__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

CHICO’S FREE NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY VOLUME 42, ISSUE 30 THURSDAY, MARCH 21, 2019 WWW.NEWSREVIEW.COM

8 $4.9 MILLION DRAMA

PRESCRIPTION:

Lockup California’s jails and prisons are de facto mental institutions PAGE 20

11 SCORE ONE

FOR JUSTICE

24 FIRE

AND RAIN


FOR DENTURES WITH EXTRACTIONS ONLY

2 

CN&R 

march 21, 2019


CN&R

INSIDE

Vol. 42, Issue 30 • March 21, 2019 OPINION

4

Editorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Guest Comment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Second & Flume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 This Modern World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Streetalk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

NEWSLINES

8

25

Downstroke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Sifter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9

HEALTHLINES

12

Appointment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Weekly Dose. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

GREENWAYS

16

Eco Event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS

19

15 Minutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 The Goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

16

COVER STORY

20

ARTS & CULTURE

24

Music Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 This Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Fine Arts listings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Scene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Nightlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Reel World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Chow. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Arts DEVO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Brezsny’s Astrology . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35

CLASSIFIEDS

35

REAL ESTATE

38

ON THE COVER: DESIGN BY TINA FLYNN

Our Mission: To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. Editor Melissa Daugherty Managing Editor Meredith J. Cooper Arts Editor Jason Cassidy Contributing Editor Evan Tuchinsky Staff Writer Ashiah Scharaga Calendar Editor Neesa Sonoquie Contributors Robin Bacior, Alastair Bland, Michelle Camy, Vic Cantu, Charles Finlay, Bob Grimm, Howard Hardee, Miles Jordan, Mark Lore, Landon Moblad, Brie Oviedo, Ryan J. Prado, Juan-Carlos Selznick, Ken Smith, Robert Speer, Carey Wilson Managing Art Director Tina Flynn Creative Services Manager Elisabeth Bayard Arthur Ad Designers Naisi Thomas, Cathy Arnold Publications Designers Katelynn Mitrano, Nikki Exerjian Director of Sales and Advertising Jamie DeGarmo Advertising Services Coordinator Ruth Alderson Senior Advertising Consultants Brian Corbit, Laura Golino Advertising Consultants Adam Lew, Jordon Vernau

President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Director of Nuts & Bolts Deborah Redmond Director of People & Culture David Stogner Director of Dollars & Sense Debbie Mantoan Nuts & Bolts Ninja Norma Huerta Payroll/AP Wizard Miranda Hansen Accounts Receivable Specialist Analie Foland Developer John Bisignano System Support Specialist Kalin Jenkins N&R Publications Managing Editor Laura Hillen N&R Publications Writer Anne Stokes Marketing & Publications Consultants Greta Beekhuis, Steve Caruso, Joseph Engle, Elizabeth Morabito, Traci Hukill, Luke Roling, Celeste Worden 353 E. Second Street, Chico, CA 95928 Phone (530) 894-2300 Fax (530) 892-1111 Website newsreview.com Got a News Tip? (530) 894-2300, ext 2224 or chiconewstips@newsreview.com Calendar Events cnrcalendar@newsreview.com Calendar Questions (530) 894-2300, ext. 2243 Want to Advertise? Fax (530) 892-1111 or cnradinfo@newsreview.com Classifieds (530) 894-2300, press 2 or classifieds@newsreview.com Job Opportunities jobs@newsreview.com Want to Subscribe to CN&R? chisubs@newsreview.com Editorial Policies: Opinions expressed in CN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons, or other portions of the paper. CN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or review materials. Email letters to cnrletters@newsreview.com. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form and to edit them for libel.

Office Assistant Jennifer Osa

Advertising Policies: All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes the responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message.

Distribution Director Greg Erwin Distribution Staff Ken Gates, Bob Meads, Pat Rogers, Larry Smith, Placido Torres, Jeff Traficante, Bill Unger, Lisa Van Der Maelen, David Wyles

CN&R is printed at PressWorks Ink on recycled newsprint. Circulation of CN&R is verified by the Circulation Verification Council. CN&R is a member of Chico Chamber of Commerce, Oroville Chamber of Commerce, Downtown Chico Business Association, CNPA, AAN and AWN. Circulation 38,650 copies distributed free weekly.

MARCH 21, 2019

CN&R

3


OPINION

Send guest comments, 340 words maximum, to gc@newsreview.com or to 353 E. Second St., Chico, CA 95928. Please include photo & short bio.

SECOND & FLUME

EDITORIAL

Better late than never On Tuesday (March 19), Butte County Public Health

issued a water-quality advisory to warn residents in Camp Fire-affected regions not to drink tap water— even if it’s been boiled. The advisory notes that water authorities—ostensibly including the Paradise Irrigation District, though no agency is specifically named—had indicated that home plumbing systems may contain contaminants. “[T]herefore, residents should not rely on home water filtration systems as they may not be adequate to provide needed protection,” the memo reads. “Due to the possibility of contamination, residents should not use tap water for drinking, cooking, food preparation, brushing teeth or similar activities.” It lists the following recommendations: Limit use of hot water; limit shower time (use lukewarm water and ventilate area); use a dishwasher to wash dishes and use air dry setting; wash clothing in cold water; do not take baths; and do not use hot tubs or swimming pools. Further, the advisory notes that well-water users or those with storage tanks may want to have their systems tested for toxins related to the damage wreaked by the fire. We at the CN&R would like to take that advice up a notch. Residents now living in the region can ensure their water is safe only through adequate testing, meaning taking samples from multiple sites within

by Melissa Daugherty m e l i s s a d @ n e w s r e v i e w. c o m

homes—and doing so regularly. We learned as much back in February, when Meredith J. Cooper broke the story that water contamination in Paradise was much worse than initially suggested and likely affected in-home plumbing (see “Widespread contamination,” Newslines, Feb. 28). The month before, we published an in-depth piece that included a list of do’s and don’ts for water use on the Ridge (see “Troubled water,” Cover story, Jan. 31) that’s very similar to the county’s. It’s perplexing Public Health waited so long to issue the aforementioned memo, the only such advisory the department has issued specifically about water. Previous information related to water—included in Public Health’s hazard advisory after the evacuation order was lifted—was nebulous at best. It simultaneously called for boiling water from public systems—something we now know isn’t a sufficient decontamination method— while noting that “tap water should be considered unsafe until proper water tests can be completed.” What sort of testing wasn’t specified. As for those connected to PID, the agency’s stop-gap measure while it addresses contaminated infrastructure is to install water tanks at standing homes in its service area. Learn more at PID’s next meeting on Tuesday (March 26), from 6-8 p.m., at the Paradise Alliance Church (6491 Clark Road). Ω

GUEST COMMENT

We’re not crazy W sense of being in control of my life. I should say, what I lost was my illusion that I was ever in control

hen we lost our home in the Camp Fire, I lost the

to begin with. It’s been painful. I’m moody; it’s hard to make any plans; I wonder, with dread sometimes, what calamity is coming next. And yet, the loss of feeling in charge has shaken me open. I like accepting help now where it was awkward before. I don’t overthink things as much. And I seem attuned to coincidences that are more akin to strange and marvelous connections you notice when you by stop putting your rational imprint Joe Wills on everything. It’s like when you The author is a switch from driver to passenger, psychotherapist and how you can really pay attention to writer in Chico. the world outside your window. Back in January, I went to see MaMuse at a fundraiser for Camp

4

CN&R

MARCH 21, 2019

Fire victims. Sarah and Karisha are wonderful musicians with longstanding Chico ties, and I have liked them and their music for many years. But this night it was as if their songs were tailored for me, and the other evacuees, to hear. One had the refrain, “You’re not crazy/You’re just sad/You’re not crazy/You’re just mad.” I could not believe it—how did they know exactly how I felt? After I got home, I set up a Pandora MaMuse station on my computer. To my delight, “You’re Not Crazy,” the song from the fundraiser, played. It starts with these buoyant mandolin notes, and then Karisha sings, but I quickly hit the pause button because I couldn’t believe what I’d just heard. I looked up the lyrics online to check—in fact, the song’s first line is, “There was a fire in your home ….” You could scan the rest of the lyrics and decide the song is not about an actual fire—it’s just a coincidence that it has this line, and that you found this song. Or you could take a step back, do a little less thinking, and accept that this song, in some lovely and not-so-crazy way, found you. Ω

M.I.A. Chico City Attorney Vince Ewing last appeared in the City Council chambers during that panel’s Dec. 4 regular meeting. As you’ll recall, that was the same night three new members were sworn in (i.e., the date the council flipped back to the liberals). The question: Is Ewing’s absence coincidental? I doubt it. And I think it has everything to do with the Chico Scrap Metal (CSM) saga. Let’s review history. Back in 2006, the city ordered CSM to vacate its home on East 20th Street by 2011—predicated on the fact that the business’ industrial practices no longer fit in with land-use designations in the area. However, the liberal majority granted deadline extensions and CSM was still there in December 2014, when the conservatives took control of the council. The representatives on the right began reversing course immediately. They started by crafting a development agreement letting the business stay put and went as far as to sue Councilman Karl Ory, two months after he was sworn into office in late 2016. Ory had been part of Move the Junkyard and helped that grassroots group with its successful referendum to put the issue on the ballot. In early 2017, Ewing told the CN&R that, among other things, Move the Junkyard’s petition had been improperly prepared. That ostensibly was the justification for the city suing one of its representatives. It also was the opening salvo in a protracted and expensive legal fight. How pricey? As of a year ago, $75,000 was the cost for two cases: the city’s lawsuit against Move the Junkyard and Ory, and the defense related to the grassroots group’s suit attempting to compel the city to move forward with the referendum or nullify its development agreement with CSM. However, the City Clerk’s Office, in its answer to my public records query, noted that CSM was picking up the tab. That’s because the aforementioned agreement included an indemnification clause stipulating that the business would pay the city attorney’s fees should any legal issues arise. The rub: The agreement never went into effect. Last summer, a Butte County Superior Court judge sided with Move the Junkyard and ordered the council to either repeal it or put the issue to a vote. The council chose the first option. And since the agreement was never valid—the referendum had stopped it in its tracks—CSM hasn’t paid a dime. The price tag now stands at around $200,000. Another expense: This past Dec. 3, CSM owner George Scott filed a lawsuit against the city. It includes a request for his attorney’s fees and other damages. In other words, the city of Chico’s counsel is now doing battle against a business with whom it previously had arrangements to receive payment from via that now-defunct development agreement. At the March 5 council meeting, Ory’s former attorney urged the council to sue Ewing for malpractice based on the indemnificationclause blunder. I’d like to know if that’s why Ewing is laying low, but he won’t return the CN&R’s calls. He again was a no-show at this week’s meeting, and nobody addressed his absence or whether he’ll ever be back. Indeed, it seems uncertainty is the only certainty. Case in point: It’s anyone’s guess how much money the city—aka taxpayers— ultimately will shell out when it comes to this issue.

Melissa Daugherty is editor of the CN&R


LETTERS

Send email to cnrletters@newsreview.com

Who’ll get the ax? Re “Oak grove chainsaw massacre” (Newslines, by Evan Tuchinsky, March 14): I’m waiting to read which city of Chico government supervisor is fired for the incompetence of allowing a work crew to cut down 27 valley oaks “accidentally.” Bob Mulholland Chico

The trashing of 27 oaks in Bidwell Park is a highly visible manifestation of trash government, at all levels— the kind of government fouling Chico since former City Manager Brian Nakamura and former Councilman Mark Sorensen began “saving” our city in earnest, seven years ago. Our saviors brought us the standard right-wing model: Fire as many city workers as possible, privatize all services, ignore infrastructure decline, maximize spending on police and never allow a serious discussion of revenue enhancement. The question is: Will our new City Council grasp the depth of

the damage done, clean house and chart a new course? There must be some talented, young, progressive managers out there, just waiting for an opportunity to serve a city like ours. Let the healing begin. Patrick Newman Chico

Diplomacy, not war Re “Condemn interference” (Letters, by Lauren Ayers and David Kiefer, March 14): Thank you, Lauren Ayers and David Kiefer, for your excellent letters about U.S./Venezuela. I’ve never seen our country so blatant about its internationally illegal plans for regime change in Venezuela. With each step, the U.S. is going against the civilizing tenets of the United Nations, Organization of American States (OAS) and Geneva Accords (i.e., interfering with internal affairs of another sovereign state, military invasion of a sovereign state, and collective punishment through economic sanctions). The United Nations forum to

solve problems through diplomacy rather than war is dying. Who’s killing off this dream? Donald Trump, the inept; Elliott Abrams, “Iago” to any shred of decency in the U.S. State Department; John Bolton, the “Deep State’s” errand boy; and the slick Venezuelan president pretender, Juan Guaidó—funded by organizations like National Endowment for Democracy, etc., and leader to organizing and fomenting violence in anti-Chavista demonstrations across Venezuela since 2007. Linda Furr Chico

On cameras: hear, hear!  Re “Bust the light-runners” (Letters, by Daniel Lassotta, March 14): While stationed in Europe in 1975, I received the most unexpected and stunning piece of mail ever from the German polizei. It contained an ugly photo of me inadvertently speeding through a red light. The penalty cost more LETTERS c o n t i n u e d

o n pa g e 6

Presents

FREE FAIR HOUSING & TENANT RIGHTS CLINIC A WORKSHOP FOR TENANTS: The workshop will include information on fair housing laws (both state and federal), discrimination, disability rights, reasonable accommodation and modification, and much more!

FREE Lunch will be provided! Tuesday, March 26, 2019 • 12PM – 2PM CARD Community Center – Room 3 545 Vallombrosa Ave • Chico, CA 95926 PRESENTER:

Katie Rogers, Staff Attorney • Legal Services of Northern California

SPONSORED BY:

City of Chico (Community Development Block Grant funded) Legal Services of Northern California, Butte Regional Office

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Legal Services of Northern California (530) 345-9491 MaRcH 21, 2019

  CN&R 

5


“It’s all about the Dirty Sauce” Vegan options aVailable

839 Main Street • Chico • (530) 345-6783

648 West 5th St. | Chico 530.924.3171 ILikeIkesPlace.com

SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY & SSI “We help YOU through the System” We assist with paperwork! Attorney at Law

LAw Of f IC E S O f B E T S Y H . A LB ERT S Over 35 years of experience.

976 Mangrove, Chico • 530.893.8387

Just Turn 65? New to Medicare with Part B? $0 Deductable Free Personal emergency response System No Need for Medical History! John Warwick Insurance Services (530) 891-5433 • johnw@peak.org

Call For a

FREE

LiMiteD tiMe

15-45%

off

BeFore 4/15/19

Certified Senior Advisor CA ins Lic #0294026

Feeling Stuck In Your Life? Lifecoaching can empower you to get back on track and create the life you want.

30 Min Consult

Katrien Ahiligwo - RN / Certified Life Coach www.chicolifecoach.com 1200 Mangrove Ave. Chico Call Me Today (530) 828-1630 6 

CN&R 

marcH 21, 2019

LETTERS c o n t i n u e d f r o m pa g e 5 Deutsche marks than a teenage soldier could afford or even calculate at that time. Total terror assured it never happened again. If cameras were installed along Highway 99 between Los Molinos and Chico—where mindless imbeciles risk lives daily by passing each other at 100 mph, regardless of weather, while tailgating constantly—there would be plenty of excess revenue available. Then officials could siphon what is necessary to satisfy their demented greed, repair all of the state’s infrastructure, and feed and shelter everyone. Perhaps Americans still are not as practical and innovative as the Germans, even half a century later. Kenneth B. Keith Los Molinos

Cleanup worries With the weather changing and things drying out, it’s time to wonder what the truckloads from Paradise will bring. I saw a picture of an accident on Neal Road, where a truck from the Camp Fire overturned and spilled the load. There on the ground lay concrete, dirt and ash. I thought that all loads leaving Paradise were to be washed, nontoxic. We were told this in public meetings. Knowing that dirt and ash have a high probability of carrying toxic chemicals, I was alarmed. I sent a letter to Butte County supervisors expressing my concerns regarding public safety. I feel when dry, we will see possible toxic clouds everywhere. I talked to the [agency responsible for] debris management and they told me they only monitor using CHP to see if anything falls from the trucks. The Butte County Air Quality Management District told me that air-quality monitors are supposed to be placed along the routes and at the sites receiving materials. This has not been done. We have no idea what our exposure will be once the wind blows. The cement is going to be crushed and reused and I think it is very toxic, too. In all, this is very dangerous to everyone. Zane Libert Palermo

‘Lifesaving reform’ People are waking to the possibility of Medicare for All, a transformative health care reform that would provide quality care to all people,

regardless of wealth, age or employment. Rep. Pramila Jayapal has introduced the Medicare for All Act of 2019, legislation that has come at a time when upward of 70 percent of Americans support expanding this loved and proven program. The movement for Medicare for All is snowballing, and no wonder! Millions of people in America are not receiving health care because they simply can’t afford it. We’ve heard enough stories: delaying a test because of high copays and deductibles; skipping doses because prescriptions are too expensive; or turning to bankruptcy and GoFundMe to deal with outrageous medical bills. People are dying unnecessarily. To realize Medicare for All, health care activists like myself are organizing our communities to build our grassroots movement and persuade legislators to pass this lifesaving reform. Join us! Call your congressional representatives and demand that they co-sponsor the Medicare for All Act. Show up at your local Medicare for All organizing party (medicare4all.org/actions)! Now is the time to act. Do it for the health of yourself, your family, and everybody. Pamela Stowe Chico

American nightmares Remember lying in bed at night knowing there was a monster hiding in the closet, or under your bed? You’d cry out for Mommy and Daddy, and they’d look in the closet, shine a light under the bed, and assure you that it was safe, plug in a nightlight, pat you goodnight, and with a smile say “happy now?”, then close the door. The spiteful child-like president has his own monster: a “caravan” of drug cartels, murderers, rapists and sex traffickers smuggling duct-taped women into America, crossing the border so they can kill Americans in their sleep. Like a child’s fear of the night, the monster is coming so Trump pleads for a nightlight, aka “the wall,” because he told everyone there would be one and it would protect them from the monster. The adults in the room see Trump’s monster as delusional, a waste of money and an affront to American dignity. Meanwhile, the Republicans in Congress have their

own monster and it’s Trump. Their nightlight is capitulation: they’ll cheer his wall; he won’t tweet nasty things about them to his base; they’ll keep their jobs; and they will sleep like children safe from the monster. Happy now? Roger S. Beadle Chico

‘Fascist legislation’ Forget the gender pay gap. Racial pay gap is passé. You’re suffering from the opinion pay gap today. It’s not what you look like, it’s who you like. Thanks to our government and the Israeli lobby, if you don’t like what some regime is doing a world away and choose not to buy their products, you can be docked in pay. Companies are required to sign a pledge promising not to support financial boycotts of Israel in order to be considered for employment. Or they can support a boycott of Israel, but bid at least 20 percent below competitors for the same work. That’s some modern fascist legislation that takes freedom away from Americans that they’ve had for centuries: the ability to choose your associates—it’s literally written in the U.S. Constitution! But no surprise coming from a government actively and conspicuously overthrowing several legitimate (and oil rich) countries around the world, while stopping humanitarian aid to Palestine. Specifically punishing typical American people for their belief in peaceful nonviolent interaction with fascist businesses—Zionist governments and corrupt entities in general—turns those Americans into de facto Palestinians. David Kiefer Chico

Correction Last week’s Greenways (see “Hashtag movement,” by Evan Tuchinsky) incorrectly stated that filmmaker Nirvan Mullick had traveled to Washington, D.C., with Camp Fire survivors who met with lawmakers for a town hall and other meetings related to climate change. The story has been corrected online. —ed. More letters online:

We’ve got too many letters for this space. please go to www.newsreview.com/chico for additional readers’ comments on past cn&r articles.


STREETALK

What’s your current obsession? Asked at Saturday farmers’ market Nia Sullivan

DONATE YOUR CAR Cars For A Cause

helps support Arc’s Family Support Programs for individuals with developmental disabilities and their families when you donate your car. * 100% Tax Dexuctible * We accept Vehicles Running or Not

* Free Vehicle Pickup * We take care of all paperwork and DMV

Make a difference in your community, call TODAY!

Call 343-3666

stylist

A really good TV show called The Good Place. I’m addicted. It’s about what happens in the afterlife. Each episode leaves you on a cliffhanger, so you have to watch the next one.

Patrick O’Connell business appraiser

I play tennis five times a week. I’ve played it for 30 years, since I was a kid. It’s good exercise, and it’s a fun game.

