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CHICO’S FREE NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY VOLUME 42, ISSUE 29 THURSDAY, MARCH 14, 2019 WWW.NEWSREVIEW.COM

MEDICAL

EXIT Fire-stricken physicians leave the Ridge in limbo by EVAN TUCHINSKY page 18

27

8

Time to rebuild

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Stop outsourcing

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CN&R

INSIDE

Vol. 42, Issue 29 • March 14, 2019 OPINION

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Editorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Guest Comment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Second & Flume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 This Modern World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Streetalk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

NEWSLINES

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Downstroke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Sifter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9

HEALTHLINES

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Appointment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Weekly Dose. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

GREENWAYS

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Eco Event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS

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15 Minutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 The Goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

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COVER STORY

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ARTS & CULTURE

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Arts Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 This Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Fine Arts listings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Nightlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Reel World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Chow. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Arts DEVO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Brezsny’s Astrology . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35

CLASSIFIEDS

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REAL ESTATE

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ON THE COVER: ILLUSTRATION BY JOHN W. TOMAC

Our Mission: To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. Editor Melissa Daugherty Managing Editor Meredith J. Cooper Arts Editor Jason Cassidy Contributing Editor Evan Tuchinsky Staff Writer Ashiah Scharaga Calendar Editor Neesa Sonoquie Contributors Robin Bacior, Alastair Bland, Michelle Camy, Vic Cantu, Charles Finlay, Bob Grimm, Howard Hardee, Miles Jordan, Mark Lore, Landon Moblad, Brie Oviedo, Ryan J. Prado, Juan-Carlos Selznick, Ken Smith, Robert Speer, Carey Wilson Managing Art Director Tina Flynn Creative Services Manager Elisabeth Bayard Arthur Ad Designers Naisi Thomas, Cathy Arnold Publications Designers Katelynn Mitrano, Nikki Exerjian Director of Sales and Advertising Jamie DeGarmo Advertising Services Coordinator Ruth Alderson Senior Advertising Consultants Brian Corbit, Laura Golino Advertising Consultants Adam Lew, Jordon Vernau

President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Director of Nuts & Bolts Deborah Redmond Director of People & Culture David Stogner Director of Dollars & Sense Debbie Mantoan Nuts & Bolts Ninja Norma Huerta Payroll/AP Wizard Miranda Hansen Accounts Receivable Specialist Analie Foland Developer John Bisignano System Support Specialist Kalin Jenkins N&R Publications Managing Editor Laura Hillen N&R Publications Writer Anne Stokes Marketing & Publications Consultants Greta Beekhuis, Steve Caruso, Joseph Engle, Elizabeth Morabito, Traci Hukill, Luke Roling, Celeste Worden 353 E. Second Street, Chico, CA 95928 Phone (530) 894-2300 Fax (530) 892-1111 Website newsreview.com Got a News Tip? (530) 894-2300, ext 2224 or chiconewstips@newsreview.com Calendar Events cnrcalendar@newsreview.com Calendar Questions (530) 894-2300, ext. 2243 Want to Advertise? Fax (530) 892-1111 or cnradinfo@newsreview.com Classifieds (530) 894-2300, press 2 or classifieds@newsreview.com Job Opportunities jobs@newsreview.com Want to Subscribe to CN&R? chisubs@newsreview.com Editorial Policies: Opinions expressed in CN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons, or other portions of the paper. CN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or review materials. Email letters to cnrletters@newsreview.com. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form and to edit them for libel.

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Advertising Policies: All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes the responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message.

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MARCH 14, 2019

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OPINION

Send guest comments, 340 words maximum, to gc@newsreview.com or to 353 E. Second St., Chico, CA 95928. Please include photo & short bio.

EDITORIAL

Contractors deserve the microscope Fchanges Recession, the Chico City Council made sweeping to cut costs. Among them were instances in ive years ago, amid the fallout from the Great

which the city cut loose employees and turned instead to private contractors, including for legal counsel and park maintenance such as tree care. We at the CN&R were wary of such arrangements, especially when it came to the city’s legal representation. Over many years, we’d watched the in-house attorney shield the city, and thus taxpayers, from potential lawsuits. The system worked well. Back in 2014, we cautioned the council that attorneys from out of the area would lack historical knowledge. We feared that the move to outside representation would eliminate the community connections we believe ensure the best interests of the city are served. The council didn’t listen and hired a firm with offices outside of Los Angeles and in the Napa area. Over the ensuing years, we’ve noted problems with outsourcing on a few occasions, but two recent blunders have solidified our concerns.

As the CN&R reported last Tuesday (March 5), during the City Council’s regular meeting, it appears Chico may be on the hook for hundreds of thousands of dollars of legal fees related to the court battle over the amortization of Chico Scrap Metal. During that meeting, allegations surfaced that the contracted city attorney had wrongly advised the panel that the business would pick up the tab for certain ongoing litigation. The price tag now stands at about $200,000. (See “Legal jeopardy and weed,” Newlines, March 7). The other event putting outsourcing under the microscope is the recent hatchet job at Lower Bidwell Park that resulted in the felling of a beautiful grove of valley oaks. In that case, without proper oversight, a contracted crew mistakenly cut down 27 of the trees (see “Oak grove chainsaw massacre,” page 9). Both of these events should give the council pause. From our perspective, it’s time for the panel to review its relationship with contractors. Our advice: Study whether cost savings have been realized, and to what degree. It may be time to part ways with outsiders, especially those who do more harm than good. Ω

GUEST COMMENT

A civil rights fiasco Ton-the-spot Monroe County, Ga., after deputies performed an test of a bag of blue substance that they hree years ago, Dasha Fincher was arrested in

found in the car in which she was a passenger. The stuff tested positive for methamphetamine. After her arrest, the judge in her case set bail at $1 million because she was perceived as a drug trafficker. There was just one problem: The roadside test was wrong. The blue substance was actually cotton candy. Fincher spent three months in jail because of the faulty test. by Fincher’s story isn’t an aberraSagiv Galai tion. The prevalence of false-positive The author is a results associated with roadside paralegal for the drug tests is common. ProPublica American Civil warned that “a minimum of 100,000 Liberties Union people nationwide plead guilty to Criminal Law drug charges that rely on field-test Reform Project. results as evidence” and that because the tests are so frequently used, this could mean thousands of wrongful convictions. Prosecutors nevertheless continue to seek unaffordable bail and charge defendants with serious crimes on the basis of unreliable roadside test results.

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It doesn’t have to be this way. For instance, the unmatched power of their office allows prosecutors to end pretrial detention in cases involving roadside tests. Prosecutors who rely on these tests must not set cash bail. Furthermore, they must ensure that lab confirmations are prompt. This can be accomplished through robust supervision and screening practices, but even in offices that have these practices, more must be done to prevent the incarceration of innocent people. As such, prosecutors and local municipalities should create or expand conviction integrity units to evaluate prior cases in which these tests were used as evidence in one’s conviction. Prosecutors do this already—around the country, offices review convictions in which misconduct, bad evidence or error led to the wrongful incarceration of innocent people. Prosecutors also must refrain from pursuing plea deals in cases in which arrest is exclusively supported by a roadside test. This would ensure that individuals who are subjected to wrongful arrest are at least free from the pressure of deciding whether to plead guilty for something they didn’t do—just because the lab hasn’t figured out that they’re innocent yet. Even if prosecutors don’t think that decriminalization, or even outright legalization, is the solution, they should put into place protections to ensure no one’s liberty is jeopardized. Ω

SECOND & FLUME by Melissa Daugherty m e l i s s a d @ n e w s r e v i e w. c o m

Chasing the glimmer At the top of the list of businesses I was determined to check on after the Camp Fire was Mendon’s Nursery—a special place to many people in this part of the North State, including yours truly. My husband and I said our wedding vows under an arbor purchased there. Years later, on our way home to Chico with our daysold infant, who was born at Adventist Health Feather River’s Birth Day Place, we popped in and picked up a fig sapling that we refer to as Henry’s tree. We visited countless times simply to peruse what’s in stock. That often ended in impulse buys. I made it to Mendon’s on Nov. 10, two days after the fire began. The gates were closed, and I could tell that the building with the registers was gone. Still, with portions of the property seemingly unscathed, customers like me have held our breath awaiting news of the nursery’s fate. Sadly, on Tuesday (March 12), the owners put speculation to rest with a long Facebook post announcing its permanent closure. A liquidation sale begins Friday. That’s not what I was hoping to hear, and I feel like that’s a common theme in the pages of the CN&R these days. We’ve reported on a lot of heavy things lately. Producing depressing but important stories is standard fare in this business. What’s unusual is when so many of them are tied to one subject. Over the past four months, more than 120 pieces related to the fire have been published in this newspaper. (You can find them archived on our website by clicking on the Camp Fire Reports link.) Regular readers know what I’m talking about. Take, for example, as first reported in the CN&R, Meredith J. Cooper’s in-depth cover story and recent follow-up piece on the town’s contaminated water and the Paradise Irrigation District’s prediction that it’s going to take years to fix the conveyance system. It’s a daunting scenario. Speaking of bleak forecasts, in this issue (page 18), Evan Tuchinsky paints the picture of the local health care landscape as it stands today. There’s a lot to wrap your head around, but the short version is that many medical providers on the Ridge have fled the region, and it’s unclear whether Adventist Health will ever reopen its hospital and several ancillary services. Though some doctors have relocated down in the valley, the contraction affects the region as a whole. A case in point is the closure of the aforementioned Birth Day Place. The popular facility drew expectant mothers from Chico and beyond. According to Tuchinsky’s reporting, however, all of its affiliated obstetricians have left the area. That certainly doesn’t bode well for reopening that beloved maternity ward. Deep sigh. I’m finding it harder to find the bright side these days. But this week there’s a glimmer on the horizon. In Newslines (page 8), you’ll read about a couple of local builders who’ve formed a new construction firm and are among those leading the charge on residential rebuilding. Meanwhile, the town and the county are working on ways to expedite the process. It’s the good news all of us probably could use about now. When it comes to positivity, I’ll take what I can get.

Melissa Daugherty is editor of the CN&R


LETTERS

ATTENTION BOOMERS

Send email to cnrletters@newsreview.com

Censures and cannabis Re “Legal jeopardy and weed” (Newslines, by Ashiah Scharaga, March 7): When I was very young, I was taught by my parents to “be responsible for my actions.” Later, while serving as an elected Associated Students representative on two college campuses, I learned that your constituents will respect you more if your public behavior is respectable and honorable. Clearly, these are lessons that Chico City Councilman Sean Morgan has not learned or is choosing to ignore. His behavior during his term as mayor was “in your face” if you did not agree with him. Now, already at the opposite side of several 6-to-1 council votes, Morgan expresses his frustration with personal outbursts from the dais. No one expected Morgan to be a gracious loser when the City Council majority flipped in the last election. Yet, this is the same Sean Morgan who directed law enforcement to remove speakers from the

podium as mayor. It is time for a reckoning. Either Councilman Morgan apologizes to Karl Ory and the community for his recent behavior, or he resigns his seat. If neither occurs, then it is time for the council majority to make his censure a matter of record. In the future, each council meeting should begin with an admonition for respectable conduct. Ronald Angle Chico

The Chico City Council is working to make cannabis available in Chico. However, it seems overly cautious on making something available that is legal in a majority of states. Why not go back to what worked for 10 years? Allow delivery while waiting on final rules. Cannabis delivery in the past had no issues, none. As it now stands, people have to order delivery from Shasta! Any service that does not offer good quality will soon fold. People like Councilman Sean Morgan do not represent the vast majority of

people in the state. His ideas are a losing proposition. Allow delivery in Chico until the council makes new rules. Marc Deveraux Chico

People and pets Re “Sheltered together” (Newslines, by Elizabeth Castillo, March 7): Thank you for raising awareness about the challenges faced by homeless people with companion animals. Chico Homeless Animal Outreach has been working since 2013 to inform local service providers, as well as the general public, about the vital bonds between people in the homeless community and their pets. We work closely with all the shelters in Chico as well as other animal welfare groups. We distribute food, water and supplies, but more importantly, we also provide medical care and vaccinations through our Manger Clinic at the Jesus Center. LETTERS c o n t i n u e d

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Disability

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Are you interested in joining a support group for people living with disabilities? Please come check out our new disability support group! nd WHEN: 2Every otherof Monday, 2:30-4:00 Monday each month, 2:30pm-4pm, 4th Wednesday of each month, 10:30am-12pm

WHERE: Disability Action Center office, Formerly ILSNC 1161 East Ave, Chico 95926 QUESTIONS? Contact ContactSandra Anna Morales at 893-8527 or at 893-8527 x 104 anna.smith@ILSNC.org or sandra@actionctr.org

March 14, 2019

CN&R

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LETTERS c o n t i n u e d f r o m pa g e 5 Animals provide unconditional love and act as a buffer against the disdain and outright abuse suffered by people living on the street. When shelters refuse to allow pets, people find themselves faced with the heartbreaking choice between losing a best friend or continuing to live on the street. I encourage anyone interested in this issue to read My Dog Always Eats First: Homeless People and Their Animals, by Leslie Irvine. More information can also be found on our website and Facebook pages, as well as from the national nonprofit mentioned in your article, Pets of the Homeless. Robin Tripp Chico

Editor’s note: The author is the founder of Chico Homeless Animal Outreach.

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Re “She listened, responded” (Letters, by Denise Minor, March 7): I would like to thank Denise Minor for the response to my letter and thank CN&R for printing it. Denise stated that I was wrong on all accounts, yet made no mention of Assembly Bill 109. Research will show how this elevated the crime rate. As for punishing taxpayers, then-Gov. Jerry Brown signed into law the gas-DMV hike long before we got to vote on it. I voted in this election and noticed that before the votes were even in, he was on TV praising voters for taxing themselves. I think the election was rigged. This tax not only hurts us at the pump; food and other goods are now more costly because of it. Open-border mentality is the phrase I should have used. Brown and Gov. Gavin Newsom both have a vision for California and that is to give health insurance to all illegals. I mentioned Kate Steinle because I believe there is a border emergency. Again, that is a topic liberals simply will not talk about. Mick Watkins Gridley

Destruction at the park In the heart of Chico’s lifeline, Bidwell Park, a stand of oaks has been massacred—adjacent to the Nature Center no less! As Robin McCollum, an urban forester and 37-year firefighting veteran said, “The Camp Fire was a manifestation of evil like I’ve never seen before,

In the heart of Chico’s lifeline, Bidwell Park, a stand of oaks has been massacred—adjacent to the Nature Center no less! —martin Lefevre

but this clear-cutting of healthy valley oaks to thin out some catalpa is a manifestation of hysteria.” Is this egregious act the shape of things to come instead of addressing the underlying causes, both local and global, of the fire that destroyed Paradise? At minimum, there was a negligent lack of planning and oversight by Public Works, and an egregious absence of crew supervision by park staff. As Richie Bamlet, urban forest manager for the city of Chico, emotionally said to me on Friday, March 8, as we viewed the destruction, “I’ve spent two years saving 20 damaged oak trees; they destroyed 28 healthy oaks in two days.” Martin LeFevre Chico

Editor’s note: For more on this, see Newslines on page 9.

PG&E, Dems and wildfire Re “Substance over image” (Letters, by Lucy Cooke, Feb. 28): My Feb. 28 letter criticized Sen. Kamala Harris as nothing more than political expediency wrapped in the demographic allure that certain Democrats think is the ticket to electoral success. I had not yet read the Feb. 23 New York Times article, “The Political Playbook of a Bankrupt California Utility.” It details the incestuous ties of top-tier California Democrats with PG&E and its oversight agency, the California Public Utilities Commission. Kamala Harris got her start in politics with appointments and backing by her longtime friend Willie Brown, a Democratic power broker, former San Francisco mayor, speaker of the California Assembly and longtime lobbyist for PG&E. You can thank Kamala Harris, when she was California attorney general—along with Willie Brown and Gov. Jerry Brown—for the very lax regulatory oversight of PG&E that contributed in the Camp Fire. Since the NYT article, no California paper has commented on the facts of the article. That may be simply a demonstration of the

power of California Democrats to keep the story quiet. Lucy Cooke Butte Valley

Condemn interference Alfred de Zayas, former secretary of the U.N. Human Rights Council and an expert in international law, was appointed as the first special rapporteur to visit Venezuela in 21 years. According to the ACLU: “SRs spend 2-3 weeks in country, talking with both governmental and nongovernmental actors, such as civil liberties organizations, victims of human rights violations as well as concerned government officials.” This January, de Zayas told The Independent that an overdependence on oil, poor governance, and corruption were significant factors in their crisis, but that the sanctions by the U.S., EU and Canada are “economic warfare.” Since 2015, nearly 2 million people fled the country and inflation reached 60,324 percent. President Obama began the sanctions, but Donald Trump increased them and also threatened military invasion. In 1973, Venezuelans voted to nationalize their oil, gold, bauxite and coltan resources, barring access to U.S. and transnational corporations. De Zayas concludes, “There is nothing more undemocratic than a coup d’état ... We do not want a repetition of the Pinochet putsch in 1973.” De Zayas joined Noam Chomsky and over 70 other academics and experts in condemning U.S. interference. Lauren Ayers Chico

More on Venezuela Forget his basket of deplorables, Trump’s digging through a trash can of war criminals for his appointees. Choosing Elliott Abrams as envoy to Venezuela is like choosing El Chapo to head up the DEA. Or choosing your Jewish son-inlaw to fashion a peace deal excluding a two-state solution between the

Jewish state of Israel and Israelioccupied state of Palestine. Maybe 535 Americans like those choices. But back to Elliott Abrams. He covered up massacres of thousands in El Salvador while calling the support of Contra killings in Nicaragua part of America’s human rights policy. Convicted during the Iran/Contra charade hearings on TV, Abrams was fined $50. I protested against this in the 1980s, so when Abrams pops up, I know the fix is in. Again. Venezuela is beset upon by this secret government’s recycled old windbags. Team Abrams with [National Security Adviser] John Bolton, who should be jailed for tricking America into bogus wars for oil/ greater Israel, is a dynamically destructive destabilizing duo dreamed up in hell. Their secret mission is overthrowing democratically elected leaders. Watch “Maduro’s” plea to America on Youtube. Hit the like button if you want America to not swap him for a corporate stooge that will exploit Venezuela’s people like never before. David Kiefer Chico

Bust the light-runners Traffic, potholes and solutions. I’m sure we have all experienced the extra traffic in town and noticed the toll it’s taking on the roads. That being said, we all experienced two, three or four people running red lights pretty regularly, especially the main intersection at the Chico Mall and the Park Avenue/Notre Dame traffic light, to name a few. Why don’t we set up red light enforcement cameras at some of these hotspots? The city can get some much-needed revenue it can use for pothole repairs and other traffic-related improvements. Possibly $5,000 per day in fines. If eventually people learn their lesson and the enforcement is no longer profitable, then it has done its job of making the intersections safer. Daniel Lassotta Chico

More letters online:

We’ve got too many letters for this space. please go to www.newsreview.com/chico for additional readers’ comments on past cn&r articles.


STREETALK

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It would be amazing for the Sacramento Valley to be represented. They kept the stadium in Sac for a reason. They’ve always had great potential, like when they had Mike Bibby and Stojaković, but something always blocked them.

