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CHICO’S FREE NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY VOLUME 42, ISSUE 32 THURSDAY, APRIL 4, 2019 WWW.NEWSREVIEW.COM

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CN&R

INSIDE

Vol. 42, Issue 32 • April 4, 2019 OPINION

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Editorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Guest Comment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Second & Flume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 This Modern World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Streetalk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

NEWSLINES

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Downstroke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Sifter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9

HEALTHLINES

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Appointment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Weekly Dose. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

GREENWAYS

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Eco Event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS

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15 Minutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 The Goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

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COVER STORY

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ARTS & CULTURE

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Arts Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 This Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Fine Arts listings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Nightlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Reel World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Chow. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Arts DEVO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Brezsny’s Astrology . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35

CLASSIFIEDS

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REAL ESTATE

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ON THE COVER: DESIGN BY TINA FLYNN

Our Mission: To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. Editor Melissa Daugherty Managing Editor Meredith J. Cooper Arts Editor Jason Cassidy Contributing Editor Evan Tuchinsky Staff Writer Ashiah Scharaga Calendar Editor Neesa Sonoquie Contributors Robin Bacior, Alastair Bland, Michelle Camy, Vic Cantu, Charles Finlay, Bob Grimm, Howard Hardee, Miles Jordan, Mark Lore, Landon Moblad, Brie Oviedo, Ryan J. Prado, Juan-Carlos Selznick, Ken Smith, Robert Speer, Carey Wilson Managing Art Director Tina Flynn Creative Services Manager Elisabeth Bayard-Arthur Ad Designers Naisi Thomas, Cathy Arnold Publications Designers Katelynn Mitrano, Nikki Exerjian Director of Sales and Advertising Jamie DeGarmo Advertising Services Coordinator Ruth Alderson Senior Advertising Consultants Brian Corbit, Laura Golino Advertising Consultants Adam Lew, Jordon Vernau

President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Director of Nuts & Bolts Deborah Redmond Director of People & Culture David Stogner Director of Dollars & Sense Debbie Mantoan Nuts & Bolts Ninja Norma Huerta Payroll/AP Wizard Miranda Hansen Accounts Receivable Specialist Analie Foland Developer John Bisignano System Support Specialist Kalin Jenkins N&R Publications Managing Editor Laura Hillen N&R Publications Writers Anne Stokes, Thea Rood Marketing & Publications Consultants Greta Beekhuis, Steve Caruso, Joseph Engle, Elizabeth Morabito, Traci Hukill, Celeste Worden 353 E. Second St., Chico, CA 95928 Phone (530) 894-2300 Fax (530) 892-1111 Website newsreview.com Got a News Tip? (530) 894-2300, ext 2224 or chiconewstips@newsreview.com Calendar Events cnrcalendar@newsreview.com Calendar Questions (530) 894-2300, ext. 2243 Want to Advertise? Fax (530) 892-1111 or cnradinfo@newsreview.com Classifieds (530) 894-2300, press 2 or classifieds@newsreview.com Job Opportunities jobs@newsreview.com Want to Subscribe to CN&R? chisubs@newsreview.com Editorial Policies: Opinions expressed in CN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons, or other portions of the paper. CN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or review materials. Email letters to cnrletters@newsreview.com. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form and to edit them for libel.

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APRIL 4, 2019

CN&R

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OPINION

Send guest comments, 340 words maximum, to gc@newsreview.com or to 353 E. Second St., Chico, CA 95928. Please include photo & short bio.

EDITORIAL

(Another) failure to communicate Early evening on Tuesday (April 2), the day Oroville

Dam’s newly constructed spillway was tested for the first time, the National Weather Service issued a tornado warning for eastern Glenn County and westcentral Butte County. A few hours later, the agency issued the first series of flood warnings. Didn’t hear anything? You’re not alone. Some residents reported receiving emergency notifications by way of texts or Amber Alert-type messages. Others received nothing at all. Butte County and the city of Chico are able to issue warnings via a system called CodeRED—it allows the agencies to send out texts or other messages to residents—but it isn’t a cure-all. That’s because it’s an opt-in arrangement. Residents have to sign up to get them. County officials are aware of this inadequacy, and to their credit they attempted to step things up for this week’s severe storm. However, there were some pretty major hiccups. For starters, the county did not issue a warning about the tornado, giving no explanation for that oversight. Meanwhile, flash flood warnings went out not only through CodeRED, but also by way of the Integrated Public Alert & Warning System and Wireless Emergency Alerts. The problem is that those alerts were targeted to precise geographical regions as opposed to

the greater population—leaving many unaware of the problems to come. According to a Chico Police Department press release, issued in the wee hours of Wednesday morning, officers were swamped with calls related to flooding. The department reported depths of more than 3 feet in certain low-lying roadways and intersections. And it called in additional staffing to address the emergency, working with public works and fire department personnel for several hours after the rain stopped to unplug drainage systems and move abandoned vehicles from public rights of way. As of press time, this newspaper was getting varied reports of damage. Multiple businesses were inundated with water and the Chico Unified School District sent out a press release asking parents of Chico Junior High students to keep their children home, if possible, due to extensive flooding on the campus. While law enforcement have not attributed any fatalities to the storm—the silver lining in a county increasingly plagued by disaster—the same can’t be said for Nov. 8. As we know, 85 people perished during the Camp Fire—an event exacerbated by inadequate alerts. Here we are five months later. While the county seems to be bettering its emergency communication protocols, it’s clearly a work in progress. Ω

GUEST COMMENT

Demand people come first M Memorize that number. The 2019 U.S. Congress’ excellent universal health insurance bill would provide edicare for All is now House Resolution 1384.

comprehensive coverage, including mental health, vision, dental, catastrophic care, and long-term care for the elderly and disabled. It is government-provided insurance for privately delivered care with a choice of clinicians—no premiums, co-pays, deductibles or exorbitant medication prices. And it will cost less than the current private for-profit chaos that leaves 1 in 5 Americans uninsured or underinsured. Multiple polls say a majority of your friends and neighbors—Republicans, by Democrats and independents—want Paul Medicare for All. O’Rourke-Babb Here’s the bad news: America’s The author, a nurse Health Insurance Plans and big practitioner, is pharma hate this plan. With Medicare co-chair of NorCal for All in place, they and their army Physicians for a of professional liars in lobbyland National Health would no longer be the first to profit Program and on the steering committee from your health care needs. Expect for California PNHP. these groups to spend hundreds of

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millions of dollars trying to convince you Medicare for All can’t work, despite studies of other countries proving it does and results in better outcomes. But the good news is great news: Around the United States, citizens are doing their homework and demanding that people come first. HR 1384 can be a giant part of that narrative. It would end tens of thousands of dollars of out-of-pocket spending. It would negotiate drug prices. It would help individual hospitals save costs by replacing redundant and complex single-item, single-patient billing with global operating budgets. It would help both labor and business by taking health insurance out of those economics. It would provide employees whose jobs are eliminated— such as insurance industry personnel—with priority job placement and retraining. So what can you do? Come to the Southside Community Center in Oroville at 12:30 p.m., April 13, to hear Dr. Ed Weisbart, a family physician, and Medicare for All advocate Tim Faust speak. Contact legislators to support HR 1384 and encourage improvements to Bernie Sanders’ single-payer bill. Build Medicare for All into your organizations’ platforms. If you’re a business owner, invite the Business Alliance for a Healthy California to speak. Watch the films Fix It and Now Is the Time. Ω

SECOND & FLUME by Melissa Daugherty m e l i s s a d @ n e w s r e v i e w. c o m

No Kondo, no thanks I first heard about Japanese organizational maven Marie Kondo when I interviewed a local decluttering consultant for a piece in the CN&R back in January 2018. The story was included in a package meant to help readers embark on the new year with self-improvement in mind. Kondo has become increasingly popular since then, thanks in large part to a new Netflix series—Tidying Up with Marie Kondo— in which she helps Americans clear out their homes. I haven’t watched it, nor have I picked up any of her books—four on the same subject, ahem—but I have read enough stories about her purging technique to know that she ought to stay out of my way. There’s something offensive to me about a person who believes the only possessions worth keeping are those that “spark joy.” Kondo calls it the KonMari method. I call it a gimmick. I’m not about to throw out a single tchotchke or knickknack simply to keep up with the latest minimalist fad. The antique typewriter I’ll never use: Ain’t giving it up. The hundreds of novels collecting dust in my study: Don’t even think about it. A mid-century, cymbal-holding monkey: Not going anywhere. Those are but a few of the belongings Kondo could never compel me to part with. As for sparking joy, that’s subjective. The old Woodstock typewriter came from a woman who called me out of the blue when I was a young reporter. She said she wanted to give it to me, but then asked for money. I gave her 20 bucks, and in return received a hunk of metal and a weird story to boot. Do I need two copies of Larry McMurtry’s novels? Of course not, but I like to pass along a good book now and again, and I dare not part with my original. That musical monkey—which doesn’t even work these days— sat on the bar in my grandparents’ house when I was a little kid. I remember being startled by its squawk when I’d walk by. I rescued it from an estate sale—passing over items of value for this sentimental one. Now that I think about it, maybe that toy sparks a little joy. But what about the things that don’t? I’m talking about the practical stuff—clothing, for example. Aside from my wedding dress, I can’t think of a single garment in my closet that elates me. But I’m not about to embark on a massive purge, because that seems awfully wasteful. Spoken like a pack-rat, I know. There’s truth to that. I recently went through a dozen years’ worth of documents in my office. It was difficult to get rid of old correspondence, especially the many heartfelt, funny and scandalous notes CN&R readers took the time to compose and send to me. I’m not nearly finished with that task. As for our collective clutter, it seems to me Americans ought to consume less in the first place. To that end, I’ve made a conscious effort to refrain from impulse buys over the past couple of years. I feel like the same philosophy applies to purging. Take your time, so you’re less likely to regret it. That’s some sound advice—I’ll call it the Daugherty method.

Melissa Daugherty is editor of the CN&R


LETTERS

Cesar’s

Send email to cnrletters@newsreview.com

HAVE LYME? Think you might have Lyme?

Yard Service

Pensions over the public Re “The problem is pensions” (Letters, by Dave Howell) and “Mark of austerity” (Second & Flume, by Melissa Daugherty, March 28): Bidwell Park has suffered deferred maintenance since massive layoffs of park staffers over the last six years. The park division was absorbed into Public Works. Like Dave Howell said, the problem is “the unsustainable cost of government employee compensation.” I’ll add, top-heavy management. Twelve management positions overseeing the park cost over $1 million in total compensation. The park division has only five “maintenance workers,” amounting to less than $300,000 in total compensation. While staff defers maintenance in the park, they continue to pay almost $20 million a year toward their pensions, about $8 million of that toward the pension deficit. At the April 2 City Council meeting, staff recommends renewal of the CalPERS agreement,

requiring employees to pay only 11 percent of the cost of their pensions. As long as the council and staff continue to place the pensions ahead of the public, infrastructure will continue to be shortchanged, including Bidwell Park. Juanita Sumner Chico

Academic hot air Re “Hot flash” (Greenways, by Evan Tuchinsky); “Savor the flap” (Chow, by Jason Cassidy); “Poetry, Stonewall art and the airport choir” (Arts DEVO, by Jason Cassidy); and “Mark of austerity” (Second & Flume, by Melissa Daugherty, March 28): After reading the customary environmental “tipping point” musings of local academics—(enviably) able to pay their mortgages by saying silly things about peddling around under the leafy canopy of Dear Old Chico—I flip a few more pages and see that beef (flap steak?) is rhapsodized in “melt in your mouth” language. Gosh, I thought beef was

the most environmentally objectionable food product on the planet. Next, we have a flock of high-school-age songbirds, burning barrels of oil winging to the Emerald Isle for a choir gig. Isn’t that the first thing we’d teach our young ’uns not to do, if all this talk of environmental mayhem was more than so much methane escaping the trousers of affluent liberals? And speaking of the leafy canopy, it should be noted that while the loss of 27 oaks is being rightfully scrutinized, all of our local parks and waterways are being defoliated at ground level; this being yet another campaign in the war on the homeless. We live in a country where homeless men are routinely incarcerated and coerced into providing slave labor. In some cases, clearing the same parkland that might provide minimal refuge when, once again, they are dumped onto our streets.

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Re “Long road ahead” (Newslines, by Meredith J. Cooper, March 28): Paradise Irrigation District indicated that its system has benzene contamination, so we have to assume that if the water was turned on to the home, that water infrastructure may be contaminated. Dr. Andrew Whelton indicates that capturing benzene molecules is difficult. He advises specific protocols for accurate testing: allowing the water to fallow for 72 hours and testing two to three locations with one being the water heater. State Regional Water Quality [Control] indicated to me that they had conducted 20 tests, and none were positive. These tests are expensive, and we have not advised our clients to conduct them. I asked people to please let me know if they had gotten a benzene detect and are willing to share these results. This is important for us to track. Whelton affirmed that he has been contacted by those with contamination issues. In-home testing is important for the community. The cost of this testing should not be on the citizens. PID is not responsible for this contamination. The district should not be responsible for the cost and manpower needed to do this testing. This testing needs to be done immediately, frequently and the results need to be as transparent as confidentiality laws will allow.

Re “Crime of the times” (Healthlines, by Evan Tuchinsky, March 28): The robberies of pharmacies in Butte County, in which thieves jump over the counters to grab medicines, are another reason for the need for improved Medicare for All that calls for doctors to talk with patients about proper diet and cutting down on sugars, and also exercise. This is also a reason why such a plan must cover and strongly encourage, whenever possible, alternative care such as chiropractic, acupuncture, naturopathy and supplements, including CBD oil and medicinal marijuana. If these terrible drugs would

as much as possible be strongly discouraged—and that includes benzodiazepines like Klonopin and sleeping pills, in addition to opioids—there wouldn’t be the need for pharmacies to have so many of those drugs in their stores. These drugs simply make people sicker and even cause death. Walter Ballin Chico

Editor’s note: For more on Medicare for All, see this week’s guest comment on page 4.

‘Plethora of evidence’ Re “‘No collusion’—now what?” (Editorial, March 28): George Mason and many other Founding Fathers argued convincingly of the need to impeach and expel presidents abusing their office and striving for despotism. We did not need then nor do we need now support derived from a report. We already have a plethora of evidence of Trump’s callous, damning disregard for law, civility and proper use of powers. It matters less that we are assured of his ultimate conviction than our insisting that representatives honor their sworn obligations to at least chastise by way of impeachment our scoundrel-aspresident. Impeachment is itself damning. To not impeach him is to allow unchecked abuse of powers by a conspicuously inept, boorish pretender. What we have thus far suffered is a restrained Trump. Were he elected to a second term, we may well suffer an even more abusive presidency. Impeachment efforts would at minimum signal intolerance of what is for Trump business as usual. It would also indicate to other nations our unwillingness to tolerate so spoiled a president. Conducting formal impeachment proceedings would be a first step in attempting to heal our damaged democracy. William Todd-Mancillas Chico

Fire friends revisited Re “Frank and Molly” (Guest comment, by Ron Angle, March 7): Recently, in the CN&R commentary, I wrote of my new friends who were trying to get by in the post-Camp Fire era. Molly, a mature and family-oriented formerly stray black and white cat, is doing very well. Frank, an

older Paradise renter who lost his residence in the fire, is not doing so well. He is still living in his car. Folks in his position—elderly and a person of color—do not have the social service workers trampling over their feet trying to help. Frank needed some small propane bottles for cooking and heating. As it happens, I had eight bottles I no longer needed. Which brought this thought to me: What do you have in your garage that you no longer need? Why not have a periodic large community “garage sale” open to those still struggling after the Camp Fire? Let’s give them a personal hand. Ron Angle Chico

Another view of Israel  Time to look up some history, then let’s take the current affairs in Israel. Its citizens (both Arabs and Jews) have rockets fired at them continually from the Gaza Strip. Some land, some don’t. When the Israelis hit back, they’re criticized for hitting harder. Who is in the right? No matter your opinion about how Israel was formed in 1948, we must deal with today’s events. Arabs live in Israel as well as Jews. Arabs are able to vote in free elections. Israel gave up the Gaza Strip in a peace deal voted on by Israel’s government. The Gaza Strip has given Hamas (a terrorist organization) a place from which to fire the aforementioned rockets. Will there ever be peace as long as Israel is surrounded on all sides by terrorists, who have vowed to drive them into the sea? What’s the answer? For me, it’s for the U.S. to stand strong against Israel’s enemies, to speak out against those who side with Hamas (who use children to shield themselves as they try to kill Israelis). We have a president who sides with Israel. We must stand up to bullies who attack democracies throughout the world. Loretta Ann Torres Chico

‘Just wondering’ More letters online:

We’ve got too many letters for this space. please go to www.newsreview.com/chico for additional readers’ comments on past cn&r articles.


STREETALK

What makes you special? Asked at Chico Mall

Pedro Cruz De La Torre retired

I am special because I am 77 and I am happy every single day, even if I have some health issues. I’ve learned over the years to be grateful with God to be 77, and have a wife for 53 years.

Megan Mickey stay-at-home mom

My three beautiful children make me special. They are 7, 4 and 15 months. They bring so much light into my life. They give me reason and purpose, even when I don’t want to keep going. They love me and I love them.

Vicki Inferrera retired

I’m a very adventurous person for a single lady. I worked 15 years in Alaska, just got back from Hawaii last week, worked in Petaluma this week, and I’m heading to San Fransisco tomorrow. I like the different environments.

M. Green retired

I have an extraordinary amount of patience. I was able to make it through 70 years of everything and still be relatively sane. I’m patient with anything except ignorance.

APRIL 4, 2019

CN&R

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NEWSLINES DOWNSTROKE BOOZE FUELS CHÁVEZ DAY

Chico’s college student community celebrated César Chávez Day in an unorthodox way and to excess. The three-day weekend ending on the day honoring the life of the nonviolent protester and champion for farmworkers’ rights resulted in numerous calls for emergency responders. According to a Chico Police Department press release, two people were shot outside a house party at Third and Cedar streets— both victims are in stable condition. Additionally, officers made 56 misdemeanor and seven felony arrests, and issued 79 alcoholrelated citations—for things like being drunk in public, being a minor in possession, and violating the glass ban downtown. Police responded to 13 calls for medical alcohol overdoses from March 29-April 1, according to Lt. Billy Aldridge. “Even over a special event weekend, 13 overdoses is a lot,” he told the CN&R.

Collateral damage

CANCER CENTER TO OPEN

Adventist Health will unveil its new cancer center in Chico on Tuesday (April 9). The opening of the Cancer Care Center is significant, according to a news release, because cancer patients treated at Feather River Cancer Center in Paradise have had to travel up to 50 miles to receive care since the Camp Fire. An added benefit: UC Davis Health is a center partner and will provide access to its Comprehensive Cancer Center’s clinical trials and technology. The facility is located at 95 Declaration Drive, Ste. 1. Full chemotherapy and other infusion services will be offered within the next few months. The center’s team will be anchored by providers who practiced in Paradise, led by medical oncologist and hematologist Dr. Sam Mazj.

