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CHICO’S FREE NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY VOLUME 42, ISSUE 31 THURSDAY, MARCH 28, 2019

P OETRY 99

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TREE TRAGEDY

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CN&R

INSIDE

Vol. 42, Issue 31 • March 28, 2019 OPINION

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Editorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Guest Comment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Second & Flume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 This Modern World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Streetalk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

NEWSLINES

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Downstroke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Sifter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9

HEALTHLINES

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Appointment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Weekly Dose. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

GREENWAYS

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Eco Event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS

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15 Minutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 The Goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

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COVER STORY

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ARTS & CULTURE

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Music Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 This Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Fine Arts listings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Scene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31 Nightlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Reel World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Chow. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Arts DEVO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Brezsny’s Astrology . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39

CLASSIFIEDS

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REAL ESTATE

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ON THE COVER: ILLUSTRATION BY WYATT HERSEY WYATTHERSEY.COM

Our Mission: To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. Editor Melissa Daugherty Managing Editor Meredith J. Cooper Arts Editor Jason Cassidy Contributing Editor Evan Tuchinsky Staff Writer Ashiah Scharaga Calendar Editor Neesa Sonoquie Contributors Robin Bacior, Alastair Bland, Michelle Camy, Vic Cantu, Charles Finlay, Bob Grimm, Howard Hardee, Miles Jordan, Mark Lore, Landon Moblad, Brie Oviedo, Ryan J. Prado, Juan-Carlos Selznick, Ken Smith, Robert Speer, Carey Wilson Managing Art Director Tina Flynn Creative Services Manager Elisabeth Bayard-Arthur Ad Designers Naisi Thomas, Cathy Arnold Publications Designers Katelynn Mitrano, Nikki Exerjian Director of Sales and Advertising Jamie DeGarmo Advertising Services Coordinator Ruth Alderson Senior Advertising Consultants Brian Corbit, Laura Golino Advertising Consultants Adam Lew, Jordon Vernau

President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Director of Nuts & Bolts Deborah Redmond Director of People & Culture David Stogner Director of Dollars & Sense Debbie Mantoan Nuts & Bolts Ninja Norma Huerta Payroll/AP Wizard Miranda Hansen Accounts Receivable Specialist Analie Foland Developer John Bisignano System Support Specialist Kalin Jenkins N&R Publications Managing Editor Laura Hillen N&R Publications Writers Anne Stokes, Thea Rood Marketing & Publications Consultants Greta Beekhuis, Steve Caruso, Joseph Engle, Elizabeth Morabito, Traci Hukill, Luke Roling, Celeste Worden 353 E. Second Street, Chico, CA 95928 Phone (530) 894-2300 Fax (530) 892-1111 Website newsreview.com Got a News Tip? (530) 894-2300, ext 2224 or chiconewstips@newsreview.com Calendar Events cnrcalendar@newsreview.com Calendar Questions (530) 894-2300, ext. 2243 Want to Advertise? Fax (530) 892-1111 or cnradinfo@newsreview.com Classifieds (530) 894-2300, press 2 or classifieds@newsreview.com Job Opportunities jobs@newsreview.com Want to Subscribe to CN&R? chisubs@newsreview.com Editorial Policies: Opinions expressed in CN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons, or other portions of the paper. CN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or review materials. Email letters to cnrletters@newsreview.com. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form and to edit them for libel.

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OPINION

Send guest comments, 340 words maximum, to gc@newsreview.com or to 353 E. Second St., Chico, CA 95928. Please include photo & short bio.

EDITORIAL

‘No collusion’—now what? Without the public release of Special Counsel Robert

Mueller’s investigative report, many questions remain as to President Trump’s potential illegal activity. What we know comes from newly appointed U.S. Attorney General William Barr, who announced that the probe did not find that POTUS or his campaign had “conspired or coordinated with the Russian government in its election interference activities.” In other words, Mueller didn’t find proof of “collusion.” Barr, who summarized Mueller’s findings, also noted that the president had not been exonerated when it comes to obstruction of justice. That is, the president may be guilty of that federal crime. That wouldn’t surprise anyone who watched former CIA Director James Comey’s congressional testimony. The president cut him loose, Comey said, after asking him to drop an investigation into the conduct of Michael Flynn, his disgraced former national security adviser. Flynn, who had a history of working with Russia—including being paid tens of thousands of dollars by its state-run television station—ultimately pleaded guilty of lying to the FBI. Others wary of the Russian government having leverage over Trump may have gleaned that by listening to the president himself. Recall Trump’s interview with TV journalist Lester Holt in which he copped to having

fired Comey—then lead investigator in the Russianinfluence case—while he was thinking about “this Russia thing.” Unsurprisingly, Trump-appointed Barr has shown no interest in pursuing obstruction charges. Republicans have seized on the “no collusion” narrative. What they don’t acknowledge is that the crime—conspiracy—carries a high burden of proof to prosecute. Moreover, they appear unmoved by the raft of indictments stemming from the special counsel’s investigation. Among the 34 people facing federal charges, seven have been convicted of crimes ranging from tax fraud and money laundering to lying to the FBI and conspiracy. Some, like Flynn, were senior members of Trump’s election campaign staff. The question for citizens concerned by Trump is how to move forward now that we’re stuck with him for the next two years. Our advice: Focus on policies—his tax plan that enriches the ultra wealthy; his efforts to fully dismantle the Affordable Care Act; his proposed cuts to education, Social Security and Medicare; his work to torch financial regulations put into place after the Great Recession. The list goes on. Those are the things affecting everyday people—and, other than the courts, there’s no stopping them until Trump is out of office. Ω

GUEST COMMENT

Ending a barbaric, discriminatory practice Gannounced nation’s already anemic death penalty when he a moratorium on the practice in California. ov. Gavin Newsom dealt a major blow to the

With 737 death row prisoners, the state has by far the nation’s largest death row, dwarfing the next largest states, Florida with 353 and Texas with 232. The death penalty is barbaric and riddled with error and bias, and other states should follow California’s lead in halting its use. The death penalty is inseparable from the taint of racial discrimination. In fact, racial bias does not come at one stage of this by process—it permeates the entire Cassandra process. Prosecutors discriminate Stubbs against jurors of color in jury The author is the selection, and the death penalty is director of the used overwhelmingly in favor of American Civil white victims rather than victims Liberties Union of color. Capital Punishment Another problem: Five former Project. death row prisoners have been exonerated in California, and there almost certainly are other innocent

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prisoners languishing under California’s broken system. There is also a base problem of unfairness with the practice that is largely unseen by the public in the form of abysmal lawyering. It’s worth pointing out that Newsom is now part of an accelerating nationwide trend in the legislatures and courts—and among governors—that have weighed the death penalty’s fatal flaws and rejected it accordingly. The Washington State Supreme Court ended the death penalty in 2018, becoming the third high court to reject the it on state constitutional grounds because of racial bias. Wyoming and Utah—both conservative states—each have come close to repealing the death penalty, based on concerns about costs and innocence. And a large number of governors have suspended the death penalty because of grave concerns with its fairness and applications. The death penalty represents the most egregious wrong our criminal punishment system can mete out— taking someone’s life. Newsom has struck a blow against this barbaric and flawed practice. Legislators, justices and governors should take note. So should the U.S. Supreme Court. The tide is turning, and now is the time to end this arbitrary, unfair and discriminatory method of punishment nationally. Ω

SECOND & FLUME by Melissa Daugherty m e l i s s a d @ n e w s r e v i e w. c o m

Mark of austerity Chico’s Public Works Department got an earful Monday evening (March 25) during the Bidwell Park and Playground Commission’s first meeting since the tree-cutting blunder this newspaper wrote about a few weeks ago (see “Oak grove chainsaw massacre,” Newslines, March 14). More than a dozen speakers chided the city for gross incompetence related to the felling of at least 27 valley oaks in Bidwell Park. That happened at a grove adjacent to the Chico Creek Nature Center during a project to reduce fire fuels, including vegetative debris and numerous nonnative catalpa trees. Erik Gustafson, Chico’s director of public works-operations and maintenance, gave a presentation about the incident. Short version: The city screwed up. For starters, trees within the project area were marked inconsistently, or “all over the board,” as Gustafson put it. Much of the damage occurred while a supervisor was tending to tasks elsewhere in the park, he said. Gustafson offered up an extensive mea culpa. Park Division Manager Linda Herman spoke as well, responding to specific queries. Why, for example, weren’t biologists consulted on the project? Answer: because just a handful of trees were supposed to be extracted. The Chico administrators’ narrative seemed to resonate with the commission’s members—the majority of whom were sworn in only last month—though citizens at the meeting seemed less mollified. In attendance were a couple of tree experts. One didn’t believe that only 27 oaks were taken down—he’d counted 35 and asked for more transparency. The other calculated the value of the fallen oaks at over $220,000. Gustafson noted that an internal investigation is ongoing, but the city already has adopted numerous measures to make sure nothing like this happens again. Those include establishing uniform tree-marking protocols; making sure the urban forest manager is consulted for tree removals beyond urgent ones (trees damaged by storms, for example); running larger-scope projects by the commission; noticing the public about such work; and training park staff, contractors and volunteers. Furthermore, the city will plant 36 trees of similar species in the park and transfer $13,000 from the Park Division budget to tree-planting. To me, the most interesting thing to note from the meeting was a narrative that underscores a longtime gripe of this newspaper: the lack of resources devoted to park maintenance. The Park Division’s budget, in particular, took a major hit during the Great Recession. Staff has been stretched thin ever since, as evidenced by the aforementioned supervisor having to duck out and, thus, not stopping the errant tree-cutting. Commission Vice Chair Aaron Haar nailed it when he attributed the botched job to austerity. Another item of note: Commissioner Lise Smith-Peters’ suggestion to create a vegetation management plan based on park zones. It wasn’t discussed in depth, but from what I gather, it would be a framework for what to remove—including where, when and how. Yet another: an endowment to generate desperately needed park maintenance funds. Considering the park has been chronically shortchanged in the annual budget—and how barrels of ink in these pages calling for increased allocations have fallen on blind eyes— that might not be such a bad idea.


LETTERS

ATTENTION BOOMERS

Send email to cnrletters@newsreview.com

Fallen oaks outrage Re “Oak grove chainsaw massacre” (Newslines, by Evan Tuchinsky, March 14): I am outraged by the city of Chico’s removal of healthy valley oak trees adjacent to the Chico Creek Nature Center. There is no way to bring those trees back, but the city must work to make sure this doesn’t happen again. It is long past time for the formation of a vegetation management plan for Bidwell Park. This plan should take into consideration the management of invasive versus native species and should clarify which parts of the park are for intensive recreational activities, such as One-Mile, and which areas will be kept in their natural state. To protect Chico from wildfires, some vegetation removal likely is necessary, both in selected parts of Bidwell Park and in places on the east side of town where there is an urban lands and wildlands interface. However, it is essential that

such fire prevention measures be made in consultation with Chico’s fire chief, Cal Fire, and the City’s urban forester. Until a vegetation management plan is adopted, the Bidwell Park and Playground Commission should adopt a temporary measure that states the urban forester must be consulted regarding any tree removal projects, and those projects must be closely supervised by city staff. Nancy E. Park Chico

Editor’s note: For more on this subject, see Second & Flume on opposite page.

Politics and PG&E Re “Hashtag movement” (Greenways, by Evan Tuchinsky, March 14): The Camp Fire was not caused by climate change. According to The New York Times, a live wire broke free of PG&E Tower 27/222, likely starting the fire. PG&E guidelines

put Tower 27/222 a quarter-century beyond its useful life. Former Gov. Jerry Brown blames climate change for the Camp Fire, and certainly the increased dryness caused by warming temperatures is a factor. However, fires at the end of the dry season are part of California’s ecosystem. Fire investigators determined that PG&E’s equipment was responsible for 17 of the 21 major wildfires in 2017, though the Camp Fire’s cause is still under investigation. The problem is the very cozy relationship PG&E had with Gov. Brown, who had former PG&E executives as his top aides. Also, then-California Attorney General Kamala Harris and her longtime mentor, the very powerful California Democrat and PG&E lobbyist Willie Brown, contributed to PG&E having a very lax regulatory environment. LETTERS c o n t i n u e d

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LETTERS C O N T I N U E D F R O M PA G E 5 PG&E has been allowed to focus on profits and dividends to stockholders, not on maintenance, with ratepayers paying for the costs of PG&E’s negligence. Slowing climate change is very necessary, as is lessening the number of California wildfires by forcing PG&E to stop paying dividends and to pour profits into maintenance which will make California safer, sooner. Lucy Cooke Butte Valley

The problem is pensions Re “Taxes and police” (Letters, by Martine Stillwell, March 14): Martine Stillwell is justifiably outraged that our city’s politicians are pushing a tax increase to fix the roads after letting them fall into disrepair thus increasing the cost to repair them. I wonder how much more outraged she would be if she knew that tens of thousands of our tax dollars are being paid to an opinion research firm to sell us that tax increase. And that doesn’t include the cost of the city bureaucracy’s staff time. The reason for the awful condition of our infrastructure and the reason for this tax increase are the unsustainable cost of government employee compensation, especially pensions. For many years money for infrastructure repair has been siphoned off for raises and unsustainable pensions. Does she know our bureaucrats have pensions worth millions? Yet instead of pension reform, our politicians believe that in a county with low wages, very high living expenses and a 21 percent poverty rate, the answer is to pass a tax increase that hits the poor the hardest. I wonder if Martine and others will be outraged enough to vote in the next election against the tax increase and the politicians who push it and encourage others to do the same. Dave Howell Chico

Home of the Hamburgler? As my family and I adventure out into our bustling community, we can’t help but notice our Measure K dollars hard at work. The progress is astounding, and some schools have taken on

Instead of pension reform, our politicians believe that … the answer is to pass a tax increase that hits the poor the hardest.

—Dave Howell

completely new looks. So new, in fact, that my husband has credited the changes thanks to Measure “KFC” as some schools’ new façades bear striking resemblances to various fast-food chains in town. As we discussed why or how this could have happened, the most prominent question became this: Are the powers that be in the Chico Unified School District administration so vapid that they didn’t notice the grossly pronounced similarities when presented the mockups for these updated exteriors or is this some subliminal product placement conspiracy in the works? I am, honestly, not sure which is worse, but if there is a citywide vote to update these school mascots, my top pick will most certainly be the Hamburgler. Morgan Dietz Chico

Beware of Trump No, Donald, it’s not “safe to go back in the water.” Just like in the movie Jaws, the shark is still out there. True, Special Counsel Robert Mueller has concluded his investigation into the Russian government’s efforts to interfere in the 2016 presidential election, and has not announced there was any collusion. I’m sure Trump strutted a self-congratulatory “told you so” persona to his guests at Mar-a-Lago when hearing this news, but make no mistake, we surely will continue to hear him bemoan that he has been “a victim of a witch hunt.” However, the closing of the special prosecutor’s probe does not mean other ongoing federal and state investigations will cease. Investigations into the Trump Organization’s financial transactions and practices will continue, to include: campaign finance violations; misuse of charity foundation funds; dubious insurance practices; foreign receivables and questionable payables with inauguration committee finances; and his blatant

violations of the Emoluments Clause, which prohibits his private business profiting from foreign entities. Incorporated businesses in America refer to themselves as corporations; crime families refer to themselves as organizations. How interesting that Donald Trump has chosen to call his company the Trump Organization. How interesting most Republicans don’t care. Roger S. Beadle Chico

How easily Trump-worshipers get hoodwinked into believing what he says. He told his followers, “Don’t believe what you see and hear” with your own eyes and ears. Rather, believe the lies of the devil himself, as he spews forth falsehoods, blasphemy and hate at lightning speed! Trump and his brainwashed minions want to attack socialism, a lifestyle Jesus preached as the way to the truth and the life. As Christians, we know this to be a fact, but those who confess Christ and follow Trump are either not reading their Bible or they are truly not saved or completely deceived. Just because evil people—like Hitler, Trump and Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro—abuse the word socialism, doesn’t make the word evil. Nationalism isn’t an evil word, until you put the word “white” in front of it. Trump loves white nationalism. Beware, the Bible tells of an evil man, like Trump, who’ll deceive Christians. Pat Johnston Red Bluff

More letters online:

We’ve got too many letters for this space. Please go to www.newsreview.com/chico for additional readers’ comments on past CN&R articles.


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NEWSLINES DOWNSTROKE MEASLES IN BUTTE COUNTY

Two adults have been diagnosed with measles in Butte County, and neither of them has a documented vaccine history, according to a press release from Butte County Public Health (BCPH). The local cases have been linked to a third in Shasta County and are considered part of a cluster. Officials have identified a few locations where people may have come in contact with the virus, including multiple spots in Red Bluff and Redding, plus the Esplanade House in north Chico (from March 5-9 and 15-19) and Enloe Medical Center’s emergency room (March 19, 8:30-9 a.m.). Those who believe they have been exposed and are not vaccinated should call BCPH at 552-3929. Symptoms of measles, which is highly contagious, include fever, cough and runny nose, followed by a rash. It can be deadly. The MMR vaccine, which protects against measles, mumps and rubella, is the best protection against the virus.

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HOUSE ARREST FOR BOMB THREATS

A former Oroville man found responsible for more than 100 false bomb threats in 2017 has been ordered to home confinement after spending five months in prison. Kao Xiong, 34, of Saint Paul, Minn., was sentenced to five months of home detention and three years of supervised release by U.S. District Judge Troy L. Nunley, according to a press release from the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of California. In 2017, while living in Oroville, Xiong mailed approximately 150 letters threatening bombings and assassinations across the U.S. Though the U.S. Postal Service reportedly intercepted many of the letters, several were delivered, including to FBI offices, airports, media outlets, private companies, a mall and both President Donald Trump and former President Barack Obama.

SUPERVISOR OPTS OUT FOR 2020

Butte County Supervisor Steve Lambert, who has represented the district spanning south Chico to Gridley since 2009, will not seek a fourth term next year. Lambert (pictured) confirmed his retirement to the CN&R by email. Biggs Mayor Nathan Wilkinson announced last Thursday (March 21) that he’s seeking the District 4 supervisorial seat and listed endorsers, including Lambert, District 1 Supervisor Bill Connelly of Oroville and former District 2 Supervisor Larry Wahl of Chico. Also running is Tod Kimmelshue, a county water commissioner and president of the Northern

California Regional Land Trust.