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NEWSLINES DOWNSTROKE MACHETE ATTACK, CHEESE THEFT

The Glenn County Sheriff’s Office grappled with two strange occurrences in recent weeks. According to a press release, last Monday (March 4) around 1:40 a.m., a man was attacked with a machete at Grindstone Rancheria. The victim, 27-year-old Carlos Hill, reportedly was walking with two youths when Dudley Burrows Jr., 39, drove up and the men began arguing. Burrows allegedly brandished a firearm before attacking Hill with the machete and driving away. Hill suffered major head and arm injuries and was transported to Enloe Medical Center. Burrows was arrested at his Elk Creek home two days later. According to GCSO logs, between Sunday night and Monday morning (March 10-11), a man allegedly broke into the Sierra Nevada Cheese Co. in Willows, stealing about $3,600 worth of equipment and apparel, including a company car and $30 worth of “cheese products.”

MORE HELP FOR SURVIVORS

Butte County has launched another resource for Camp Fire survivors.

Immediate Disaster Case Management

(IDCM) services, a partnership with the Administration for Children and Families, will provide case managers to support and assist survivors with unmet needs related to the disaster. This includes help navigating the Small Business Administration loan and Federal Emergency Management Agency appeals processes, and development of a personal disaster recovery plan. Case managers also will facilitate referrals for such things as health insurance, housing, financial assistance, transportation, behavioral health and legal resources. Survivors can access IDCM at the Butte County Employment Center, 24455 Carmichael Drive in Chico, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday.

DEBRIS REMOVAL UPDATE

Camp Fire survivors registered with the government debris removal program who are waiting to move back to their properties can get on a priority list to fast-track the cleanup. Go to buttecountyrecovers.org/agencies/ housing for information on the process. People may not live in temporary dwellings, such as RVs and trailers, on burned properties until fire debris is cleared (see “Board gets bombshell,” Newslines, Jan. 31). In the meantime, the county has set up temporary RV parks at Lime Saddle Campground—full at press time—and the CMA Church in Paradise. County spokeswoman Casey Hatcher (pictured) said about a dozen spaces will be available at the DeSabla campgrounds in a few weeks. 8

CN&R

MARCH 14, 2019

Rebuilding the Ridge Contractors, public officials pave the way for growth

W looked out a window at work, at Sierra Nevada Brewing Co., and saw an ominous hen the Camp Fire hit, Isaiah Mangold

cloud of smoke in the air. He drove home to Paradise and he and his wife, Laura Sutherlandstory and Mangold, started packphoto by ing “nonchalantly.” Meredith They’d been evacuated J. Cooper before and knew the m ere d i t h c @ drill; they expected to n ew srev i ew. c o m be back home that night. Mother Nature had other plans, however, and the couple, their two kids and their dog ended up staying with Mangold’s parents in Red Bluff for several weeks, before moving in to the RV park set up by his employer at Meriam Park. The experience was chilling, but they made it out without incident. For Mangold, whose brother’s property is next door to his, whether to rebuild was never a question. He’s not alone—many like him hope to return to the Ridge, but the process is daunting and complicated. The town of Paradise, Butte County and a new local firm have stepped up to try to make it easier for people to move forward, giving hope to those

committed to returning to the area. “We have a pretty strong group of friends and family determined to rebuild and be together,” Mangold said. “The reality is, if we don’t rebuild, everyone will be spread to the wind. Nobody wants that.” In the months following the fire, the Mangolds weighed their options for rebuilding, and then a friend turned them on to Nor Cal Development Inc., a new company formed in the wake of the Camp Fire with the singular goal of rebuilding the Ridge. Mangold didn’t know what to expect from their first meeting, but it didn’t take long before he was sold. These guys were the real deal, he said. Frank Lewis and Michael Hart both graduated from Chico State and have worked locally as contractors for years. Lewis spent much of his career in the Bay Area before moving back to the North State; Hart has built several well-known structures, including Chico State’s Student Health Center. Now, they share a vision to shape the residential landscape of the Ridge. “This was an enormous natural disaster … and it’s hard to conceive of what that means,” Hart said during a recent interview at Nor Cal Development’s headquarters. “We have a unique perspective on what

rebuilding Paradise means.” The pair’s new venture aims to encapsulate all aspects of rebuilding—from debris removal to handing over house keys—under a single umbrella. The goal: to streamline the process for both residents and local building departments while providing a road map for positive development and growth in the Camp Fire burn area. “A lot of people have never built a house, or even dreamed of building a house,” Hart said. “We can’t help everyone, but we are giving families hope—they love their community and they want to go back home.” At Nor Cal Development, which occupies a

20,000-square-foot building off of OroChico Highway at the Midway, business is happening fast. Hart and Lewis started by creating seven different floor plans. Clients can choose among those, then customize. Limiting the options makes the process simpler for people who are new to homebuilding while also easing pressure on building officials—after a plan has been approved once, it’s smooth sailing. In fact, they’ve already submitted plans for Mangold’s house and a few others. The company aims to pave the way for


Frank Lewis (left), Julian Martinez and Michael Hart of Nor Cal Development have a plan to deal with a lack of clean water in Paradise: They’ll install storage tanks at residences and supply water until the irrigation district’s system is up and running.

positive growth. Hart and Lewis estimate they will hire about 100 workers, from laborers to electricians to surveyors, with the goal of employing people who were displaced and helping them rebuild. Julian Martinez is a case in point. Two days before the fire, which claimed his home, he lost a bid for a Paradise Town Council seat. His campaign platform was based on fire prevention and boosting the economy, two things he’s now working toward as Nor Cal Development’s vice president of operations. “It was a pretty seamless transition,” he said. More than anything, the team sees itself as bringing hope to the community. “This is better than anything I’ve ever been a part of,” Lewis said. “We hope to make an impact on the community as a whole, to set an example,” Hart added. The town of Paradise has received

eight house plans post-fire thus far, according to Colette Curtis, spokeswoman for Paradise. No permits will be approved until debris removal has been completed—Mangold said his lot was cleared last week. Turnaround for permit approval tends to be a couple of weeks. At Tuesday night’s meeting (March 12), the Town Council approved a contract with 4Leaf Inc. to bolster its Building Department. That means more staff to accommodate the added workload. They will start work in a couple of weeks. “Prior to the fire, we handled about 30 building permits a year,” Curtis said. “We are expecting much, much more than that.” The county already has contracts with firms to handle extra workloads, though it’s possible it could hire additional temporary employees, said Casey Hatcher, county spokeswoman. As for codes and fees, nothing has changed. Impact fees, Hatcher explained, have been waived in both Paradise and the unincorporated areas because rebuilding won’t add an impact—it’s just replacing it. Paradise will consider whether to alter its building codes, but those discussions will take time, Curtis said. “We’re working to develop a vision for the community,” Curtis said. “We want codes to be as safe as they can be, while also being appropriate for the place that we live in.” Ω

Oak grove chainsaw massacre Tree lovers lament ‘assault’ on Lower Park woods by city-contracted crew Robin McCollum had just begun talking about a field of fallen

trees by the Chico Creek Nature Center when a white SUV slowed to a halt and the driver rolled down the front passenger window. “Is this where the village is going to go?” the woman asked, referring to the Mechoopda living history exhibit proposed to be sited adjacent to the center. “No,” replied McCollum, chair of local environmental group Chico Tree Advocates. The tribal installation would go in the old deer pens nearby. This clearing owes its existence to ignoble circumstances. Monday afternoon (March 11), McCollum re-examined events of a week earlier, when a Cal Fire corrections crew cut down 27 valley oaks that weren’t slated for removal. The thinning project, as planned by city staff, called for cutting into the grove’s catalpas—trees known for their heart-shaped leaves and narrow seed pods—to reduce fire fuels in Lower Bidwell Park. With marks painted on trunks coded unclearly, collateral damage ensued. “This is a failure, based on two things: lack of knowledge and lack of professional responsibility,” said McCollum, a retired Butte County tree foreman. He specifically faults on-site supervisors for not distinguishing healthy oaks from dispensable catalpas, and for not recognizing a job that rose to the level of review by not only the city’s urban forester but also the Bidwell Park and Playground Commission. McCollum said he since has surveyed the scene with two commissioners, Elaina McReynolds (the chair) and Lise Smith-Peters. “The integrity of the whole forest is harmed by the improper removal, this assault,” he added. “Nature takes its toll in due course, but when we come in and stupidly [fell healthy trees], this is an injury to the whole system.”

SIFT ER Kosovo loves us! After the free-fall of approval in response to President Trump’s first year in office, the world’s image of U.S. leaders has remained steady after year No. 2. It’s still pretty crummy, though, with 31 percent approving and 40 percent disapproving of our country’s leadership—that’s compared with 48 percent approval and 28 percent disapproval in 2016,

Robin McCollum, chair of Chico Erik Gustafson, the city’s public works Tree Advocates, shows the cleardirector-operations, didn’t minimize the cutting next to Chico Creek Nature cause or effects in a phone interview with Center. He says restoring the 27 the CN&R. While “the intent had a lot of lost oaks will take at least 20 merit and was good,” he said—cleaning years. PHOTO BY EVAN TUCHINSKY out an overgrown area, thick with deadwood and brush, to reduce its fuel load— “from my investigation, once they got in there and started removing a lot of those trees, it became a lot larger than anyone anticipated. At that point, the brakes should have been put on.” The city, in taking responsibility, will utilize part of a grant for planting valley oaks, previously received from Cal Fire, to replace the fallen trees. “This particular area looks different [without the oaks],” he said. “But, we think after our replanting efforts and mitigation efforts, it’s going to be a place that’s going to be enjoyed by all—and a fire and safety hazard will be dramatically reduced.”

So, how did this happen? Both McCollum and Gustafson cite communication

as the prime problem. City staffers who identified trees for trimming and felling did so with marks misinterpreted by the Cal Fire supervisor as well as the two city supervisors on-site intermittently. Chico pays $200 a day for crews from the Salt Creek Camp, a minimum-security correctional facility in the Redding area. Cal Fire trains and oversees the workers. “Their heads are down, they’re working hard, and all of a sudden they look up and it’s quite a bit different viewshed,” Gustafson said. Public Works immediately instituted standardized marks for tree crews, including contractors, whom the city will make sure to Barack Obama’s last year as president. Of inform. A full ring with an identifier at the base the top four global powers, only Russia’s indicates a tree for removal, and a green dot leadership has a lower 2018 approval signals pruning. Urban Forester Richie Bamlet (30 percent), while both China (34 percent) wasn’t consulted before this project—Gustafson and Germany (39 percent) outpace the U.S. said Bamlet will review “field operation plans Measured by continent, Europe hates us the and tree removals” moving forward. most, with a mere 24 percent apThe city will chip some of the wood for proval (ranging from Russia’s ground cover there, then sell the rest at auction. 11 percent to Kosovo’s As for the trees it will plant, based on Bamlet’s 80 percent) and recommendations, McCollum estimates at least 20 Africans seem comyears before the grove resembles its previous self. paratively giddy “We lost a part of the valley oak riparian forest with Trump and that is Lower Bidwell Park that was given to the company. at rate city for the promise to take care of it,” he said. of 52 percent. Source: Gallup’s 2019 Rating World Leaders report

—EVAN TUCHINSKY eva ntu c h insk y @ newsr ev iew.c o m

NEWSLINES C O N T I N U E D MARCH 14, 2019

O N PA G E 1 0

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Camp Fire survivors at Silver Dollar RV lots struggle to find a place to land

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Acupuncture

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months. Sfour Most days, Thomas, a Camp Fire survivor,

teven Thomas has tried to stay busy these past

leaves his trailer behind at the Silver Dollar Fairgrounds’ south RV parking lot and continues his search for a new home for his family: his wife, 14-year-old son and their dog. It has been a fruitless, frustrating effort. Tuesday morning (March 12), Thomas was installing a towing package on one of the family cars. They are preparing to move come April 30. The fairgrounds has asked those staying in the approximately 60 RVs in its north and south lots to leave by May, in preparation for the Silver Dollar Fair, according to Melissa Fornof, a fair exhibit representative. The Thomases most likely will move to Washington, closer to relatives, because “it’s impossible to find a place” locally, he said. The couple grew up on the Ridge and raised their son there, and they hate the idea of uprooting him. Life after the fire is like “getting kicked out of one place and going on to the next,” he added. “I’m pulling my hair out nightly, stressed out.” The Thomases aren’t alone. Though several people told the CN&R that life at the RV park is quiet and drama-free, many residents are struggling quietly behind closed doors, trying to figure out what comes next with limited resources available. For Thomas, his family is what has kept him going. They had no insurance for their rental in old Magalia that is now rubble, and used the $3,000 they received from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to buy the trailer they’re living in now. “Really it was like a Band-Aid on a gunshot wound,” he said. “It got us out of sleeping in our car, but now we’re sleeping in a big car, pretty much.” Since the Camp Fire, the fairgrounds has served as a sort of limbo for survivors. At peak count, more than 700 people were living there at a Red Cross-run shelter. That shelter was permanently closed on Feb. 15, despite the organization having extended its lease at the fairgrounds through March 15. Workers began ushering people out in January, and half a dozen Camp Fire survivors told the CN&R they were headed onto the streets of Chico (see “Nowhere to go,” Newslines, Jan. 31).

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Others, like the Thomases, were able to move their trailers to the north or south lot. Those who stayed after Feb. 15 started being charged the fairgrounds’ standard rate of $40 per night. A $1 million donation from Wells Fargo has covered the cost for some of the families (those not paying privately, receiving FEMA assistance or insurance coverage), according to Casey Hatcher, a spokeswoman for Butte County, the fiscal agent for those funds. As for the folks who don’t have a plan come May 1, Hatcher said the county is encouraging them to contact FEMA for further assistance or access Immediate Disaster Case Management services (see Downstrokes, page 8). She noted that the county relaxed zoning laws for RV dwellers through 2020. Those waiting to move back to their properties in the burn area should contact the county to be placed on a priority clean-up list (more info at buttecountyrecovers.org). Fornof said fairgrounds staff will determine if the RV lots will reopen for the general public in June, after the fair ends. At the north RV lot on Monday (March 11), a

little girl numbered hopscotch boxes with rainbow chalk on the asphalt as Jesse Domondon visited with a neighbor farther down the row of tightly packed trailers and vehicles. His dog, Medusa, a muscular American bully, excitedly trotted up to passersby for attention. Domondon told the CN&R he’s lucky she made it out of the fire alive—he was working in Chico when his Paradise rental burned. Since then, Domondon has moved from place to place. He settled at the fairgrounds in January. As financial support and other resources have dwindled for survivors, Domondon has found it increasingly difficult to cope, he told

Jesse Domondon, pictured with his dog, Medusa, says he’s uncertain of his future come May 1, when the RV lots at the Silver Dollar Fairgrounds will close. About 60 RVs are parked there, most owned by Camp Fire survivors. PHOTO BY ASHIAH SCHARAGA

the CN&R. While others from the Ridge could afford to purchase homes and resettle elsewhere in Butte County, he said he is part of a remaining group of survivors who are stuck, unsure of where to turn. “I’m very bitter … I know I didn’t ask for the fire,” he said. “I’m blessed to have my life and ’Dusa’s life … but I’m very frustrated.” One of Domondon’s new neighbors, Amanda McMurray, told the CN&R the fire displaced four generations of her family, now scattered across the North State. “For what it is, it’s OK,” she said of life at the fairgrounds. The neighborhood is quiet and people keep to themselves, she added, and employees at the fairgrounds have been nonintrusive and helpful. A recent electricity connection issue with her trailer was fixed quickly, she said. “My main challenge is getting used to not having a fenced yard,” she said. Her dog, Bella Boo, used to run around in hers in Paradise, where she also tended tomato plants. For now, McMurray plans to relocate in Paradise after the debris-removal process is finished. Some days, she feels rather hopeless about her future and about the future of her hometown, she said. Other days, she tells herself, “it’s not the end.” “I know for the outcome to be bright … I have to do the footwork, I have to make it bright,” she said. “It will get better with time, it will.” —ASHIAH SCHARAGA ash ia h s@ newsr ev iew.c o m

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March 14-24 at

Old City Hall Redding tickets at

www.axreptheatre.com MARCH 14, 2019

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HEALTHLINES

Fruitful discussions PEAR conversation cards encourage positivity, connectivity story and photo by

Ashiah Scharaga ashiahs@ newsrev i ew. com

W kept repeating the same brief routine with his mom, Shelley, when she’d pick him hen Nathan Anderson was a teenager, he

up from school. She’d ask, “How was your day?” He’d reply, “Fine.” Like many 13-year-olds, he wasn’t particularly keen to talk about his feelings. While they were eating dinner together one night, Mom passed him a piece of paper from a ceramic jar. It was filled with slips with simple prompts like, “One thing that made me smile today was” and “Three things I learned today include.” As the mother and son used the prompts more often, they started losing track of time and having deeper discussions. And, as Anderson grew into a young man, he found that his confidence grew, too. “At first, I just thought it was kind of lame,” Anderson said with a laugh, “but then I started getting more into it. … It did start changing my view even of myself, speaking positively a lot. My brain would start doing it naturally: I’d start giving myself positive feedback, rather than negative feedback.” What became known as the “positivity pot” started being used at get-togethers with friends and family. After a fun, intimate group experience at a graduation party, Anderson thought there was room for the concept to grow. He joined childhood friends Matthew Roberts and Benjamin White to launch a kick-

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starter in 2017, raising over $19,000 to create decks of PEAR Cards—the “PEAR” stands for Positive Engagement And Response. Each deck contains 100 cards with printed prompts and positive affirmations. The cards are more than just icebreakers—they’re designed for positive reflection, building trust and making connections. The deck includes simple questions, such as those that ask people to talk about their favorite song or favorite season, along with others that encourage deeper reflection, such as to share their favorite childhood memory, their greatest strength or something they’re looking forward to. Roberts said the mindset behind PEAR has been to use the cards to create an environment in which people feel more comfortable to “be open and positive … and willing to be vulnerable and put themselves out there.” During the development process, the trio formed connections they never expected, including having sold and shipped PEAR Cards to educators and therapists across the United States. Chico High, their alma mater, has 20 sets for its students. Therapist Victoria Sanders, CEO of VMS Family Counseling Services in Fresno, has purchased 50 decks for her practice and plans to order more. They primarily have gone to families that are struggling with communication or have taken in a new foster child. She asks them to use PEAR Cards at dinner or in

a similar setting “to give them a jumping-off point to have a healthy and positive conversation.” Many of the families have told her this has helped create a more open and communicative environment. “The PEAR Cards give families/people a safe and nonthreatening opportunity to express themselves, sometimes about easy things, but sometimes also about really personal and private things,” Sanders wrote via email. “Any time that we are able to find something that helps us express ourselves, our mental health is benefiting.”

From left: Nathan Anderson, Benjamin White and Matthew Roberts founded PEAR Cards as a way to encourage meaningful conversation among friends. Now, their product has blossomed into a classroom and therapeutic tool.

appointMent

For Anderson, Roberts and White, the drive for

PEAR to make a positive difference in the realm of mental health is personal: They lost a close friend to suicide their last year of high school. An estimated 50 percent of all Americans are diagnosed with a mental illness or disorder in their lifetime, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. And, suicide statistics in America are staggering, especially among young people. It is the 10th leading cause of death among adults, according to the CDC, and the second leading cause of death for those ages 10 to 34. One of the CDC’s suicide prevention strategies, “promotion of connectedness,” has a direct connection to what the PEAR team HEALTHLINES c o n t i n u e d

o n pa g e 1 5

In this together Many rural Americans are knee-deep in a struggle to acquire quality, accessible health care they can afford. Lack of doctors, plus addiction and poverty are just a few of the challenges they face. But all is not lost. The documentary The Providers follows the “country doctors” working at New Mexico clinics that offer free care to all who walk through their doors. Screening Thursday (March 14) at MONCA at 6 p.m., this film digs deep into the healing power of providers’ relationships with marginalized patients.