CHAMBER APPOINTS CEO

The Chico Chamber of Commerce has hired longtime Chicoan Katy Thoma as its president and CEO. Thoma (pictured) was selected, in part, for her experience in the nonprofit realm. She is a former executive director of both the Jesus Center and the Chico State Research Foundation. Thoma also has held local leadership roles at regional banks. Her first day at the chamber was Monday (April 1). She is filling the vacancy left by Katie Simmons, who departed in November after nearly seven years in that role. “I look forward to working with local stakeholders on the housing, roads and public safety issues impacting our community in light of the Camp Fire,” Thoma said in a press release. 8

CN&R

APRIL 4, 2019

Residents complain of trees lost as PG&E lops potential hazards

W

hen Bob Dickinson stopped by his girl-

friend’s property in Paradise last week to check on things, he knew it would look different—workers had been busy cleaning up the debris and chopping down trees. story and What he wasn’t prepared photo by Meredith J. for, however, was to Cooper see their three beloved redwoods reduced to m ere d i t h c @ n ew srev i ew. c o m stumps. “I’d spoken with Contact PG&E: a PG&E arborist and Residents and busi- said, ‘You’re not going ness owners with to take the redwoods, complaints about the right?’” he told the tree removal process in the Camp Fire zone CN&R, adding that he’d can call 800-PGE-5000 been assured they were or send an email to safe, as they were 17 wildfiresafety@PGE. feet from the utility’s com. People who wish easement, outside the to keep the wood from chopped trees on their 15-foot buffer. “My girlproperty should call friend had a real attach888-421-1700. More ment to them. They info can be found online were the only things she at pge.com/trees. had left. What a heartbreaker.” What’s more, other trees on the property, when felled, damaged a retaining wall and

landed on the leach field—Dickinson isn’t sure yet if that was damaged; he’ll wait for the septic inspection—and some of the logs had been removed. He’d been assured that PG&E would not take the wood. His girlfriend, Delores Costello, had wanted it. Dickinson and Costello are not a unique case. PG&E plans to chop a total of 91,000 trees in the Camp Fire burn area. It’s about two-thirds of the way finished with that effort. Complaints like Dickinson’s are hard to miss on social media. Thing is, a right-of-entry form isn’t needed for the power company to conduct its work, contrary to what’s required for debris-removal crews, and therefore PG&E doesn’t have the same maps with leach fields and septic systems drawn out. Plus, after requests from Paradise and Butte County officials not to leave behind logs by default, it changed that policy this week—now, tree crews will remove logs unless directed by the homeowner to leave them. “We made that change in response to safety concerns raised by the town and county—we will be announcing that shortly,” Paul Moreno, PG&E spokesman, told the CN&R. “We wanted to make sure that

the wood debris won’t pose a fuel hazard … [or] get in the way of cleanup efforts.” Prior to the Camp Fire, PG&E embarked on a

large-scale effort to cut back potential fuels by “increasing the distance between trees and power lines in high fire-risk areas,” including Paradise, Magalia and the foothills, Moreno said. After Nov. 8, it had a whole new set of issues to tackle. Rather than simply rewiring the Ridge exactly the same, it drew up new maps in some places. “There wasn’t much infrastructure left standing, so we didn’t replicate the system,” Moreno explained. “We rebuilt the system so we could get power to all of the buildings that could accept power, plus accommodate new growth.” Then, the utility sent out contracted tree inspectors to assess the situation and mark trees that would need to be removed or trimmed to accommodate the power poles and lines. Trees marked with a “P1” were a top priority because they posed an immediate hazard. “P2” trees were deemed probable problems and scheduled to be chopped within a year. Those marked “NC” would need to be removed for “new construction,”


Bob Dickinson stands on the remains of a redwood on his girlfriend’s property in Paradise. He says the tree wasn’t slated for removal but was chopped anyway.

meaning they would be hazardous to the newly drawn electric grid. In all, Moreno said, 91,000 trees will be removed from the Camp Fire burn zone. To date, about 60,000 had been chopped down. With easements granted to the utility for construction and maintenance of electric lines, workers—there could be “as many as 2,000 or more working on a given day”—need not ask for permission to enter private property. That can be frustrating for landowners. “You almost have to be on your property when they’re there,” Dickinson said. “But how, when they won’t let you live here?” And until now, the crews were instructed to leave any lumber behind unless specifically asked to haul it away. Dickinson said he’d located some of the redwood logs piled up along the PG&E easement adjacent to Costello’s property. He used spray paint to mark them with the address, because he’d like to keep the wood. On social media, other Camp Fire survivors have complained of issues similar to Dickinson’s: trees falling into the ash footprint, broken septic tanks, damaged driveways. Many have complained about the deterioration of the canopy that attracted them to the area in the first place. Chelsea Dwyer told the CN&R in January that, while she and her husband loved their home in Paradise, it just wasn’t the same—without the trees, she could see straight out to the Skyway from their Bille Road property. Not all of the trees being taken down are being cut by PG&E, Moreno said. Other entities, like Caltrans and local governments, also are employing arborists and crews to assess hazards and remove trees. Moreno urged customers to call or email PG&E with special requests or complaints (see infobox). “We also have a claims process, should there be any damage, he said. “We want the process to be smooth for property owners.” As for Dickinson, he told the CN&R that he already has called an attorney to file a claim against the utility. “We’d like to be compensated for the lumber,” he said, looking from the stumps up into the sky where the redwoods once towered overhead. “But it’s not about the money—it’s more about the demoralization. It makes you want to give up.” Ω

Nature speaks, council heeds Climate emergency declaration caps storm-shortened meeting With thunder clapping and rain falling steadily, local

environmentalists from groups united as Chico 350 & Allies started gathering on the steps outside City Council chambers about 90 minutes before the council meeting Tuesday evening (April 2). The lengthy agenda included a resolution, championed by Councilwoman Ann Schwab, declaring a climate emergency. As Schwab would explain later, in introducing the item, “the impacts of climate change are a critical concern,” citing the Camp Fire as an example. She added that while Chico “already has made significant commitments to sustainability, this resolution should serve as a guiding principle”—not just for the Sustainability Task Force, in updating action plans past 2020, but also for the city as a whole in assessing all problems. She had ample support: Many from the rally of roughly three dozen were among the 20 speakers who encouraged the council to adopt the declaration. Several other speakers questioned the validity of the issue and the effectiveness of local legislation on a global condition. Resident Murray Lind, referring to this discussion and an earlier one on cannabis, bellowed from the lectern, “I want more police in our town … we’re talking pot and fake climate!” But, the input—and impact—of another party resonated most loudly. Nature punctuated the meeting with a series of sonic flurries. First came a sequence of cellphone alerts signaling a tornado warning and flash-flooding. Soon after, rain pelted the roof. The volume intensified: As high school and college students spoke of concerns about climate affecting their future, concussive echoes threatened to drown them out. Following a break, during which Councilwoman

Kasey Reynolds departed because flooding in town had affected her personally, Schwab stated that “the impact we’ve had tonight is a very potent example of what we’re going to have unless we make some very significant changes.” The resolution (accessible at tinyurl. com/ChicoDeclare) includes the city eliminating greenhouse gas emissions no later than 2030 and fostering a “just transition” economically by creating good-paying jobs, plus calling on the state and federal governments to “initiate an emergency mobilization to mitigate climate change.” It passed, 5-1, with Councilman Sean Morgan dissenting. Schwab had offered to let anyone suggest changes that would yield a unanimous vote— Morgan, the lone conservative present,

Supporters of a climate emergency declaration sing protest songs at a rally organized by Chico 350 & Allies outside City Council chambers Tuesday (April 2). PHOTO BY EVAN TUCHINSKY

replied that there was “no point in tearing the whole thing apart, I can’t get there.” With streets outside the chambers sidewalk-deep in water, council members decided to adjourn after the vote, at 8:33 p.m., postponing a dozen items and closed session. “Drama: before, during and after,” Stone told the CN&R as he readied to head home. “But really an exciting moment for climate action and addressing the severity of this problem in this community. Dramatic weather—what we saw here tonight, the reason for the closure of the meeting—is exactly the type of thing we’re trying to combat.” Ahead of the climate declaration, the

SIFT ER Housing headaches Chico’s housing market, tight before the Camp Fire and virtually impenetrable since, has affordability on the minds of many in the North State. Turns out the topic has risen to the forefront across the Golden State. According to survey results released last week by the Public Policy Institute of California (PPIC), 68 percent of adult residents statewide consider housing affordability in their area to be a big problem, 21 percent somewhat of a problem. Nearly half, 47 percent, said housing costs make them consider moving to another region or state.

Just two months earlier, after newly inaugurated Gov. Gavin Newsom released his budget plan, PPIC respondents listed housing as the fourth-highest priority for state government—behind immigration, education and jobs/economy. Also in the latest poll, which surveyed 1,706 people by phone, 72 percent support Newsom’s proposed $1.8 billion one-time spending on low- and moderate-income housing.

council gave shape to the committee that will suggest how the city might structure commercial cannabis. Four committee members got direct spots based on organizational appointments, as will a fifth to be named, and council members will nominate five various community representatives. In two weeks, the council will finalize the community members and choose from among themselves a City Council designee. The Commercial Cannabis Citizen Advisory Committee drew 26 applicants as a result of the recruitment process contentiously drafted at the March 5 meeting. (See “Legal jeopardy and weed,” Newslines, March 7.) Ultimately, the council opted to specify slots to incorporate interests: cannabis expert, local business, downtown business, Chamber of Commerce, real estate, the university, public schools, public health and community at large—the latter receivNEWSLINES C O N T I N U E D APRIL 4, 2019

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ing two. City staff presence will include law enforcement. Vice Mayor Alex Brown immediately made a motion to put on the committee Butte County’s public health officer, Dr. Andy Miller, and the individual chosen by the Chico Unified School District to represent its agency, Assistant Superintendent Jim Hanlon. Schwab questioned the process of considering nominees without a framework set. She also noted that Chico State might want to select an appointee, since the city had invited the university to join, too. “Be consistent,” Schwab said. Stone noted that the Downtown Chico Business Association had endorsed one of its board members, Teri DuBose—and Councilman Karl Ory pointed out that the Chico Chamber of Commerce had recommended Karli Olsen (a board member). Fourteen applicants spoke, including DuBose. A unanimous vote made Miller and Hanlon the first committee members. A separate motion on DuBose and Olsen carried 6-1, with Ory opposed, saying the DCBA had appointed someone “not for” cannabis, which he deemed “grandstanding a little bit.” The council voted unanimously to let Chico State determine its appointee, but not until after debate swirled as to what constituted a Chico perspective for a city committee. Must a member reside within city limits, as required for commissioners or board members? Morgan advocated to “categorically deny” anyone without a Chico address—and when it came to the university, where he teaches, he pointedly said if the representative were a student who isn’t from here, he’d be “uninterested in hearing from that person.” In a final burst of drama, Stone and Brown joined Morgan and Ory in voting down a motion by Councilman Scott Huber to add a second council representative to the committee. Ory said the panel was large enough. Morgan, again pointed, asked Schwab if she’d be willing to serve after stating he felt Brown would echo positions of the cannabis industry. Schwab, mayor when Chico previously considered legalization of dispensaries for medical cannabis, said she would. —Evan Tuchinsky eva ntu c h insk y @ newsr ev iew.c o m


Oroville Councilwoman Janet Goodson said the city has to make a priority to clean up debris and blight, particularly in Southside, annexed in 2015. PHOTO BY ASHIAH SCHARAGA

Southside’s plight Oroville residents protest blight in impoverished district

As Janet Goodson looked at the

imposing heap of garbage in front of her, she fell silent. A fetid smell wafted from the piles of refuse spilling into the alleyway parallel to Oro Bangor Highway and Greenville Street in Southside Oroville. Among the detritus: crumbling concrete walls, a broken-down vehicle, a caved-in mattress. Goodson, an Oroville city councilwoman, has seen this kind of neglect within her neighborhood for years. And she’s fed up. She became the first elected official from Southside after its annexation in 2015. Since then, she’s attempted to address the disparity between that neighborhood and the rest of the city. She made some progress the past two years as vice mayor, discovering a vehicle disposal program that also provides funding for code enforcement. But there’s still a lot of work to be done. For many council members, it’s “out of sight, out of mind,” she said—they don’t see what she sees every day. That alleyway is just one example—the neglect is widespread. Goodson led the CN&R down several streets with similar views: piles of rotting trash and wood debris;

boarded-up, crumbling homes; broken-down vehicles. “This is my neighborhood, and there are good people that live here,” Goodson said. “And they feel trapped.” She isn’t the only Southside resident who is frustrated. Monday (April 1), more than a dozen community members protested outside a property on the corner of El Noble and Mesa avenues, neighboring Central Middle School. Goodson said it has been a year since the home’s roof collapsed and the property was left in a state of disrepair. That day, children walking by after school chatted nervously while passing the protesters. One cut across the property, stepping over wooden boards with nails sticking out of them. Pastor Kevin Thompson, a longtime Oroville resident and chief executive officer of the Southside Oroville Community Center, helped rally people that day alongside Goodson, calling on the city to address the property immediately for the safety of the neighborhood and its children. This is not acceptable, nor a good example to be setting, he said.

“We’re asking for equality,” he told the CN&R later. “The pendulum of justice and humanity has to swing evenly in both directions.” For Bill Bynum, vice president of the local chapter of the NAACP, the situation is one of environmental injustice as well. Neighborhoods on Fort Wayne and Elgin streets are in particularly dire need of attention. “It’s not a matter of street lights and sidewalks or even roads,” he said. “It’s like a poster child of a city neglecting its citizenry.” Many departments are understaffed

within the city of Oroville, and code enforcement is no exception. It has a core staff of three—a director and two officers. At a recent City Council meeting, Assistant City Administrator Bill LaGrone explained that a code enforcement officer had to get special permission to take up an issue at a home. Though the city has policies and procedures in place, it doesn’t have the money to enforce them. “We’ve created a program that, through grant funding, we have the personnel, we’re able to write a letter, but we have no teeth in that,” LaGrone said. “We’re a paper tiger.” That night, the council approved $15,000 to get the department through the rest of the fiscal year. LaGrone said he will propose a “more robust, aggressive” enforcement program for 2019-20. That includes officers identifying a problem and ordering the property

owner to take care of it within 10 days. If nothing changes, a citation will be issued and an administrative hearing process begins, LaGrone said. The city may place a lien on the property in question and seize and sell it if the amount owed exceeds the value. That effort likely will be buoyed by a pending economic surge put in place by voters. With the city facing a general fund deficit of nearly $2 million, mainly due to rising pension costs, residents in November passed a 1 cent sales tax increase. Collection started Monday and is anticipated to generate $3.7 million per year. Vice Mayor Scott Thomson told the CN&R the council has to proceed in a fiscally responsible manner for the entire citizenry of Oroville. Southside, where blighted properties and illegal dumping are most concentrated, is still relatively new to the city, he said. However, the issues have been long-standing, he added, and the responsibility for cleanup falls on property owners, as well. “It’s really easy to point a finger at the government and say it’s their fault,” he said. “[The issue is] definitely not neglected. It’s not something we’re putting on the back burner.” In the meantime, locals say neighborhoods are languishing. Take Liza West’s situation, for example. She lives on Mesa Avenue and has made multiple complaints to the city about the aforementioned property near the middle school, she told the CN&R. She always ends up leaving messages. West added that she understands the city has been “terribly poor,” and is hopeful the sales tax increase will help spur action. “Of course you’re frustrated. What can you do?” she said. “I just cover my eyes when I walk past. And that’s not a solution, is it?” For Goodson, the buck stops with her fellow City Council members. She hopes the panel will listen to the pleas from her neighborhood. “If this is not a priority, then it will continue,” Goodson said. “It is my hope that this new council really takes a hard look at addressing this problem.” —ASHIAH SCHARAGA ash ia h s@ newsr ev iew.c o m

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HEALTHLINES Carol Holcomb, who lost her home in Paradise to the Camp Fire, says she relives the disaster in nightmares and flashbacks. PHOTO BY MICHELLE CAMY FOR KAISER HEALTH NEWS

Collective trauma

the mental health distress is going to be among affected populations,” said sociology professor Lori Peek, director of the Natural Hazards Center at the University of Colorado at Boulder. In Paradise, the “magnitude of the disaster” was staggering. Paradise officials report that 9 in 10 homes in the town burned down. “It’s been pretty traumatic,” said Elissa Crane, who lost the low-income rental she shared in Paradise with her husband and her disabled adult son. The family has been staying in an insurance-paid hotel since November as they search for an affordable apartment for themselves and their two cats. With temporary housing insurance about to run out, they’re considering a permanent move to Idaho. “We are animals and our nests are very important to us,” Rothbaum said. “One of the most stressful things you can do to an animal is mess up its nest.” Martha Bryant’s house was one of three

Camp Fire survivors struggle with lasting psychological damage by

Stephanie O’Neill

Omorning of her pine-shaded neighborhood was the sun that reflected red and gold on her ne of the final memories Carol Holcomb has

trees Nov. 8. That day, she said, promised to be a beautiful one in Paradise. So she was surprised to hear what sounded like raindrops tapping her roof a short time later. Holcomb, 56, stepped outside to investigate and saw a chunk of pine bark floating down from the sky. “It was about 3 inches by 2 inches,” she said. “And it was smoking.” It was her first glimpse of the approaching wildfire that would become the deadliest and most destructive in California history—one she continues to relive in debilitating nightmares and flashbacks. The Camp Fire killed 85 people in the region, many of them elderly. Most died in their homes, others while fleeing in their cars or trying to reach safety on foot. For thousands of residents, the terror of sitting in traffic jams as the wildfire bore down left emotional scars. “Everyone who experienced this went through trauma,” said Linnea Duncan, a licensed clinical social worker who fled the fast-moving firestorm

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from her home in Magalia. Sandro Galea, dean of Boston University’s School of Public Health, said that after such an event, “We would expect to find a high burden of post-traumatic stress disorder and depression.” Galea, a leading researcher in the field of mass trauma and disaster, said the consequences for individuals can vary depending on the intensity of their experience, the type of support available to them after the disaster and whether the community comes together in the recovery and rebuilding process. For Holcomb, it took nearly three hours to escape Paradise as smoke from burning houses, cars and brush turned day to night and cut visibility to mere feet. Barely able to see the road, she got behind a large truck, its tail lights her guide. As she watched the flames devour nearly everything around her, she could hear residential propane tanks exploding like steel-encased kernels of popcorn. “You could hear, ‘Boom, boom, boom,’” she said. Just as she got out of the flames, her truck caught fire. Holcomb pulled onto the median of the highway and jumped out in time to save herself and her cat. A man she didn’t know told her to get into his truck and together they made it to safety. In the commotion, she left a backpack next to her burn-

ing truck. It contained treasures: her mother’s Bible, her grandfather’s Purple Heart from World War I and photographs of both of them. Nightmares and flashbacks in the immediate aftermath of a disaster are normal, says Barbara Rothbaum, director of a trauma and anxiety recovery program at Emory University School of Medicine. So, too, are irritability, anger, hyper-vigilance and problems with sleep and concentration. When these symptoms persist for at least a month, the diagnosis can be post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD. First acknowledged by America’s mental health community in 1980, it’s the one mental health disorder predicated on exposure to traumatic events. For most people, Rothbaum said, the psychological distress will fade. But for others— especially those who avoid thinking, speaking or writing about the event—symptoms may stick around for years, affecting their relationships, their work and their ability to heal. “It’s very similar to the grief process,” Rothbaum said. “We don’t think there’s any way to the other side of the pain except through it.” In the general population, Galea said, about 10 percent of those with direct exposure to a disaster will experience PTSD. But among children, women and those with prior mental illness, susceptibility to disaster-induced PTSD is significantly higher, studies show. “It’s the magnitude of a disaster that oftentimes can help us to predict how severe

remaining in a ravaged neighborhood. On her first visit back, she said, she failed to recognize her own house. She continues to have nightmares; traffic jams trigger panic attacks. “What I remember the most is just the sheer fear and panic and my heart pounding,” said Bryant, 60, a third-generation resident of Paradise. “Nobody was moving. And I was just screaming, ‘Move! Move! HEALTHLINES C O N T I N U E D

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APPOINTMENT Weekend workout Run, walk, saunter or skip through beautiful Bidwell Park at the ninth annual Poppy Walk & 5K Run, which starts at 8:30 a.m. this Saturday (April 6). The event takes place at One-Mile Recreation Area and benefits the Peg Taylor Center, a local organization that provides medical and social services for older adults. This year, Butte County Sheriff Kory Honea is the honored guest, and the Elks will be barbecuing hot dogs and pouring cold lemonade at the finish line. Invite the whole family along—kids under 12 stroll for free! For more information, call 3422345 or go to poppywalk.org.