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Paradise schools face hard choices as families move on

Lspentclasstheirat Achieve Charter High School break differently than most

ast summer, members of the inaugural

incoming ninth-graders. They painted, landscaped, stained picnic tables and put finishing story and photo by touches on church buildEvan Tuchinsky ings that once housed a school. By Aug. 15, evan t u c h i ns k y @ n ew srev i ew. c o m opening day, they had helped restore a campus to call their own. On Nov. 8, those living nearby saw the site in flames as they escaped the Camp Fire down Clark Road. Calvary Baptist Church did not survive the wildfire that destroyed most of Paradise. “They were driving by it and hearts were breaking, thinking of all the work they put into creating their school,” said Casey Taylor, executive director of Achieve Charter School, whose high school grew out of an elementary and middle school established in 2005. The disaster also displaced Achieve’s other campus at St. Thomas More Catholic Church—as well as Paradise Unified School District (PUSD) sites and other schools on the Ridge, private and charter. Achieve found a new home at Life

Church in Chico. On Dec. 3, when schools reopened countywide, 44 of 50 Achieve high-schoolers and 205 of its 236 kindergarteners though eighth-graders settled back into classrooms. Those numbers have waned. With the rebuild of Paradise protracted, Taylor said an Achieve family leaves the area on a weekly basis. The K-8 enrollment is now 186, ninth grade 42. Next year, Achieve is full for most grades, but the wait list has just 39 versus the usual 200—and as of Monday (March 25), just 34 had signed up for ninth grade and the new 10th grade combined. The high school, anticipating more students than composed the inaugural class, had staffed up heading into the year with six teachers and two administrators. Last Wednesday night (March 20), Achieve’s board decided to suspend high school operations for next year at a minimum. The K-8 school will continue for two years, at least, in facilities under construction at Life Church. “Waiting until the last minute or this summer wouldn’t be doing anybody any favors,” Taylor said of the decision, referring to students and staff. Representatives from the Butte County Office of Education,

which oversees the high school’s charter, attended the emotion-filled meeting. Taylor said students cried throughout the next day after hearing the news. “I feel heartbroken for the high school,” said Taylor, who’d spearheaded a contentious battle with PUSD over the charter— getting denied by the district twice and finally turning to the county for approval. “Our kids have been angry and bitter and frustrated about the fire,” she added, “but once they knew this was going to be the final year of Achieve Charter High, they decided to make it the best few months together of their lives, and they’re not going to take anything for granted.” K-12 education on the Ridge comprises the

Paradise school district, six charter campuses and a private school, Paradise Adventist Academy (PAA). After the fire, PAA and Core Butte consolidated with their affiliated locations in Chico. Paradise Charter Middle School, Children’s Community Charter School and Home Tech Charter—like Achieve—also secured Chico sites. PUSD has classes spread across northern Butte County. The district set a goal of keeping students with their teachers, so it accepted space where it could find it, such


Achieve Charter School Executive Director Casey Taylor, whose high school is closing, says the K-8 campus will remain open and at Life Church for at least two years.

as the old Orchard Supply Hardware store. PUSD also leased an industrial complex by the Chico Municipal Airport to reconstitute Paradise High, and put Paradise Elementary students in Oroville. Even so, Superintendent Michelle John told the CN&R, “We’re Paradise Unified—we can’t stay down here for the three to five years it’s going to take people to rebuild.” Thus, PUSD plans to start the next school year back home. K-6 students on the Upper Ridge will attend one of the two Magalia schools, Pine Ridge or Cedarwood. All other K-6 students will go to Paradise Intermediate, and Paradise High will become a 7-12 school. “If, in fact, it’s safe,” John emphasized. The two Paradise campuses must pass soil and air-quality tests, and need clean water—PUSD hopes to drill sealed wells, but if that’s not possible, it will install storage tanks. PAA will remain at Chico Seventhday Adventist Church next year as repairs to its campus continue. Children’s Community Charter, at this point, also expects to stay put. Core Butte’s Paradise campus is gone, but Paradise Charter Middle School and Home Tech expect to reoccupy their campuses in the fall. For the district, attendance will be, in John’s words, “a gamble.” Enrollment already has declined: Before the fire, PUSD had 3,386 K-12 students, including 839 in high school. The total dipped to 1,924 in January, roughly the same as this month’s report of 1,956. Both Cedarwood and Pine Ridge are full for fall, John said, with 260 students per campus. PUSD estimates an upside of 500 elementary students and 700 students total for grades 7-12. Based on other communities recovering from disasters, John said the district total could fall below 1,300, roughly a third of the pre-fire enrollment. PUSD will offer bus transportation to its schools—even from Gridley, where FEMA is readying temporary housing for families, including an estimated 200 to 280 school-age children. Still, John understands that some displaced residents may choose neighborhood schools where they’ve resettled. “In this kind of disaster, like [Hurricane] Katrina and Santa Rosa [fire], you only retain 30 percent of your population,” John said. “And no one’s had the kind of disaster we’ve had.” Ω

Waiting game Families in limbo as FEMA housing timelines remain undefined

Ka roofhasover been grateful for since Nov. 8: She has her head and a job, and her family risty Malloy has tried to focus on what she

is safe. But living in a travel trailer in a dirt lot behind a church in Chico for nearly four months has been hard, to say the least. For one, the trailer’s roof leaks. And its propane heater doesn’t provide enough warmth, so her family uses a space heater. There are five of them—Kristy, her husband and their three children—crammed into a small living space with their two dogs and cat. After the Camp Fire, Malloy signed up for temporary housing through the Federal Emergency Management Agency. The family didn’t have anywhere else to turn for help. That’s because, after the Humboldt Fire, “the insurance companies disappeared” for their older modular home on Stapleton Lane in Paradise that escaped that 2008 blaze. They weren’t so fortunate this time around. FEMA housing communities are in the works in Gridley and south Chico—the topic of Tuesday’s (March 26) special Chico City Council meeting—but progress on them has been slow, and they are not enough to accommodate all eligible families. In the meantime, that’s left many trying to figure out their next steps while living in less-

than-ideal conditions. For Malloy, despite continued calls to FEMA, she has yet to hear anything concrete—no timeframe for when or where a FEMA-provided and -furnished manufactured housing unit, with one to three bedrooms, will become available. “I’m really frustrated,” she said. “I’m kind of in the dark…. I know there are FEMA trailers [being used]; how the heck [those people] got in there before anybody else, I don’t know. “But that’s the problem. There’s not enough places, and there’s not enough com-

SIFT ER High-tech homes For the first time since it started the biannual State of the Home survey, HomeServe asked homeowners across the U.S. about habits like using smart home devices—ranging from voicecontrolled assistants like Alexa to video monitoring to smart light bulbs—and making repairs. The online survey, conducted by the

• 56 percent of homeowners own a smart home device, while 36 percent use at least one mobile app to manage something in their home. • 18 percent of homeowners— and 31 percent of those with household incomes of less than $50,000—have no savings set aside for emergency repairs. • 54 percent had a homerepair emergency within the past year—16 percent replaced an HVAC system, 14 percent repaired a toilet and 12 percent had leaky pipes.

Harris Poll, also asked about saving for a repair emergency and hiring contractors. Here are some of the key findings, released this week:

• When faced with hiring a contractor, 41 percent turned to family and friends for a referral, versus 27 percent who searched online for help.

Source: businesswire.com

Kristy Malloy has been living in a trailer with her husband and three kids (from left: Aiden, Bethany and Wyatt) since late November. The family has been approved for FEMA housing, but has no idea when any units will become available. PHOTO BY ASHIAH SCHARAGA

munication with FEMA.” In part, this uncertainty stems from the fact that FEMA is still working out the details, according to Dan Horvath, director of FEMA’s northern branch for California, who spoke with the CN&R after Tuesday’s meeting. One of the agency’s biggest hurdles is securing land, he said. Currently, there are 229 families living in FEMA-provided trailers, according to FEMA spokesman Victor Inge. Most are scattered around Butte County: there are 70 at Bidwell Canyon Marina in Oroville, 50 at the Glenn County Fairgrounds and 27 at the Old Orchard RV Park in Orland. In addition, FEMA is paying for 174 families to stay in hotels and motels, spread among 18 counties surrounding Butte (plus, 634 elsewhere across the U.S.). But these numbers are far short of the overall target of housing 1,300 families. Gridley’s project at a 72-acre city-owned industrial park is expected to provide 350 modular homes for one to two years. In Chico, 2750 Hegan Lane and 1 Aztec Drive—13 acres total comprising an expected 82 homes—are also in an industrial area, but on private property, with a similar lease agreement. Melissa Fornof, a Silver Dollar Fair exhibit spokeswoman, said 61 units are planned for the fairgrounds’ north lot, where FEMA is installing utilities. NEWSLINES C O N T I N U E D MARCH 28, 2019

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NEWSLINES C o n t i n u e d f R o M pA g e 9

The Chico City Council has held

two informational sessions related to the communities planned for Chico. Tuesday, more than half of the 10 speakers addressing the dais were from Cessna Avenue, a neighborhood in unicorporated Butte County near the Hegan Lane development. Most voiced concerns about traffic congestion and safety. JD Estep told the panel it recently took her 45 minutes to drive about one mile, from her home to Park Avenue. “That’s the kind of crazy it is right now, and that’s in ideal conditions,” she said. Others, however, urged FEMA to get moving. Joe Mack, who manages one of the south Chico industrial properties, appeared exasperated. There has been no activity, no dirt turned since a lease was signed six weeks ago, he said. “My question is, when are we going to break ground, get one person housed?” he said. “Then we’ll all come back here and complain about it.” In response to the public’s comments, Horvath said he understands the community’s pain and frustration, and wishes the process was quicker. It takes an average of four months for FEMA to set up such communities once a lease is signed, he added. “This housing mission is a really tough mission, to meet all the environmental requirements, the permitting, working with the water district … working with PG&E, the requirements to trench all power underground,” he said. In the meantime, families are stuck in limbo. Malloy has been getting to know her new neighbors, bringing them meals and care packages to welcome them to their makeshift neighborhood. She and her husband don’t want to uproot their children, but are concerned it’ll take too long for FEMA housing to become available. They won’t be making any decisions until the summer. “It is [hard], but there are people in worse situations than I am. … we’re coming into our new normal.” —AshiAh sChArAgA ash ia h s@ newsr ev iew.c o m


Long road ahead Residents push for answers regarding Paradise water contamination

Department of Toxic Substance Control

Kevin Phillips looked out at a crowd

of some 700 people, most of them his customers, and delivered a painful message that many had heard before from varying sources. But to get confirmation from the Paradise Irrigation District manager that it may take two to three years to get the town’s water infrastructure back up and running at full capacity still sent shock waves through the large auditorium. “There is no game book, no game plan. We’re having to [create] the plan right now,” Phillips explained during a short introduction outlining the process PID is going through to assess contamination in the pipelines. “We’re going to have more of these meetings to keep you guys up-to-date so you can understand the process, the hurdles we’re jumping through.” That, it seemed, was welcome news. And despite some in the audience who were quick to sling insults and ask accusatory questions, the mood in the room was more exasperation at a terrible situation and less anger toward the irrigation district. A case in point: Toward the end of the three-hour meeting at Paradise Alliance Church Tuesday night (March 26), one particularly irate man told Phillips and the others onstage—including Purdue engineer Andrew Whelton, an expert on water contamination who has been consulting with the district—that he’d just spent $200,000 on rebuilding two rentals in Paradise. “If I can’t deliver water to renters, I’m losing money,” he said. “If I was your boss, you’d be walking down a road.” The crowd appeared to stand behind Phillips—a round of “boos” followed this passionate outburst. “I understand your frustration,” Phillips said calmly. “We’re fight-

March 2019

Public Notice The mission of DTSC is to protect California’s people and environment from harmful effects of toxic substances by restoring contaminated resources, enforcing hazardous waste laws, reducing hazardous waste generation, and encouraging the manufacture of chemically safer products.

ing for those new constructions, and to get temporary water to those new constructions.” That is the best answer he could give for the dozens of people who pleaded for clean water for their existing homes—and those they hope to rebuild in the months and years to come. As it now stands, PID is recommending not using its water for drinking, cooking, even bathing (beyond a short, cold or lukewarm, shower). While the main culprit appears to be benzene, a known carcinogen believed to have leached into the pipelines when the Camp Fire melted plastic pipes and meters, other “volatile organic compounds” also have been found. With 173 miles of pipes, testing them all, then eliminating the contamination and restoring service, is a daunting task. It will start at the top and move down, as PID works on a gravity-based system. And it will require shutting the system down before getting it back up. One way the district is hoping to mitigate the impacts is to provide water tanks—and water to fill them—to individual structures. Phillips said he is working with the Federal Emergency Management Agency and California Office of Emergency Services to secure funding for that, and he’s expecting an answer in early April. Home and business owners, however, are still responsible for ensuring that their internal plumbing is safe, as the contamination has been found through testing at taps. Many of the public speakers

Paradise Irrigation District Manager Kevin Phillips addresses a crowd of hundreds at the Paradise Alliance Church. PHOTO BY MEREDITH J. COOPER

expressed frustration at the lack of direction they’ve been given, and the mixed messaging they receive depending on whom they talk to. A prime example Tuesday evening was Kristin Cooper, who was representing North State Water Treatment. “When I spoke to our regional water quality office, it was their understanding that there had not been a single positive test [inside a home],” she said. “We have been urging people not to pay for [expensive] tests.” Whelton said he’d gotten similar mixed information from varying agencies, which he hopes will be remedied. But he affirmed that, “I have been contacted by people who have found contamination in their homes. The state is saying they don’t have that information.” Going forward, Phillips said, the PID is expecting to implement the next phase of testing within 30 days. He also urged those in attendance to sign up for water system updates on the district’s website (pidwater. com), where they can also find information on test results, upcoming meetings and how to register for a PID-provided water tank. “We are dedicated to the town of Paradise and to its citizens so this town can rebuild quickly,” Phillips said. —MEREDITH J. COOPER m e re d i t h c @new srev i ew. c o m

NOTICE OF STANDARDIZED PERMIT RENEWAL FOR THE HAZARDOUS WASTE STORAGE AND TRANSFER FACILITY ASBURY ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES EPA ID. NO. CAL000827844 On October 22, 2018, the Department of Toxic Substance Control (DTSC) received a hazardous waste permit renewal application from Asbury Environmental Services (AES), doing business as World Oil Environmental Services (Facility) at 2549 Scott Avenue in Chico, California 95928-7188. This facility opened in 1991 as Evergreen Oil Company. DTSC is reviewing the application to ensure AES’s operations continue to meet the technical and regulatory requirements to protect human health and the environment. This Facility stores and transfers hazardous waste, used oil, waste antifreeze and oily water received from off-site generators. The Facility has a tank farm unit containing three above-ground tanks, with a capacity of 10,000, 1,000 and 500 gallons. These tanks are permitted to store used oil, waste antifreeze, and oily water. The Facility also has a container storage area that allows various size containers, not exceeding 275 gallons, to store waste antifreeze, used oil, oily sludge, oily debris, and oily water. The current permit will remain effective until there is a final decision on the renewal application. DTSC may request additional information from the Facility before its final decision. If the application is determined to be technically complete, DTSC will then prepare a draft permit decision document for public review and comment. If DTSC renews the Permit, the Facility could continue to store/transfer hazardous waste for the next ten years. You may review or copy the Permit Renewal application and other supporting documents at the following locations: Chico Public Library, 1108 Sherman Avenue, Chico, California 95926 (530) 891-2761 - Call for hours DTSC File Room, 8800 Cal Center Drive, Sacramento, California 95826 (916) 255-4159 - Call for appointment You may also view this notice and project related documents at the following DTSC website: https://www.envirostor.dtsc.ca.gov/public/hwmp_profile_ report.asp?global_id= CAL000827844 If you have any questions regarding this Notice, please contact: Project Manager. Mr. Lung-Yin Tai at 916-255-3615 or Lung-Yin.Tai@dtsc.ca.gov or Public Participation Specialist, Kerry Rasmussen at 916-255-3650, 866-495-5651 or Kerry.Rasmussen@dtsc.ca.gov For media questions, please contact Gamaliel Ortiz Public Information Officer at (916) 327-4383 or at Gamaliel.Ortiz@dtsc.ca.gov

HEARING IMPAIRED INDIVIDUALS may use the California Relay Service at 1-800-855-7100 or 711 (TTY). MARCH 28, 2019

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HEALTHLINES Janet Balbutin, owner of Chico Pharmacy and Paradise  Drug, has increased security measures in response to  recent robberies in the North State.

Crime of the times

pects nearby in a white Toyota stolen out of Sacramento. One suspect from the Chico and Redding crimes was arrested in Sacramento, while the other remained at large as of the CN&R’s deadline. Chico Police Chief Mike O’Brien said these heists match others along the northern Sacramento Valley—even if not always the same individuals, the perpetrators may be a single group. Butte County Sheriff Kory Honea and O’Brien

see opioid thefts, whether robberies or overnight break-ins, as part of a broader pattern feeding addiction. “A daytime robbery where people are present is certainly alarming,” Honea told the CN&R by phone. “That said, we’ve also experienced in this county burglaries of pharmacies where people are seeking opiates … and a definite increase of opioids on the streets, oftentimes in the form of heroin, but also fictitious oxycontin pills being sold or brought into the community which contain fentanyl.” Oxycontin is a high-strength opioid, a synthetic form of morphine. Fentanyl is far more

Pharmacy robberies rise as side effect of opioid crisis story and photo by

Evan Tuchinsky

evantuc hin sk y @ n ewsrev i ew. com

Jous50changes years, a period marked by numerin her profession. Whether in anet Balbutin has been a pharmacist for

a national chain or an independent store like those she owns, Chico Pharmacy and Paradise Drug, pharmacists face tightening regulations and increasing scrutiny from state and federal regulators—particularly for narcotic painkillers, or opioids. They also face a growing threat that’s forced Balbutin, for one, to change the way she works. In the past several years, the number of robberies at pharmacies has increased dramatically. California leads the nation for armed thefts of controlled prescription drugs, according to the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency, with 270 of the country’s 875 in 2017 (the most recent year compiled). California’s fig-

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ure represents a 71 percent increase from the previous year and nearly triple the amount from 2015. The rise coincides with efforts to combat the opioid crisis gripping the United States, rural regions especially. Recently—locally—robberies of Rite Aids made headlines. From Sacramento to Redding, including Chico and Gridley, men have approached pharmacy counters demanding narcotics. Law enforcement officials connect the crimes because of similarities in each instance. “It’s so scary for us,” Balbutin said. “We’re in a high-traffic area for offenders, and I’ve been a party to some cases where those offenders don’t care if they’re going to get caught, they just want this dose right now.” Thieves have broken into her pharmacies 23 times, including three times in a threemonth span two winters ago. Police identified one burglar, who took Xanax and Norco (a medium-strength opioid), as the son of a customer who’d been coming to Paradise Drug for decades. There have been near-misses, too.