DEMENTIA AND SLEEP Deborah Bier, PhD

Deborah Bier, PhD has successfully trained thousands of family and professional caregivers in Dementia Care Best Practices. Her credentials are unique in that she experienced years of cognitive impairment herself following a brain injury in an auto accident. She has been a psychotherapist and home care agency director of care for over 25 years. Dr. Bier is considered a gifted health educator, able to synthesize complex health topics into easy-to-understand language and down-to-earth actions. She holds a PhD in therapeutic counseling, a certificate in gerontology, and is a certified Dementia Care Partner.

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You are a Daughter, Son, Spouse, or other Relative who assists a loved one with any of the following — Personal Care | Finances | Driving Shopping | Medications Meal Preparation PASSAGES Caregiver Resource Center is dedicated to serving families and individuals who provide care for brain impaired adults and frail elderly. PASSAGES Caregiver Resource Center can assist you with: • Information • Education • Support Groups • Workshops • Family Consultations

www.PassagesCenter.org Passages Caregiver Resource Center is funded by the California Department of Healthcare Services, the Area Agency on Aging (PSA2, PSA3), and the California Department of Aging.

march 14, 2019

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Rebuilding the Ridge Supporting Local Businesses on the Ridge and Surrounding Communities RE-opEnEd aftER thE camp fiRE Century 21 SeleCt InC., Sue Mawer 1101 El Monte Ave, Chico (530) 520-4094

Century 21 SeleCt real eState, SuSan G. thoMaS 1101 El Monte Ave, Chico (530) 518-8041

Century 21 SeleCt, Patty G. MCKee, realtor® 1101 El Monte Avenue, Chico (530) 518-5155

ParadISe Gentle dentIStry, Brent e Parrott, ddS 2014 5th Avenue, Oroville (530) 877-2313

tax SolutIonS

CW ElECtriC

ParadISe FItneSS 6626 Clark Rd, Suite M, Paradise (530) 872-5090

55 Tuscan Drive, Paradise (530) 872-3443

ParadISe lutheran ChurCh

Hood ortHodontiCs 2755 Esplanade, Chico (530) 343-7021

780 Luther Drive, Paradise (530) 877-3549

BluE tEam rEalty

Swede’S SMall enGIne rePaIr 8279 Skyway Rd, Paradise (530) 990-5676

CompaC EnginEEring, inC.

eye lIFe InStItute 5889 Clark Road, Paradise (530) 877-2020

heGenBart SePtIC tanK CleanInG PO Box 243, Magalia , Ca 95954 (530) 877-7261

wIlSon PrIntInG & SIGnS

lIntronICS eleCtrICal

art houSe (530) 762-7238

MIChael VIale, ddS 650 Rio Lindo Avenue, Suite 10, Chico (530) 872-5233

nanny GoatS CloSet, llC 5430 Sawmill Road, SPC 1, Paradise (530) 327-4763

lIBerty tax SerVICe

(530) 518-3003

ParadISe SyMPhony orCheStra Paradise (530) 513-1507

rIte aId, ParadISe 6007 Clark Road, Paradise (530) 872-2700

a StItCh aBoVe eMBroIdery & ShIrt PrIntInG

6848 Skyway Suite V, Paradise (530) 872-1876

2050 Lincoln Street, Oroville (530) 413-9887

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aChIeVe Charter SChoolS oF ParadISe

980 Elliott Rd, Paradise (530) 877-4493

771 Elliott Rd, Paradise (530) 872-4100

alarm allianCE (530) 873-4699

1803 Mangrove Ave., Suite D, Chico (530) 877-9014 730 Main Street, Chico (530) 877-8721

1051 Mangrove Ave, Chico (530) 961-3400

paradisE rotary CluB P.O. Box 820, Paradise (530) 413-7725

paradisE sympHony soCiEty, inC. P.O. Box 1892, Paradise (530) 809-0799

prEfErrEd profEssionals 1001 Bille Road, Paradise (530) 876-8616

Ridge Telephone diRecToRy upstart puBlisHing inC.

1111 Noffsinger Lane, Paradise (530) 872-2044

1001 Bille Road, Paradise (530) 876-8616

gatEs garagE door sErviCEs

ritE aid, magalia

6553 Skyway, Paradise (530) 680-9457

14115 Lakeridge Circle, Magalia (530) 873-0800

Holiday markEt

ropp painting Company

6848-L Skyway, Paradise (530) 877-7621

13949 Andover Dr., Magalia (925) 872-8278

J&J optiCal, inC.

roxannE dEsign studio

6153 Center Street, Paradise (530) 876-1586

6612 Rosewood Drive, Magalia (530) 521-5913

lakE orovillE marina

tHE dEpot musEum

3428 Pentz Road, Paradise (530) 877-2883

5570 Black Olive Dr, Paradise (530) 877-1919

paradisE airport

toWn of paradisE

4405 Airport Road, Paradise (530) 521-2289

5555 Skyway, Paradise (530) 872-6291

paradisE pErforming arts CEntEr

trilogy ConstruCtion, inC.

777 Nunneley Road, Paradise (530) 872-8454

paradisE pinEs propErty oWnErs assoC. 14211 Wycliff Way, Magalia (530) 873-1114 Ext. 16

7054 Skyway, Paradise (530) 877-1180

us Bank 6817 Skyway, Paradise (530) 877-9373

WHitE Janitorial (530) 518-7468

SPonSoRed by

Check back next week for more businesses and organizations that have re-opened. Listings provided by Paradise Ridge Chamber of Commerce. paradisechamber.com 14

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march 14, 2019


HEALTHLINES

C O N T I N U E D F R O M PA G E 1 2

PEAR Cards can be purchased for $25 at Made in Chico, Sweet Chico Confections, amazon.com and pearcards.com.

exploring partnerships with local school districts to get decks on each campus, as well as a program dedicated to mental health and wellness. The ultimate goal is that the cards could be used to help educators identify kids who may be experiencing mental health issues, or, at the very least, foster self-love and break down barriers to connecting with others, like the fear of rejection. “If one of the impressions that’s being made on them inside the classroom is that it’s OK to express yourself and it’s OK to speak positively about the person next to you and also about yourself—you don’t have to be an egoist to say you love yourself or to give yourself a compliment— y’know, that’s huge,” Anderson said. White added: “If this sparks somebody to say something that got them the help they needed, that’s mission accomplished. If it only changed one life, we would be happy.” Ω

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hopes to do. White said one objective is to be part of a positive cultural shift toward eliminating stigma about mental illness, making it more of the norm for people to talk about their feelings and beliefs. Since their product is still new— it launched in February 2018—sales have been slow, but they’ve had great feedback from teachers, therapists, families and groups of friends. They were able to write their first check for charity last year. Ten percent of all proceeds from PEAR go to organizations focused on promoting mental health: Mental Health America (MHA), the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, and the Brain & Behavior Research Foundation. For MHA, a nonprofit headquartered in Virginia, donations from its fundraising partners, like PEAR Cards, support its public education campaigns and free online screening tools. MHA spokeswoman America Paredes said the organization has found PEAR Cards to be a useful tool when initiating conversation, and because the prompts are open-ended, they can encourage the forging of deeper connections and combat feelings of isolation. Right now, the PEAR team is

CITY OF CHICO PlAnnIng COmmIssIOn ACCEssORY DWEllIng UnIT (ADU) – COmmUnITY WORKsHOP

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City of Chico Planning Commission will hold a public workshop on March 21, 2019 at 6:00 p.m. in the City Council Chambers located at 421 Main Street, regarding the following: Accessory Dwelling Units (ADUs) – Community Workshop - The Planning Commission will hold a community workshop to discuss Accessory Dwelling Units (ADUs). ADUs due to their limited size and accessory relationship to an existing “main residence” are a form of affordable market rate housing. A number of alternative programs and incentives for increasing ADU production were previously presented to the Chico City Council. After careful consideration, the Council directed the Planning Commission to conduct an ADU workshop and report back to the Council with recommendations to stimulate ADU production, specifically potential Code amendments to the City’s ADU regulations. The community workshop will consist of a primer on ADUs including a summary of State ADU laws, recent ADU amendments to City Codes, ADU fees, a progress report on ADU permitting and construction activity, and recap of the potential ADU program recommendations and potential amendments that were initially presented to the City Council. One of the major topics of discussion will be the City’s current Code requirement that the property owner occupy either the main residence or the ADU. Planning staff will summarize the workshop comments and return to the Planning Commission with recommendations at another Planning Commission meeting in April or May 2019. The Planning Commission recommendation will then be forwarded to the City Council for consideration at a future meeting. Questions regarding this project may be directed to Principal Planner Bruce Ambo at (530) 879-6801, or bruce.ambo@chicoca.gov or Kelly Murphy, Planner at (530) 879-6535 or kelly. murphy@chicoca.gov. Any person may appear and be heard at the public workshop. The Planning Commission may not have sufficient time to fully review materials presented at the public workshop. Interested parties are encouraged to provide written materials at least 8 days prior to the public workshop to allow distribution with the Planning Commission’s agenda packet and thus, adequate time for the Planning Commission to review. All written materials submitted in advance of the public workshop must be submitted to the City of Chico Community Development Department, 411 Main Street, Second Floor, or mailed to P.O. Box 3420, Chico, CA 95927. Written materials should refer to the specific public workshop item listed above.

AdvocAtes Needed Become a state certified Long-Term Care Ombudsman and make a difference in the lives of the residents of nursing homes and assisted living facilities. We need people in Oroville, Paradise, Glenn and Tehama Counties. If you have time and wish to make a difference, please call!

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Green for winter blues Feel like you’ve been stuck under a thick wool blanket for months? The recent time change may help you feel better, but there’s another way to perk up when you have the winter blues: Go green. Recent studies have shown that bringing houseplants into your home (and office) can help reduce stress, increase oxygen levels, and brighten your mood. Potting soil even carries special microbes, cheekily known as “outdoorphins,” that act as a natural antidepressant. Though experts aren’t sure why plants can make you feel better, the general consensus is that humans are hardwired to connect with the natural world, and that taking care of something makes you feel good. Choose hardy, low-light plants that don’t get too thirsty—a few to consider are the Chinese evergreen, pothos and snake plant. Plant power!

City oF CHiCo – CommittEE RECRUitmEnt CommERCiAL CAnnABiS ADviSoRy CommittEE The Chico City Council is seeking applications for volunteers to serve on a temporary Commercial Cannabis Advisory Committee. The work of the Committee may take three to seven weeks, or as much time is needed to complete its work. The Committee will meet on a weekly basis with the dates and times to be determined. Applicants are being recruited in the following areas of expertise to serve on the Committee: • Expert from the cannabis industry with an understanding of CA State regulations • Public Health representative • Local business/Chamber of Commerce representative • Downtown Chico Business Association representative • Chico Unified School District representative • California State University Chico representative • Real Estate industry Two community members at large Applications are available online at the City of Chico’s website at ci.chico.ca.us as well as available at the front counter on the Third Floor of the Chico Municipal Center. ALL APPLiCAtionS ARE DUE By 5:00 P.m. on FRiDAy, mARCH 22, 2019, in tHE City CLERk’S oFFiCE on tHE tHiRD FLooR oF tHE CHiCo mUniCiPAL CEntER, 411 mAin StREEt. APPLiCAtionS CAn ALSo BE EmAiLED to DAni.RogERS@CHiCoCA.gov. tHE City CoUnCiL wiLL mAkE itS APPointmEntS At tHE REgULARLy SCHEDULED CoUnCiL mEEting on APRiL 2, 2019. MARCH 14, 2019

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GREENWAYS Susan Dobra and her partner, John-Michael Sun, spread the message of #ClimateUprising from the remains of their home in Paradise.

Hashtag movement

PHOTO COURTESY OF CLIMATEUPRISING.ORG

Camp Fire survivors spread word on climate change by

Evan Tuchinsky evantuc hin sk y @ n ewsr ev i ew. com

TSusan Dobra’s memory. Nov. 8, she and her partner, John-Michael

wo days from 2018 remain etched indelibly in

Sun, came dangerously close to the Camp Fire. Fleeing their home in Paradise, on the western edge of Bille Road, they escaped gridlock by parking at a nearby spiritual center, only to be told to head to the Skyway. They ditched their car, took their dog and hiked through forested neighborhoods—at one point saying goodbyes, fearing separation. Ultimately, a sheriff’s deputy drove them to Chico, swerving rapidly to avoid bursts of flame. “It was like a movie set in a disaster film,” Dobra said. Dec. 4, she spoke her piece to Bernie Sanders and Nancy Pelosi. Dobra is a local leader for #ClimateUprising, a grassroots organization established after the fire to spur action on climate change: legislative, corporate and personal. L.A.-based filmmaker Nirvan Mullick arranged for Camp Fire survivors to attend a Washington, D.C., town hall called by Sanders, the senator from Vermont who hadn’t yet declared he’d again run for president. By the time they arrived at the nation’s capital, the itinerary ballooned to two full days of meetings with legislators, including Pelosi, the California Democrat who’d soon reclaim the post of speaker of the House. The group featured Dobra and three nurses from Adventist Health Feather River, along with Mullick and Audrey Denney, the Chicoan planning to challenge Rep. Doug LaMalfa for the second straight election (see “Round two,” Newslines, Feb. 28). In their meeting with Pelosi, Dobra sat beside the congresswoman. “I looked her right in the eye and said, ‘You need to understand what just happened

16

CN&R

MARCH 14, 2019

“We need to make people understand that this is what happens because of climate change.”

—Susan Dobra

“I know for me, when I heard of people losing their houses in Redding [in the 2018 Carr Fire] and in Sonoma [in the 2017 Tubbs Fire], I didn’t really get it, didn’t really get it,” Dobra told the CN&R. “Even with people in my own town in 2008, whose houses burned to the ground [in the Humboldt Fire], I didn’t really understand it.”

shoot. Mullick’s team is putting together other videos—and he plans to make a documentary on Camp Fire recovery and Denney leading up to the 2020 election. Meanwhile, the organization has started planning a series of local town halls. Sanders told the D.C. group he’d come; now that he’s in campaign mode, his schedule has grown busier, but #ClimateUprising holds out hope. The first event will tie in with Earth Day, April 22; they’re firming a date and place to host national organizers of the Sunrise Movement, youth backers of the Green New Deal. “We want to keep talking and telling stories,” Mullick said. Just like Sanders encouraged them to do. “We need to make people understand that this is what happens because of climate change,” Dobra said, paraphrasing the senator. “This isn’t a future problem; this isn’t [that] the seas are rising or the polar ice caps are melting—all of that is far away. This is hitting your hometown, and it’s going to happen over and over and over again if we don’t do something.” Ω

Now Dobra carries that message, along with

to us,’” Dobra recalled. After describing how she lost everything, as did all of her neighbors, who spread “to different parts of the region so we can’t even get together and commiserate with each other,” she told Pelosi: “I just need you to understand that so you understand what the actual price of global climate change is.” Dobra wasn’t sure how much of an impression she made until just before exiting, when the congresswoman returned to her after speaking with others. Pelosi told her, “I do get what you’re talking about,” and relayed a personal story of fire loss. “She said, ‘I don’t talk about this to anybody, but 30 years ago, my brother’s house burned to the ground, and it’s just like you say, they didn’t have a scrap of paper to write on—and they lost two children,’” Dobra shared. “‘So,’ she said, ‘I do understand.’ “That was powerful.” Dobra’s account resonated with Sanders, too. The senator gave what she called “a very clear directive”: He encouraged her and the other survivors to keep telling their stories, keep advocating. Get connected:

Visit climateuprising.org or @ClimateUprising on Facebook. Group members will participate in the Chico Climate Strike on Friday (March 15) starting at 10 a.m. at Chico State’s Trinity Commons.

a call to action. She, like Mullick, cites research encapsulated in the federal government’s National Climate Assessment that climate change is exacerbating California’s wildfires. On social media, she’s appeared in #ClimateUprising photos and videos—as has her musician partner, Sun, most notably a performance of “Refugee” off his record The Ashes of Paradise (see Arts Devo, Feb. 21). Word of what they were doing “pretty quickly reached a lot of folks,” Mullick said. His connection to the region was a Facebook friend. His connection to the Camp Fire, beyond empathy, was the experience of his sister evacuating from the Woolsey Fire concurrently ravaging Southern California. According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, without steps taken, he said, “in 30 years, 140 million to 200 million people will be displaced. The number could be as high as a billion. “We’re seeing how complicated it is to deal with 52,000 people being displaced: housing shortages, downstream impacts, all this secondary homelessness, all these communities being spread out, lives forever destroyed, if not lost. It’s hard to imagine.” Mullick has released clips from footage he and his #ClimateUprising crew have shot, such as the D.C. trip and the first time Dobra and Sun saw the remains of their home. They drew 300 people to Paradise for a Feb. 17

ECO EVENT

Eternal waters Along with The Beatles and AstroTurf, the 1960s also gave rise to modern environmentalism. A symbol of that movement was the passage of the National Wild and Scenic Rivers Act, a landmark law that since has preserved nearly 2,000 miles of rivers and streams in California. On Monday (March 18), 6:30-8 p.m., the Chico Creek Nature Center will host Steve Evans, wild rivers director for the California Wilderness Coalition, to present a talk titled 50 Years of River Protection. Evans, a former general manager for the Butte Environmental Council, will provide a historical overview of both state and federal river systems and how they protect free-flowing streams and endangered fish and wildlife throughout the state, as well as current river protection issues both nationwide and locally.


EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS photo by Meredith J. cooper

15 MINUTES

THE GOODS

‘hottest show in town’

apps that deliver

When glass artist Andy Libecki and his wife, Mylee Franscisco, moved to Chico from Bellingham, Wash., eight years ago, Bryon Sutherland was the first to welcome them. He drove up from his Gridley glass studio with a six-pack, walked in to Libecki’s studio and gave him a hug. The two have been friends—and cocreators—ever since. When the Camp Fire forced Sutherland (pictured, at left) out of his Gridley rental, the two decided it was time to join forces. So, they opened G-Town Hot Shop as a community space. They’re perhaps most excited about the Hot Glass Royale dinners they host, complete with catered dinner and live glass shows. This Saturday (March 16), they’re holding a “Break It or Buy It” auction starting at noon, where unclaimed items get smashed, and they often do live demos on Friday evenings, when neighbor Eckert Malting & Brewing’s tasting room also is open. Francisco, who also blows glass, runs a dance studio adjoining the space. The shop is at 2280 Ivy St., Ste. 120 (take Park Avenue to Meyers Street, which turns into Ivy), and the showroom is open 10 a.m.-5 p.m. on Sundays. Call 899-9533 or go to gtownhot shop.com for more info.

Every day, it seems, I’m learning about a new food delivery app or a new restaurant offering delivery in Chico. It’s almost enough to make me want to plop down on the couch, cuddle up with Oliver, my Boston terrier, and binge on another foreign Netflix show (have you seen Secret City yet?) and let someone bring me a smorgasbord. Five years ago, aside from restaurants that delivered their own food, there was Entree Express, and that was it. Then there was Grubhub. These days, there’s also Door Dash, FoodJets and Uber Eats. It’s kind of exciting, actually, to be able to get some of my favorite foods brought to me. Sometimes I don’t have time to take a full lunch break, and while I love my options downtown, being able to expand my sphere is pretty cool. Some of my faves I didn’t realize deliver: Inday’s Filipino Restaurant (FoodJets and Uber Eats), The Lab Bar & Grill (FoodJets), La Flor de Michoacan (Uber Eats), Lovely Layers Cakery (Uber Eats), OM Foods (Uber Eats) and Tacos Tonaya #2 (FoodJets). The new kid on the block, for me at least, is JoyRun, which has some fun, different options including Burgers and Brew and Taj Fine Indian Cuisine. Beyond places listed, though, JoyRun lets any user “start a run” and take orders for others while they’re there. So, I tried it out. A young woman named Camila was running to Gordo Burrito around lunchtime and picked me up a shrimp taco and chicken quesadilla for an extra $3.70. Not bad!