SEXUAL VIOLENCE HAS NO BOUNDARIES

All Gender Identities, Races, Ages, Social Classes & Ethnicities are Affected • 1 in 5 women will be raped in their lifetime • Nearly 1 in 2 women and 1 in 5 men experience sexual violence victimization other than rape at some point in their lives • Intimate partner sexual assault and rape are used to intimidate, control, and demean survivors of domestic violence • Intimate partner sexual assault is more likely than stranger or acquaintance assault to cause physical injury • 40-50% of women in abusive relationships will also be sexually violated during the course of the relationship • 18% of female survivors of spousal rape say their children witnessed the crime • Only 1 in 10 report being sexually violated. Marital rape is the most under-reported form of sexual assault.

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HEALTHLINES

c o N t I N u e d F R o m PA g e 1 2

About this story:

It was produced by Kaiser Health News, a nonprofit news service covering health issues. It is an editorially independent program of the Kaiser Family Foundation that is not affiliated with Kaiser Permanente.

big difference in terms of the emotional healing process,” she said. The town of Paradise Facebook page seems to be filling that role. In addition to providing notices about building regulations, safety issues and where to get free drinking water, it’s acting as a public forum where people can participate in live planning meetings and discussions about the town’s future. For Holcomb, though, there will be no going home to Paradise. She is healing—getting treatment for PTSD symptoms and, thanks to a thoughtful person who put the backpack she’d left on the median back in her burned-out truck, she recovered some of her family’s treasures. But Holcomb won’t rebuild, she said. She is instead looking for a home in a farming community with trees in orchards that can resist a wildfire. “I can’t live in the forest again,” she said. “I just can’t.” Ω

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Get going! Move!’” Bryant said she knows she needs counseling, but life’s been too full of other decisions to seek it out. In a 2017 study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association Psychiatry, Galea and colleagues found that one way to address the psychological consequences of disaster is through “stepped care,” which screens survivors as they move through the recovery process, “so that you can direct them to the care they need, when they have that need,” said Galea. Providing regular mental health treatment—including practical approaches like cognitive behavior therapy—is one of two key steps to recovery. The other, Galea said, is through restoring a community’s social and economic functioning. Peek, the sociologist, who studied PTSD after Hurricane Katrina, said for those who want to return to Paradise, participation in community-wide conversations is essential. Virtual town halls helped people displaced by the 2005 hurricane participate in the recovery, Peek said. “It was those moments of connection and the sense of cultural familiarity that sometimes made a

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As the turn of the season brings a new crop of produce to the market, it’s a good time to research the types of fruits and vegetables in need of the most washing due to pesticide residue. According to the Environmental Working Group, close to 70 percent of the produce sold in the U.S. carry pesticides. This doesn’t mean you shouldn’t eat your veggies. There is a “clean fifteen” list for produce with negligible to no pesticides, such avocados, corn, pineapple and onions. To stay on the safe side, the EWG suggests soaking and washing all of your produce thoroughly and splurging for organic, when possible. And, remember, you always can grow your own! Here is the 2019 list of dirtiest produce:

APRIL 4, 2019

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GREENWAYS WAYS Matthew Sligar has filmed nearly 100 videos for his website and YouTube channel, Rice Farming TV.

Learning from the land

PHOTO COURTESY OF MATTHEW SLIGAR

Butte County farmer engages, educates via web channel by

Ashiah Scharaga ashiahs@ n ewsrev iew. com

Fning:of acloud-covered Northern California rice field is stunbuttes in the background, or farmer Matthew Sligar, the landscape

monstrous machines turning the earth and frequent appearances from critters like barn owls, crawdads, snakes and jackrabbits. But a person can feel quite isolated working for hours on end in the middle of open acreage. That’s why he founded Rice Farming TV, to share what life in agriculture is like. Sligar has proven himself to be a master storyteller: Rice Farming TV has captured the attention of nearly 21,000 subscribers on its YouTube channel, with the most popular video drawing more than 425,000 views. The venture has been thrilling. “I have fans who are viewing from all around the world who are fellow rice farmers … and we’re exchanging rice farming stories,” Sligar told the CN&R, “and also just [the] general public, who are interested in where rice comes from.” Since 2016, Sligar has filmed nearly 100 episodes for Rice Farming TV, mostly in southwest Butte County. He often dreams up creative and comedic ways to share his story. In one video, he recites a love poem to his shovel while trudging through mud in kneehigh boots, readying the fields for the 2019 crop. In another, he caresses the rice plants in a field dotted with both real and digitally created Rice Krispies treats. “I’m just happy to be carrying on the family legacy and tradition of snapping, crackling and popping out these delicious treats,” he deadpans. In addition to showcasing his sense of humor to entertain people, Sligar also earnestly and thoughtfully speaks about the hard work that goes into rice farming in the interest of teaching others about the industry. Rice

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is one of the state’s largest crops, grown on about 550,000 acres—97 percent of which are within the Sacramento Valley—and contributing $5 billion to the state’s economy each year, according to the California Rice Commission. The state grows virtually all of the United States’ sushi rice. One video follows Sligar on a “typical 14-hour workday” during the planting season. Another offers a step-by-step explanation of how rice is planted in Butte County. In others, he takes viewers on virtual tractor rides and demonstrates important tools, like his autonomous agriculture drone. Sligar doesn’t shy away from controversial topics, either, such as weed and pest control management and water usage. He frequently features guests on his show, most notably other Northern California rice farmers, such as Willows-based organic grower Tom Knowles. Another was Jim Morris, California Rice Commission communications manager, who identified his favorite species of birds that can be spotted around California’s rice fields, which provide habitat for more than 230 wildlife species. Sligar’s growing audience is a reflection of

the quality of Rice Farming TV, Morris told the CN&R via phone—the episodes are fun,

Learn more:

Go to ricefarmingtv.com for episodes or to buy Matthew Sligar’s rice.

entertaining and teach people a lot about agriculture along the way. “You don’t have to be an expert on rice farming to really appreciate all he’s doing,” Morris said. “Matthew has been a huge help in telling why rice matters, and that includes from your sushi roll to being a vital part of our environment.” Sligar said he has received tremendous support for his channel. He has lobbied for the rice industry in Washington, D.C., and participates in a rice leadership development program that allows him to travel, meet and befriend fellow farmers, and “get exposed to the larger picture of the rice industry.” Though Sligar is a third-generation rice farmer, he didn’t always intend to pick up the family trade. One of his least favorite duties as a teen was shoveling the rice fields. He left the North State after high school, studying modern American literature at UC Santa Cruz and then resettling abroad in Prague, where he ran a tourism company for six years. He didn’t stay away from the farm for too long, however. In 2012, he settled in Gridley with his wife, Clara, to raise a family. Now, he harvests 1,600 acres of Calrose mediumgrain rice in west Biggs and Richvale with his father, George. He’s been able to reflect on the benefits of the job: financial security, working outdoors and providing a healthy lifestyle for his family—and, with Rice Farming TV, the social connectivity and educational opportunities.

Sligar’s 3-year-old daughter, Elena, isn’t quite old enough to spend much time in the fields, but she knows that when her dad goes off to work, he says hello to the frogs just for her. His childhood memories there weren’t all laborious (or shovel-related). Sligar recalled “playing with the dog, looking in the junk pile and making swords out of scraps … and climbing on equipment like it was a jungle gym.” He’s looking forward to helping Elena create her own memories of farming as she grows up, and imparting the work ethic his father instilled within him. “I valued the lifestyle that farming gave me as a kid, so I wanted to give that [to the next generation] as I was planning a family,” he said. “It’s important to do the best you can in every single task throughout the entire crop year, because all of that combined is going to help the end product, that being the best yield you can get.” Ω

ECO EVENT

Dandelion stew Spring brings elderflowers and wild lettuces to Bidwell Park for the picking, along with plenty of other hidden delights to diversify your fridge and pantry. But how do you know which is poison, weed, or good to eat? The Chico Creek Nature Center has got you covered this Saturday (April 6), from 10-11:30 a.m., with Incredible Edibles Upper Park. During this informative walk—led by an experienced naturalist— you’ll learn what to pluck, what to leave alone, and how to prepare what you collect. For more info, visit ccnaturecenter. org.


Sex without consent is a crime. Being forced into any unwanted sexual situation can do lasting emotional damage.

BUSINESS OFFICES HOURS: Monday – Friday (excluding Holiday) 10a-6pm Butte/Glenn: 530-891-1331 or 877-452-9588 @ 2889 Cohasset Road, Suite 2 Chico, CA 95973 Tehama: 530-529-3980 Calling from Corning: 530-824-3980 @ 725 Pine Street, Red Bluff, CA 96080

APRIL 4, 2019

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Rebuilding the Ridge Supporting Local Businesses on the Ridge and Surrounding Communities RE-opEnEd aftER thE camp fiRE United CoUntry Johnson real estate 30 Landing Circle, Suite 300, Chico (530) 877-1791

a Good doG day Behavior and traininG 13699 Endicot Circle, Magalia, CA (530) 459-8767

A-1 And Son handyman serviCes 14737 Wildfire Dr, Magalia (530) 519-4680

ampla health 14137 Lakeridge Circle, Magalia (530) 674-4261

apple ridGe Carpet & Upholstery CleaninG 14687 Tyler Court, Magalia (530) 873-4304

Beary sUdsy soap Company 6130 Lambert Lane, Magalia (530) 520-5051

BlaCk oak traininG inC.

sav mor Foods 14001 Lakeridge Circle, Magalia (530) 873-4654

speCtrUm landsCapes (530) 873-9011 14514 Colter Way, Magalia (530) 877-1216

14182 Decatur Drive, Magalia (530) 990-6892

650 Rio Lindo Avenue #5, Chico (530) 345-4880

CalifoRnia voCations, inC

14154 Skyway, #8, Magalia (530) 873-7640

564 Rio Lindo Suite 204, Chico (530) 877-4146

BlUe star solUtions

cOldwell BAnKer pOnderOsA

2136 Myers St, Oroville (530) 872-0948

2061 Dr. MKL Pkwy #167 & #169, Chico (530) 877-6244

Gloss nail salon

Jaki’s hilltop CaFe

reed eleCtriC

BIrKenstOcK Of cHIcO and paRadise

ReMAx of PARAdiSe rhonda maehl

2110 Montgomery St, Oroville (530) 521-3160

2767 Olive Highway, Oroville (530) 533-8500

2242 Park Ave. #C, Chico (530) 635-3251

P.O. Box 599, Magalia (530) 872-0850

14618 Skyway, Magalia

oroville hospital

BecKy’s GrOOmInG pArAdIse

Cedar Creek

ChUCk’s plaCe Fast strip

14112 Skyway, Magalia (530) 873-1275

1380 East Ave, Chico (530) 3215355

6408 Crossroads Road, Magalia (530) 877-5734

moniqUe pierson oF hair medley

dobRiCh septiC seRviCe (530) 873-0199

dR. Wilson dds

1074 East Avenue Suite S, Chico (530) 877-7661

dr.Bent mAcKAy dds 1279 E. 1st Avenue, Chico (530) 877-8694

monkey BUsiness 153 Canyon Highlands Drive, Oroville (530) 415-5115

one Way ConstrUCtion and remodelinG 1900 Oro Dam Blvd #12 - PMB 270, Oroville (530) 521-4549

allevity ReCRuiting & staffing

A-OK HOme InspectIOn servIce

Wood, Water & stone landsCapinG

2124 Myers Street, Oroville (530) 513-7955

2410 Foothill Blvd, Oroville (530) 877-4923

383 Connors Court, Suite A, Chico (530) 891-1955

Waller real estate

PO Box 1731, Magalia (530)624-1562

Rose Chapel MoRtuaRy and CReMatoRy

faRMeRs insuRanCe, CaRly fosteR agenCy

572 Rio Lindo Avenue, Suite 202, Chico (530) 762-2594

haiRdResseR Colleen ConnoR 3028 Esplanade Suite D, Chico (530) 228-8718

hanosh & hunteR dental gRoup 1660 Humboldt Rd, Suite 1, Chico (530) 877-9800

hudson applianCe CenteR 2525 Dominic Drive, Suite D, Chico (530) 877-6312

hunteRs pest ContRol 2555 Zanella Way, Chico (530) 876-1457

iMMediate CaRe MediCal CenteR 376 Vallombrosa Ave, Chico (530) 891 - 1676

JIm’s AutO 2610 HWY 32, Chico (530) 872-8080

JOHn J. rAnK, AttOrney At lAw 116 Henshaw Avenue, Suite C, Chico (530) 891-4000

KevIn BAKer InsurAnce agenCy allstate 389 Conners Ct. Suite G, Chico (530) 872-4644

Kyle nelsOn pHOtOGrApHy 11 Commerce Court #3, Chico (707) 799-5630

laufeR ChiRopRaCtiC 1810 Esplanade, Suite A, Chico (530) 895-1151

MattheWs, hutton & WaRRen, Cpas 2639 Forest Avenue, Suite 100, Chico (530) 877-6793

nevin & Witt insuRanCe and finanCial seRviCes 1600 Mangrove Avenue #195, Chico 530-872-0111

SPonSoRed by

Check back next week for more businesses and organizations that have re-opened. Listings provided by Paradise Ridge Chamber of Commerce. paradisechamber.com 18

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EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS Photo CouRtesy of bRuCe sPAngLeR

15 MINUTES

THE GOODS

butte County: we’re open

Mall musings

Bruce Spangler was born and raised in Oroville, so when he was able to find a job there in his field—he started in hospitality in 2003—he was eager to return to his hometown. With a degree in zoology from Humboldt State, he fell into the hotel business because it paid the bills—and he excelled at it. He’s been general manager of the Holiday Inn Express in the City of Gold since 2011 and is currently serving as president of Explore Butte County, aka the Butte County Tourism Business Improvement District. He recently took time to talk with the CN&R about the local tourism industry, which has been impacted by the Camp Fire on two fronts—not only in the loss of attractions in the burn areas but also in the influx of houseless residents and out-of-town laborers staying in local hotels. Check explorebuttecounty.com for more.

Did the fire affect how you market our area to out-of-town visitors? Once the Camp Fire hit, Explore Butte County had an emergency meeting. We pulled in [marketing nonprofit] Visit California, plus [local representatives], and we had a round table to discuss ideas as to what we should do at this point. We knew we had to rethink our strategy. The most important thing is to support our communities at this time. So, all of the events and festivals—in Paradise, Oroville, Chico and the surrounding areas—we

by

Meredith J. Cooper meredithc@newsreview.com

will continue to highlight those. We want to remind people that Butte County is still open. But we switched our marketing focus to the drive markets rather than overnight stays. So, we’re targeting people in Sacramento and Redding, anywhere within about a two- to four-hour drive.

Are there any vacancies? We’re starting to see, as hoteliers, that for Thursday to Sunday, occupancies are opening up. So, that means there’s availability to book leisure travel. We’re starting to have wedding blocks come in—that’s really important for Chico, spring weddings. And we’re building up to our busy season.

Chico’s expecting a new Holiday Inn Express—any updates? We’re hoping to open there at the end of May. Unfortunately, it won’t be open before graduation, but we’re hoping by June 1. We have a Visit California trip that’s

coming through [then], a group of international tour operators coming from a symposium in San Francisco who are taking a tour of the northern region of California. It’ll include an overnight stay in Chico, with a full day in Oroville, Chico and the surrounding areas. We’re excited to host something like that.

Are you seeing any new trends in the tourism industry? People are getting back into doing road trips. Visit California is seeing that as a huge motivator. So, our next campaign will be a road trip campaign. San Francisco is a huge, prime market for us. It’s just far enough out that people want that couple-day stay. They want to get out of the city, into the open spaces, but not too far, so they don’t have to devote too much time to it.

stuDent sPeciaL!

—MEREDITH J. COOPER m e re d i t h c @new srev i ew. c o m

I haven’t felt much like shopping since the Camp Fire. I know I advocate in this space for supporting our local retailers, but I myself have struggled to find the motivation to go buy, for instance, new jeans or a new pair of shoes. But, last week, I mustered the energy and forced myself out of the house and over to the Chico Mall. If nothing else, it would give me a chance to see what’s going on there now that the disaster resource center has closed. The cool news: Several new places are preparing to open in vacant storefronts. And three of those are Paradise businesses. The first that caught my eye was Dove’s Gypsy Heart Boutique, a popular Skyway women’s clothing/home décor store owned by its namesake, Dovie Detches. The Paradise shop didn’t burn, but Detches has been clearing out inventory the past few weeks in anticipation of moving to the Chico Mall. The new digs are across from American Eagle Outfitters. Next door to Dove’s (and next to Rue Guy) is another Paradise transplant, Americana Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu. Opened by head instructor Andrew “Mu Shu” Osterlund in 2007, the martial arts studio offers memberships, classes for kids and adults, and private lessons. The third Paradise transplant in the mall is Backyard Solutions, which is hard to miss with its large Jacuzzi in the front display window. The store specializes in outdoor appliances and décor, from barbecues to greenhouses, and is located next to Hot Topic.

CAMPIng tIMe The Oroville/Feather Falls Casino is Butte County’s only KOA campground, and I recently got word that it is changing its designation to a KOA Journey. What that basically means is it’s conveniently situated along “the highways and byways of North America” and it has long, pull-through parking spaces that make setup and tear-down particularly easy. The Feather Falls campground also has wifi, cable, a dog park and gift shop. Plus, it’s right by the casino! Adding to its allure, the Oroville/Feather Falls Casino KOA received the 2018 KOA Founder’s and President’s awards for world-class service and exceptional quality standards. gRowIng busIness I was driving down Park Avenue a week or so ago and

noticed the Taqueria Martinez sign outside the walk-up window at 1530 Park Ave. had been replaced by one advertising Taqueria Pinolera. (Martinez had been part of the Cocina Cortes family, whose patriarch passed away last year.) I stopped to check it out. My first question: Are you related to the Tacos el Pinolero trucks? The answer: Yep! The on-site kitchen has allowed them to expand their menu options, but at the time of my visit they were still working on getting the menu printed. So, go see for yourself.

