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CHICO’S FREE NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY VOLUME 42, ISSUE 26 THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 2019 WWW.NEWSREVIEW.COM

Weird CHICO

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February 21, 2019


CN&R

INSIDE

presidents day

Vol. 42, Issue 26 • February 21, 2019 4

Editorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Guest Comment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Second & Flume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 This Modern World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Streetalk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

NEWSLINES

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HEALTHLINES

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Appointment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Weekly Dose. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

GREENWAYS

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Eco Event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS

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15 Minutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 The Goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

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COVER STORY

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ARTS & CULTURE

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Arts Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 This Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Fine Arts listings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Scene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Nightlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Reel World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Chow. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Arts DEVO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Brezsny’s Astrology . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35

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Our Mission: To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. Editor Melissa Daugherty Managing Editor Meredith J. Cooper Arts Editor Jason Cassidy Contributing Editor Evan Tuchinsky Staff Writer Ashiah Scharaga Calendar Editor Nate Daly

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OPINION

Send guest comments, 340 words maximum, to gc@newsreview.com or to 353 e. Second St., Chico, Ca 95928. Please include photo & short bio.

SECOND & FLUME

EDITORIAL

Don’t dismiss bernie—yet Bernie Sanders’ announcement Tuesday (Feb. 19)

that he’s entering the 2020 presidential race may have struck terror in the hearts of many Democrats. After all, a lot of the independent Vermont senator’s loyalists—Bernie-or-busters—helped put us where we are today. You know, deep into the heart of darkness. In just two years, we’ve watched the current administration dismantle the nation’s progress on everything from health care and environmentalism to the financial protections set in place after Wall Street and investment banks triggered the largest recession since the Great Depression. Meantime, Trump and the GOP brokered a restructured tax system that benefits the ultra wealthy and major corporations at the expense of not only everyday Americans but also the country’s financial underpinnings. The national deficit has grown by more than $2 trillion during Trump’s term despite a strong economy and POTUS’ campaign promise that he’d reduce and then eliminate it altogether. Of course, that’s the tip of the iceberg when it comes to a president whose actions have given rise to a modern white supremacy movement and for whom an increasing mountain of evidence linked to

his associates points to him being compromised by, and working in the interest of, Russian President Vladimir Putin and other dangerous despots, including Saudi Arabia’s crown prince. Sanders’ supporters often are quick to point the finger at the Democratic Party and the so-called establishment for the outcome of the 2016 presidential election, but there was a responsible choice to make on Nov. 8, 2016, and many progressives have yet to atone for making a reckless one. All that said, we don’t think Sanders’ 2020 bid is necessarily a bad omen. For one thing, he will keep the Democrats seeking their party’s nomination focused on his progressive agenda, one we believe benefits the majority of Americans. Sanders very likely will redouble the debate around important issues: economic inequality, health care, climate change, a federal minimum wage, Wall Street reform, etc. Our advice: Go into the campaign cycle with an open mind. The path ahead is long, and there are several smart, well-qualified and passionate people already in the mix. Don’t dismiss Sanders, but don’t dismiss his challengers, either. And remember: The nation can’t afford another four years under Trump. Ω

GUEST COMMENT

america’s role in yemen’s suffering AwhoIbrahim, a 28-pound, 12-year-old Yemeni girl is slowly starving to death. You can meet Abrar victim of the three-year war in Yemen is Abrar

by Googling her name. Yemen, the Arab world’s poorest country, has been wracked by a bloody war between the Houthi rebels and supporters of Yemen’s internationally recognized government. A conservative estimate is that 85,000 Yemeni children under age 5 have subsequently died, by most by starvation, as food Roger Beadle prices have doubled; another 12 The author, a Chico million people are on the brink resident, is a Chico State alum and former of starving to death. Saudi Arabia small-business owner. is carrying out the most horrific human rights atrocity in the world. United Nations officials and aid experts warn that this could become the worst famine the world has seen in a generation. The Saudi Arabia-led coalition of Middle Eastern and North African states has been waging war in Yemen since 2015 against the Houthi rebels, whom the Saudis see as a terrorist threat

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February 21, 2019

sanctioned by Iran, Saudi Arabia’s sworn enemy. It does not excuse or justify the horrific carnage they have unleashed on the people of Yemen. They are doing so with fulsome support from the Pentagon and the American weapons industry. In 2017 alone, the U.S. sold Saudi Arabia $491 million worth of laser-guided missiles, various ammunition, and programmable bomb systems. The 2017 deal was partially created with the help of Jared Kushner, son-in-law of and senior adviser to President Trump; Kushner had cultivated relationships with Saudi royalty during the presidential transition and personally contacted Lockheed Martin during the deal-making process. House Republicans and Democrats alike last week voted to pull aid from Yemen. Rep. Doug LaMalfa, however, voted nay on that bipartisan effort to end suffering in the region. Now it’s in the Senate’s hands to see if the Trump administration will remain complicit with Saudi Arabia’s genocidal assault on a small, poor country on the Arabian Peninsula. Say a prayer for Abrar and the countless other people starving to death. It is said that a picture is worth a thousand words—the picture of Abrar will spill a thousand tears. Ω

by Melissa Daugherty m e l i s s a d @ n e w s r e v i e w. c o m

Love is hell It was fall 2001 and my cousin, Jeff, had recently moved back to Chico from Manhattan and introduced me to Ryan Adams by way of his new album, Gold. Released two weeks after the Twin Towers fell, its single—“New York, New York”—propelled the singer-songwriter/indie-rocker/alt-country troubadour to some recognition. The aforementioned song was timely, but others on the album resonated more with me. Jeff gave me a copy, and I hit repeat on “La Cienega Just Smiled” and “Harder Now That It’s Over.” That last one seems apropos these days. I’m referring to a story in The New York Times last week alleging that Adams subjected his ex-wife, the singer and actress Mandy Moore, to psychological abuse that stunted her professionally. He also reportedly manipulated other women he’d pulled into his orbit—ostensibly to lure them into bed—with promises of helping their music careers. My heart sank as soon as I read the headline: “Ryan Adams Dangled Success. Women Say They Paid a Price.” Ugh. Before diving into the story, having received an alert to my phone, I posted a link to Facebook. I did that to stanch an onslaught of messages. People who know me well—even some strangers who read this space—know I’m a fan. My friends are especially aware. They’ll recall a near-obsessiveness— how I bought every album, set up a Google Alert, and read everything I could about Adams (including his blogs and blogs about him). Some joined me at concerts—like one at UC Berkeley in 2008, where I refused to budge despite having the flu. Through a fevered haze and chills, I sat motionless as Adams and his bandmates in the Cardinals, amazing musicians in their own right, played the last song of the evening: an a capella version of the country-tinged “Pearls on a String.” I practically held my breath through the harmonies. They brought me to tears. I was enough of a fan to know that Adams was temperamental and a bit of a ladies’ man. It pained me, however, to read about a much more serious allegation: that he’d pursued an underage musician. According to the Times, he and a 15-year-old girl exchanged sexually explicit messages, and he exposed himself to her during video calls. Through his lawyer, Adams denied having had inappropriate interactions with anyone “he knew was underage.” There are indications the girl at points misrepresented herself as older. However, it also appears Adams didn’t buy it. “[I] would get in trouble if someone knew we talked like this,” one of his texts reportedly reads. That’s a bridge too far, irrespective of whether she claimed to be older. I’m done with Ryan Adams. I’ll never spend another dime on that wanker. My devotion now: supporting the female artists he hurt. There are many. The Times story is thoroughly reported and establishes a pattern of behavior. I believe it’s accurate, and I’m sickened by his apologists. Still, 18-plus years deep, I’ve had a hell of a time processing. That’s because there’s more to it than the music alone. I fell in love with my nowhusband shortly after the release of Cold Roses. That album is basically the soundtrack to our courtship—one of its tracks is among the two Adams songs played at our wedding. Two songs. A friend of mine urged me to not let Adams rob me of the joy I’d found in his work over the years, especially the wedding recessional song. “It doesn’t matter that he wrote and recorded it. Because it’s your song. So you own it. It’s yours,” he told me. He’s right, but the lesson remains: I will never get this invested in an artist ever again.