Any pieces you’re working on now that stand out? Libecki: Right now we’re working on this frozen waterfall chande-

The

lier. It’s phosphorescent, so when all the lights are out it glows in the dark. Sutherland: And I’m starting to monument heirlooms and relics from the fire. So, I’ve been scavenging in the scrap yards and looking for cool things from the Camp Fire to monument it.

What got you into glass? Sutherland: At Chico State, I took the glass program and got a glass sculpture degree. I was addicted since the first semester. There are no words—I just thought, this is the only way to live, is to blow glass. Libecki: My core being is an adventurer, thrill-seeker. I’m always seeking that present moment. My friends had a shop and they needed somebody. I fell into it. But once I touched the glass, I knew it fulfilled that … Sutherland: Adrenaline rush. Libecki: Yeah. It forces you into the present moment, the glass— there’s nowhere else you can be.

What do you hope for this place? Libecki: It’s gratitude town. It’s

most, we’re happy to be alive. Then it’s also a space where you can leave everything you’re worried about out there [pointing to door] because it doesn’t belong in here; you have to be present in the moment. Sutherland: It’s therapy. Libecki: One of our students … said she’s stopped her therapy sessions with a counselor because this is her therapy. That really brought a lot of joy to us.

Tell me about your workshops. Sutherland: We teach classes every weekend. And we have private classes, where people can rent us, almost any day of the week. Libecki: People come in with their ideas and we literally help them build it. This one woman is a ferret freak. She came in and said, “I just want to learn to sculpt ferrets.” Sutherland: And we’ve never sculpted ferrets before. Libecki: We spent like four hours straight sculpting ferrets. And they’re beautiful—they’re amazing.

this place where, first and fore-

BAmBI INN

—MEREDITH J. COOPER m e re d i t h c @new rev i ew. c o m

by

Meredith J. Cooper meredithc@newsreview.com

Soup and cupcakeS Speaking of Lovely Layers, I found myself in the Meyers Street area recently around lunchtime and was reminded that I had yet to try their soups. It was Friday, so naturally clam chowder was on the menu. The dining area is super cute, and the soup was delicious. (I may also have ordered a cupcake to go—Bailey’s and coffee—yum.)

new digS My boyfriend, Chuck, actually had a Friday night off last week, so

we decided to make it a date night and check out the newly refurbished Sierra Nevada Taproom and Restaurant. Wow! It’s been quite a while since I’ve been there, but the change is drastic. Everything is brighter and the seating is communal, which reminds me of being at the Hofbrau Haus in Munich, but more modern. We opted to sit outside, because inside was packed, with a line wrapped along the wall, and the back patio is super nice, with heaters set up all over. We chatted with our tablemates, ordered some food and beers and had a nice time.

Fire and ice After dinner, we decided to check out the free demo at G-Town Hot

Shop (see 15 Minutes, this page). What fun! Next door, the tasting room was open at Eckert Malting & Brewing. We ordered a few beers—did you know Eckert is one of only two breweries in the country brewing gluten-free Resilience IPA?—and returned to the show. What a great way to end the night.

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CN&R

17


MEDICAL MIGRATION by

Evan Tuchinsky eva ntu c h insk y @ newsr ev iew.c o m

Camp Fire aftermath includes exodus of doctors, leaving underserved area in limbo

Dr. Zeljka Chobanov practiced on the Ridge for years. She says she doesn’t like changes, but “whether it was Oroville, whether it was any other location, I couldn’t be spared.” PHOTO BY EVAN TUCHINSKY

Adventist Health Feather River’s main campus on Pentz Road has remained closed since the fire. PHOTO BY MEREDITH J. COOPER

18

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MARCH 14, 2019

D

r. Zeljka Chobanov, like every resident of the Ridge, had her life irreversibly altered Nov. 8 when the Camp Fire devastated the region. She, her husband and two young children survived with their house intact. Her primary place of practice, however, turned to ash. A neurologist, Chobanov saw patients at two facilities operated by Adventist Health—the Canyon View Clinic and Feather River Specialty Services—and performed procedures at Feather River Hospital. The firestorm consumed lower-elevation buildings of the main campus, including the Canyon View Clinic, and damaged portions of the hospital to the extent that its future remains uncertain. Her office, across Pentz Road within Feather River Specialty Services, burned to the ground; “absolutely gone,” she said. Chobanov lost her medical library, diplomas and all practice documents that weren’t digitally preserved in the electronic medical record system. She had stored her most important paperwork in two safes rated fireproof.


➟➟➟➟➟➟➟ “When I got to the office, I looked at the foundation and I actually saw the resemblance of the two safes that actually melted,” Chobanov recalled. “[The residue], you take it and it just crumbles.” She couldn’t afford to crumble. Besides her family, she had patients to consider. Many evacuated in such haste that they left medications behind. Some suffered adverse effects from the disaster. Some simply needed the reassurance that their doctor-patient connection remained when so much else did not. In the immediate aftermath, Chobanov stayed in contact by phone. Her family returned home shortly after

Thanksgiving, which also is when she began taking in-person appointments. Adventist Health, the faith-based nonprofit that owns Feather River Hospital, found her a location in Chico until resettling her practice into the Feather River Health Center, the rural health clinic on the Skyway, which reopened the day after Christmas. Long-term, she faced a professional decision. Adventist Health had not definitively stated it would reopen the hospital—and still hasn’t. Behind the scenes, Chobanov and other Ridge physicians got no such assurance, either. So, effective Feb. 1, Chobanov switched her affiliation to Oroville Hospital. She’s joined Dr. Lynne Pappas, a psychiatrist who’d been based at the Feather River Health Center; Dr. Damien Pestana, previously with Feather River Gastroenterology; and audiologist Deborah Touchette, who moved her

practice—Paradise Hearing & Balance Clinics—into Oroville Ear, Nose and Throat. Other physicians, most notably the pediatricians and general practitioners of Paradise Medical Group, set up shop in Chico. Others, predominantly specialists, left the area altogether. With Paradise already classified by the federal government as a medically underserved area, and the North State among the rural California regions suffering a chronic shortage of physicians, the exodus off the Ridge has compounded an existing problem. “Big picture, I think [the area has] lost more physician services than we’ve lost population,” said Mike Wiltermood, CEO of Enloe Medical Center in Chico, where the largest share of refugees has resettled. “You really see it in the emergency room. ... “What we see and what we believe, simply because of the rush of people coming into the emergency room and urgent care centers, is that we’re still woefully under the community requirement for primary care.”

Dr. Richard Thorp, CEO of Paradise Medical Group, says his practice will have a “dual presence”— in Chico and Paradise—once it can reopen two of its Pentz Road buildings. PHOTO BY EVAN TUCHINSKY

Most every local primary care doctor—family medicine, internal medicine, pediatrics—in private practice has a waiting list for new patients. Low-income adults and families on governmentsubsidized insurance plans, namely Medi-Cal, must go to clinics such as Ampla Health, Northern Valley Indian Health and, yes, the Feather River Health Center. Those facilities are impacted as well. More and more, hospitals and clinics have turned to midlevel providers to fill the gap. Nurse practitioners and physician assistants treat patients in primary care and specialty practices. (See “The ‘doctor’ will see you,” Healthlines, Oct. 23, 2014.) But if a midlevel’s hospital, clinic or medical office closes, they—and their patients— must deal with displacement. Chobanov’s practice requires hospital affiliation. She has patients with multiple sclerosis who receive infusion therapies she can’t provide in an outpatient facility without special licensing. She orders procedures, such as lumbar punctures, which she needs colleagues to perform. She does electro-diagnostic testing, which takes specialized equipment. “After a lot of communication back and forth,” Chobanov said, “I came to a conclusion that, actually, even if certain services are coming back to the Paradise area, it’s going to take quite some time—and I was not really in a situation to stand by and wait until then.”

Delicate balance Adventist Health Feather River, known as Feather River Hospital until 2017, long comprised sites and services nestled around Paradise, plus a few satellites off the Ridge. That network included a house for hospice care, offices for specialty practices, clinics for primary care and rehabilitation, a pharmacy and, as of two years ago, a center promoting wellness (see “Preventative measures,” Healthlines, Sept. 30, 2018). The hospital itself—the centerpiece of the main campus, overlooking clinic buildings and senior housing that, in turn, overlooked Feather River Canyon—closed for just the second time in its 68-year history after the Camp Fire wreaked its havoc. The first closure, following evacuations for the 2008 Humboldt Fire, lasted a matter of months once Feather River cleaned facilities and passed inspections. This closure could persist for years. Along with claiming whole buildings, the fire caused damage to structures that on superficial view appeared untouched or relatively unaffected. The parent organization, based in Roseville, stated publicly it would need a comprehensive inspection and assessment before determining the hospital’s future, but cited 2020 as the earliest it could reopen. Adventist Health retained or job-placed 407 of 1,205 Feather River employees. Last month, the remaining 798 were issued final paychecks. Adventist Health did not provide specific information for this article by deadline. Instead, the organization sent a statement. It reads, in part: “Just like our patients, health care providers based in Paradise are having to make difficult deci-

sions about their future due to destroyed businesses and homes. Paradise has been blessed to have excellent providers, although several of them, like others in the community, have decided that leaving the area is what is best for their families. “Even with some providers leaving the area, Adventist Health has a great network of providers that is helping us to ensure we do have a wide range of healthcare specialties available at our clinics in Chico and at the Feather River Health Center in Paradise…. We are working on strategies to partner with providers that will help us expand our services and increase patient capacity.” The bulk of those services cluster at the 41,000-squarefoot health center in lower Paradise, plus existing offices in Chico. Enloe and Oroville Hospital have faced a delicate balance between supporting and poaching. In a sense, they’re competitors—yet they, with Orchard Hospital in Gridley, compose a countywide health system that responds collectively to emergencies. There were 69 patients at Feather River when the Camp Fire reached Paradise. Hospital staff used their own vehicles to supplement ambulances evacuating them to Enloe and Oroville Hospital. Enloe welcomed Adventist Health officials into its conference center, across The Esplanade from the hospital, to use as a command center while granting medical personnel emergency credentials to treat patients. Oroville Hospital CEO Robert Wentz told the CN&R days after the fire that his facilities had room for additional doctors. (See “Uncertain prognosis,” cover story, Nov. 15.) In the intervening months, he says he’s taken a strategic MIGRATION C O N T I N U E D MARCH 14, 2019

O N PA G E 2 2

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MIGRATION C O N T I N U E D

F R O M PA G E 1 9

approach to courting providers from the Ridge, looking only for those who mesh with his hospital and its needs. “We knew them because they were in the area, and then we got an insight into how professional they really are under some of the most dire of circumstances,” Wentz said. “That kind of a window isn’t something you usually get to see.” Brady Haynes, Enloe’s vice president of physician engagement, continues to focus on collaboration with Adventist Health and Paradise doctors. Notably, he placed Paradise Medical Group (PMG), a primary care practice that lost its facility to the fire, into a vacant clinic next to the Enloe Regional Cancer Center. The group remains independent from Chico’s hospital, though its pediatricians have privileges to admit and treat patients there. In any case, Enloe dispatched three trucks and eight workers to bring down unscathed equipment from PMG’s old location. Several other Ridge doctors shifted their shingles to Chico. Dr. Arthur Silverstein joined Northstate Cardiology Consultants and Enloe’s medical staff. Dr. Gregory Davis, affiliated with Feather River and Enloe, set up a new gynecology practice, Mangrove Women’s Health. The Chico VA Clinic hired primary care providers Drs. Courtney Badour and Joseph Lee ahead of its expansion at Meriam Park. Mainly, Enloe is bolstering its capacity to handle loads that have increased since the fire. For instance, in the absence of Feather River, births at the Nettleton Mother & Baby Center jumped 40 percent.

Haynes said the obstetrics department will add comprehensive midwifery services, including deliveries by certified nurse midwives, in the near future. “Babies don’t stop,” he said.

Going mobile The morning of the fire, about 7:30, Dr. Richard Thorp looked out a window and “noticed something wasn’t right.” He recalls an odd color to the sky; when he stepped outside his home, on the east side of Paradise, he smelled smoke and saw it plume. That prompted him to head west to the Feather River Health Center, which he thought was in immediate jeopardy. An internal medicine practitioner who’s president and CEO of PMG, he also served as medical director for the rural health clinic. A call from Lorretta Sarmento, PMG’s operations manager, redirected him to their Pentz Road office complex uphill from the hospital. “By this time, there was ash falling in the parking lot [and] you could hear the fire coming down the canyon,” Thorp said. “It was just was this huge roar, like a steam locomotive—it was just an amazing sound—[and] things exploding in the background; whether it was propane tanks or trees, I don’t know. But it was pretty intense.” Due to the early hour, around 8 a.m., only Dr. Jason Vance had patients in the office. Those few, along with the staff, evacuated. The fire wound up destroying one of the three buildings PMG occupied, the northern one that housed Vance Dr. James Logan and his Paradise Medical Group colleagues have adapted to their new clinic in Chico. PHOTO BY EVAN TUCHINSKY

“The hope is to continue growing through recruitment … because the need is obviously so great.” –Dr. Lynne Pappas

(family medicine), the pediatricians and two specialty practices. The sister structures, which housed the remaining PMG providers, sustained damage but survived. As with Chobanov, PMG providers faced immediate needs—personal and professional. Thorp and Vance were among the practice’s 34 displaced employees, two-thirds of the staff; among them, 27 lost their homes. Thirteen employees were so affected by the traumatic events that they couldn’t return to work, though three subsequently came back and two may come next month. Practitioners began connecting with patients the next day. PMG uses a digital phone system, Thorp explained, so the company simply transferred calls to cellphones. Doctors used the electronic medical record system, or EMR, to fill prescriptions. “The EMR was really a blessing,” said Dr. James Logan, a pediatrician and PMG’s chief operating officer. Meanwhile, Vance got a call

from Dr. Randall Williams at Mangrove Medical Group, offering space to treat patients. By Monday, Nov. 12, “two business days after the fire,” Vance said, “we had our patients getting emails, texts and phone calls saying we were ready for them.” PMG also shared space in the Chico branch of a pediatric cardiology practice based in Sacramento until consolidating into the clinic on Cohasset Road. Formerly a children’s health clinic, the Enloeowned building is a compact single story of 5,600 square feet— “definitely a change,” Logan said, from the 20,000 square feet spanning the trio of buildings the 10 providers had in Paradise. Regardless, PMG will situate here for the foreseeable future. The practice will reopen its surviving Paradise offices as soon as possible so family practice and internal medicine providers can see Ridge patients closer to home. These practitioners and the pediatricians will continue taking appointments in the Chico clinic in what Thorp described as a “dual presence” in the communities. Newly expanding their reach is telemedicine. Last Wednesday (March 6), the practice launched a partnership with Blue Shield of California, an insurer Thorp said is helping fund PMG’s recovery, and Teledoc, a firm that offers online consultations with physicians. Patients, regardless of their location, can “see” their PMG provider via smartphone, tablet or computer. (They can speak by phone as well.) The practice utilizes Teledoc’s technology, such as a mobile app, for these virtual visits. Eventually, Thorp said, the platform could bring specialists remotely to the Ridge. “Everything is kind of fluid,” he added. “We’re kind of making this plan up as we go.”

Best estimates When, or if, Adventist Health reopens Feather River Hospital, it will need to deal with the loss of physicians who staff a medical center. The organization did not respond to multiple requests for a count; the CN&R estimates, based on reporting, at least 28 doctors from Paradise no longer practice in Butte County. Not even considering those practicing off the Ridge 22

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MARCH 14, 2019

who lost homes, that figure could be twice as high—representing 60 percent of the Ridge’s physicians—if, as PMG doctors say, the network of specialists established by Adventist Health has vanished. “Building that kind of specialty infrastructure takes time,” said Thorp, a former Feather River board member and past president of the California Medical Association. “Many of the specialties that were there six months ago weren’t there when I came to Paradise in 1981. We didn’t have oncology, we didn’t have cardiology, we didn’t have GI, we didn’t have pulmonary medicine, we didn’t have psychiatry ... “And without primary care, you can’t build a specialty network.” That’s because primary care is the entry point of the health care system. Those doctors’ referrals direct patients to specialists. Without them, insurers rarely pay for care. PMG managed to keep all eight of its physicians, plus its nurse practitioner and physician assistant. Logan, Thorp and Vance each said the doctors never questioned staying locally—together. Their practice formed in 2001; all six founders remain active. (Besides those three, there’s Dr. Arthur Brinckerhoff, internal medicine; Dr. Susan Mallory, pediatrics; and Dr. Richard Turner, family medicine.) Overall, though, the Paradise medical community has fractured. Every obstetrician who delivered babies at the Birth Day Place had left the area by March 1. PMG doctors also cited the loss of three general surgeons, three primary care physicians, two gastroenterologists, a pulmonologist, a neurologist and an oncologist. Feather River’s closure left emergency room doctors and hospitalists without a workplace; anesthesiologists, surgeons and others without privileges at another hospital faced the same predicament. Then there’s the human element. “Any of the people that went through the fire went through the trauma,” said Haynes, of Enloe. “So for some of them, [the decision to leave] was the effects of what they went through—rightly so. “And it’s no different than any other of the population: A lot of them lost everything, their houses, and with the housing shortage, they can’t find homes. Like anybody else, they have to make the decision whether they want to rebuild.


facility by Highway 70, the Mental Well-Being Clinic, with three therapists. Pappas brought along Jacquie Lynn Donadio, her psychiatric nurse the past 12 years. “When I came on with my nurse specialist, the idea was to grow the department,” Pappas said. Among the initiatives: consultations for hospital patients “who are suffering and have psychiatric needs.” She added: “The hope is to continue growing through recruitment … because the need is obviously so great.”

Oroville Hospital CEO Robert Wentz sees departures of physicians from a region already short on providers as adding “additional challenges to recruiting.” PHOTO BY EVAN TUCHINSKY

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What’s ahead? “Since across the nation there’s a [doctor] shortage, they can move anywhere they choose,” he added. “Even if we could retain them, for some of these services, you have to be close by a hospital either for [being on] call or to handle their patients.” That was the case with Chobanov. She said she never thought of leaving the area—she didn’t want to uproot her children, and with her house standing, she didn’t face the dilemma of whether to rebuild. The offer from Oroville Hospital meant she still could care for her current patients after a minimal transition. She rotates between two offices: Dove’s Landing Neurology, on Oro Dam Boulevard, and Oroville Hospital Neurology, on the main campus. “I really don’t like changes,” she said, laughing softly. “Whether it was Oroville, whether it was any other location, I couldn’t be spared … but I’m surrounded by a great group of people that made it easier.”