Come join us at our dediCated yoga studio

Stephanie Linderman hospital volunteer

Health. I’m trying to get healthier again by working out and using a better eating plan. I’m trying to do three meals a day: two protein drinks, and a healthy meat and vegetable for dinner.

highest quality yoga in a beautiful space

Tom Wenbourne retired lawyer

Surfing. I surf in San Diego where I live, and in Mexico. I’ve done it since I was a little kid, and after I retired I just got into it again.

rex stromness

tom Hess

cheri neal

Come join us!

lisa Weber

BEST OF CHICO WINNER 2015-2018

yogacenterofchico.com • 342-0100 250 Vallombrosa #150 • next to t-bar MARCH 21, 2019

CN&R

7


NEWSLINES DOWNSTROKE Adventist HeAltH ReveAls CHAnges

In announcing the April 1 opening of a walk-in clinic in Paradise, Adventist Health Feather River also revealed it will suspend its hospital license and affiliate the associated services and facilities with Adventist Health and Rideout in Marysville, effective May 2. According to a press release from Adventist Health’s PR firm last Thursday (March 14), the California Department of Public Health requires a hospital to be open to keep an active license. Paradise’s hospital has been closed since the Camp Fire, Nov. 8 (see “Medical migration,” cover story, March 14). The new clinic will operate weekdays within the existing Feather River Health Center at 5125 Skyway.

dog pACk AttACks

With their owner in court answering complaints of missing registrations and rabies vaccinations for his dogs, nine among a pack of over a dozen attacked at least two people in a Magalia neighborhood, requiring officers from both the Butte County Sheriff’s Office and Butte County Animal Control to respond. Last Thursday morning (March 14), according to a BCSO press release, deputies responded to a call of as many as three victims in the 6400 block of Rosewood Drive. They isolated one neighbor, who’d been seriously injured, so she could be transported by ambulance for hospitalization. A second victim was transported independently and underwent surgery for several major injuries caused by the dogs. The owner, Peter Ricca, and Animal Control officers arrived from court to secure the nine dogs, which the county seized. Ricca, 64, got to keep the four other dogs quarantined at his home.

dA: HendRix ‘suiCide by Cop’

Butte County District Attorney Mike Ramsey declined to press charges against five law enforcement officers involved in the fatal shooting of GD Hendrix, labeling the Nov. 15 incident a “suicide by cop.” Announcing his decision Wednesday (March 20), after an investigation by the county’s critical incident team, Ramsey cleared two Butte County sheriff’s deputies, two Shasta County sheriff’s deputies and a California

Department of Fish and Wildlife warden.

Hendrix (pictured), 48, from Berry Creek, was on parole but had removed his ankle monitor. He also was suspected in a 2014 double homicide. He fled a Yankee Hill store evacuated for the Camp Fire and led deputies on an eight-mile chase. After Hendrix feinted having a gun that turned out to be a small pipe, officers shot him. 8 

CN&R 

MARCH 21, 2019

$4.9 million conundrum Second time around, discussion of shelter-crisis funding just as chaotic

story and photo by

Meredith J. Cooper m er e d i t h c @ n ew srev i ew. c o m


Stephen Terry had hoped to receive HEAP funding to increase shelter space at the Oroville Rescue Mission, but now he says the project will likely fall through.

Crime watch Chico police chief reveals post-Camp Fire statistics

of funding that project (two people abstained from that vote). Attorney Ron Reed, whose Base Camp projects in Oroville run by Caminar were unanimously approved earlier in the meeting ($1,581,432), spoke afterward: “[Behavioral Health] should hear this response. We as a community need to learn from it and correct it.” The rest of the awards are as follows: Ampla Health’s pilot mobile medical unit was funded ($971,716), but at less than was originally requested. Council member Tami Ritter, also a county supervisor, spoke against buying a vehicle for a private entity with no promise that it will stay in the region. The council agreed and added stipulations to the project—that it remain in Butte County for five years and that the hours include some nighttime and weekend shifts. The Community Action Agency of Butte County received a total of $490,535 for two projects. The first is for the Esplanade House, to provide rental subsidies and cover operational costs for 16 families’ apartments a year; the grant period ends in June 2021. The second will pay for case management and landlord mediation for 52 households a year. Chico Housing Action Team was awarded $455,043.58 for operational costs and rental payments to house 10 families with children. The Jesus Center will receive $450,000 toward a 24-hour low-barrier shelter for 100 people—to be bolstered with a portion of $1 million donated by Walmart. And the Torres Community Shelter was added to the funded list—because money was freed up from not funding Behavioral Health—to the tune of $377,268.10, to continue its day center. Five Oroville projects applied for funding, but none were high enough on the list—apparently ranked by the ad hoc committee, though no rank was made public—to be discussed. The Oroville Rescue Mission had requested funding to purchase property for a 24-hour low-barrier shelter. Project We Hope had requested funding for its Haven of Hope on Wheels mobile shower unit as well as a nighttime emergency shelter. “We’re screwed and Oroville gets no low-barrier shelter. That’s where we’re at,” Stephen Terry, of the Oroville Rescue Mission, said. Ω

After the immediate emergency response for

the Camp Fire ebbed, Chico Police Chief Mike O’Brien reached out to the California Police Chiefs Association for advice “on how to mitigate the impacts of such a disaster.” The association’s director was quite frank, O’Brien told the Chico City Council at its Tuesday (March 19) meeting. Her response: “One does not exist, but you guys are going to be the ones to write it.” O’Brien was prefacing a crime statistics report requested by the council, so the city can get a better grasp on impacts since the fire. He compared November 2017 through January 2018 with the same time frame a year later. He acknowledged it was “certainly surprising to me” to see that property crimes have decreased significantly post-Camp Fire. Violent crimes, however, have spiked. He was quick to note that Chico experienced the same trend in the year preceding the Camp Fire—a decrease in property crime and increase in violent crime—and that post-fire spikes aren’t the fault of fire survivors, but rather are a reflection of the city’s estimated population increase of 20,000. Most notably, larceny is down 42 percent and burglary is down 31 percent. When it comes to violent crime, aggravated assault (including domestic violence) increased 19 percent and robbery increased by 26 percent. Perhaps not as surprising, because of

increased traffic, is that the department has seen a “24 percent increase in traffic collisions in that three-month time period,” he said. Councilman Scott Huber originally requested the report so the council could understand pre- and post-Camp Fire impacts related to law enforcement and hear possible short-term solutions due to the city’s population increase. Rather than asking for additional police officers, O’Brien told the council he knew the impending public pension crisis has not disappeared, and alluded that during budget discussions this April the panel will see he has focused on “strategic” alternatives. For example, a gunshot detection and alert system, more surveillance cameras and a license plate recognition system could go a long way. “Technology is one way, I think strategi-

SIFT ER Families on the brink Despite reports of a healthy economy, millions of families are facing economic uncertainty, according to the Prosperity Now Scorecard, a nonprofit data bank based in Washington, D.C. The scorecard ranks state financial vulnerability across policy categories, including housing, health care, education, business and jobs, and financial assets and income. More than 1 in 5 jobs (22.5 percent) are considered low-wage, paying below the poverty threshold for a family of four. And 40 percent of households that experience a loss of income don’t have enough savings to make ends meet at the poverty level for more than two months. Additionally, 13.2 percent of households fell behind on their bills last year—the rate is higher (22.1 percent) for households making less than $30,000. California ranked 18th out of 51 (Washington, D.C. is included). Here are the top financially stable states, by rank.

1. Vermont 2. Hawaii 3. New Hampshire 4. Washington 5. Utah 6. Virginia 7. Massachusetts and Wyoming (tied) 9. Iowa 10. Oregon

Chico Police Chief Mike O’Brien (pictured at a press conference in January) shared a report with the City Council on Tuesday that showed property crimes decreased and violent crimes increased following the Camp Fire. This mirrors a trend within the past year for Chico, however. PHOTO BY ASHIAH SCHARAGA

cally, we can enhance the abilities of our police department and the safety of our community,” he said. “Don’t get me wrong, there is a cost … but there is no pension for technology.” During public comment on the agenda item, downtown restaurateur Will Brady and Golden Valley Bank CEO Mark Francis advocated for a sales tax to fund public safety. “I think, in the right circumstances, a sales tax could go a very long way in an increase in the police department [staffing levels],” said Francis, a member of the Chico Chamber of Commerce board of directors. Others advocated for any additional funding to go toward social work and mental health services, not police. For Nathaniel Perry, the stats show that “it looks like we have more of a perception of a crime wave since the Camp Fire than an actual one,” and that public safety funding should go toward road safety and traffic mitigation. When it comes to a sales tax, the council is investigating the idea. At its April 16 meeting, the panel will provide feedback for consultant EMC Research to develop a survey to gather public input on potential revenue measures. In other council news:

The Jesus Center will be the site of city grant-funded warming and cooling centers for the remainder of this fiscal year and also the 2019-20 operational year, at a cost of $15,000 and $30,000, respectively. A “Code Blue” NEWSLINES C O N T I N U E D MARCH 21, 2019

O N PA G E 1 0

CN&R

9


NEWSLINES

Just Approved!

C o n t i n u e d f R o M pA g e 9

by City of Chico and Butte County to place on Your Property as a secondary unit and/or Move it to Paradise and Live on Your Homesite while you Rebuild!

Why live in a tin can with 2” walls and plastic toilets when you can live in a beautiful little home w ith all t he am enities. Granite countertops *Concrete siding *Full size kitchen Appliances - Washer & Dryer available! More pictures and floor plans at canterburycabins.com Model H ome o n D isplay at 15 Co mmerce Ct , Suit e 100 (off Meyers) Open House every Saturday 10-3 or by Appointment

15 Commerce Ct, Suite 100, Chico, CA

cn&r is Looking for • Distribution manager • aDvertising consuLtant • staff writer Do you love Chico? Do you want to help local businesses succeed? So do we! The Chico News & Review is a family owned business that has been part of the Chico community since 1977. Our mission is to publish great newspapers which are successful and enduring, create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow while respecting personal welfare, and to have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. If you want to make a difference and do something that matters then keep reading.

for more information, visit www.newsreview.com/chico/jobs

530.899.8297

canterburycabins.com 10

CN&R

MARCH 21, 2019

will be triggered when temperatures are below 32 degrees, and a “Code Red” when temperatures reach 100 degrees or higher for two or more days. Executive Director Laura Cootsona told the panel it can accommodate a maximum of 135 people in its dining room. Two staff members will be there at all times, as well as a security guard to manage the gate to the center’s parking lot (the company has not been chosen yet). Animals and personal belongings will be allowed and people “can come in as they are—it is all behavior-based.” Cootsona said the Jesus Center will set up chairs. However, it will provide blankets and mats if needed and “make reasonable accommodations for people to be as comfortable as possible,” with heating and cooling being its No. 1 priority. Later on, just before the panel adjourned to closed session, Councilman Karl Ory appeared incensed to find there was no update regarding an independent review of whether he could participate in discussions regarding Chico Scrap Metal (CSM). Before he was elected, Ory was involved in a referendum effort to move the recycler off East 20th Street due to its nonconforming use with zoning laws. The City Attorney’s Office has maintained Ory has a conflict of interest (see “Legal jeopardy and weed,” Newslines, March 7). Jared told the CN&R later that the independent legal review has “been tabled at this point.” “Our staff has failed to adhere to a vote of the council,” Ory said, adding that the city manager confirmed that the city attorney would like “their law firm [to] manage this process.” He reiterated that it’s important for the public to remember the city has paid $200,000 from CSM litigation. Earlier, during the public comment period for closed session, CSM owner Kim Scott told the panel that nothing has changed in the past 10 years of back-and-forth with the city. CSM will proceed with its lawsuit against the city, or the council can follow the Chapman-Mulberry Neighborhood Plan and help fund CSM’s move. But “you have to compensate us.” —AshiAh schArAgA ash ia h s@ newsr ev iew.c o m

equal OppORTuNITy emplOyeR


David Phillips leads a march of about 20 people downtown on the second anniversary of his son Desmond’s death. Desmond was shot and killed by Chico police during a mental health crisis on St. Patrick’s Day in 2017. PHOTO BY ASHIAH SCHARAGA

A force for change Families of those killed by law enforcement hope use-of-force reform bill will save others When jovial Celtic music spilled out of the doors of

Duffy’s Tavern on Sunday afternoon (March 17), it stood in stark contrast to the grieving procession outside. St. Patrick’s Day is not a holiday for David Phillips. Instead, it will forever be remembered as the day his 25-year-old son, Desmond, was shot and killed by Chico police officers during a mental health crisis. Phillips led the group— which included Desmond’s sister, nieces, nephews and cousins—through the streets of downtown, past pedestrians clad in green and people dining outdoors. He called out his son’s name, and the group echoed in response: “Justice for Desmond Phillips!” Since Desmond’s death, the Phillips family has continued to press policy makers for more crisis-intervention, de-escalation and implicit-bias training for law enforcement. This has been their charge not just for Desmond—who was killed two years ago—but also for others slain during police encounters in Butte County, including Myra Micalizio, Tyler Rushing and Breanne Sharpe. “Every day is hard. But this day … every St. Patrick’s Day, I will be reminded that my son was murdered,” David Phillips told the CN&R. “I just don’t want that to happen to any other family.” Things appear to have reached a tipping point in California, which has the 11th highest rate of police-involved killings in the nation, according to the database Mapping Police Violence. At the state level, advocates for police reform, like the Phillips family, have made progress when it comes to transparency and law enforcement records, via Senate Bill 1421. They’re hopeful that the proposed Assembly Bill 392 will rep-

resent the next step forward, reforming police use-of-force rules. SB 1421, which went into effect Jan. 1, requires the

release of personnel records and audio and video footage related to complaints and investigations of certain conduct, including lethal and nonlethal officer-involved shootings. Currently, the law is being hashed out in the courts, however. Records related to incidents that occurred prior to this year have been kept confidential at many law enforcement agencies. When the CN&R requested personnel records from the Chico Police Department related to officerinvolved shootings and use-of-force incidents since 2017, Commander Jeramie Struthers said the City Attorney’s Office had instructed CPD not to release records prior to Jan. 1. The Butte County Sheriff’s Office confirmed receipt of a similar request, but did not reply by press time. Sheriff Kory Honea told the CN&R that, “as this process unfolds, we’ll get a better understanding of how the law can be applied.” Scott Rushing, whose son, Tyler, was shot and killed by a security guard and a Chico police officer in July 2017, said denying access shirks the intent of the law. He has been attempting to get the disciplinary records of all the officers involved in his son’s death, to no avail. “We want to know about the officers that killed our son,” Rushing said. “It’s absolutely insulting to me that law enforcement would come out and say it only applies to shootings from Jan. 1 forward.” When it comes to AB 392, advocates believe it could

spark real changes in policing, as it would require officers to use alternatives to guns to prevent death

or serious bodily injury, and bar self-defense claims if an “officer’s criminally negligent actions created the necessity for the use of deadly force.” Concerned Citizens for Justice (CCJ), which formed in response to Phillips’ killing and concerns about use-of-force protocols, has followed this piece of legislation closely, says CCJ co-founder Margaret Swick. The bill is “huge” because it “requires de-escalation whenever possible, [and] it makes a requirement of law enforcement officers to avoid deadly force unless ‘necessary.’ “Previously, they’ve been able to say ‘if reasonable,’” she continued. “That’s very subjective.” The law has been criticized by police unions across the state, however. Chico Police Chief Mike O’Brien said he is concerned that AB 392 would create dangerous situations for officers and communities because it creates this “tier of things you need to do before you use force.” “Unfortunately, in some situations, you don’t have the luxury of time, and those seconds are really valuable,” he said. O’Brien said he found the competing Senate Bill 230 to be reasonable and appropriate. It would require law enforcement agencies to create their own use-of-force policies, with de-escalation techniques and other alternatives to force used “when feasible.” It also would create a state-mandated use-offorce training program. For Rushing, current legislation is vague and antiquated, and gives officers too much leeway to act with deadly force. “I think Tyler, he might be alive today if [AB] 392 were already approved,” he said. Phillips shared a similar sentiment: AB 392 could help save other families’ children. A 2016 study published by the Social Science Research Network—a journal dedicated to the dissemination of scholarly research—examined the efficacy of use-offorce policies in over 90 U.S. police departments, finding “substantially fewer policeinvolved killings among departments that have more of these policies in place.” Officers working for those departments also were less likely to be killed or assaulted in the line of duty. The Phillipses and Rushings, and activists with Justice for Desmond Phillips, want to change what they see as inadequate, unchecked policing. Both families have active wrongful death lawsuits against the city of Chico, and Phillips also has filed a federal civil rights lawsuit. Police aren’t afraid of being prosecuted “because all they’ve got to say is, ‘I was afraid,’” Phillips said. “When they start being held accountable, there’s not going to be as many police shootings.” —ASHIAH SCHARAGA ash ia h s@ newsr ev iew.c o m

Your plumbing

Fixed Right, Right Now!

Cesar’s Yard Service

• 10 Years Experience! • Yard Care • Tree Trimming • Gutter Cleaning • Sprinkler Repair

Free eStimate!

530.854.0221

show l❤ ve thrift Mon/Sat Tues Wed Thurs Fri Sun

Buy 1 get 1 free (clothing) 50% off 30% off everything 30% off for seniors & students 50% off 30% off everything

Veterans 20% off open 7 days a week | donations appreciated 1405 Park Ave. Chico, (530) 892-9198 www.facebook.com/ShowLoveThrift MARCH 21, 2019

CN&R

11


HEALTHLINES Aaron Sauberan, principal of Loma Vista, and Cate Szczepanski, executive director of Innovative Preschool, get to greet their students at the new building after spring break.

who already have challenges,” she said, “so we can get to the instructional meat of their day and really tap into their potential.” Loma Vista has provided special education at

Schoolhouse rocks Special services campus gets impactful upgrade story and photo by

Evan Tuchinsky

evantuc hin sk y @ n ewsrev i ew. com

Sdays,roomwillinbecome the building that, in a matter of their new campus, Aaron

tepping inside the transitional kindergarten

Sauberan and Cate Szczepanski couldn’t contain their giddiness. They pointed out features that represent light-year improvements from the facility that their schools serving students with special needs—Loma Vista and Innovative Preschool—have settled in, and for, the past 30 years together. Vertical windows bring in natural light, while ceiling fixtures have dimmer switches to control illumination for children with sensitivity issues. Fabric squares on the wall, at first glance art elements, actually function as sound baffles to limit ambient noise both within the classroom and from the cavernous hallway/multipurpose room beyond the door.

12

CN&R

MARCH 21, 2019

A dedicated bathroom occupies a back corner; up front, a touchscreen monitor lowers to kid-friendly sightlines and armlengths. The transitional kindergarten (TK) room, like every place inside and outside the facility, has ample space for movement. As if to demonstrate, when Szczepanski sat in the lone adult-height chair, Sauberan wheeled her back and forth whimsically—she, arms and legs akimbo, sporting the same childlike grin. Sauberan, Loma Vista’s principal, and Szczepanski, Innovative’s executive director, showed the CN&R around last Thursday (March 14), just ahead of spring break. Construction crews had final touches to complete. Some classrooms, notably the interior interlinked pair for Innovative, remained unfurnished. Movers needed to bring myriad items. Nonetheless, when students return Monday (March 25), this is where they’ll come. It’s just around the corner, adjacent to their old school, but in many regards it’s a whole new world. “The dynamic that I observe is there’s

these quiet one-on-one spaces, collaborative group areas, very intentional for what the purpose of [each] place is for kids, depending on what they’re working on,” Szczepanski said. “That’s overarching for the whole building.” On an intangible level, Sauberan said, “we have been stopping and having staff discussions on what we want to leave behind and what we want to take with us. This gives us a fresh opportunity to look at some of our practices and maybe recognize the ones that were just born out of necessity of having this old building. Maybe they weren’t in the best interest of children necessarily; maybe they were just the best we could do, and now that we have this blank slate, we can critically think about those things.” Bathroom breaks represent a significant example. Transporting and supervising students, plus assisting those with impairments, have demanded coordination and extra staffing. (Almost on cue, as the administrators discussed logistical challenges, Szczepanski’s walkie-talkie relayed a call requesting a restroom supervisor.) Each preschool room, as the TK room, connects to a bathroom. An adult restroom with an accessible shower sits across the hall from the two classrooms for students over 18 learning life- and vocational skills. Adelle Harris, Loma Vista’s TK teacher, said proximity not only to restrooms but also the playground and food service will make a significant impact. “We’re really reducing some of the demands of daily school living on students

the Marigold Avenue site since 1963. Innovative Preschool formed in 1989 and holds a distinct position, physically and operationally, as a private nonprofit school within a public campus. The property also encompasses Marigold Elementary, where construction continues, as both schools received bond funding for upgrades via Measure K (see “Facilities 101,” Cover story, Oct. 20, 2016). Parking and a portion of the new Marigold campus will cover the old Loma Vista footprint. Loma Vista’s facility grew outmoded in the 1970s, Sauberan said, when the federal government passed laws governing special education—notably, the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Education for All Handicapped Children Act two years later. The preschool partnership further accentuated the gap. Innovative runs year-round, 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., for kids ages 2 1/2 to 5 1/2. Loma Vista runs on a standard school schedule, with students as young as 3 and old as 22; firstthrough 12th-graders typically attend classes elsewhere, with extra support from special-ed professionals from the Chico Unified School District, administered by Sauberan and Assistant Principal Jeana Peyton. HEALTHLINES C O N T I N U E D

O N PA G E 1 5

APPOINTMENT

Fine tune your feelings Vital signs need checking, eyes must be tested, and it turns out that all those feelings we have rolling around inside us need attention, too. The Chico Area Recreation and Park District will hold an Emotional Tune-Up Seminar today (March 21), 10 a.m.-3 p.m., for just that purpose. The Lakeside Pavilion will host a diverse mix of professionals and laymen to help nourish your spirit and boost your overall outlook on life with classes on a range of topics, including dealing with the loss of pets, managing stress and feeling gratitude.


march 21, 2019

CN&R

13


survivors*, We are here When you need us r es p e ct i ng yo u r ch oices, empo w e r i n g you and pr ov i d i n g co m p assionat e care

*survivors, significant others & the community

BUSINESS OFFICES HOURS: Monday – Friday (excluding Holiday) 10a-6pm Butte/Glenn: 530-891-1331 or 877-452-9588 @ 2889 Cohasset Road, Suite 2 Chico, CA 95973 Tehama: 530-529-3980 Calling from Corning: 530-824-3980 @ 725 Pine Street, Red Bluff, CA 96080 14

CN&R

march 21, 2019


HEALTHLINES

C o n t i n u e d f R o M pA g e 1 2

Open house:

’s Independent Journalism Fund

able to communicate everything he needed to.” She enrolled her second child, who needed no support, in Innovative as well—and she got her special education credential. This is her sixth year teaching TK at Loma Vista. Harris had seen the exterior of the new building but only photos of the interior last Thursday. She’s held the view that “it’s not just a shiny new box”; echoing the administrators, she expressed excitement about revisiting methodologies. “I really see this as an opportunity to leave behind the reasons why we can’t do things and hold on to what we definitely take with us, the dedication to the profession—and then reach higher,” she said. “So, if the logistics are not reasons … let’s keep going. And, then, what’s next?” Ω

Donate to

Loma Vista will host a grand opening reception tuesday (March 26) at 4 p.m. at the new facility, 1560 Manzanita Ave., neighboring the current campus. Visit lomavista.chicousd.org and innovativepreschool.org for more information about the schools.