Amber Denna, compliance and risk manager for the stores, said a man turned away at Paradise Drug went up the street and robbed Cobblestone Pharmacy (since closed). The pharmacies also received calls from a man claiming to be a doctor from Southern California prescribing large quantities of codeine cough syrup; when pressed for a diagnosis, he only could muster, “Real bad cough,” raising suspicion. “When I called the [actual] doctor,” Denna continued, “the doctor said, ‘Do not have them in your store, they’re a gang from Sacramento—they’ll do anything.’ “Sometimes you’ll be able to call the police to arrest [perpetrators],” she added, “but then there’s those times when you could harm yourself, too [by intervening]. They’re desperate. They’ll do anything.” In the Chico robbery, Feb. 26 at the Rite Aid on Mangrove Avenue, two men vaulted the counter and, after assaulting an employee, drove off in a white sedan with the narcotics they demanded. A week later, Feb. 1, Redding police say the same two men robbed a Rite Aid there; as in Chico, they jumped the counter and got away in a car registered out of the area. March 6, three men strong-armed the Gridley Rite Aid for prescription drugs and fled on foot. Gridley Police arrested the sus-

HEALTHLINES C o n t i n u e d

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AppointMent Put ‘spring’ in your step Do good to more than just your own body this Saturday (March 30) at Enloe Medical Center’s annual Heart & Sole 5k Run/ Walk for Wellness. Meet bright and early at One-Mile Recreational Area for a 7 a.m. start, and choose either a 1-mile or 5k course that will take you through beautiful Bidwell Park. The first 650 participants to cross the finish line will receive a finisher’s medal, and commemorative T-shirts will be available. Proceeds support patients and families in need. Contact the Enloe Foundation at 332-4568 for more info and registration.


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Personal security tips: • Be alert, inside and around the pharmacy. • Report suspicious activity to police. • don’t intervene and risk endangering yourself. • if prescribed opioids, secure your pills and don’t tell others.

O’Brien said by phone, “we’ve created a whole other tier of addicts from this medication—in fact, I know of people who have died from this medication, these addictions. “The genie was kind of out of the bottle, but then there was an effort to get some control, which is good. Then you had, I think, some more desperation.” Balbutin said this clampdown period corresponds with the increase in robberies, a connection Honea and O’Brien also made. She’s invested in new security measures for both pharmacies, which are neighbors on Cohasset Road until Paradise Drug rebuilds from the Camp Fire, and increased private patrols. She also has changed the way the staff—including her sister, Ava, and brother, Ray—operates. They’re more cautious, more observant. Delivery drivers use cars without signage. Employees get escorted to their cars. Balbutin, 74, has stopped working late and takes precautions as she drives home. Said Denna: “It’s definitely something that’s always in the back of your mind.” Ω

Bad eggs

Source: CNN Health

’s Independent Journalism Fund

The new verdict is in: As your frisky little hens are finally laying them by the basketful, word on the street is you may have to cut back on the wholesome egg. Fact is, the yolk of an egg contains 186 mg of cholesterol, and most doctors recommend no more than 300 mg of cholesterol a day. That sure puts a damper on that Saturday morning three-egg omelet. A new study published this month in the Journal of the American Medical Association detailed research gathered from almost 30,000 people in the U.S. over 17-plus years, and the data showed that consuming more than the recommended amount of dietary cholesterol was associated with a 3.2 percent higher risk of heart disease and a 4.4 percent higher risk of early death. But don’t lose heart just yet—how the eggs are cooked makes a difference, as do other unhealthy behaviors you may partake in. So maybe hard-boil it and chow down while walking around the block.

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potent, 50 to 100 times stronger than morphine and, thus, potentially fatal in even small doses. Chico attracted national news coverage in January when a man died and at least a dozen adults were treated at Enloe Medical Center after a mass overdose of fentanyl. “If people are seeking oxycontin and the supply through pharmacies and other legitimate means has become more difficult to obtain,” Honea continued, “the fact that illegal drug suppliers are manufacturing fake oxycontin pills using fentanyl demonstrates there’s a significant problem [with addiction] but also represents a significant health problem.” Along with heroin and fentanyl, O’Brien mentioned information about prescription painkiller use presented by Dr. Andy Miller, Butte County’s public health officer. Miller, alarmed by the amount of opioids in Butte County, championed community prescribing guidelines adopted by primary care providers and emergency room physicians (see “An uphill battle,” Healthlines, Nov. 2, 2017). Miller declined to comment for this article, but he previously cited studies indicating greater effectiveness of opioids for relieving acute, or short-term, pain than chronic, or long-term, pain. Miller also pointed to risks of dependence and overdose that grow with protracted use. “From what I’ve heard,”

C o n t i n u e d f R o M pA g e 1 2

Community Supported

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MARCH 28, 2019

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GREENWAYS

Hot flash We’ve passed climate tipping point—now what? by

Evan Tuchinsky evantuc hin sk y @ n ewsrev i ew. com

The United Nations Environment Assembly in

Nairobi, Kenya, brought together representatives from 115 countries for four days this month. They reviewed reams of research— notably, Global Environment Outlook 6, compiled by 250 scientists, and Global Linkages: A graphic look at the changing Arctic—and issued an array of statements. One drew international headlines. “Even if the world were to cut emissions in line with the existing Paris Agreement commitments, winter temperatures over the Arctic Ocean would rise 3-5°C by midcentury…. Meanwhile, rapidly thawing permafrost could even accelerate climate change further and derail efforts to meet the Paris Agreement’s long-term goal of limiting the rise in global temperature to 2°C.” This March 13 announcement, made at the conference and in a news release, declared the warming as “locked into the climate system” because of greenhouse gas emissions from the past and near-term, plus heat that’s stored in the ocean. Joyce Msuya, acting executive director

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of the UN Environment Programme, stated: “What happens in the Arctic does not stay in the Arctic. We have the science; now more urgent climate action is needed to steer away from tipping points that could be even worse for our planet than we first thought.” That’s one way to take the news—how eco-minded folks have. Groups such as Chico 350 and local members of Citizens Climate Lobby see this as a rallying cry for action and spread the word via social media. Kristina Schierenbeck, a Chico State biology professor whose research has illustrated how climate change triggers species’ migration, told the CN&R in an email that “yes, we may have reached the tipping point, which is exactly why we need to stop fossil fuel use NOW if we are going to be able to reduce the pending impacts.” But what about the cynical interpretation? That is, if we’re past the point of rescue—the tipping point, the point of no return—then what’s the point of doing anything? The proposition of “urgent climate action” demands change, which entails new habits and lifestyle—sometimes with more cost and less comfort. To quote the Grateful Dead: “I may be going to hell in a bucket, babe, but at least I’m enjoying the ride.” Why sacrifice if our fate is sealed? The simple answer is we’re not doomed yet. Arctic conditions are critical, true, and have a ripple effect; however, other thresholds remain uncrossed. Learn more:

Visit tinyurl.com/UNarctic for Global Linkages: A graphic look at the changing Arctic and tinyurl.com/UNoutlook6 for Global Environment Outlook 6, reports from the United Nations Environment Programme.

“If we’re past one particular tipping point, which is what’s going to happen to the global ice sheets, that’s just one thing that we might be worried about,” said David Hassenzahl, dean of Chico State’s College of Natural Sciences. His research spans a spectrum of environmental science fields, such as climate, ecology, biodiversity, energy and water. Antarctica, for instance, has a geologic composition distinct from the Arctic. Scientists such as Guy McPherson, who’s returning to Chico to speak April 28-29, forecast the Southern Hemisphere lagging behind the Northern Hemisphere for cataclysmic climate events like an ice age. “So, why should we keep worrying?” Hassenzahl continued. “Well, because people are going to keep suffering. For some people, the plants and animals that are going to go extinct are also important. That’s not unimportant, but human suffering is the most important to me.” Hassenzahl cited John Holdren, science adviser

and director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy during the Obama administration, in regards to suffering. Holdren said we have three choices in the face of climate change: mitigate, adapt or suffer—“The more mitigation we do, the less adaptation will be required and the less suffering there will be.” Mitigation refers to reducing activities that negatively impact the climate; predominantly, burning fossil fuels. Adaptation, Hassenzahl continued, means altering our lives and landscape “so we’re not as vulnerable to a changing climate.” That includes reconsidering where farmers grow specific crops and how builders construct shelter. Hassenzahl sees actions having impacts

both individual and widespread. “The changes we can make to improve the climate can also improve our lives,” he said. “I’ve lived here five years, and I’ve driven to work about nine times, and four of those were during the [Camp] Fire. The rest of the time, I’ve bicycled to work. My life is better and has a lower climate footprint. “There’s a lot of things that are already happening and a lot of things we can do,” Hassenzahl added, noting alternative energy as an example. “I think there are lots of places for optimism, and big places for optimism, to cause change on a [generational] scale.” Meanwhile, he expressed skepticism about spurring action by shock, saying: “I think environmentalists do a disservice when they focus on the negative—we know from research that when you talk about the bad things that climate change is going to do, people shut off or [give up].” Natalie Carter, executive director of the Butte Environmental Council, told the CN&R by phone that she sees the U.N. statement as “more of a wake-up call than a doomsday announcement, and what’s needed is action to avoid this problem getting any worse.” Like Hassenzahl, she pointed to positive developments, such as Chico’s Climate Action Plan to reduce fossil-fuel dependence and emissions. “Yeah, some of this [climatic shift] is already happening, and there’s nothing that can be done about the damage that’s been done,” Carter said. “But more damage can be avoided … and small changes add up.” Ω

ECO EVENT

First stop: education! Start your weekend off early with the 14th annual This Way to Sustainability Conference— the largest of its kind and entirely student run. This two-day event takes place today through Friday (March 28-29), 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Chico State. The theme this year is “Regenerating Ecological Systems: Impacts & Solutions to Climate Crisis.” The conference will include more than 125 speakers addressing the most pressing environmental topics today, including issues responding to the impact of the Camp Fire, such as regenerative agriculture and water resource management. The event is free for students of any age and from any campus with ID. Visit csuchico.edu/ sustainability for scheduling and ticket info.


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Check back next week for more businesses and organizations that have re-opened. Listings provided by Paradise Ridge Chamber of Commerce. paradisechamber.com 18

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EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS PHOTO BY ASHIAH SCHARAGA

15 MINUTES

THE GOODS

Nature’s treasures

Fruit of the vine

Kirk Jefferson would be content spending the rest of his retirement working in his backyard wood shop. He’s already jokingly told his wife, Kay, to sell their RV. “We like to travel, but I’m just as happy home in the garage,” he said during a recent interview in his Chico home, shoting Kay a mischievous grin. After working 43 years for PG&E, Jefferson, 63, rekindled his passion for woodworking, which he started in his high school days. He sells his works under the moniker Oleander Sawdust, creating “useful art” from recycled wood and wine barrel staves. You can find Jefferson’s recycled walnut charcuterie boards and magnetic knife racks at Zucchini & Vine in Chico as well as at Dave & Ruth’s woodwork arts and crafts shop in Los Molinos. You can also contact Jefferson personally at kirkjefferson@gmail. com.

How did you get into woodworking? When I was young, I always liked woodworking. When I started [at] PG&E … my career picked up and wood got pushed aside. I didn’t have time, had kids, had a family, did all that. And then, when I was getting ready to retire, my lovely wife—I was telling her, “I kinda want to get back

by

Meredith J. Cooper meredithc@newsreview.com

into doing woodworking” … She goes, “Why don’t we fix up your garage for a wood shop?” I’m like, That’s an open checkbook right there from the wife saying fix up the shop! So I gutted it, poured a new foundation in there, put in a 100-amp service and rewired the whole thing to handle a bunch of power tools, and slowly started buying tools.

Why recyclable materials? About a year ago, I went to a garage sale and bought some wood tools. And this guy was moving and he had to get his yard clean, and he goes, “Y’know, I’ve got a bunch of scraps of walnut.” It was weathered and, I mean, [I thought], You can’t use this. He gave me a truckload. I didn’t want to be ungrateful, and I thought, Well, [I’ll] at least take it and see what I can do. I had to mill it and then, all of the sudden, god, there’s this gorgeous piece

of wood out of that literal crap pile. So, I started making a bunch of stuff [i.e., decorative and serving trays, key chains, candle holders, wine gift boxes, signs and cellphone holders]. I fell in love with the grain on the wood. I go, It looks gorgeous! I’ve got to make something out of that.

What do you enjoy most about it? To me, I find that the challenge and the art of woodworking is coming up with something useful out of really crappy, recycled wood. [I enjoy] being creative. I brought a truckload and a half of this firewood from [Wineland Walnut] I’m going to make something out of. To me, that is so satisfying, to have something useful that was going to be in a fireplace ’cause it was no good. Maybe I see something in other people’s trash, so to speak. —ASHIAH SCHARAGA as h i a h s @new srev i ew. c o m

I had an opportunity this past weekend to attend the Arc of Butte County’s 19th annual Wine, Beer & Food Tasting benefit, and it was, as anticipated, a ton of fun. Over a dozen local wineries and breweries took part in the festivities, providing an opportunity to taste a lot of the region’s bounty all in one place. The timing couldn’t have been more perfect, as the CN&R last week quietly announced this summer’s inaugural Butte County Wine Week, and it gave me a chance to hobnob with local winemakers and drum up some excitement. Several of them informed me they already were percolating on special events to coincide with the week—actually 10 days, June 7-16. Think Chico Beer Week, but with wine—check buttecountywineweek.com for updates, including how to participate. The event also featured live music, an auction, and art by some of Arc’s clients, and I bought a rad little multidimensional painting by an artist named Renee. I spoke to Alan Carrier, longtime Arc art teacher, who works with adults with developmental disabilities, about the pieces on display and he beamed when I said I was going to buy one. “That’ll make Renee really happy,” he told me. Something new that I noticed in visiting with the various winery owners and staff on Sunday is that two distinct geographical areas have banded together to market themselves. In south county, Bangor Ranch Vineyard & Winery, Cobble Ridge Artisan Distillery, Hickman Family Vineyards and Spencer-Shirey Wines have joined forces to represent the Bangor Wine & Spirits Region. (Look ’em up on Facebook.) And just south of Chico, Almendra Winery & Distillery, Dog Creek Cellars, Gale Vineyards and Nascere Vineyards are marketing themselves as the Durham Wine District. Very cool! Speaking of Nascere, if the name sounds almost familiar, it is. Earlier this month, winemakers Jess and Vanessa Pitney announced that they were changing the name of their Nesseré Vineyards to Nascere after learning that another winery, in Calistoga, had already claimed the former. Check out Nascere—Italian for “to be born”—and its gorgeous new cornhole setup at 3471 Durham-Dayton Highway, Sat.-Sun., noon-5 p.m. Some tasting highlights from Sunday: the Atomix red blend from Butte Valley’s Straw House Cellars, the Drama blend by Oroville’s Live Vine Vineyard & Winery, the PM Frenzy blend from Spencer-Shirey and Almendra’s Luna blend. Apparently I was feeling the blends that day!

COOL BEANS Chico roaster Tender Loving Coffee released its RISE blend over the weekend (March 23) to benefit Camp Fire survivors. “We know that many impacted by the tragedy fear that support will dry up just as they are ready to receive it,” TLC co-founder Heath Dewey said in a press release. “Our goal is to raise funds that can benefit Butte County in the long-term.” Purchase 12-ounce bags of RISE for $14 at TLC’s cafe (365 E. Sixth St.). In addition, TLC raised $7,150 through private donations and an art auction organized by the phoenix530 collective and handed out checks to residents of Concow and Magalia. Nice job!

MARCH 28, 2019

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y Poetr 99

Kicking off National Poetry Month with readers’ short works

ADULT WINNERS FIRST PLACE

Burnt shirt

Long braids and long strands Saliva Breathing normally and pressing up into the sheets Prone and so unbelievably blue Like a cyborg and an iris confused Eyeballs like fishbowls Canvas soothed Every need harnessed So sick with fire Cold and the coming doom Sweet doom Smells that reprogram Burn up slowly and sweet William Parnell Chico

A

pril is National Poetry Month, and this year our annual Poetry 99 issue starts celebrating it a few days early. Consider this your poetry pregame. Once again, the Chico News & Review’s readers overwhelmed us with hundreds of entries, and most everyone adhered to the word-count restriction! We received so many good poems that some of the judges’ favorites wouldn’t fit in the paper. We’ve included those overflow poems with the online version of the feature. Thank you to our our esteemed judging panel—the writing professionals of the 1078 Gallery Literary Committee— as well as all of the writers who entered. Happy National Poetry Month, everyone!

First place? Not bad for a guy who doesn’t really write poetry. William Parnell used to be known around these parts as a rocker, playing bass for one-time local faves Deerpen. He says he’s recently started to try more writing, and that this piece was written on a whim, “almost like a form of therapy.” William Parnell

Note: Names are stripped from all entries before judging so writers’ identities do not influence their decisions.

SECOND PLACE

Craning

Under the yellow of the street light the large sycamore tree casts a shadow we stand here just off the sidewalk in the mud patch her eyes grow big—listening I have my arms raised to alert her to the sound of the cranes we have stopped mid-sentence Emma Schutz Fort Chico

Members of the 1078 Gallery Literary Committee (from left): Muir Hughes, Sarah Pape and Angela Youngblood.

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Emma Schutz Fort

Emma Schutz Fort has been writing poetry since her college days at UC Santa Cruz. She used to be a regular at local readings and says she recently dug up some of her old work and became inspired to write more. When she’s not writing or working as a school counselor, she likes to hike and enjoy nature.