Room to grow Dr. Lynne Pappas doesn’t live in the burn zone and didn’t lose her office to the fire. Her psychiatry practice—for children, adolescents and adults, from as far away as Yreka—resided in the Feather River Health Center. Still, Nov. 8 and the days that followed proved trying. After almost 11 years in Paradise, and 16 years prior working around the North State, she has a large pool of patients. Pappas also was part of a team, working with therapists and other psychiatrists at Adventist

Health Feather River. They had many patients in crisis, amid a crisis. With their building closed, the team turned a Chico Starbucks into their command center. Each morning, they’d meet, formulate an action plan, then disperse to homes, shelters and camps to give care. Cellphones and computers kept everyone connected. “It was a series of very long days—20-hour days sometimes—of being on the phone, contacting all patients, trying to find them … reaching out to make sure they were OK,” Pappas said. “We were doing what we could to facilitate whatever we could for their needs, because in the moment obviously it was just mayhem. “But more than anything, I think the people that we work with, we were a grounding for them, and so it was a blessing for everyone.” She secured space in a church through the end of December, when the Feather River Health Center reopened. She came back to find cramped quarters. Pappas no longer had her allotment of rooms in which to see patients. Because her case load is so full and varied, she requires two; with added providers to accommodate, Feather River would spare only one. “I needed to find a facility with a space to work where I could continue seeing all of my patients,” Pappas said. “Oroville Hospital had reached out to me at that time and was wanting to embrace that, provide whatever space I needed to continue practicing and to build the practice.” She, like Chobanov, started Feb. 1. The hospital set her up in a

The future of health care in Paradise is like the future of the town itself. Much will depend on how many residents return and the extent to which their community rebuilds. “Nobody will know for years,” Haynes said. “As we get farther away from the event, we will understand more. But I think it will take two years to understand what the new norm is.” With communities co-mingled— Chico, Oroville and Gridley housing fire refugees and providing services, including health care—Haynes noted a ripple effect. Long-term, might the population decrease from those choosing to move away, instead of rebuild, offset the loss of providers? Haynes considers that a possibility. Wentz isn’t convinced. He asserted that the loss of physicians from the Ridge “has an effect on the entire region”—already facing a provider shortage, “this obviously didn’t make that better. It just adds some additional challenges to recruiting, to assure we have the right number of physicians to care for the people. And we will take care of them.” Pappas said her professional move to Oroville is permanent. Chobanov said the same thing. A full-service hospital in Paradise won’t bring them back. “I really loved my prior position, and the hospital,” Chobanov said. “I had a perfect 6 1/2 years there. I really enjoyed it very much. “However, realistically, I don’t see it coming back as it was—at least in the near future. And I cannot sit in two chairs at the same time. I have to take care of my professional life, my patients, my family. So, I’m here for good.” Ω

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MARCH 14, 2019

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Arts &Culture THIS WEEK 14

THU

Special Events 2019 POINT IN TIME SURVEY: Call for volunteers! The annual Point In Time survey is scheduled for Thursday, March 28, and survey conductors are needed to interview members of our local homeless community. Data collected will assist in the development of quality services that lead to the long-term stability of permanent housing and self-sufficiency. Visit website to register. Thu, 3/14. Butte Countywide Homeless Continuum of Care, 2039 Forest Ave. buttehomelesscoc.com

CARNIVAL: Rides, games, food and fun for the whole family. Located in the west parking lot behind Dick’s Sporting Goods. Check the website for pricing and hours. Thu, 3/14, 4pm. Chico Mall, 1950 E. 20th St. chicomall.com

LAW ENFORCEMENT RECORDS PUBLIC OR PRIVATE?: Sunshine Week is an annual nationwide celebration of access to public information. League of Women Voters presents a free informational forum about transparency and access to law enforcement and public records. Doors at 6:30. Thu, 3/14, 7pm. Free. Chico Branch of the Butte County Library, 1108 Sherman Ave. lwvbuttecounty.org

THE PROVIDERS: A documentary set against the backdrop of the physician shortage and opioid epidemic in rural America. Panel discussion with Kathleen Kirby of the Rural Nursing Preceptorship program at Chico State. RSVP is requested at 243-5493. Thu, 3/14, 6pm. Free. MONCA, 900 Esplanade. monca.org

Music BIG BAD VOODOO DADDY: Leading the swing scene for more than 25 years, the band’s original core lineup will play your favorite jazz and dixieland classics. Thu, 3/14, 8:30pm. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfallscasino. com

THE WORLD FAMOUS GLENN MILLER ORCHESTRA: Touring since 1956, this real deal orchestra will be playing a long list of punchy jazz standards. Thu, 3/14, 7:30pm. Red Bluff State Theater, 333 Oak St., Red Bluff. statetheatreredbluff.com

HA’PENNY BRIDGE Saturday, March 16 Unwined Kitchen & Bar SEE SATURDAY, MUSIC

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FINE ARTS ON NEXT PAGE

THE ALMOND ORCHARD Opens Thursday, March 14 Blue Room Theatre

SEE THURSDAY-SATURDAY, THEATER

presentation and provide supplies. Great for beginners and experienced zine-making peeps alike. Works in progress welcome. Sat 3/16, 12pm. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

Music hot Celtic music to celebrate St. Paddy’s Day. Chico favorites Mark McKinnon and Molly Paul will return to the stage with this California-Celtic crew. Doors open at 7:30. Sat, 3/16, 8pm. $7. Unwined Kitchen & Bar, 980 Mangrove Ave. unwined chico.com

LOW FLYING BIRDS: After-brunch tunes

with some Americana soul-grass. Sat, 3/16, 2pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St. lasalleschico.com

THE ALMOND ORCHARD: Local, contemporary adaptation of Chekhov’s The Cherry Orchard, set in Chico. The play, adapted and directed by Joyce Henderson, examines the reluctant acceptance of change. Thu, 3/14, 7:30pm. $15. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. blueroomtheatre.com

SERENDIPITY: Dance performance will feature the works of Inspire School of Arts & Sciences dance program students, featuring works in progress and experimental pieces that push students out of their comfort zones. All proceeds go directly to the dance program. Thu, 3/14, 7pm. $5-$8. CUSD Center for the Arts, 1475 East Ave. inspirechico.org

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FRI

Special Events CARNIVAL: See Thursday. Fri, 3/15, 4pm. Chico Mall, 1950 E. 20th St. chicomall.com

DROP-IN OPIOID OVERDOSE RESPONSE TRAININGS: Every Friday in March stop in to see a friendly North Valley Harm Reduction Coalition volunteer for a 10-minute training. Fri, 3/15, 10:30am. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

FAMILY MOVIE NIGHT: Who Framed Roger Rabbit? Family-friendly entertainment, plus meal deals! Fri, 3/15, 7pm. Chico Mall,

1950 E. 20th St. chicomall.com

WORLD OF OUTLAWS SPRINT CAR SERIES: Winged sprint cars fly at the $10,000 Mini Gold Cup at the fairgrounds. $1 of every ticket sold will go directly to the California fire relief. Fri, 3/15, 6pm. Silver Dollar Speedway, 2337 Fair St.

Music CMEA REGION III BAND FESTIVAL PERFORMANCE: Las Plumas/Oroville Alliance Band’s 2019 festival performance. Fri, 3/15, 10am. Laxson Auditorium, 400 W. First St.

MIKE STUD: Creator of bro-jam hit “College Humor” brings his brand of DIY hip-hop to Chico for his farewell tour. Featuring TJ Mizell & Drama Relax. Fri, 3/15, 9pm. Senator Theatre, 517 Main St. senatortheatrechico. com

TYLER DEVOLL: Happy hour tunes. Fri, 3/15, 4pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St. lasalleschico.com

Theater THE ALMOND ORCHARD: See Thursday. Fri, 3/15, 7:30pm. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. blueroomtheatre.com

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SAT

Special Events ARBOR DAY FESTIVAL: Second annual event features a tree circus, booths, vendors, games, raffles, educational talks and activities for all ages. All proceeds and donations fund Oroville’s botanical gardens and education center. Sat 3/16, 10am. Free. 2053

TWO YEARS WITHOUT JUSTICE FOR DESMOND PHILLIPS COMMUNITY POTLUCK Sunday, March 17 Trinity United Methodist Church SEE SUNDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS

Montgomery St., Oroville. 282-3665. obgec.com

ARDUINO DAY: A worldwide birthday celebration of Arduino, an open-source electronics platform designed to make electronics more accessible. Sat 3/16, 8am. Idea Fab Labs Chico, 603 Orange St. chico.idea fablabs.com

BACKPACK TO ANTELOPE CREEK: A moderate to easy 2-3 mile hike to camp beside boisterous Antelope Creek, where spring should be in full bloom. Call Alan at 891-8789 or 588-8031 to sign up. Meet at Chico Park & Ride at 9am. Sat 3/16-Sun 3/17. Sierra Club Yahi Group, sierraclub.org

BREW FLOW: Celebrate St. Paddy’s with a

45-minute yoga sesh and some beer. Sat 3/16, 11am. The Commons Social Empourium,

Special Events CARNIVAL: See Thursday. Sun, 3/17, 12pm. Chico

HA’PENNY BRIDGE: Unwind with a night of

Theater

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SUN

MAX MINARDI: Brunch with indie rock singer/ songwriter with a country-tinged voice. Sat, 3/16, 11am. La Salles, 229 Broadway St. lasalleschico.com

ROCKING FOR PARADISE: The third of four fundraising events featuring some of Cali’s best cover bands. Tonight it’s Foreigner Unauthorized & The Executive Rocker Show taking on Foreigner. All ages welcome; net proceeds go to Camp Fire relief. Sat, 3/16, 6:30pm. $15-$20. El Rey Theater, 230 W. Second St. elreychico. com

Theater THE ALMOND ORCHARD: See Thursday. Sat, 3/16, 7:30pm. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St.

Mall, 1950 E. 20th St. chicomall.com

DRUNK IRISH HISTORY: St. Patrick’s Day improv comedy show at Studio 561. There will be drinking games, impaired monologues and improvised Irish folktales. Bring a pint of Guinness or your favorite libation. Sun, 3/17, 7pm. Chico Live Improv Comedy, 561 E. Lindo Ave.

ST. PADDY’S BRUNCH WITH THE SPUDZ: Traditional Irish music and a special St. Paddy’s vegan brunch menu. Sun, 3/17, 11am. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

TWO YEARS WITHOUT JUSTICE FOR DESMOND PHILLIPS COMMUNITY POTLUCK: The community is invited to join the Phillips family in remembering Desmond with potluck lunch, activities for kids, speakers and performances including Nikki B Fly, Himp C, and J Bliz. Pre-potluck march through downtown, meet at the City Plaza at 2:30pm. Sun, 3/17, 3pm. Free. Trinity United Methodist Church, 285 E. Fifth St. (310) 625-2713.

Music PUB SCOUTS/ST. PADDY’S DAY: A Chico holiday tradition that pairs well with beer and whiskey. Sun, 3/17, 1pm. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St.

blueroomtheatre.com

2412 Park Ave. thecommonschico.com

THIS WEEK CONTINUED ON PAGE 26

CARNIVAL: See Thursday. Sat 3/16, 12pm. Chico Mall, 1950 E. 20th St. chicomall.com

INCREDIBLE EDIBLE PLANTS!: Join a naturalist for an informative walk through the park that focuses on what you can eat. Sat 3/16, 10am. Chico Creek Nature Center, 1968 E. Eighth St.

EDITOR’S PICK

LIFE BY MOONLIGHT NIGHT HIKE: Discover Bidwell Park at night under a waxing moon and the guidance of a certified naturalist. Sat 3/16, 8pm. Chico Creek Nature Center, 1968 E. Eighth St. ccnaturecenter.org

LITTLE RED HEN GALA: Inaugural event includes dinner, silent auction and music from Decades. Proceeds will benefit supportive employment for adults with developmental disabilities and programs for children with autism. Sat 3/16, 6pm. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St. littleredhen.org

ST. PATRICK’S DAY GALA: Chico Sunrise Rotary Club hosts a fundraiser for local youth literacy. Event will include dinner, beer, wine, dancing and an auction. Must be 21 or older. Sat 3/16, 5:30pm. BMU Auditorium, Chico State, 400 W. First St. rotarychicosunrise.org

ZINE-MAKING WORKSHOP SERIES W/ ENOLA: Enola (No Gods No Mattress) will do a short

FREE LISTINGS! Post your event for free online at www. newsreview.com/calendar, or email the CN&R calendar editor at cnrcalendar@newsreview.com. Deadline for print listings is Wednesday, 5 p.m., one week prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

FIDDLER OF THE FUTURE You may think you know the fiddle, but a woman called “the Jimi Hendrix of violin” by The New York Times is hitting the Sierra Nevada Big Room stage on Monday (March 18) to show you something different. Eileen Ivers has been playing the Irish fiddle since childhood and has since racked up an impressive résumé. Known for exploring the Celtic foundations of Americana roots music, Ivers has toured with Riverdance and played for presidents; won a Grammy and scored movie soundtracks; and been awarded the all-time Irish fiddle championship nine times. Expect the unexpected. MARCH 14, 2019

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THIS WEEK cOnTinUEd frOM PagE 25

s i e m m Ca 2019

FINE ARTS

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ThE PUZZLE ShOW

Shows through March 29 Chico Art Center

MOn

SEE arT

Special Events 50 YEARS OF RIVER PROTECTION: Steve  Evans of the California Wilderness  Coalition will present a historical  overview of both the state and federal wild and scenic rivers systems  and how they protect free-flowing  streams and endangered fish and  wildlife throughout the state.  Mon, 3/18, 6:30pm. Free. Chico Creek Nature  Center, 1968 E. Eighth St. 519-4724.  chicorec.com 

LYME DISEASE EDUCATION SEMINAR: Monthly  support group features Dr. Mark Light  of Chico Integrative Health.  Mon, 3/18, 5:30pm. Free. Northwood Commons  Clubhouse, Corner of Cusssick and  Lassen avenues. thelymecenter.org 

Music EILEEN IVERS: This Grammy-winning fiddler has been playing since the age of  9, performing with everyone from The  Chieftains to Patti Smith and Sting.  She brings a catalogue of both traditional and progressive Celtic fiddle  tunes and a full band to the Big Room  stage. $25.  Mon, 3/18, 7pm. Sierra  Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St.

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TUE

Special Events CUISINES OF ITALY UMBRIA REGIONAL DINNER:

A celebration and benefit for musicians and others affected by the Camp Fire

CHICO AREA MUSIC FESTIVAL 2019 April 20 Sierra Nevada Big Room SPONSORED BY

Umbria, known as “The Green Heart of  Italy,” will highlight a carefully curated  dinner menu at Grana, featuring  braised rabbit, chicken, or seasonal  whitefish stew complete with a selection of crostini appetizers, salad,  and dessert. Call Grana for reservations.  Tue, 3/19, 5pm. Grana, 198 E.  Second St.

Theater ANNE OF GREEN GABLES: Take the kids to  see a classic during spring break. This  adaptation is specifically designed for  families and young children and comes  with options for theater fun before  and after the performance.  $5-$10. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St.   chicowomensclub.org 

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WEd

Special Events CUISINES OF ITALY UMBRIA REGIONAL DINNER: See Tuesday.  Wed, 3/20, 5pm. Grana,  198 E. Second St.

Theater ANNE OF GREEN GABLES: See Tuesday.  Wed, 3/20, 10am. $5-$10. Chico  Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St.   chicowomensclub.org 

Art ART ETC: 3 Ladies Art Exhibit, group show with  Barbara Batt, Wilma Rae Forester and Carol  Smith. Reception March 16, 5-8pm, with  food, drinks, music and silent auction. Show  running through April 30, all proceeds going  to the North Valley Community Foundation  Camp Fire Relief. Through 3/16. Free. 256 E.  First St., 895-1161.

CHICO ART CENTER: The Puzzle Show, communitybased art show features work from 300  artists of all ages and experience. Bid on  individual puzzle pieces and contribute to  this unique fundraiser for the Chico Art  Center. Reception on Friday, March 29, from  5-7pm. Through 3/29. 450 Orange St. chico  artcenter.com

ENLOE CANCER CENTER: Beth Bjorklund, oil paintings in our Healing Art Gallery by Northern  California artist. The Enloe Cancer Center,  Healing Art Gallery features artists whose  lives have been touched by cancer. Through  4/19. Free. 265 Cohasset Road, 332-3856.

JACK HEADLEY UNIVERSITY ART GALLERY: IDEA |  MEDIA | PROCESS, the diverse and innovative art practices of the Department of Art  & Art History at California State University,  Chico. Architecture, ceramics, painting,  photography, printmaking, performance and  sculpture. Reception March 14, 5:30-7:30pm.  Chico State, ARTS 121. headleygallerycsuchico. com

JANET TURNER PRINT MUSEUM: Regional Collective:  California Society of Printmakers, a juried  exhibition. Through 4/13. Chico State, 400 W.  First St. theturner.org

MAIN EVENT GALLERY: Views of the West, gallery  member artists depict ranch life, cowboys,  round-ups, animals and the scenic beauty  that surrounds the North State. Featured  will be the works of artist Suzanne Bears  and photographers Debbie Carlisi, Karen  Roy Crockett and Clare Jones-Carbonell.  Through 5/4. 710 Main St., Red Bluff. 391-3259.  tehamaarts.org

MUSEUM OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA ART: Dennis  Leon I am here, the sculptor’s work has  been exhibited at the San Francisco Museum  of Modern Art, the Oakland Museum, the  Corcoran Gallery and beyond. Through 3/24.  $5. 900 Esplanade.

ORLAND ART CENTER: Perfection in Pencil and 

fOr MOrE MUSIC, SEE NIGHTLIFE On PagE 28

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Paint, showcasing works by Peter Piatt, Steve  Crane, Sharon Crabill and Eve Berg-Pugh.  Through 3/23. 732 Fourth St., Orland. orland  artcenter.com

VALENE L. SMITH MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY: Altar  States Spirit Worlds and Transformational  Experiences — The Works of Peter  Treagan, interactive tech art complete with  3D glasses and hidden imagery so visitors  can participate in what is described as a  transformational visionary art experience.  Through 5/17. Chico State, 400 W. First St.

Museums BOLT’S ANTIQUE TOOL MUSEUM: Ongoing  exhibit, this fascinating, unique museum has  over 12,000 hand tools on display, charting cataloging the evolution and history of  tools. Through 6/15, closed Sundays. $3. 1650  Broderick St, Oroville.

CHICO CHILDREN’S MUSEUM: Ongoing exhibit, featuring tons of cool stuff for kids to explore  including a miniature city, complete with a  junior vet clinic, dentist, cafe and farmer’s  market, a giant fish tank, multi-sensory  room, imagination playground and much  more. Check the website for hours and  admission information. Through 8/3. $7-$9.  325 Main St. chicochildrensmuseum.org

CHICO CREEK NATURE CENTER: Living Animal  Museum & Nature Play Room, learn all about  local critters, plants and wildlife. Through  5/25. $2-$4. 1968 E. Eighth St. chicorec.com

CHICO HISTORY MUSEUM: Anna Marks A Quiet  Chico Angel, in honor of Women’s History  Month, the museum’s Spring Lecture Series  presents the story of Mark’s contribution to  the building of Chico, with photographs and  scrapbooks filled with memories spanning  1900-1960. $5 donation, refreshments will be  served. Through 3/16. 141 Salem St. chico  historymuseum.org

GATEWAY SCIENCE MUSEUM: From Here to  There, explore the science of how things  move by land, sea and air. Also on display  are The Foothills and America›s Wolves: From  Tragedy to Inspiration. Through 5/12. $5-$7.  625 Esplanade. csuchico.edu

PATRICK RANCH MUSEUM: Ongoing exhibit, working farm and museum with rotating exhibits  open every Saturday and Sunday from 11am  to 3pm. Through 5/26. 10381 Midway, Durham.  patrickranchmuseum.org

VALENE L. SMITH MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY: Remarkable Lives, exploring  the intertwined worlds of birds and humans,  in partnership with the Altacal Audubon  Society and Snow Goose Festival. Exhibits  include bird songs and behaviors, local photography and a robotic recreation of the late  Jurassic Archaeopteryx. Through 7/31. 400  W. First St.