Show your support at www.independentjournalismfund.org

Since Loma Vista also houses school psychologists, speech therapists and other districtwide specialists, “this is a central location,” Sauberan said. Families from all schools come for initial assessments. (Therapy provided by California Children’s Services will move to Little Chico Creek Elementary.) The co-location of Loma Vista and Innovative, he continued, “benefits both of us, because they have a place to be, and have their staff and students exposed to kids with special needs, and our kids with special needs have exposure to those typical preschool things happening.” Harris has witnessed this from multiple vantage points. She first visited as a prospective parent whose preschooler didn’t communicate beyond a single sound. A high school teacher who’d taken a leave with the birth of her second child, she “felt it like a whoosh when I first walked into the building that this was a special place, that teachers were working at a high level to meet kids with a variety of needs.” When her first-born finished at Innovative, she said, “he left being

AdvocAtes Needed

WEEKLY DOSE

Become a state certified Long-Term Care Ombudsman and make a difference in the lives of the residents of nursing homes and assisted living facilities. We need people in Oroville, Paradise, Glenn and Tehama Counties. If you have time and wish to make a difference, please call!

530.898.5927

Fight the bite Along with spring beauty comes a dangerous, often unseen threat— ticks, including those known to carry Lyme disease. Symptoms of a tick bite are rarely more than a small red bump, so your best bet is prevention. Ticks live along the border of trails, deep in the brush and leaf litter, so stick to the walkways. This includes Bidwell Park and Lake Oroville Recreation Area, where recent surveillance by the Butte County Mosquito and Vector Control District has found increased populations of the western black-legged tick (aka deer tick). Try to wear long sleeves and pants while hiking; even turn up the dork-meter by tucking those pants into your socks. Fortunately, not all repellents have to be chemical-based. Though DEET and permethrin sprays are proven effective, garlic oil and other essentials like rose-geranium oil and oil of lemon eucalyptus also repel the suckers. And don’t forget the all-important tick check: Find a good friend to help you inspect all of your hidden spots including your scalp, and make sure to examine your pets and kids, too.

! y e n o m u o y saves Yoga Center of Chico $10 Value You pay $5

Gift Ce50offr%tifica te Yo

ga Center of 250 Vallom Chico brosa #150 | 530.342.01 This is a gift certifi cate & does not expire 00 according to CA CC Can be used with other Sec. 1749.45-1749.6. Not discounts & offers . Cannot be used for redeemable for cash. Cash value for this gratuity. Change will certificate is equal be given to the amount paid by the consumer minus as store credit. any amount used.

Buy online anytime with a credit card or in person with cash, check or credit card M-F 9am – 5pm at 353 E. Second Street, Downtown Chico. MARCH 21, 2019

CN&R

15


GREENWAYS

Can’t be tamed Wildlife explorer/ filmmaker brings passion for conservation to life by

Nate Daly

ODeAndrade Puget Sound earlier this month, Filipe was sipping cold brew coffee— n the phone from the Vashon Islands in

“It tastes like I made out with a dragon!”— and preparing to set sail in search of orcas, an animal he had yet to experience in person. He was super excited, which seems to be the normal mode for this globe-trotting conservationist, explorer and filmmaker. After a series of winter storms pummeled the Pacific Northwest, his timing seemed to be perfect. “I hope the weather stays,” he said. “It’s glorious right now. It feels like Mother Nature’s birth channel. It’s where life happens!” As usual, DeAndrade was stoked. He has reason to be: He anchors a web series, Untamed with Filipe DeAndrade, for the Nat Geo WILD network and is traveling the country talking about it on a tour produced by National Geographic, coming to Chico on Wednesday. DeAndrade, 32, was born in a Rio de Janeiro favela, or slum, and recalls camping in the Brazilian rainforest and exploring the Amazon as a young child—memories that shaped his life’s journey. In search of opportunity, his single mother moved the family to Cleveland, where his exposure to the great outdoors was limited to catching frogs in backyards and urban parks. He later attended the University of Florida, where he earned a degree in wildlife ecology and conservation. As a self-described “child of the Jackass generation,” DeAndrade spent time goofing off with his friends, making videos that mimicked the MTV series, but he soon realized that videography could help him share his view of the world in a way that past generations could not—at least not on a student’s budget. Technological advances have put professional-grade equipment within reach for nearly everyone, something that revolutionized DeAndrade’s ability to make films. “Twenty to 30 years ago, you couldn’t grab a quality camera and capture these imag16  

CN&R 

MARCH 21, 2019

es,” he said, referencing Malcolm Gladwell’s book Outliers. Gladwell argues that Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates’ success is partly due to growing up near one of three computer servers then in the country, and also points to a seemingly bizarre prevalence of NHL players with January birthdays (grouped by birth year in youth hockey, the incrementally older kids were larger and stronger, leading to more attention from coaches). He says people of his generation are the “outliers of film,” but for future filmmakers, the world is wide open. On a recent marine wildlife outing near the Costa Rica/Panama border, where he’s currently based, DeAndrade remarked that his students all had cellphones with the ability to shoot high-definition video, despite coming from very low-income families. That kind of access has leveled the playing field—now everyone has a story-making tool in their hand. Almost anyone can film bull sharks or romp through Costa Rica’s ecologically rich Osa Peninsula with a camera. The key, he insists, is telling a good story. That’s where the magic happens. “There’s always going to be another piece of gear,” he noted. “But the things we remember the most are great stories.” His advice for young filmmakers: “Work on your stories. Write as often as you can.”

Event info:

filipe DeAndrade comes to Chico state on Wednesday (March 27), 7:30 p.m., at laxson Auditorium. Visit tinyurl.com/ChicoPerform or call 898-6333 for tickets and more information. to view untamed episodes, visit Nat Geo WilD’s youtube channel (youtube.com/user/ NatGeoWild).

In 2015, DeAndrade parlayed his storytelling

and video experience into the short film Adapt, winning National Geographic’s “Wild to Inspire” competition at the Sun Valley Film Festival. That led to the gig hosting Untamed, where he has been able to pursue experiences such as staking out sea turtles and trekking across land and water to find a mountain lion. He maintains a do-it-yourself ethos and mostly works on a shoestring budget. The series’ upcoming third season will focus on Central American marine ecosystems. In the Vashon Islands, DeAndrade was taking a few days off before flying to Toronto for another round of inspiring talks about his work on Untamed. The cold brew might have been kicking in, but it was obvious he’s exhilarated by the upcoming show dates. “The live tour is my absolute, 100 percent favorite part of what I do. [Nat Geo] Live is a very infectious setting where you get to see the impact of your work immediately,” he told the CN&R. “The kids treat you like rock stars. They’re incredibly passionate about wildlife.” He said young people ask the best questions, frequently stumping him with scientific queries. Fostering the passion within his audience is an important component of his conservation work. National Geographic recently awarded DeAndrade a grant that will pay for environmental education in Costa Rican public schools. The program will bring nature into classrooms and help students develop a love of their unique ecosystem. DeAndrade is understandably stoked to help lay a sustainable groundwork for the future—and it all comes back to personal connections with the wild.

Filipe DeAndrade’s adventures filming the web series  Untamed include close encounters with wildlife, such as this  alligator snapping turtle. PHoto CouRtesy of NAtioNAl GeoGRAPHiC

“People protect what they love. They love what they understand. And they understand what they are taught,” he said. “It’s our job as conservationists to teach people about what we’re experiencing in a way that they’ll fall in love with it and want to protect it.” Ω

ECO EVENT Angry birds Dromaeosaurids were birds the size of small children wielding claws like grapefruits and brains the size of peas, and they share a common ancestor with the birds of today. The term “raptors” refers not only to these Jurassic Park-style beasts, but also any feathered bird with talons. The Chico Creek Nature Center will be digging deep into this relationship on Saturday (March 23), from 10 to 11:30 a.m., with Raptors Reborn! This is must-see material for budding paleontologists and ornithologists who want to learn more about the evolution of feathers and the hunting habits of deadly birds of prey.


march 21, 2019

  CN&R 

17


Rebuilding the Ridge Supporting Local Businesses on the Ridge and Surrounding Communities RE-opEnEd aftER thE camp fiRE CVS

Backyard SolutionS

attic treaSureS mall

1950 East 20th St., Suite B240, Chico (530) 521-3112

7409 Skyway, Paradise (530) 518-7471

6800 Skyway Road, Paradise (530) 876-0186

deSign Build SolutionS

auto Zone auto PartS

Dollar General

410 East Street, Orland (530) 966-6823

7542 Skyway, Paradise (530) 872-4692

6574 Clark Road, Paradise (530) 327-6010

integrity BuilderS

Big o tireS

6627 Clark Road, Paradise (530) 828-9265

5995 Skyway, Paradise (530) 872-1385

Griffin appraiSal SerViCeS

AmericAn Self-StorAge

Black oak training inc.

9100 Skyway. Paradise (530) 872-1219

PO Box 1731, Magalia (530) 624-1562

clark road Storage

BullSeye PlumBing

1117 Noffsinger Lane, Paradise (530) 877-6258

6268 Oliver Road, Paradise (530) 538-9465

Jiffy luBe

c & c roofing

6081 Clark Road, Paradise (530) 413-9081

P.O. Box 337 Paradise (530) 873-0744

ParadiSe alliance church

c&J Service center

6491 Clark Rd, Paradise (530) 877-7069

541 Pearson Rd, Paradise (530) 413-9533

ParadiSe irrigation diStrict

chaSe Bank

2656 Neal Road, Paradise (530) 570-5140 549 Pearson Road, Leg A, Paradise (408) 309-8451

finS, fur & feather SPortS 1520 Bader Mine Road, Paradise (530) 876-8800

american gaS Station

6282 Skyway, Paradise (530) 877-3992

paraDiSe Coin anD GifT 6848 Skyway, #U, Paradise (530) 872-3363

leS SCHwab Tire CenTer

Positive – i Dance & CirCuS CenTer

5605 Almond St, Paradise (530) 228-8228

napa auTo parTS

8935 Skyway, Paradise (530) 327 - 7913

re ConSTruCTion 618 Castle Drive, Paradise (530) 872-8338

reibeS auTo parTS 5990 Clark Road, Paradise (530) 877-6511

7020 Skyway, Paradise (530) 877-6244

5990 Clark Road, Paradise (530) 877-3171

SaVe marT

crafty Sewing Sue SeamStreSS

neeDful THinGS & anTiqueS

Sierra CenTral CreDiT Union (atM only)

8229 Skyway, Paradise (530) 877-1868

814 Roe Road, Paradise (530) 717-9675

american homeS and land

craig deBertS’S auto

8247 Skyway, Paradise (530) 762-7265

niCHolS upHolSTery 897 Buschmann Rd, Paradise (530) 877-2637 • (530) 815-8044

5580 Almond Street, Paradise (530) 413-0041

635 Pearson Road, Paradise (530) 876-1466

animal hoSPital on the ridge

croSSfire tree & vegetation

1509 Wagstaff Road, Paradise (530) 877-3000

paraDiSe bikeS

1122 Elliot Road, Paradise (530) 872-8060

lyonS expreSS lube & oil

coldwell Banker PonderoSa real eState

7368 Skyway, Paradise (530) 877-1135

paraDiSe auTo boDy

5954 Clark Road, Paradise (530) 762 - 0057

yony’S roaSted corn

o’reilly’S auTo parTS

8467 Montna Drive, Paradise (530) 514-4749

liSa family pHarmaCy

6669 Clark Road, Paradise (530) 872-5030

803 Bruce Lane, Chico, CA (530) 514-2001

laSby’S CarpeT CleaninG

6308 Skyway, Paradise (530) 877-2424

6332 Clark Road, Paradise (530) 877-4971 (909) 247-5398

HanDS on DoG TraininG

norTHSTaTe CarpeT CleaninG

3254 Indian Springs Road, Paradise (530) 228-1697

norTHern reCyClinG & waSTe SerViCeS 920 American Way, Paradise (530) 876-3340

6636 Clark Road, Paradise

5175 Skyway, Paradise 800-222-7228

SilVer SCiSSorS peT GroominG 3024 Wild Iris Lane, Paradise (530)877-5046

SimpliSTiC realTy 6400 Skyway, Paradise (530) 872-9000

SPonSoRed by

Check back next week for more businesses and organizations that have re-opened. Listings provided by Paradise Ridge Chamber of Commerce. paradisechamber.com 18

CN&R

march 21, 2019


EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS PHoTo By SHAnnon Rooney

15 MINUTES

THE GOODS

Cacao to craft cocoa

Building an empire

Matt Armstrong’s love for making craft chocolate can be traced to 2010, when he traveled to Panama to visit his brother, who was working with cacao farmers in the Peace Corps. Armstrong had just graduated from Chico State with a degree in communications, and he found his career path after learning from indigenous tribespeople how to make chocolate in their traditional way. Upon returning to California, he and his brother opened a wholesale drinking-chocolate business and cafe in Santa Cruz, which they sold in 2016. After a brief detour to Denver, where he joined forces with a different chocolate maker, Armstrong decided to come home to Butte County—he was born and raised in Paradise—and start his own company, Armstrong Chocolate Co. One thing he’s maintained along the way is a commitment to purchasing top-quality cacao from ethically sound farms. You can find him most Saturdays at his vendor table at the Chico Certified Farmers’ Market, where he sells drinking chocolate as well as bars. He’s happy to chat with customers about anything related to chocolate—he uses a cacao bean, bigger than his hand, to spark conversation—and he often offers samples. Go to armstrongchocolate. com for more info.

You buy cacao beans from places like Costa Rica and Belize. How do you choose?

you can’t be a foreigner with no established connections [and visit the farms].

Some [of the things I consider] include proper management of trees, watering, shade, correct harvesting practices, and especially fermentation, with five to seven days the average.

How do you hope to share what you do with Butte County?

What have you learned from visiting cacao farms? I’ve learned to assess cacao …. Assessment includes aromatics, taste, textures, what it visually looks like, fermentation—when it has a good ferment, it has a very fruity smell. If it’s musky, you know something went wrong. You can’t always know what happened, but you have to know what off-quality looks like.

How do you buy the cacao you use? I work with a broker who visits the [cacao] farms and does an evaluation. Working with a broker is critical. It’s not unusual for an armed person to be with the cacao. In some countries,

I like to teach chocolate classes, talk about chocolate, and share with youth the importance of travel. That one trip [to Panama] changed me in the direction of chocolate. I’m available to visit classrooms and talk about chocolate in relationship to topics like chemistry, history and more. I’d also like to team up with some restaurants.

What’s the status of craft chocolate right now? Craft chocolate is where craft beer was about 10 years ago. Before, you couldn’t get machinery that was scaled down. A person in Washington state started making things like a winnower, refiners and grinders. He just started experimenting, asking, “What can I build to make chocolate in my home?” —SHANNoN RooNEY

oney! m u o y TE saves ERTIFICA

15th Street Cafe

$10 Value You pay $5

GIFT C 50% off

by

Meredith J. Cooper meredithc@newsreview.com

In early November, I got word that local health-coach-turned-food-guru Amy Lacey had taken a career leap—she’d parlayed her business, Cali’Flour Foods, into a brick-and-mortar cafe, Cali’Concept Kitchen. Her grand opening was planned for Nov. 13; then the Camp Fire hit and everybody’s plans changed. The news of Cali’Concept Kitchen’s opening inside New Earth Market—it took the space previously occupied by Rolling Stone Pizza—got lost amid the brain fog that followed Nov. 8. Then, with the new year came a package in my mailbox: It was Lacey’s cookbook, Cali’Flour Kitchen, filled with recipes for and using cauliflower pizza crust, pasta and rice. Last week, I finally made it over to Cali’Concept and got to chat with Lacey and her cafe manager, Lora Adams, both of whom were bubbly and enthusiastic about the business, which has taken off over the past year as the vegetable has gained popularity. “There are 35 cauliflower products on the market,” Lacey said. “When we first launched this product way back in 2016, there wasn’t even cauliflower rice. It’s been crazy.” Lacey got into the health field after being diagnosed with lupus, an autoimmune disease. She discovered cauliflower, a natural anti-inflammatory, happens to make a great pizza crust, minus the gluten and sugar that trigger her lupus. A business was born. After buying out her partner in 2017, Lacey said, she switched up nearly everything, from her crust recipe—she now offers several options, such as spicy jalapeño and dairy-free—to her assembly process, which now utilizes the stems in addition to the flowers. She moved her operations from Chico to Salinas because she’d outgrown her facility here—and it brought her closer to the cauliflower fields. She even added products, including crackers and pasta. Now, Cali’Flour Foods is in stores across the United States. But Lacey holds a special place in her heart for New Earth, the first. “We weren’t a proven concept and there was nothing else out on the market,” Lacey said. “They took a total chance on us. And we get to do this now, so my loyalty to them is huge.” Rolling Stone Pizza gave her a shot, too, serving her crusts and inspiring her topping combinations. She and Adams insisted I try a few, including the delicious Popeye’s Cadillac (spinach, chicken, tomatoes, mozzarella and feta). I look forward to trying out recipes in Lacey’s book, too. She tells me she’s been tapped to write a second and her next product line likely will be frozen dinners. So, stay tuned! The cafe is open daily and also hosts classes. Go to califlourfoods.com or cali conceptkitchen.com for more info.

Tool TiMe Chico is once again home to a True Value Hardware, which opened earlier this month in the SaveMart shopping center off East Avenue. In addition to all the traditional True Value inventory, it’s also the new home of Holiday Pools & Spas, which opened in 1958(!) and relocated from East and Cohasset.

on sale until end of july PiNot Noir

CABErNEt SAuViGNoN

Bud Light 8/12/18•Bottles/Cans Reg $9.99 - $15.99 SALE $7.99 - $12.99

10

Modelo 12/18 • Bottles/Cans Reg $16.99 - $22.99 SALE $13.99 - $18.99

809.1087 FE REET CA ITE 120 | 530. .45-1749.6. Not redeemable for cash. 15TH ST 1749 SU Code Sections store credit. RK AVE California Civil Change will be given as 1414 PA and does not expire accordingt betoused for gratuity. . Canno certificate unts and offers This is a gift with other disco Can be used

Buy online anytime with a credit card or in person with cash, check or credit card M-F 9am – 5pm at 353 E. Second Street, Downtown Chico.

Belle Glos Napa Cellars Reg $57.99 Reg $54.99 SALE $45.99 SALE $43.99

Humboldt St. Supery Napa Valley Quilt Distillery Vodka Reg $22.99 Reg $41.99 Reg $45.99 SALE $15.99 SALE $32.99 SALE $35.99

Largest Selection of Wine Around over 1,000 Wines Available Huge selection of Beer & Spirits, too!

Wild turkey Longbranch Reg $39.99 SALE $31.99

Knob Creek Reg $36.99 SALE $26.99

958 east avenue (Next to Donut Nook) 530.592.3171• Open Daily 8am–10pm MARCH 21, 2019

CN&R

19


lockup limbo

Policy failures, shortage of psychiatric beds transform California jails and prisons into de facto mental institutions BY JOCELYN WIENER

J

effrey Jurgens stood in a cage in an orange jumpsuit, screaming that he was Jesus Christ. From her seat in the Sacramento courtroom, his mother watched through tears. Joanna Jurgens knew how important it was for the district attorney prosecuting Jeffrey for stealing a car—and the judge deciding his fate—to see the extent of her son’s illness. But it was torture to watch. For years, she had begged judges to steer Jeffrey, who has schizoaffective disorder, into long-term treatment. She worried he would get hurt. She feared he could hurt someone else.