Melissa Daugherty is editor of the CN&R


LETTERS

Send email to cnrletters@newsreview.com

About that justification  Re “A very loving individual” (Newslines, by Meredith J. Cooper, Feb. 14): Recently the Butte County district attorney found that Butte County sheriff’s deputies acted in reasonable self-defense when they shot to death a Palermo woman in April 2018. Concerned Citizens for Justice disagrees with that decision. We believe that the community should find the following facts alarming: 1. Both deputies were wearing body cameras that they did not turn on until after the shooting. 2. The victim was shot five times in the back. 3. She was not armed. 4. She was known to be mentally ill. 5. The DA said that people exercising self-defense are not required to retreat, even if safety could have been achieved by retreating. We think that this is an uncivil conclusion to reach in a civilized community. Retreat is preferable to shooting an unarmed, mentally ill human being. We want guardians—not

warriors—to police our communities. We want de-escalation techniques to become normal practice for every officer. We grieve for the officers who must live with this tragedy knowing that they could have avoided killing a person had they been adequately trained in and practiced both de-escalation and behavioral-health intervention. We ask, “Do you find this shooting reasonable?” Margaret Swick Chico

‘Rest my case’ Re “Help for Trump?” (Letters, by Robert Woods, Feb. 14): Just a shout-out to Robert Woods for proving my point on the 2016 presidential election, albeit Woods chose to ignore the double-dealing Tad Devine, and the alleged sexual harassment charges in Bernie’s ill-fated campaign. Not to mention Bernie’s third home. Let’s look at the results in the three states that enabled Comrade Trump to take the White House

hostage. Clinton lost to Comrade Trump in Michigan by 10,264 votes; Jill Stein had 51,463 votes. Clinton lost to Comrade Trump in Pennsylvania by 44,292 votes; Stein had 49,292 votes. And Clinton lost to Comrade Trump in Wisconsin by 22,748 votes; Stein had 30,980. Pissed-off Bernie backers registered in droves as protest to the DNC’s “poor treatment” of Bernie Sanders (i.e., Butte College students). Could the results in the three aforementioned states have been from the same fateful situation? Furthermore, Jill Stein sat next to Michael Flynn and Vladimir Putin at the 10-year anniversary dinner in Moscow for the Russian state TV, aka RT. I rest my case. Thanks, Bob. Ray Estes Redding

Remembering Loretta Chico is mourning the death of Loretta Metcalf, though she would prefer that we eat pasta and drink wine. LETTERS c o n t i n u e d

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Loretta graduated from Chico State, worked as a grief counselor, then in the university’s EOP office in the early 1980s. In her off hours, Loretta founded a women’s newspaper, The New Voice. She also co-starred with Rose Febbo on KZFR’s cooking show, Mangia with the Mamas. Loretta met the love of her life, the late professor Homer Metcalf, in the 1980s. They married and threw wild, joyous parties at their Cohasset lake and estate while spending community time in LaSalles as part of the “Westenders’ Club.” (Their photo hangs above the bar.) Loretta and Homer contributed to the Chico Creek Nature Center, the Feminist Women’s Health Center and KZFR. Loretta worked as a hospice volunteer and guided me into hospice counseling following my mother’s death in 2011. Loretta was a dynamic, vibrant role model for the women of Chico. Please tune in to KZFR Monday (Feb. 25), at 10 a.m., as host Dave Guzzetti toasts Loretta with her favorite music and local friends. Patrick and Sheila Metcalf and Loretta’s loving grandkids will be happy you did. Vernon Andrews Chico

Not antisemitism I am sick to death of criticism of Israel being conflated with antisemitism. It cheapens the terrible reality of true antisemitism, and constrains American citizens from their obligation to take action against human rights abuses, particularly those empowered by the U.S. government. Palestinians in their homeland are violently oppressed by Israeli policies, many fear to the point of genocide. U.S. citizens who criticize Israeli policies, advocate for BDS and demand justice for Palestine are expressing outrage against human rights violations. [These actions have] nothing to do with prejudice against the Jewish people. I am a Jewish American and registered Democrat. I am ashamed that accusations of antisemitism are being used by our most powerful elected officials—Nancy Pelosi, Chuck Schumer and Donald Trump—to protect Israel’s cruel and inhumane policies. The strident criticism of Ilhan Omar’s honest comments about the power of American Israel Public Affairs Committee and the Israeli

lobby over U.S. policy, and of Rashida Tlaib’s simple suggestion that a congressional delegation travel to Palestine, reveals the stranglehold Israel has over our government. I implore my fellow citizens to speak out in defense of democracy, against our government’s protection of injustice. “To learn who rules over you, simply find out who you are not allowed to criticize” —Voltaire Emily Alma Chico

Where’s the Shasta Pack? I’m deeply saddened and concerned by the loss of, and the circumstances surrounding, the Shasta Pack. It is highly unlikely that the wolves would suddenly “pack up” and leave. Furthermore, it is disturbing that their sudden departure came a few weeks after a standoff between ranchers and wolf advocates and a sighting of wolves feeding on a calf carcass. Killing in retribution should not be the answer. Barriers and avoidance strategies are. Livestock growers, wolf advocates and hunters should share “tending the flock.” I will gladly contribute to funding for ranchers who have lost animals to wolves. I also expect responsible people to pay the cost of replacement for a wolf killed by humans or their animals. Because wolves have protected status, ecological value as a top carnivore, are scarce and have commercial value as tourist attractions, their value is significantly higher than a calf, lamb or pet. Competitive interests have driven the value of both private and public land to the breaking point. I believe open range grazing is the healthiest way to raise livestock. We also need to preserve even greater range for wolves on public land. With cooperative management, we can provide for the needs of present and future generations. Dick Cory Chico

Camp Fire care We have been providing health care to our community for over 40 years, and like so many in the area, we at Women’s Health Specialists understand the great loss that so many have faced, and immediately felt the strong desire to reach out to survivors and their families. In order to better help serve our

beloved neighbors and community members who have been impacted by the Camp Fire, we were able to obtain a grant that allows us to provide rides to and from appointments at our clinic until the end of March, for a variety of reproductive health services for men and women who were affected by the fire, whether it be because they are a survivor, housed survivors after the fire, or received medical care from an affected provider. We are grateful for the opportunity to offer help and support to our community in any way that we can. Some of our staff were deeply affected by the Camp Fire, and we continue to keep all survivors in our hearts, as we understand that the journey to recovery is a long and arduous road, and has only just begun. Laura Morehouse Chico

America, the oligarchy Political discussion around Venezuela rarely mentions our embargoes or sanctions that have driven Venezuela into the ditch. No mention of CIA money and support for the opposition that continue to destabilize. How about some comparisons, including our destruction of the Middle East, with the same excuses: “We are bringing freedom and democracy.” No mention of the fact that our ideas of freedom and democracy come at the cost of destruction and death. How many of the dead are enjoying our form of freedom and democracy? How about those who have lost loved ones, homes and communities? Why is it that only oil- and mineralrich nations must be saved by our righteous bombing and destruction? How much have the leaders we have installed in place of the “despots” done for their citizens? You must be asleep not to recognize that we are no longer a democracy ourselves, according to Princeton and Harvard, which have declared that we are now officially an oligarchy. Maybe we need to start a bombing and killing rampage here, to save ourselves for our own democracy. Jeanne Thatcher Chico

More letters online:

We’ve got too many letters for this space. please go to www.newsreview.com/chico for additional readers’ comments on past cn&r articles.