Carolyn Singleton

HONORABLE MENTIONS

Shadow Fertile

I think of Emily Dickinson as the baby rolls inside of me. I sit before the television doing printed cross-stitch longing for the pure silence of her 19th century Amherst home, for her ink pen carving the poetry of her solitude. Somewhere her bones lie crumbling in a mausoleum her auburn hair attached to a bleached skull. As the child stretches and moves inside me and domestic duties call to me I think of Emily, of her shadow fertile with words and imagery. Jean Varda Chico

No Harm

Newsflash: Pepperidge Farm Goldfish recalled. I picture the boy I babysit who begged

THIRD PLACE

A Moment

Tangled in the peanut butter of late lunches, Contemplating world affairs, I giggle and wink at the toaster. Carolyn Singleton Chico

Carolyn Singleton really enjoyed the process of editing her poems to fit the parameters of our short poetry contest. “It was fun. It was like a puzzle, only with words.” In addition to writing poetry, the retired special-education teacher enjoys reading poems and committing them to memory, especially the works of A.A. Milne.

me for feeder fish not knowing they were destined to die. He loves crickets in lizards’ clear cages, Ghost Shrimp in algae, living rocks that make the bottom look bright. Nose pressed against the universe of freshwater fish, I think he is safe. I won’t tell him why crickets don’t chirp for lizards long. The goldfish he wants will do no harm. When we get home, I will tell his mom he ate popcorn, and goldfish clotted in the tanks like curds unspoiled in the whey. Emily Novikov Chico

POETRY 99 (and Fiction 59) READING:

All poets published in this year’s Poetry 99 issue (and all writers from last fall’s Fiction 59 issue—the reading for which was canceled due to the Camp Fire) are invited to read their works during a free public reading at The Bookstore (118 Main St.) Friday, March 29, 6:30 p.m.

On Being a Woman

The tulip tree blooms pink then the rains knock all that beauty to the ground. You stand inside, watch the wind scatter petals to the lawn. Like an anxious bride, you want to be other: form of salmon, form of deer— to slip through brush with your own kind of beauty, to swim the swollen river out to sea and back again. How else will you learn to navigate the narrows when snags keep catching your ribs, antlers; how else will you learn to struggle against this wind, to lean into yourself with any kindness or grace? Amy Antongiovanni Chico

Thanks, Virus!

Sometimes I need a chrysalis, shelter made from flesh and skin. This brief cold helps. My shivering bod cowers under a silent blanket. I sink into my kind mattress that guides me towards shimmering fever, and rest here, wrapped in humming fuzz. My thoughts make no sense. So fine! For a day I get wind chimes, gum balls, Lincoln logs, purple bats, Jerry Garcia dining with Sarah Palin, a vacation from the real. Welcome, night! I’ll reassemble me. In the morning, strengthened by aspirin, throat lozenges, black tea, I’ll crack awake and re-emerge into history’s nightmare.

Christmas Eve, Under the Freeway

I’m useless to you. walking through the underpass. Holiday rain sprays us all as cars scatter puddles. Dusk comes and holiday lights start to flash—green ones, red, are they meant to keep you awake so you’ll go away? Bearded guy, reading a wrinkled book, flat faced woman glancing from your shriveled sleeping bag, thin dude guarding your upside down bike, I’ll write about you all, OK? Cars hiss as they pass. It’s wet. Cold. I wave, offer nothing solid to your turning away eyes. I’m useless. Paul Belz

If I Were Brave

If I were brave, I wouldn’t store my words like bags of rice under the floorboards of mountaintop temples. I would split them open, fry their bodies recklessly, roll them off rooftops like carrion, like rain. Someday is sacrilege. Words are for mouths, and there is no greater pity than a rotting meal. If I were brave, I would slash them all: the bags, the boards, the windows, the bell, until the temple was heaving with the froth of hungry vultures. Evin Wolverton Chico

HONORABLE MENTIONS Read more online

Paul Belz Chico

MORE

POETRY C O N T I N U E D

MARCH 28, 2019

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HIGH SCHOOL WINNERS FIRST PLACE

6 word memoir

now, it’s hard to feel safe. Shannon Moakley Chico 16

By the time many of you read her poem, Shannon Moakley will be in Texas. Her family is relocating after losing their Paradise home in the Camp Fire, and as you can tell from her words, she’s still dealing with the effects of the disaster. Shannon enjoys writing—both poetry and journaling—and she loved being a cheerleader for the basketball and football teams as well as teaching cheer to the kids in the Paradise Junior Football program.

Seven Mills

Shannon Moakley

THIRD PLACE

Every Day, Every Day

SECOND PLACE

Regrowth

Lily Sypnicki

A town of chimneys Twisted, blackened rubble Scattered at their feet Grieving trees Dressed in black Bow their heads Old cars Who dutifully carried their owners For miles, for years Stopped in their tracks Abandoned Droop morosely to the ground Land of memories Of homes Friends Family Ravaged, left empty

Barren and cold For the rain That came too late To flow through A tainted enemy And yet Through charred earth Grass rises Raising its stalks Bright, fresh green To the sun Together They challenge nature And spread over the hills Anew Lily Sypnicki Chico 17

As the judges were reading the poems for this year’s Poetry 99 contest, Lily Sypnicki was on the other side of the world, in Japan, with other area high-schoolers traveling to help “build bridges between America and Japan.” Lily is the president of the Poetry Club at Pleasant Valley High School, and she enjoys sewing and playing video games in her free time.

HONORABLE MENTIONS

I would like to take myself Far outside Of this sopping wet of sky, Far past the grimace of the grayness Of the walk. I would like to lift the moisture up From the rose hips Drain out all the clogged Pores of the beaten down Ground beneath me. I would like To freeze in my mind A memory, like a rusty penny Because in between fences And every day every days I find the hidden glory Of mud pies And rambling branches And close my eyes slowly To let down all these bridges. Seven Mills Chico 16

The vivid imagery of Seven Mills’ poem is a clue to what her current favorite artistic pursuit is: filmmaking, specifically writing and acting. The Inspire School of Arts & Sciences senior takes full advantage of her school’s resources to create original works with her friends, the latest being a short film called The Adventures of Chance Finn, which she says is “about these spirits haunting our school.”

Read online

MORE

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POETRY C O N T I N U E D

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SEXUAL VIOLENCE HAS NO BOUNDARIES

All Gender Identities, Races, Ages, Social Classes & Ethnicities are Affected • 1 in 5 women will be raped in their lifetime • Nearly 1 in 2 women and 1 in 5 men experience sexual violence victimization other than rape at some point in their lives • Intimate partner sexual assault and rape are used to intimidate, control, and demean survivors of domestic violence • Intimate partner sexual assault is more likely than stranger or acquaintance assault to cause physical injury • 40-50% of women in abusive relationships will also be sexually violated during the course of the relationship • 18% of female survivors of spousal rape say their children witnessed the crime • Only 1 in 10 report being sexually violated. Marital rape is the most under-reported form of sexual assault.

KNOW YOUR RIGHTS about sexual assault. If you, or someone you know, has been sexually assaulted you can receive a free forensic medical examination, regardless of whether or not you choose to participate in the criminal justice process.

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JUNIOR HIGH WINNERS Wildflower Open Classroom student Maya Klein is a regular in the CN&R’s writing contests, and this is her second time taking home the top spot. In 2017, she won first place in the newspaper’s Fiction 59 contest. In addition to painting and drawing, Maya loves to dance, and she’ll be performing in North State Ballet’s production of Coppelia this spring.

Anna Feller

Maya Klein

THIRD PLACE FIRST PLACE

mornings we missed

Dancing

A pregnant silence precedes the drop of the needle Suddenly the quiet is filled by cracking, popping music Bouncing off walls Picking up the feet of Anyone Within earshot And carrying them straight into the middle Of a spinning, battered floor. The outside world does not exist here, The delirious dancing of dozens Drowns out anything beyond that small room. They are letting their inner madness spill out, Ooze over the dance floor, Permeate the waves of music, And imbue every one of them With a frantic glee Then the music stops And they all return to the mundane. Maya Klein Chico 13

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Mari Castro

SECOND PLACE

at 5 a.m., the silver full moon still shines bright its light dancing on the tips of early morning raindrops. soon, the golden sun peers out from the east fading the rain in its warmth so that soon, against the orange sunrise a slight rainbow meets the moon and together, they both fade before we can wake up. Anna Feller Chico 13

Humans are Monsters

The swaying green, The swaying air, The strong base of tree giving all its support, for the leaves, The branches, will strive. One cut and it’s over. The humans got to it.

This is Anna Feller’s second time placing in the Poetry 99 contest (she took second place last year). When it comes to reading poetry, Anna enjoys Sylvia Plath, and as for music, she says that lately she’s been into Mac DeMarco and Los Angeles psych-soul band The Marías. Mari Castro Chico 11

Mari Castro doesn’t often write poetry; she says she’s more of a math person. This piece was for an assignment in her social studies class at Chico Junior High. In her free time, Mari likes to play softball and do karate.

HONORABLE MENTIONS Read online


KIDS WINNERS Aveline Travis Tobin La Bar

SECOND PLACE

Magical Moon

Moon Beautiful, magical, alone Glowing bright In deep black space No feet, no hands, no bright blue eyes Morgen Reiser Chico 11

Morgen Reiser penned her Poetry 99 entry as part of her homeschool writing workbook. In addition to writing, she says she enjoys reading as well as climbing rocks and trees, and taking care of her animals—two dogs, a cat, chicken, fish and a horse!

THIRD PLACE

cLAsH!

cLAsH! Loud music is always coming From that small building With the golden yellow cat Sitting on the roof Looking down at the sidewalk With the tiny flowers Growing in the cracks Of the concrete

FIRST PLACE

Name Poem

T-truth teller O-observant (I found a tick on my dog) B-best friends with Dresden I-I love Mexican candy (so spicy!) N-never is lonely (I always have my dog)

Aveline Travis Chico 11

Tobin La Bar Chico 8

Aveline Travis is a regular top finisher in the CN&R’s annual Fiction 59 contest, and this is her first time in the top three for poetry. The Sherwood Montessori student said she loves music, especially Frank Sinatra; baking; and hanging out with her cats, Titus and Lazer.

As part of his home-school program, Tobin La Bar takes part in a writing group that plays writing games, like this name poem that snagged him first place. Tobin says he enjoys drawing, playing with his friends and going to the park.

Morgen Reiser

HONORABLE MENTIONS Read online

MARCH 28, 2019

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Arts &Culture PHOTO BY BEOWULF SHEEHAN

IE D OR

THIS WEEK

Brontez Purnell on making art that’s needed

Special Events

TPurnell. twice as fast to keep up with Brontez The Oakland-based artist takes the do-

CÉSAR CHÁVEZ FILM SCREENING: Biographical film (2014) about

he world would need to start turning

it-yourself ethos to a new, inspiring level, one where he continually creates bold work as an author, choreographer, zine-maker, musician and documentary filmmaker. Purnell has no problem pursuing new interests; when he sees a need somewhere, he sets out to fill it. It’s an approach to art that started with zinemaking as a teenager growing up in Triana, Ala. “I was a punk kid,” Purnell said in a recent interview. “I was never the kid who wanted by Robin Bacior to go to the store and read Rolling Stone or Spin. I wanted to be my own Preview: editor; I wanted to create Brontez Purnell appears twice on content. I wanted control Saturday, March 30: over what I was reading, The Nightlife of Jacuzzi because no one was ever Gaskett reading, specifically speaking to 3-4 p.m., at Blackbird; and “An Evening with me. I wanted to see a thing Brontez Purnell,” I wanted to make happen 7:30 p.m., at in the world.” 1078 Gallery. True to form, Purnell Blackbird will be giving two perfor1431 Park Ave. facebook.com/ mances featuring multiple blackbirdchico disciplines when he comes to Chico this Saturday 1078 Gallery (March 30). The first event 1710 Park Ave. 1078gallery.org will be an afternoon reading of his new children’s book, The Nightlife of Jacuzzi Gaskett, at Blackbird, and the second will be an evening screening at 1078 Gallery of selections from Purnell’s documentary, Unstoppable Feat, The Dances of Ed Mock, plus a performanceart piece followed by a short Q&A session. By 2002, Purnell had moved to Oakland, where he started playing in punk bands 28

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the life of American labor leader César Chávez starring Michael Peña and John Malkovich. Thu, 3/28, 8pm. Free. Sutter Courtyard, Chico State, 400 W. First St. csuchico.edu

HERBAL REMEDIES WORKSHOP INTERNAL FIRST AID: Part one of twopart workshop on herbal first aid. All are welcome, $10 donation for supplies. Thu, 3/28, 6:30pm. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

THIS WAY TO SUSTAINABILITY CONFERENCE: The largest student-run sustainability conference of its kind in North America, and this is the biggest year yet. This annual event will host more than 100 sustainability professionals to educate students, staff, faculty and community members on a variety of sustainability-related topics. Thu, 3/28, 8am-5pm. Costs vary. Chico State. 898-3333. csuchico.edu/sustainability

TRANS WEEK: Full week of events to empower, serve and increase

(including lively Kill Rock Stars electropop crew Gravy Train!!!!), lived in a warehouse with 20 other people, and collected writings for what eventually would become a new zine, Fag School, centered around sexual experiences—though that wasn’t the original intention. The underground classic nonetheless became a definitive voice on the matter, one that spoke openly and frankly about queer sexual encounters. “I never set out to write about sex,” Purnell said. “I usually wrote about what was awkward about sex, or what went wrong, or the human aspect about sex.” In the decade and a half that followed, Purnell continued to publish zines, comics and books as well as tour with punk bands, create documentaries, and even open the Brontez Purnell Dance Company. In 2017, he released the novel Since I Laid My Burden Down, after which Purnell received the 2018 Whiting Award in Fiction. The fictional story follows DeShawn, a young man living in the punk-underground community in San Francisco, who finds himself returning to his small

hometown in Alabama after his uncle dies. Upon his return, he’s confronted with a slew of relationships from past and present, left to navigate his place within each. The real-life parallels are clear, and on many levels for Purnell, intentionally autobiographical. He said the writing process was one of learning to tell a fictional story interwoven with his own “very intense vulnerability” and catharsis. “It was a time in my life where I’d just gotten a grant, I was making a documentary, a lot of people in my life were dying or going away, and I wanted a focal point,” Purnell said. “I wanted to write a fictionalized book about loss.” More recently, Purnell released Jacuzzi Gaskett, a story centered on a young boy caring for his sibling while his single parent is at work. “I always wanted to see a story about a kid who maybe didn’t have the best circumstances, but you knew somehow that he was gonna be OK,” Purnell said. “I knew so many kids who grew up like Jacuzzi, but I didn’t see books about kids like Jacuzzi, so I thought it was an important thing to have.” Ω

access to resources for the transgender, nonbinary, genderexpansive, genderqueer and two-spirit communities. Events include trainings, parents’ meeting with doctors and counselors, workshop for trans kids, luncheon, self-care day for trans adults, and a GIFT (gender inclusive for teens) dance. Visit website for schedule. Thu, 3/28. Stonewall Alliance Center. stonewallchico.org

TRANS WEEK:

Thursday-Sunday, March 28-31 SEE THURSDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS & ART, PAGE 30

Music SIERRA HULL: Renowned mandolin player and vocalist was just 10 years old when she debuted at the Grand Ole Opry. Hull has since toured with the Indigo Girls, Garth Brooks and Gillian Welch, released three albums and been nominated for a Grammy. Thu, 3/28, 7pm. State Theatre for the Arts, 333 Oak St., Red Bluff. statetheatreredbluff.com


FINE ARTS ON NEXT PAGE CHICO STAGE RACE PARTY Sunday, March 31 Greenline Cycles SEE SUNDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS

Music CHICO SPRING FLING: An evening of music, dinner 

30

SAT

Special Events  AMAIN CYCLING CHICO STAGE RACE: See Friday.  Sat 3/30, 7am. Chico. chicostagerace.com  BRONTEZ PURNELL: Whiting Award-winning zine-

Theater THE ALMOND ORCHARD: Local, contemporary  adaptation of Chekhov’s The Cherry  Orchard. The play, written and directed by  Joyce Henderson, examines the reluctant  acceptance of change.  Thu, 3/28, 7:30pm. $15.  Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. blueroomtheatre.com 

NUNSENSE: Chico Theater Company brings back  this zany musical about the misadventures  of five nuns trying to raise money by putting  on a talent show in a high school gym.  Thu, 3/28, 7:30pm. $16-$22. Chico Theater  Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. chicotheatercompany.com 

29

FRI

Special Events AMAIN CYCLING CHICO STAGE RACE: Three-day  Stage Race popular with pros and amateurs.  See website for schedule and registration  info.  Fri, 3/29, 7am. Chico. chicostagerace. com 

ENVIRONMENTAL COALITION GATHERING: Community  Gathering following the last keynote speaker  of the This Way to Sustainability Conference.  Event will bring together local environmental  organizations and their supporters to share  visions, goals and recent achievements. Free  appetizers and adult beverages for sale.  Fri, 3/29, 5:30pm. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E.  Third St. becnet.org 

THE MATRIX FILM DISCUSSION AND VIEWING: Twenty  years to the day since The Matrix debuted,  Idea Fab Labs hosts a deep dive into its  meaning and affect on society followed by  a screening of the film at 9pm. Snack Bar  will benefit 94.5 FM KWQA maker radio,  ticket discount if you show up in Matrix  clothes.  Fri, 3/29, 8pm. $3-$5. Idea Fab Labs  Chico, 603 Orange St. chico.ideafablabs.com

THIS WAY TO SUSTAINABILITY CONFERENCE: See  Thursday.  Fri, 3/29, 8am-5pm. California  State University, Chico, 400 W. First St. 8983333. csuchico.edu/sustainability 

TRANS WEEK: See Thursday.  Fri, 3/29. Stonewall  Alliance Center. stonewallchico.org 

Music ACROSS THE GREAT DIVIDE: In celebration of the  50th anniversary of legendary roots rock  pioneer The Band, Chico Performances  presents a double-bill tribute with two  of the biggest Americana acts playing  today, Dustbowl Revival and Hot Club of  Cowtown.  Fri, 3/29, 7:30pm. $15-$44. Laxson  Auditorium, Chico State. csuchico.edu 

