1740 Cardinal Ct 740 Northgraves Ave 1293 Glenshire Ln 10 Smith Brothers Ct 2725 Ceanothus Ave 33 Dean Way 1258 Hobart St 963 Palmetto Ave 1384 Manzanita Ave

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico

$435,000 $429,000 $427,500 $403,000 $400,000 $397,500 $392,000 $362,500 $360,000 $360,000 $353,000

3/2 3/2 3/2 3/1 3/2 3/2 3/2 3/3 3/1 1/1 3/2

SQ. FT. 1476 1728 1826 1200 1357 1762 1578 1289 1089 977 1552


eXPAnd your business reACh

Need a hand with your home purchase?

Protect your goodies. Insurance & Risk Management Services for:

bidwell TiTle & esCrOw

Pa ge

14

Vla

de’s

e mra k o ak bre

s

Sac ram

ento

n by Joh

S ’S new

&

obe

Get

Culture,

flynn

CHICO’S FREE NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY VOLUME 42, ISSUE 8

From

funn y to he artfe lt WWW.NEWSREVIEW.COM

kly nt wee

|

Volu

mid r vote e guid

On the BALLOT page

iSSu e me 30,

27

thu rSd

ay,

oct obe

2018 r 18,

12

|

page 14

25-

31,

201

8

With locations in:

Chico: 894-2612 • Oroville: 533-2414 Paradise: 877-6262 • Gridley: 846-4005 www.BidwellTitle.com

, lo ca l fo lk s sh ar e th ei r ta le s ab ser ou t

+t e r m

|

r

t

gr ee ni n G t h e li gh t

See Arts&

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 18, 2018

on eas nme ente rtai

oCt

th e he ha s , bu t th ro ne ng s’ e ki th n ca ce nt er fo rm er ne ra l ge as ru le r? ma na ge

• Farm • Business • Life • Health • Home • Auto

new Sre

View .com

SPECIAL ISSUE: 2018 election primer

vin

g n ort h

ern

mens

nev

ada

truat

, ta h

oe

an

ion

d t ru

cke

e

4 ENDORSEMENTS!

Cnrsweetdeals.newsreview.Com

27 BLOOD ON HER HANDS 24 ZOMBIELAND

A dv e rt i se i n Chi C o, re n o , A nd sA Cr A me nt o! Learn more at Dahlmeier.com Oroville Chico

if you’re interested in Advertising,

CAll (530) 894-2300

530.533.3424

License #0680951

530.342.6421

How Much is Your Home Worth Today? Ask the Professionals at Century 21 Select

530.345.6618 | www.C21SelectGroup.com Condo! Adorable 3 bed/2 bath, 1,249 sq ft. ..................................................... $259,000 Pending

GORGEOUS CUSTOM HOME

In gated community, 2,628 sq ft, built in 2001, 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, 3 car sold garage, family room plus den. Home is beautifully landscaped and has solar, $565,000.00.

SplaSh into thiS beautiful Saltwater pool! Well maintained 3 bed/2 bath, plus ding e nparking, den/office or possible 4th bed home offering 1,776 sq ft, PRV too! .........$475,000 Teresa Larson (530) 899-5925

beautiful 4 bed/3 bath, 2,512 sq ft, hardwood floors, formal living, dining, plus family room!............................................................................................................. $519,900 updated Gorgeous, custom features in this 3 bed/2 bath, 1,008 sq foot condo. Really

special! ...............................................................................................................$215,000 DRE #01177950 chiconativ@aol.com

Kimberley Tonge l 530.518.5508 Lic# 01318330

Newer Home in Wildwood Park with views of Foothills. $425,000 2 bed 2 bath Condo in Chico in a great area. $167,500 Alice Zeissler l 530.518.1872 CalBRE #01312354

The following houses were sold in Butte County by real estate agents or private parties during the week of March 25- March 29, 2019 The housing prices are based on the stated documentary transfer tax of the parcel and may not necessarily reflect the actual sale price of the home. ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

SQ. FT.

ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

SQ. FT.