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958 east avenue (Next to Donut Nook) 530.592.3171• Open Daily 8am–10pm APRIL 4, 2019

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C I T S A DR S E R U MEAS , Fire officials emergency es i t i l i t u , s r e d respon are p e r p s r e h t o and for the 2019 on wildfire seas About this story:

It was produced by CalMatters, an independent public journalism venture covering California state politics and government. Learn more at calmatters.org.

20

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APRIL 4, 2019

BY JUDY LIN

D

on’t be fooled by the precipitation, the snowpack, the wildflowers. It’s unlikely that California’s iconic landscape will sustain the moisture to withstand the 100-degree summer and fall. California has yet to recover from the fiveyear drought that began in 2012. For four years, record wildfires have ravaged the state, including the Tubbs Fire in Napa and Sonoma in 2017 and last year’s Camp Fire. The 2019 wildfire season officially kicks off in mid-May, but California’s wildfire season is essentially year-round now.


Fire safety has become far more politically fraught and expensive. Here, firefighters respond to the 2017 Ponderosa Fire, a 4,000acre blaze that destroyed 32 homes and numerous outbuildings in the Forbestown area. PHOTO COURTESY OF CAL FIRE

recent disasters. That includes clearing brush and trees away from transmission lines, replacing wooden poles with metal ones, and using drones and weather monitoring stations to gauge danger via wind and smoke patterns. Yet even these expensive precautions may not ward off the next towering inferno, say fire officials. “I think we are better prepared,” said Kelly Huston, deputy director of the state Office of Emergency Services. “The real question is whether or not that’s enough.”

‘A sense of urgency’

So what happens when the next big wildfire hits? State fire officials are already amassing new aircraft that drop thousands of gallons of bright-red flame retardant. Emergency responders are pre-positioning fire crews in high-threat areas. State officials will no longer second guess the use of wireless emergency alerts that grab people’s attention by making smartphones vibrate and squawk. The major investor-owned utilities— Pacific Gas & Electric, Southern California Edison and San Diego Gas & Electric—now plan to shut off power, even where fire risk is minimal, during red flag weather warnings. It’s considered a public-safety measure of last resort because a power outage can cut off internet access and make communication difficult for hospitals, firefighters and emergency personnel. The utilities also plan to fireproof California’s electricity grid, a result of their equipment being implicated in so many

Malibu residents flee the Woolsey Fire. The blaze started on Nov. 8—the same day as the Camp Fire—and killed three people. It destroyed more than 1,600 buildings. PHOTO BY CYCLONEBISKIT VIA CREATIVE COMMONS

Part of the problem is that California has been caught off guard by the new climatedriven fire seasons, amplified by longer hot summers and extended droughts. Seven of the 10 most destructive wildfires in state history have happened in the last five years. “The fires are behaving so much differently than they have before,” Huston said, noting the new wildfires are “virtually impossible to fight” as they leap mountains and gallop for miles, creating their own weather systems. “You couldn’t have predicted this based on past fire.” California Public Utilities Commission President Michael Picker told state lawmakers on Jan. 30 that climate-change-driven

wildfire is happening much faster than anyone predicted. But for the state regulatory agency to enforce safety at the state’s eight investor-owned utilities, Picker said, he would need 15,000 to 20,000 new staff to police every electricity pole and wire. The agency has, roughly, a 1,300-member staff. The CPUC regulates not only privately owned utilities from telecom to water, but also rail crossing safety, limos and ride sharing. Historically, Picker’s role has been more like that of an administrative judge than a police chief. “If you want to get the Legislature to allow me to be a total dictator, make decisions overnight, I’m happy,” Picker elaborated to reporters. “That’s not what our job is. We are like a technical court. People have to have their day in court. It’s not a fast process. Have you been in a court proceeding that took one day?” But his answer on the challenges of enforcement frustrated lawmakers, on whom political pressure has mounted with every disaster. The CPUC is not known for swiftness. It took nine years to issue a statewide fire-threat map after Southern California fires, caused by Santa Ana winds whipping power lines, prompted commissioners in 2009 to demand one. It has laid out a two-month schedule just for reviewing fire prevention plans utilities must submit under recent and hard-fought

“I think we are better prepared. The real question is whether or not that’s enough.” —Kelly Huston, California Office of Emergency Services deputy director

wildfire safety legislation. After Picker’s testimony, Democratic Assemblyman Jim Wood, a forensic dentist who represents fire-ravaged Santa Rosa, took to Twitter. “I want to hear a sense of urgency,” he wrote. “We don’t have time for a standard bureaucratic approach.”

Amassing ‘more tools’ Ultimately, the fire challenge involves painful long-term decisions such as how to reconcile the acute demand for California housing with the suddenly limited supply of land that isn’t in a high-risk fire zone. Short-term, Democratic state Sen. Bill Dodd of Napa is among those who hope incremental improvements might make a difference. He is proposing the commission work with Cal Fire and the Office of Emergency Services to improve coordination for turning off power in red-flag weather, alerting residents to evacuate and better targeting crews to fight fires. His bill, Senate Bill 209, which cleared the Senate’s Governmental Organization Committee last week, would establish an official, statewide California wildfire warning center. “It would give us more tools in trying to make sure this doesn’t happen again,” Dodd said. Emergency officials also are studying past fires, and preparing. Survivors of the Tubbs Fire in Napa and Sonoma counties

MEASURES C O N T I N U E D O N PA G E 2 2 APRIL 4, 2019

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MEASURES C O N T I N U E D

F R O M PA G E 2 1

A motorcycle ditched along the side of a road in Magalia was among the hundreds of abandoned vehicles reporters witnessed in the days immediately following the Camp Fire. Eighty-five people died during the blaze, the deadliest and most destructive in state history. PHOTO BY MELISSA DAUGHERTY

complained they had little or no warning when the flames flared up at night under dry windy conditions. Local officials opted against sending out a mass alert for fear of causing panic or hindering emergency responders. “Everybody I talk to in our neighborhood pretty much either had family call or a neighbor knock on the door. I don’t know of anyone that got an emergency alert,” said Patrick McCallum, a higher education lobbyist who barely escaped his Santa Rosa home with his wife, Sonoma State University President Judy Sakaki. “Worse, there were police and fire engines running around but they were not allowed to put their alarms on.” Butte County residents escaping the Camp Fire experienced similar issues with inadequate or nonexistent warnings. The state is expected to soon issue clearer guidance to all 58 counties for issuing alerts and warnings to the public across multiple platforms. The new thinking is to over-communicate, rather than rely on the alerts of the 1980s sent over television and radio or ringing landlines. “It is something people depend on to

make decisions in a crisis,” Huston from OES said. The state also believes pushing out wireless emergency alerts on smartphones similar to an Amber Alert can now be done effectively without creating chaos. This simple weather warning was sent out to seven counties encompassing 22 million people in Southern California in December 2017 as a precaution after authorities saw dry windy conditions similar to the wine country fire two months earlier: “Strong winds overnight creating extreme fire danger. Stay alert. Listen to authorities.” This fire season, Californians may see it again.

A firefighting air force Meanwhile, Cal Fire is beefing up its capabilities. And rather than waiting to respond to a wildfire, emergency personnel have shifted to pre-positioning strike teams before a fire even starts. The switch comes at a price; Cal Fire’s expenses now already routinely exceed its

WORST WILDFIRES # OF STRUCTURES

7 of the 10 most destructive* wildfires in California have occurred in the last five years *Structures burned Source: Cal Fire

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18,804 5,636

LOCATION OF FIRE

Camp Fire in Butte (2018) Tubbs Fire in Napa & Sonoma (2017)

2,900

Tunnel Fire in Alameda (1991)

2,820

Cedar Fire in San Diego (2003)

1,955

Valley Fire in Lake, Napa & Sonoma (2015)

1,650

Witch Fire in San Diego (2007)

1,643

Woolsey Fire in Ventura (2018)

1,604

Carr Fire in Shasta & Trinity (2018)

1,355

Nuns Fire in Sonoma (2017)

1,063

APRIL 4, 2019

Thomas Fire in Ventura & Santa Barbara (2017)

budget. Last year’s fire spending set a new record, and the political climate has made the outlays difficult to question. “That’s expensive because you’re paying the same amount of money for firefighters whether they’re fighting a fire or sitting waiting for a fire to start,” Huston said. “But you have to weigh that against the potential for loss and the expense of a disaster.” The state already boasts a formidable firefighting air force, featuring S-2T air tankers that dump 1,200 gallons of flame retardant and Huey helicopters for lifting fire crews in and out of steep terrain. This spring, the Hueys will start to be replaced by more modern Black Hawks, the Army’s frontline utility helicopter. The first one is expected to be ready in May, said Cal Fire spokesman Scott McLean. And over the next two years, Cal Fire will add seven C-130 Hercules cargo planes. Those will be retrofitted to carry between 3,000 and 4,000 gallons of flame retardant. “California will have one of, if not the largest, firefighting air forces in the world,” McLean said.

What about the utilities? At ground zero in much of the state are California’s investor-owned utilities and their spark-prone equipment. PG&E has vowed to expand power shut-off territory to as many as 5.4 million customers, up from 570,000 today. Southern California Edison is focused on better weather monitoring, adding 62 high-definition cameras

and 350 micro weather stations as part of a broader $582 million safety plan. And San Diego Gas & Electric, which has been most aggressive with more than $1 billion in safety upgrades, will continue to replace wood poles with steel poles, hire a helitanker on standby year-round, and contract with firefighters specially trained to put out electrical fires. Yet there’s no statewide standard for deciding when the power should be shut off. Instead, participating utilities base decisions on temperature, wind, humidity and other factors. San Diego Gas & Electric has been lauded for its proactive use of public safety power shutoffs.

“California will have one of, if not the largest, firefighting air forces in the world.” —Scott McLean, Cal Fire spokesman


Calli-Jane DeAnda, executive director of the Butte County Fire Safe Council, says creating a forest management plan is critical to avoiding future disasters like the Camp Fire. PHOTO BY MEREDITH J. COOPER

annUal BiKE issUE

Plan for the future Local group gets $100,000 for forest management

PG&E’s rollout has been less reassuring. Two days before the most destructive wildfire in California history ignited, 62,000 PG&E customers in eight counties, including Butte, were warned that their power could be turned off as a precautionary measure. “This is an important safety alert from Pacific Gas and Electric Company. Extreme weather conditions and high fire-danger are forecasted in Butte County. These conditions may cause power outages in the area of your address. To protect public safety, PG&E may also temporarily turn off power in your neighborhood or community. If there is an outage, we will work to restore service as soon as it is safe to do so.” —6:30 p.m. Nov. 6, 2018 Cal Fire reports the Camp Fire ignited around 6:30 a.m. on Nov. 8. PG&E never shut off power. In fact, the utility went on to issue cancellation notifications hours after the deadly blaze started. “This is an important safety update from Pacific Gas and Electric Company. Weather conditions have improved in your area, and we are not planning to turn off electricity for safety in the area of your address.” —2 p.m. Nov. 8, 2018 PG&E wouldn’t comment on its decision. The CPUC would say only that it is investigating when asked if the state was looking at why the utility didn’t initiate a blackout. Ω

W

hen it comes to preventing future wildfires in Butte County, forest management is at the top of the list. And, aside from a plan funded last year specifically for Magalia, the region has none. At least not yet. “Right now there is a lack of forest management, especially in the wild-urban interface,” said Calli-Jane DeAnda, executive director of the Butte County Fire Safe Council. “We’ve lost about a quarter of our forest to fire.” The council last month was awarded $100,000 by the Sierra Nevada Conservancy for its Big Chico Creek Forest Health Management Plan, which covers 7,939 acres north of Chico and adjacent to Forest Ranch, including the Big Chico Creek Ecological Reserve, which is owned and run by Chico State. According to the project description, it will “protect water quality and improve water quantity in Big Chico Creek and for downstream users; prevent catastrophic wildfire; restore forest ecosystems from overstocked conditions with forest thinning and prescribed fire; improve air quality and carbon storage; and reduce greenhouse gas emissions.” The plan is in line with the Sierra Nevada Watershed Improvement Program, whose focus is on restoring and improving ecosystem and community resilience in the Sierra Nevada. It was among 35 projects to be funded—to the tune of $26 million. The aforementioned Magalia plan, which received funding from the conservancy last year, includes several projects, one of which was slated to get started in December. That project area “burned to a crisp” in the Camp Fire, DeAnda said. For Big Chico Creek, she hopes a variety of projects—from forest thinning to prescribed burns—will enhance the overall health of the forest and creek while helping to prevent future disasters. The funding doesn’t come because of November’s blaze, however. “This was written months and months before the Camp Fire,” she said. “We’re trying to get ahead of the curve.”

On stands april 25 Chico is one of the best bike towns in the U.S. and locals and students alike are peddling where they need to go more than ever. Our annual celebration of local bicycle culture is tied with Chico Velo’s Wildflower Century ride, which attracts over 4,000 cyclists to our town. Include your business in this extremely popular issue that will not only reach our nearly 118,000 regular readers, but also the 4,000 Wildflower visitors too!

For more inFormation, call an advertising representative today at (530) 894-2300

—MEREDITH J. COOPER m e re d i t h c @new srev i ew. c o m

APRIL 4, 2019

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23


Arts &Culture A journey to

simplicity First-time author learns to lighten up by traveling with family to India

Downerthe ofmirror. A mother of two daughters, a devoted wife, and a busy home-birth practice, Moes says she was beginena Moes’ path to enlightenment started while looking in

ning to lose it. “At times I would catch myself feeling so frazzled, so overwhelmed by how much energy it took to keep up the kids’ activities, keep up the house, keep up the business, keep the marriage enlivened and healthy, I just really quesby tioned, Is this how it’s supposed to be?” Neesa Sonoquie Caught in a never-ending juggling act, Moes says serendipity stepped in to push her neesas@ newsrev i ew.c om out of the routine. Her sister, a foreign correspondent living in India, was having a baby. After a short solo trip for the birth when she Preview: Book Launch for saw first-hand the role of extended family, The Buddha Sat Right spirituality, and a simpler approach to almost Here, with reading and everything, Moes decided to return with her talk by author Dena family. She hadn’t planned on writing a book Moes, Tuesday, April 9, 7-9 p.m. about the trip, but The Buddha Sat Right Here: A Family Odyssey Through India and Nepal 1078 Gallery would be born soon after. 1710 Park Ave. “I started fantasizing about walking away 433-1043 1078gallery.org from this whole thing that we’d created, to take a break from it all and get some new perspective,” Moes said. Her husband, Adam, a self-employed acupuncturist, was already a dedicated practitioner of Buddhism and teacher of meditation—they had met at a spiritual retreat 23 years prior. For Moes, the journey would be a welcome break from the materialistic focus she felt their life as family had taken on. They

made a plan for a year and a half out, the beginning of 2014. They would rent out the house, close their businesses and pull the girls out of classes for part of the school year. In Moes’ words, “This would be an adventure of togetherness, an adventure of learning about the world and our global family.” Eight months in India proved to be a soul-changing experience for everyone. With the help of her sister, the family was able to time their travels around India’s gushing monsoons and extreme heat, and they seemed to find themselves in the right place at the right time for events like meeting the Dalai Lama and receiving a coveted hug from Amma, a Hindu spiritual leader known as the “hugging saint.” “I almost named the book Just in Time,” Moes said, “because everywhere we went people were like, ‘Ah! You’re just in time!’” Despite all the fortuity and bonding, the book reveals a long and sometimes difficult trip that tested Moes’ marriage and actually split the family in two for a portion of the journey. “We weren’t just there to see tourist sites and have fun,” she said. “We considered it a pilgrimage.” Upon arriving home, Moes found it difficult to answer the nonstop, “So, how was the trip?” questions. “How could I begin to explain the incredible transformation and adventure that we had had? I started thinking I needed to write a book to answer the question,” she said. Once set to the task, the writing flowed and she was able to finish it in a year and a half. After landing an agent and receiving a few rejections from bigger publishing houses, she decided to go with the female-run independent publisher She Writes Press. She is now on the cusp of a countrywide book tour that kicks off at the 1078 Gallery this Tuesday (April 9). Moes learned to lighten up on the trip, and says she was able to forgive herself for what she had considered a laundry list of failures as a mother and wife. In contrast to the supportive, simplified approach to life that she had witnessed during her travels, she realized that she had been struggling to maintain an unrealistic American ideal for years. On the message of the book, Moes describes it as layered: “Motherhood, family and Buddhist dharma. I think people will read the story and learn about the Buddhist teachings as a side thing, but that is the philosophical framework—the love and compassion that is our true nature underneath everything else.” But Moes makes sure not to sugarcoat the path to everyday enlightenment: “You can be flawed and funny and make mistakes, and still do incredible things.” Ω

THIS WEEK 4

THU

Special Events COMMON THREADS NORTH DINNER: Five Northern California women will be honored for their extraordinary contributions to agriculture and community at this awards celebration and dinner. Thu, 4/4, 5pm. $55. Butte Creek Country Club, 175 Estates Drive. commonthreadsnorth.com

THURSDAY NIGHT MARKET: First market of the season with local produce, fresh flowers, music, arts and crafts, and food

trucks. Continues every Thursday through September. Thu, 4/4, 6pm. Downtown Chico. 345-6500. downtownchico.com

TREE PLANTING WORKSHOP: Hands-on workshop that will teach you the basics of tree planting, care, and maintenance. See website for details. Thu, 4/4, 5:30pm. CARD Center, 545 Vallombrosa Ave. becnet.org

Music DELFEAYO MARSALIS & THE UPTOWN JAZZ ORCHESTRA: Worldrenowned trombonist and member of the “first family of jazz” brings that old-school New Orleans sound with a full band. Thu, 4/4, 7:30pm. $15-$40. Laxson Auditorium, Chico State, 898-6333. chicoperformances.com

Theater THE BOOK CLUB PLAY: A comedy that explores life, love, literature and reading between the lines. Thu, 4/4, 7:30pm. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Road, Paradise. totr.org

The author, Dena Moes, with dancers in Naggar, India.

NUNSENSE: Chico Theater Company brings back this zany musical about the misadventures of five nuns putting on a talent show

PHOTO COURTESY OF DENA MOES

THE RIVER BRIDE Thursday-Sunday, April 4-7 Wismer Theatre SEE THURSDAY, THEATER

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FINE ARTS ON NEXT PAGE

THE TIM BLUHM BAND Friday, April 5 Chico Women’s Club SEE FRIDAY, MUSIC in a high school gym. Thu, 4/4, 7:30pm. $16-$22. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. chicotheatercompany.com

Music STEVE JOHNSON: Saturday morning tunes and brunch with veteran guitarist/vocalist. Sat, 4/6, 11am. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

THE RIVER BRIDE: Chico State’s School of the Arts presents a dark fairy tale inspired by Latino folklore and mythology. Thu, 4/4, 7:30pm. $8-$20. Wismer Theatre, Chico State, 898-6333, csuchico.edu/soa

lasalleschico.com

Theater

5

THE BOOK CLUB PLAY: See Thursday. Sat, 4/6, 7:30pm. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal

FRI

Road, Paradise. totr.org

HELLO, DOLLY!: See Friday. Sat, 4/6, 7:30pm. Paradise Performing Arts Center, 777

Special Events

Nunneley Road, Paradise. paradiseperform ingarts.com

FIRST FRIDAY CREEPER RACES & SPRING BLOCK PARTY: Local businesses face off in a homemade creeper race in downtown Oroville, complete with pop-up shops, giveaways, food and beer. Fri, 4/5, 5pm. Historic Downtown Oroville. 538-2542. orovilledba. com

Music CON BRIO: Seven-piece band from the Bay Area plays booty-shaking soul, psych-rock and R&B. Local singer/songwriter Kyle Williams opens. Fri, 4/5, 8pm. $15. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St.