Theater THE ALMOND ORCHARD: See Thursday.  Fri, 3/29, 7:30pm. $15. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First  St. blueroomtheatre.com 

NUNSENSE: See Thursday.  Fri, 3/29, 7:30pm. $16$22. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road,  Ste. F. chicotheatercompany.com 

BIRDING AROUND THE GRAY LODGE WILDLIFE AREA: All  birders and nature lovers are welcome.  Meet at the Park and Ride at 9am (closest to  Highway 99). Contact Matt Forster at find  forster@yahoo.com for more info.  Sat 3/30, 9am. Altacal Audubon Society. altacal.org 

BRONTEZ PURNELL READS THE NIGHTLIFE OF JACUZZI GASKETT: Multi-genre artist and author reads  from his new children’s book, The Nightlife  of Jacuzzi Gaskett. (Purnell will also be at  1078 Gallery in the evening, 7:30pm).  Sat 3/30, 2pm. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

CHICO IDOL! AUDITIONS: Children’s Choir of  Chico hosts tryouts for a local version of  American Idol for kids. Contact Laney at  lpoye@childrenschoirofchico.org.  Sat 3/30, 8:30am. Floral Avenue Arts Center, 2500  Floral Ave., Ste. 20. childrenschoirofchico.org 

LOW AND BEHOLD: Alumni of Chico State’s Low  Brass Choir will join the current ensemble  for a night of music featuring a range of  wind instruments on works by Edvard Grieg,  Johannes Brahms, Stan Kenton, John Philip  Sousa and more. This event is free and open  to the public.  Sat, 3/30, 7:30pm. RowlandTaylor Recital Hall, Performing Arts Center  134, 898-5152. csuchico.edu/soa

REESE WEIL: Soulful sounds and late breakfast.  Sat, 3/30, 11am. La Salles, 229  Broadway St. lasalleschico.com 

Theater THE ALMOND ORCHARD: See Thursday.  Sat, 3/30, 7:30pm. $15. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First  St. blueroomtheatre.com 

GOD HELP US!: The Ed Asner will be leading the  cast in this thought-provoking political  comedy that attempts to erase party lines  so we can all work, live and laugh together.  One night only, this is a Camp Fire benefit  fundraiser for Theatre on the Ridge. Tickets  available on theater website.  Sat 3/30, 7:30pm. Paradise Performing Arts Center, 777  Nunneley Road, Paradise. totr.org 

NUNSENSE: See Thursday.  Sat, 3/30, 7:30pm. $16-$22. Chico Theater Company,   166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. chicotheater  company.com 

Special Events  AMAIN CYCLING CHICO STAGE RACE: See Friday.  Sun, 3/31, 7am. Chico. chicostagerace.com  CHICO STAGE RACE PARTY: Cheer on the Chico  Stage Race Criterium racers with drinks,  music, food, and a raffle at Greenline Cycles.  Proceeds go to the winners of the race  and the 6th Street Center for Youth.  Sun, 3/31, 12pm. Greenline Cycles, 515 Main St.  (Festivities in the Senator Theatre parking  lot.) greenlinecycles.com 

NORTH TABLE MOUNTAIN WILDFLOWER HIKE: Latino  Outdoors-Central Valley visits Table  Mountain during its prime to spend four  hours among the fields and flowers. Email  centralvalley@latinooutdoors.org for  info.  Sun, 3/31, 9am. North Table Mountain  Ecological Reserve, 2488 Cherokee Road,  Oroville.

TRANS WEEK: See Thursday.  Sun, 3/31. Stonewall  Alliance Center. stonewallchico.org 

Music LEANN COOLEY: Sunday brunch will feature Chico  singer/songwriter and multi-instrumentalist  playing blues, country, rock, bluegrass, and  swing.  Sun, 3/31, 11am. Tender Loving Coffee,  365 E. Sixth St.

TIM MCKEE, FRED CAMPBELL, LARRY PETERSON: Local veteran guitar masters join  Eric Weber on sax for some late-afternoon  tunes.  Sun, 3/31, 2pm. Studio Inn Lounge,  2582 Esplanade.

THIS WEEK CONTINUED ON PAGE 30

FLY ME TO FRINGE!: See Friday.  Sat 3/30, 7pm. CUSD Center for the Arts, 1475 East  Ave. inspirechico.org 

HEART & SOLE 5K RUN/WALK FOR WELLNESS: Enloe’s 

EDITOR’S PICK

fifth annual run/walk fundraiser for the  Enloe Foundation. Choose either the one-mile  or 5k course through beautiful Bidwell Park.  Call 332-4568 for more information.  Sat 3/30, 7am. One-Mile Recreational Area, Bidwell  Park. enloe.org 

TRANS WEEK: See Thursday.  Sat 3/30. Stonewall  Alliance Center. stonewallchico.org 

FLY ME TO FRINGE!: A benefit show featuring  Scottish music, dance and drama to support  Inspire students traveling to perform at the  2019 Edinburgh Fringe Festival. The event  will feature local bands and performers.  Fri, 3/29, 7pm. CUSD Center for the Arts, 1475  East Ave. inspirechico.org 

maker, punk drummer and choreographer  will perform and present a short film, ending  with a Q&A and book signing. Opening the  evening will be Chico’s own SCOUT. (Purnell  also will have a reading at Blackbird earlier  in the day, 2-3pm).  Sat, 3/30, 7:30pm. $5-$15.  1078 Gallery, 1710 Park Ave. 1078gallery.org

and a silent auction benefiting Hooker Oak  Elementary and Hooker Oak families and  staff affected by the Camp Fire. Popular  local cover band Decades will perform.  Sat 3/30, 5:30pm. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E.  20th St. sierranevada.com 

31

SUN

GOD HELP US! Saturday, March 30 Paradise Performing Arts Center

SEE SATURDAY, THEATER

WILD & SCENIC FILM FESTIVAL: Fifth annual event  includes 12 award-winning shorts about  nature, adventure, conservation, water,  our changing world, wildlife and agriculture.  There also will be prizes, concessions, craft  beer and wine. See website for more info.  Sat 3/30, 7pm. State Theatre Red Bluff, 333 Oak  St., Red Bluff. statetheatreredbluff.com 

RETURN TO CRIPPLE CREEK

FREE LISTINGS! Post your event for free online at www. newsreview.com/calendar, or email the CN&R calendar editor at cnrcalendar@newsreview.com. Deadline for print listings is Wednesday, 5 p.m., one week prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

Trace the family tree of influences for any current musical act with guitars and beards and you’ll likely find the The Band somewhere deep in its roots. In honor of the legendary group that once backed Bob Dylan and was the subject of Martin Scorsese’s The Last Waltz, two Americana supergroups known for foot-stomping live shows have created Across the Great Divide: A Celebration of the 50th Anniversary of The Band. Renowned alt-country band Dustbowl Revival (pictured) will join gypsy-jazz masters Hot Club of Cowtown to perform the classics from both Music from the Big Pink and The Band’s self-titled second album this Friday (March 28) at Laxson Auditorium. Come take a load off. MARCH 28, 2019

  CN&R 

29


“It’s all about the Dirty Sauce” Vegan options aVailable

THIS WEEK CONTINUED FROM PAGE 29

Theater NUNSENSE: See Thursday. Sun, 3/31, 2pm. $16-

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$22. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. chicotheatercompany.com

1

MON

Special Events CATS IN THE COMMUNITY: In tribute to the legacy of César Chávez, students, faculty, staff and community members will travel to various locations around Chico to volunteer and provide services. Check in 9am in Sutter courtyard. Volunteers are invited back to the courtyard around 2pm for a complimentary lunch and prize drawing with music and games. Visit CAVE at the Associated Students website or email kaengle@csuchico.edu for more info. Mon, 4/1, 9am. Chico State, 400 W. First St. https://as.csuchico.edu

ANNUAL BIKE ISSUE

Nashville-based alt-country band playing cowboy jazz, Tex-Mex waltzes, ballads, and soulful R&B dance tunes. McClain is known for his songwriting chops and for spinning good old-fashioned stories on stage. Mon, 4/1, 7:30pm. $25. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St. sierranevada.com

2

TUE

Special Events Counties will provide training on how to properly sort waste and divert recyclables and compost away from the landfill. Contact Becky Holden at 740-0441 or email atbholden@ recology.com for more info. Tue, 4/2, 3:30pm. Chico Branch Butte County Library, 1108 Sherman Ave. recology.com

3

Special Events AN EVENING OF WONDER MAGIC: Chico Magical Arts presents Dean Waters and Stephen Chollet for a night of comedy and magic that will include live mind-reading. Wed, 4/3, 7pm. Unwined Kitchen & Bar, 980 Mangrove Ave. unwinedchico.com

MUSHROOMING IN THE SIERRA NEVADA (AND BEYOND): Thea Chesney, U.S. Forest Service botanist, will introduce some of the spectacular mushrooms that occur in the many habitats of the Sierra Nevada and other California Mountain ranges. Wed, 4/3, 7pm. Free. Chico Branch, Butte County Library, 1108 Sherman Ave. mountlassen. cnps.org

Chico is one of the best bike towns in the U.S. and locals and students alike are peddling where they need to go more than ever.

TREE PLANTING WORKSHOP: Hands-on workshop that will teach you the basics of tree planting, care, and maintenance. Free to attend, and you receive a free tree. See website for details. Wed, 4/3, 5:30pm. CARD Center, 545 Vallombrosa Ave. becnet.org

Our annual celebration of local bicycle culture is tied with Chico Velo’s Wildflower Century ride, which attracts over 4,000 cyclists to our town. Include your business in this extremely popular issue that will not only reach our nearly 118,000 regular readers, but also the 4,000 Wildflower visitors too!

For more information, call an advertising representative today at (530) 894-2300

CN&R

MARCH 28, 2019

Shows through April 21 1078 Gallery

ANTSY MCCLAIN & THE TRAILER PARK TROUBADOURS:

WED

On stands april 25

PETER JODAITIS: THE COLOR OF WATER IF THERE WERE NO SKY

Music

BETTER AT THE BIN: Recology of Butte and Colusa

30

FINE ARTS

FOR MORE MUSIC, SEE NIGHTLIFE ON PAGE 32

SEE ART

Art 1078 GALLERY: Peter Jodaitis – The Color of Water If There Were No Sky, showcase of a life’s work, featuring watercolor and drawing. Reception April 5, 5-7:30pm. Through 4/21. 1710 Park Ave. 1078gallery.org

BUTTE COLLEGE ART GALLERY: Mixed-Media Madame, new works by Traci Owens. Reception with live painting performance March 28, 4-6pm. Through 3/28.

CHICO ART CENTER: The Puzzle Show, community-based show features work from 300 artists of all ages and experience. Reception Friday, March 29, 5-7pm. Through 3/29. 450 Orange St., 895-8726. chicoartcenter.com

ENLOE CANCER CENTER: Beth Bjorklund, oil paintings in our Healing Art Gallery by Northern California artist. The Enloe Cancer Center, Healing Art Gallery features artists whose lives have been touched by cancer. Through 4/19. 265 Cohasset Road, 332-3856.

JACKI HEADLEY UNIVERSITY ART GALLERY: Idea/ Material/Process, showcases the diverse and innovative art practices of the Chico State art studio faculty, with ceramics, painting, photography, printmaking, performance and sculpture. Through 3/29. Chico State, ARTS 121.

JANET TURNER PRINT MUSEUM: Regional Collective, a juried exhibition featuring the works from the California Society of Printmakers. Juror’s talk with Leslie Jones March 28, 5:30pm, in Zingg Recital Hall. Through 4/13. Chico State, Arts & Humanities Building. theturner.org

MUSEUM OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA ART: Expressions of Resilience, Trans Week arts show featuring art by and about trans people and their lives, experiences, struggles and accomplishments, presented by the Stonewall Alliance Center. Reception Friday, March 29, 6-9pm with live music, performance art, hors d’oeuvres and a no-host beer and wine bar. Through 3/31. $5-$10. 900 Esplanade. monca.org

VALENE L. SMITH MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY: Altar States Spirit Worlds and Transformational Experiences – The

Works of Peter Treagan, interactive tech art complete with 3D glasses and hidden imagery so visitors can participate in what is described as a transformational visionary art experience. Through 5/17. Chico State.

Museums BOLT’S ANTIQUE TOOL MUSEUM: Unique museum has over 12,000 hand tools on display, charting cataloging the evolution and history of tools. Closed Sundays. Through 6/15. $3-$0. 1650 Broderick St., Oroville.

CHICO CHILDREN’S MUSEUM: Cool stuff for kids to explore including a miniature city, complete with a junior vet clinic, dentist, cafe and farmer’s market, a giant fish tank, multi-sensory room, imagination playground and much more. Check website for hours and admission information. Through 8/3. $7-$9. 325 Main St. chico childrensmuseum.org

CHICO CREEK NATURE CENTER: Living Animal Museum & Nature Play Room, learn all about local critters, plants and wildlife. Through 5/25. $2-$4. 1968 E. Eighth St. chicorec.com

CHICO HISTORY MUSEUM: John Bidwell Overland to California, lecture on the story of John Bidwell’s 1841 overland journey from the Missouri River to California when he was just 21. Sat., March 30, 10am. $5 donation, refreshments will be served. Call 891-4336 or email rtjarguy@aol.com for more info. 141 Salem St.

GATEWAY SCIENCE MUSEUM: From Here to There, explore the science of how things move by land, sea and air. Also on display are The Foothills and America’s Wolves: From Tragedy to Inspiration. Through 5/12. $5-$7. 625 Esplanade. csuchico.edu

PATRICK RANCH MUSEUM: Working farm and museum with rotating exhibits open every Saturday and Sunday from 11am to 3pm. Through 5/26. 10381 Midway, Durham. patrickranchmuseum.org

VALENE L. SMITH MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY: Remarkable Lives, exploring the intertwined worlds of birds and humans, in partnership with the Altacal Audubon Society and Snow Goose Festival. Exhibits include bird songs and behaviors, local photography and a robotic recreation of the late Jurassic Archaeopteryx. Through 7/31. 400 W. First St.


SCENE

Fragile roots

Writer/director Joyce Henderson plays the lead, Margaret Dietz, alongside Eric Ricketts as Luis Castillo, in The Almond Orchard. PHOTO BY JOE HILSEE

JOHN VANDERSLICE W / MEERNAA LIVE AT

THE BIG ROOM

FRIDAy, APRIL 26, 2019 SIERRA NEVADA BREWING CO.

1075 E. 20TH ST., CHICO. TICKETS ON SALE NOW! $12 AVAILABLE IN THE GIFT SHOP OR ONLINE AT WWW.SIERRANEVADA.COM/BIGROOM

Local adaptation of Chekhov classic examines struggle of a modern farming family

Cposed the turn of the 19th century be successfully transto today’s Sacramento Valley?

an a classic Russian play set on a country estate at

That’s the question asked—and answered—by the Blue Room Theatre’s current production of The Almond Orchard, based on Anton Chekhov’s The Cherry Orchard. Adapted and directed by Joyce Henderson, The Almond Orchard works hard to find equivalency between Chekhov’s by brilliant 1904 portrait of Russian Robert Speer society during a time of profound rober tspeer social and political upheaval and @newsrev i ew.c om what it suggests are similar conditions in the Sacramento Valley. Review: The Cherry Orchard premiered The Almond Orchard in 1904, when Russia was still reelshows Thursdaying from the emancipation of the Saturday, March 28-30, 7:30 p.m. serfs 43 years earlier. Industrious former serfs were gaining status and Blue Room Theatre becoming rich, and many aristocrats, 139 W. First St. unable to care for their farms with895-3749 out the slave labor they had enjoyed, blueroomtheatre.com became impoverished. Henderson, who also plays the main character, Margaret Dietz, has carried over class and wealth distinctions in her adaptation. As The Almond Orchard begins, Margaret is returning to the family estate on the Sacramento River near Chico. For several years she has been living in New York City, to which she fled following the drowning death of her young son. Henderson, who is truly a force of nature in local theater, plays Margaret as a madly loving and lovable woman who is also hopelessly naïve and impulsive when it comes to managing money. She’s fallen behind on the mortgage, which is why the estate is about to be auctioned off and, with it, the family’s large and beautiful almond orchard. Margaret’s brother, Peter (an excellent Bruce Dillman), is even more foolish. He keeps coming up with harebrained schemes to make money, but like his

Chekhovian counterpart, Leonid Andreievitch Gayev, and others among the landowner class, he lacks drive and determination. The man who does have drive is Luis Castillo (played by Eric Ricketts), a wealthy local businessman of Latino heritage whom everyone calls Louis. He is willing to lend the Dietz family money to pay their debts, but family pride gets in the way—as well as the long-shot hope that an eccentric aunt in San Francisco will come up with the money. Luis also insistently argues that, by developing part of the estate, including the almond orchard, into summer rental cottages, the Dietz family could maintain ownership. There are an even dozen roles in Henderson’s adaptation, and all but one—a transient veteran who passes through and talks Margaret into giving him the last of her money—are involved in one or more subplots, including a couple of love stories. The characters form three groups: the Dietz family (Peter, Margaret and Margaret’s daughters, Maria and Elizabeth); their local friends, including Luis; and the “servants” (i.e., employees) who keep the Dietzes and their estate functioning. All would be greatly affected, one way or another, if the almond orchard were sold. The decline of the Dietz estate is attributed to the family’s weakness in the face of outside pressures. Whether that’s realistic is debatable, but it’s certainly true that many farm families today are fragile. As their children become adults and, aware that farming is relentlessly hard work, decide they don’t want to follow in their parents’ footsteps, conflicts over inheritance sometimes occur. The Almond Orchard is a big play being staged in a small theater, but overall it works well. The acting is generally quite good, and the set (designed by Amber Miller) is left open to accommodate a dozen actors, who sometimes are all on stage at once. Miller is also responsible for the huge painting of a blooming almond tree on the stage’s back wall. More than any other single element, it establishes what is at stake in this story—and in our valley. Ω

SierraNevadaBeer

@SierraNevada

@SierraNevadaChico

MARCH 28, 2019

CN&R

31


NIGHTLIFE

THURSDAY 3/28—WEDNESDAY 4/3 Band, plus special guests. All musicians and music enthusiasts welcome. Thu, 3/28, 7pm. Studio Inn Lounge, 2582 Esplanade, (408) 449 2179.