2 Heartwood Ct

Chico

$352,500

3/2

1424

1580 Greenhaven Ln

Chico

$315,000

3/2

1385

4 Sun Circle Ct

Chico

$350,000

3/3

1205

91 Key West Loop

Chico

$310,000

4/2

1402

949 Neal Dow Ave

Chico

$350,000

3/1

1468

1195 Gossamer Ln

Chico

$289,000

3/2

1126

9 New Dawn Cir

Chico

$345,000

3/3

1817

295 White Ave

Chico

$260,000

2/1

1310

1520 Boucher St

Chico

$329,000

4/2

1463

882 Glenn St

Chico

$225,000

3/3

1359

2022 Huntington Dr

Chico

$325,000

3/2

1142

11113 Nelson Bar Rd

Oroville

$589,000

2/2

1926

1594 E 1st Ave

Chico

$325,000

3/2

1578

1218 Montgomery St

Oroville

$520,000

5/2

3319

973 Lupin Ave

Chico

$320,000

3/2

1322

200 La Mirada Ave

Oroville

$429,000

2/2

2250

17 River Oaks Dr

Chico

$320,000

2/2

1146

3379 Sunview Dr

Paradise

$600,000

4/2

2558

901 Oak Lawn Ave

Chico

$320,000

3/2

1188

6476 Danika Ct

Paradise

$565,000

3/2

2420

1272 Dale Way

Chico

$318,000

3/1

1050

6687 Brook Way

Paradise

$430,000

3/3

1908

april 11, 2019

CN&R

43


A celebration of and benefit for musicians and others affected by the Camp Fire

PRESENTS :

s i e m C am CHICO AREA MUSIC FESTIVAL 2019

Official P rogram:

Saturday, April 20

Sierra Nevada Big Room

7-10 p.m.

1075 E. 20th St., Chico

SPONSORED BY:

FREE TICKETS! see inside for details

A SPECI AL CN &R PU LL-OU T SU PPLEMEN T


Schedule for:

CHICO AREA

MUSIC FES

2019

Chico Area Music Festival peformers (from top) Lo & Behold, Surrogate and John-MIchael Sun.

Saturday, April 2 at Sierra Nevad

1075 E. 20th St.

(doors at 6 p.m., pre-s

Main Stage

T

he Chico News & Review presents the finale for the 15th annual Chico Area Music Festival & Awards Show, an all-ages musical variety show featuring performances by more than a dozen local acts on two stages, plus the presentation of the 2019 CAMMIES awards. This year’s event also will be a celebration of and benefit for Butte County musicians affected by the Camp Fire. Roughly half of the night’s performers are from Paradise, Magalia or Concow. In addition to a dozen or so Critics’ Choice Awards, the CN&R will hand out the Readers’ Choice Award for Best Local Act. Visit newsreview.com/cammies to vote for your favorite! (Voting ends April 17, at midnight.)

2 CAMMIES • MUSIC FESTIVAL • APRIL 2019

Surrogate Lo & Behold Aberrance Mark McKinnon & The Strolling Rogues Leonard Cohen Tribute Orchestra Sunny Acres John-Michael Sun Himp C Astronaut Ice Cream

Vote now for Best Local Act at newsreview


WE arE rapE Crisis CEntEr advoCatEs!

STIVAL

9

stat e ce Rt i f i e d t R a i n e d , s e x u a l a ssa u lt c o u n se l o R s p R o v i d i n g pR i v i l e g e d /c o m m u n i c at i o n (c o n f i d e n t i a l i t y )

20, 7-10 p.m. da Big Room

o n ly R a p e c R i si s ce n t e R f o R the communities within butte, gl e n n & te h a m a c o u n t i e s

., Chico

show at 6:30)

Mezzanine Stage Pre-show (6:30 p.m.): Chico Open-Mic All-Star Revue, hosted by Andan Casamajor Intermission: Paradise Open-Mic All-Star Revue, hosted by Susan Dobra

GET MORE EYES ON YOUR SHOW OR EVENT

CN&R’S ONLINE CALENDAR

Free Tickets Admission is free, but donations to the Music Around the Camp Fire Fund are encouraged. Pre-registration for tickets is required. For details visit sierranevada.com or facebook.com/chicocammies

t w.com/cammies

cal

en

da

r

a c b nt!

it eve

subm

WE arE availablE through our Crisis linE 24 hour 7 days a WEEk!

❤ RegaRdless of when sexual assault occuRRed ❤ to ask a question, make a RefeRRal, get options & emotional suppoRt ❤ accompaniment seRvices suppoRting clients by being physically pResent ❤ advocacy seRvices help to inteRvene with agencies and/oR individuals on behalf of ouR clients

WE providE support and EduCation!

❤ followup contact to ensuRe continuity of seRvices ❤ one-on-one counseling ❤ suppoRt gRoups ❤ community outReach ❤ education pRogRams available foR all age gRoups foR schools, agencies oR businesses ❤ state ceRtified tRained, volunteeR/inteRn advocate pRogRam

NOW THAT YOU KNOW WHO WE ARE JOIN US AND SPREAD THE WORD Log onto www.newsreview.com and visit the calendar section to add your next event, show, fundraiser or exhibit. It’s just that easy.

businEss oFFiCEs hours: Monday – Friday (excluding holiday) 10a-6pm butte/glenn: 530-891-1331 or 877-452-9588 @ 2889 Cohasset road, suite 2 Chico, Ca 95973 tehama: 530-529-3980 Corning: 530-824-3980 @ 725 pine street, red bluff, Ca 96080

www.newsreview.com CAMMIES • MUSIC FESTIVAL • APRIL 2019 3


Profile for News & Review

c-2019-04-11  

c-2019-04-11