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NEWSLINES DOWNSTROKE OROVILLE EXTENDS RENT CONTROL

Disaster-area protections will continue for residential tenants after the Oroville City Council voted unanimously Tuesday evening (Feb. 19) to impose a rent-control ordinance for the next 10 1/2 months. Effective immediately, no landlord may increase rents more than 10 percent over the rate charged before Nov. 1, just prior to the Camp Fire. Both the governor and president included Butte County in disaster declarations; state anti-gouging laws cap at 10 percent the amount businesses may increase prices after disasters, and municipalities may extend this. The Chico City Council passed a similar ordinance, running through May 16.

ASSESSING CHICO’S FIRE THREATS

In the wake of the Camp Fire, many Chicoans no doubt are curious about the local fire risk. Fire Chief Steve Standridge addressed their concerns in a presentation to the City Council Tuesday evening (Feb. 19). Unlike Paradise, he said, Chico’s urban forest is made up mostly of deciduous trees, which burn less intensely than conifers. Chico’s flat topography is another plus. A wildfire threat does exist on the city’s east side, especially in the areas of Upper Park and the Stilson Canyon watershed, Standridge noted. Wind is the deciding factor in how destructive a wildfire will be. Another plus: His department has established a good working relationship with Cal Fire. “We’re lucky in this area,” he said. “We have a rapid fire-response capacity.” In fact, he worries more about building fires than wildfires. He said he is especially concerned about large apartment buildings, such as Bidwell Oaks and Sierra Sunrise. Fire can travel down their long hallways extremely fast, he said.

PARADISE PLANS REBUILD

Launching a series of “listening sessions” on how to rebuild from the Camp Fire, the Paradise Town Council will hold a special meeting Friday morning (Feb. 22) with residents and its long-term planning consultant. The two-hour workshop, which starts at 10 a.m. at Paradise Alliance Church (6491 Clark Road), will include small-group discussions on the town’s future. Urban Design Associates will incorporate ideas from this and upcoming sessions into planning proposals. Meanwhile, Mayor Jody Jones (pictured) told the CN&R that she met last week with federal officials about securing funds for a sewer line in the business district. She characterized the meeting as “very productive” and said via email, “I’m very encouraged.” 8

CN&R

FEBRUARY 21, 2019

Building a village Mechoopda, city and CARD collaborate on plan to create an interpretive display that celebrate the hisTtoryandofmonuments Chico’s settlers and founder Gen.

here are plenty of public parks, buildings

John Bidwell. But there isn’t a single park or monument named for the original inhabitants by of Chico, members of Patrick the Mechoopda Indian Evans Tribe—at least none that Tribal Vice Chair Sandra Learn more: Knight can think of off A public meeting about the top of her head. the proposed cultural exhibit will be held “None of our aborigiMarch 7 at 6 p.m. nal names for the terriat the Chico Creek tory [are used], none of Nature Center, our tribe’s names. Our 1968 E. Eighth St. members feel kind of invisible,” Knight said. The Mechoopda are looking to end that omission by building a cultural exhibit on a 3-acre plot of unused city land within Bidwell Park. The tribe is working with the city of Chico and the Chico Area Recreation and Park District (CARD) on the project, which is dependent on grant funding from the California Natural Resources Agency. “It’s been something we’ve wanted to do for a long time,” Knight said, “to build some kind of cultural center where visitors could

find out about the real story of the first people in the area, which is not in textbooks.” The Maidu Living Village is proposed for the fenced-off and unused deer pen next to the Chico Creek Nature Center. The plan is to create an interactive experience to teach visitors about the Mechoopda, a tribe of Maidu people, and provide a space for cultural activities like basket weaving and acorn processing. Knight said the vision is for visitors to take a trip through the tribe’s history, from precontact with settlers to the contact period and into the present. They would first assemble in an arbor area, and then take a guided tour through a native plant garden, a replica of a traditional precontact native home, and a replica of a wooden shack like one tribal members would have lived in at the rancheria. Visitors also could partake in hands-on experiences. “We have some mortars and pestles, some very large mortars we could put there. It would be a good spot for people to actually touch them and grind acorns in them,” Knight said. The project is contingent upon funding

available through Proposition 68. Passed last June, it allowed the state to sell $4 bil-

lion in general obligation bonds for grant programs for parks, water infrastructure and other environmental projects. It also authorized the state Legislature to appropriate $40 million for a grant program administered by the Natural Resources Agency to fund projects that protect, restore or enhance California’s cultural, community and natural resources. Eligible projects must fulfill at least one of five requirements, which include protecting or restoring Native American cultural resources and developing visitor centers that educate the public about natural landscapes or the contributions of California’s ethnic communities. “The grant seemed like it was written for this project,” Knight said. The Chico Park Division is handling the grant proposal. The first phase of the process includes submitting a conceptual proposal with a rough estimate of the cost of the project and a sketch of the planned development. That was completed last week, according to Park Division Manager Linda Herman. “The estimated costs and funds we are requesting for the project are approximately $750,000, which includes a 10 percent contingency amount of $68,156,” Herman said


Sandra Knight says an interactive exhibit dedicated to the Mechoopda Indian Tribe, of which she is vice chair, would offer insight into current traditions as well as those from times of preEuropean contact. PHOTO BY CHRISTINA MCHENRY

in an email. The city has contracted with NorthStar Engineering to help put together the proposal and concept, but actual blueprints for the village won’t be drawn up unless the grant is awarded. If the Natural Resources Agency approves the concept, the city will be invited to a second round of proposals later this spring, at which point City Council approval will be needed. Herman said the city had long been looking for a use for the property, formerly an enclosure for injured deer rescued by the Department of Fish and Wildlife. A key component of the village would be

connecting it to the Chico Creek Nature Center next door. As part of the threeway collaboration on the project, CARD would oversee day-to-day operations and maintenance. The center is also perfectly situated to coordinate field trips to the village, CARD Director Ann Willmann said. “Our focus will be on the kids coming through. We already have field trips that come through the nature center; this will add the opportunity for kids to learn about the Mechoopda tribe,” Willmann said. Operational costs could be covered by the fee the Nature Center would charge for field trips, Willmann said. The center includes Mechoopda and Maidu history in its field trip curriculum, but the village project would offer a completely new learning opportunity for students, she added. Knight said that the idea for the village’s interactive exhibits was inspired by the exhibits at the Gold Nugget Museum in Paradise, which burned down in the Camp Fire. Instead of focusing on the lives of white settlers brought to Chico by the Gold Rush, the village would teach students how the Mechoopda lived and worked as stewards of the environment, Knight said. The living village also would differ from the Maidu exhibit at the Lake Oroville Visitor Center by focusing specifically on the culture and history of the Mechoopda. “We want to convey why we love this land so much, that everything here is sacred; the water, the land, the salmon, we’re family with those things,” Knight said. “We want to convey that to young people, so they can respect the land like us.” Ω

Heavy lifting Chico council weighs warming center, toilets and climate change

Just how cold and dangerous does it have

to get before the city will open its new warming center at night? That was one of the difficult questions the Chico City Council tried to solve at its lengthy meeting Tuesday evening (Feb. 19). Council members praised City Manager Mark Orme and his staff for responding to a recent cold snap by erecting two emergency warming tents in Depot Park in just 24 hours. The rapid response was needed to protect homeless people from extreme cold weather. However, the warming center isn’t cost-effective, Orme said, and the council needed to find another way to keep people from freezing to death. The council also needed to establish the scope of the warming center. How cold it has to get outdoors was open to interpretation. The problem is that cold levels are subjective: Forty degrees on a foggy day can seem as cold as 32 degrees on a sunny day. Orme presented four options, ranging from working with a nonprofit agency—he teasingly said he had one in mind—to a spendy option involving creation of

a new fire captain position within the Fire Department. As it turned out, the nonprofit agency was the Jesus Center. Its executive director, Laura Cootsona, told council members that the center’s dining hall would work well as a warming center. It has the added advantage of offering direct services there. Councilman Karl Ory moved to approve the Jesus Center option and set the trigger temperature at 32 degrees. His motion passed, 6-1, with Sean Morgan dissenting. Cootsona will need approval from her board of directors before the warming center can be developed. In the meantime, the city will continue to operate the Depot Park warming center in the event of extreme cold, as it did for the second time this past weekend.