JESUS & THE DINOSAURS

band from L.A. with a big following plays the patio. Also, the chill sounds of Oakland’s Credit Electric and local singer/songwriter Garrett Gray. Thu, 3/28, 8pm. $10. Argus Bar + Patio, 212 W. Second St.

LEFTY’S BLUES JAM: Popular Butte County blues night, tip jar funds go to participating musicians to replace equipment lost in the Camp Fire. Guest band: Chico’s First Street Blues. All welcome. Sign-up starts at 6:30. Thu, 3/28, 7pm. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave.

SIERRA HULL: Renowned mandolin player and vocalist was just 10 years old when she debuted at the Grand Ole Opry. Hull has since

KEYSER SOZE: Six-piece rock and ska band from Reno returns to Chico for a booty-shaking night of funk. Joined by psychedelic soul outfit The Marshall House Project. Fri, 3/29, 9pm. $8. Lost on Main, 319 Main St., 892-2445. lostonmainchico.com

ACROSS THE GREAT DIVIDE: In celebra-

SEE FRIDAY & SATURDAY

THE BLANK TAPES: Cool garage-rock

you can relax to. Fri, 3/29, 6:30pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St.

29FRIDAY

Friday & Saturday, March 29 & 30 The Spirit & The Maltese

28THURSDAY

JOHN SEID, LARRY PETERSON, CHRIS WENGER: Happy hour tunes that

toured with the Indigo Girls, Garth Brooks and Gillian Welch, released three albums and been nominated for a Grammy. Thu, 3/28, 7pm. State Theatre for the Arts, 333 Oak St., Red Bluff. statetheatreredbluff.com

SONS OF JEFFERSON: Night of Americana with local string players doing original and traditional music. LeAnn Cooley and Shane Clayton join the show. All ages. Thu, 3/28, 6pm. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

SURF NOIR KINGS: Original surf music with Miles Corbin, Robert Karch, Mark Wilpolt, and Jerry Morano. Thu, 3/28, 6:30pm. Farm Star Pizza, 2359 Esplanade, 3432056. farmstarpizza.com

tion of the 50th anniversary of legendary roots-rock pioneer The Band, Chico Performances presents a double-bill tribute with two of the biggest Americana acts playing today, Dustbowl Revival and Hot Club of Cowtown. Fri, 3/29, 7:30pm. $15-$44. Laxson Auditorium, Chico State. chicoperformances. com

tic/electric guitar and drum set available to use. Sign-up at 7pm, all ages welcome until 10pm. Fri, 3/29, 7:30pm. $1. Down Lo, 319 Main St., 513-4707.

PETTY LUV: In celebration of the

cled men take it off and dance. Fri, 3/29, 8pm. Gold Country Casino & Hotel, 4020 Olive Highway, Oroville. goldcountrycasino.com

PUB SCOUTS: Traditional Irish music

TYLER DEVOLL: Happy hour tunes. Fri,

THE RUN UP: Covers for dancing, fea-

TYLER DEVOLL: Alternative pop tunes

for happy hour. Fri, 3/29, 4pm. $1. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St.

GUEST NO. 66: Early-bird show with Chico experimental noise band joined by Oakland’s cacophonous genre-benders Preening and local no-wavers Beehive. Fri, 3/29, 5pm. $7. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave. punkers from Fairfield headline all-ages show with Sac surf punks Las Pulgas and punk troubadour Nothing Left from Chico. Fri, 3/29, 8pm. $8. The Spirit Venue, 2360 Oro Quincy Hwy, Oroville.

Twenty years ago The Matrix was released and blew our minds with slow-moving bullets and the debut of Keanu as an action hero. If you haven’t watched this masterpiece once a year since then, this Friday (March 29) is your chance to catch up and take a nostalgic trip down the rabbit hole. Idea Fab Labs Chico is hosting a 20-Year Anniversary of The Matrix: Film Discussion and Viewing with snacks and a ticket discount if you show up in proper Matrix attire, so grab your sunglasses and trench coats.

legend, big Tom Petty tribute at the box. Fri, 3/29, 8pm. $10-$15. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave. tackleboxchico. com

CHIPPENDALES: Famous troupe of mus-

JESUS AND THE DINOS: Garage-

THUMPIN’ THURSDAY ROCK ’N’ BLUES JAM: Hosted by the Loco-Motive

OPEN MIC: Bring an instrument, acous-

THERE IS NO SPOON

turing hits from 1960s to today. Fri, 3/29, 8:30pm. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfallscasino.com

SOUL POSSE: Five-piece band plays upbeat dance music from all genres. Plus, wine, food and dancing. Fri, 3/29, 6pm. Almendra Winery & Distillery, 9275 Midway Road, Durham., 828-8040.

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with local singer/guitarist. Fri, 3/29, 7pm. The Exchange, 1975

Local upbeat cover band Rock Mosaic plays classic rock and country hits while you plan your pranks for Monday. Sat, 3/30, 9pm. Studio Inn Lounge, 2582 Esplanade.

Montgomery St., Oroville. theexchangeoroville.com

30SATURDAY

BELLA DONNA: Stevie Nicks tribute band performs both solo and Fleetwood Mac hits with authentic wardrobe and stage production. Sat, 3/30, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino

AFTER DINNER DANCE PARTY: Late-night party with the 1980s songs you love

saves you money! Yoga Center of Chico

to sing and dance to. Sat, 3/30, 10pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St. lasalleschico.com

3/29, 4pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St. lasalleschico.com

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THIS WEEK: FIND MORE ENTERTAINMENT AND SPECIAL EVENTS ON PAGE 28 RETROTONES: Classic rock and country

NOX NOVACULA, CRUZ DE NAVAJAS, IVER & ROGUE SQUADRON Wednesday, April 3 Ike’s Sandwiches SEE WEDNESDAY

& Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfallscasino.com

BRONTEZ PURNELL: Whiting Awardwinning zine-maker, punk drummer and choreographer will perform and present a short film, ending with a Q&A and book signing. Opening the evening will be Chico’s own SCOUT. (Purnell also will have a reading at Blackbird earlier in the day, 2-3pm). Sat, 3/30, 7:30pm. $5-$15. 1078 Gallery, 1710 Park Ave. 1078gallery.org

CHICO SPRING FLING: An evening of music, dinner and a silent auction benefiting Hooker Oak Elementary and Hooker Oak families and staff affected by the Camp Fire. Popular local cover band Decades will perform. Sat 3/30, 5:30pm. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St. sierranevada.com

CHIPPENDALES: See Friday. Sat, 3/30,

8pm. Gold Country Casino & Hotel, 4020 Olive Highway, Oroville. goldcountrycasino.com

ESPLANADE: Local ’80s party band for

late-night happy hour dancing. Sat, 3/30, 10pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St. lasalleschico.com

HARD TARGET: Popular country/hip-hop star in the vein of Kid Rock takes the stage at the Box. Sat, 3/30, 9pm. $10-$15. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave. tackleboxchico.com

JESUS & THE DINOSAURS: A night of bangin’ rock with bilingual punkers Jesus & the Dinosaurs from Fairfield, local power trio Severance Package and garage-pop stars Bad Mana. Sat, 3/30, 8:30pm. $7. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave. maltesebarchico.com

JOHN SEID, LARRY PETERSON, CHRIS WENGER: See Friday. Sat, 3/30,

6:30pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St.

THE LONG AND SHORT OF IT: Short- and long-form improv show with the best of the CLIC improvisers. Sat, 3/30, 7pm. Chico Live Improv

Comedy, 561 E Lindo Ave. chico livecomedy.com

covers from the 1960s to today. Sat, 3/30, 8pm. $7. Unwined Kitchen &

Bar, 980 Mangrove Ave. unwinedchico.com

THE RUN UP: See Friday. Sat, 3/30,

8:30pm. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

VIRGINIA MARLO: Piano and heartfelt vocals blend pop, alternative, and hip-hop with a singer-songwriters perspective. Sat, 3/30, 6pm. Almendra Winery, 9275 Midway, Durham. almendrawinery.com

LOW AND BEHOLD: Alumni of Chico State’s Low Brass Choir will join the current ensemble for a night of music featuring a range of wind instruments on works by Edvard Grieg, Johannes Brahms, Stan Kenton, John Philip Sousa and more. This event is free and open to the public. Sat, 3/30, 7:30pm. RowlandTaylor Recital Hall, Performing Arts Center 134, 898-5152. csuchico. edu/soa

MIKE RUSSEL: Original roots rock and blues from local singer/ songwriter. Sat, 3/30, 7pm. The Exchange, 1975 Montgomery St., Oroville. theexchangeoroville.com

NOCHE LATINA: Put on your nice clothes and head to Lost for a night of dancing to a wide range of Mexican beats featuring DJ Lil 50 and all the way from Vegas, DJ Kidd-B. Sat, 3/30, 9pm. $8. Lost On Main, 319 Main St. lostonmainchico.com

1MONDAY

ANTSY MCCLAIN & THE TRAILER PARK TROUBADOURS: Nashville-based alt-country band playing cowboy jazz, Tex-Mex waltzes, ballads, and soulful R&B dance tunes. McClain is known for his songwriting chops and for spinning good oldfashioned stories on stage. Mon, 4/1, 7:30pm. $25. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St. sierranevada. com

2TUESDAY

OPEN MIC: Hosted by veteran

Chico singer/songwriter Andan Casamajor. . Tue, 4/2, 6pm. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

3WEDNESDAY

AN EVENING OF WONDER MAGIC: Chico Magical Arts presents Dean Waters and Stephen Chollet for a night of comedy and magic that will include live mind-reading. Wed, 4/3, 7pm. Unwined Kitchen & Bar, 980 Mangrove Ave. unwinedchico.com

TOM JONES DINNER SHOW: Tom Jones tribute artist Harmik brings authentic looks and sound. Wed, 4/3, 6:30pm. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfallscasino.com

NOX NOVACULA: Seattle death-rockers

hit the stage with some Mexico City goth from Cruz De Navajas, local darkwave by Iver and hardcore punk from Rogue Squadron. All ages. Wed, 4/3, 8pm. $7. Ike’s Place, 648 W. Fifth St.

OPEN MIC: Showcase your talents at open mic hosted by Mr. Bang! All ages, sign-ups start at 5:30pm. Wed, 4/3, 6pm. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

THE STOCKINGS: Brit-pop band from Seattle hits Chico on the cusp of new album. Joined by local rockers The Exclusionaries and Jamm. Wed, 4/3, 7pm. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave. maltesebarchico.com

ALMOST SUMMER DAZE

The chill, nostalgic sounds of SoCal band The Blank Tapes beckon carefree sunny afternoons daydreaming on the grass while The Kinks waft from the speakers of an old boombox. Get seduced tonight (March 28) at Argus Bar + Patio when these ’60s-inspired rockers join the indie-soul sounds of Oakland’s Credit Electric and local tender-heart, singer/ songwriter Garret Gray

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Poetry 99 POETRY 99 READING And the re-scheduled

FICTION 59 READING Friday, March 29, 6:30 p.m. The Bookstore 118 Main St., Chico

REEL WORLD

Who’s in the mirror?

Jordan Peele’s frightening reflection of America

OThingin horror lore: Invasion of the Body Snatchers, The and now Us, Jordan Peele’s frightening follow-up h, those evil doppelgangers and their wonderful place

to his highly acclaimed 2017 directorial debut, Get Out. I ask you, what could be creepier than another version of you trying to slash by your neck? For his new film, Peele Bob Grimm plays on that ultimate nightmare bg ri m m with chilling glee. @new srev i ew. c o m The film starts with a quote about America having many miles of tunnels underneath its surface, then a quick flashback shot of a C.H.U.D. videotape next to a VCR. A TV plays an advertisement for Hands Us Lupita Nyong’o, Across America, and there is all sorts Winston Duke, Shahadi of subtext spelled out before anyWright Joseph and thing really happens. Evan Alex. Directed When a young girl (played by by Jordan Peele. Madison Curry) in the same ’80s Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. flashback drifts away from her father Rated R. at an amusement park on the Santa Cruz pier and finds herself in a darkened hall of mirrors, Peele shows that he’s not playing around. Prepare to be scared, disturbed and uncomfortable. Things then jump to the present day, where Adelaide and Gabe (Lupita Nyong’o and Winston Duke) are taking their children, Zora and Jason, to the beach. It’s the same beach we saw in the flashback, and we find out that Adelaide was that young girl. She’s not happy about revisiting the place, but Gabe and kids really want to go, so she takes one for the team. The family excursion quickly becomes the worst vacation ever, as another family shows up at night. A quick examination of the intruders reveals what the commercials for this movie have already told you: The family outside is a darker mirror image of the stunned

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family inside the house. They aren’t coming over to borrow the lawn mower. They intend to kill. No question, writer-director Peele has been gobbling up zombie, slasher and isolation-horror movies all of his life, and their influences play a significant part in his vision. The movie is a mind bender, but it’s also an efficient, bare-knuckled horror-thriller. It’s the whole package. Nyong’o gets a chance to play two meaty roles here and she’s all over both. While Adelaide is a strongwilled mom we can’t help but root for, her doppleganger, Red, is a croaky monster who comes with an unexpected level of pathetic sadness. Before his more recent horror success, Peele was known for his comedy work, so it’s no surprise that, in addition to being able to scare the piss out of audiences, he can make us laugh, as well. In that way, Us is often as funny as it is scary. Duke is a crack-up as the dad who can’t quite get it right when trying to protect his family. And in a masterstroke of casting, Tim Heidecker—of Tim and Eric Awesome Show, Great Job!—scores high as Gabe’s smug friend Josh and wise-ass husband to Kitty (Elisabeth Moss, whose work here qualifies as some of her best). There is a lot more going on with Us than scares and laughs. When asked who they are, Red, the lead doppelganger, replies, “We are Americans,” and without giving away much more, that is a clue to how wide Peele’s scope is in what is also an unforgiving condemnation of this country’s history—and its current state—of social injustice. The movie is a lot of fun, but it’s also a heavy one. Ω

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A Menu From Around the World • 10 New Menu Items • Breakfast & Lunch

FILM SHORTS Reviewers: Bob Grimm and Juan-Carlos Selznick.

Opening this week The Beach Bum

Matthew McConaughey stars as a stonedout free spirit/writer who lives by his own rules. Written/directed by Harmony Korine (Kids, Julien Donkey-Boy) and also starring Snoop Dogg, Isla Fisher and Jonah Hill. Cinemark 14. Rated R.

Climax

Gaspar Noé (Enter the Void) directs this hallucinatory exploration of human nature and physicality that follows a dance troupe that’s trapped in a remote schoolhouse on a wintery night and dosed with a powerful form of LSD. Pageant Theatre. Rated R.

Dumbo

A live-action adaptation of Disney’s famous character, the young circus elephant whose ears are so big he can fly. Directed by Tim Burton (Edward Scissorhands, Big Fish). Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

Hotel Mumbai

Dev Patel and Armie Hammer star in this historical biopic that tells the story of the 2008 terrorist attack in Mumbai, India, that killed 164 people. Cinemark 14. Rated R

Unplanned

A Christian faith-based film based on the memoir of a former Planned Parenthood employee turned anti-abortion activist. Cinemark 14. Rated R

2

Captain Marvel

Despite the fact that she’s playing a superhero who has the power to shoot elec-

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Film adaptation of Rachel Lippincott’s young-adult novel of the same name about two teens whose newfound love for one another is complicated by the fact that their respective life-threatening illnesses keep them from coming into physical contact. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

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How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World

The third entry in the animated franchise picks up a year after the events in the previous film, with Hiccup the dragon (voice of Jay Baruchel) searching for a dragon utopia. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

A Madea Family Funeral

Tyler Perry is back for film No. 11 in the Madea series, this time the hijinks unfold at a family funeral in the backwoods of Georgia. Feather River Cinemas. PG-13.

4

Us

See review this issue. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R —B.G.

Wonder Park

A 3-D animated feature about a young girl (voiced by Brianna Denski) with a wild imagination who works with a cast of talking animals to bring a dream amusement park to life. With Matthew Broderick, Jennifer Garner, Ken Hudson Campbell, Kenan Thompson, Ken Jeong, Mila Kunis and John Oliver. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

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Alita: Battle Angel

Robert Rodriguez (Sin City) directs this film adaptation of Yukito Kishiro’s Japanese cyberpunk manga series, Gunnm, featuring a cyborg heroine named Alita (Rosa Salazar) who was rendered for the big screen using CGI technologies developed for James Cameron’s Avatar. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13.

trical bursts from her hands, Brie Larson’s Captain Marvel suffers from a disappointing lack of energy. Larson’s turn as the title character, aka Carol Danvers (aka Vers), is plagued by lethargy and bizarre line deliveries, and she gives off a detached vibe that she doesn’t want to be in the movie. Had the film around her been really good, the lead’s bored disposition might’ve been forgiven, but this cosmic superhero origin story and intergalactic war movie is also riddled with some haphazard storytelling and awful special effects. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13 —B.G.