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Sipho’s monthly celebration of Jamaican culture

M music came in 1973, when I bought The Wailers’ first major y introduction to Jamaican

American-released album, Catch a Fire, with its silver cover story and in the form of photo by a giant Zippo Carey Wilson lighter. The reggae masterpiece is a study in Review: Tempo parties, every contrasts, with second Saturday. somber lyrics Next up: March 9. and what critic Buffet ($20/$15 stu- Robert Christgau dents) starts at noon; called “anguished music (free) at 5 p.m. rhythms” sharing Sipho’s Jamaica space with cele1228 Dayton Road bratory paeans to 895-1866 earthly physical love and danceinducing brightness. Hoping for a bit of that brightness, I headed to the outskirts of Chico where the orchards meet Dayton Road last Saturday (May 9) to join the monthly Tempo reggae party at Sipho’s Jamaica. Every second Saturday, in the ultimate expression of his intention to bring Jamaican culture to Chico, owner Newton “Sipho” Merritt opens the restaurant’s doors and its spacious patio for a day-long party featuring a buffet and an evening of live and DJ reggae music. The music is set on the enclosed patio, its backdrop of bamboo painted in the emblematic

Rastafarian colors of red, yellow and green and the DJ station set on a slightly elevated stage. In addition to frequent performances by Sipho (who is Jimmy Cliff’s nephew) and other local reggae musicians, the live portions of Tempo often include visiting players. This month, the headliner was Jamaican roots ambassador IQulah (who also happens to live in Chico). Amazingly, the shows are always free, and the buffet is only $20 ($15 for students). Sipho’s serves a variety of traditional Jamaican dishes—from jerk chicken to curried goat—most of which are presented during the monthly self-serve, all-you-can-eat buffets. I arrived relatively early in the festivities, and was happily surprised to encounter a half-dozen friends who invited me to join them for a celebratory dinner in the main dining room. The communal table was already covered with sturdy paper plates filled with aromatic bounty from the banquet and dotted with bottles of Red Stripe Jamaican-style lager, and I hastily endeavored to catch up with everyone. The variety of dishes proved larger than could practically fit on one plate, so I had to take two passes at the buffet. For the first round, I selected a protein-heavy mix of jerk chicken, escovitch fish (fried and covered in peppers, onions and carrots), stewed oxtail

and rice and peas (red beans), with a serving of green salad splashed with oil and vinegar. Each dish’s flavor complemented that of the others, with the jerk chicken— slightly blackened on the outside, but tender, moist, and appropriately and pleasantly spicy—the star of my plate. A second pass yielded rasta pasta (with tofu and vegetables) and Ital stew, the latter of which is a savory vegetarian concoction including pumpkin, root vegetables, red beans, coconut milk, scallions, garlic and Scotch bonnet peppers. It was my favorite of the meal. As for the music, the highlight of the evening was a live percussion and vocal trio consisting of Sipho, IQulah and Ras Keen, each playing hand drums of different sizes and tonalities to accompany their voices. It was music stripped to its most basic rhythmic and melodic components. Hearing the “Rasta Man Chant” from The Wailers’ Burnin’ album rendered in this fashion, with the three voices intoning, “One bright morning when my work is over/Man will fly away home,” imparted a sense of spiritual unity that enhanced the genuine hospitality and friendliness exuded by host Sipho and his staff. This is good work: sharing the flavors of Jamaican culture to bring the community together. Ω

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NIGHTLIFE

THURSDAY 03/14—WEDNESDAY 03/20 RUPAUL’S DRAG RACE SEASON 11 VIEWING PARTY: Hosted by Priscilla DeVille, complete with Fantasy Drag Race League and prizes. Doors at 7:30pm. Thu, 3/14, 8pm. Free. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave. maltesebar chico.com

LIGHT//SOUND, GARRETT GRAY AND TEENY NYMPH

THUMPIN’ THURSDAY ROCK ’N’ BLUES JAM: Hosted by the Loco-Motive

Tonight, March 14 Blackbird

Band plus special guests. All musicians and music enthusiasts welcome. Thu, 3/14, 7pm. Studio Inn Lounge, 2582 Esplanade., (408) 449-2179.

SEE THURSDAY

WILL WATJE: Guitarist/saxophonist from Decades playing solo. Thu, 3/14, 7pm. The Commons Social Empourium, 2412 Park Ave.

Garret Gray

14THURSDAY

BIG BAD VOODOO DADDY: Leaders of

the swing scene for more than 25 years, the band’s original core lineup will be playing your favorite jazz and dixieland classics. Thu, 3/14, 8:30pm. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfallscasino.com

GOOD DOG: Gordy, John and Mark serve up a big sandwich of mountain porch music complete with banjos, lap-slide, dobro and doghouse bass. Thu, 3/14, 6:30pm. Farm Star Pizza, 2359 Esplanade. (619) 838-6710. farmstarpizza.com

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15FRIDAY

HEPWORTH, HEGG & DESANTIS ORGAN TRIO: Blues/funk band builds on the organ trio style made popular by Jimmy Smith and Larry Young. Thu, 3/14, 6pm. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

LIGHT//SOUND: New Orleans-based singer/songwriter Daniel Amedee brings his meditative, urban folk to Blackbird. Joined by the soft sounds of locals Garrett Gray and Teeny Nymph. Thu, 3/14, 7pm. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

CHAD BUSHNELL: Nashville recording artist out of Red Bluff will turn up the country at the Box. Fri, 3/15, 9pm. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave. tackleboxchico.com

DECADES: Chico favorites play hits

from the 1940s to today. Fri, 3/15, 9:30pm. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

THE EMO NIGHT TOUR: DJs will spin Warped Tour classics from Fall Out Boy and the bands that sound like them. Fri, 3/15, 8pm. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave. maltesebar chico.com

MIKE STUD: Creator of bro-jam hit “College Humor” brings his brand of DIY hip-hop to Chico for his farewell tour. Featuring TJ Mizell & Drama Relax. Fri, 3/15, 9pm. Senator Theatre, 517 Main St. senatorth eatrechico.com

FRIDAY NIGHT MASHUP: Single Six, The Empty Gate and stoicB4dark team up for an eclectic night of R&B metal and dark western rock. All ages. Fri, 3/15, 8pm. The Spirit, 2360 Oro Quincy Highway, Oroville.

BANG YOUR CABEZA

Imagine Ozzy howling “War Pigs” while wandering the dusty roads of Mexico, tequila-drunk and thrumming a guitar until his fingers bleed (actually, maybe not too much of a stretch). This is the Metalachi experience. Expect some fiddle, horns and a smoke machine as the best (and likely only) heavy metal mariachi band rock the stage at Lost on Main this Sunday (March 17). St. Paddy’s Day will never be the same.

ICED: Female-led punk out of Eugene here for a night of hardcore at the 1078. Joined by Chico’s D-FY, The Choice and End/Game. Fri, 3/15, 7pm. 1078 Gallery, 1710 Park Ave. 1078gallery.org

JOHN SEID, LARRY PETERSON, BOB LITTELL: Good tunes with local

favorites. Fri, 3/15, 6:30pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St. diamondsteakhousechico.com

MOONSHINE LIGHTNING: High-energy modern country and classic rock. Fri, 3/15, 8:30pm. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfallscasino.com

OPEN MIC: Bring an instrument— acoustic/electric guitar and drum set available to use. Sign-up at 7pm, all ages welcome until 10pm. Fri, 3/15, 7:30pm. $1. DownLo, 319 Main St., 513-4707.

PUB SCOUTS: Traditional Irish music

for happy hour. Fri, 3/15, 4pm. $1. Duffy›s Tavern, 337 Main St.

SWAMP ZEN: Jam band favorites guaranteed to get you on the dance floor. Doors open at 7:45. Fri, 3/15, 8pm. $7. Unwined Kitchen & Bar, 980 Mangrove Ave. unwinedchico.com

TYLER DEVOLL: Snappy guitar tunes,

food and beer. Fri, 3/15, 7pm. The Exchange, 1975 Montgomery St., Oroville. theexchangeoroville.com

16SATURDAY

ALEX VINCENT: Smooth grooves,

drinks and food. Sat, 3/16, 7pm. The Exchange, 1975 Montgomery St., Oroville. theexchangeoroville.com

BRAD PETERSON & FRIENDS: Live band, beer from Feather Falls and appetizers from Ana Pina. All proceeds go to the Birdcage Theatre. Sat 3/16, 6pm. $20. Birdcage Theatre, 1740 Bird St., Oroville. birdcagetheatre.org


THIS WEEK: FIND MORE ENTERTAINMENT AND SPECIAL EVENTS ON PAGE 24 VERY STABLE GENIUS & LITTLE AMERICA Saturday, March 16 Tender Loving Coffee SEE SATURDAY

Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St. diamondsteakhousechico.com

KELLY TWINS DUELING PIANOS:

Very Stable Genius DRAG SHOW: Drag queens and kings

bring hot fire to the stage. Sat, 3/16, 10pm. $7. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave. maltesebarchico.com

DRIVER: Local classic rock kings play

an early St. Patrick’s Day bash. Sat, 3/16, 9pm. Studio Inn Lounge, 2582 Esplanade.

HA’PENNY BRIDGE: Unwind with a night of hot Celtic music to celebrate St. Paddy’s Day. Chico favorites Mark McKinnon and Molly Paul will return to the stage with this CaliforniaCeltic crew. Doors open at 7:30. Sat, 3/16, 8pm. $7. Unwined Kitchen & Bar, 980 Mangrove Ave. unwined chico.com

JOHN SEID, LARRY PETERSON, BOB LITTELL: Good tunes with local favorites. Sat, 3/16, 6:30pm. Diamond

Chico’s famous song-duelers taking your requests. Sat, 3/16, 9pm. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

KENNY METCALF AS ELTON: Popular tribute band playing Elton John’s early catalogue in full Vegas-style. Sat, 3/16, 9:30pm. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfallscasino.com

KYLE WILLIAMS: Guitar tunes, wine

and food. Sat, 3/16, 6pm. Purple Line Urban Winery, 760 Safford St., Oroville. purplelinewinery.com

MYSTIC ROOTS: Jam on with the party reggae of old Chico favorites for the one-year anniversary of the new La Salles. Sat, 3/16, 10pm. $5. La Salles, 229 Broadway St. lasalleschico.com

PRE-PADDY’S DAY PARTY WITH ON/OFF AND AMAHJRA: Legit Dubliners On/ Off perform with psychedelic blues

dudes Amajhra. Sat, 3/16, 9pm. Lost on Main, 319 Main St. lostonmain chico.com

ROCKING FOR PARADISE: The third of four fundraising events featuring some of Cali’s best cover bands. Tonight it’s Foreigner Unauthorized & The Executive Rocker Show taking on Foreigner. All ages welcome; net proceeds go to Camp Fire relief. Sat, 3/16, 6:30pm. $15-$20. El Rey Theater, 230 W. Second St. elreychico.com

ST. PATRICK’S DAY WITH BLACKOUT BETTY: Corned beef and cabbage

and some high-octane rock. Sat, 3/16, 9pm. $5. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave. tackleboxchico.com

VERY STABLE GENIUS: Pianist and composer Bryan McAllister heads this modern jazz quintet with a heavy rock sound. Opening set by Little America. All ages, doors at 7:30pm. Sat, 3/16, 8pm. $7-$12. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

17SUNDAY

METALACHI: The world’s first and

only heavy metal mariachi band is coming to Chico on St. Paddy’s day. Doors at 8:30. Sun, 3/17, 7pm. $15. Lost On Main, 319 Main St.

OPEN MIC COMEDY NIGHT: Make people laugh at this early St. Paddy’s day show. Sign-ups start at 6pm & close at 6:45pm. Sun, 3/17, 7pm. The

Maltese, 1600 Park Ave. maltesebar chico.com

SHAMROCK FESTIVAL AT THE DOWNLO: Smokey the Groove headlines with The Jeff Pershing Band, The Damaged Goods, Caloy and more. All-day music and traditional Irish food. Sun, 3/17, 1:30pm. $5. The DownLo, 319 Main St. 892-2445.

YOUR M.O.M. COMEDY: Chico’s best

20WEDNESDAY

FULL HOUSE BLUES JAM: Join house

band the Southside Growlers for

a night of home-grown blues. Wed, 3/20, 7:30pm. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfallscasino.com

LITTLE BLACK CLOUD: Local dirty rock ’n’ rollers join psychedelic

genre-jumpers Amahira and the greasy blues of Ranchero for a night of stoner jams. Wed, 3/20, 7:30pm. $7. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

OPEN MIC: Music, storytelling, poetry and more. Wed, 3/20, 7pm. Butte County Library, Chico Branch, 1108 Sherman Ave.

local comedians. Signups between 8-9pm. Sun, 3/17, 9:30pm. Free. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave..

18MONDAY

EILEEN IVERS: This Grammy-winning fiddler has been playing since the age of 9, performing with everyone from The Chieftains to Patti Smith and Sting. She brings a catalogue of both traditional and progressive Celtic fiddle tunes and a full band to the Big Room stage. $25. Mon, 3/18, 7pm. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St.

19TUESDAY

OPEN MIC: Hosted by veteran

Chico singer/songwriter Andan Casamajor. There’s always a guitar to borrow and a house cajón for frisky fingers, so come on down and get on the list. Tue, 3/19, 6pm. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

SPRING FLING

Hardcore times four with a tour kick-off show for Eugene’s ICED and Chico’s own D-FY at the 1078 Gallery on Friday (March 15). Female-fronted ICED has just debuted its first EP, with half of all digital sales going to Sexual Assault Support Services. These are old-school DIY-ers complete with cassette tapes, homemade merch and zines. Come out and support the noise of real punx. Locals The Choice and End/Game fill out the bill.

MARCH 14, 2019

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‘Captain … Meh’ Low-energy approach drags down latest Marvel superfilm

Dhands, has the power to shoot electrical bursts from her Brie Larson’s Captain Marvel suffers from a espite the fact that she’s playing a superhero who

disappointing lack of energy. Larson’s turn as the title character, aka Carol Danvers (aka by Vers), is plagued by lethargy and Bob Grimm bizarre line deliveries, and she gives off a detached vibe that she doesn’t bg ri m m @ new srev i ew. c o m want to be in the movie. Captain … Meh, I Dunno, Whatever. Had the film around her been really good, the lead’s bored disposition might’ve been forgiven, but Captain Marvel this cosmic superhero origin story and intergalactic war movie is also Starring Brie Larson and Samuel L. riddled with some haphazard storyJackson. Directed by telling and awful special effects. Anna Boden and Ryan I went into Captain Marvel hopFleck. Cinemark 14, ing for a badass superhero movie, Feather River Cinemas. but found myself more intrigued by Rated PG-13. the subplot involving an up-andcoming, low-ranking S.H.I.E.L.D. agent named Nick Fury, played by Samuel L. Jackson. Honestly, the de-aged Jackson in this movie and returning Agent Coulson (Clark Gregg) from the first Avengers movie are so good you wish they had their own film. I’m not putting the blame solely on Larson. The Danvers/Marvel character—a fighter pilot on Earth whose powers are born of other worlds—is a bust when it comes to superheroes. All she does is fly around and send out energy from her hands. She has moments here where she goes full Captain Marvel mode, and this brings on a big light show where she glows and gets white eyes and a goofy-looking mohawk, but overall her superpowers don’t register as all that exciting. Plus, the light show isn’t helped

2

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MARCH 14, 2019

any by the film’s special effects, which look rushed and cartoonish. As a result, Captain Marvel in her full glory doesn’t integrate with the worlds around her; she looks animated and out of place. It’s reminiscent of how bad the villain Steppenwolf looked in Justice League. It takes you right out of the action. Part of the film is set on Earth in the ’90s, which means Jackson’s Fury has a full head of hair and both eyes. It also means there’s music by Nirvana and No Doubt, both of which are used in situations that feel awkward and forced. Directors Anna Boden and Ryan Fleck get a little carried away in their efforts to be cute with the tunes. There’s a big supporting cast, including Annette Bening as a scientist and murky memory in Carol’s dreams. Lashana Lynch does good work as Maria Rambeau (pronounced “Rambo”), an Earthly friend of Carol’s. Jude Law gets a change of pace with an action role as an alien named Yon-Rogg, while Ben Mendelsohn plays Fury’s S.H.I.E.L.D. boss, another character with a few surprises to offer. And then there’s the orange tabby named Goose, a cute cat from another planet. Again, however, the special effects are a letdown when Goose goes full Goose. The film isn’t 100 percent devoid of fun, it’s just not on par with other Marvel Universe offerings. That’s a high bar to hit. As for Captain Marvel, the end of Avengers: Infinity War hinted at some major participation for her, so this is just the start for the character. Hopefully things get better. Ω

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3 4

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5 Excellent


Reviewers: Bob Grimm and Juan-Carlos Selznick.

Opening this week Apollo 11

Documentary on the 1969 Apollo 11 mission, the first manned flight to the moon, using never-before-seen archival footage, including stunning 70mm scenes. No interviews, no narration. Cinemark 14. Rated G.

Captive State

After 10 years of occupation by alien forces, the population of Earth is split into two sides—those who cooperate and those who resist. Starring John Goodman, Ashton Sanders and Vera Farmiga. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

Everybody Knows

Asghar Farhadi (The Salesman, A Separation) directs this thriller about a woman (Penélope Cruz) whose past comes back to haunt her when she’s faced with navigating the aftermath of a kidnapping during a family wedding in Spain. Also starring Javier Bardem. Pageant Theatre. Rated R.

Five Feet Apart

Film adaptation of Rachel Lippincott’s young-adult novel of the same name about two teens whose newfound love for one another is complicated by the fact that their respective life-threatening illnesses keep them from coming into physical contact. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

Wonder Park

Alita: Battle Angel

Robert Rodriguez (Sin City) directs this film adaptation of Yukito Kishiro’s Japanese cyberpunk manga series, Gunnm, featuring a cyborg heroine named Alita (Rosa Salazar) who was rendered for the big screen using CGI technologies developed for James Cameron’s Avatar. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

Fighting With My Family

A biopic based on the life of English wrestler Paige (played by Florence Pugh), her wrestling family and her journey to the WWE. Also starring Vince Vaughn and The Rock. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World

The third entry in the animated franchise picks up a year after the events in the previous film, with Hiccup the dragon (voice of Jay Baruchel) searching for a dragon utopia. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

Isn’t It Romantic

A fantasy-satire starring Rebel Wilson as an unlucky-in-love woman who finds herself stuck in a stereotypical rom-com universe. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13.

3

The LEGO Movie 2: The Second Part

Another healthy dose of family-friendly fun at which both kids and parents should laugh heartily. The Second Part picks up five years after the end of the first movie, and our hero Emmet (Chris Pratt) is happily buying coffee in Apocalypseburg, a devastated LEGO-land of sullen tones and broken dreams where master builder Wyldstyle (Elizabeth Banks) has taken to dramatic narration at all times as things in their world have turned from awesome to bleak. The culprits are aliens called Duplos, invading forces that are at once undeniably adorable and unabashedly destructive. It’s a crazed world where Batman (Will Arnett) gets engaged to Queen Waterva Wa’Nabi (Tiffany Haddish), leader of the Duplo, and Emmett winds up running with a Kurt Russell-type antihero named Rex Dangervest, who is suspiciously like him (and who is also voiced by Pratt). The movie feels a bit repetitive in places, and some of the action is too fast to be fully taken in, but flaws aside, it’s still a lot of fun. There’s a slightly dark underbelly at play here, and it’s fun to see a kid’s flick that doesn’t totally play it safe. Cinemark 14. Rated PG —B.G.

A Madea Family Funeral

Tyler Perry is back for film No. 11 in the Madea series, this time the hijinks unfold at a family funeral in the backwoods of Georgia. Cinemark 14. PG-13.

The Upside

A buddy dramedy about the relationship that develops between a wealthy quadriplegic (Bryan Cranston) and the ex-con (Kevin Hart) hired to take care of him. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13.

’s Independent Journalism Fund

Apollo 11

See review this issue. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13 —B.G.