SIFT ER Strengthening the herd With measles back on the radar in California, parents and physicians are once again shining a light on immunizing children in the state. Despite vaccine requirements for school attendance, many California children receive medical exemptions and therefore are vulnerable when such diseases do make an appearance (see “Shot wave,” Healthlines, page 12). Here in Butte County, the majority of schools have achieved 95 percent or higher vaccine rates for kindergarteners. Here are the ones that haven’t, according to shotsforschool.org, a program of the California Department of Public Health.

Chico

Citrus Avenue Elementary: 94% Marigold Elementary: 94% Blue Oak Charter: 79% Wildflower Open Classroom: 73% Core Butte Charter: 51%

Oroville

Stream Charter: 90% Learning Community Charter: 74%

The Ridge (pre-Camp Fire) Pine Ridge, Magalia: 91% Children’s Community Charter, Paradise: 91% Paradise Elementary: 92%

City-run warming tents in Depot Park may well be replaced by an indoor site at the Jesus Center. PHOTO BY ASHIAH SCHARAGA

In other news:

Council members received a lengthy oral report—based on a voluminous and data-rich written one—from Mark Stemen, chairman of the Sustainability Task Force (STF), outlining that body’s many accomplishments and continuing challenges. When it comes to meeting the goals of the city’s Climate Action Plan, Stemen said, “Chico was on target to meet its previous goals, and then came the Camp Fire.” Chico has proven, he said, that it can reduce its greenhouse-gas (GHG) emissions, but fire is an ongoing threat. A vulnerability assessment included in the report noted that the number of fire-inducing extreme-heat days (over 104 degrees) had doubled from four to eight annually, and the forecast is that the number will continue to increase. According to the STF report, the state of California recently adopted a new GHG target of 40 percent reduction of 1990 levels by 2030. The report recommends that the city adopt the statewide target and create a new Climate Action Plan to implement it. (The current plan only goes through 2020.) It also recommends that the STF be upgraded from its current, anomalous status as an advisory committee to become a fullfledged “standing” commission. These recommendations were supported by nearly all of the dozen or so audience members who addressed the council. Eric Nilsson, the retired principal of Inspire School of Arts & Sciences, was one of them. “There is no better time to establish NEWSLINES C O N T I N U E D FEBRUARY 21, 2019

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bold and visionary leadership,” he said. Ultimately the panel voted, 4-3, with Councilmembers Ory, Scott Huber and Ann Schwab dissenting, to approve the first two recommendations but not to upgrade the STF to a full commission “at this time,” in Mayor Randall Stone’s words.

The Butte College Foundation’s Camp Fire Relief Fund committee meets to discuss disbursing donations to affected students.

At Huber’s request, the council took

up an issue with which it has been wrestling since 2015: public toilets open around the clock. In 2016, the city experimented with leaving City Plaza restrooms open 24/7, but the level of vandalism was intolerable, said Eric Gustafson, Public Works director-operations and maintenance. Still, it was a valuable experiment, he said. His department learned, for example, that leaving the restrooms open did reduce the amount of human waste befouling downtown. The city subsequently changed the restrooms’ open hours from 5 a.m. to 9 p.m. seven days a week. This reportedly has given homeless people more opportunity to relieve themselves in the city’s restrooms. There is general agreement, however, that around-the-clock restrooms are needed. Gustafson’s agenda report recommends that the city “identify funding for two portable restroom systems” and continue discussions with the Butte County Association of Governments for future grants to obtain a Portland Loo, a more sophisticated outdoor restroom. Again, about a dozen people spoke to this matter. Nearly all agreed with the recommendations, but several felt they were overly focused on downtown when there was a similar need in other places. And two portables simply aren’t enough, they said. One of them was Angel Gomez, of the Butte Environmental Council. More portables are needed, she said, “especially along waterways near homeless camps,” where human feces is getting into the creeks and posing a serious public health threat. Council members voted, 5-2, to approve Gustafson’s recommendations, with Morgan and Kasey Reynolds dissenting. Where the portables will be sited remains to be decided. —ROBERT SPEER robe r tspeer@ newsr ev i ew. com

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PHOTO BY JOSH COZINE

College community Butte sees 8 percent lower enrollment, steps up to help students in wake of Camp Fire Mykayla Moron was out of the area

for her stepfather’s funeral when she heard about the Camp Fire on Nov. 8. She tried rushing back to her Paradise home, but it was too late. Her house and everything in it were lost, including her laptop. As a full-time student at Butte College, studying business and marketing, Moron was concerned she would have to drop out. She stayed for a few weeks with her grandparents in Almanor. A few days of making the hour-and-ahalf, one-way commute proved too challenging. Thankfully for Moron, the school was accommodating, allowing her to take extra time off and even replacing her laptop. With the added bonus of being gifted an RV through a nonprofit, she’s been able to return to classes. “It was heartwarming, seeing how much [Butte College] cared, and getting so much support,” she said. Nestled in the foothills near Chico and Paradise, Butte College serves nearly 10,000 students, many who, like Moron, come from the areas of Paradise, Magalia and Concow.

As of spring 2019, enrollment was down by 823 students from the same time last year—an approximate 8 percent decline in the student population. “It’s a pretty big loss,” said Clinton Slaughter, dean of Student Services. That enrollment drop figure is nearly identical to the number of students known to have lived in areas affected by the Camp Fire— around 820, Slaughter said. However, as has been evidenced throughout the region, it’s not just people who lived in the Camp Fire area who were affected—many people throughout Butte County lost jobs; friends and family members are doubled up in homes; and others are losing rental properties to the real estate market. All these effects and more were reflected in a survey of students taken after the fire. The other, bigger issue, according to administrators like Allen Renville, vice president for Student Services, is that students are taking fewer units. Many affected by the fire who have returned this spring have noted that with various hardships—like increased commuting

time, as many having moved to farther away towns like Corning, Orland, Red Bluff and even Sacramento—some have shifted to online classes only. “It’s clear it’s had an impact,” Renville said. In a small, somewhat cramped

conference room, members of the Butte College Foundation’s Camp Fire Relief Fund committee gathered on an early morning the first day of February. There, they held a conference that went well beyond the hour-long time it was allotted. “Let’s just give it all out,” said Hope Shapiro, representing the Office of Advancement and Development, speaking to a small group circling a small table with a phone open on conference call for others to join in. On the agenda was how to spend what remained of the over $500,000 that had been donated to the college, first through GoFundMe.com campaigns, and then through the foundation, which had been set up specifically for the campus’ Camp Fire relief efforts. “It was meant to be given out immediately,” she said.