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A celebration and benefit for musicians and others affected by the Camp Fire

PRESENTS :

s i e m m a C CHICO AREA MUSIC FESTIVAL 2019

Saturday, April 20 7-10 p.m. (doors at 6 p.m., pre-show at 6:30)

Performances by a dozen local artists, plus CAMMIES Awards presentation

Sierra Nevada Big Room 1075 E. 20th St., Chico

FREE TICKETS!

available online only; pre-registration required for admission. Visit: facebook.com/chicocammies or sierranevada.com for details. SPONSORED BY:

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MARCH 28, 2019

Vote now for Best Local Act at newsreview.com/cammies

Donations encouraged for Music Around the Camp Fire Fund


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Savor the flap A new cut of beef for grilling season

FmightThesoundnamewhenis terrible. But, as off-putting as it surveying the butcher’s case, if lap steak.

you give it a chance, you’ll have a hard time choosing tri-tip over flap steak the next time you grill. story and In the words of the brother-inphoto by Jason Cassidy law who introduced it to me, flap steak is, in fact, a “beautiful” cut j aso nc of meat. On his recommendation, @newsrev iew.c om I’ve kept my preparation simple: salt, grill, rest, slice. And it tastes incredible. It has a deep beefy flavor and slightly chewy texture while remaining uncommonly tender, even along the well-done edges (something that cannot be said for a similarly grilled tri-tip). The flat, fibrous and well-marbled flap steak is often confused with skirt or flank. All three come from the bottom half of the animal, where the more active muscles/tougher cuts reside, but while skirt steak is taken from the plate section in the forequarter, and flank steak from the flank section in the hindquarter, flap is in the bottom sirloin of the steer, the same region as the tri-tip. It’s sometimes referred to as sirloin tips (which is actually a different cut) or bavette, the latter a nod to the French name for the cut—more correctly, bavette d’aloyau, or sirloin bib (as opposed to bavette de flanchet, or flank steak). One of the biggest differences between the three is that, while flank and skirt are readily available from most butchers, flap is hard to find, especially in Chico. The brother-in-law who sang its praises discovered it at a Costco near his Maryland home, but when he came out here to visit last summer, a butcher on duty

at our local warehouse told us that it wasn’t something they regularly carried. It wasn’t until a Costco trip earlier this month that I lucked upon “beef loin flap meat steak” ($8.99/ pound). The following week it was gone, only to return again last week. I’ve since heard different things from different Costco butchers—one who never had heard of the cut and one who said it usually comes out during grilling season. At least our Costco sometimes carries it. I called other area butcher shops—Safeway’s meat department, the Meats Lab at Chico State, the Butcher Shop at S&S Produce—and none of them stocks it. The only other place I could find that sold it was the carniceria inside Panaderiá la Michoacana (1414 Park Ave., Ste. 110). Butcher Sergio Alejandre Jr. says he sells flap steaks both plain and marinated under the name arrachera (a term more often used for skirt or flank steak that has been tenderized and marinated) for $8.69/pound. If you can get your hands on some, it’s probably best prepared how you would any piece of beef for the grill—whether for carnitas or just a platter of sliced steak—using your favorite marinade and/or rub, cooking on high heat, and letting it rest 10 minutes before slicing. Personally, I’m such a fan of the flavor of the meat, I’m inclined to stick with salt as my only seasoning. The most important variable to keep in mind is how you slice the cooked meat. Flap steak has very defined, loose fibers, and if you cut with the grain you’ll be chewing on rubber bands. Slice against the grain, however, and the meat will melt in your mouth. Ω MARCH 28, 2019

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ARTS DEVO by JASON CASSIDY • jasonc@newsreview.com

This guy saves you money.

WORD National Poetry Month begins Monday (April 1), and we here at the CN&R are kicking it off a little early with this annual Poetry 99 issue. It’s one of Arts DEVO’s favorite projects to work on: an issue devoted to the art of words, a cover devoted to a local artist (this year’s amazing work is by ecologist/folk artist Wyatt Hersey) and one of the most rewarding components of all—the live reading. This year, the event is again at The Bookstore (Friday, March 29, 6:30 p.m.), Folk art by Wyatt Hersey. and I highly recommend attending and drinking in the inspiring atmosphere of a room filled with poets of all ages sharing their recently published words. Plus, there’s the bonus of 2018 Fiction 59 winners—from last fall’s fire-canceled reading—who’ve been invited to join in the fun. If you’re looking for more ways to celebrate the coming month, visit the Academy of American Poets site at poets.org and choose from the handy list of suggestions, everything from signing up for the Poem-a-Day series to writing an “Exquisite Corpse” poem with your friends. And sign up for a free copy of this year’s National Poetry Month poster, featuring this excerpt from U.S. Poet Laureate Tracy K. Smith’s poem “An Old Story”: And then our singing/Brought on a different manner of weather … We took new stock of one another./We wept to be reminded of such color. ART SHOW, TAKE TWO The theme of Stonewall Alliance’s 2018 Coming Out for

Art show has taken on a new meaning in the aftermath of the Camp Fire. The Expressions of Resilience exhibit—which was scheduled to open at the Museum of Northern California Art last November—is now opening at MONCA to piggyback with this year’s Trans Week art show. This Friday (March 29), 6-9 p.m., there will be a “grand reception,” featuring both shows’ works, including an interactive piece by one of the show’s organizers, Jess Mercer, titled “Read Between the Thin Red Lines.” The collage is composed of verbal attacks that were made online and an invitation to the viewer to rework the language—cross out, rewrite—and take away the words’ negative power.

“ICE IS SLOWLY MELTING” The Chico High School choir went on a singing

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tour in Ireland for spring break, and its first concert wound up being an unscheduled performance at the San Francisco airport. While waiting on a flight delay at the gate, the large group belted out The Beatles classic “Here Comes the Sun,” and a smartphone video of the song was soon posted to Twitter. A few online newspapers—including the Irish Independent and Dublin Live—picked up the story and reposted the video, which shows the impressive harmony-rich a capella performance followed by enthusiastic applause from the crowd at the gate. Props to choral director Jenise Coon and her student singers for representing Chico and for transforming a stressful situation into a beautiful experience. Chico choir, Irish castle.


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY For the week oF MArCh 28, 2019 ARIES (March 21-April 19): Kermit the

Frog from Sesame Street is the world’s most famous puppet. He has recorded songs, starred in films and TV shows and written an autobiography. His image has appeared on postage stamps and he has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. Kermit’s beginnings were humble, however. When his creator Jim Henson first assembled him, he consisted of Henson’s mom’s green coat and two halves of a white ping pong ball. I mention this because the current astrological omens suggest that you, too, could make a puppet that will one day have great influence. APRIL FOOL! I half-lied. Here’s the whole truth: Now isn’t a favorable time to start work on a magnificent puppet. But it is a perfect moment to launch the rough beginnings of a project that’s well-suited for your unique talents.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Taurus

businessman Chuck Feeney made a huge fortune as the entrepreneur who codeveloped duty-free shopping. But at age 87, he lives frugally, having given $8 billion to philanthropic causes. He doesn’t even own a house or car. In accordance with astrological omens, I invite you to follow his lead in the coming weeks. Be unreasonably generous and exorbitantly helpful. APRIL FOOL! I exaggerated a bit. While it’s true that now is an extra favorable time to bestow blessings on everyone, you shouldn’t go overboard. Make sure your giving is artful, not careless or compulsive.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Now is a

perfect time to start learning the Inuktitut language spoken by the indigenous people of Eastern Canada. Here are some key phrases to get you underway. 1. UllusiuKattagit inosek! Celebrate your life! 2. Pitsialagigavit, piggogutivagit! Because you’re doing amazing things, I’m proud of you! 3. Nalligijauvutit! You are loved! 4. Kajusitsiatuinnagit! Keep it up! APRIL FOOL! I lied. Now isn’t really a better time than any other to learn the Inuktitut language. But it is an important time to talk to yourself using phrases like those I mentioned. You need to be extra kind and super positive toward yourself.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): When he

was 20 years old, Greek military leader Alexander the Great began to conquer the world. By age 30, he ruled the vast territory between Greece and northwest India. Never shy about extolling his own glory, he named 70 cities after himself. I offer his example as a model for you. Now is a favorable time to name clouds after yourself, as well as groves of trees, stretches of highway, buses, fire hydrants, parking spaces and rocks. APRIL FOOL. I got a bit carried away. It’s true that now is a good time to assert your authority, extend your clout and put your unique stamp on every situation. But I don’t recommend that you name entire cities after yourself.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Now is an excellent

time to join an exotic religion. How about the Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster, which believes that true spiritual devotion requires an appreciation of satire? Or how about Discordianism, which worships the goddess of chaos and disorder? Then there’s the United Church of Bacon, whose members exult in the flavor of their favorite food. (Here’s a list of more: tinyurl. com/WeirdReligions.) APRIL FOOL! I wasn’t entirely truthful. It’s accurate to say that now is a great time to reinvigorate and transform your spiritual practice. But it’s better if you figure that out by yourself. There’s no need to get your ideas from a bizarre cult.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Studies show

that people who love grilled cheese sandwiches engage in more sexual escapades than those who don’t. So I advise you to eat a lot of grilled cheese sandwiches, because then you will have more sex than usual. And that’s important, because you are now in a phase when you will reap huge healing benefits from having as much sex as possible. APRIL FOOL! I lied when I implied

by rob brezsny that eating more grilled cheese sandwiches would motivate you to have more sex. But I wasn’t lying when I said that you should have more sex than usual. And I wasn’t lying when I said you will reap huge benefits from having as much sex as possible. (P.S. If you don’t have a partner, have sex with your fantasies or yourself.)

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): If you ever

spend time at the McMurdo Station in Antarctica, you’ll get a chance to become a member of the 300 Club. To be eligible, you wait until the temperature outside drops to minus 100 degrees Fahrenheit. When it does, you spend 20 minutes in a sauna heated to 200 degrees. Then you exit into the snow and ice wearing nothing but white rubber boots, and run a few hundred feet to a ceremonial pole and back. In so doing, you expose your naked body to a swing of 300 degrees. According to my astrological analysis, now is an ideal time to pull off this feat. APRIL FOOL! I lied. I’m not really urging you to join the 300 Club. On the other hand, I do think it’s a favorable phase to go to extremes for an authentically good cause.

CLASSIFIEDS Call for a quote. (530) 894-2300 ext. 2 Phone hours: M-F 9am-5pm. Deadlines for print: Line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Display ad deadline: Friday 2pm

All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. Further, the News & Review specifically reserves the right to edit, decline or properly classify any ad. Errors will be rectified by re-publication upon notification. The N&R is not responsible for error after the first publication. The N&R assumes no financial liability for errors or omission of copy. In any event, liability shall not exceed the cost of the space occupied by such an error or omission. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes full responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. *Nominal fee for some upgrades.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Scientific

research shows that if you arrange to get bitten by thousands of mosquitoes in a relatively short time, you make yourself immune. Forever after, mosquito bites won’t itch you. Now would be an excellent time for you to launch such a project. APRIL FOOL! I lied. I don’t really think you should do that. On the contrary. You should scrupulously avoid irritations and aggravations, especially little ones. Instead, immerse yourself in comfort and ease. Be as free from vexation as you have ever been!

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

If allowed to do what comes naturally, two rabbits and their immediate descendants will produce 1,300 new rabbits in 12 months. In five years, their offspring would amount to 94 million. I suspect that you will approach this level of fertility in the next four weeks, at least in a metaphorical sense. APRIL FOOL! I stretched the truth a bit. There’s no way you will produce more than a hundred good new ideas and productions and gifts. At the most, you’ll generate a mere 50.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): The

weather is warm year-round and the crime rate is low on Pitcairn, a remote South Pacific island that is a 30-hour boat ride away from the nearest airport. The population has been dwindling in recent years, however, which is why the government offers foreigners free land if they choose to relocate. You might want to consider taking advantage of this opportunity. APRIL FOOL! I was exaggerating. It’s true that you could get major health benefits by taking a sabbatical from civilization. But there’s no need to be so drastic about it.

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PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Now is a

favorable time to disguise yourself as a bland nerd with no vivid qualities, or a shy wallflower with no strong opinions, or a polite wimp who prefers to avoid adventure. Please don’t even consider doing anything that’s too interesting or controversial. APRIL FOOL! I lied. The truth is, I hope you’ll do the opposite of what I suggested. I think it’s time to express your deep authentic self with aggressive clarity. Be brave and candid and enterprising.

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AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): You

don’t have to run faster than the bear that’s chasing you. You just have to run faster than the slowest person the bear is chasing. OK? So don’t worry! APRIL FOOL! What I just said wasn’t your real horoscope. I hope you know me well enough to understand that I would never advise you to save yourself by betraying or sacrificing someone else. It’s also important to note that the bear I mentioned is entirely metaphorical in nature. However, I do want you to know that there are effective ways to elude the symbolic bear that are also honorable. To discover them, meditate on calming down the beastly bear-like qualities in yourself.

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Estate Sale inside house new clothing mrs/women’s the lowest price anywhere. A large throwrug & a hand-painted mirror, items for 25 cents, lots of misc. 585 Aleut St., Biggs, Th Fri & Sat 4, 5, & 6, 10AM-3PM 32ft 2014 Forrest River RV Salem. Sleeps 9, 2 slides, 35’8” length, outdoor kitchen with refridgerator & sink bbq attached to back. Great condition, practically new. Contact George 707-3102156 $19,999 Out of State Property for Sale 10 acres Gallatin Valley, MT, property sports deer & pheasants, irrigation water right, septic & well approved. 406-581-5635 $289K

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMEN The following persons are doing business as H AND A HYBRID SEED COMPANY at 3030 Thorntree Dr #4 Chico, CA 95973. STEEN HENRIKSEN 13384 Moonlight Court Chico, CA 95973. TAMERA HENRIKSEN 13384 Moonlight Court Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: STEEN C. HENRIKSEN Dated: February 25, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000252 Published: March 7,14,21,28, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as STERLING SPARKLE METAL WORKS at 633 Orange Street, #4 Chico, CA 95926. RICHARD STERLING OGDEN 1065 Citrus Ave Chico, CA 95926. SUSAN MARIE SPARKLE 2055 Park Way Village Dr. Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: RICHARD S. OGDEN Dated: February 22, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000242 Published: March 7,14,21,28, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as THE STYLE CORE at 1641 Oak Vista Ave Chico, CA 95926. BODY BEAUTIFUL LLC 1641 Oak Vista Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: ERIC MATHIS, MANAGING MEMBER Dated: February 26, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000258 Published: March 7,14,21,28, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CAL JAVA at 1601 Esplanade Ste. 1B Chico, CA 95926. CHRISTOPHER MCHENRY 1015 Lupin Ave Chico, CA 95973. NICOLE MICHELLE MCHENRY 1015 Lupin Ave Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: NICOLE MCHENRY Dated: February 26, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000261 Published: March 7,14,21,28, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as RAILFLOWER FARM at 3000 Chico River Rd. Chico, CA 95928. ELLEN MARIE KNIGHT 14011 Limousin Dr. Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ELLEN KNIGHT Dated: February 26, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000262 Published: March 7,14,21,28, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as HARRISON ASSOCIATES at 94 Orange Ave Bangor, CA 95914. MARK HARRISON 94 Orange Ave Bangor, CA 95914. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: MARK HARRISON Dated: January 28, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000139 Published: March 7,14,21,28, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as DOMESTIC GOODS at 1032 Neal Dow Avenue Chico, CA 95926. MATTHEW SHAUN DAUGHERTY 1032 Neal Dow Avenue Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: MATTHEW DAUGHERTY Dated: February 28, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000268 Published: March 7,14,21,28, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ACCESS LOCK AND SAFE at 6 Fremont St Apt 37 Chico, CA 95928.

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TREVOR TOMLINSON 6 Fremont St Apt 37 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: TREVOR TOMLINSON Dated: Fevruary 28, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000272 Published: March 7,14,21,28, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as SEELADAVID SALON at 1209 Esplanade Unit 6 Chico, CA 95926. AMANDA ANNE BANKS 2 Picual Ct Chico, CA 95928. CHRISTOPHER PAUL BANKS 2 Picual Ct Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: CHRISTOPHER P BANKS Dated: February 21, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000238 Published: March 7,14,21,28, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as WALKER’S WOODWORKS at 2547 Oro Garden Ranch Rd Oroville, CA 95966. BRANDON LEE WALKER 2547 Oro Garden Ranch Rd Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: BRANDON WALKER Dated: February 19, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000231 Published: March 14,21,28, April 4, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ARBOR PRO TREE CARE at 636 Burnt Ranch Way Chico, CA 95973. JASON RIX 636 Burnt Ranch Way Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JASON RIX Dated: February 13, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000213 Published: March 14,21,28, April 4, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ASSOCIATED CHICO EYE SPECIALISTS at 3537 Bay Avenue Chico, CA 95973. ROBERT DUDLEY STONE MD 3537 Bay Avenue Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ROBERT D. STONE Dated: February 26, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000259 Published: March 14,21,28, April 4, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as DANI PADGETT PHOTO, DANI PADGETT WEDDINGS at 2797 Grape Way Chico, CA 95973. DANIELLE PADGETT WATSON 2797 Grape Way Chico, CA 95973. ERIC WATSON 2797 Grape Way Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: DANIELLE WATSON Dated: February 22, 2019

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FBN Number: 2019-0000244 Published: March 14,21,28, April 4, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following persons have abandoned the use of the fictitious business names DANI PADGETT WEDDINGS, DANI PADGETT PHOTO at 2797 Grape Way Chico, CA 95973. STEER AND ARBOR LLC 2797 Grape Way Chico, CA 95973. This business was conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: DANIELLE WATSON, OWNER Dated: February 22, 2019 FBN Number: 2018-0000990 Published: March 14,21,28, April 4, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as KAIT’S SWEET KREATIONS at 1661 Forest Ave #27 Chico, CA 95928. KAITLYN ZANGL 1661 Forest Ave #27 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: KAITLYN ZANGL Dated: March 1, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000277 Published: March 21,28, April 4,11, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as EMINENCE GROUP at 2359 Myers Street, Suite #5966 Oroville, CA 95966. TIANA LYNN HARRISON TRUSTEE 2359 Myers Street, Suite #5966 Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by a Trust. Signed: TIANA HARRISON Dated: February 19, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000229 Published: March 21,28, April 4,11, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as LAURA’S WIG AND BEAUTY SUPPLY at 872 East Ave Chico, CA 95926. KATHLEEN A MCCLYMONT 10116 Jones Ave Durham, CA 95938. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: KATHLEEN MCCLYMONT Dated: March 5, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000296 Published: March 21,28, April 4,11, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as MANIFEST GLASS at 818 Salem St Chico, CA 95928. MERRICK JAMES BOYER 972 E 9th St Chico, CA 95928. RYAN PATRICK RODRIGUEZ 1126 Hobart St Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: RYAN RODRIGUEZ Dated: February 25, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000249

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as LOOK AHEAD VETERINARY SERVICES at 1451 Clark Rd Oroville, CA 95965. MICHELE C WEAVER, DVM AND CRAIG A BROWN, DVM, INC. 1451 Clark Rd Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: MICHELE WEAVER PRESIDENT Dated: March 21, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000348 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as FRANKLIN RECYCLING at 4405 Airport Rd Paradise, CA 95969. JOHN HENRY FRANKLIN 885 E 5th Street Chico, CA 95928. CLARK E GARDNER 6 Abbott Circle Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: JOHN H. FRANKLIN Dated: March 13, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000323 Published: March 21,28, April 4,11, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following person has abandoned the use of the fictitious business name HEEL AND SOLE SHOES at 708 Mangrove Ave Chico, CA 95926. RICK NORMAN STUELPNAGEL 4730 Songbird Chico, CA 95973. This business was conducted by an Individual. Signed: RICK STUELPNAGEL Dated: March 18, 2019 FBN Number: 2017-0001588 Published: March 21,28, April 4,11, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as SWEET T’S at 803 Burgess Lane Chico, CA 95973. BRANDON BLIZMAN 803 Burgess Lane Chico, CA 95973. TARYN BLIZMAN 803 Burgess Lane Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: BRANDON BLIZMAN Dated: February 20, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000233 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as SARAH RICHARDSON’S CANINE CONNECTION, THE CANINE CONNECTION at 10 Seville Court Chico, CA 95928. SARAH LUCILE RICHARDSON 22 Sunland Drive Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: SARAH RICHARDSON Dated: March 8, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000308 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CHICO PEACE, CHICO PEACE AND JUSTICE CENTER, CHICO PEACE ENDEAVOR, CPJC at 526 Broadway Chico, CA 95928. CHICO PEACE ENDEAVOR 526 Broadway Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: ARAMENTA HAWKINS, DIRECTOR Dated: March 19, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000353 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as AZTLAN, FIFTH SUN at 495 Ryan Ave Chico, CA 95973. GONZALES PARK, LLC 495 Ryan Ave Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: CLINT L SMITH, DIRECTOR Dated: March 21, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000359 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as GEI, GONZALES ENTERPRISES at 495 Ryan Ave. Chico, CA 95973. GONZALES PARK, LLC 495 Ryan Ave. Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: CLINT L SMITH, DIRECTOR Dated: March 21, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000360 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PALM TO PALM at 1321 Palm Avenue Chico, CA 95926. ALEXANDRIA MULLER 1321 Palm Avenue Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ALEXANDRIA MULLER Dated: March 19, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000347 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2019

FICCTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as HENDREN DISABILITY ADVOCATES, SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY ADVOCATES at 341 Broadway, Suite 402 Chico, CA 95928. MARY GALVIN 318 Flume St Chico, CA 95928. KEVIN MARK HENDREN 318 Flume St Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: KEVIN HENDREN Dated: February 28, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000270 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2019

NOTICES NOTICE OF HEARING Petitioner: SHARON K.