20

CN&R

MARCH 21, 2019

Joanna, 56, knew Jeffrey, who was 22 at the time of that 2014 hearing, did not belong behind bars. But after struggling to stabilize him through treatment in the community, she’d become convinced the criminal justice system was her last hope. These days, the main path to treatment at a state psychiatric hospital is through jail. However controversial those state hospitals may be, many families conclude they are the best option for their loved ones. “That is a sad state of affairs in our society; that only when you get locked up does it become a priority to get you treatment,” said Los Angeles District Attorney Jackie Lacey, who said she’s heard many parents describe similar feelings of desperation. Perhaps nowhere is California’s mental health crisis more evident than in its criminal justice system. After decades of failure to create and fund policies that effectively help people with serious mental illnesses, many now say the jails and prisons have become the state’s default mental institutions. Close to a third of California’s inmates have a documented serious mental illness, according to the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation. “We’re going to end up with an incarceration system that’s mainly dealing with people that have serious mental health problems,” said Democratic Sen. Jim Beall of San Jose. “It’s our own fault, in a way, for not having a good mental health system.”


Joanna Jurgens reflects on her son Jeffrey, who has struggled with mental illness and is now living at Atascadero State Hospital after stealing a car. PHOTO BY RANDY PENCH FOR CALMATTERS

that solutions to the crisis must be found elsewhere. The broader issue is that society is “letting people get so sick” that they end up in jails and emergency rooms, Lowe said. Jennifer Mathis, director of policy and legal advocacy

get away with it,” he said. “People would be incarcerated for mental health treatment at a state hospital for a longer who were deemed incompetent to stand trial after arrest— time than they would serve if they simply pled guilty.” and ordered sent to state hospitals for treatment—increased One major reason for the growing wait-list is that, while by 60 percent, state figures show. Judges make such referthe number of state hospital beds has increased, it has not rals when doctors determine that defendants are unable to kept pace with the need. State hospitals now have more than understand legal proceedings or cooperate with their attor6,200 beds—a significant portion of which are reserved for neys—the goal generally being that they get stabilized and other needs. In recent years the state has added about 700 then return to stand trial. hospital and “jail-based competency restoration” beds. Often this leaves people who need mental health treatA few decades ago, fewer than half of state hospital ment stuck in county jails. Inmates in Jeffrey’s condition patients came from the criminal justice system. Today, can wait in limbo for months, or even years, before being more than 90 percent of them do—with more than a fifth of sent to a state hospital. those individuals found incompetent to stand trial. The next Five years ago, an average of 343 inmates with mental largest group were tried and found not guilty by reason of illness were awaiting placement. Last year, that number insanity. shot up to 819. “We have hundreds of The increasing number of people sitting in our (compeople incompetent to stand trial munity) hospitals right now may also reflect changing attitudes who could benefit from a among public defenders, who now long-term stay at a state hossee questioning someone’s compepital, but we can’t get them in tency as an avenue to a more therathere,” said Sheree Lowe, vice peutic environment, said David president of behavioral health Meyer, professor with the USC for the California Hospital Institute of Psychiatry, Law, and Association. Behavioral Science. Forty years That said, many experts ago, “we would never, ever refer believe state hospital stays are somebody for incompetency pro–Los Angeles District Attorney Jackie Lacey so restrictive and expensive ceedings if we could in any way In the past five years, the number of people in California

“That is a sad state of affairs in our society; that only when you get locked up does it become a priority to get you treatment.”

at the Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law, describes state hospitals as “kind of like living in prison.” “It’s not really a life on a long-term basis,” she said, but added that many families have gone so long without good community mental health services for their loved ones that they see no other real option. State data show that 47 percent of the inmates who were found incompetent to stand trial last year had no Medi-Cal mental health services during the six months before they landed in jail. Almost half were unsheltered; in many cases, the charges they faced were directly related to their homelessness and untreated psychosis, according to the Department of State Hospitals. It was not that the system didn’t know them, though. At Napa State Hospital, state data show, nearly half of the people who were incompetent to stand trial had been arrested 15 or more times before they were deemed incompetent. Joanna Jurgens’ memories of Jeffrey’s childhood— soccer games and fishing trips and visits to the snow— have been obscured by the shadow of his illness. As a little boy, he acted out so much it was hard to keep him in preschool. By middle school, she was receiving daily calls from the principal’s office. Freshman year in high school, he started getting into fights and brought a knife to school. Unable to control his behavior, Joanna—who operates a clinic for UC Davis Medical Center—and her ex-husband prevailed upon the school district to send their son to a locked residential program in Utah. The structure appeared to help. But after nine months, she said, he returned home and the same behaviors resurfaced. That Thanksgiving, when Jeffrey was 17, his mother drove him to his grandmother’s house in Tahoe. He couldn’t stop obsessing about a white car he thought was trailing them, which he insisted carried either government agents or the CIA. Joanna took him to psychiatrist after psychiatrist. They put him on mood stabilizers and, eventually, antipsychotics. He continued to spiral. Marijuana made the symptoms worse. He stole Joanna’s car again and again. Then, at 19, Jeffrey stole a friend’s parents’ car. They pressed charges. “He needs help and I don’t know what to do,” Joanna remembers telling an El Dorado County judge around 2010. “We’re waiting for a disaster to happen.” The judge was sympathetic, but told Joanna his hands were tied. He sent Jeffrey to jail for 90 days. After he got out, Jeffrey was on and off the streets, lost in a haze of street drugs and psychosis. LOCKUP C O N T I N U E D

MARCH 21, 2019

O N PA G E 2 2

CN&R

21


LOCKUP C O N T I N U E D

F R O M PA G E 2 1

Over and over, he’d land in psychiatric hospitals. But each time he’d stabilize after a few weeks and his insurance provider would insist he be discharged, Joanna said. Joanna was certain her son needed longer-term inpatient treatment. She begged doctors to put him under a conservatorship, allowing a legal guardian to make decisions on his behalf. A doctor who saw him at Sierra Vista Hospital in Sacramento agreed with her, Joanna said. Jeffrey spent six weeks there while the doctor pushed for him to be conserved. The county refused—Joanna remembers being told that Jeffrey needed to fail out of community treatment once more to be eligible. Michelle Lazark, who at the time worked

on the Sacramento Police Department’s mobile crisis unit, remembered the first time she came upon the disheveledlooking young man wearing tattered clothes and no shoes. “Are you a new guy?” she asked. Jeffrey told her his name. Lazark asked if she could call his mom. “Oh my God,” Joanna said after she picked up the phone. “Where did you find him?” Over the years, Lazark often would help Joanna search for Jeffrey. Sometimes he was relatively lucid, and she’d share her sandwich with him and chat. Other times she took him to the hospital. If he was self-medicating with meth, she’d take him to jail for a few hours to sober up. “You want to protect them and you want to take them to a safe place where they can detox,” Lazark said. “If that was jail, then that’s what I would do every time. It’s not criminalizing it; it’s keeping them safe.” But not all interactions with law enforcement went well. In 2012, two CHP officers saw Jeffrey driving a stolen car the wrong way down a one-way street in Sacramento. After a high-speed chase, he came to a stop. A lawsuit filed by the family in federal court said that, although Jeffrey was unarmed and had raised his hands, officers began kicking and beating him with their batons—leaving him with a broken hand and a traumatic brain injury—and then high-fived each other. After an in-car camera video of the incident came out, the district attorney dropped charges against Jeffrey. Last spring, Jeffrey received a million-dollar settlement. The officers involved all remain employed by the CHP. The day he was discharged from jail, Jeffrey disappeared back into homelessness, said his attorney, Beau Weiner. Months later, on Dec. 5, 2013, he stole

22

CN&R

MARCH 21, 2019

a car from valet parking in downtown Sacramento and was peacefully apprehended. Twice a week, his mother visited him in jail. “I see you in here a lot,” she remembers a security officer telling her one day. “I visit my son,” she said. “He probably doesn’t deserve it,” the officer said. Joanna Jurgens looked at him sadly. Why bother trying to explain? “You don’t know the whole situation,” she said. Because their mental illness leaves them so vulnerable, inmates in that condition are often kept in solitary confinement for their own protection. But extended stays in solitary exacerbate their mental illnesses, too. “You put a bird in a cage, you got to let him out sometime, or he’ll die,” said Samuel Mays, whose adult son, Lorenzo, has been in Sacramento County Jail for eight years waiting to be declared competent. Lorenzo, who has cognitive delays as well as mental illness, is the lead plaintiff in a class action complaint being brought by Disability Rights California against Sacramento County. The complaint cites overcrowding, understaffing and “dangerous, inhumane and degrading conditions,” including use of extended solitary confinement on inmates with serious mental illness. “He’s suffering,” Samuel said of his son. “You can only take so much of that.” Douglas Clark, who landed in jail on an attempted burglary charge in 2009, picked

up a new charge in prison after throwing feces at a correctional officer. Clark, who has schizophrenia and hears spirits talking to him, was found incompetent to stand trial, said his mother, Tammy Clark. He was sent to regain competency at the state hospital. He returned to jail to be tried, she said, but went off his medication, or had it changed, and then became mentally unstable again. That cycle keeps repeating, she said. She tries not to seem upset when she talks to him—she wants to be “a light” in his dark world. But sometimes he can tell she’s been crying. “It’s so disheartening,” she said.

Mental illness behind bars Active mental health cases

Inmates receiving psychiatric medication

Inmates assigned to mental health beds 0 2%

4%

6%

8%

10%

12% 14% 16% 18%

20% 22% 24%

On the last day of 2016, more than 17,000 inmates were identified as “active mental health cases” among reporting jails in California.

Michelle Lazark, a Sacramento police officer who works in the Mental Health Unit, put Jeffrey Jurgens back in touch with his mother. PHOTO BY RANDY PENCH FOR CALMATTERS

Even as the population of inmates with

mental illness burgeons, some advocates see the beginning signs of hope. Sen. Beall, who himself has a family member with schizoaffective disorder, said the administrations of former governors Arnold Schwarzenegger and Jerry Brown rebuffed policy proposals meant to make comprehensive mental health services available in the community. But last year, Brown signed a provision to allow courts to divert certain offenders with mental illness into community-based inpatient or outpatient treatment programs, and another to reduce the maximum wait time for an inmate to become competent to stand trial—from three years to two. In January, Gov. Gavin Newsom proposed a state budget that includes tens of millions of dollars for mental health programs, including training law enforcement officers on crisis de-escalation. The budget also would provide one-time grants to treat young people experiencing early psychosis and $100 million for “whole person care” programs that seek to address the housing, health, mental health and substance abuse needs of people experiencing homelessness. Judge Stephen Manley started one of the nation’s first mental health courts in Santa Clara County more than 20 years ago. In these courts, public defenders, prosecutors, judges and social service providers work together to connect people with mental illness who have been arrested for certain crimes with services and treatment, with a goal of keeping them out of jail.


About this article:

This story is the first of a series exploring the challenges

being behind bars. That “Everyone wants to tell Californians face in the pursuit of mental health care. setting of being in a cell, me, ‘It’s so complex, we Jocelyn Wiener is a contributing writer to CALmatters. This story was supported by a grant from the California with loud noises, is not an can’t solve it.’” Manley Health Care Foundation. Read more at calmatters.org opportune manner in which said. “And I say, ‘No, you to address serious mental can. Get together and figillness.” ure out what you can do.’” For now, though, such courts still only serve Over the years, the model has expanded to a fraction of the ballooning need. Sex offenders, counties around California. arson registrants, active gang members, those On a recent afternoon in Department 8 in who have caused great bodily injury or death, and the downtown Sacramento courthouse, Judge those arrested for driving under the influence are Lawrence Brown called up the mental health court among those who are typically excluded. And participants one by one. He complimented a wommany such courts aren’t designed to serve those an’s red hat, another man’s poncho. He ribbed who are incompetent to stand trial. those who had a lot of hair, contrasting it with his own balding pate. Standing alongside their public defenders, Jeffrey Jurgens doesn’t remember much about the some participants beamed as he lauded their progmonths he waited in jail to get a bed at Atascadero ress staying on medications and off drugs, getState Hospital—one of the five state hospitals that ting jobs and doing their dishes. Others squirmed house people with serious mental illness. Reached uncomfortably in the spotlight. One woman’s over the phone there, Jurgens, now 27, said at first voice cracked as she described her troubled relathat being in jail “doesn’t feel too good.” tionship with her mother. After his mother prompted him, he recalled “The fact that you’re taking all of these steps being periodically locked in solitary confineto take care of yourself, we’re behind you a thoument at the Sacramento County Jail after he was sand percent,” the judge told her. arrested in December 2013, alone with the voices, Brown, who has run the county’s mental health emerging—in her memory—for just an hour court since 2013 and has helped it to expand, every couple of days. says he’s been drawn to the work because of the “It was a bummer,” he said quietly. “I was “humanity of it all.” going a little stir crazy. I didn’t know what to do, “Keeping them in jail once they’re back on what to think. Nobody would help me while I was their medication is not a very compassionate there. They just pushed me off because I wasn’t approach,” he said. “They’re living a nightmare like everyone else.” His mother figures it’s good he doesn’t remember more. Because she does. Jeffrey Jurgens at Atascadero State Hospital a couple of years ago, She remembers the day he called her, pansurrounded by his parents. PHOTO COURTESY OF JOANNA JURGENS icked, after his heavyset new cellmate kept trying to give him bear hugs. She remembers him whispering into the phone: “I’m really scared.” With Lazark’s help, she got him moved. Joanna also remembers the night Jeffrey called her, agitated and delusional. She was so terrified of what he might do to himself or someone else that she raced to the jail and refused to leave until she spoke to a sergeant. After Jeffrey was arrested for stealing the car from the valet, weeks passed before he appeared before a judge, screaming that he was Jesus. In February 2014, he was admitted to a state hospital. At the end of August, after six months of receiving treatment and preparing for a court appearance, he was found competent enough to have a trial. Months later, in May 2015, he was found not guilty by reason of insanity. He returned to Atascadero State Hospital that June. Someday he hopes he’ll be well enough to get out, so he can spend time with his family and get a job at a grocery store. Joanna wishes her son had received intensive treatment earlier. It troubles her to think about all the other inmates like him, stuck behind bars with no one to speak up for them. “You’ve got to fight,” she said. “If somebody doesn’t have someone to advocate for them, they don’t stand a chance. They don’t stand a chance.” Ω

POETRY

99

On stands March 28

POETRY 99 READING And the re-scheduled

FICTION 59 READING Friday, March 29, 6:30 p.m. The Bookstore (118 Main St.)

SPONSORS

MARCH 21, 2019

CN&R

23


Arts &Culture

Fire rAiN

Alan Rigg and Maggie. PHoTo bY MEloDY STEPHENS

THIS WEEK

a n d

21

THU

A musical life interrupted by disaster, twice

Islammed visiting Chico when Hurricane Katrina into the Gulf Coast and he n the summer of 2005, Alan Rigg was

learned that his New Orleans home had been destroyed and that his vacation would become a permanent one. “I didn’t have anything to go back to,” he said. “So, I settled here.” by A lifelong musiJason Cassidy cian, Rigg has spent j aso nc@ the years since estabnewsrev i ew.c om lishing himself as a respected local player Preview: and bandleader and Alan Rigg band putting down roots in performs Friday, this area, moving first March 22, 8 p.m. to Stirling City and then Cost: $7 settling into a small Unwined Kitchen home in a mobile home & Bar park among the pines in 980 Mangrove Ave. Paradise. 809-2634 On Nov. 8, Rigg unwinedchico.com was still asleep when the phone rang. “My best friend called me at about 8 o’clock in the morning and told me to get the hell out of there,” he said. Rigg had fortuitously left a few heavy items in his car the night before—a keyboard and two amplifiers—and on the way out was able to grab only a couple of guitars and his Australian shepherd, Maggie. Outside, there were spot fires all over the property and a three-story house behind his park was already consumed. And then there was the traffic jam. “I got about 100 yards out of the trailer park, and I was immediately trapped

24

CN&R

MARCH 21, 2019

for three hours. … It just kept going on. It was so dark, and so smoky and hot. It’s just hard to describe.” He escaped, but once again lost nearly everything to a disaster. With his home gone, he’s also had to leave the area and its music scene in order to find a place to live—first in a donated apartment on the Mendocino coast and now at a friend’s almond ranch north of Chico. But he does have new fifth-wheel trailer—thanks to a GoFundMe campaign started by friends that raised $12,000—and a plan to return to Paradise as soon as he’s able. For his part, Rigg is trying to keep a positive outlook. “My life has been an incredible roller-coaster ride! Tragedy can bring miracles,” he said. “Coming to California would never have happened without Katrina. Who knows what the next incarnation will be.” Rigg has been playing music for more than 50 years. He was born in Kentucky and grew up in Indiana, where at age 14 he joined his first band, a regionally popular garage-rock outfit called The Weejuns. He moved around, touring the South with succession of groups—Cold Sweat, C.C. Express and a professional backup band called the Memphis AllStars, which would provide musical accompaniment for touring performers— everyone from Little Anthony to Chuck Berry. In 1995, fulfilling a lifelong dream, he moved to music-rich New Orleans. A couple of fellow performers he met while playing on the streets of that city actually

Special Events AN EMOTIONAL TUNE-UP SEMINAR: An afternoon of breakout work-

lured him out West. Michael Borland (aka Zack Dragon) and Pablo Diablo—of one-time Butte County Cajun-rock crew the Double Zero Band—invited their friend to Butte County to join them in the scene. Once fate stranded him here, Rigg got right to work. He formed the Alan Rigg Trio—with him singing and playing keyboard and guitar—and began performing jazz whenever he could. As he established himself and started meeting other local musicians, the trio eventually grew into the Alan Rigg Band, featuring a large rotating crew of local ringers that includes the likes of sax players Don Bowman and Eric Weber, vocalist Jane Perry, drummers John Hale and David Breed, percussionist Jerry Morano, bassist Jack Lemley, plus other guests. The expanded cast has beefed up the jazzy sound, bringing in elements of Zydeco, rock, funk and R&B to the band’s repertoire of covers and originals and making them regulars at restaurants, clubs and community events all over Butte County. On Friday (March 22), his Alan Rigg Band will make its first public appearance since the fire, bringing its New Orleans-influenced sound to a Mardi Gras-themed celebration (and birthday party for the bandleader, who turns 67) at Unwined Kitchen & Bar. Rigg is looking forward to the musical reunion and eager to rejoin his community. “I love my band, and I miss my people tremendously,” Rigg said. “They’re like family to me.” Ω

shops devoted to emotional well-being and enhancing your  overall outlook. Professionals and laymen will share experiences  and information through discussions and demonstrations to  benefit attendees regardless of current emotional state of  mind.  Thu, 3/21, 10:30am. Lakeside Pavilion, 2565 California Park  Drive. chicorec.com 

BIKE NIGHT: Bike night kick-off party with DJ Ron, food, beer, raffle  and burn-out contest for chance to win a new tire gift certificate.  Thu, 3/21, 6:30pm. Sierra Steel Harley-Davidson, 1501  Mangrove Ave. sierrasteelhd.com 

CUISINES OF ITALY UMBRIA REGIONAL DINNER: “The Green Heart of Italy”  is the inspiration for a carefully curated dinner menu at Grana  featuring braised rabbit, chicken, or seasonal whitefish stew.  Call for reservations.  Thu, 3/21, 5pm. Grana, 198 E. Second St.

FIBER ARTS NIGHT OUT: Bring your own knitting, crocheting, hand  sewing, cross-stitch, embroidery, or other fiber project and  work on it in the company of other hand-crafters.  Thu, 3/21, 4pm. Butte County Library, 1108 Sherman Ave.

WORLD DOWN SYNDROME DAY ICE CREAM SOCIAL: Social gathering for  children to play and explore and a chance families to connect.  Free ice cream sundaes, bounce house, parachute play and  sensory station.  Thu, 3/21, 5:30pm. Arc Pavilion, 2040 Park Ave.  nvcf.org 

KITE DAY

Sunday, March 24 Community Park SEE SUNDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS


FINE ARTS ON NEXT PAGE

STEVE POLTZ Friday, March 22 Chico Women’s Club SEE FRIDAY, MUSIC

Music

IDENTIFYING LICHENS TO GENUS: One-day workshop led by Tom Carlberg, veteran cryptogamic botanist and president of the California Lichen Society. For more information contact 898-5356 or sscholten@ csuchico.edu. Sat 3/23, 9am. $50-$130. Friends of the Chico State Herbarium, Holt Hall, Room 129, Chico State. friendsofthechi costateherbarium.com

CHICO WOMEN IN CONCERT: A huge celebration of women artists featuring an eclectic mix of solo and group performances by a variety of locals playing just about every style including folk, Celtic, country, pop, rock, jazz and blues. This event raises funds for programs that support local women and children and sells out almost every year. Tickets at Music Connection, Signs & Graphic Design, and online at eventbrite.com. Thu, 3/21, 6:30pm. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St. chicowomensclub.org

NOR CAL ROLLER GIRLS: First home match this season against Floodwater Roller Derby. All ages, trivia, beer garden and raffle donating 50 percent of proceeds to Catalyst Domestic Violence Services. Sat 3/23, 7pm. $6-$12 (kids 6 and under are free). Cal Skate/ Funland, 2465 Carmichael Drive. 518-8453.