After a passionate discussion, the committee decided to maintain a contingency fund of $20,000 to be awarded on a case-by-case basis by the Financial Aid Office, while the remaining was to be immediately given to Camp Fire survivors. Committee members used the survey results to determine the areas of most need. Aside from cash, they noticed a large number of students had lost their laptops in the fire. “Lots of students were left without anything,” said Brian Murphy, director of Butte College Institutional Research. “One thing we kept noticing was students losing their laptops.” The college has made a major point of replacing computers for students, so that they can remain enrolled in classes. Last month, 175 laptops were delivered to to the college, most of which have been given to students already. Another 250 are expected soon. As for Moron, who received one of the donated laptops, she’s back in class, attending full-time this spring. It’s still difficult, though, as she’s now living in a small space with her son and younger brother and sister, along with their pets, in a Los Molinos trailer park. “It’s still tough,” she said. “I have to take a three-hour night class and end up driving home at 10 o’clock. But [the college] has helped so much.” —JOSH COZINE


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rEibEs auto Parts 5990 Clark Road, Paradise (530) 877-6511

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siErra cEntraL crEdit Union (AtM only) 5175 Skyway, Paradise (800) 222-7228

siLvEr scissors PEt grooming 3024 Wild Iris Lane, Paradise (530) 877-5046

simPListic rEaLty 6400 Skyway, Paradise (530) 872-9000

skyWay mart 5309 Skyway Road, Paradise (530) 413-7785

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6848 Skyway, #U, Paradise (530) 872-3363

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HEALTHLINES

Shot wave Vaccine exemptions scrutinized again amid latest measles outbreak by

Elizabeth Aguilera

Tvaccines, ing families to easily opt out of childhood the number of kids getting medical hree years after California stopped allow-

waivers has tripled—the result, critics say, of some doctors loosely issuing exemptions to help families get around the law. The decrease has left some counties, including Nevada and Plumas, below the recommended vaccination rate required for “community immunity” against dangerous diseases such as measles and whooping cough. Butte County is on the cusp. And the number of medical exemptions will continue to rise unless the state clamps down, warns a study in the journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics. The authors interviewed local public health officers across the state, some of whom complained of doctors charging fees in exchange for writing exemptions. This winter—as an outbreak of measles

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strikes several states that allow parents to opt out of vaccinating their children because of personal or philosophical objections— California is one of three states (along with Mississippi and West Virginia) that allow only medical exemptions. Since the law was enacted, California’s vaccination rate has risen more than 2 percent. It’s now just over 95 percent, above the 94 percent rate the state health department says should be sufficient to protect those who can’t be vaccinated, but regional pockets of the population remain at risk. Nevada County has the lowest vaccination rate, 81.7 percent, and the highest exemption rate, 7.7 percent, among kindergarteners, according to statistics from the California Department of Public Health. Trinity, with 84.5 percent vaccinated, has the second-highest exemption rate, 7 percent, followed by Plumas’ 4.7 percent exempted (with 91.2 percent vaccinated). Butte has a 94.5 percent vaccination rate and just 1 percent exempt. State public health data show medical exemptions among kindergartners rose to

now represent 0.7 percent statewide in the last school year, from 0.2 percent two years earlier—an uptick largely in private schools, where more than 1 in 50 students now have a medical waiver from the vaccination law. All told, 4,111 California kindergarteners had permanent medical exemptions from vaccination in the last school year, out of more than a half-million kindergarteners enrolled. Legislators and health experts are debating what to do next. One proposal would be modeled on an existing state requirement that any veterinarian seeking to exempt a sick dog from rabies vaccination must obtain approval from a health official. “We delegated that authority to licensed physicians, and the problem is we have physicians abusing that authority,” said Democratic state Sen. Richard Pan, a Sacramento-area pediatrician who authored the state’s controversial ban on personal waivers after a measles outbreak originating at Disneyland infected 136 people in December 2014. “I think we need the health departments to basically say when someone is abusing that authority—and to withdraw that authority and invalidate exemptions that were fraudulent.” Pan has yet to propose a legislative remedy, saying he is working with the state health department and the California Medical Board on how to deal with physicians who may be in violation. The California Medical Association, a doctors’ organization that supported eliminating the personal exemption, is again

working with Pan. The organization supports “having standards in place to make sure the medical exemption system is not being abused,” said association spokesman Anthony York. But critics say any new rules would amount to overkill by lawmakers, who had promised to leave medical exemptions to the discretion of doctors. “The state is inserting itself in between the patient-doctor relationship,” said Rebecca Estepp, an advocate who campaigned against jettisoning the personal waiver and calls the increase in medical waivers “nothing.” She attributes most of the rise to the fact that many parents whose children qualified for a medical exemption used to just sign a personal exemption card because it was easier. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or CDC, urges vaccinations for the vast majority of children, saying they are generally safe and that the benefits of protection against potentially fatal diseases—such as measles—are worth the risk. The CDC acknowledges that vaccines can cause side effects. Federal guidelines advise avoiding or delaying certain vaccines for children with certain health conditions, including compromised immune systems, and those with a personal or family history HEALTHLINES C O N T I N U E D

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APPOINTMENT Blossom bustle

The Durham Sports Boosters invite you for a run through the orchards during the Almond Blossom Run this Sunday (Feb. 24). The 37th annual race offers 5k and 10k routes that start at the rose garden in front of Durham High School, head through town streets and then loop back through beautifully blossoming trees. The event, which begins at 9 a.m., helps support Durham sports programs. Go to durhamsportsboosters.com to register.


February 21, 2019

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new topics

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February 21, 2019


HEALTHLINES

About the article:

This is an edited version of a story produced for CALMatters.org, a nonprofit, nonpartisan media venture covering California policies and politics. The CN&R’s Evan Tuchinsky contributed localized content.

Portland. By the CN&R’s deadline, it had reached 10 states, including California, and surpassed 100 cases—though the Butte County Public Health Department reported no measles within its jurisdiction. According to the CDC, the vaccine for measles is 97 percent effective with two doses and 93 percent effective with one dose. Still, lawmakers may be reluctant to invite a sequel to the turbulent Capitol fight four years ago over vaccinations exemptions; instead they may urge state regulators to more aggressively crack down on dubious medical exemptions. If a new law is proposed, Estepp said, legislators should expect to see vocal parents and advocates who oppose tighter vaccine regulation flood their offices like they did last time. Ω

This guy saves you money.

of seizures. California law also allows family medical history to be taken into account. The study in Pediatrics reported that most California county and city health officers and immunization staff reported few or no problems with medical exemptions. But other staffers did report problems, noting that some doctors were listing questionable conditions such as a family history of allergies, or charging fees in exchange for writing exemptions, or charging families for medical tests to establish family history and exemptions signed by doctors who do not usually treat children. One local health officer, the study noted, cited the example of a physician charging families to watch a video before issuing a three-month exemption at a cost of $300. Parents then would be required to return for a fresh exemption at additional cost. This year’s measles outbreak, which started predominantly among unvaccinated children, spread widely from a southwest Washington county bordering

C O N T I N U E D F R O M PA G E 1 2

SAVE THE DATE

WEEKLY DOSE

UNDERSTANDING AND MANAGING PTSD AND BRAIN INJURY In Recognition of March being Brain Injury Awareness Month, Brain Injury Coalition in collaboration with Passages Caregiver Resource Center Presents: Understanding and Managing Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and Brain Injury

Many probably can file this missive under, “Yeah, duh,” but if you’re a connoisseur of microwave popcorn, granola bars and frozen dinners, listen up. A major French study recently published in JAMA Internal Medicine has found a link between the consumption of ultra-processed foods and a higher risk of death. The study monitored the diets of tens of thousands of middle-age French people between 2009 and 2017, and found there’s a 14 percent higher risk of dying an early death with every 10 percent increase in the consumption of ultra-processed foods. The relationship between diet and disease is complex, and more research is needed, but your body will thank you for checking nutrition labels for high fats, salt, sugars and things you can’t pronounce. Make fresh, simple ingredients a focus. Chop some veggies, use the stove, learn how to braise. The kitchen is fun!

Source: JAMA Internal Medicine

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GREEN GREENWAYS Gordon Gregory and Julie Heath, co-leaders of Citizens’ Climate Lobby’s Chico chapter, say they’re optimistic about legislation designed to reduce fossil-fuel use.