TIM BLUHM BAND: KZFR presents Chico legend/ Mother Hips frontman to celebrate his new solo album, Sorta Surviving. Alex Nelson opens. Tickets available at Chico Paper Co., Blaze N’ J’s, the KZFR office or brownpapertickets.com. Fri, 4/5, 6:30pm. $20-$25. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St., 895-0706. kzfr.org

Theater THE BOOK CLUB PLAY: See Thursday Fri, 4/5, 7:30pm. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Road, Paradise. totr.org

HELLO, DOLLY!: Paradise Adventist Academy presents this classic musical comedy about a strong-willed matchmaker who travels to New York to help an old man find love. Fri, 4/5, 10am. Paradise Performing Arts Center, 777 Nunneley Road, Paradise. paradise performingarts.com

NUNSENSE: See Thrusday. Sat, 4/6, 7:30pm. $16$22. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. chicotheatercompany.com

NUNSENSE: See Thursday. Fri, 4/5, 7:30pm. $16$22. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Suite F. chicotheatercompany.com

THE RIVER BRIDE: See Thursday. Fri, 4/5, 7:30pm. $8-$20. Wismer Theatre, Chico State, 898-6333. csuchico.edu/soa

THE SECRET GARDEN: Blue Room Youth Theatre presents classic tale about young girl who discovers a secret garden after being sent to live with her despondent uncle in a huge castle. Fri, 4/5, 7:30pm. $10. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. blueroomtheatre.com

6

SAT

Special Events ALL CHURCH SPRING BAZAAR: Hand-crafted holiday gift items, baked goods, plants, handmade quilts and more. Lunch will be served. For additional information call Carolyn Denton at 865-4590. Sat 4/6, 9am. First Baptist Church, 850 Palmetto Ave.

BLOCK PARTY WITH A PURPOSE: Help clean up Little Chico Creek. Snacks and

DELFEAYO MARSALIS & THE UPTOWN JAZZ ORCHESTRA Tonight, April 4 Laxson Auditorium

SEE THURSDAY, MUSIC

coffee will be provided. Sat 4/6, 9am. Cypress and Humboldt avenues. becnet.org

CIRQUE DU MONCA: Fundraising gala with food by Chicobi’s, music by The Jeff Pershing Band, stilt-walkers, a tarot card reader, photo booth and art auction with local and Bay Area artists. SOLD OUT. Sat 4/6, 6pm. Museum of Northern California Art, 900 Esplanade. monca.org

INCREDIBLE EDIBLES UPPER PARK: Join an experienced naturalist for an informative walk through the park to learn about edible plant life. Meet in Parking Area E. Sat 4/6, 10am. Chico Creek Nature Center, 1968 E. Eighth St. ccnaturecenter.org

JAY LARSON: Big on the late-night circuit, the comedian is known for his narrative, storytelling style. He has appeared on This American Life and Comedy Central and will be starring in the second season of the Twin Peaks reboot, so the man is legit. Sat, 4/6, 6:30pm. $15-$25. El Rey Theater, 230 W. Second St.

PLANT FAMILIES IN THE GARDEN AND IN THE WILD: Join botanists Linnea Hanson and Emily Meigs Doe to learn how to identify the plants. Sat 4/6, 9am. Friends of the Chico State Herbarium, Holt Hall, Room 129, Chico State. friendsofthechicostateherbarium.com

POPPY WALK & 5K RUN: Fundraiser for the Peg Taylor Center, which supports people living with serious health conditions. For more information call 342-2345 or visit site. Sat 4/6, 8:30am. $25-$35. One-Mile Recreation Area, Bidwell Park. poppywalk.org

THE RIVER BRIDE: See Thursday. Sat, 4/6, 2pm. $8-$20. Wismer Theatre, Chico State, 898-6333. csuchico.edu/soa

THE SECRET GARDEN: See Friday. Sat, 4/6, 7:30pm. $10. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. blueroomtheatre.com

7

St. John’s Episcopal Church, 2341 Floral Ave. childrenschoirofchico.org

FLOW JAM IN THE PARK: Local fire-dancers the Lumininjas have organized a day of play in the park for all prop-wielding performers. Sun, 4/7, 1pm. Sycamore Field, Lower Bidwell Park.

KOSHER DELI LUNCH FUNDRAISER: Fundraiser for CBI’s Shul School with kosher pastrami, corned beef, and sliced turkey sandwiches, served with coleslaw, side salads, sauerkraut, soups and dessert. Sun, 4/7, 12pm. $10-$18. Congregation Beth Israel, 1336 Hemlock St.

THE LOCAL TABLE: Benefit for the Valene L. Smith Museum of Anthropology with locally sourced foods, wines, brew and cider. Spanish tapas catered by Chico Natural Foods Co-op, live jazz by Bogg, and a traditional flamenco dance performance. Sun, 4/7, 4pm. $35-$40. Wine Time, 26 Lost Dutchman Drive.

Music BOGG: Vegan brunch and Jazz. Sun, 4/7, 11am. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St. HYMNS AT DAWN: Chico State’s Department

SUN

of Music and Theatre’s Sundays at Two series features Daun Weiss singing classical and traditional songs of faith. Sun, 4/7, 2pm. Zingg Recital Hall, Chico State, ARTS 279. 898-5152. csuchico.edu/soa

Special Events AQUATIC INSECTS OF BIG CHICO CREEK AND BIDWELL PARK: Park Watch Ambassador Lecture Series 2019 presented by Daniel Pickard of the Aquatic Bioassessment Lab at Chico State. Sun, 4/7, 10am. Chico Branch Library, 1108 Sherman Ave.

CAM OPEN HOUSE AND FLY-IN: See dozens of aircraft, meet pilots from all around Northern California and even take a ride on a classic biplane or a P-51 Mustang. Sun, 4/7, 9am. Chico Air Museum. chicoairmuseum.org

CHICO IDOL! FINAL ROUND & SHOW: Finalists per-

SCOTTY’S SUNDAY AFTERNOONS: Sunny Side Boys and the Boogie Band are playing bluegrass on the deck. Sun, 4/7, 3pm. Scotty’s Landing, 12609 River Road.

Theater THE BOOK CLUB PLAY: See Thursday. Sun, 4/7, 2pm. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Road, Paradise. totr.org

HELLO, DOLLY!: See Friday. Sun, 4/7, 2pm. Paradise Performing Arts Center, 777 Nunneley Road,

form in front of a live audience and a panel of professional judges. Proceeds benefit the Children’s Choir of Chico. Sun, 4/7, 4pm. $10.

THIS WEEK CONTINUED ON PAGE 26

EDITOR’S PICK

TORPEDO TURNS 10: Celebration for Sierra Nevada’s Torpedo Extra IPA’s 10th birthday with music by local indie-rock band Viking Skate Country and Redding’s Belda Beast, plus birthday cake, a demo of the Hop Torpedo, a Q&A with the brewers, a Torpedo tap takeover and more. Sat, 4/6, 7pm. $15. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St. sierrranevada.com

WILDFLOWER AND NATURE FESTIVAL: Food, crafts, tours, children’s activities and bands all day. Hillcrest Avenue performs from 12-2pm. Sat 4/6, 10am. Riverbend Park, Montgomery St., Oroville. 370-3573.

FREE LISTINGS! Post your event for free online at www. newsreview.com/calendar, or email the CN&R calendar editor at cnrcalendar@newsreview.com. Deadline for print listings is Wednesday, 5 p.m., one week prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

TO MARKET, TO MARKET It’s that time again! Thursday Night Market in downtown Chico is officially ringing in spring tonight (April 4) from 6-9 p.m. Farm-fresh produce, a rainbow of hand-picked flower bouquets, locally made arts and crafts, jewelry, clothes, and a smorgasbord of food trucks offering everything from burritos to meatballs. You can expect tunes on every corner and craft beer and wine sampling, even a free bike valet parking service. So, grab your reusable bags and join in the fun before it gets hotter than a pepper sprout out here. APRIL 4, 2019

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“It’s all about the Dirty Sauce” Vegan options aVailable

THIS WEEK coNTINuED fRom PAgE 25

FINE ARTS

Paradise. paradiseperformingarts.com 

NUNSENSE: See Thursday.  Sun, 4/7, 2pm. $16$22. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road,  Ste. F. chicotheatercompany.com 

THE RIVER BRIDE: See Thursday.  Sun, 4/7, 2pm. $8-$20. Wismer Theatre, Chico State,  898-6333. csuchico.edu/soa

THE SECRET GARDEN: See Friday.  Sun, 4/7, 2pm. $10. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St.  blueroomtheatre.com 

Spanish Nights are back at Red Tavern. Two nights of Tapas, Paella, live Spanish music and Flamenco!

Proudly owned & operated by Rich & Christine Garcia since November, 2013! 1250 ESPLANADE | REDTAVERN.COM | 530.894.3463

648 West 5th St. | Chico 530.924.3171 ILikeIkesPlace.com

8

moN

Special Events REMEMBERING THE RIDGE: Chico State students, 

supp rt

real

news Donate to ’s InDepenDent JournalIsm FunD:

faculty and members of the community are  invited to come together to memorialize  Camp Fire loss, celebrate resilience and  strengthen the community. Ceremony will  include music, poetry and an interactive  art installation.  Mon, 4/8, 5:30pm. Meriam  Library breezeway, Chico State.

9

TuE

Special Events THE BUDDHA SAT RIGHT HERE: Reception celebrating the release of Dena Moes’ travel memoir.  Evening will include a reading and discussion  followed by a reception with drinks, snacks,  music and a book signing.  Tue, 4/9, 7pm. 1078  Gallery, 1710 Park Ave. 1078gallery.org 

Music known for his signature “heavy wood” style.  This event will be filmed for the TV series  Plugged In and Turned On In Paradise.  Tue, 4/9, 7pm. $25. Museum of Northern  California Art, 900 Esplanade., 762-1490.  monca.org

SERGEI TELESHEV: Internationally acclaimed  master of the accordion performs works  by Bach, Piazzolla, Tchaikovsky and more.  Joined by violinist Natasha Popova.  Tue, 4/9, 7:30pm. Oroville State Theatre, 1489 Myers  St. orovillestatetheatre.com

10

WED

Special Events THE OCCUPATION OF THE AMERICAN MIND: The Chico  State Peace Institute and the Chico Palestine  Action Group present a film that explores  the complex history of what has shaped  the way American media covers Israel’s  ongoing military occupation of Palestinian.  Discussion will follow.  Wed, 4/10, 7pm. Free.  Ayers Hall, Room 120, Chico State.

Music JIMMIE VAUGHAN: Living guitar legend and  founding member of The Fabulous  Thunderbirds hits the Big Room stage  for a night of roots and blues.  Wed, 4/10, 7:30pm. $17. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E.  20th St. sierranevada.com

Theater HIGH SCHOOL MUSICAL 2: Family-friendly musical production with a live band.  Wed, 4/10, 7pm. $12-$15. Pleasant Valley High School,  1475 East Ave. pvhs. chicousd.org 

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APRIL 4, 2019

Shows through May 25 The Museum of Northern California Art SEE ART

Art 1078 GALLERY: Peter Jodaitis – The Color of  Water  If There Were No Sky, showcase of  a life’s work, featuring watercolor and  drawing. Reception April 5, 5-7:30pm.  Through 4/21. 1710 Park Ave. 1078gallery. org

CHICO ART CENTER: Creative Fusion, a show of 

InDepenDentJournalIsmFunD.org DON ROSS: Canadian acoustic guitar master 

26

TEND

student artwork selected and prepared  by Chico Art teachers. Reception Friday,  April 5, 5-7pm. Through 4/26. Free. 450  Orange St. chicoartcenter.com

ENLOE CANCER CENTER: Beth Bjorklund, oil  paintings in our Healing Art Gallery by  Northern California artist. The Enloe  Cancer Center, Healing Art Gallery  features artists whose lives have been  touched by cancer. Through 4/19. Free.  265 Cohasset Road, 332-3856.

JANET TURNER PRINT MUSEUM: Regional  Collective, a juried exhibition featuring  the California Society of Printmakers.  Through 4/13. Chico State, 400 W. First St.  theturner.org

MAIN EVENT GALLERY: Views of the West, gallery member artists and photographers  depict ranch life, cowboys, round-ups,  animals and the scenic beauty that  surrounds the North State. Featured  are works by Suzanne Bears, Karen  Roy-Crockett, Debbie Carlisi and Clare  Jones-Carbonell. Through 5/4. Free. 710 S.  Main St., Red Bluff, 391-3259.

MUSEUM OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA ART: Tend, Chikoko presents an exploratory multimedia exhibit that utilizes  found, broken, burnt and re-purposed  items with a focus on textiles to examine the meaning of home. Also: Trapeze  Acrobats, circus paintings by Clay Vorhes.  Opening reception Thursday, April 4,  6-8pm. Closing event Saturday, May 25,  6-8pm. Through 5/25. 900 Esplanade.  monca.org

ORLAND ART CENTER: Witty and Wild and  Whimsical, featuring the works of Gary  Baugh, Marilynn Jennings, and Paula  Busch showcasing a range of techniques  including collage and encaustic painting. Through 5/25. 732 Fourth St., Orland.  orlandartcenter.com

PROVISIONS GALLERY: Grand Opening & First  Group Art Show, Chico’s newest white  wall art gallery located in the back of  downtown’s Upper Park Clothing store. 

Artwork from more than nine local artists. Opening reception on Thursday April  4th, 6-9pm. Through 5/9. 122 W. Third St.  provisionsgallery.com

VALENE L. SMITH MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY: Altar States Spirit Worlds  and Transformational Experiences –  Works of Peter Treagan, interactive tech  art exhibit. Through 5/17. Chico State.

Museums BOLT’S ANTIQUE TOOL MUSEUM: This fascinating, unique museum has over 12,000 hand  tools on display, charting cataloging the  evolution and history of tools. Closed  Sundays. Through 6/15. $3. 1650 Broderick  St., Oroville.

CHICO CHILDREN’S MUSEUM: Tons of cool stuff  for kids to explore including a miniature  city, complete with a junior vet clinic,  dentist, cafe and farmer’s market, a giant  fish tank, multi-sensory room, imagination playground and much more. Check  the website for hours and admission  information. Through 8/3. $7-$9. 325 Main  St. chicochildrensmuseum.org

CHICO CREEK NATURE CENTER: Living Animal  Museum & Nature Play Room, learn all  about local critters, plants and wildlife.  Through 5/25. $2-$4. 1968 E. Eighth St. 

GATEWAY SCIENCE MUSEUM: From Here to  There, explore the science of how things  move by land, sea and air. Also on display  are The Foothills, and America’s Wolves:  From Tragedy to Inspiration. Through  5/12. $5-$7. 625 Esplanade. csuchico.edu

GATEWAY SCIENCE MUSEUM: Museum Without  Walls presents Elk in California talk,   with Tom Batter, PhD. student at the  Mammalian Ecology and Conservation  Unit at UC Davis. 4/10, 7:30pm. 625  Esplanade. csuchico.edu

PATRICK RANCH MUSEUM: Working farm and  museum with rotating exhibits open  every Saturday and Sunday from 11am  to 3pm. Through 5/26. 10381 Midway,  Durham. patrickranchmuseum.org

VALENE L. SMITH MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY: Remarkable Lives, exploring the intertwined worlds of birds and  humans, in partnership with the Altacal  Audubon Society and Snow Goose Festival.  Through 7/31. 400 W. First St.


MUSIC

Lettin’ your roots show The Dustbowl Revival at Laxson Auditorium. PHOTO BY KEN PORDES

A warm tribute to musical pioneers The Band

Itheir like a cozy, down-home gathering of friends, but in presentation of the collaborative themed concert, t’s not easy to make a large formal auditorium feel

Across the Great Divide, the Hot Club of Cowtown and the Dustbowl Revival managed to do just that. The mostly acoustic by Carey presentation by the two bands was Wilson steeped in American musical traditions and set an appropriately warm tone for Review: what was a celebration of The Band, Across the the pioneering Canadian-American Great Divide: A Celebration of the roots-rock group that half a century 50th Anniversary of ago released its first two hugely influThe Band with the ential albums, Music From Big Pink Dustbowl Revival (1968) and The Band (1969). and the Hot Club of The Hot Club kicked off the show Cowtown, Friday, March 29, Laxson with “High Upon the Mountain,” an Auditorium. original bluegrass number that gave the trio plenty of room to warm up their voices and instruments. Bassist Jake Erwin and guitarist Whit Smith set the cantering pace with a boom-chick rhythm that Elana James’ dextrous fiddle melody immediately elevated into springtime mountain music, enhanced by her sweetly sung lyrics evoking parallels between lush country scenery and the memories of lost love: “high upon the mountain, you’re the morning breeze/sweepin’ like an eagle, down through my restless dreams.” Smith added immaculate lead embellishments on his vintage Gibson as well as some high-lonesome authenticity with his vocal harmonies. Beginning the concert with an original song seemed a gutsy choice, but one that worked well to affirm James’ assertion (in the program) that, “This isn’t strictly a ‘tribute’ show. It’s more a testament to the timelessness and broad influences of The Band’s songs.” And with three virtuoso players and more than 20 years of stage time as a band, the influences shared by the group and their forebears is broad and worthy of exploration. One of my personal favorites by The Band—which I fondly remember listening to on the radio as a child—is the mournful ballad “Long Black Veil,” the only cover on the band’s debut. The song received a justifiably

reverent rendition, with Smith taking the lead vocal sung by Rick Danko. The Hot Club’s version more closely reflects the arrangement of Lefty Frizzel’s 1959 recording, with the welcome addition of Smith’s guitar solo and James’ gentle background vocals and doleful fiddle. After an intermission, the Dustbowl Revival spread its eight players across the stage and brought the more rockin’ aspects of The Band to joyous life with a horninfused cover of “Don’t Do It” from the 1972 live album, Rock of Ages. Drummer Joshlyn Heffernan and bassist James Klopfleisch locked in the groove as bandleader and guitarist Zach Lupetin encouraged the rather staid audience to get up and dance, and a few exuberant souls filled the side aisles with justified groovin’. Alternating between excellent originals and Band classics, the Dustbowl Revival created a rockin’ ambiance that kept the cheers and applause exploding after each song. My only slight complaint was that vocalist Liz Beebe’s mic needed to be turned up to better project her voice. Lupetin possesses the ability to use song introductions to draw an audience in to the performance and dedicating Dustbowl’s song “Beside You” to those affected by the Camp Fire was a nice touch. The group’s version of The Band’s lively “Rag Mama Rag” brought Hot Club’s James out of the wings to duet with fellow fiddler Connor Vance, and the two swapped licks with each other as well as the spirited horns of trumpeter Matt Rubin and trombonist Ulf Bjorlin. For a show-closing all-inclusive rendition of “Up on Cripple Creek,” that hymn to enablers, the rest of Hot Club joined the Revival for a full-on hoedown that included solos by everyone and an epic bass battle between Erwin playing upright and Klopfleisch on electric that fused bluegrass, jazz and rock in a celebration of rhythm gone wild. A standing ovation brought everyone back for an allacoustic, un-mic’d Dustbowl Revival sing-along called “So Far Away,” with the lyrics “I got these new friends/ And I ain’t drinking alone,” which punctuated the feeling that we’d spent the evening carousing and reminiscing with a bunch of musical friends. Ω

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NIGHTLIFE

THURSDAY 4/4—WEDNESDAY 4/10 performs a genre-bending (and head-scratching) mix of classics from Pink Floyd, Phish and Talking Heads. Thu, 4/4, 8pm. $15. Lost On Main, 319 Main St. lostonmainchico. com

Rainbow Girls

SURROGATE: Catchy, longtime local indie-rock group joined by the Alex Draper Band. Thu, 4/4, 8pm. $7. Argus Bar + Patio, 212 W. Second St.