Theater THE ALMOND ORCHARD: Local adaptation of

RAPTORS REBORN!: Learn about the relationship

Chekhov’s The Cherry Orchard. The play, written and directed by Joyce Henderson, examines the reluctant acceptance of change. Thu, 3/21, 7:30pm. $15. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. blueroomtheatre.com

between birds and dinosaurs, the evolution of feathers, and the many adaptations that make birds of prey some of the most deadly hunters alive today. Sat 3/23, 10am. Chico Creek Nature Center, 1968 E. Eighth St. ccna turecenter.org

ANNE OF GREEN GABLES: Take the kids to see a classic during spring break. This adaptation is specifically designed for families and young children and comes with options for theater fun before and after the performance. Tuesday-Friday at 10am, Saturday at 7pm. Thu, 3/21, 10am. $5-$10. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St. chicowomensclub.org

22

FRI

Special Events BEER BY WOMEN II: Celebrate Women’s history month with beers from women-owned breweries, made by women, with recipes created by women brewers. Fri, 3/22, 12pm. The Chico Taproom, 2201 Pillsbury Road, Ste. 114. thechicotaproom.com

CUISINES OF ITALY UMBRIA REGIONAL DINNER: See Thursday. Fri, 3/22, 5pm. Grana, 198 E. Second St.

DROP-IN OPIOID OVERDOSE RESPONSE TRAININGS: Every Friday in March stop in to

RECLAIM OLD HUMBOLDT WAGON ROAD: Monthly

Music

Theater

NORTH STATE SYMPHONY POPS! TRIBUTE TO ARTHUR FIEDLER: The symphony celebrates the joy

THE ALMOND ORCHARD: See Thursday. Fri, 3/22, 7:30pm. $15 Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First

of the Boston Pops with a mix of light classics and popular hits of Arthur Fiedler and Sousa, plus classic film scores, the best of Broadway and more. Fri, 3/22, 7:30pm. $21$40. Laxson Auditorium, Chico State. 898-6333. northstatesymphony.org

ANNE OF GREEN GABLES: See Thursday. Fri, 3/22, 10am. $5-$10. Chico Women›s Club, 592 E.

STEVE POLTZ: KZFR presents Canadian singersongwriter and guitarist and founding member of indie-rock band The Rugburns. Poltz is known for good old-fashioned singalong shows with simple melodies and satirical lyrics. Daniel Rodriguez of Elephant Revival opens. Tickets available at Chico Paper Co., Blaze N’ J’s and the KZFR office. Fri, 3/22, 6:30pm. $20-$25. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St. 895-0706. kzfr.org

STEVE JOHNSON: Veteran musician plays light rock and folk classics from the 1960s and 1970s. Fri, 3/22, 4pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St. lasalleschico.com

see a North Valley Harm Reduction Coalition volunteer for a 10-minute training. Fri, 3/22, 10:30am. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave. PHOTO BY KEN PORDES

St. blueroomtheatre.com

Third St. chicowomensclub.org

NUNSENSE: Chico Theater Company brings back this zany musical about the misadventures of five nuns trying to manage a fundraiser by putting on a talent show in a high school gym. Fri, 3/22, 7:30pm. $16-$22. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. chicotheatercompany.com

cleanup hosted by Respect the Walls. Long pants and closed-toed shoes are a must. Bring snacks and water, equipment will be provided. Sat 3/23, 8am. Old Humboldt Wagon Road.

SUCCULENT SALE: Buy some plants, drink some beer. Sat 3/23, 12pm. The Commons Social Empourium, 2412 Park Ave. thecommon schico.com

Snacks for sale and silent auction. Sat, 3/23, 7pm. $20-$30. Trinity United Methodist Church, 285 E. Fifth St. 518-9992. chicohous ingactionteam.org

THE BIDWELLS: Local Chico couple sings songs from the heart for Sunday brunch. Sat, 3/23, 11am. La Salles, 229 Broadway St. ELI YOUNG BAND: Rebel country band with Texas roots, joined by country-soul crooner Willie Jones. Tickets available at Diamond W Western Wear, Blaze N’ J’s Smoke Shop and Fusion Pit. Sat, 3/23, 9pm. $25. Senator Theatre, 517 Main St. senatortheatrechico. com

WHITEY JOHNSON BAND: Norton Buffalo Hall West presents two-time Grammy winner Gary Nicholson playing Southern blues with his famous Whitey Johnson Band. Sat, 3/23, 7pm. $20. Chico Guild Hall, 2775 Nord Ave. 762-1490. chicoguildhall.org

Theater THE ALMOND ORCHARD: See Thursday. Sat, 3/23, 7:30pm. $15-$0. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. blueroomtheatre.com

ANNE OF GREEN GABLES: See Thursday. Sat, 3/23, 7pm. $5-$10. Chico Women›s Club, 592 E. Third St. chicowomensclub.org

NUNSENSE: See Friday. Sat, 3/23, 7:30pm. $16$22. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. chicotheatercompany.com

Music ARETHA VAN MORRISON: Funky fundraiser for the Chico Housing Action Team. Local singers join the Living Karaoke Band for covers of the hits of Aretha Franklin and Van Morrison.

23

SAT

THIS WEEK CONTINUED ON PAGE 26

EDITOR’S PICK

Special Events BEER BY WOMEN II: See Friday. Sat 3/23, 12pm. The Chico Taproom, 2201 Pillsbury Rd Suite 114. thechicotaproom.com

CHICO WOMEN IN CONCERT Tonight, March 21 Chico Women’s Club SEE THURSDAY, MUSIC

CAMP FIRE COMIC RELIEF: Healing with humor— the Paradise Alliance Church presents a free comedy show along with a free meal for those who could use a good laugh. Food trucks at 4:30pm, show at 6pm. Must be 10 or older. Reserve tickets at campfirecomicre lief.eventbrite.com Sat 3/23, 6pm. Paradise Alliance Church, 6491 Clark Road, Paradise.

CHRIS D’ELIA: Comedian, actor, writer and podcast host with a huge social media following comes to the casino for a stop on his Follow the Leader tour. Sat 3/23, 8pm. $35-$90. Gold Country Casino & Hotel, 4020 Olive Highway, Oroville. goldcountrycasino.com

HIKING AND BIRDING OROVILLE TRAILS: Moderately strenuous 3- to 5-mile hike along several trails. Meeting place TBD. Contact Dawn Garcia at 513-1785 or avifan59@gmail.com for more info. Sat 3/23, 8am. Free. Oroville. 5194724. altacal.org

FREE LISTINGS! Post your event for free online at www. newsreview.com/calendar, or email the CN&R calendar editor at cnrcalendar@newsreview.com. Deadline for print listings is Wednesday, 5 p.m., one week prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

RARE BEAUTY Brazilian-American wildlife filmmaker Filipe DeAndrade likes to get his hands dirty. Whether wrangling crocodiles or spiders, his passion for the natural world is incandescent. Born into poverty and addiction, he found his voice through his love for animals and the outdoors. After winning a short-film contest, he went on to host the hit show Untamed on the National Geographic channel and a soon-to-be-released documentary about wildlife along the Mexico and U.S. border. DeAndre will share his extraordinary journey and some hard-earned wisdom on how to find your life’s purpose this Wednesday (March 27) at Laxson Auditorium. MARCH 21, 2019

CN&R

25


THIS WEEK CoNTINuEd fRoM pAgE 25

s i e m m Ca 2019

FINE ARTS

24

SuN

THIN AIR

Special Events

Shows through March 31 Naked Lounge

THE ARC’S 19TH ANNUAL WINE, BEER & FOOD TASTING BENEFIT: Wines from local and regional wineries, craft beers and a few distillery offerings  along with appetizers and desserts. Raffle,  silent auction, and live music featuring Soul  Posse.  Sun, 3/24, 3pm. $30. Arc Pavilion, 2040  Park Ave. arcbutte.org 

SEE ART

KITE DAY: Free event with a simple vision:  bring a kite, pack a picnic, and enjoy a fun  sense of Chico community. All kite flyers  will receive a souvenir, compliments of Bird  in Hand.  Sun, 3/24, 12pm. Free. 20th Street  Community Park, 1900 Dr. Martin Luther King  Jr. Parkway. 895-4711. chicorec.com 

Music KYLE WILLIAMS: Sunday brunch with guitarplaying heartthrob Kyle Williams.  Sun, 3/24, 11am. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St. MINETTI QUARTETT: This world-famous quintet  from Vienna known as classic interpreters of Beethoven, Mendelssohn and Haydn  playing a wide repertoire of both 19th- and  20th-century music on this rare stop through  town.  Sun, 3/24, 2pm. $15-$36. Zingg Recital  Hall, Chico State. 898-6333. csuchico.edu 

ROBBIE FULKS: KZFR brings the Chicago altcountry/bluegrass singer-songwriter to town.  This Grammy-nominated guitarist has been  playing for more than 30 years alongside such  greats as Lucinda Williams and Sam Bush.  Tickets available at Chico Paper Co., Blaze N’  J’s and the KZFR office. Doors at 6:30pm.  Sun, 3/24, 6:30pm. $15-$20. Chico Women’s Club, 592  E. Third St. 895-0706. kzfr.org 

Theater NUNSENSE: See Friday.  Sun, 3/24, 2pm. $16-$22.  Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste.  F. chicotheatercompany.com 

A celebration and benefit for musicians and others affected by the Camp Fire

26

TuE

Special Events CHICO GUILD POTLUCK: Richard Roth will talk 

CHICO AREA MUSIC FESTIVAL 2019 April 20 Sierra Nevada Big Room SPONSORED BY

about people-centered agriculture and  how to improve your garden.  Tue, 3/26, 6pm. Chico Community Guilds, 2775 Nord Ave.  chicoguildhall.org 

27

WEd

Special Events NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC LIVE: Wildlife filmmaker,  conservationist, and star of National  Geographic’s Untamed, Filipe DeAndrade  presents an evening filled with the world’s  rarest animals, a preview of his new documentary, and advice on how to find your own  true passion in life.  Wed, 3/27, 7:30pm. $15$32. Laxson Auditorium, Chico State.  chicoperformances.com 

Music CHAMBER MUSIC NIGHT: Hosted by the North  State Symphony with performances by  Butte MTAC Youth Orchestra and the Joshua  Hegg Trio.  Wed, 3/27, 6pm. Wine Time, 26 Lost  Dutchman Drive. winetimechico.com 

Vote for your Favorite Act at newsreview.com/cammies 26

CN&R

MARCH 21, 2019

foR MoRE MUSIC, SEE NIGHTLIFE oN pAgE 28

Art CHICO ART CENTER: The Puzzle Show, community-based show features work from 300  artists of all ages and experience. Bid on  individual puzzle pieces and contribute  to this unique fundraiser for the gallery. Reception Friday, March 29, 5-7pm.  Through 3/29. Free. 450 Orange St.,   895-8726. chicoartcenter.com

ENLOE CANCER CENTER: Beth Bjorklund, oil  paintings in our Healing Art Gallery by  Northern California artist. The Enloe  Cancer Center, Healing Art Gallery  features artists whose lives have been  touched by cancer. Through 4/19. Free.  265 Cohasset Road. 332-3856.

JACKI HEADLEY UNIVERSITY ART GALLERY: Idea |  Material | Process, showcases the diverse  and innovative art practices of the Chico  State art faculty. Through 3/29. Chico  State, Arts & Humanities Building.

JANET TURNER PRINT MUSEUM: Regional  Collective—California Society of  Printmakers, a juried group exhibition.  Juror’s Talk with Leslie Jones March 28,  5:30pm. Zingg Recital Hall. Through 4/13.  Arts & Humanities Building, Chico State.  theturner.org

MAIN EVENT GALLERY: Views Of The  West, member artists and photographers  depict ranch life, cowboys, round-ups,  animals and the scenic beauty that surrounds the North State. Through 5/4.  Free. 710 Main St., Red Bluff, 391-3259.  tehamaarts.org

MUSEUM OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA ART: Dennis  Leon I am here, the sculptor’s work  has been exhibited at the San Francisco  Museum of Modern Art, the Oakland  Museum, the Corcoran Gallery and  beyond. Through 3/24. $5. 900 Esplanade.

NAKED LOUNGE: Thin Air, first solo show by  artist Brandon McKie (aka Thin Air).  Reception/musical performance, March  27, 5pm. 118 W. Second St.

ORLAND ART CENTER: Perfection in Pencil and  Paint, showcasing works by Peter Piatt,  Steve Crane, Sharon Crabill and Eve BergPugh. Through 3/23. 732 Fourth St., Orland.  orlandartcenter.com

VALENE L. SMITH MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY: Altar States Spirit Worlds  and Transformational Experiences, The  Works of Peter Treagan, interactive tech  art complete with 3D glasses and hidden  imagery so visitors can participate in  what is described as a transformational visionary art experience achieved  through ritual, ceremony and prophecy.  Through 5/17. Chico State.

Museums BOLT’S ANTIQUE TOOL MUSEUM: Ongoing exhibits, this fascinating, unique museum has  over 12,000 hand tools on display, charting  cataloging the evolution and history of  tools. Closed Sundays. Through 6/15. $3.  1650 Broderick St., Oroville.

CHICO CHILDREN’S MUSEUM: Ongoing exhibits, featuring tons of cool stuff for kids to  explore. Check the website for hours   and admission information. Through 8/3.  $7-$9. 325 Main St. chicochildrens  museum.org

CHICO CREEK NATURE CENTER: Living Animal  Museum & Nature Play Room, learn all  about local critters, plants and wildlife.  Through 5/25. $2-$4. 1968 E. Eighth St.  chicorec.com

GATEWAY SCIENCE MUSEUM: From Here to  There, explore the science of how things  move by land, sea and air. Also on display  are The Foothills and America›s Wolves:  From Tragedy to Inspiration. Through 5/12.  $5-$7. 625 Esplanade. csuchico.edu

PATRICK RANCH MUSEUM: Ongoing  exhibit, working farm and museum with  rotating exhibits open every Saturday  and Sunday from 11am to 3pm. Through  5/26. 10381 Midway, Durham. patrick  ranchmuseum.org

VALENE L. SMITH MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY: Remarkable Lives, exploring the intertwined worlds of birds and  humans, in partnership with the Altacal  Audubon Society and Snow Goose Festival.  Exhibits include bird songs and behaviors,  local photography and a robotic recreation of the late Jurassic Archaeopteryx.  Through 7/31. Chico State.


SCENE

After the fires

CON BRIO

Oregon Shakespeare Festival bounces back from summer of smoke

Tyear.Ashland is coming off a tough Wildfire smoke bedeviled

he Oregon Shakespeare Festival in

the 2018 festival, costing it some $2 million in lost revenue due to canceled outdoor performances. In 2019, however, it’s bouncing right back. It opened its new season with a diverse mix of four productions, beginning with a lively staging of Shakespeare’s As You Like It. That was followed by by: John Waters’ Robert Speer Hairspray: rober tspeer@ the Broadway newsrev i ew.c om Musical; the world premiere Review: of Octavio Solis’ oSF presents As you Like It, Hairspray: the Mother Road, broadway Musical, a “sequel” to Mother Road and John Steinbeck’s Cambodian Rock band, novel The now showing through october. Visit site for Grapes of Wrath; details. and Lauren Yee’s powerful Oregon Cambodian Rock Shakespeare Festival Band. When I saw 15 S. Pioneer St., Ashland, ore. them last weekend (800) 219-8161 (March 15-17), all osfashland.org four productions earned standing ovations, which speaks to their consistent quality. Here’s my take on them: Cambodian Rock Band: The six actors in this impressive production do double duty as members of a terrific on-stage rock band who, as the play—directed by Chay Yew— begins in 1975, are threatened by the imminent takeover by the murderous Khmer Rouge. Subsequent scenes are set in 1978, by which time the Khmer Rouge has murdered some 2 million people, and 30 years later,

LIVE AT

THE BIG ROOM

FRIDAy, APRIL 5, 2019 SIERRA NEVADA BREWING CO.

1075 E. 20TH ST., CHICO. TICKETS ON SALE NOW! $15 AVAILABLE IN THE GIFT SHOP OR ONLINE AT WWW.SIERRANEVADA.COM/BIGROOM

as a father who escaped the killing fields seeks to reconcile with his American daughter, who is part of a legal team seeking to convict a Khmer Rouge leader charged with war crimes. This merging of a painful history, both personal and collective, with the music of the Cambodian-American band Dengue Fever is an inspired collaboration. (Thomas Theatre) As You Like It: This is one of Shakespeare’s most familiar comedies, but its plot is also one of his most complicated, so you might want to read an online précis before arriving at the theater. OSF has staged it in two acts, with the first providing the expository setup and the second the denouement that brings the several plot threads together into a romantically—and politically—satisfying end. Among the many superb performances, those of Jessica Ko as Rosalind, Román Zaragoza as Orlando and Rex Young as the fool Touchstone stand out. (Bowmer Theatre) Hairspray: the Broadway Musical: As both play and movie, John Waters’ most commercially successful creation has taken on a cult status not unlike that of The Rocky Horror Picture Show. The story of a plus-size girl, Tracy Turnblad, who in 1962 earns a spot on Baltimore’s popular Corny Collins Dance Show and proceeds to try to integrate it has evolved into being Waters’ most subversive work. Of the many fine performances, Katy Geraghty’s as Tracy steals the show by illustrating that heavy people can dance as well as anyone. The production also features a terrific stage

Tony Sancho (center, as Martín Jodes) in  Mother Road. PHoto by Jenny GRAHAM

set and delightful choreography. (Bowmer Theatre) Mother Road: In John Steinbeck’s novel The Grapes of Wrath, the Mother Road down which Tom Joad and his family travel from Oklahoma to California is Highway 66. In Octavio Solis’ play (directed by Bill Rauch in his last season as OSF artistic director), the road is the same but the direction is reversed. William Joad (Mark Murphey), Tom’s cousin, is dying of cancer and has come to California to find his last living “blood kin,” to whom he wishes to give his 2,000-acre Oklahoma ranch. To his surprise, that relative turns out to be Martín Jodes (Tony Sancho), a long-lost cousin from the Mexican side of the family. The pair encounter many obstacles on their journey to the ranch, some of their own making. The big question is: Can they get there before William dies? Solis is a poet as well as a playwright, and he infuses this play with a poetic sensibility that elevates it well above melodrama. (Bowmer Theatre) Upcoming productions include: Between Two Knees, an imaginative take on Native American history (opens April 3 in the Thomas Theatre); the summer series in the Allen Elizabethan Theater (with Macbeth, Alice in Wonderland and All’s Well That Ends Well) begins May 29; Indecent in the Angus Bowmer Theatre (opens July 3); and How to Catch Creation opening July 23 in the Thomas Theatre. Ω

SierraNevadaBeer

@SierraNevada

@SierraNevadaChico

If you can’t recycle, repurpose. Feel good Recycling.

Chico: 2300 Fair St. • 343-8641 • Hours: Monday-Saturday 8am–3:45pm MARCH 21, 2019

CN&R

27


NIGHTLIFE

THURSDAY 3/21—WEDNESDAY 3/27 DEFCATS: Upbeat dance, pop, and clas-

FIFTH ANNUAL SOWING CIRCLE: Fundraising event for From the  Ground up Farms featuring Sick!  Sick! Sick!, Hap Hathaway, AZ  Redsmoke and One Up the Acoustic  DJ.  Fri, 3/22, 7:30pm. $7-$10. The  Maltese, 1600 Park Ave. maltesebar  chico.com

Sunday, March 24 Chico Women’s Club SEE SUNDAY

SPAFFORD: Genre-bending jam band  from Arizona joined by local alt-pop  crew DeVoll. Tickets available at  Diamond W Western Wear, Blaze ‹N›  J›s Smoke Shop, and DownLo.  Fri, 3/22, 8:30pm. $17.50. Lost On Main,  319 Main St.

IKE’S SPRING FLING: All the sounds 

21THURSDAY

HELLO I’M SORRY: Seattle indie-rock  band joins local sad post-punks  Citysick and dream-pop stars Thin  Air. All ages.  Thu, 3/21, 7pm. $7. 1078  Gallery, 1710 Park Ave. 1078gallery.org

CHARMING DISASTER: Brooklyn folk-

noir duo plays with Oroville’s The  Boulder Creek Bandits for an eerie  night of intricate harmonies, dark  lyrics and a dash of ukulele.  Thu, 3/21, 8pm. The Spirit, 2360 Oro  Quincy Highway, Oroville.

SAMARIA GRACE: Local blues/funk  singer is joined by jazz band  Meraki.  Thu, 3/21, 6pm. Tender  Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

CHICO WOMEN IN CONCERT: A huge  celebration of women artists featuring an eclectic mix of solo and  group performances by more than  two dozen locals, including LeeAnn  Cooley, Holly Taylor, Vera Marie  Bridges and many more. This event  raises funds for programs that  support local women and children.  Tickets at Music Connection, Signs &  Graphic Design, and online at event  brite.com.  Thu, 3/21, 6:30pm. Chico  Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St.