Paying dividends Climate group gets carbon-fee bill to Congress story and photo by

Evan Tuchinsky

evantuc hin sk y @ n ewsrev i ew. com

Iittypically conveys bad news. Headlines with signal pending thresholds for global warmn climatology, the term “tipping point”

ing, polar ice melt, sea level rise and other crises. When climate leaves a stable state—when a tiny change can trigger a massive effect, on the system as a whole—that’s what scientists mean by a tipping point. Local environmentalist Julie Heath sees a different kind of tipping point on the near horizon. She dedicates countless hours to a solution for what she considers the most consequential problem of our time. That solution finally shows signs of legislative life. Late last month, Rep. Ted Deutch (D-Fla.) introduced House Resolution 763 in Congress. The Energy Innovation and Carbon Dividend Act of 2019 puts forth policy initiatives championed the past 12 years by Citizens’ Climate Lobby, a nationwide advocacy organization to which Heath belongs. The bill would put a fee on fossil fuels to encourage transitions to cleaner energy, with proceeds going to the people, not the government. (See “Lobbying for change,” Greenways, June 22, 2017.) H.R. 763 had 13 co-sponsors as of the CN&R’s deadline, including one Republican—but the congressional Climate Solutions Caucus, split evenly between GOP and Democratic representatives, has 90 mem-

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FEBRUARY 21, 2019

bers. Heath said the number wasn’t even two dozen when she joined CCL’s Chico chapter two years ago. “It feels like we may be approaching a tipping point in this whole debate,” Heath said. “I have a very conservative family from Bakersfield. We were out to eat, and I said, ‘Well, what I’ve been doing lately, I’ve been doing some volunteering around climate action.’ I thought they were going to turn me off, or they were going to make snide comments—they thanked me.” H.R. 763 awaits hearings in three House committees: Ways and Means, Energy and Commerce, and Foreign Affairs. CCL legislative experts told Heath and Gordon Gregory, co-leaders of the Chico chapter, that they expect a Senate bill around June. Versions debuted in the House and Senate near the end of the last congressional session—Nov. 28 and Dec. 20, respectively—but expired. Meanwhile, Feb. 7—two weeks to the day after H.R. 763 was introduced—Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.) and Sen. Ed Markley (D-Mass.) released a resolution calling for the federal government to create a Green New Deal designed to cut carbon emissions make for a more sustainable economy. CCL supported their resolution. “I don’t fool myself [into thinking] that the politics of this are going to be easy, at Learn more:

Visit tinyurl.com/HR763 to read the Energy Innovation and Carbon Dividend Act of 2019 and tinyurl.com/ CCLchico for details about Citizens’ Climate Lobby and its Chico chapter.

any stage,” Gregory said. “Entrenched interests—overcoming that is going to be a heck of a challenge. I personally think the only way that’s going to happen is if enough people simply insist that we have to deal with climate change; we’re not there yet, but I think it’s growing all the time.” CCL’s plan, as embodied in the legislation,

calls for a fee on oil, coal and gas that increases over time. Each American gets an equal monthly share to defray associated price increases. The program pays its expenses; the government gets no part of the dividend. To level international trade, imports face a “border carbon adjustment” fee, while exports convey a refund. H.R. 763 contains two carve-outs: exemptions for the military and the agricultural sector. Heath explained those sound worse than they are. The military already has green initiatives, as it recognizes climate change as a significant threat to international security and its operations. Farmers, meanwhile, lack technological alternatives and financial resources to replace all their equipment with zero-emission machines—plus, ag exhaust contributes less than 1 percent of U.S. greenhouse gases. “We’re a very pragmatic organization,” Heath said. “Politically, if you want it to get passed, you have to be realistic.” Legislators from the farm belt warmed to the carbon dividend with those exceptions. “We believe the military is greening faster than any other type of organization that exists,” she added, “so it’s unlikely that they’re going to be behind the curve any-

way. And there’s just too many people in the country who [work in] agriculture who’d be adversely impacted, and it is a very small percentage of what’s being produced [in emissions], so we feel this is a worthwhile carveout to get the legislation passed.” The Chico chapter focuses exclusively on California’s first congressional district, currently represented by Republican Doug LaMalfa. A rice farmer from Richvale, LaMalfa staunchly supports President Trump, who pulled the U.S. out of the Paris climate accords, and refutes humans’ influence on climate. Gregory has spoken multiple times with LaMalfa’s legislative aide on energy policy, Jack Lincoln; the chapter’s congressional liaison, Robin Anderson, met with LaMalfa at the Oroville field office. “He was polite, asked good questions, was aware of the organization and the basic concepts of the bill,” Gregory said, noting that Anderson and CCL Chico lobbyist Ann Bykerk-Kauffman, who also attended, told him they were encouraged. “Even though he has publicly questioned the reality of climate change, and to my knowledge taken no steps to understand it or deal with it in a positive way,” Gregory added, “this is the kind of legislation that somebody like Doug LaMalfa can potentially support.” Ω

ECO EVENT

Audacity of imagination The highlight of any budding young scientist’s year is the science fair. Elementary- through high school students get to explore the scientific method, experiment, design cool projects, then show off their work. This year’s Chico Science Fair celebrates the 50th anniversary of the moon landing and will be open for public viewing Wednesday (Feb. 27) at a new location, the Masonic Family Center (1110 W. East Ave.). Enjoy a wildlife presentation by conservation ambassadors at 5 p.m., followed by the awards ceremony at 6 p.m.


EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS PHOTO BY MEREDITH J. COOPER

15 MINUTES

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Breathing community

Ambassadors, not more cops

For the past four years, Zuri Osterholt (pictured, on the left) and Tatiana Looney have been teaching yoga in and around Chico, everywhere from Chico’s Hot Yoga Club, Freebird Aerial Yoga and In Motion Fitness to Ohana Health in Paradise. Most recently, they’ve been co-managing two yoga clubs—in Chico and Granite Bay. When the space at 707 Wall St. in Chico—the former Studio One Ballroom, which closed following the Camp Fire—came open last month, they jumped on the opportunity to open their own business, which they’ve dubbed Hatha House. They already have a full staff and are offering membership discounts until their grand opening, March 1. A variety of membership options, from single classes to unlimited, are available. Swing by that evening for live music, foodtruck eats and a sneak peek at Hatha House. Go to hatha-house. com or call 884-4130 for more info.

ing, that’s the heat source. It’s clean heat. So, you’re not walking into a room that feels stuffy and hot—this feels like the sun is on your skin. There are so many health benefits to infrared heating. Osterholt: And when the body’s a little warmer, it’s easier to move, so it’s great for the yoga.

What do you envision for this space? Osterholt: A community cen-

feet of space. So, we’re able to divide it into two sections, where we can do our infrared mat yoga and then get up in the aerial hammocks and fly and play around.

ter. Likeminded people coming together. We see ourselves partnering up with other businesses in the area and offering that community hub for people to participate in classes for wellness—not just the yoga— and coming in for workshops, teacher trainings ... Looney: ... events—if people want to have a concert here, let’s do it!

I’ve heard of aerial yoga and I’ve heard of hot yoga—what is infrared yoga? Looney: The panels that are hang-

What’s the biggest thing you’ve gotten from yoga? Looney: For me, it’s mindful-

This place is huge! Looney: It is huge—it’s 4,000 square

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ness. It’s so oversaid, I guess, but it’s taught me to pay attention to who I am, how I am with other people, how I act, react. You find that on the mat. Maybe you’re in a pose and it’s really difficult to balance that day, your balance is off. You can either get very upset at yourself or laugh it off and see it as a lesson. That’s been a big thing for me; to take a moment to take a breath and be like, OK, how do I react in this situation? Do I flip someone off and blare my horn or do I smile and wave and say, “You go ahead”? Osterholt: I think I would say connection. Connection of the mind, body, breath that you get in the physical practice, but also connection … because we all show up here together when we practice yoga in a classroom setting. So you’re forming that connection and that connection goes out into the whole world. —MEREDITH J. COOPER m e re d i t h c @new srev i ew. c o m