Show your support at www.independentjournalismfund.org

Now playing

Captain Marvel

Donate to

A 3-D animated feature about a young girl (voiced by Brianna Denski) with a wild imagination who works with a cast of talking animals to bring a dream amusement park to life. With Matthew Broderick, Jennifer Garner, Ken Hudson Campbell, Kenan Thompson, Ken Jeong, Mila Kunis and John Oliver. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

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CHOW

Raising the bar Downtown restaurateur’s third effort mixes Southern flavors, oldschool charm

STowne door into the main room of Bill’s Lounge, one is immediately

tepping through the large, deep-set

transported into another world. Maybe it’s the lack of windows, the low lighting or the funky soundtrack blaring through the speakers. Or perhaps it’s the old-school story and arcade games or photo by the Cajun- and Meredith J. Southern-inspired Cooper menu. Whatever m e re d i t h c @ the reason, it new srev i ew. c o m works. The original Bill’s Towne Towne Lounge Lounge at 327 Main St. 135 Main St. (now part of 487-7031 Chico Children’s billstownelounge.com Museum) was Open for dinner a true drinking Tuesday-Sunday, lunch establishment, and dinner Thursday- one that opened Sunday. Happy hour at 6 a.m. for folks 2-6 p.m. Closed Mondays. getting off the graveyard shift and was known for its booths lining the walls, pool and shuffleboard, and the liquor license that allowed patrons to purchase six-packs for the road. I frequented the old spot, opened in 1966, and was sad to see it go six years ago. So, when news hit that downtown restaurateur Will Brady was planning a revival of sorts, I approached it with a combination of excitement and skepticism. I’m happy to report it’s fast become one of my favorite new places, and it’s not yet reached its full potential. About a month ago, I started hearing rumblings about the shrimp and grits on Bill’s menu. So, as my

boyfriend works nights, I decided to treat myself for Valentine’s Day dinner. I wasn’t alone, either. A smattering of singles lined the bar, while couples retreated to the relative privacy of the high-backed booths. I ordered a glass of the house Cabernet, which was, despite perhaps betraying the lounge’s dive bar roots, quite good. And then, I had to try those shrimp and grits ($15). My expectations were high—considering the man running the place also owns The Banshee and B Street Public House—and they were easily met. The shrimp were perfectly plump and the bacon jam they’re cooked in added a depth of flavor to the bland-in-comparison cheddar grits. The greens were a bit spicy for my palate, but I was more than satisfied without them. I went back for lunch a few weeks later, craving the gumbo, which my Valentine’s Day server had assured me was not spicy. He was right—with the exception of the andouille sausage, which packs a small punch. Since it was lunchtime, I ordered the small version ($7, versus $13), and it was the perfect size. Served over rice, the rich gumbo—which also included breaded, fried chunks of chicken—was a winter-perfect

Bartender Jason Wooten serves a plate of shrimp and grits at Bill’s Towne Lounge.

stew consistency. For my third visit, I went with the Southern fried chicken sandwich ($12), which comes with slaw. Don’t let the simplicity of its description deter you—just chicken, housemade pickles, sauce and bun—as the chicken itself was otherworldly, crunchy on the outside, juicy and tender on the inside, and bursting with flavor. During that final visit, the kitchen happened to be playing around with different recipes. Brady and a bartender were tasting a bar cheese that I finagled my way in on. Good stuff. As Brady showed me the patio, which is under construction (on the Main Street side of Chico Coffee Co.) and expected to be completed by summertime, he told me he’s planning to fill out the Towne Lounge menu with more lunch and appetizer options, particularly those that hit under the $10 mark. (Maybe add some under-$5 cocktails, too?!) The patio is set to include a pool table and potentially shuffleboard, bringing a bit more of the old Towne Lounge into the new. Looking forward to it. Ω


ARTS DEVO by JASON CASSIDY • jasonc@newsreview.com

SCHOOL OF ART, CONTINUED ... Last Thursday (March 7), Chico State was

stupid with art, so Arts DEVO took advantage of the break in the winter weather to venture onto campus to devour as much as I could in one afternoon. In addition to the six galleries on campus with current exhibits, this day featured the added attraction of the once-a-semester Open Studios event, composed of several mini exhibits of works by BFA and MFA students throughout both the Arts & Humanities Building and Ayres Hall. During my rounds, I thoroughly enjoyed the offerings at the University Art Gallery and the Anthropology Museum (see “Put on your art shoes,” page 24), but as it usually does, the Open Studios event captured my heart. There’s always work by artists I’ve never seen before, and that’s the stuff for me. Some of the highlights from the half-dozen or so studios/galleries I visited included the magnetic characters in the incredible paintings of Martin Townsend, Jill Harris’ abstract ceramics, and Kristy Moreno’s sad/sweet little sculpture, “Inadequacy.” But my favorite of the day, and the year so far, were the fantastic prismacolor drawings by Ryan Ramos. I’ll let his artist statement do the introduction: “A central component of my work is the eroticized male nude, used as “Inadequacy,” by Kristy Moreno. an unmistakable assertion of queer power. Nudity can be simultaneously confrontational and vulnerable, a contradiction that I am exploring in my most recent work.” The works definitely deliver on that intention, with a barrelchested Latino, a lounging biker and a hairless hulk all shamefree and striking and beautiful in their naked glory. But the beautifully rendered subjects Painting by Martin Townsend. also stand out as well-composed works of poster-style art. The bearded Latino man is featured in several poses among the petals and leaves of five giant blue roses, and the vivid image is both playful and iconic. I also loved Ramos’ tender self-portrait. More shy than his other subjects, the thin bleached-blond artist looks like a paper doll in his red briefs, black socks and impressive mustache. See the art I can’t show in this space by following Ramos on Instagram @ryan_ramos_art.

TWO TICKETS TO JIMMY KIMMEL! For its third annual St. Patrick’s Day Gala, the Chico Sunrise Rotary Club has received a donation of two backstage tickets to the filming of an episode of Jimmy Kimmel Live! The gala is a dinner/auction fundraiser for children struggling with literacy Self portrait by Ryan Ramos. (this year with a focus on those impacted by the Camp Fire), and the two tickets up for grabs include airfare, green room passes and gift certificates for hotel stay. There are a ton of other auction items that you can try to win online (Kings tickets, jewelry, island getaways), but you have to be present at the gala this Saturday (March 16), at Chico State’s BMU Auditorium, to bid on the Kimmel tix. More info at rotarychicosunrise.org MARCH 14, 2019

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Karen James is a noted journalist who specializes in relationships, romance, and sex.

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as good as ever. Then he took a small pack of tablets from his satchel, gave it to my husband, and said “These come from a small town up north and are made from naturally pure extracts, packed with densely rich sexual nutrients. They will give you back the sex-drive you had when you were young, and make you harder than you can imagine.” Then he laughed and said, “You’ll become an Italian Stallion like me!” Italian Stallion is right! These past several weeks have been a dream. My husband's desire for me is through the roof. He takes me whenever he wants, and he even wakes up most days with a ‘morning salute’ like he did years ago. I love it! He’s a sexual powerhouse, beaming with confidence, and our marriage is stronger than ever. Karen, here’s why I’m writing you. The pack of tablets is about to run out and we desperately want more. I’ve looked everywhere but can’t find them. Do you know anything about these tablets from Europe and how to get some here in the States? Sincerely, Tina C., Fort Worth, TX Tina, you and the rest of my readers are in luck because I do know about these secret European sex tablets. Ever wonder why older men from Italy, Greece, Spain, and all over Europe are famous for staying energized, passionate and sexually active well into their golden years? Well, for decades, these men have relied on a unique blossom extract called Provarin to enhance their sexual performance and satisfaction. Milled on the fertile northern plains, the key ingredients come from pure extracts found along the Sea. Finely ground and pressed into tablets, Provarin has a legendary reputation throughout the European sexual underground for fueling extremely hard erections, and a powerful climax. As Giovanni from Amsterdam put it, “It's like sexual rocket fuel, especially for us older guys!”

“My husband shocked me with more sexual passion than he’s had in years. He took me in the bedroom and gave me a night I’ll never forget!” about Provarin a few years ago when I was dating a cowboy from Wyoming. He took Provarin every morning and believe me, that good ol’ boy sure rocked my nights! All-natural and safe to take, Provarin is still a well-kept secret for those in the know and they like to keep it that way. It’s an old-school, family business and product is still harvested by hand. They don't have a website and don’t do any advertising. They don't need to. Long-time customers and word of mouth ensures their limited stock is sold out every year. They do have a distributer here in the U.S. and you’ll be happy to know that Provarin is surprisingly inexpensive. When I reached out for this article, a spokesman said they were proud to produce the highest quality product for men and couples. He went on to say that if any of my readers call today and mention this article, they’ll be offered a ONE-TIME 50% DISCOUNT, FREE SHIPPING, AND 30 BONUS TABLETS FREE! Wow, so there you go, Tina – and the rest of you readers! This offer is only good while supplies last so just give them a call today and mention this article. The number is 1-800-333-6482. Aren’t you glad you asked?

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These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. Dramatic portrayal. Results atypical. Your results may vary. To assure confidentiality, identifying details, scenarios have been modified or fictionalized. The pen name Karen James is used for privacy purposes. Always consult a health care provider before taking any supplement.

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY For the week oF March 14, 2019 ARIES (March 21-April 19): The coming

weeks might be a good time to acquire a flamethrower. It would come in handy if you felt the urge to go to a beach and incinerate mementos from an ex-ally. It would also be useful if you wanted to burn stuff that reminds you of who you used to be and don’t want to be any more, or if you got in the mood to set ablaze symbols of questionable ideas you used to believe in but can’t afford to believe in any more. If you don’t want to spend $1,600 on a flamethrower, just close your eyes for ten minutes and visualize yourself performing acts of creative destruction like those I mentioned.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Taurus

aphorist Olivia Dresher writes that she would like to be “a force of nature,” but “not causing any suffering.” The way I interpret her longing is that she wants to be wild, elemental, uninhibited, primal, raw, pure—all the while without inflicting any hurt or damage on herself or anyone else. In accordance with your astrological omens, that’s a state I encourage you to embody in the coming weeks. If you’re feeling extra smart—which I suspect you will—you could go even further. You may be able to heal yourself and others with your wild, elemental, uninhibited, primal, raw, pure energy.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): In some

major cities, the buttons you push at a crosswalk don’t actually work to make the traffic light change faster. Pushing the “close door” buttons in many elevators also doesn’t have any effect. Harvard psychologist Ellen Langer says these buttons are like placebos that give you “the illusion of control.” I bring this phenomenon to your attention in hopes of inspiring you to scout around for comparable things in your life. Is there any situation where you imagine you have power or influence, but probably don’t? If so, now is an excellent time to find out—and remedy that problem.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Philip Boit

was born and raised in Kenya, where it never snows except on the very top of Mount Kenya. Yet he represented his country in cross-country skiing events at the Winter Olympics in 2002 and 2006. How did he do it? He trained up north in snowy Finland. Meanwhile, Kwame Nkrumah-Acheampong competed for Ghana in the slalom in the 2010 Winter Olympics. Since there was no snow in his homeland, he practiced his skills in the French Alps. These two are your role models for the coming months. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you’ll have the potential to achieve success in tasks and activities that may not seem like a natural fit.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): In the process of

casting for his movie The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, director David Fincher considered selecting A-list actress Scarlet Johansson to play the heroine. But ultimately he decided she was too sexy and radiant. He wanted a pale, thin, tougherlooking actress, whom he found in Rooney Mara. I suspect that in a somewhat similar way, you may be perceived as being too much something for a role you would actually perform quite well. But in my astrological opinion, you’re not at all too much. In fact, you’re just right. Is there anything you can do—with full integrity—to adjust how people see you and understand you without diluting your brightness and strength?

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): In 1993, an

English gardener named Eric Lawes used his metal detector to look for a hammer that his farmer friend had lost in a field. Instead of the hammer, he found the unexpected: a buried box containing 15,234 old Roman silver and gold coins worth more than $4 million today. I bring this to your attention because I suspect that you, too, will soon discover something different from what you’re searching for. Like the treasure Lawes located, it might even be more valuable than what you thought you wanted.

by rob brezsny LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “The role of

the artist is exactly the same as the role of the lover,” wrote author James Baldwin. “If I love you, I have to make you conscious of the things you don’t see.” To fully endorse that statement, I’d need to add two adverbs. My version would be, “The role of the artist is exactly the same as the role of the lover. If I love you, I have to kindly and compassionately make you conscious of the things you don’t see.” In accordance with current astrological omens, I recommend that you enthusiastically adopt that mission during the coming weeks. With tenderness and care, help those you care about to become aware of what they’ve been missing—and ask for the same from them toward you.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): For

thousands of generations, our early ancestors were able to get some of the food they needed through a practice known as persistence hunting. They usually couldn’t run as fast as the animals they chased. But they had a distinct advantage: They could keep moving relentlessly until their prey grew exhausted. In part that’s because they had far less hair than the animals, and thus could cool off better. I propose that we adopt this theme as a metaphor for your life in the coming weeks and months. You won’t need to be extra fast or super ferocious or impossibly clever to get what you want. All you have to do is be persistent and dogged and disciplined.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

Wompsi’kuk Skeesucks Brooke is a Native American woman of the Mohegan tribe. According to her description of Mohegan naming traditions, as reported by author Elisabeth Pearson Waugaman, “Children receive names that are descriptive. They may be given new names at adolescence, and again as they go through life according to what their life experiences and accomplishments are.” She concludes that names “change as the individual changes.” If you have been thinking about transforming the way you express and present yourself, you might want to consider such a shift. 2019 will be a favorable time to at least add a new nickname or title. And I suspect you’ll have maximum inspiration to do so in the coming weeks.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): For

many of us, smell is our most neglected sense. We see, hear, taste and feel with vividness and eagerness, but allow our olfactory powers to go underused. In accordance with astrological omens, I hope you will compensate for that dearth in the coming weeks. There is subtle information you can obtain—and in my opinion, need quite strongly—that will come your way only with the help of your nose. Trust the guidance provided by scent.

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AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Essay-

ist Nassim Nicholas Taleb says humans come in three types: fragile, robust or antifragile. Those who are fragile work hard to shield themselves from life’s messiness. The downside? They are deprived of experiences that might spur them to grow smarter. As for robust people, Taleb believes they are firm in the face of messiness. They remain who they are even when they’re disrupted. The potential problem? They may be too strong to surrender to necessary transformations. If you’re the third type, antifragile, you engage with the messiness and use it as motivation to become more creative and resilient. The downside? None. In accordance with the astrological omens, I urge you to adopt the antifragile approach in the coming weeks.

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PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): In 2014,

NASA managed to place its MAVEN spacecraft into orbit around Mars. The cost of the mission was $671 million. Soon thereafter, the Indian government put its own vehicle, the Mangalyaan, into orbit around the Red Planet. It spent $74 million. As you plan your own big project, I recommend you emulate the Mangalyaan rather than the MAVEN. I suspect you can do great things—maybe even your personal equivalent of sending a spacecraft to Mars—on a relatively modest budget.

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as FOTOVISION PRODUCTIONS at 2990 Alamo Avenue Chico, CA 95973. PHIL FOTO 2990 Alamo Avenue Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: PHIL FOTO Dated: February 6, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000187 Published: February 21,28, March 7,14, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing

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business as DANIEL PATRICK ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, DANIEL PATRICK GRAPHIC DESIGN at 3760 Morrow Ln, Suite E Chico, CA 95928. DANIEL PATRICK ESCUDERO 30 Shari Ln Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: DANIEL P. ESCUDERO Dated: February 11, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000202 Published: February 21,28, March 7,14, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CERTIFIED FORTRESS at 2952 Esplanade, Suite 150 Chico, CA 95973. KEITH NELSON MITTEN II 3174 Rogue River Drive Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: KEITH MITTEN Dated: February 13, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000210 Published: February 21,28, March 7,14, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as LA FONDA at 330 Main Street Chico, CA 95928. HENRI SPITERI 1308 Kentfield Road Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ENRIQUE SPITERI Dated: February 7, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000191 Published: February 21,28, March 7,14, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as LOOMCHI at 184 E Washington Ave Chico, CA 95926. CHEYENNE KRISTINE NG 184 E Washington Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: CHEYENNE NG Dated: February 13, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000209 Published: February 21,28, March 7,14, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ROPP PAINTING COMPANY at 4658 Hicks Lane Chico, CA 95973. DAVID C ROPP 4658 Hicks Lane Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: DAVID C. ROPP Dated: February 14, 2019 FBN Number; 2019-0000215 Published: February 21,28, March 7,14, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing busienss as CLARK FAMILY MILLING at 85 Bull Creek Lane Cohasset, CA 95973. KENNETH G CLARK 85 Bull Creek Lane Cohasset, CA 95973. TRENTON G CLARK 1740 Vilas Road Cohasset, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a General Partnership.

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Signed: KENNETH G. CLARK Dated: February 8, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000198 Published: February 21,28, March 7,14, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as VALLEY COUNTERTOPS at 43 Norfield Ave, Suite 2 Chico, CA 95928. JON RUSSELL LAWSON 43 Norfield Ave, Suite 2 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JON LAWSON Dated: January 16, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000092 Published: February 28, March 7,14,21, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as PURE IN LUCK at 9109 Stanford Lane Durham, CA 95938. MARIAH OSEN 9109 Stanford Lane Durham, CA 95938. MICHAEL OSEN 9109 Stanford Lane Durham, CA 95938. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: MARIAH OSEN Dated: February 15, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000218 Published: February 28, March 7,14,21, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as AMTC LLC at 711 Waterford Drive Chico, CA 95973. AMTC LLC 711 Waterford Drive Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: CHARLIE POOLER, CEO Dated: February 8, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000197 Published: February 28, March 7,14,21, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as JBR EARTHWORK AND ELECTRIC at 2139 W Sacramento Ave Chico, CA 95973. JUSTIN BROWN 2139 W Sacramento Ave Chico, CA 95973. JOSEPH RANKIN 2139 W Sacramento Ave Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: JUSTIN BROWN Dated: February 19, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000223 Published: February 28, March 7,14,21, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as DOUBLE BARREL SMOKIN BBQ at 2549 White Ave Chico, CA 95973. ROBERT CLIFFORD HENDERSON 2549 White Ave Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ROBERT HENDERSON Dated: January 31, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000155

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as HEALING CENTER at 574 Manzanita Ave #4 Chico, CA 95926. JANETTE Y VOTAW 854 Muir Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JANETTE Y VOTAW Dated: February 11, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000205 Published: February 28, March 7,14,21, 2019

FICTITOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following persons have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name FEATHER RIVER ROWING CLUB INC at 930 Garden Drive Oroville, CA 95965. FEATHER RIVER ROWING CLUB INC 930 Garden Dr Oroville, CA 95965. This business was conducted by a Corporation. Signed: ANTHONY CATALANO, BOARD MEMBER Dated: February 4, 2019 FBN Number: 2017-0000922 Published: February 28, March 7,14,21, 2019

FICTITOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as SIERRA STREET PROPERTIES at 23 Herlax Circle Chico, CA 95926. JEFFREY SCOTT MELLUM 23 Herlax Circle Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JEFF MELLUM Dated: January 29, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000140 Published: February 28, March 7,14,21, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as COLLEGE CARE CONSULTING at 260 Wild Rose Circle Chico, CA 95973. NATHALIE MARGUERITE THOMAS 260 Wild Rose Circle Chico CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: NATHALIE THOMAS Dated: February 19, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000220 Published: February 28, March 7,14,21, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMEN The following persons are doing business as H AND A HYBRID SEED COMPANY at 3030 Thorntree Dr #4 Chico, CA 95973. STEEN HENRIKSEN 13384 Moonlight Court Chico, CA 95973. TAMERA HENRIKSEN 13384 Moonlight Court Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Married Couple.