22FRIDAY

with local rapping noise-punks  Pervert joined by Sac’s Imaginary  Friends and Las Pulgas, The Brankas  from SF and Loose out of Portland.  All ages.  Fri, 3/22, 8pm. $7. Ike’s  Sandwiches, 648 W Fifth St.

singer-songwriter and guitarist  and founding member of indie-rock  band The Rugburns. Poltz is known  for good old-fashioned sing-along  shows with simple melodies and  satirical lyrics. Daniel Rodriguez  of Elephant Revival opens. Tickets  available at Chico Paper Co., Blaze  N’ J’s and the KZFR office.  Fri, 3/22, 6:30pm. $20-$25. Chico Women’s  Club, 592 E. Third St. 895-0706.   kzfr.org 

beer. Fri, 3/22, 7pm. The Commons  Social Empourium, 2412 Park Ave.  thecommonschico.com

JOHN SEID, LARRY PETERSON, STEVE COOK: Eclectic mix of tunes by local 

KALIMBA – A TRIBUTE TO EARTH WIND AND FIRE: Covers of all the 

STRANGE PASSAGE: Chico Area Punks  present throwback jangly guitarpop crew out of Massachusetts,  plus the space-punk of Sunny Acres  and the joyful noise of Viking Skate  Country. All ages.  Fri, 3/22, 8pm. $7.  1078 Gallery, 1710 Park Ave.   1078gallery.org

hits spanning more than three  decades.  Fri, 3/22, 9:30pm. $5.  Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3  Alverda Drive, Oroville. 

ALAN RIGG BAND: New Orleans-style  jazz and blues for an evening of  fun, friendship, and healing. First  show for the band since the Camp  Fire.  Fri, 3/22, 8pm. Unwined Kitchen  & Bar, 980 Mangrove Ave., 282-2329.  unwinedchico.com

STEVE POLTZ: KZFR presents Canadian 

JAMM BAND: Good tunes, good 

favorites. Fri, 3/22, 6:30pm. Diamond  Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St.   diamondsteakhousechico.com 

NORTH STATE SYMPHONY POPS! TRIBUTE TO ARTHUR FIEDLER: The symphony 

Aretha & Van Morrison

23SATURDAY raiser for the Chico Housing Action  Team. Local singers join the Living  Karaoke Band for covers of the hits  of Aretha Franklin and Van Morrison.  Snacks for sale and silent auction.  Sat, 3/23, 7pm. $20-$30. Trinity United  Methodist Church, 285 E. Fifth St. 5189992. chicohousingactionteam.org 

BLUE HIPPIES: Eclectic rock ’n’ roll-

BOB’S COMEDY SHOW & MUSIC:   Featuring visting comic Zach  Chapaloni and locals Annie Fischer,  Joey Haney and Hottub Nickles.  Music by comedy/music duo Legit  Supreme.  Sat, 3/23, 8pm. $5-$7. The  Maltese, 1600 Park Ave. 

CAREY ROBINSON TRIO: Local jazz band  featuring Susan Schrader and Greg  D›Augelli.  Sat, 3/23, 6pm. Purple  Line Urban Winery, 760 Safford St.,  Oroville. purplelinewinery.com

15th Street

Public Notice

Glass–Free Zone

one nigHt onLy!

Mangrove Ave. unwinedchico.com

ARETHA VAN MORRISON: Funky fund-

ers bring the party.  Sat, 3/23, 8pm. $7. Unwined Kitchen & Bar, 980 

celebrates the joy of the Boston 

Living KaraoKe Band Presents a triBute to

Legendary Motor City psychobilly trio Koffin Kats will leave its mark on The Maltese this Wednesday (March 27) with help from Oakland’s Year of the Fist and locals Sex Hogs II.

Pops with a mix of light classics and  popular hits made famous by the  likes of Arthur Fiedler and Sousa.  Plus, classic film scores, the best  of Broadway and more.  Fri, 3/22, 7:30pm. $21-$40. Laxson Auditorium,  Chico State, 898-6333. northstate  symphony.org

sic rock.  Fri, 3/22, 9pm. $5. Tackle  Box, 379 E. Park Ave.

ROBBIE FULKS

HERE, DEAD KITTY

Declared March 29 – April 1, 2019

Café

PUBLIC NOTICE-NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that pursuant to Chapter 9.32., Glass-Free Zone of the Chico Municipal Code, the City Manager has declared the Glass-Free Zone ordinance operative from 6:00 p.m. on Friday, March 29, 2019, through Monday, April 1, 2019 at 6:00 p.m. Generally, the possession of glass containers on city owned property is prohibited within the Glass Free Zone during this time period.

A map of the Glass-Free Zone is set forth below.

a Benefit for

Admission $20-$30

TriniTy UniTed MeThodisT ChUrCh • 285 e. 5Th sTreeT, ChiCo 28

CN&R

MARCH 21, 2019

C ED A R

S T R E E T

tickets: zucchini & Vine, The Bookstore, CHat booth at the sat. farmers Market

IV Y

ST R EE T

ST R

ST EE B R R T O EE A D T W A Y

7T H

An AMAzing Line-Up of 20 LoCAL ArTisTs!

IG B

O IC H C

FL U M E

M A IN

W .

7pm Saturday • March 23

C.S.U.C.

K EE R T C 1S

Your Neighborhood Place for Coffee, Food & More

Zone Glass Free

~

Featuring Specialty Coffees Pastries Breakfast & Lunch Local Wines and Craft Beers 7am to 3pm Monday through Saturday 8am to 2pm Sunday 1414 Park Ave, Ste 120 Chico 530-809-1087 ~


GYMSHORTS, SUNNY ACRES & PANTHER SURPRISE Tuesday, March 26 Duffy’s Tavern SEE TUESDAY

THIS WEEK: FIND MORE ENTERTAINMENT AND SPECIAL EVENTS ON PAGE 24 to Catalyst Domestic Violence Services. Sat, 3/23, 7pm. $6-$12 (kids six and under are free). Cal Skate/Funland, 2465 Carmichael Drive, 518-8453.

OVERDRIVE: Playing a variety of ‘70s effects, moving lights, lasers and video projection Sat, 3/23, 9:30pm. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfallscasino.com

JOHN SEID, LARRY PETERSON, STEVE COOK: See Friday. Sat,

Gymshorts

CHRIS D’ELIA: Comedian, actor, writer and podcast host with a huge social media following comes to the casino for a stop on his Follow the Leader tour. Sat, 3/23, 8pm. $35-$90. Gold Country Casino & Hotel, 4020 Olive Highway, Oroville. goldcountrycasino.com

ELI YOUNG BAND: Rebel country band with Texas roots, joined by countrysoul crooner Willie Jones. Tickets available at Diamond W Western Wear, Blaze ’N’ J’s Smoke Shop and Fusion Pit. Sat, 3/23, 9pm. $25. Senator Theatre, 517 Main St. senatortheatrechico.co

HOUSE OF FLOYD: Tribute band captures the essence of each of the Pink Floyd eras, complete with sound

3/23, 6:30pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St. diamondsteakhouse chico.com

MIDGET WRESTLING: Midgets with Attitude return to the Box for a night of tasteless fun and mayhem. Sat, 3/23, 9:30pm. $10-$35. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave. tackle boxchico.com

MOMMA T & THE SHAKY GROUND BAND: Sacramento cover band. Sat, 3/23, 8:30pm. Feather Falls Casino

& Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfallscasino.com

MUDSTONE: A night of rock and good times. Sat, 3/23, 9pm. Studio Inn Lounge, 2582 Esplanade.

NOR CAL ROLLER GIRLS: First home match this season against Floodwater Roller Derby. All ages, trivia, beer garden, and raffle with 50 percent of proceeds going

& ’80s rock for late-night happy hour. Sat, 3/23, 10pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St. lasalleschico.com

RASTAPALOOZA: The original General Smiley of the legendary duo Michigan and Smiley—Jamaican reggae/dancehall pioneers in the 1970s—comes to Lost. Also, I-Trinity, and Stay Positive Sound. Sat, 3/23, 9pm. $10-$15. Lost On Main, 319 Main St. lostonmainchico.com

THERE WILL BE LOUD VIDEO RELEASE PARTY: Concert film premiere for local alt-rock band The Damaged Goods. Video will show between 8-9pm. Sat, 3/23, 7pm. Winchester Goose, 800 Broadway St. thewinchestergoose.com

WHITEY JOHNSON BAND: Norton Buffalo Hall West presents two-time Grammy winner Gary Nicholson playing Southern blues with his Whitey Johnson band. Sat, 3/23, 7pm. $20. Chico Guild Hall, 2775 Nord Ave. 762-1490. chicoguildhall.org

24SUNDAY

MINETTI QUARTETT: This world famous quintet from Vienna known as classic interpreters of Beethoven,

Mendelssohn, and Haydn will play a wide-ranging repertoire of both 19th- and 20th-century music on this rare stop through town. Sun, 3/24, 2pm. $15-$36. Zingg Recital Hall, Chico State. 898-6333. csuchico.edu

MR. BANG: Tape release show and tour kick-off, joined by Turd Eater, Angry Son and Mucid. All ages. Sun, 3/24, 8pm. $7. Ike›s Sandwiches, 648 W. Fifth St.

OPEN MIC COMEDY NIGHT: Working on a bit? See if it’s a hit or heckleworthy, and enjoy cheap beer specials. Sun, 3/24, 8pm. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave. maltesebarchico.com

ROBBIE FULKS: KZFR brings the Chicago alt-country/bluegrass singer-songwriter to town. This Grammy-nominated guitarist has been playing for more than 30 years alongside such greats as Lucinda Williams and Sam Bush. Tickets available at Chico Paper Co., Blaze N› J›s and the KZFR Office. Doors at 6:30pm. Sun, 3/24, 6:30pm. $15-$20. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St. 895-0706. kzfr.org

25MONDAY

THIRD MONDAY JAZZ JAM: Once a

month jazz performance and open jam, always all ages, always free. Mon, 3/25, 7:30pm. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

26TUESDAY

SIGSALY: Two-piece band from

Vancouver, B.C. brings electronic music for dancing. Joined by Redding hip-hop artist Calvin Black and Chico’s own DMT and Dudecorpse. Tue, 3/26, 6pm. $7. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

TRASH ROCK TUESDAY W/ GYMSHORTS: Rhode Island rockers joined by locals Sunny Acres and Panther Surprise, along with something called a “baloney pony” for a mid-week ripper. Tue, 3/26, 9pm. $5. Duffy›s Tavern, 337 Main St.

27WEDNESDAY

CHAMBER MUSIC NIGHT: Hosted by

the North State Symphony with performances by Butte MTAC Youth Orchestra and the Joshua Hegg Trio. Wed, 3/27, 6pm. Wine Time, 26 Lost Dutchman Drive. winetimechico.com

KOFFIN KATS: Psychobilly punk out of Detroit with Oakland rockers Year of the Fist and Chico hotties Sex Hogs II. Wed, 3/27, 8pm. $10. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave. maltesebarchico.com

THIN AIR ART RECEPTION: Thin Air performs in celebration of first solo art show. Wed, 3/27, 5pm. Naked Lounge, 118 W. Second St.

RIDE THE MINIMAL-WAVE

Picture a slow-motion dance party in a red-lit basement during Stanley Kubrick’s Eyes Wide Shut, but before things got too weird. That should conjure the sound of Sigsaly (pictured), an electro-industrial duo out of Vancouver, B.C. With lovelorn lyrics and gothy beats, this is music to move to with your eyes closed. Put on your weirdest mask and join the groove on Tuesday (March 26) at Blackbird. Calvin Black, DMT and Dudecorpse fill out the bill.

MARCH 21, 2019

CN&R

29


REEL WORLD

NO.

It Is A Complete sentenCe

Serving Butte, Glenn & Tehama Counties

342-RAPE

24 hr. hotline (Collect Calls Accepted) www.rapecrisis.org

Tribal drug war

‘A rural folktale verging on classical tragedy’

Banddance in a remote Colombian village. The dancers onlookers are living in the 20th century, but the

irds of Passage begins with a traditional courtship

traditions are ancient and indigenous, with family and tribal honor as prime values. The marriageable young woman by at the center of the ritual is Zaida Juan-Carlos (Natalia Reyes), and she is soon Selznick joined by Rapayet (José Acosta), an apparent outsider who nevertheless commits himself wholly to this old courtship tradition. Rapayet and Zaida will indeed soon be married, Birds of Passage but first he has to prove himself to her proud and wary family—by way Opens Friday, March 22. Starring Carmiña of providing an elaborate, challengeMartínez, José filled dowry. Acosta and Natalia He meets the challenge in full, Reyes. Directed by but in the process he and a swashCristina Gallego and Ciro Guerra. Pageant buckling pal named Moisés (Jhon Theatre. Not Rated. Narváez) also get into the business of dealing the marijuana that his cousins are growing somewhere in the hills. That leads to unexpected wealth and excess, but also to a skein of calamities born of the clash of tradition and modernity, and the half-hidden contradictions within both. The film plays, at times, like a folkloric epic, or an ethnographic pageant, and, at others, like a rural folktale verging on classical tragedy. And with its spectacular widescreen imagery, its bleak and luminous desert settings, and its bursts of vengeful gunfire, the film also has the feel of a sly, offbeat variation on the spaghetti westerns of the ’70s and ’80s. There’s no clear-cut tragic hero in all this, unless it’s that traditional code of values—an array of apparent noble virtues that here seem to carry the seeds of their

4

30

CN&R

MARCH 21, 2019

own destruction, especially when put in contact with the dramatic entanglements portrayed here. But even the most nearly noble of the chief characters gets outside the story’s circles of vengeance. The stately, almost biblical progression of events in Birds of Passage is fascinating all by itself. And the conviction that the chief characters bring to their splitsecond choices on matters of honor and fate provides dramatic momentum quite apart from any questions of whether we care about them or not. Carmiña Martínez is particularly striking as the matriarchal Úrsula, mother of Zaida and conflicted moral sage among the villagers. Acosta and Reyes as the young lovers exude modest heroic potential and doomed vulnerability in more or less equal amounts. Juan Martínez (as the cowboy-hatted proto-mafioso Anibal) and José Vicente Cote (as the wryly avuncular Peregrino) make strong impressions as contrasting figureheads of embattled clans. Narváez, as the heedlessly reckless Moisés, steals every scene he’s in. Youthfully arrogant Leonídas, who inherits leadership of a family before he even qualifies as an adolescent, is played by Greider Meza with a kind of childishly diabolical venom. This film’s directorial team, Cristina Gallego and Ciro Guerra, also made one of the very best films of 2015, Embrace of the Serpent. This one is not quite at the same level of achievement, but both films are especially noteworthy for their dazzling mixtures of realism and mythic spirit. Ω

1 2 3 4 5 Poor

Fair

Good

Very Good

Excellent


FILM SHORTS Reviewers: Bob Grimm and Juan-Carlos Selznick.

Opening this week

4

Birds of Passage

See review this issue. Pageant Theatre. Not rated —J.C.S.

Us

Writer/director Jordan Peele’s follow-up to his celebrated 2017 debut, Get Out, is a frighting-looking tale of a family terrorized by a pack of doppelgängers. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

Now playing Alita: Battle Angel

Robert Rodriguez (Sin City) directs this film adaptation of Yukito Kishiro’s Japanese cyberpunk manga series, Gunnm, featuring a cyborg heroine named Alita (Rosa Salazar) who was rendered for the big screen using CGI technologies developed for James Cameron’s Avatar. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13.

2

Captain Marvel

Despite the fact that she’s playing a superhero who has the power to shoot electrical bursts from her hands, Brie Larson’s Captain Marvel suffers from a disappointing lack of energy. Larson’s turn as the title character, aka Carol Danvers (aka Vers), is plagued by lethargy and bizarre line deliveries, and she gives off a detached vibe that she doesn’t want to be in the movie. Had the film around her been really good, the lead’s bored disposition might’ve been forgiven, but this cosmic superhero origin story and intergalactic war movie is also riddled with some haphazard storytelling and awful special effects. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13 —B.G.

Captive State

After 10 years of occupation by alien forces, the population of Earth is split into two sides—those who who cooperate and those who resist. Starring John Goodman, Ashton Sanders and Vera Farmiga. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

Five Feet Apart

Film adaptation of Rachel Lippincott’s youngadult novel of the same name about two teens whose newfound love for one another is complicated by the fact that their respective life-threatening illnesses keep them from coming into physical contact. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World

The third entry in the animated franchise picks up a year after the events in the previous film, with Hiccup the dragon (voice of Jay Baruchel) searching for a dragon utopia. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

Isn’t It Romantic

A fantasy-satire starring Rebel Wilson as an unlucky-in-love woman who finds herself stuck in a stereotypical rom-com universe. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13.

3

The LEGO Movie 2: The Second Part

Another healthy dose of familyfriendly fun at which both kids and parents should laugh heartily. The Second Part picks up five years after the end of the first movie, and our hero Emmet (Chris Pratt) is happily buying coffee in Apocalypseburg, a devastated LEGO-land of sullen tones and broken dreams where master builder Wyldstyle (Elizabeth Banks) has taken to dramatic narration at all times as things in their world have turned from awesome to bleak. The culprits are aliens called Duplos, invading forces that are at once undeniably adorable and unabashedly destructive. It’s a crazed world where Batman (Will Arnett) gets engaged to Queen Waterva Wa’Nabi (Tiffany Haddish), leader of the Duplo, and Emmett winds up running with a Kurt Russell-type antihero named Rex Dangervest, who is suspiciously like him (and who is also voiced by Pratt). The movie feels a bit repetitive in places, and some of the action is too fast to be fully taken in, but flaws aside, it’s still a lot of fun. There’s a slightly dark underbelly at play here, and it’s fun to see a kid’s flick that doesn’t totally play it safe. Cinemark 14. Rated PG —B.G.

A Madea Family Funeral

Tyler Perry is back for film No. 11 in the Madea series, this time the hijinks unfold at a family funeral in the backwoods of Georgia. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. PG-13.

Wonder Park

A 3-D animated feature about a young girl (voiced by Brianna Denski) with a wild imagination who works with a cast of talking animals to bring a dream amusement park to life. With Matthew Broderick, Jennifer Garner, Ken Hudson Campbell, Kenan Thompson, Ken Jeong, Mila Kunis and John Oliver. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

Us

MARCH 21, 2019

CN&R

31


A Menu From Around the World CHOW • 10 New Menu Items • Breakfast & Lunch • Authentic Flavors - Exceptional Service!

Eggs Benedict

To your health?

3221 EsplanadE | 530.891.4500 | mon-fri 8am-2pm sUn 8am-1pm

The PerfecT Pairing of Business and Lunch. open Thursdays and fridays 11:00am to 2:00pm

1250 ESPLANADE | REDTAVERN.COM | 530.894.3463

For the beer enthusiast, balance is key

healthy. It’s an unfortunate AwArd winning BBQ! Breality that recently caught up with reaking news: Beer is not

Massachusetts beer writer Norman Miller, who for by years wrote a Alastair beer column Bland called “The Beer Nut” for the Metro West Daily News. But in November, he called it quits. In his final column—a remarkable ode to humility and self-reckoning—he confessed, “My lifestyle is killing me. I’m middleaged and obese. I need to make 4945 Hwy 99E, Vina • (530) 839-2938 • Thurs-Sun 11am - 9pm changes so I can see 45, let alone 50 or beyond.” He said he often drank five or six beers four nights a week, and, describing health problems and emergency room visits, he said, “I can’t live this way.” He reminds us that the line between enthusiast and alcoholic $ can grow blurry and that, as with Pita Pit many things, there are consePita Pit 2847 530.899. $10 Value You pay $6.50 ay St | quences to overdoing it. dw oa 240 Br off Drinking large volumes of alcohol can hurt the liver. But the most immediate health impact of beer is its propensity for causing Buy online anytime with a credit card or in weight gain. Most craft beers are person with cash, check or credit card M-F 9am fat-makers, carrying at least 150 – 5pm at 353 E. Second Street, Downtown Chico.