by

Meredith J. Cooper meredithc@newsreview.com

The past six months have been challenging for a number of reasons. But if things like providing enough housing for Chico’s market or improving infrastructure like roads were hard before the Camp Fire, they’re certainly exacerbated now. Those are not mind-blowing conclusions, but they are significant nonetheless, and they are among the findings the Chico Chamber of Commerce released last week in its special Camp Fire economic report. “At the current pace of development, the outlook for providing permanent housing for our workforce within the foreseeable future is bleak,” the report reads. Specifically, the chamber concluded that Chico needs 10-15 more police officers to keep our city safe; an additional $150,000 immediately channeled into road repair and maintenance; and incentives to spur housing development. “Without immediate action to address these challenges, the Chamber anticipates a loss of businesses and associated jobs, loss of headquarter status for businesses that started here and subsequently expanded out of the area, an increasing loss of talent either retained or recruited and a significant reduction of public services,” the report reads. Mayor Randall Stone shared similar concerns during his State of the City address last Friday (Feb. 15). I like his take on housing: He wants to require 10 percent of new housing developments be set aside for low-income residents. I also much prefer his approach to public safety over the constant clamor of “we need more police.” Stone’s opinion is that the Downtown Ambassadors program has shown proven results. I see it regularly in cleaner streets and simply feeling safer when those bright yellow shirts are around. “Instead of spending $160,000 per year—that’s the average per annum cost of a police officer—we could spend a fraction of that cost on multiple Ambassadors, social workers, and case managers to address Quality of Life issues with better outcomes!” he wrote in his speech. Agreed!

DESSERT TIME I was walking downtown earlier this week with a co-worker and we noticed some activity inside Insomnia Cookies. Turns out they opened over the weekend—on Main Street, near Third—and we popped in to check it out. The young woman behind the counter was super enthusiastic and sold me on a Cookiewich, two cookies of your choice sandwiched around a scoop of ice cream. It did not disappoint. The fact that they serve their cookies warm made all the difference. They’re open late, with delivery till 3 a.m. daily. ANOTHER ONE BITES THE DUST … Payless ShoeSource is the latest casualty in the Amazon retail war. The discount store with two locations in Chico (by Safeway on Mangrove Avenue and inside the Chico Mall) and one in Oroville (by FoodMaxx on Oro Dam Boulevard) will be closing all of its shops in the coming months. March 1 is the last day for returns or exchanges; March 11 is tentatively set as the last day for using gift cards—so get thee to Payless!

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Weird Chico T

his issue marks the sixth year that the Chico News & Review has officially been celebrating the weird side of Chico, and it’s refreshing to see that our little Nor Cal outpost has lost none of its freaky charm. In fact, we might be keeping Chico weirder than ever. The Blue Room Theatre has been at the forefront of bringing challenging works to local audiences, and in our first story in this package, we look at how the downtown staple has stuck with its mission for 25 years. Over at Chico State, the Music and Theatre Department is once again showcasing experimental music at its annual New Music Symposium by bringing to town minimalist pioneer Terry Riley—one of the most influential composers of the last century—to town. We also have features on long-running local belly dance fusion duo BellySutra, as well as a brand-new purveyor of weird art, the trippy noisemakers calling themselves Guest No. 66. And last, the CN&R and 1078 Gallery are presenting the annual Keep Chico Art Show (no talent show this year; hopefully back in 2020) next week, Feb. 28-March 3. Come get weird with us.

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Hilary Tellesen and Louis Fuentes in Bug (Feb. 2018). PHOTO BY JOE HILSEE

I After 25 years, Blue Room Theatre continues to be a vital part of Chico

t’s easy to undervalue the out-of-sight blackbox theater tucked away in the top story of the Collier Hardware building. But from the first opening night on April 28, 1994 (of cofounder Denver Latimer’s daring original work, Soup or Salad) to the recently closed Hand to God (starring a foul-mouthed puppet terrorizing folks in a church basement), the Blue Room Theatre has created a tradition of presenting challenging, thought-provoking art to our little rural oasis. Now, on the cusp of its 25th anniversary, the theater seems to have rounded a corner. Though the Blue Room has enjoyed many different eras of artistic success since its backyard avant-garde beginnings, over the last four years, a committed core of seasoned theater vets has reorganized and refocused the theater, adding some stability to the adventurous spirit in order to continue telling all of those crazy stories.


Chavira and local actor/director/playwright The path to resurgence has been a cirHillary Tellesen working together to curate cuitous one. the plays. In 2007, after seven years on the job, the “We were just able to get a good group Blue Room board let Joe Hilsee go as the of people,” said Miller, who added that the theater’s artistic director. The company at combination of experience and a shared the time—which included his wife, Amber passion between her, the committee and theMiller (who had been at the theater since ater’s board of directors has made it work. 1997)—followed in protest. The Rogue “It takes a community to have a community Theatre troupe that they formed soon after theater.” made a go of things by putting on highquality productions at various locations—an “The first thing ... was to take art gallery, a warehouse, even a couple of the production aspect away from co-productions at the Blue Room—before the director to allow that person winding down in 2014. to focus on what was going During that time, fun and funky works on onstage,” said Hilsee. “If continued happening at the Blue Room, with the director is making the a wide range of musicals, classic and modern poster, and designing the set, and recording the sound comedies and dramas, and spirited doses of late-night fare coming through in the first effects, and making the few years. Around 2012, however, the conFacebook invite, then sistency of productions started to vary as a something was going rotating cast of leaders came and went. to get overlooked. When local theater vets Steve Swim This also helped and Martin Chavira got on the board of instill a consistent directors, Hilsee said they approached him and Amber about coming back and getting things in order. “It had kind of become a place where individual directors would do what they wanted on Next on the boards: their own with their own Live Word! people,” Hilsee said. “It (collaboration with North State Writers) was becoming more of a Saturday, Feb. 23, 7:30 p.m. performing arts building Sunday, Feb. 24, 2 p.m. rather than having its own The Almond Orchard artistic personality.” (local adaptation of Anton In 2015, Miller was Chekhov’s The Cherry Orchard) hired as the managing March 14-30 director, and an Artistic Blue Room Theatre Direction Committee was 139 W. First St. 895-3749 formed, featuring Hilsee, blueroomtheatre.com

quality to the product, which has to be in place in order to build a consistent audience base.” Things have been markedly more consistent, with well-promoted and -balanced seasons of contemporary plays, modern classics and locally created works. The highlights have been many, but some of the CN&R’s most favorably reviewed Blue Room productions over the last four seasons include last fall’s dark Farce, comedy The Walworth Farce by Irish playwright Enda Bug, an Walsh; Tracy Letts’ Bug exploration of the “darker elements of the 21st century American zeitgeist”; and Tellesen’s original “postmodern selfreferential

Joe Hilsee (center) in The Walworth Farce. PHOTO BY ALEX HILSEE

comedy with an absurdly fractured chronology,” Good With Faces, in 2017. “We purposefully try to give the audience something that they didn’t even know existed,” Hilsee explained. “When an audience member walks up the stairs, they should have no idea what to expect.” “We like to also look at past works that were challenging to their time,” Miller added. In 2018, the schedule featured a handful of older works—including David Mamet’s Glengarry Glen Ross and Tennessee Williams’ The Glass Menagerie—that contained themes that, for better or worse, remain relevant. “But it really boils down to respect,” Hilsee said. “Respect the theater artists by giving them a chance to do something challenging and meaningful to work on, and respect the audience by always assuming they are cooler and smarter than you are.” Before the Camp Fire hit, things were looking up at the box office as well. “We were doing really well, [then] November hit us really hard,” said Miller, who is hopeful things will turn around in the new year. With such devoted caretakers at the helm, there’s reason to be hopeful. The conservative number of shows the Blue Room has produced over the past 25 years is 288. As Hilsee points out with regard to the hundreds of backdrops that have cycled through the space: “The paint on the back wall is pretty damn thick.” —JASON CASSIDY jaso nc @ newsr ev iew.c o m

Blue Room Theatre Managing Director Amber Miller. PHOTO BY JASON CASSIDY

MORE

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FEBRUARY 21, 2019

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T

erry Riley’s groundbreaking composition “In C” was released in 1964, at the dawn of the British Invasion, and at a time when singles like The Supremes’ “Baby Love” and The Beach Boys’ “I Get Around” had teenagers’ hearts aflutter at dances across the country. Even to this day, it’s hard to wrap one’s head around what Riley created more than half a century ago.