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Signed: STEEN C. HENRIKSEN Dated: February 25, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000252 Published: March 7,14,21,28, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as STERLING SPARKLE METAL WORKS at 633 Orange Street, #4 Chico, CA 95926. RICHARD STERLING OGDEN 1065 Citrus Ave Chico, CA 95926. SUSAN MARIE SPARKLE 2055 Park Way Village Dr. Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: RICHARD S. OGDEN Dated: February 22, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000242 Published: March 7,14,21,28, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as THE STYLE CORE at 1641 Oak Vista Ave Chico, CA 95926. BODY BEAUTIFUL LLC 1641 Oak Vista Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: ERIC MATHIS, MANAGING MEMBER Dated: February 26, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000258 Published: March 7,14,21,28, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CAL JAVA at 1601 Esplanade Ste. 1B Chico, CA 95926. CHRISTOPHER MCHENRY 1015 Lupin Ave Chico, CA 95973. NICOLE MICHELLE MCHENRY 1015 Lupin Ave Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: NICOLE MCHENRY Dated: February 26, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000261 Published: March 7,14,21,28, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as RAILFLOWER FARM at 3000 Chico River Rd. Chico, CA 95928. ELLEN MARIE KNIGHT 14011 Limousin Dr. Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ELLEN KNIGHT Dated: February 26, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000262 Published: March 7,14,21,28, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as HARRISON ASSOCIATES at 94 Orange Ave Bangor, CA 95914. MARK HARRISON 94 Orange Ave Bangor, CA 95914. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: MARK HARRISON Dated: January 28, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000139 Published: March 7,14,21,28, 2019

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The following person is doing business as DOMESTIC GOODS at 1032 Neal Dow Avenue Chico, CA 95926. MATTHEW SHAUN DAUGHERTY 1032 Neal Dow Avenue Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: MATTHEW DAUGHERTY Dated: February 28, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000268 Published: March 7,14,21,28, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ACCESS LOCK AND SAFE at 6 Fremont St Apt 37 Chico, CA 95928. TREVOR TOMLINSON 6 Fremont St Apt 37 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: TREVOR TOMLINSON Dated: Fevruary 28, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000272 Published: March 7,14,21,28, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as SEELADAVID SALON at 1209 Esplanade Unit 6 Chico, CA 95926. AMANDA ANNE BANKS 2 Picual Ct Chico, CA 95928. CHRISTOPHER PAUL BANKS 2 Picual Ct Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: CHRISTOPHER P BANKS Dated: February 21, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000238 Published: March 7,14,21,28, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as WALKER’S WOODWORKS at 2547 Oro Garden Ranch Rd Oroville, CA 95966. BRANDON LEE WALKER 2547 Oro Garden Ranch Rd Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: BRANDON WALKER Dated: February 19, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000231 Published: March 14,21,28, April 4, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ARBOR PRO TREE CARE at 636 Burnt Ranch Way Chico, CA 95973. JASON RIX 636 Burnt Ranch Way Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JASON RIX Dated: February 13, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000213 Published: March 14,21,28, April 4, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ASSOCIATED CHICO EYE SPECIALISTS at 3537 Bay Avenue Chico, CA 95973. ROBERT DUDLEY STONE MD 3537 Bay Avenue Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ROBERT D. STONE Dated: February 26, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000259

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Published: March 14,21,28, April 4, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as DANI PADGETT PHOTO, DANI PADGETT WEDDINGS at 2797 Grape Way Chico, CA 95973. DANIELLE PADGETT WATSON 2797 Grape Way Chico, CA 95973. ERIC WATSON 2797 Grape Way Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: DANIELLE WATSON Dated: February 22, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000244 Published: March 14,21,28, April 4, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following persons have abandoned the use of the fictitious business names DANI PADGETT WEDDINGS, DANI PADGETT PHOTO at 2797 Grape Way Chico, CA 95973. STEER AND ARBOR LLC 2797 Grape Way Chico, CA 95973. This business was conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: DANIELLE WATSON, OWNER Dated: February 22, 2019 FBN Number: 2018-0000990 Published: March 14,21,28, April 4, 2019

NOTICES NOTICE OF INTENTION TO SELL REAL PROPERTY AT A PRIVATE SALE IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF BUTTE In the Conservatorship of the Person and Estate of SUE ERWIN, Conservatee. NOTICE is herby given that, subject to confirmation by the above entitled Court, on March 26, 2019, at 10:30 a.m. or thereafter within the time allowed by law, the undersigned, as conservator of the estate of SUE ERWIN, will sell at private sale to the highest and best net bidder on the terms and conditions hereinafter mentioned, all right, title and interest of conservatee and subsequently all right, title and interest of the estate in real property thereon located in the County of Butte, State of California, and more particularly described as follows: A single family residence located at 14348 Sinclair Circle, Magalia, California. All that certain real property situated in the County of Butte, State of California, described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: AP#: 064 440 007 000 All that certain real property situate in the County of Butte, State of California, described as follows: PARCEL I: LOT 71, AS SHOWN ON THAT CERTAIN MAP ENTITLED, “PARADISE PINES UNIT NO. 6”, WHICH MAP WAS RECORDED IN THE OFFICE OF THE RECORDER OF THE COUNTY OF BUTTE, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, ON AUGUST 26, 1970, IN BOOK 35 OF MAPS, AT PAGE(S) 92, 93 AND 94. CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION RECORDED DECEMBER 2, 1970, IN BOOK 1648, PAGE 3, OFFICIAL RECORDS.

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EXCEPTING THEREFROM ALL MINERALS, OIL, GAS, ASPHALTUM AND OTHER HYDROCARBON SUBSTANCES, WITH PROVISION THAT ANY AND ALL MINING OPERATIONS SHALL BE DONE FROM ORIFICES OUTSIDE THE SURFACE AREA OF THE LAND DESCRIBED HEREIN, AND THAT NO DAMAGE SHALL BE DONE TO THE SURFACE OF SAID LAND. PARCEL II: A NON-EXCLUSIVE EASEMENT OVER LOTS E AND F (THE COMMON AREAS) OF SAID PARADISE PINES UNIT NO. 6, AND LOTS DESIGNATED FOR COMMON AND RECREATION AREAS, AS DESCRIBED IN THE DECLARATION OF ANNEXATION FOR UNITS IV, VIII AND X. The sale is subject to current taxes, covenants, conditions restrictions, reservations, rights, rights of way, and easements of record, any encumbrances of record to be satisfied out of the purchase price. The property is to be sold on an “as is” basis except as to title. The conservator of the estate has an exclusive listing with Blue Team Realty, Inc. Interested parties may contact Evie Cameron, Broker Associate at (530) 941-7955. The terms and conditions of the sale are: cash sale, taxes, rents, operating, and maintenance expenses, premiums on insurance acceptable to the purchaser shall be pro-rated as the date of confirmation of sale. Escrow charges, examination of title, recording of conveyance, any title insurance policy shall be paid 1/2 by Buyer and 1/2 by Seller. The undersigned reserves the right to reject any and all bids prior to entry of an order confirming the sale. Signed: SHELBY BOSTON, Public Guardian Case No. 17PR00390 Published: March 7,14,21, 2019

NOTICE OF LIEN SALE Pursuant to CA Business Code 21700, in lieu of rents due, the following units contain clothes, furniture, boxes, etc. 256SS TODD J JOHNSTON 7x10 (Boxes, Totes, Furniture) 156AC TERRI JORDAN 12x12 (Furniture, Bed Set, Totes, Boxes) 250SS WHITNEY WHEATON 5x5 (Bags, Boxes, Bicycle) 360CC1 SHERRI WHEATON 12x12 (Furniture, Boxes, Household Items) Contents to be sold to the highest bidder on: Saturday March 23, 2019 Beginning at 1:00pm Sale to be held at: Bidwell Self Storage, 65 Heritage Lane, Chico, CA 95926. (530) 893-2109 Published: March 7,14, 2019

NOTICE OF LIEN SALE 2007 Chevy Impala CA License# 5YSW637 VIN# 2G1WB58K079245364 Lien Sale March 26, 2019 10:00am at NORTH VALLEY TOWING 4950 Cohasset Rd #B2 Chico, CA 95973. Published: March 14, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner MARIJANE RHEANN DAVIS filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: MARIJANE RHEANN DAVIS Proposed name: MARIJANE RHEANN STAUSS

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THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: April 10, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: February 4, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00403 Published: February 21,28, March 7,14, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner DEVIN JOSE LANDAVAZO BLANCO filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: DEVIN JOSE LANDAVAZO BLANCO Proposed name: DEVIN DANNY LANDAVAZO GALOS THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: April 3, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: February 15, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00494 Published: February 28, March 7,14,21, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner MICHAEL BENSON filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: MICHAEL BENSON Proposed name: BENSON BENSON THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the

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matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: March 27, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: January 16, 2019 Case Number: 18CV03571 Published: February 28, March 7,14,21, 2019

SUMMONS SUMMONS NOTICE TO RESPONDENT ANTHONY BUNCE You are being sued by plaintiff: JANET DONNELLY You have 30 calendar days after this Summons and Petition are served on you to file a Response (form FL-120) at the court and have a copy served on the petitioner. A letter, phone call, or court appearance will not protect you. If you do not file your Response on time, the court may make orders affecting your marriage or domestic partnership, your property, and custody of your children. You may be ordered to pay support and attorney fees and costs. For legal advice, contact a lawyer immediately. Get help finding a lawyer at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courts.ca.gov/selfhelp) at the California Legal Services website (www.lawhelpca.org), or by contacting your local county bar association. FEE WAIVER: If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the clerk for a fee waiver form. The court may order you to pay back all or part of the fees and costs that the court waived for you or the other party. The name and address of the court are: Superior Court of California, County of Butte 1775 Concord Avenue Chico, CA 95928 The name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner’s attorney, or the petitioner without an attorney, are: MICHAEL M. ROONEY/ JEFFREY MONSELL 1361 Esplanade Chico, CA 95926-4900 (530) 345-5678 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Dated: November 2, 2018 Case Number: 18FL02331 Published: February 21,28, March 7,14, 2019

SUMMONS NOTICE TO RESPONDENT SCOTT ANDREW SPAULDING You are being sued by petitioner: NANCY JANE SPAULDING You have 30 calendar days after this Summons and Petition are served on you to file a Response (form FL-120) at the court and have a copy served on the petitioner. A letter, phone call, or court appearance will not protect you. If you do not file your Response on time, the court may make orders affecting your marriage or domestic partnership, your property, and custody of your children. You may be ordered to pay support and attorney fees and costs. For legal advice,

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contact a lawyer immediately. Get help finding a lawyer at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courts.ca.gov/selfhelp) at the California Legal Services website (www.lawhelpca.org), or by contacting your local county bar association. FEE WAIVER: If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the clerk for a fee waiver form. The court may order you to pay back all or part of the fees and costs that the court waived for you or the other party. The name and address of the court are: Superior Court of California, County of Butte 1775 Concord Avenue Chico, CA 95928 The name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner’s attorney, or the petitioner without an attorney, are: MICHAEL M. ROONEY/ RONALD T. MARQUEZ 1361 Esplanade Chico, CA 95926-4900 (530) 345-5678 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Dated: December 31, 2018 Case Number: 18FL02654 Published: March 14,21,28, April 4, 2019

PETITION

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decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: NICOLE R. PLOTTEL 466 Vallombrosa Ave. Chico, CA 95926 (530) 893-2882 Case Number: 19PR00113 Dated: March 6, 2019 Published: March 14,21,28, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE SHANE L. MASTEN, also known as SHANE LOREN MASTEN, SHANE MASTEN To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: SHANE L. MASTEN, also known as SHANE LOREN MASTEN, SHANE MASTEN A Petition for Probate has been filed by: SHANNON W. MASTEN in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: SHANNON W. MASTEN be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: April 9, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE KONRAD JOSEPH PAUL To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: KONRAD JOSEPH PAUL a petition for Probate has been filed by: HOWARD W. PAUL in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: HOWARD W. PAUL be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: April 2, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the

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this Legal Notice continues

court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: SONYA K. FINN The Law Offices of Leverenz & Finn 515 Wall Street Chico, CA 95928. (530) 895-1621 Case Number: 19PR00116 Dated: March 7, 2019 Published: March 14,21,28, 2019

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NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE DORIS VIOLET NESMITH, aka DORIS V. NESMITH, aka DORIS NESMITH To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: DORIS VIOLET NESMITH, aka DORIS V. NESMITH, aka DORIS NESMITH A Petition for Probate has been filed by: SUSAN EIDSON in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: SUSAN EIDSON be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: April 9, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: TBA Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the

decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: CLAYTON B. ANDERSON 20 Independence Circle Chico, CA 95973 (530) 342-6144 Case Number: 19PR00098 Dated: March 4, 2019 Published: March 14,21,28, 2019

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NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE JIMMY H. MYERS, also known as JIMMY MYERS, JIMMY HENRY MYERS To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: JIMMY H. MYERS, also known as JIMMY MYERS, JIMMY HENRY MYERS A Petition for Probate has been filed by: JAMES A. MYERS in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: JAMES A. MYERS be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: March 26, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney.

IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: NICOLE R. PLOTTEL 466 Vallombrosa Ave. Chico, CA 95926 (530) 893-2882 Case Number: 19PR00105 Dated: February 28, 2019 Published: March 7,14,21, 2019

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NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE VIRGINIA ROSE VANCE To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: VIRGINIA ROSE VANCE a petition for Probate has been filed by: DEBI OLSZEWSKI in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: DEBI OLSZEWSKI be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decendent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: March 19, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or

contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: SONYA K. FINN The Law Offices of Leverenz & Finn 515 Wall Street Chico, CA 95928. (530) 895-1621 Case Number: 19PR00068 Dated: February 20, 2019 Published: February 28, March 7,14, 2019

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REAL ESTATE

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“We stepped up the game building houses after the Santa Rosa fire, and we helped some people get back into their homes,” said John the Contractor. He looked slowly around the landscape and said, “But this Paradise situation is an altogether different ballgame.” John sadly shook his head. “Damn fire,” he said, “damn Camp fire.” He and I stood on Billie Road in Paradise surveying the destruction we locals are so familiar with these days. John the Contractor is from over on the Coast and was getting his first look at our tragedy. “Let’s do this!” said John. He jumped into the pickup and gripped tightly on the wheel as he drove. “Listen,” he said, “I have friends who will buy building lots, and I have crews that will come build houses.” He was talking faster now. “How quickly can we get started?” “That’s the magic question,” I said. “The lot-clearing has just begun, and we don’t know when the Paradise water system will be available, and…” “Yeah, yeah,” he said, “there’s always that stuff to get past, but we will do it!”

We pulled off the Skyway into the Lookout Point turnout. As we stood at the rail overlooking the Little Grand Canyon of the Butte Creek drainage, John said, “People do want to come back to Paradise, right?” I recited the theory I’ve heard spoken lately, that a third of the former Paradise residents are never coming back, and another third are undecided. But a third are determined to get back to Paradise as soon as they can. “Well,” said John, “if roughly 14,000 homes burned down, and a third of the people aren’t coming back, that means over 4,000 lots will be available to build on. So, let’s buy a bunch of lots and build a bunch of houses!” “Well, I said, “we don’t know how many people will want to buy a new home in Paradise after all it’s been through.” John waved his arm toward the awesome view of the Canyon below. “This whole place is a Paradise,” he said. “If we build it, they will come!”

Doug Love is Sales Manager at Century 21 in Chico. Call 530-680-0817 or email dougwlove@gmail.com License #950289

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CN&R

march 14, 2019

PRICE

BR/BA

$899,000.00 $899,000.00 $750,000.00 $580,000.00 $550,000.00 $541,500.00 $475,000.00 $457,000.00 $437,500.00 $435,000.00 $430,000.00

4/3 4/3 4/4 3/2 4/3 3/2 4/3 3/2 3/2 4/2 3/2

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Homes Sold Last Week ADDRESS

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Sponsored by Century 21 Select Real Estate, Inc. SQ. FT. 3131 3805 2799 1931 2293 1756 2060 1648 1540 1707 1348

ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

1441 Radcliff Ln 110 W 22nd St 3266 Tinker Creek Way 2531 New Heather Way 1516 Gilbert Ln 849 W 11th Ave 10 Allie Ct 2830 Lovell Ave 19 Marydith Ln 1022 Sir William Ct 1225 Whitewood Way

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico

$429,000.00 $415,000.00 $410,000.00 $410,000.00 $406,000.00 $405,000.00 $404,000.00 $395,000.00 $394,500.00 $392,000.00 $389,000.00

3/2 3/2 3/2 3/2 3/3 3/3 3/2 4/2 4/3 3/3 4/2

SQ. FT. 1928 1784 1453 1494 1592 1808 1507 1644 1525 1852 17 80


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235 aCres loCated in the Beautiful setting of Butte Valley. Offering 2 newer stunning custom homes, horse set up, out buildings, and fully fenced property. Wonderful opportunity to have privacy with enough acres to have $1,650,000 horses, cattle or just the peaceful setting that this has to offer

.....................................

adoraBle 3 bed/2.5 bth, 1,502 sq ft with front and back porches plus a formal dining room and living room with an ENDING $335,000 open floor plan, in door laundry room, 2-car garage and all furnishing in the Phome are included.

.......

Kimberley Tonge l 530.518.5508 Lic# 01318330

Newer Home in Wildwood Park with views of Foothills. $425,000 2 bed 2 bath Condo in Chico in a great area. $167,500 Alice Zeissler l 530.518.1872 CalBRE #01312354

The following houses were sold in Butte County by real estate agents or private parties during the week of February 25 - March 1, 2019 The housing prices are based on the stated documentary transfer tax of the parcel and may not necessarily reflect the actual sale price of the home. ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

SQ. FT.

ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

SQ. FT.

2880 Eaton Rd

Chico

$389,000.00

3/2

1543

3000 Burnap Ave

Chico

$316,000.00

2/1

1054

2608 Duffy Dr

Chico

$384,500.00

3/2

1624

6 Manor Cir

Chico

$315,000.00

3/2

1592

1 Morning Rose Way

Chico

$381,500.00

3/2

1600

77 Lexington Dr

Chico

$312,500.00

3/3

1248

1982 Webb Ave

Chico

$380,000.00

3/2

1404

1267 Dale Way

Chico

$299,000.00

3/1

1162

1572 Warner St

Chico

$379,000.00

5/3

1240

1334 Bruce St

Chico

$280,000.00

3/1

1020

1577 Kona Dr

Chico

$366,000.00

3/2

1389

1637 Chico River Rd

Chico

$275,000.00

2/1

1062

1083 Sierra Vista Way

Chico

$335,000.00

3/1

1275

2863 Godman Ave

Chico

$274,000.00

3/2

1368

18 Santos Way

Chico

$330,000.00

4/2

1788

1134 W 5th St

Chico

$228,000.00

4/2

1108

550 Waterford Dr

Chico

$326,500.00

3/2

1370

1412 Boucher St

Chico

$219,000.00

3/1

736

25 Vincent Ln

Chico

$324,000.00

4/3

2392

3415 Rodgers Ave

Chico

$201,500.00

4/3

2048

1660 Arcadian Ave

Chico

$323,000.00

2/1

1007

667 E 16th St

Chico

$180,000.00

1/1

644

march 14, 2019

CN&R

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345 West FiFth street ChiCo, CA 95928 (530) 891–6328 Please call for reservations Open Fridays for Lunch 11:30am to 2:30pm Join us for Happy Hour 7 days a week 4:30 to 6:00pm

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