Steaks, Burgers, Sandwiches & more! Fri/Sat Prime Rib Specials Full Bar + Catering/Venue 23x Award Winner

oney! m u o y saves 35%

10

Civil Codes and used by all California ed to abide This certificate may becredit. 49.6. Review is requir store dba News & Sections 1749.45-17 ase will be given as Code purch unity Publishing Chico Comm dance with California Civilchange remaining from corporation, Any accor As a Californiacates do not expire in t be used for gratuity. , but canno Gift certifi regulations. discounts and offers with other

32

CN&R

MARCH 21, 2019

calories in a 12-ounce bottle or can. Some—like imperial stouts and other strong beers—may contain 300 calories or more. Have a 22-ouncer of one of these giants and you could be imbibing 600 calories. These numbers add up, and it’s little wonder that the “beer belly” is the loathed consequence of a few too many pints. Some breweries are considering this as they draw up recipes. In Delaware, Dogfish Head has introduced a new low-calorie IPA. Named Slightly Mighty, the beer—to be released again in April—contains 4 percent alcoholby-volume and, per 12-ounce serving, just 95 calories, according to the brewery’s website. The beer is made using a technique that allows all the sugar in the beer to be converted into alcohol. In most beers, about a quarter of the grain malt goes unfermented. So, in the Dogfish Head beer, less sugary malt is needed to achieve the desired alcohol level—meaning less total caloric energy in the beer. While the beer is being hyped by some media as a groundbreaking step, it really isn’t much, if any, different from the brut IPAs that emerged out of San Francisco last

year and have gained such fandom. These beers are dry, with little to no residual sugar and, as a result, fewer calories than conventionally made beers of the same alcoholic content. For this writer, I look at beer as a supplement to a lifestyle, not its focus—and as such, I believe it can be healthy. I drink plenty of beer, but I also enjoy riding a bicycle uphill as fast as I possibly can. When—and if—I break my personal best times on the Sausalito-Golden Gate Bridge climb or McCullough Road in the Headlands, you can bet I’ll have a beer afterward. As for those low-calorie beers, like the Slightly Mighty, kudos to the effort, but I don’t really see the point. If we believe that less beer is more, then none must be best—and that leaves us with either an empty glass or a guilty conscience as we timidly sip a pint. Neither outcome is much fun for a beer lover. I think there can be a comfortable balance involving physical exercise, restraint and any beer on the menu—even a strong one. Under these circumstances, beer \is healthy. Ω


MARCH 21, 2019

  CN&R 

33


annUal BiKE issUE Chico is one of the best bike towns in the U.S. and locals and students alike are peddling where they need to go more than ever. Our annual celebration of local bicycle culture is tied with Chico Velo’s Wildflower Century ride, which attracts over 4,000 cyclists to our town. Include your business in this extremely popular issue that will not only reach our nearly 118,000 regular readers, but also the 4,000 Wildflower visitors too!

On stands april 25 For more information, call an advertising representative today at (530) 894-2300

34

CN&R

MARCH 21, 2019

3/14/19 1:27 PM

Sign up for our newSletter. get 10% off.

visit CnrSweetdealS.newSreview.Com

310346_4.9_x_5.4.indd 1

ARTS DEVO by JASON CASSIDY • jasonc@newsreview.com

CROSSING THE VERNAL EQUINOX

Spring is here, and for Arts DEVO, all hope is reborn in the sounds of new music by local bands. This week, I’ve been stomping through the wildflower blooms to the tune of the killer self-titled fresh release from Mr. Bang, the long-running project of local punk-rock troubadour Josh Lang. The justreleased album is the full-band version of Mr. Bang (also Lang’s solo moniker), and it is a gloriously fuzzed-out blend of energetic punk rock and super-overdriven riff-heavy stoner-metal grooviness that would’ve Josh Lang is Mr. Bang. made Lemmy Kilmister proud. In addition to Lang on guitar and vocals, the album features Khari Cowell on drums, Ryan Allan on bass, and Seabass also on guitar. Releasing it on March 8 also holds meaning for the songwriter, whose father died on that date in 2009. “I not only lost my father, I lost the center of my universe, I lost my north star, I lost my direction,” Lang says in the album notes. “The next 10 years was an oddity and a journey but with every step I found who I really was and grew into what I am now and that’s what this album and what Mr. Bang means to me.” Get the digital version at mrbangfact.band camp.com, and the analog during the cassetterelease party this Sunday, March 24, 7:30 p.m., at Ike’s Place. Mucid, Angry Son and Reno’s Turd Eater fill out the bill.

BREAK OUT THE DONKEY SAUCE! Air times for the Chico episode of Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives have been posted! According to the Food Network website, the first showing of “Coming Together in Cali” will be aired April 19, 9:30 p.m., and four hours later April 20, at 12:30 a.m. From the synopsis for Guy’s our guy. episode 18 from season 29: “For this trip, Guy Fieri zeroes in on Chico, California, celebrating the town’s food scene as residents and restaurant owners recover from ravaging fires that rocked the area.” The show’s producers haven’t announced the places Fieri visited when he was here in January, but the rest of the episode’s description offers some obvious clues that the sightings and rumors are true that Grana (“a woodfired Italian spot cooking up powerhouse pork ragu and killer chicken”), Upper Crust (“a bakery servin’ up standout savory specialties like their legendary black bean chili and a Korean pork salad”) and The Banshee (“a pub elevating their grub with a ‘Pho-rench Dip’ and banh mi tacos”) are all highlighted. And if the non-affiliated dinersdriveinsdiveslocations.com site is to be believed, so are Momona, The Rawbar and Sin of Cortez. A VOTE FOR COMMUNITY As I shared in this space a couple weeks ago, this year’s CAMMIES Festival and Awards Show is at the Sierra Nevada Big Room April 20. In addition to live performances from a wide range of players (to be announced very soon) from Chico and the rest of Butte County—especially those areas impacted by the Camp Fire—we will be handing out some awards, one for which we need the help of music-lovers in the community: Best Local Act. All active bands and solo musicians playing original music are eligible. Head to newsreview. com/cammies to vote for your fave.


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY For the week oF MArCh 21, 2019 ARIES (March 21-April 19): During the

coming weeks, everything that needs to happen will indeed happen only if you surprise yourself on a regular basis. So I hope you will place yourself in unpredictable situations where you won’t be able to rely on well-rehearsed responses. I trust that you will regard innocence and curiosity and spontaneity as your superpowers. Your willingness to change your mind won’t be a mark of weakness but rather a sign of strength.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): In the

animated kids’ film Over the Hedge, 10 talking animals come upon a massive, towering hedge they’ve never seen. The friendly group consists of a skunk, red squirrel, box turtle, two opossums and five porcupines. The hedge perplexes and mystifies them. It makes them nervous. There’s nothing comparable to it in their previous experience. One of the porcupines says she would be less afraid of it if she just knew what it was called, whereupon the red squirrel suggests that from now on they refer to it as “Steve.” After that, they all feel better. I recommend that you borrow their strategy in the coming weeks. If a Big Unknown arrives in your vicinity, dub it “Steve” or “Betty.”

by rob brezsny disarming explosive devices before they detonated. Over the course of his career, he defused an estimated 50,000 bombs and mines. Let’s make him your patron saint for the coming weeks. Why? Because I suspect you will be able to summon a metaphorical version of his power: an extraordinary capacity to keep volatile situations from blowing up. You’ll be a virtuoso at waging peace and preventing strife.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): There

was a time, less than a century ago, when pink was considered a masculine color and blue a feminine hue. In previous eras, many European men sported long hair, wore high heels and favored clothes with floral patterns. Franklin D. Roosevelt, one of America’s most prominent 20th century presidents, sometimes wore skirts and feather-bedecked hats as a child. With these facts as your keystone, and in accordance with astrological omens, I encourage you to experiment with your own gender expressions in the coming weeks. It’s prime time to have fun with the way you interpret what it means to be a man or woman—or any other gender you might consider yourself to be.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): I urge you to SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): locate a metaphorical or very literal door that will give you access to a place that affords you more freedom and healing and support. Maybe you already know about the existence of this door—or maybe it’s not yet on your radar. Here’s advice from Clarissa Pinkola Éstes that might help. “If you have a deep scar, that is a door,” she writes. “If you have an old, old story, that is a door. If you love the sky and the water so much that you almost cannot bear it, that is a door. If you yearn for a deeper life, a full life, a sane life, that is a door.”

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Musician

Carole Kaye is the most famous bass guitarist you’ve never heard of. Over the course of five decades, she has plied her soulful talents on more than 10,000 recordings, including gems by Frank Zappa, Stevie Wonder, Frank Sinatra, Simon and Garfunkel, and the Beach Boys. Twentyseven-time Grammy-winner Quincy Jones has testified that Kaye has written “some of the most beautiful themes I’ve ever heard in my life” and that she “could do anything and leave men in the dust.” I trust this horoscope will expand the number of people who appreciate her. I also hope you’ll be inspired to become more active in spreading the word about the gifts that you have to offer the world. It’s high time to make sure that people know more of the beautiful truth about you.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “When you want

happiness, what are you wanting?” asks aphorist Olivia Dresher. The repeat of an event that made you feel good in the past? A sweet adventure you’ve thought about but never actually experienced? Here’s a third possibility. Maybe happiness is a state you could feel no matter what your circumstances are; maybe you could learn how to relax into life exactly as it is and feel glad about your destiny wherever it takes you. In my opinion, that third approach to happiness will be especially natural for you to foster in the coming weeks.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): There are

old traditions in many cultures that pay special attention to the first brick or stone that is laid in the earth to initiate the construction of a future building. It’s called a cornerstone or foundation stone. All further work to create the new structure refers back to this original building block and depends on it. I’m pleased to inform you that now is a favorable phase to put your own metaphorical cornerstone in place. You’re ready to begin erecting a structure or system that will serve you for years to come. Be sure you select the right place for it, as well as the best building materials.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Born under

the sign of Libra, Ivan Kharchenko (19181989) was a military officer and engineer for the Soviet army. His specialty was

According to estimates by population experts, about 109 billion humans have been born on planet Earth over the millennia. And yet I’m quite sure that not a single one of those other individuals has been anything like you. You are absolutely unique, an unmatched treasure, a one-of-a-kind creation with your own special blend of qualities. And in my prophetic view, you’re ready to fully acknowledge and celebrate these facts on a higher octave than ever before. It’s high time for you to own your deepest authenticity, to work with extra devotion to express your soul’s code, to unabashedly claim your idiosyncratic genius.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): We

don’t know as much about European history between the sixth and ninth centuries as we do about other eras. Compared to the times that preceded and followed it, cultural and literary energies were low. Fewer records were kept. Governments were weaker and commerce was less vigorous. But historians don’t like to use the term “Dark Ages” to name that period because it brought many important developments and activities, such as improvements in farming techniques. So in some ways, “Lost Ages” might be a more apropos descriptor. Now let’s turn our attention to a metaphorically comparable phase of your own past, an era that’s a bit fuzzy in your memory, a phase about which your understanding is incomplete. I suspect that the coming weeks will be an excellent time to revisit that part of your life and see what new evidence and insights you can mine.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Why

do some American libraries ban certain books, ensuring they’re unavailable to local readers? The reasons may be because they feature profanity or include references to sex, drug use, the occult, atheism and unusual political viewpoints. Marjane Satrapi’s Persepolis is one of the most frequently censored books. Others are Maya Angelou’s I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, Beloved by Toni Morrison and The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini. In my astrological opinion, these are exactly the kinds of books you should especially seek out in the coming weeks. In fact, I suggest you commune with a variety of art and ideas and influences that are controversial, provocative and intriguing.

CLASSIFIEDS Call for a quote. (530) 894-2300 ext. 2 Phone hours: M-F 9am-5pm. Deadlines for print: Line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Display ad deadline: Friday 2pm

All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. Further, the News & Review specifically reserves the right to edit, decline or properly classify any ad. Errors will be rectified by re-publication upon notification. The N&R is not responsible for error after the first publication. The N&R assumes no financial liability for errors or omission of copy. In any event, liability shall not exceed the cost of the space occupied by such an error or omission. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes full responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. *Nominal fee for some upgrades.

DISH TV $59.99 For 190 Channels + $14.95 High Speed Internet. Free Installation, Smart HD DVR Included, Free Voice Remote. Some restrictions apply. Call Now: 1-800-3736508 (AAN CAN) CASH FOR CARS! We buy all cars! Junk, high-end, totaled - it doesn’t matter! Get free towing and same day cash! NEWER MODELS too! Call 1-866-5359689 (AAN) CAN) Suffering from an ADDICTION to Alcohol, Opiates, Prescription PainKillers or other DRUGS? There is hope! Call Today to speak with someone who cares. Call NOW 1-855-266-8685 (AAN CAN) Attention Viagra users: Generic 100 mg blue pills or Generic mg yellow pills. Get 45 plus 5 free $99 + S/H. Guaranteed, no prescription necessary. Call Today 1-844-879-5238

www.RealAstrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888.

32ft 2014 Forrest River RV Salem. Sleeps 9, 2 slides, 35’8” length, outdoor kitchen with refidgerator & sink bbq attached to back. Great condition, practically new. Contact George 707-3102156 $19,999 Out of State Property for Sale 10 acres Gallatin Valley, MT, property sports deer & pheasants, irrigation water right, septic & well approved. 406581-5635 $289K PENIS ENLARGEMENT PUMP. Get Stronger & Harder Erections Immediately. Gain 1-3 Inches Permanently & Safely. Guarenteed Results. FDA Licensed. Free Brochure: 1-800-354-3944 www.DrJoelKaplan.com (AAN CAN)

Need a roommate? Roommates.com will help you find your Perfect Match today! (AAN CAN)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS A Relaxing Massage In a cool, tranquil studio. $40 special. By appointment only. 10:30am - 7pm. 530893-0263. No texting. A Unique Touch by Deja. Full-Body Shower and Massage. $140 per 1hr & 20min session. Ask 4 special rates 4 fire victims (530) 321-0664 Ultra Soothing Massage. You will feel better now. Hours 10-6 M-Su. Michelle (530) 566-6477

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): At the age

of 97, Piscean cartoonist Al Jaffee is still creating new material for the satirical Mad magazine, where he has worked since 1964. There was one 63-year stretch when his comic stylings appeared in all but one of Mad’s monthly issues. I nominate him to be your role model during the next four weeks. It’s a favorable time for you to access and express a high degree of tenacity, stamina and consistency.

Signed: MARIAH OSEN Dated: February 15, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000218 Published: February 28, March 7,14,21, 2019

AIRLINE CAREERS begin here Get started by training as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Mainetenance 800725-1563 (AAN CAN)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as VALLEY COUNTERTOPS at 43 Norfield Ave, Suite 2 Chico, CA 95928. JON RUSSELL LAWSON 43 Norfield Ave, Suite 2 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JON LAWSON Dated: January 16, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000092 Published: February 28, March 7,14,21, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as PURE IN LUCK at 9109 Stanford Lane Durham, CA 95938. MARIAH OSEN 9109 Stanford Lane Durham, CA 95938. MICHAEL OSEN 9109 Stanford Lane Durham, CA 95938. This business is conducted by a Married Couple.

this Legal Notice continues

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as AMTC LLC at 711 Waterford Drive Chico, CA 95973. AMTC LLC 711 Waterford Drive Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: CHARLIE POOLER, CEO Dated: February 8, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000197 Published: February 28, March 7,14,21, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as JBR EARTHWORK AND ELECTRIC at 2139 W Sacramento Ave Chico, CA 95973. JUSTIN BROWN 2139 W Sacramento Ave Chico, CA 95973. JOSEPH RANKIN 2139 W Sacramento Ave Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: JUSTIN BROWN Dated: February 19, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000223 Published: February 28, March 7,14,21, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as DOUBLE BARREL SMOKIN BBQ at 2549 White Ave Chico, CA 95973. ROBERT CLIFFORD HENDERSON 2549 White Ave Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ROBERT HENDERSON Dated: January 31, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000155 Published: February 28, March 7,14,21, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as HEALING CENTER at 574 Manzanita Ave #4 Chico, CA 95926. JANETTE Y VOTAW 854 Muir Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JANETTE Y VOTAW Dated: February 11, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000205 Published: February 28, March 7,14,21, 2019

FICTITOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following persons have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name FEATHER RIVER ROWING CLUB INC at 930 Garden Drive Oroville, CA 95965. FEATHER RIVER ROWING CLUB INC 930 Garden Dr Oroville, CA 95965. This business was conducted by a Corporation. Signed: ANTHONY CATALANO, BOARD MEMBER Dated: February 4, 2019 FBN Number: 2017-0000922

this Legal Notice continues

Published: February 28, March 7,14,21, 2019

FICTITOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as SIERRA STREET PROPERTIES at 23 Herlax Circle Chico, CA 95926. JEFFREY SCOTT MELLUM 23 Herlax Circle Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JEFF MELLUM Dated: January 29, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000140 Published: February 28, March 7,14,21, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as COLLEGE CARE CONSULTING at 260 Wild Rose Circle Chico, CA 95973. NATHALIE MARGUERITE THOMAS 260 Wild Rose Circle Chico CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: NATHALIE THOMAS Dated: February 19, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000220 Published: February 28, March 7,14,21, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMEN The following persons are doing business as H AND A HYBRID SEED COMPANY at 3030 Thorntree Dr #4 Chico, CA 95973. STEEN HENRIKSEN 13384 Moonlight Court Chico, CA 95973. TAMERA HENRIKSEN 13384 Moonlight Court Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: STEEN C. HENRIKSEN Dated: February 25, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000252 Published: March 7,14,21,28, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as STERLING SPARKLE METAL WORKS at 633 Orange Street, #4 Chico, CA 95926. RICHARD STERLING OGDEN 1065 Citrus Ave Chico, CA 95926. SUSAN MARIE SPARKLE 2055 Park Way Village Dr. Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: RICHARD S. OGDEN Dated: February 22, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000242 Published: March 7,14,21,28, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as THE STYLE CORE at 1641 Oak Vista Ave Chico, CA 95926. BODY BEAUTIFUL LLC 1641 Oak Vista Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: ERIC MATHIS, MANAGING MEMBER Dated: February 26, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000258 Published: March 7,14,21,28, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CAL JAVA at 1601 Esplanade Ste. 1B Chico, CA 95926. CHRISTOPHER MCHENRY 1015 Lupin Ave Chico, CA 95973. NICOLE MICHELLE MCHENRY 1015 Lupin Ave Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: NICOLE MCHENRY Dated: February 26, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000261 Published: March 7,14,21,28, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as RAILFLOWER FARM at 3000 Chico River Rd. Chico, CA 95928. ELLEN MARIE KNIGHT 14011 Limousin Dr. Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ELLEN KNIGHT Dated: February 26, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000262 Published: March 7,14,21,28, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as HARRISON ASSOCIATES at 94 Orange Ave Bangor, CA 95914. MARK HARRISON 94 Orange Ave Bangor, CA 95914. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: MARK HARRISON Dated: January 28, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000139 Published: March 7,14,21,28, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as DOMESTIC GOODS at 1032 Neal Dow Avenue Chico, CA 95926. MATTHEW SHAUN DAUGHERTY 1032 Neal Dow Avenue Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: MATTHEW DAUGHERTY Dated: February 28, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000268 Published: March 7,14,21,28, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ACCESS LOCK AND SAFE at 6 Fremont St Apt 37 Chico, CA 95928. TREVOR TOMLINSON 6 Fremont St Apt 37 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: TREVOR TOMLINSON Dated: Fevruary 28, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000272 Published: March 7,14,21,28, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are

CLaSSIFIEdS

CONTINUED ON 36

this Legal Notice continues

MArCh 21, 2019

CN&R

35


doing business as SEELADAVID SALON at 1209 Esplanade Unit 6 Chico, CA 95926. AMANDA ANNE BANKS 2 Picual Ct Chico, CA 95928. CHRISTOPHER PAUL BANKS 2 Picual Ct Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: CHRISTOPHER P BANKS Dated: February 21, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000238 Published: March 7,14,21,28, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as WALKER’S WOODWORKS at 2547 Oro Garden Ranch Rd Oroville, CA 95966. BRANDON LEE WALKER 2547 Oro Garden Ranch Rd Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: BRANDON WALKER Dated: February 19, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000231 Published: March 14,21,28, April 4, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ARBOR PRO TREE CARE at 636 Burnt Ranch Way Chico, CA 95973. JASON RIX 636 Burnt Ranch Way Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JASON RIX Dated: February 13, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000213 Published: March 14,21,28, April 4, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ASSOCIATED CHICO EYE SPECIALISTS at 3537 Bay Avenue Chico, CA 95973. ROBERT DUDLEY STONE MD 3537 Bay Avenue Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ROBERT D. STONE Dated: February 26, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000259 Published: March 14,21,28, April 4, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as DANI PADGETT PHOTO, DANI PADGETT WEDDINGS at 2797 Grape Way Chico, CA 95973. DANIELLE PADGETT WATSON 2797 Grape Way Chico, CA 95973. ERIC WATSON 2797 Grape Way Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: DANIELLE WATSON Dated: February 22, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000244 Published: March 14,21,28, April 4, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following persons have abandoned the use of the fictitious business names DANI PADGETT WEDDINGS, DANI PADGETT PHOTO at 2797 Grape Way Chico, CA 95973. STEER AND ARBOR LLC 2797 Grape Way Chico, CA 95973. This business was conducted

this Legal Notice continues

36

CN&R

by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: DANIELLE WATSON, OWNER Dated: February 22, 2019 FBN Number: 2018-0000990 Published: March 14,21,28, April 4, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as KAIT’S SWEET KREATIONS at 1661 Forest Ave #27 Chico, CA 95928. KAITLYN ZANGL 1661 Forest Ave #27 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: KAITLYN ZANGL Dated: March 1, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000277 Published: March 21,28, April 4,11, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as EMINENCE GROUP at 2359 Myers Street, Suite #5966 Oroville, CA 95966. TIANA LYNN HARRISON TRUSTEE 2359 Myers Street, Suite #5966 Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by a Trust. Signed: TIANA HARRISON Dated: February 19, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000229 Published: March 21,28, April 4,11, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as LAURA’S WIG AND BEAUTY SUPPLY at 872 East Ave Chico, CA 95926. KATHLEEN A MCCLYMONT 10116 Jones Ave Durham, CA 95938. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: KATHLEEN MCCLYMONT Dated: March 5, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000296 Published: March 21,28, April 4,11, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as MANIFEST GLASS at 818 Salem St Chico, CA 95928. MERRICK JAMES BOYER 972 E 9th St Chico, CA 95928. RYAN PATRICK RODRIGUEZ 1126 Hobart St Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: RYAN RODRIGUEZ Dated: February 25, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000249 Published: March 21,28, April 4,11, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as FRANKLIN RECYCLING at 4405 Airport Rd Paradise, CA 95969. JOHN HENRY FRANKLIN 885 E 5th Street Chico, CA 95928. CLARK E GARDNER 6 Abbott Circle Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: JOHN H. FRANKLIN Dated: March 13, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000323 Published: March 21,28, April 4,11, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT

this Legal Notice continues

march 21, 2019

The following person has abandoned the use of the fictitious business name HEEL AND SOLE SHOES at 708 Mangrove Ave Chico, CA 95926. RICK NORMAN STUELPNAGEL 4730 Songbird Chico, CA 95973. This business was conducted by an Individual. Signed: RICK STUELPNAGEL Dated: March 18, 2019 FBN Number: 2017-0001588 Published: March 21,28, April 4,11, 2019