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EDWARDS Respondent: GERALD D. EDWARDS To: SHARON K. EDWARDS, Petitioner A Court Hearing will be held as follows: Date: May 15, 2019 Time: 8:15am Dept: 7 Room: TBA Superior Court of California, County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95928 WARNING to the person served with the Request for Order: The court may make the requested orders without you if you do not file a Responsive Declaration to Request for Order (form FL-320), serve a copy on the other parites at least nine court days before the hearing (unless the court has ordered a shorter period of time), and appear at the hearing. (See form FL-320-INFO for more information.) Dated: March 14, 2019 Case Number: FL047985 Published: March 21,28, April 4,11, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner SAMANTHA BRYANT filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: AUBREE AUTUMN-LEE SYNDERGAARD Proposed name: AUBREE AUTUMN-LEE BRYANT THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 8, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: March 11, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00759 Published: March 21,28, April 4,11, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner CHRISTOPHER JOESPH LANE filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: CHRISTOPHER JOESPH LANE Proposed name: CHRISTOPHER JOSEPH NUNES THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard

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and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 1, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: 1 Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: March 11, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00733 Published: March 21,28, April 4,11, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner DELTA DAWN MORRISSEY filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: WAYLON JOCASH LEE Proposed name: WAYLON JOCASH MORRISSEY THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 8, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: March 12, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00784 Published: March 21,28, April 4,11, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner CHRISTOPHER PEACE DOLAN filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: CHRISTOPHER PEACE DOLAN Proposed name: CHRISTOPHER PEACE MOORE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 15, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: 10 Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928

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Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: March 18, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00832 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: ASHLEE MICHELE HOLMES Proposed name: ASHLEE MICHELE SHULTS THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 8, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: March 11, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00697 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner SUSANNA GARRETT PORTER filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: SUSANNA GARRETT PORTER Proposed name: SUSANNA GARRETT BRAVO THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 15, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: March 13, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00788 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner TOU XA CHASENGNOU filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: TOU XA CHASENGNOU

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Proposed name: CHEEMENG CHA THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 1, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: 10 Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: March 12, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00739 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner PETER CHASENGNOU filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: PETER CHASENGNOU Proposed name: PETER KONG CHA THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 1, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: 10 Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: March 13, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00741 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner NICK CHASENGNOU filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: NICK CHASENGNOU Proposed name: NICK CHENG CHA THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing

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to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 1, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: 1 Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: March 11, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00740 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner PANG YANG filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: PANG YANG Proposed name: PA CHUE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 1, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: 1 Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: March 11, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00737 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner MARCIE LYNN MEYERSON filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: MARCIE LYNN MEYERSON Proposed name: MARCIE LYNN THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 1, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L.

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MOSBARGER Dated: March 21, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00897 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner CONNOR MATTHEW TOLLE filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: CONNOR MATTHEW TOLLE Proposed name: JEREMIAH MATTHEWS-TOLLE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 8, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: March 12, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00706 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2019

SUMMONS SUMMONS NOTICE TO RESPONDENT SCOTT ANDREW SPAULDING You are being sued by petitioner: NANCY JANE SPAULDING You have 30 calendar days after this Summons and Petition are served on you to file a Response (form FL-120) at the court and have a copy served on the petitioner. A letter, phone call, or court appearance will not protect you. If you do not file your Response on time, the court may make orders affecting your marriage or domestic partnership, your property, and custody of your children. You may be ordered to pay support and attorney fees and costs. For legal advice, contact a lawyer immediately. Get help finding a lawyer at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courts.ca.gov/selfhelp) at the California Legal Services website (www.lawhelpca.org), or by contacting your local county bar association. FEE WAIVER: If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the clerk for a fee waiver form. The court may order you to pay back all or part of the fees and costs that the court waived for you or the other party. The name and address of the court are: Superior Court of California, County of Butte 1775 Concord Avenue Chico, CA 95928 The name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner’s attorney, or the petitioner without an attorney, are: MICHAEL M. ROONEY/ RONALD T. MARQUEZ 1361 Esplanade

this Legal Notice continues


Chico, CA 95926-4900 (530) 345-5678 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Dated: December 31, 2018 Case Number: 18FL02654 Published: March 14,21,28, April 4, 2019

SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: CHARLENE A ALLEE YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: BUTTE COUNTY CREDIT BUREAU A CORP NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The Court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Avenue Chico, CA 95928 LIMITED CIVIL CASE The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney is: JOSEPH L SELBY (#249546) Law Office of Ferris & Selby 2607 Forest Avenue Ste 130 Chico, CA 95928. (530) 366-4290 Dated: June 29, 2018 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Case Number: 18CV02133 Published: March 21,28, April 4,11, 2019

PETITION NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE DORIS VIOLET NESMITH, aka DORIS V. NESMITH, aka DORIS NESMITH To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: DORIS VIOLET NESMITH, aka DORIS V. NESMITH, aka DORIS

this Legal Notice continues

NESMITH A Petition for Probate has been filed by: SUSAN EIDSON in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: SUSAN EIDSON be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: April 9, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: TBA Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: CLAYTON B. ANDERSON 20 Independence Circle Chico, CA 95973 (530) 342-6144 Case Number: 19PR00098 Dated: March 4, 2019 Published: March 14,21,28, 2019

A Petition for Probate has been filed by: SHANNON W. MASTEN in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: SHANNON W. MASTEN be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: April 9, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: NICOLE R. PLOTTEL 466 Vallombrosa Ave. Chico, CA 95926 (530) 893-2882 Case Number: 19PR00113 Dated: March 6, 2019 Published: March 14,21,28, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE SHANE L. MASTEN, also known as SHANE LOREN MASTEN, SHANE MASTEN To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: SHANE L. MASTEN, also known as SHANE LOREN MASTEN, SHANE MASTEN

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE KONRAD JOSEPH PAUL To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: KONRAD JOSEPH PAUL a petition for Probate has been filed by: HOWARD W. PAUL in the Superior Court of

this Legal Notice continues

this Legal Notice continues

California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: HOWARD W. PAUL be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: April 2, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: SONYA K. FINN The Law Offices of Leverenz & Finn 515 Wall Street Chico, CA 95928. (530) 895-1621 Case Number: 19PR00116 Dated: March 7, 2019 Published: March 14,21,28, 2019

MARSHA L. GIBBS in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: MARSHA L. GIBBS be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: April 16, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: NICOLE R. PLOTTEL 466 Vallombrosa Ave. Chico, CA 95926. (530) 893-2882 Case Number: 19PR00122 Dated: March 11, 2019 Published: March 21,28, April 4, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE LAWRENCE P. GIBBS, also known as LAWRENCE PARKER GIBBS, LAWRENCE GIBBS To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: LAWRENCE P. GIBBS, also known as, LAWRENCE PARKER GIBBS, LAWRENCE GIBBS a petition for Probate has been filed by:

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE LEE PARKER SHERIDAN, aka LEE P. SHERIDAN, aka LEE SHERIDAN To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: LEE PARKER SHERIDAN, aka LEE P. SHERIDAN, aka LEE SHERIDAN a petition for Probate has been filed by:

this Legal Notice continues

this Legal Notice continues

JUSTYNE SHERIDAN in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: JUSTYNE SHERIDAN be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: April 16, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: REBECCA YUHASZ McKernan, Lanam, Bakke & Williams LLP 55 Independence Circle, Suite 106 Chico, CA 95973. (530) 877-4961 Case Number: 19PR00132 Dated: March 18, 2019 Published: March 28, April 4,11, 2019

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REAL ESTATE

FOr mOrE INFOrmaTION aBOUT aDVErTISING IN OUr rEaL ESTaTE SEcTION, caLL 530-894-2300

Love’s Real estate

Daylight Savings

1676 Park View Ln, ChiCo | 3 beds | 2 baths 9,148 sqft Lot | $438,000

| 1,616 sq ft

Enjoy Chico’s good life from this stylishly updated home in a secluded cul-de-sac neighborhood, super close to Bidwell Park! You could walk to the Park or ride your bike through the Park to campus, to downtown, and beyond! Enjoy the inground gunite pool on those warm, ...ok - HOT Chico nights! Pool Party!!! Very nice remodeled open kitchen! Real oak hardwood floors! Real brick fireplace! Real sweet house! The basic home floor plan is available in the Peter tichinin MBA, Broker AssociAte supplemental documents section as well as many property inspections. Bre# 00828481 peter@chicohoMes.coM Have your Realtor show you.

(530) 680-1900 www.chicohomes.com centUrY 21 seLect reAL estAte

Apparently, everyone was in the mood to fight. I was out to lunch with two old buddies, a loan officer and a Realtor. Maybe it was the time change. Apparently, when the daylight savings time change happens, we become surly. A notice was passed around my office meeting that first morning after the time change. The notice described post-daylight savings symptoms in people, in which the amygdala, the emotional center of the brain, becomes “more reactive to negative situations.” Apparently, we become more susceptible to “mood disruptions” and “increased irritability.” At lunch, the loan officer said, “I can’t believe interest rates are still so low. We were told early in the year that rates would be going up, and I went out and warned everybody. Now I look like an idiot.” “You shouldn’t fall for fake news and dumb predictions,” said the Realtor. “Hey, turkey,” said the loan officer, “my resources are time-tested and up to the minute!” “The only thing time-tested,” said the Realtor, “is your idiocy.” I piped up. “Apparently, daylight savings messes with all of us in a bad way,” I said.

“Something has certainly messed with the Realtor in a bad way,” said the loan officer. “Don’t mess with me!” said the Realtor. “Apparently,” I said, “the amygdala in our brain goes out of whack at daylight savings time.” “The amyg-whatta?” said the loan officer. “Apparently, we become irritable and moody,” I said. “Anyway, interest rates don’t seem to matter,” said the Realtor. “Sales are booming, and it looks like the boom will continue for a long time to come.” “Now who’s an idiot?” said the loan officer. “This boom is a temporary aberration caused by a disaster!” “There you go again,” said the Realtor, “relying on fake news and dumb predictions, no doubt. It’s obvious to anyone with half a brain that this boom is long-term.” The Realtor turned to me. “Daylight savings has definitely rattled his brain. What do you think, Mister Amygdala?” “Apparently,” I said. The Realtor pointed at me. “If you say ‘apparently’ one more time!” The loan officer added in his own threat. I said nothing. Apparently, that daylight savings notice has some truth to it.

Doug Love is Sales Manager at Century 21 in Chico. Call 530-680-0817 or email dougwlove@gmail.com License #950289

Homes are Selling in Your Neighborhood Shop every home for sale at www.C21SelectGroup.com

530.345.6618 Steve KaSprzyK (Kas-per-ziK)

14056 Hereford

You don’t have to spell it for me to sell it! 27 years representing clients in our area Century 21 select Chico California c21falconer@gmail.com (530) 518–4850 License#01145231

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14855 Klamath Court

$279,000

$989,000

CalDRE #02056059

Paul Champlin | (530) 828-2902 Making Your Dream Home a Reality

Olivia Larrabee l (530) 520-3169 Olivia.Larrabee@c21selectgroup.com

Homes Sold Last Week ADDRESS

TOWN

4117 Augusta Ln 4424 Altatina Dr 90 Felicidad Ln 2 Budlee Ct 3031 Ceanothus Ave 168 Estates Dr 3023 Calistoga Dr 13 Kingsburry Ct 449 Newport Dr 280 Saint Augustine Dr 2296 Bar Triangle St

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico

42

CN&R

march 28, 2019

PRICE

BR/BA

$775,000 $765,000 $646,000 $590,000 $560,000 $559,000 $540,000 $530,000 $517,000 $484,000 $475,000

4/3 3/2 4/4 3/2 4/3 3/3 4/3 3/2 4/3 4/2 3/2

Curious about your home’s value in today’s marketplace? Call me, I can help!

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Lic# 01506350

Joyce Turner

(530) 570–1944 • joyce_turner@ymail.com

Sponsored by Century 21 Select Real Estate, Inc. SQ. FT. 3010 2321 2399 2100 1897 2440 2172 1934 2172 2086 1678

ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

2371 Ritchie Cir 246 Estates Dr A 2733 White Ave 778 Henshaw Ave 195 Pauletah Pl 58 Saint Francis Dr 1834 Bedford Dr 27 El Cerrito Dr 950 Yosemite Dr 1606 Laburnum Ave 107 Watson Ln

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico

$472,500 $422,500 $390,000 $389,591 $381,000 $365,000 $358,500 $355,500 $341,000 $340,000 $339,500

4/3 2/2 4/3 3/2 3/2 3/2 3/2 3/3 3/3 3/2 3/2

SQ. FT. 2439 1737 2112 1566 1601 2100 1842 1308 1871 1628 1408


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the Chico news & review is a family owned business that has been part of the Chico community since 1977. our mission is to publish great newspapers which are successful and enduring, create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow while respecting personal welfare, and to have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live.

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How Much is Your Home Worth Today? Ask the Professionals at Century 21 Select

530.345.6618 | www.C21SelectGroup.com Condo! Adorable 3 bed/2 bth, 1,249 sq ft with 1-car attached garage, nice size back yard! Fireplace in living room. One you won’t want to miss!!..............................................................$259,000

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SplaSh into thiS beautiful Saltwater pool! Well maintained 3 bed/2 bth, plus den/office or possible 4th bedroom home offering 1,776 sq ft, RV parking too!..................................$475,000

Teresa Larson (530) 899-5925 DRE #01177950 chiconativ@aol.com

beautiful 4 bed/3 bth, 2,512 sq ft home, .30 of an acre! 2-car garage, mature landscaping. $519,900 235 aCreS loCated in the beautiful Setting of butte Valley! Offering 2 newer stunning custom homes, horse set up, outI buildings, fully fenced property. Wonderful N Gto haveandhorses, E N Dacres opportunity to have privacy with Penough cattle or just the peaceful setting that this has to offer.....................................................................................$1,650,000

Kimberley Tonge l 530.518.5508 Lic# 01318330

Newer Home in Wildwood Park with views of Foothills. $425,000 2 bed 2 bath Condo in Chico in a great area. $167,500 Alice Zeissler l 530.518.1872 CalBRE #01312354

The following houses were sold in Butte County by real estate agents or private parties during the week of March 11- March 16, 2019 The housing prices are based on the stated documentary transfer tax of the parcel and may not necessarily reflect the actual sale price of the home. ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

SQ. FT.

ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

SQ. FT.

13581 Garner Ln

Chico

$336,000

3/2

1140

2055 Amanda Way #8

Chico

$219,000

3/2

2398 Alba Ave

Chico

$330,000

3/3

1800

1617 Palm Ave

Chico

$190,000

3/1

1244 906

1595 La Linda Ln

Chico

$330,000

3/2

1345

2055 Amanda Way #13

Chico

$180,000

2/1

864

1594 Hawthorne Ave

Chico

$330,000

3/2

1809

1106 W 8th Ave #9

Chico

$180,000

3/2

988

1465 Filbert Ave

Chico

$325,500

3/1

1141

2760 Levi Ln

Chico

$159,500

3/2

1580 2742

1457 Eaton Rd

Chico

$320,000

3/2

1248

5051 Oro Dam Blvd E

Oroville

$530,000

3/4

26 Redding Ct

Chico

$317,000

3/1

1050

25 Favorite Ct

Oroville

$420,000

3/2

1680

1085 Windsor Way

Chico

$295,000

3/2

1402

519 Porter Ct

Paradise

$615,000

3/3

3064

1618 Spruce Ave

Chico

$270,000

4/2

1152

5821 Yorkshire Dr

Paradise

$550,000

3/3

2644

427 Oak St

Chico

$250,000

4/3

1168

4508 Casa Sierra Vis

Paradise

$465,000

4/4

2815

1147 W 4th St

Chico

$232,500

3/2

1114

6222 Himmel St

Paradise

$365,000

3/2

1824

march 28, 2019

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