THUMPIN’ THURSDAY ROCK ’N’ BLUES JAM: Hosted by the Loco-Motive

RAINBOW GIRLS & THE MONDEGREENS

Band plus special guests. All musicians and music enthusiasts welcome. Thu, 4/4, 7pm. Studio Inn Lounge, 2582 Esplanade, (408) 449-2179.

Saturday, April 6 Argus Bar + Patio SEE SATURDAY

4THURSDAY

DELFEAYO MARSALIS & THE UPTOWN JAZZ ORCHESTRA: World-renowned trombonist and member of the “first family of jazz” brings that old-school New Orleans sound with a full band. Thu, 4/4, 7:30pm. $15$40. Laxson Auditorium, Chico State, 898-6333. chicoperformances. com

GNARLY PINTS: Married duo play guitar and fiddle. Thu, 4/4, 6pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St. lasalleschico.com

HANNAH JANE KILE: Singer, multiinstrumentalist and composer with

deep roots in the Americana-folk tradition. Thu, 4/4, 6pm. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St., 433-0414.

JOHN UNDERWOOD: One-man band from Reno joined by locals Toofless Sean Corkery, Truck Stop, and the debut of Astronaut Ice Cream. All ages. Thu, 4/4, 7:30pm. $7. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

METALCORE: High-volume ear assault with Vice Versa, Brace for Mavericks, Gigantes and Faint Silhouette. Thu, 4/4, 7pm. $7. Ike’s Place, 648 W. Fifth St.

PINK TALKING FISH: Popular hybrid fusion tribute act from New England

5FRIDAY

CON BRIO: Seven-piece band from the Bay Area plays booty-shaking soul, psych-rock and R&B. Local singer/ songwriter Kyle Williams opens. Fri, 4/5, 8pm. $15. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St. sierranevada. com

DOWNTOWN TECHNO: Three hours of dancing plus three live DJs for one high-energy evening. All ages, 21 and over to drink. Fri, 4/5, 8pm. $7. Ike’s Place, 648 W. Fifth St.

GREAT FALLS & HEIRESS: A night of darkness with powerful Seattle noise-metal band Great Falls joined

GET UP OFFA THAT THING

Con Brio is a musical term that means “with spirit,” and the appropriately named seven-piece soul/funk band playing the Sierra Nevada Big Room on Friday (April 5) performs with that and more. Known for a legendary stage show that boasts moves like James Brown’s, the group’s fusion of psychedelic rock and R&B has garnered a massive following in its Bay Area stomping grounds. Local favorite Kyle Williams opens. Prepare to get funkified.

by fellow brutal screamers Heiress. Locals Lyfecoach open. Fri, 4/5, 9pm. $7. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

JOHN SEID, LARRY PETERSON, CHRIS WENGER: Chill happy hour tunes

with local favorites. Fri, 4/5, 6:30pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St.

OPEN MIC: Bring an instrument (acoustic/electric guitar and drum set available to use). Sign up at 7pm, all ages welcome until 10pm. Fri, 4/5, 7:30pm. $1. Down Lo, 319 Main St., 513-4707.

PUB SCOUTS: Traditional Irish music for happy hour. Fri, 4/5, 4pm. $1. Duffy›s Tavern, 337 Main St.

SOUL PERSUADERS: Veteran soul,

funk, rhythm & blues band. Fri, 4/5, 8:30pm. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfallscasino.com

TIM BLUHM BAND: KZFR presents Chico legend/Mother Hips frontman to celebrate his new solo album, Sorta Surviving. Alex Nelson opens. Tickets available at Chico Paper Co., Blaze N’ J’s, the KZFR office or brownpapertickets.com. Fri, 4/5, 6:30pm. $20-$25. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St., 895-0706. kzfr.org

TYLER DEVOLL: Happy hour tunes. Fri, 4/5, 4pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St. lasalleschico.com

VALLEY OAK CHILDREN’S SERVICES BENEFIT CONCERT: Benefit concert with popular local cover band Decades, to support Butte Parent Cafe program. Fri, 4/5, 7pm. $20. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave., 899-4969. valleyoakconcert.eventbrite.com

ZEPPARELLA: All-female Led Zeppelin

6SATURDAY

BALD ROCK BOYS: Local classic-country duo. Sat, 4/6, 7pm. Copa de Oro, 1445 Myers St., Oroville, (775) 771-4116.

BLACK FONG: Ready yourself for a full-

tribute band. Fri, 4/5, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfalls casino.com

body sensory assault with Chico’s favorite funk-masters. Openers: The Stuff That Leaks Out. Sat, 4/6, 8pm. Studio Inn Lounge, 2582 Esplanade.

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THIS WEEK: FIND MORE ENTERTAINMENT AND SPECIAL EVENTS ON PAGE 24 JIMMIE VAUGHAN Wednesday, April 10 Sierra Nevada Big Room SEE WEDNESDAY

celebrate the release of their new album. North Bay folk-trio Rainbow Girls open the show. Sat, 4/6, 8pm. $10. Argus Bar + Patio, 212 W. Second St.

MOSTLY FINE: Improvisatory, bare-

DRINK, TALK, LEARN: Sort of like an open-mic but for teaching. Folks sign up to give a three-minute long PowerPoint presentation on things they want to share/inform/tell/rant to a bar full of people. There will be awards and penalties, witty banter is encouraged. Sat, 4/6, 7pm. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

GREEN MACHINE: Popular reggae jam band with new lineup returns to Chico. Sat, 4/6, 9pm. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave. tackleboxchico.com

JAY LARSON: Big on the late-night circuit, the comedian is known for his narrative, storytelling style. He has appeared on This American Life and Comedy Central and will be starring in the second season of

the Twin Peaks reboot, so the man is legit. Sat, 4/6, 6:30pm. $15-$25. El Rey Theater, 230 W. Second St.

JOHN SEID, LARRY PETERSON, CHRIS WENGER: Chill happy hour tunes with local favorites. Sat, 4/6, 6:30pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St. diamondsteak housechico.com

MAX MINARDI: Talented indie-folk singer/songwriter plays late night happy hour. Sat, 4/6, 10pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St. lasalleschico.com

THE MONDEGREENS & RAINBOW GIRLS: Harmony-driven indie/rock band, The Mondegreens, originally from Chico, now in Seattle, tour to

bones jazz duo with a sax and a drum set joined by local guitar dude Cat Depot Sat, 4/6, 8pm. $7-$12. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St., 433-0414.

RUNNING IN THE SHADOWS: Fleetwood Mac tribute band from Paradise. Sat, 4/6, 8pm. $7. Unwined Kitchen & Bar, 980 Mangrove Ave. unwinedchico.com

SOUL PERSUADERS: See Friday. Sat,

4/6, 8:30pm. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfallscasino.com

SPAZMATICS: High-energy 1980s cover band with a nerdy vibe. Sat, 4/6, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino &

Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

TORPEDO TURNS 10: Celebration for Sierra Nevada’s Torpedo Extra

IPA’s 10th birthday with music by local indie-rock band Viking Skate Country and Redding’s Belda Beast, plus birthday cake, a demo of the Hop Torpedo, a Q&A with the brewers, a Torpedo tap takeover and more. Sat, 4/6, 7pm. $15. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St. sierranevada.com

7SUNDAY

OPEN MIC COMEDY NIGHT: Working on a bit? See if it’s a hit or heckle-worthy, and enjoy cheap beer specials. Signups start at 8pm. Sun, 4/7, 9pm. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave. maltesebarchico.com

THE SHORT TIMERS IMPROV SHOW: Short-form improv with the Short Timers featuring classic improv games and CLIC originals. Sun, 4/7, 7pm. $5. Chico Live Improv Comedy, 561 E. Lindo Ave. chicolivecomedy.com

9TUESDAY

DON ROSS: Canadian acoustic guitarmaster known for his signature “heavy wood” style. This event will be filmed for the TV series Plugged In and Turned On In Paradise. Tue, 4/9, 7pm. $25. Museum of Northern California Art, 900 Esplanade., 7621490. monca.org

OPEN MIC: Hosted by veteran Chico singer/songwriter Andan Casamajor. There’s always a guitar to borrow and a house cajón for frisky fingers, so come on down and get on the list. Tue, 4/9, 6pm. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

SERGEI TELESHEV: Internationally acclaimed master of the accordion performs works by Bach, Piazzolla, Tchaikovsky and more. Joined by violinist Natasha Popova. Tue, 4/9, 7:30pm. Oroville State Theatre, Oroville. orovillestatetheatre.com

10WEDNESDAY

JIMMIE VAUGHAN: Living guitar legend

and founding member of The Fabulous Thunderbirds hits the Big Room stage for a night of roots and blues. Wed, 4/10, 7:30pm. $17. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St. sierranevada.com

POETRY READING: Hear local poets and bring your own poetry to read at this monthly meeting of creative minds. Wed, 4/10, 5:30pm. Free. 15th Street Cafe, 1414 Park Ave., Ste. 120, (760) 898-0825.

ADULT HUMOR

Chances are you have seen Jay Larson somewhere. A mainstay on Conan O’Brien’s show, the comedian, actor and writer also hosted Esquire Network’s Best Bars in America and will soon star in the second season of Showtime’s Twin Peaks, so the man has range. His stand-up is the straightforward kind that explores the dark side of marriage, family life and getting older with brutal honesty. Witness Larson bring the funny at the El Rey Theater on Saturday (April 6).

APRIL 4, 2019

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Just plain dumb Tim Burton taints a Disney classic and his own legacy Dumbo Tamounts wasteful remake of the 1941 animated classic that to one big nothing—for kids and adults alike. he decline of Tim Burton continues with

,a

The original Dumbo was a little more than an hour long, while this one lasts for nearly by two hours that feel like 40. A bunch Bob Grimm of unnecessary subplots and added characters take away time from one bg ri m m @ new srev i ew. c o m of the lone bright spots, the title character, an admittedly cute CGI achievement. There are no talking animals in this version, so scratch Timothy Q. Mouse, the singing crows and the Dumbo lullaby from Mama elephant. Instead Colin Farrell, Eva of the mouse (who does make a brief Green, Nico Park, appearance in a cage), we get the Danny DeVito and Michael Keaton. requisite precocious children, one of Directed by Tim them played by Thandie Newton’s Burton. Cinemark daughter, Nico Parker, who abso14, Feather River lutely cannot act. Cinemas. Rated PG. Colin Farrell appears as Holt, the precocious kids’ dad, an injured World War I vet. The circus is led by Max Medici (a blustery Danny DeVito), who has purchased a cheap, pregnant elephant. After Holt’s circus-performer wife dies, Max assigns him to be keeper of the elephants, a comedown from his previous gig as a circus cowboy. Farrell, like most of the human actors in this movie, seems lost. V.A. Vandevere, the villain of the film played by Michael Keaton, purchases Dumbo and plans to make him a main attraction at his Dreamland amusement park, which has a strong resemblance to Disneyland. So, in a way, the character can be seen as being modeled after Walt Disney. And he is portrayed as an evil

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megalomaniac, so, in essence, Burton gets away with indirectly portraying Disney as a bit of a greedy monster. I’m not saying this is inaccurate, but it’s odd to see it in an actual Disney movie. As for Keaton, he’s at his sneering worst in his movie, as if he was just put in front of the camera and told to act persnickety. You’d think the man who played Batman in a movie by the guy who directed Batman would translate to something fun. Alas, it did not. In the original, Dumbo flew in only a couple of scenes for just a few seconds. Here, he has multiple flying scenes, which lessens the magic. And the scene in the original where Dumbo gets wasted and sees pink elephants is, regrettably, replaced by a lame bubble show homage. As much as I liked the original, I’ve always taken issue with the notion that anybody would ridicule Dumbo for having big ears. All elephants have big ears, do they not? The premise falls especially flat in a big-budget live-action movie. The morality lesson at the core just doesn’t ring true with actual humans acting it out. It’s corny. Burton’s last great movie was 2007’s Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street, and in the interim, one of his worst films was another Disney reboot, Alice in Wonderland. Dumbo is actually worse than that mess, and proof that Burton needs to get far away from the Mouse and move closer to the weirdos who inspired the first half of his career. Ω

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FILM SHORTS

Opening this week The Best of Enemies

Historical biopic starring Taraji P. Henson and Sam Rockwell, as a civil rights activist and Ku Klux Klan leader, respectively, who are forced to work with one another on school integration in North Carolina in the early 1970s. Cinemark 14.

The Mustang

Matthias Schoenaerts stars as a prison inmate with a violent past who takes part in a rehabilitation program involving the breaking/training of wild horses. Pageant Theatre. Rated R.

Pet Sematary

Jason Clarke, Amy Seimetz and John Lithgow star in this latest adaptation of Stephen King’s horror novel about a family’s terrifying dealings with a mysterious burial ground. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

Shazam!

The first big-screen treatment of the classic DC Comics character, the alter ego of troubled teen Billy Batson (played by Asher Angel), who turns into a buff adult (Zachery Levi) full of superpowers when exclaims, “Shazam!” Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

Now playing The Beach Bum

Matthew McConaughey stars as a stonedout free spirit/writer who lives by his own rules. Written/directed by Harmony Korine (Kids, Julien Donkey-Boy) and also starring Snoop Dogg, Isla Fisher and Jonah Hill. Cinemark 14. Rated R.

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Captain Marvel

Despite the fact that she’s playing a superhero who has the power to shoot electrical bursts from her hands, Brie Larson’s Captain Marvel suffers from a disappointing lack of energy. Larson’s turn as the title character, aka Carol Danvers (aka Vers), is plagued by lethargy and bizarre line deliveries, and she gives off a detached vibe that she doesn’t want to be in the movie. Had the film around her been really good, the lead’s bored disposition might’ve been forgiven, but this cosmic superhero origin story and intergalactic war movie is also riddled with some haphazard storytelling and awful special effects. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13 —B.G.

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Dumbo

See review this issue. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG —B.G.

Five Feet Apart

Film adaptation of Rachel Lippincott’s young-adult novel of the same name about two teens whose newfound love for one another is complicated by the fact that their respective life-threatening illnesses keep them from coming into physical contact. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World

The third entry in the animated franchise picks up a year after the events in the previous film, with Hiccup the dragon (voice of Jay Baruchel) searching for a dragon utopia. Cinemark 14. Rated PG.

Hotel Mumbai

Dev Patel and Armie Hammer star in this historical biopic that tells the story of the 2008 terrorist attack in Mumbai, India, that killed 164 people. Cinemark 14. Rated R

Unplanned

A Christian faith-based film based on the memoir of a former Planned Parenthood employee turned anti-abortion activist. Cinemark 14. Rated R.

4

Us

A young girl in a 1980s flashback drifts away from her father at an amusement park on the Santa Cruz pier and finds herself in a darkened and frightening hall of mirrors. Things then jump to the present day, where Adelaide and Gabe (Lupita Nyong’o and Winston Duke) are taking their children, Zora and Jason, to the beach. It’s the same beach we saw in the flashback, and we find out that Adelaide was that young girl. She’s not happy about revisiting the place. The family excursion quickly becomes the worst vacation ever, as another family shows up at night. A quick examination of the intruders reveals what the commercials for this movie have already told you: The family outside is a darker mirror image of the stunned family inside the house. They aren’t coming over to borrow the lawn mower. They intend to kill. Writer-director Jordan Peele follows up the success of Get Out with another mind bender, one that is also an efficient, bareknuckled horror-thriller, plus a comedy and a brutal social satire. It’s the whole package. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R —B.G.

This guy saves you money.

Reviewers: Bob Grimm and Juan-Carlos Selznick.

join us for

h c n u l y frida

Wonder Park

A 3-D animated feature about a young girl (voiced by Brianna Denski) with a wild imagination who works with a cast of talking animals to bring a dream amusement park to life. With Matthew Broderick, Jennifer Garner, Ken Hudson Campbell, Kenan Thompson, Ken Jeong, Mila Kunis and John Oliver. Cinemark 14. Rated PG.

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A celebration and benefit for musicians and others affected by the Camp Fire PRESENTS :

s i e m m a C CHICO AREA MUSIC FESTIVAL 2019

Saturday, April 20 7-10 p.m.