NOTICES NOTICE OF INTENTION TO SELL REAL PROPERTY AT A PRIVATE SALE IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF BUTTE In the Conservatorship of the Person and Estate of SUE ERWIN, Conservatee. NOTICE is herby given that, subject to confirmation by the above entitled Court, on March 26, 2019, at 10:30 a.m. or thereafter within the time allowed by law, the undersigned, as conservator of the estate of SUE ERWIN, will sell at private sale to the highest and best net bidder on the terms and conditions hereinafter mentioned, all right, title and interest of conservatee and subsequently all right, title and interest of the estate in real property thereon located in the County of Butte, State of California, and more particularly described as follows: A single family residence located at 14348 Sinclair Circle, Magalia, California. All that certain real property situated in the County of Butte, State of California, described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: AP#: 064 440 007 000 All that certain real property situate in the County of Butte, State of California, described as follows: PARCEL I: LOT 71, AS SHOWN ON THAT CERTAIN MAP ENTITLED, “PARADISE PINES UNIT NO. 6”, WHICH MAP WAS RECORDED IN THE OFFICE OF THE RECORDER OF THE COUNTY OF BUTTE, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, ON AUGUST 26, 1970, IN BOOK 35 OF MAPS, AT PAGE(S) 92, 93 AND 94. CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION RECORDED DECEMBER 2, 1970, IN BOOK 1648, PAGE 3, OFFICIAL RECORDS. EXCEPTING THEREFROM ALL MINERALS, OIL, GAS, ASPHALTUM AND OTHER HYDROCARBON SUBSTANCES, WITH PROVISION THAT ANY AND ALL MINING OPERATIONS SHALL BE DONE FROM ORIFICES OUTSIDE THE SURFACE AREA OF THE LAND DESCRIBED HEREIN, AND THAT NO DAMAGE SHALL BE DONE TO THE SURFACE OF SAID LAND. PARCEL II: A NON-EXCLUSIVE EASEMENT OVER LOTS E AND F (THE COMMON AREAS) OF SAID PARADISE PINES UNIT NO. 6, AND LOTS DESIGNATED FOR COMMON AND RECREATION AREAS, AS DESCRIBED IN THE DECLARATION OF ANNEXATION FOR UNITS IV, VIII AND X. The sale is subject to current taxes, covenants, conditions restrictions, reservations, rights, rights of way, and easements of record, any encumbrances of record to be satisfied out of the purchase price. The property is

this Legal Notice continues

to be sold on an “as is” basis except as to title. The conservator of the estate has an exclusive listing with Blue Team Realty, Inc. Interested parties may contact Evie Cameron, Broker Associate at (530) 941-7955. The terms and conditions of the sale are: cash sale, taxes, rents, operating, and maintenance expenses, premiums on insurance acceptable to the purchaser shall be pro-rated as the date of confirmation of sale. Escrow charges, examination of title, recording of conveyance, any title insurance policy shall be paid 1/2 by Buyer and 1/2 by Seller. The undersigned reserves the right to reject any and all bids prior to entry of an order confirming the sale. Signed: SHELBY BOSTON, Public Guardian Case No. 17PR00390 Published: March 7,14,21, 2019

NOTICE OF HEARING Petitioner: SHARON K. EDWARDS Respondent: GERALD D. EDWARDS To: SHARON K. EDWARDS, Petitioner A Court Hearing will be held as follows: Date: May 15, 2019 Time: 8:15am Dept: 7 Room: TBA Superior Court of California, County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95928 WARNING to the person served with the Request for Order: The court may make the requested orders without you if you do not file a Responsive Declaration to Request for Order (form FL-320), serve a copy on the other parites at least nine court days before the hearing (unless the court has ordered a shorter period of time), and appear at the hearing. (See form FL-320-INFO for more information.) Dated: March 14, 2019 Case Number: FL047985 Published: March 21,28, April 4,11, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner DEVIN JOSE LANDAVAZO BLANCO filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: DEVIN JOSE LANDAVAZO BLANCO Proposed name: DEVIN DANNY LANDAVAZO GALOS THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: April 3, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: February 15, 2019

this Legal Notice continues

Case Number: 19CV00494 Published: February 28, March 7,14,21, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner MICHAEL BENSON filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: MICHAEL BENSON Proposed name: BENSON BENSON THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: March 27, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: January 16, 2019 Case Number: 18CV03571 Published: February 28, March 7,14,21, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner SAMANTHA BRYANT filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: AUBREE AUTUMN-LEE SYNDERGAARD Proposed name: AUBREE AUTUMN-LEE BRYANT THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 8, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: March 11, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00759 Published: March 21,28, April 4,11, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner CHRISTOPHER JOESPH LANE filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows:

this Legal Notice continues

Present name: CHRISTOPHER JOESPH LANE Proposed name: CHRISTOPHER JOSEPH NUNES THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 1, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: 1 Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: March 11, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00733 Published: March 21,28, April 4,11, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner DELTA DAWN MORRISSEY filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: WAYLON JOCASH LEE Proposed name: WAYLON JOCASH MORRISSEY THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 8, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: March 12, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00784 Published: March 21,28, April 4,11, 2019

SUMMONS SUMMONS NOTICE TO RESPONDENT SCOTT ANDREW SPAULDING You are being sued by petitioner: NANCY JANE SPAULDING You have 30 calendar days after this Summons and Petition are served on you to file a Response (form FL-120) at the court and have a copy served on the petitioner. A letter, phone call, or court appearance will not protect you. If you do not file your Response on time, the court may make orders affecting your marriage

this Legal Notice continues

or domestic partnership, your property, and custody of your children. You may be ordered to pay support and attorney fees and costs. For legal advice, contact a lawyer immediately. Get help finding a lawyer at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courts.ca.gov/selfhelp) at the California Legal Services website (www.lawhelpca.org), or by contacting your local county bar association. FEE WAIVER: If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the clerk for a fee waiver form. The court may order you to pay back all or part of the fees and costs that the court waived for you or the other party. The name and address of the court are: Superior Court of California, County of Butte 1775 Concord Avenue Chico, CA 95928 The name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner’s attorney, or the petitioner without an attorney, are: MICHAEL M. ROONEY/ RONALD T. MARQUEZ 1361 Esplanade Chico, CA 95926-4900 (530) 345-5678 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Dated: December 31, 2018 Case Number: 18FL02654 Published: March 14,21,28, April 4, 2019

SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: CHARLENE A ALLEE YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: BUTTE COUNTY CREDIT BUREAU A CORP NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The Court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Superior Court of California County of Butte

this Legal Notice continues

1775 Concord Avenue Chico, CA 95928 LIMITED CIVIL CASE The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney is: JOSEPH L SELBY (#249546) Law Office of Ferris & Selby 2607 Forest Avenue Ste 130 Chico, CA 95928. (530) 366-4290 Dated: June 29, 2018 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Case Number: 18CV02133 Published: March 21,28, April 4,11, 2019

PETITION NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE JIMMY H. MYERS, also known as JIMMY MYERS, JIMMY HENRY MYERS To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: JIMMY H. MYERS, also known as JIMMY MYERS, JIMMY HENRY MYERS A Petition for Probate has been filed by: JAMES A. MYERS in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: JAMES A. MYERS be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: March 26, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a

this Legal Notice continues


this Legal Notice continues

this Legal Notice continues

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE KONRAD JOSEPH PAUL To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: KONRAD JOSEPH PAUL a petition for Probate has been filed by: HOWARD W. PAUL in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: HOWARD W. PAUL be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: April 2, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition

this Legal Notice continues

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE LAWRENCE P. GIBBS, also known as LAWRENCE PARKER GIBBS, LAWRENCE GIBBS To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: LAWRENCE P. GIBBS, also known as, LAWRENCE PARKER GIBBS, LAWRENCE GIBBS a petition for Probate has been filed by: MARSHA L. GIBBS in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: MARSHA L. GIBBS be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: April 16, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an

this Legal Notice continues

inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: NICOLE R. PLOTTEL 466 Vallombrosa Ave. Chico, CA 95926. (530) 893-2882 Case Number: 19PR00122 Dated: March 11, 2019 Published: March 21,28, April 4, 2019

more services online www.newsreview.com

real news

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE SHANE L. MASTEN, also known as SHANE LOREN MASTEN, SHANE MASTEN To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: SHANE L. MASTEN, also known as SHANE LOREN MASTEN, SHANE MASTEN A Petition for Probate has been filed by: SHANNON W. MASTEN in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: SHANNON W. MASTEN be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: April 9, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a

or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: SONYA K. FINN The Law Offices of Leverenz & Finn 515 Wall Street Chico, CA 95928. (530) 895-1621 Case Number: 19PR00116 Dated: March 7, 2019 Published: March 14,21,28, 2019

supp rt

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE DORIS VIOLET NESMITH, aka DORIS V. NESMITH, aka DORIS NESMITH To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: DORIS VIOLET NESMITH, aka DORIS V. NESMITH, aka DORIS NESMITH A Petition for Probate has been filed by: SUSAN EIDSON in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: SUSAN EIDSON be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: April 9, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: TBA Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a

Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: NICOLE R. PLOTTEL 466 Vallombrosa Ave. Chico, CA 95926 (530) 893-2882 Case Number: 19PR00113 Dated: March 6, 2019 Published: March 14,21,28, 2019

’s Independent Journalism Fund at www.independentjournalismfund.org

Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: CLAYTON B. ANDERSON 20 Independence Circle Chico, CA 95973 (530) 342-6144 Case Number: 19PR00098 Dated: March 4, 2019 Published: March 14,21,28, 2019

Donate to

person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: NICOLE R. PLOTTEL 466 Vallombrosa Ave. Chico, CA 95926 (530) 893-2882 Case Number: 19PR00105 Dated: February 28, 2019 Published: March 7,14,21, 2019

Save up to

50% ts n a r u a t s e r n o and events!

+

10% off Get an extra p for the u n iG S u o y n whe letter S w e n S l a e d Sweet

Cnrsweetdeals.newsreview.Com

march 21, 2019

CN&R

37


REAL ESTATE

FOr mOrE INFOrmaTION aBOUT aDVErTISING IN OUr rEaL ESTaTE SEcTION, caLL 530-894-2300

Love’s Real estate

Housing Help

The post-fire housing crisis has put a lot of people in tight spots. We know people and meet people victimized by the Camp Fire who are trying to figure out their next move. Stick around? Leave town? Rent? Buy? We’ve witnessed people’s revelations, good and bad, about the insurance coverage they get or don’t get, when, or how. We brought up the Disaster Relief Loan program, the FHA 203(h) loan, that has helped people buy a house with no down payment money, people who had no idea they could possible qualify to own a home. We told people to call a loan officer at a lending institution and ask about it.

5083 Lago Vista Way , Paradise 95969 | $599,000

An acre lot with a fantastic home in Lago Vista subdivision. Super kitchen with granite counters, Kitchen Aide cook top, double oven, breakfast bar and breakfast room. In ground pool and spa. Formal living and dining room with gas fireplace. Family room is open to the kitchen and has a pellet stove on brick hearth. Master bedroom has walk in closet, separate soaking tub and shower and tiled floors and counters. The oversize garage also features a half bath of it’s own. Acre lot.

Larry Knifong team

CALBRE:00913120 2061 DR. MARtin LuthER king Pkwy suitE 167 & 169 offiCE: 530-872-5400 CELL:530-680-6234 EMAiL: LARRy@knifongtEAM.CoM

We also told people to check out wildfirerecovery.org to investigate the variety of disaster relief programs found there. One of the relief programs found at wildfirerecovery.org is the Individuals & Households Program (IHP), which is giving grant money, tax-free, for rental assistance to people who are renters or homeowners. The program is for “households displaced from their primary residence by a federally-declared disaster” (the Camp Fire). The money

is to enable people to pay for temporary housing while repairs are made to their pre-disaster residence, or for permanent rental housing, if they can’t go back. Rental assistance money can be used to rent a house, an apartment, a manufactured home, a condo, a recreational vehicle, or any other “readily fabricated dwelling.” To qualify for the program, your former residence must have been within the disaster area; you have no insurance, or insurance has been denied, or your insurance doesn’t cover all of your losses; the affected home is where you usually live and where you were living at the time of the Camp Fire; and you can’t live in that home now because you can’t get to it, or it requires repairs or replacement because of the fire. You can also get help at www.disasterassistance.gov or by calling FEMA at 800-621-3362. We all seem to know people who are staggered and confused by this disaster and need some direction, right? Let’s pass this stuff on.

Doug Love is Sales Manager at Century 21 in Chico. Call 530-680-0817 or email dougwlove@gmail.com License #950289

Homes are Selling in Your Neighborhood Shop every home for sale at www.C21SelectGroup.com

530.345.6618 Newer Home in Wildwood Park with views of Foothills. $425,000 2 bed 2 bath Condo in Chico in a great area. $167,500

“Building trust one home at a time.”

Alice Zeissler | 530.518.1872

Brad Smith | 530.894.4533 DRE #02032624

DRE #01312354

Homes Sold Last Week ADDRESS

TOWN

100 Eagle Nest Dr 1462 Creekhaven Pl 45 Glenbrook Ct 2215 E 8th St 417 Stonebridge Dr 3181 Wood Creek Dr 10 Stratford Way 3020 Surrey Ln 1020 Mildred Ave 2631 Chantel Way 3779 Cosby Ave

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico

38

CN&R

march 21, 2019

Butte County is Experiencing an Extreme Housing Shortage! It is great to time sell - give me call to see if the time is right for YOU

Nice 3 bedroom homes coming on the market soon, call me for details.

PRICE

BR/BA

$720,000 $714,000 $688,000 $600,000 $590,000 $564,000 $547,000 $544,000 $535,000 $531,000 $530,000

3/2 4/3 4/3 3/2 3/2 3/2 4/3 4/3 3/3 3/2 3/2

Jennifer Parks | 530.864.0336 BRE# 01269667

Sponsored by Century 21 Select Real Estate, Inc. SQ. FT. 2572 2389 2491 2177 2133 2018 2281 2607 1730 1895 1960

ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

256 E 1st Ave 1468 Lucy Way 1490 Hannah Rose Ct 3188 Sawyers Bar Ln 3264 Rogue River Dr 2690 Guynn Ave 756 Vallombrosa Ave 2815 Levi Ln 1352 Oleander Ave 225 Silver Lake Dr 1427 Yosemite Dr

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico

$525,000 $525,000 $500,000 $479,000 $475,000 $437,000 $435,000 $435,000 $430,000 $425,000 $401,500

6/3 3/2 4/3 4/3 4/2 3/2 3/2 3/2 3/1 3/2 3/2

SQ. FT. 2994 1978 2201 3113 2216 1762 1798 1580 1278 1774 1718


eXPAnd your business reACh

Need a hand with your home purchase?

Protect your goodies. Insurance & Risk Management Services for:

bidwell TiTle & esCrOw

Pa ge

14

Vla

de’s

e mra k o ak bre

s

Sac ram

ento

n by Joh

S ’S new

&

obe

Get

Culture,

flynn

CHICO’S FREE NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY VOLUME 42, ISSUE 8

From

funn y to he artfe lt WWW.NEWSREVIEW.COM

kly nt wee

|

Volu

mid r vote e guid

On the BALLOT page

iSSu e me 30,

27

thu rSd

ay,

oct obe

2018 r 18,

12

|

page 14

25-

31,

201

8

With locations in:

Chico: 894-2612 • Oroville: 533-2414 Paradise: 877-6262 • Gridley: 846-4005 www.BidwellTitle.com

, lo ca l fo lk s sh ar e th ei r ta le s ab ser ou t

+t e r m

|

r

t

gr ee ni n G t h e li gh t

See Arts&

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 18, 2018

on eas nme ente rtai

oCt

th e he ha s , bu t th ro ne ng s’ e ki th n ca ce nt er fo rm er ne ra l ge as ru le r? ma na ge

• Farm • Business • Life • Health • Home • Auto

new Sre

View .com

SPECIAL ISSUE: 2018 election primer

vin

g n ort h

ern

mens

nev

ada

truat

, ta h

oe

an

ion

d t ru

cke

e

4 ENDORSEMENTS!

Cnrsweetdeals.newsreview.Com

27 BLOOD ON HER HANDS 24 ZOMBIELAND

A dv e rt i se i n Chi C o, re n o , A nd sA Cr A me nt o! Learn more at Dahlmeier.com Oroville Chico

if you’re interested in Advertising,

CAll (530) 894-2300

530.533.3424

License #0680951

530.342.6421

How Much is Your Home Worth Today? Ask the Professionals at Century 21 Select

530.345.6618 | www.C21SelectGroup.com

Teresa Larson (530) 899-5925 DRE #01177950 chiconativ@aol.com

Condo! Adorable 3 bed/2 bth, 1,249 sq ft with 1-car attached garage, nice size back yard! Fireplace in living room. One you won’t want to miss!!..............................................................$259,000 235 aCres loCated ated in the Beautiful setting of Butte Valley! Offering 2 newer stunning custom homes, horse set up,Nout and fully fenced property. Wonderful NG E D I buildings, opportunity to have privacy with Penough acres to have horses, cattle or just the peaceful setting that this has to offer.....................................................................................$1,650,000 adoraBle 3 bed/2.5 bth, 1,502 sq ft with front and back porches plus a formal dining room ING and living room with an open floor P plan, laundry room, 2-car garage and all furnishing E NinDdoor in the home are included.............................................................................................$335,000 ............................................................................................$ Beautiful 4 bed/3 bth, 2,512 sq ft home, .30 of an acre! 2-car garage, mature landscaping. $519,900

FOR SALE

6ac Creekside on Butte Creek $249,000 3.4 ac, well, septic and power in place $115,000 5 ac lot. Owner carry $29,500 LD S Oremodeled Campus condo tastefully $159,000 26.6 ac walnuts with 5800 sq ft home SOLD $1,455,000

3 bed 2 bath in Magalia with lots of upgrades! Call now for more info & private showings! CalDRE #02056059

Olivia Larrabee l (530) 520-3169 Olivia.Larrabee@c21selectgroup.com

Mark Reaman l (530) 228-2229 Lic# 01265853

Mark.Reaman@c21selectgroup.com

The following houses were sold in Butte County by real estate agents or private parties during the week of March 4- March 8, 2019 The housing prices are based on the stated documentary transfer tax of the parcel and may not necessarily reflect the actual sale price of the home. ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

SQ. FT.

ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

SQ. FT.

3001 Ashburton Ln

Chico

$387,000

3/2

1540

218 W 3rd Ave

Chico

$328,000

2/1

923

1273 Glenshire Ln

Chico

$385,000

3/2

1471

2 Wysong Ct

Chico

$320,500

3/2

1214

1485 Manzanita Ave

Chico

$363,500

3/2

1530

421 Legacy Ln

Chico

$320,000

3/2

1179

1233 Whitewood Way

Chico

$362,500

3/2

1817

2764 Camden Ct

Chico

$310,000

2/2

1321

880 Mathews Dr

Chico

$361,000

3/2

1540

2034 Huntington Dr

Chico

$300,000

3/3

1142

6 Rugosa Oak Ct

Chico

$359,000

3/2

1314

2231 Hutchinson St

Chico

$300,000

3/3

1920

288 Vail Dr

Chico

$345,000

4/2

1407

13 Pebblewood Pines Dr

Chico

$300,000

2/2

1559

19 Skywalker Ct

Chico

$345,000

3/2

1435

2788 Ceres Ave

Chico

$297,500

3/2

1039

829 W 4th Ave

Chico

$345,000

5/2

2220

24 Phlox Way

Chico

$295,500

3/2

1308

1725 Dayton Rd

Chico

$330,000

1/1

940

2421 Cactus Ave

Chico

$295,000

3/3

1425

2552 Mariposa Ave

Chico

$329,500

3/2

1551

276 Connors Ave

Chico

$289,000

2/1

1174

march 21, 2019

CN&R

39


r o f s u join

h c n u l y a

d i r f 13

16

16

13

15

17

18

17

18

345 West FiFth street ChiCo, CA 95928 (530) 891–6328 Please call for reservations Open Fridays for Lunch 11:30am to 2:30pm Join us for Happy Hour 7 days a week 4:30 to 6:00pm

15

Profile for News & Review

c-2019-03-21  

c-2019-03-21