(doors at 6 p.m., pre-show at 6:30) Featuring performances by: Surrogate, Lo & Behold, Aberrance, Mark McKinnon & The Strolling Rogues, Leonard Cohen Tribute Orchestra, Sunny Acres, John-Michael Sun, Himp C, Astronaut Ice Cream, Chico Open-Mic All-Star Revue (hosted by Andan Casamajor), and Paradise Open-Mic All-Star Revue (hosted by Susan Dobra) Plus CAMMIES Awards presentation

Sierra Nevada Big Room 1075 E. 20th St., Chico

FREE TICKETS! SPONSORED BY:

Vote now for Best Local Act at newsreview.com/cammies

available online only; pre-registration required for admission. Visit: facebook.com/chicocammies or sierranevada.com for details Donations encouraged for Music Around the Camp Fire Fund

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CHOW

Pop-tarts and hand pies New Near & Dear bakery a hit with its creative vegan treats

SDearbuilding with her. The 22-year-old runs her Near & bakery from an apartment on the first floor of a ydney Carroll’s neighbors must love sharing a

146-year-old converted schoolhouse near downtown Chico, and on the Tuesday morning this reporter arrived for an interview, story and the smell of something savory was photo by Jason Cassidy wafting all the way to the sidewalk out front. j aso nc @ Through the large kitchen window, newsrev i ew.c om Carroll could be seen smiling as she filled a jar with freshly toasted Near & Dear coconut shavings for the Pop-TartFacebook: like pastries she’d later make. It was “Near & Dear” Instagram: @near quite the scene, one that provided a anddearbakedgoods vivid impression of the workings of a cottage business in Chico. The young entrepreneur’s greatest sales tool, however, might be her social media presence, specifically the photos she posts to Facebook and Instagram. In addition to the standard close-ups of the products of the day, she also regularly posts artfully staged scenes, such as heart-shaped hand pies stuffed with creamy potatoes and caramelized onions fanned out atop a copy of Neil Young’s Harvest album; or a gold/orange/brown tableau with a woman in a vintage sweater, a fruit still life on the wall and her butternutsquash “pop-tarts” in what looks like a frame from a Wes Anderson film. It’s an effective approach in a smartphone world, and one that matches well with the hip local spots where Near & Dear products are sold—including downtown hangout the Naked Lounge; the Winchester Goose craft-beer bar; Tender Loving Coffee cafe; and Carroll’s biggest account, Blackbird bookstore/coffee house/ artist-and-activist hangout in south Chico. Near & Dear has been in operation for nearly a year and a half, having debuted at the same time as Blackbird, whose owners she auditioned for as they were working on getting the space ready to open. “She dropped off a picnic basket of treats with us one afternoon when we were still doing construction. This was before we had even talked about what kind of

Sydney Carroll works in her pastries we were going to sell home kitchen. or even had an open date,” said Blackbird co-founder Molly Roberts. “I feel like we’ve grown up with her. She is an integral part of Blackbird.” “They were my gateway,” said Carroll, who moved to Chico from the Bay Area a few years ago, initially for college (she says she’s taking a break from school for now). After getting a job on the GRUB farm, she started developing an outlook on food that would inform her business: “Eating [as] locally and naturally as possible.” The name of her bakery is both a nod to the “near and dear” feelings she holds for her formative GRUB experience, as well as the commitment to sourcing as many near/local ingredients as she can. The ethics behind her food definitely resonate with her customer base, but it’s Carroll’s creativity (trying inventive recipes—plum donuts, mini rose cake loafs, Meyer lemon cinnamon rolls) and her skills as a baker—which she picked up from the kitchens of her mother and grandmother—that make her products disappear from counters before she can replenish them. Making baked goods vegan is pretty straightforward—take out the eggs and replace the butter with some other fat. But making them taste good requires finesse and not skimping on the good stuff. In the “poptarts” and hand pies, for example, Carroll’s crusts are made with a generous amount of coconut oil, making for an arguably more luxurious crispiness—and decadent experience—than your average butter-made version. Carroll recently greatly improved her efficiency by replacing her old malfunctioning home oven/stove with a second-hand commercial one, and she says things are going well enough that she’s hoping to be able to hire an employee soon. Her ultimate goal is to one day turn Near & Dear into a brick-and-mortar. “My dream goal is to have my own cafe that is open late-night style,” she said, “hopefully something in a house that’s cozy and sweet.” And with how enthusiastic local response has been, Carroll said she’d prefer to keep it in this area. “I know I wouldn’t be where I am now if Chico wasn’t so awesome.” Ω APRIL 4, 2019

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ARTS DEVO by JASON CASSIDY • jasonc@newsreview.com

WELCOME TO THE WHISKEYDROME Last weekend was about as perfect

as it gets in Chico—blue skies, sunshine, spring flowers, mid-70s temps, and tons of bikes! It was an especially inviting scene in downtown Chico on Sunday (March 31), as a few blocks were closed to traffic, and bike racers in skin-tight outfits zipped around an L-shaped course on day No. 3 of AMain Cycling’s three-day Chico Stage Race. As if that wasn’t wild enough, right in the middle of it all, racing at its own off-the-wall pace, was Greenline Cycle’s Chico Stage Race Party in the parking lot next to the Senator Theatre. The annual event is a circus of bike, barbecue and beer fun, with Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. on hand, alongside food vendors and bike shenanigans—a bunnyhop bar, an army of tiny bikes for riding around the lot and, most impressively, the Whiskeydrome. The circular wooden structure is a cross between a velodrome and Thunderdome, and all the brave bikers spun around the thing sideways throughout the afternoon as local bands provided a Jon Yunker owns the Whiskeydrome. soundtrack to the radness (full PHOTO BY KEN PORDES disclosure: Arts DEVO’s band of noise-making dorks was among those performing). It was a pretty perfect way to enjoy a sunny day. And, Greenline raised more than $2,000 for 6th Street Center for Youth. Nice work!

CAMP FIRE MEMORIAL On Monday (April 8), at 5:30 p.m., Chico State stu-

dents, faculty and staff are collaborating for a community ceremony to “memorialize our loss, celebrate our resilience and strengthen our community” in the wake of the Camp Fire. The event will take place in the breezeway of Meriam Library and will feature speakers (including university President Gayle Hutchison), performers, a slideshow of photographs and poems, and a memorial art installation that members of the community are encouraged to contribute to in the coming weeks. A digital installation of the materials from the event will be collected on the university’s permanent Remembering the Ridge archive at rememberingtheridge.org.

MOST HEAVY A lot of metal bands

come through Chico, and to be honest, it becomes a bit of a blur after a while—same huge amps, same Cookie Monster-howling, same everything. I still enjoy most of it, but it’s not often that I’m surprised by it. This Friday (April 5), however, The Maltese is hosting a show that just might get the old goose bumps erect as two especially brutal Seattle crews—Great Falls and Heiress—join new local madness-makers Lyfecoach for a night of raised beers and earnest head-nodding.

NEW ART GALLERY!!! Downtown Chico is getting a new art space this week. Tonight (April 4), Provisions Sesar Sanchez of Lyfecoach. Gallery (inside the Upper Park Clothing PHOTO BY MILES CLAIBOURN store, at 122 W. Third St.), is having its grand opening with a reception for a group show featuring works by a bunch of hip locals, including Dylan Tellesen, Sea Monster, Matt Loomis, Daniel Beebe, Siana Sonoquie, Jed Speer, David Selkirk, Lucas Rod, Wyatt Hersey and Christian Garcia. Find the gallery online at provisionsgallery.com 34

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APRIL 4, 2019


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY For the week oF APrIL 4, 2019 ARIES (March 21-April 19): A mushroom

shaped like a horse’s hoof grows on birch trees in parts of Europe and the United States. If you strip off its outer layer, you get amadou—spongy stuff that’s great for igniting fires. It’s not used much anymore, but it was a crucial resource for some of our ancestors. As for the word “amadou,” it’s derived from an old French term that means “tinder, kindling, spunk.” The same word was formerly used to refer to a person who is quick to light up, or to something that stimulates liveliness. In accordance with astrological omens, I’m making “Amadou” your nickname for the next four weeks.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): “Human

beings are not born once and for all on the day their mothers give birth to them,” wrote novelist Gabriel Garcia Marquez. “Life obliges them over and over to give birth to themselves.” Here’s what I’ll add to that: As you mature, you do your best to give birth to ever-new selves that are in alignment with the idealistic visions you have of the person you want to become. Unfortunately, most of us aren’t skilled at that task in adolescence and early adulthood, and so the selves we create may be inadequate or distorted. Fortunately, as we learn from our mistakes, we eventually learn to give birth to selves that are strong and righteous. The only problem is that the old false selves we generated along the way may persist as ghostly echoes in our psyche. And we have a sacred duty to banish those ghostly echoes. I tell you this, because the coming months will be an excellent time to do that banishing. Ramp up your efforts NOW!

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “When

spring came, there were no problems except where to be happiest,” Ernest Hemingway wrote in his memoirs. He quickly amended that statement, though, mourning, “The only thing that could spoil a day was people.” Then he ventured even further, testifying, “People were always the limiters of happiness except for the very few that were as good as spring itself.” I bring these thoughts to your attention so as to prepare you for some good news. In the next three weeks, I suspect you will far exceed your quota for encounters with people who are not “limiters of happiness”—who are as good as spring itself.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): It’s time to

prove that Cancerians have more to offer than nurturing, empathizing, softening the edges, feeling deeply, getting comfortable and being creative. Not that there’s anything wrong with those talents. On the contrary, they’re beautiful and necessary. But for now, you need to avoid being pigeonholed as a gentle, sensitive soul. To gather the goodies that are potentially available to you, you’ll have to be more forthright and aggressive than usual. Is it possible for you to wield a commanding presence? Can you add a big dose of willfulness and a pinch of ferocity to your self-presentation? Yes and yes!

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): General Motors

manufactured a car called the Pontiac Aztek from 2001 to 2005. It didn’t sell well. One critic said it looked like “an angry kitchen appliance,” and many others agreed it was exceptionally unstylish. But later the Aztek had an odd revival because of the popularity of the TV show Breaking Bad. The show’s protagonist, Walter White, owned one, and that motivated some of his fans to emulate his taste in cars. In accordance with astrological omens, I suspect that something of yours may also enjoy a second life sometime soon. An offering that didn’t get much appreciation the first time around may undergo a resurgence. Help it do so.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): “Of all the

female sins, hunger is the least forgivable,” laments feminist author Laurie Penny. She’s referring to the hunger “for anything, for food, sex, power, education, even love.” She continues: “If we have desires, we are expected to conceal them, to control them, to keep ourselves in check. We are supposed to be objects of desire,

by rob brezsny not desiring beings.” I quote her because I suspect it’s crucial for you to not suppress or hide your longings in the coming weeks. That’s triply true if you’re a woman, but also important if you’re a man or some other gender. You have a potential to heal deeply if you get very clear about what you hunger for and then express it frankly.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Only one of

Nana Mouskouri’s vocal cords works, but over the course of an almost 60-year career, the Libran singer has sold more than 30 million records in 12 different languages. Many critics speculate that her apparent disadvantage is key to her unique style. She’s a coloratura mezzo, a rare category of chanteuse who sings ornate passages with exceptional agility and purity. In the coming weeks, I suspect that you will be like Mouskouri in your ability to capitalize on a seeming lack or deprivation.

CLASSIFIEDS Call for a quote. (530) 894-2300 ext. 2 Phone hours: M-F 9am-5pm. Deadlines for print: Line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Display ad deadline: Friday 2pm

All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. Further, the News & Review specifically reserves the right to edit, decline or properly classify any ad. Errors will be rectified by re-publication upon notification. The N&R is not responsible for error after the first publication. The N&R assumes no financial liability for errors or omission of copy. In any event, liability shall not exceed the cost of the space occupied by such an error or omission. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes full responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. *Nominal fee for some upgrades.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Your

tribe is symbolized by three animals: the scorpion, the eagle and the mythological phoenix. Some astrologers say that the scorpion is the ruling creature of “unevolved” or immature Scorpios, whereas the eagle and phoenix are associated with those of your tribe who express the riper, more enlightened qualities of your sign. But I want to put in a plug for the scorpion as being worthy of all Scorpios. It is a hardy critter that rivals the cockroach in its ability to survive—and even thrive in—less than ideal conditions. For the next two weeks, I propose we make it your spirit creature.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

Sagittarian novelist Gustave Flaubert declared that it’s “our duty is to feel what is sublime and cherish what is beautiful.” But that’s a demanding task to pull off on an ongoing basis. Maybe the best we can hope for is to feel what’s sublime and cherish what’s beautiful for 30 to 35 days every year. Having said that, though, I’m happy to tell you that in 2019 you could get all the way up to as many as 95 to 100 days of feeling what’s sublime and cherishing what’s beautiful. And as many as 15 to 17 of those days could come during the next 21.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

Sommeliers are people trained to perceive the nuances of wine. By sampling a few sips, the best sommeliers can discern facts about the type of grapes that were used to make the wine and where on earth they were grown. I think that in the coming weeks you Capricorns should launch an effort to reach a comparable level of sensitivity and perceptivity about any subject you care about. It’s a favorable time to become even more masterful about your specialties, to dive deeper into the areas of knowledge that captivate your imagination.

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AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Every

language is a work in progress. New words constantly insinuate themselves into common usage, while others fade away. If you traveled back in time to 1719 while remaining in your current location, you’d have trouble communicating with people of that era. And today, linguistic evolution is even more rapid than in previous ages. The Oxford English Dictionary adds more than 1,000 new words annually. In recognition of the extra verbal skill and inventiveness you now posses, I invite you to coin a slew of your own fresh terms. To get you warmed up, try this utterance I coined: vorizzimo! It’s an exclamation that means “thrillingly beautiful and true.”

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BUTTE COUNTY GIGANTIC SURPLUS SALE!!! Friday, April 5, 2019 9:00-1:30pm 14 County Center Dr. Oroville, CA Monitors $10-$15, File Cabinets & Bookcases ($5 per drawer or shelf) Chairs $10, $5, $1, Desks $5 Phones, Speakers, Office Supplies & Tons of $1 items! Don’t Miss This Sale! BUTTE COUNTY SURPLUS DONATIONS TO NONPROFITS Monday, April 8th, 2019 / 10am-12pm 14 County Center Dr., Oroville, CA. Desks, Chairs, Bookcases, File Cabinets, Tables, Modular Furniture Panels, Phones, Office Supplies and Accessories **Available Only for Nonprofits** Bring Proof of Nonprofit Status Items must be taken at time of selection Estate Sale Inside House new clothing mrs/women’s the lowest price anywhere. A large throwrug & a hand-painted mirror, items for 25 cents, lots of misc. 585 Aleut St., Biggs, Th Fri & Sat 4, 5, & 6, 10AM-3PM PENIS ENLARGEMENT PUMP. Get Stronger & Harder Erections Immediately. Gain 1-3 Inches Permanently & Safely. Guarenteed Results. FDA Licensed. Free Brochure: 1-800-354-3944 www.DrJoelKaplan.com (AAN CAN)

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PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): One of

history’s most audacious con men was George C. Parker, a Pisces. He made his living selling property that did not legally belong to him, such as the Brooklyn Bridge, the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Statue of Liberty. I suspect you could summon his level of salesmanship and persuasive skills in the coming weeks. But I hope you will use your nearly magical powers to make deals and perform feats that have maximum integrity. It’s OK to be a teensy bit greedy, though.

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing

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business as WALKER’S WOODWORKS at 2547 Oro Garden Ranch Rd Oroville, CA 95966. BRANDON LEE WALKER 2547 Oro Garden Ranch Rd Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: BRANDON WALKER Dated: February 19, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000231 Published: March 14,21,28, April 4, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ARBOR PRO TREE CARE at 636 Burnt Ranch Way Chico, CA 95973. JASON RIX 636 Burnt Ranch Way Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JASON RIX Dated: February 13, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000213 Published: March 14,21,28, April 4, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ASSOCIATED CHICO EYE SPECIALISTS at 3537 Bay Avenue Chico, CA 95973. ROBERT DUDLEY STONE MD 3537 Bay Avenue Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ROBERT D. STONE Dated: February 26, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000259 Published: March 14,21,28, April 4, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as DANI PADGETT PHOTO, DANI PADGETT WEDDINGS at 2797 Grape Way Chico, CA 95973. DANIELLE PADGETT WATSON 2797 Grape Way Chico, CA 95973. ERIC WATSON 2797 Grape Way Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: DANIELLE WATSON Dated: February 22, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000244 Published: March 14,21,28, April 4, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following persons have abandoned the use of the fictitious business names DANI PADGETT WEDDINGS, DANI PADGETT PHOTO at 2797 Grape Way Chico, CA 95973. STEER AND ARBOR LLC 2797 Grape Way Chico, CA 95973. This business was conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: DANIELLE WATSON, OWNER Dated: February 22, 2019 FBN Number: 2018-0000990 Published: March 14,21,28, April 4, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as KAIT’S SWEET KREATIONS at 1661 Forest Ave #27 Chico, CA 95928. KAITLYN ZANGL

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1661 Forest Ave #27 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: KAITLYN ZANGL Dated: March 1, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000277 Published: March 21,28, April 4,11, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as EMINENCE GROUP at 2359 Myers Street, Suite #5966 Oroville, CA 95966. TIANA LYNN HARRISON TRUSTEE 2359 Myers Street, Suite #5966 Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by a Trust. Signed: TIANA HARRISON Dated: February 19, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000229 Published: March 21,28, April 4,11, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as LAURA’S WIG AND BEAUTY SUPPLY at 872 East Ave Chico, CA 95926. KATHLEEN A MCCLYMONT 10116 Jones Ave Durham, CA 95938. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: KATHLEEN MCCLYMONT Dated: March 5, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000296 Published: March 21,28, April 4,11, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as MANIFEST GLASS at 818 Salem St Chico, CA 95928. MERRICK JAMES BOYER 972 E 9th St Chico, CA 95928. RYAN PATRICK RODRIGUEZ 1126 Hobart St Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: RYAN RODRIGUEZ Dated: February 25, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000249 Published: March 21,28, April 4,11, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as FRANKLIN RECYCLING at 4405 Airport Rd Paradise, CA 95969. JOHN HENRY FRANKLIN 885 E 5th Street Chico, CA 95928. CLARK E GARDNER 6 Abbott Circle Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: JOHN H. FRANKLIN Dated: March 13, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000323 Published: March 21,28, April 4,11, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following person has abandoned the use of the fictitious business name HEEL AND SOLE SHOES at 708 Mangrove Ave Chico, CA 95926. RICK NORMAN STUELPNAGEL 4730 Songbird Chico, CA 95973. This business was conducted by an Individual. Signed: RICK STUELPNAGEL Dated: March 18, 2019

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FBN Number: 2017-0001588 Published: March 21,28, April 4,11, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as SWEET T’S at 803 Burgess Lane Chico, CA 95973. BRANDON BLIZMAN 803 Burgess Lane Chico, CA 95973. TARYN BLIZMAN 803 Burgess Lane Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: BRANDON BLIZMAN Dated: February 20, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000233 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as SARAH RICHARDSON’S CANINE CONNECTION, THE CANINE CONNECTION at 10 Seville Court Chico, CA 95928. SARAH LUCILE RICHARDSON 22 Sunland Drive Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: SARAH RICHARDSON Dated: March 8, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000308 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CHICO PEACE, CHICO PEACE AND JUSTICE CENTER, CHICO PEACE ENDEAVOR, CPJC at 526 Broadway Chico, CA 95928. CHICO PEACE ENDEAVOR 526 Broadway Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: ARAMENTA HAWKINS, DIRECTOR Dated: March 19, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000353 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as LOOK AHEAD VETERINARY SERVICES at 1451 Clark Rd Oroville, CA 95965. MICHELE C WEAVER, DVM AND CRAIG A BROWN, DVM, INC. 1451 Clark Rd Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: MICHELE WEAVER PRESIDENT Dated: March 21, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000348 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as AZTLAN, FIFTH SUN at 495 Ryan Ave Chico, CA 95973. GONZALES PARK, LLC 495 Ryan Ave Chico, CA 95973.

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This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: CLINT L SMITH, DIRECTOR Dated: March 21, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000359 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as GEI, GONZALES ENTERPRISES at 495 Ryan Ave. Chico, CA 95973. GONZALES PARK, LLC 495 Ryan Ave. Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: CLINT L SMITH, DIRECTOR Dated: March 21, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000360 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PALM TO PALM at 1321 Palm Avenue Chico, CA 95926. ALEXANDRIA MULLER 1321 Palm Avenue Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ALEXANDRIA MULLER Dated: March 19, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000347 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as HENDREN DISABILITY ADVOCATES, SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY ADVOCATES at 341 Broadway, Suite 402 Chico, CA 95928. MARY GALVIN 318 Flume St Chico, CA 95928. KEVIN MARK HENDREN 318 Flume St Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: KEVIN HENDREN Dated: February 28, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000270 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as SQUYRES FIRE PROTECTION, INC. at 166 East Third Street Chico, CA 95928. SQUYRES FIRE PROTECTION, INC. 166 East Third Street Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: BRANDON SQUYRES PRESIDENT Dated: March 26, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000390 Published: April 4,11,18,25, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as RPM MARINE at 5656 Pentz Road Paradise, CA 95969. LOGAN JEFFREY CUSEO 15192 Coutolenc Road Magalia, CA 95954. MICHAEL THEADORE OMARY 5656 Pentz Road Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: MICHAEL T O’MARY Dated: March 25, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000377 Published: April 4,11,18,25, 2019

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BURKE COOKIE CO. at 3278 Tinker Creek Way Chico, CA 95973. JENNIFER KAY BURKE 3278 Tinker Creek Way Chico, CA 95973. JOSHUA ALAN BURKE 3278 Tinker Creek Way Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: JENNIFER BURKE Dated: March 22, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000367 Published: April 4,11,18,25, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as TIPSOO HOPE at 151 Tipsoo Peak Rd Berry Creek, CA 95916. CAROLINE LOUISE CLOVER 151 Tipsoo Peak Rd Berry Creek, CA 95916. ANTHONY LOUIS ENGRO II 151 Tipsoo Peak Rd Berry Creek, CA 95916. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: ANTHONY ENGRO II Dated: March 27, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000394 Publsihed: April 4,11,18,25, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ANYTIME AIRPORT SHUTTLE at 3166 Godman Ave Chico, CA 95973. LINDA MYERS 3166 Godman Ave Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: LINDA MYERS Dated: March 15, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000336 Published: April 4,11,18,25, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as AGS CONSTRUCTION SERVICES at 6150 Center Street Paradise, CA 95969. ALPHONSE G SPERSKE 1252 Wagstaff Road Paradise, CA 95969. AMY M SPERSKE 1252 Wagstaff Rd Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: AMY SPERSKE Dated: March 28, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000400 Published: April 4,11,18,25, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as PARKER’S CORNER at 9305 Midway Durham, CA 95938. PARKER’S CORNER, INC. 9050 Lasell Lane Durham, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: ARLITA PURSER, CORP. SECRETARY Dated: March 27, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000396 Published: April 4,11,18,25, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as THE LOFT HAIR AND SKIN CARE at

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2535 Forest Ave #110 Chico, CA 95928. BRENDA E BAUREIS Two Ilahee Lane #40 Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: BRENDA E BAUREIS Dated: March 29, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000407 Published: April 4,11,18,25, 2019

NOTICES NOTICE OF HEARING Petitioner: SHARON K. EDWARDS Respondent: GERALD D. EDWARDS To: SHARON K. EDWARDS, Petitioner A Court Hearing will be held as follows: Date: May 15, 2019 Time: 8:15am Dept: 7 Room: TBA Superior Court of California, County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95928 WARNING to the person served with the Request for Order: The court may make the requested orders without you if you do not file a Responsive Declaration to Request for Order (form FL-320), serve a copy on the other parites at least nine court days before the hearing (unless the court has ordered a shorter period of time), and appear at the hearing. (See form FL-320-INFO for more information.) Dated: March 14, 2019 Case Number: FL047985 Published: March 21,28, April 4,11, 2019

NOTICE OF SALE To be sold for cartage, transportation, storage charges, costs of advertisement and sale: Furniture, household goods, cartons, tools, miscellaneous inventory at present stored in warehouse at 251 Boeing ave. Chico Ca 95973. Of Brady’s Moving and Storage, Inc. by, and variously marked, with names as follows: HARRY PHILLIPS TRUST, JAMES PHILLIPS, C/O CYNDI MAXWELL, C/O SUSAN BROWN LOT #6963 MARLENE SCHULTZ. LOT #8000 These goods will be offered for sale to pay past due storage, transportation, cartage, etc. Charges, as is, without inspection, at the location of 251 Boeing Ave, Chico, California 95973. April 22nd, 2019 at 10 A.M. Published: April 4,11, 2019

NOTICE OF LIEN SALE Pursuant to CA Business Code 21700, in lieu of rents due, the following units contain clothes, furniture, boxes, etc. 219SS CANDACE CARBY 6x15 (Clothing, Furniture, Personal items, Misc.) 393CC1 HALEY WALL 6x12 (Clothing, Misc.) 258SS LAVETTE WELSHANS 7x7 (Clothing, Misc.) 067CC MAYELA WICKHAM 12x12 (Art supplies, Camping supplies, golf clubs, misc.) Contents to be sold to the highest bidder on: Saturday April 20, 2019 Beginning at 1:00pm Sale to be held at: Bidwell Self Storage, 65 Heritage Lane, Chico, CA 95926. (530) 893-2109 Published: April 4,11, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE

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FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner SAMANTHA BRYANT filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: AUBREE AUTUMN-LEE SYNDERGAARD Proposed name: AUBREE AUTUMN-LEE BRYANT THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 8, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: March 11, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00759 Published: March 21,28, April 4,11, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner CHRISTOPHER JOESPH LANE filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: CHRISTOPHER JOESPH LANE Proposed name: CHRISTOPHER JOSEPH NUNES THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 1, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: 1 Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: March 11, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00733 Published: March 21,28, April 4,11, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner DELTA DAWN MORRISSEY filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: WAYLON JOCASH LEE Proposed name: WAYLON JOCASH MORRISSEY THE COURT ORDERS that all

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persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 8, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: March 12, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00784 Published: March 21,28, April 4,11, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner CHRISTOPHER PEACE DOLAN filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: CHRISTOPHER PEACE DOLAN Proposed name: CHRISTOPHER PEACE MOORE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 15, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: 10 Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: March 18, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00832 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: ASHLEE MICHELE HOLMES Proposed name: ASHLEE MICHELE SHULTS THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed,

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the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 8, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: March 11, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00697 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner SUSANNA GARRETT PORTER filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: SUSANNA GARRETT PORTER Proposed name: SUSANNA GARRETT BRAVO THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 15, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: March 13, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00788 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner TOU XA CHASENGNOU filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: TOU XA CHASENGNOU Proposed name: CHEEMENG CHA THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 1, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: 10 Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: March 12, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00739 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner PETER CHASENGNOU filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: PETER CHASENGNOU Proposed name: PETER KONG CHA THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 1, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: 10 Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: March 13, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00741 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner NICK CHASENGNOU filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: NICK CHASENGNOU Proposed name: NICK CHENG CHA THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 1, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: 1 Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: March 11, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00740 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner PANG YANG filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: PANG YANG Proposed name: PA CHUE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to

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show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 1, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: 1 Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: March 11, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00737 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner MARCIE LYNN MEYERSON filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: MARCIE LYNN MEYERSON Proposed name: MARCIE LYNN THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 1, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: March 21, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00897 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner CONNOR MATTHEW TOLLE filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: CONNOR MATTHEW TOLLE Proposed name: JEREMIAH MATTHEWS-TOLLE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition

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without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 8, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: March 12, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00706 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner COURTNEY M. JOY filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: COURTNEY MICHELLE JOY Proposed name: RACHEL ISABELLE JOY THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 8, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: March 27, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00900 Published: April 4,11,18,25, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner DAVID CASTILLO MARTINES filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: DAVID CASTILLO MARTINES Proposed name: DAVID CASTILLO THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 8, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: March 21, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00887 Published: April 4,11,18,25, 2019

SUMMONS SUMMONS NOTICE TO RESPONDENT SCOTT ANDREW SPAULDING You are being sued by petitioner: NANCY JANE SPAULDING You have 30 calendar days after this Summons and Petition are served on you to file a Response (form FL-120) at the court and have a copy served on the petitioner. A letter, phone call, or court appearance will not protect you. If you do not file your Response on time, the court may make orders affecting your marriage or domestic partnership, your property, and custody of your children. You may be ordered to pay support and attorney fees and costs. For legal advice, contact a lawyer immediately. Get help finding a lawyer at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courts.ca.gov/selfhelp) at the California Legal Services website (www.lawhelpca.org), or by contacting your local county bar association. FEE WAIVER: If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the clerk for a fee waiver form. The court may order you to pay back all or part of the fees and costs that the court waived for you or the other party. The name and address of the court are: Superior Court of California, County of Butte 1775 Concord Avenue Chico, CA 95928 The name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner’s attorney, or the petitioner without an attorney, are: MICHAEL M. ROONEY/ RONALD T. MARQUEZ 1361 Esplanade Chico, CA 95926-4900 (530) 345-5678 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Dated: December 31, 2018 Case Number: 18FL02654 Published: March 14,21,28, April 4, 2019

SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: CHARLENE A ALLEE YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: BUTTE COUNTY CREDIT BUREAU A CORP NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can

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locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The Court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Avenue Chico, CA 95928 LIMITED CIVIL CASE The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney is: JOSEPH L SELBY (#249546) Law Office of Ferris & Selby 2607 Forest Avenue Ste 130 Chico, CA 95928. (530) 366-4290 Dated: June 29, 2018 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Case Number: 18CV02133 Published: March 21,28, April 4,11, 2019

PETITION NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE LAWRENCE P. GIBBS, also known as LAWRENCE PARKER GIBBS, LAWRENCE GIBBS To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: LAWRENCE P. GIBBS, also known as, LAWRENCE PARKER GIBBS, LAWRENCE GIBBS a petition for Probate has been filed by: MARSHA L. GIBBS in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: MARSHA L. GIBBS be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: April 16, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of

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either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: NICOLE R. PLOTTEL 466 Vallombrosa Ave. Chico, CA 95926. (530) 893-2882 Case Number: 19PR00122 Dated: March 11, 2019 Published: March 21,28, April 4, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE LEE PARKER SHERIDAN, aka LEE P. SHERIDAN, aka LEE SHERIDAN To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: LEE PARKER SHERIDAN, aka LEE P. SHERIDAN, aka LEE SHERIDAN a petition for Probate has been filed by: JUSTYNE SHERIDAN in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: JUSTYNE SHERIDAN be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: April 16, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of

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letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: REBECCA YUHASZ McKernan, Lanam, Bakke & Williams LLP 55 Independence Circle, Suite 106 Chico, CA 95973. (530) 877-4961 Case Number: 19PR00132 Dated: March 18, 2019 Published: March 28, April 4,11, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE NORMAN B. HOLLAND, also known as NORMAN HOLLAND, NORMAN BRUCE HOLLANDT To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: NORMAN B. HOLLAND, also known as NORMAN HOLLAND, NORMAN BRUCE HOLLAND a petition for Probate has been filed by: DAVID B. HOLLAND in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: DAVID B. HOLLAND be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: April 23, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the

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date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: NICOLE R. PLOTTEL 466 Vallombrosa Ave. Chico, CA 95926. (530) 893-2882 Case Number: 19PR00141 Dated: March 26, 2019 Published: April 4,11,18, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE GRACE ANNETTE KING aka GRACE A. KING aka GRACE KING To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of:

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GRACE ANNETTE KING aka GRACE A. KING aka GRACE KING a petition for Probate has been filed by: STEPHANIE M. ADAMS in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: STEPHANIE M. ADAMS be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: May 7, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: TBA Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should

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appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: DANA L. CAMPBELL, ESQ. Tyree & Campbell, LLP 1600 Humboldt Road, Suite 4 Chico, CA 95928 (530) 894-2100 Case Number: 19PR00140 Dated: March 25, 2019 Published: April 4,11,18, 2019

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37


REAL ESTATE

FOr MOrE iNFOrMaTiON aBOUT aDVErTiSiNG iN OUr rEal ESTaTE SECTiON, Call 530-894-2300

Love’s Real estate

Zero Down

The idea that Linda and Diane and John could buy a house was a preposterous idea. All three were long-time renters in a senior mobile home park in Paradise. Linda and Diane were roommates in their mobile, and Linda’s brother John lived across the street. They all escaped through the flames of the Camp Fire, a terrifying four-hour drive in two cars. “Fire was on both sides of the car, and embers were blowing underneath,” said Linda.

1180 Mt Ida | OrOvIlle | $329,900 Own a great home in the lower foothills of Oroville. Recently renovated ranch style home. Almost everything new or nearly new... dual pane windows, interior & exterior paint, bathroom cabinets & counter-tops, appliances, paneled doors with nickel hardware. Deck off the living room for easy access to outdoor entertaining. In-ground pool is fenced with locking gates. Beautiful view overlooking the pool. City Sewer & South Feather Water. Just minutes to the lake. Numerous recreational opportunities (hiking & biking trails, fishing, boating), shopping and schools.

Table MounTain RealTy (530) 534-5376

They all lost everything they owned, except their dogs and cars. They had attempted to get renter’s insurance on their belongings, but because of the age of their mobile homes and the location of the park, they were denied. None of them had ever owned a home, and they had no money for a down payment. “I work for a hotel, the Oxford Suites, in Chico,” said Linda, “and my roommate Diane and my brother John are retired on fixed incomes. We didn’t think we could ever buy a home. We just needed a place to live.”

3400 OrO Dam BlvD. E. OrOvillE, Ca 95966

They had some time to search, though, because the Oxford Suites gave them a room. “The first I heard of the fire was when they called me that morning from the Oxford Suites and told me Paradise was being evacuated,” said Linda. “And can you believe they asked me if I wanted them to reserve me a room? Free? The rooms all went real fast. They never charged me anything!” A lender told them they could not qualify for a loan, but they ran into a Realtor, Bob, who sent them to a loan officer, Jim, who knew about the FHA Disaster Relief Program, which allows for a zero down payment. Linda and Diane and John now share the home they bought in January. Their mortgage payment is less than their combined rents were in the mobile home park. “We cried when we signed the papers,” said Linda, “and Diane is crying right now.” “We have a nice big side yard we are going to make nice for the dogs and us,” she said. “We’ve named it Paradise Park!”

Doug Love is Sales Manager at Century 21 in Chico. Call 530-680-0817 or email dougwlove@gmail.com License #950289

Homes are Selling in Your Neighborhood Shop every home for sale at www.C21SelectGroup.com

530.345.6618

Spring has sprung. Plant yourself in a new home this year with me as your trusted Realtor

Newer Home in Wildwood Park with views of Foothills. $425,000 2 bed 2 bath Condo in Chico in a great area. $167,500

“Building trust one home at a time.”

Alice Zeissler | 530.518.1872

Brad Smith | 530.894.4533 DRE #02032624

DRE #01312354

Homes Sold Last Week ADDRESS

TOWN

380 Weymouth Way 211 White Cedar Ln 854 Coit Tower Way 3555 Shadowtree Ln 77 Cinder Cone Loop 104 W Frances Willard Ave 1296 Arch Way 2776 Ceanothus Ave 914 Pomona Ave 1611 Harvest Glen Dr 929 Christi Ln

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico

38

CN&R

ap ri l 4 , 2 0 1 9

Butte County is Experiencing an Extreme Housing Shortage! It is great to time sell - give me call to see if the time is right for YOU

PRICE

BR/BA

$715,000 $669,500 $585,000 $571,000 $520,500 $465,000 $463,500 $447,000 $425,000 $399,000 $392,000

4/3 4/3 4/3 3/3 3/2 2/1 4/2 3/2 4/1 3/2 3/2

Jennifer Parks | 530.864.0336 BRE# 01269667

Sponsored by Century 21 Select Real Estate, Inc. SQ. FT. 2938 2390 1927 2795 2073 1458 2051 1696 1512 1544 1596

ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

3068 Eaton Rd 17 Quista Dr 1261 Calla Ln 445 W 6th St 1239 Broadway St 19 Betsey Way 10486 Cohasset Rd 24 Quista Dr 9988 Cohasset Rd 1274 Marvin Way 1258 Normal Ave

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico

$389,000 $389,000 $385,000 $380,000 $374,500 $369,000 $365,000 $359,000 $355,000 $354,000 $339,000

3/2 4/2 3/3 4/2 2/1 3/2 3/3 3/2 2/2 3/2 3/1

SQ. FT. 1543 1938 1365 1380 1110 1337 2963 1675 1458 1537 980


Need a hand with your home purchase?

bidwell TiTle & esCrOw

With locations in:

cn&r is looking for • Advertising consultAnt • distribution mAnAger • stAff Writer

Chico: 894-2612 • Oroville: 533-2414 Paradise: 877-6262 • Gridley: 846-4005 www.BidwellTitle.com

the Chico news & review is a family owned business that has been part of the Chico community since 1977. our mission is to publish great newspapers which are successful and enduring, create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow while respecting personal welfare, and to have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live.

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How Much is Your Home Worth Today? Ask the Professionals at Century 21 Select

530.345.6618 | www.C21SelectGroup.com FOR SALE

Condo! Adorable 3 bed/2 bath, 1,249 sq ft. ..................................................... $259,000 Pending SplaSh into thiS beautiful Saltwater pool! Well maintained 3 bed/2 bath, plus ding e nparking, den/office or possible 4th bed home offering 1,776 sq ft, PRV too! .........$475,000 Teresa Larson (530) 899-5925 DRE #01177950 chiconativ@aol.com

$279,000

beautiful 4 bed/3 bath, 2,512 sq ft, hardwood floors, formal living, dining, plus family room!............................................................................................................. $519,900 updated Gorgeous, custom features in this 3 bed/2 bath, 1,008 sq foot condo. Really special! ...............................................................................................................$215,000

6ac Creekside on Butte Creek $249,000 3.4 ac, well, septic & power in place $98,500 3/2, 2,000 sq ft north Chico $429,000

14855 Klamath Court Magalia CalDRE #02056059

Olivia Larrabee l (530) 520-3169 Olivia.Larrabee@c21selectgroup.com

Mark Reaman l (530) 228-2229 Lic# 01265853

Mark.Reaman@c21selectgroup.com

The following houses were sold in Butte County by real estate agents or private parties during the week of March 18- March 22, 2019 The housing prices are based on the stated documentary transfer tax of the parcel and may not necessarily reflect the actual sale price of the home. ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

SQ. FT.

ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

SQ. FT.

2222 Hutchinson St

Chico

$337,000

2/2

1500

3915 Oro Bangor Hwy

Oroville

$630,000

3/3

2634

1269 Calla Ln

Chico

$325,000

3/2

1355

8 Hart Dr

Oroville

$382,000

3/2

2322

5 Thomas Ln

Chico

$310,000

3/2

1501

81 Hercules Ave

Oroville

$377,500

3/2

2132

1483 E 1st Ave

Chico

$291,000

3/2

1639

1780 7th St

Oroville

$325,000

3/2

1560

4722 Cable Bridge Dr

Chico

$290,000

2/1

898

1856 Hooker Oak Ave

Chico

$290,000

3/2

1144

1067 Lupin Ave

Chico

$284,000

2/2

997

395 E 14th St

Chico

$269,000

2/1

1032

2492 Oro Quincy Hwy

Oroville

$279,000

3/2

1585

455 Tigertail Ln

Paradise

$574,500

3/3

2780

6475 Danika Ct

Paradise

$560,000

3/3

2630

1802 Chris Ct

Paradise

$559,000

3/3

2401

1059 Honey Run Rd

Chico

$233,000

3/1

1020

5811 Royal Ct

Paradise

$470,000

3/3

2073

2055 Amanda Way #46

Chico

$222,000

3/2

1244

5811 Yorkshire Dr

Paradise

$469,000

4/3

2317

2055 Amanda Way #29

Chico

$221,000

3/2

1008

1076 Kindig Dr

Paradise

$340,000

3/2

1514

a pri l 4, 2019

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