Terry Riley PHOTO BY CHRIS FELVER (COURTESY OF SRO ARTISTS INC.)

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“In C” is made up of 53 modules, or pieces of melodies and musical loops assigned to different players, that, when played as written—or sped up or slowed, or even with parts omitted—over and over begin to create a sort of kaleidoscope of sound. The length of the performance dictates which sounds emerge. Riley, now 83, has quietly made a massive impact on popular music with his experiments. That particular pioneering piece of minimalist music influenced numerous artists—Soft Machine, Mike Oldfield and Tangerine Dream, to name a few—and most notably inspired the intro for The Who’s “Baba O’Riley.” “In C”—written by Riley in one night—was first performed in San Francisco by outsider composers and Riley collaborators Steve Reich, Pauline Oliveros, Jon Gibson and Morton Subotnick, and has been interpreted countless times since. “It’s played a lot—I mean, once a day somewhere in the world,” Riley said from his Yuba County home. “What I like about it is that it does have this flexibility, and it can surprise me at times when people come up with novel ideas on how to perform it.” Riley will perform the famous piece alongside some 35 or 40 Chico State students and faculty members—under the direction of Department of Music and Theatre faculty member David Dvorin—next Thursday (Feb. 28) to open the annual New Music Seminar at the university. While “In C” is arguably Riley’s best-known piece, his work and contributions to music go far beyond that. His 1969 album A Rainbow in Curved Air was light years ahead of its time, a synth-andtape-loop sci-fi journey that provided a road map for all ambient and electronic albums that followed. “In C” and Rainbow were released on a major label at time when America was socially and chemically transforming. If you think psychedelics played a big part in Riley’s music, you’d be right. “It had a big impact on the way I conceived a musical form,” Riley said. “It took me into details of music that I hadn’t seen before. It blew things up, like a big magnifying glass. That’s one of the things that ‘In C’ does—patterns change gradually over a long period of time. You couldn’t accomplish this any other way.” The biggest influence on Riley’s music was meeting Indian classical singer Pandit Pran Nath in New York in 1970 through a mutual friend.

“I can’t imagine not meeting him; it was destined to be,” Riley said matter-of-factly. “I’d heard Pandit Pran Nath’s music in the late-’60s, and was very moved by it, but I didn’t really understand what it was about, or why I was moved. And it was like a big mystery that I felt I had to solve in my own music. I had to understand it before I could progress further with my own compositions.” Riley would end up teaching at Mills College in Oakland years later, and always included aspects of Indian classical music in his courses. While music has taken Riley to all parts of the world, he’s spent a good portion of his life in Northern California, where he still resides. His early years were spent in Redding, at a time when the city had only one high school, and he attended Shasta College and studied with renowned pianist Duane Hampton (who later set up the Duane Hampton School of Music in Redding). Known primarily as a solo artist, Riley’s collaborations over the years are noteworthy to say the least. He’s had a long-lasting musical relationship with the members of the Kronos Quartet, whom he met at Mills College in the late-’70s. Riley also worked with John Cale on 1971’s psychedelic journey Church of Anthrax, and collaborated with jazz swashbuckler Don Cherry, whom Riley introduced to Indian classical music, and reflects on fondly. “It was not as intense as my collaboration with John Cale,” Riley said of his time with Cherry. “It was more relaxed and flowing. What I liked about Don Cherry is he was kind of a minstrel—he’d always be playing music in the street. If you’d be talking and walking down the street, he’d have his flute out, playing away.” Riley still loves collaborating. He’ll be playing with Grammy-winning pianist Gloria Cheng for a second New Music Symposium performance on March 1. But his main musical partner over the last 20 years has been his son and guitarist Gyan (they will tour Europe this summer). The partnership has been the right thing at the right time for the elder Riley, one that satisfies his creative and paternal instincts. “We’ve developed this kind of improvisational rapport in our concerts,” he explained. “It’s been a great thing for me in my old age to have this new path to explore.” —MARK LORE

Live new music:

Chico State’s New Music Symposium: Feb. 28-March 1 No cover (seating limited) Feb. 28, 7 p.m.: “In C,” with Terry Riley and Chico State student ensemble Rowland-Taylor Recital Hall March 1, 3 p.m.: Terry Riley and Gloria Cheng “In Conversation” Rowland-Taylor Recital Hall March 1, 7:30 p.m.: Terry Riley and Grammy Award winner Gloria Cheng perform composed and improvised piano works. Zingg Recital Hall


BellySutra (from left): Megan Love and Selina Lynn. PHOTO BY NATASHA ROOT

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elly dancers Selina Lynn and Megan Love have performed as Keep Chico Weird talent show, earning high marks for impressive mermaids, bulls and circus freaks. They’ve shimmied and displays of skill and theatrics as Lynn and Love synchronized their shaken their hips with the lights out, decked out in glow-inroutines with video effects projected on a large movie screen. the-dark paint, and have danced as wolves in headdresses, Lynn says she’s been captivated by belly dancing for as long sacrificing the blood of their hunters by symbolically pouring it on as she can remember. During one fateful visit to Busch Gardens themselves during a tribal prayer routine. when she was a kid, she recalled seeing a show featuring “this The two, known collectively as BellySutra, have found that beautiful lady on stage with a giant snake.” their imaginations, however wild and weird, have been whole“She was getting paid to dance,” she said. “I was determined heartedly embraced in Chico. to figure out, ‘How can I do that?’” Lynn started taking classes at “We can do anything,” Lynn said during a recent interview at 19, commuting from her Gridley home to Sacramento. BellySutra’s Dangerous Hips dance studio. “We have had blood, As for Love, dancing was essentially the only thing she hadn’t and people are like, ‘Give me more blood.’ I love that. … They let explored as a performer. She’d played piano, sang and acted, us be our crazy selves, and they like it. Instead of being scared, then started dancing with Lynn, whom she’d met through a mututhey’re like, ‘Wow, that’s awesome!’” al friend while they were living in Yuba City. The two clicked, and Since forming BellySutra in 2009, Lynn and Love have drawn now, 10 years after forming BellySutra, they’ve added a dance inspiration for their “belly dance fusion” routines from a variety studio to their partnership. Dangerous Hips opened last March, of performing styles, combining tango, hip-hop and other forms and in addition to teaching beginner and intermediate belly dance, of dance with belly dance to contribute to an ever-changing and they’re also renting out the space to other local belly dancers for engaging art form. practices and classes. “Belly dance is always there, but we add all these crazy eleThe pair acknowledged that belly dancing can be intimidating ments,” Lynn said. “It could be characters; it could be gestures, for beginners, but it’s a very open and welcoming art form, Love body language.” said. There are no limits or restrictions with regards to age, size The two also have performed with flaming or gender. swords balanced atop their heads, and dreamed Lynn said that people often are surprised what their Live hips: BellySutra performs Spirit up elegant fan veil dances. The latter involves bodies can do, adding, “Plus, getting to be free and Animal Saturday, handheld fans trailed by several feet of silk. move how your body moves—that’s, like, really great.” March 9, at 8 p.m. All In addition to performing at private parties, “Empowering,” Love interjected. ages until 10 p.m. No BellySutra and its student troupes share their “Belly dancing really gives people lots of confidence. cover. At the DownLo (319 Main St.) love of belly dance in shows throughout Chico, It makes you feel beautiful, it makes you just feel good regularly performing at the DownLo as well as about yourself,” Lynn said. “Belly dancing makes you Shake yours: Dangerous Hips at the LaRocca Vineyards Tasting Room every forever a goddess, I tell you.” dance studio second Thursday when the downtown Thursday —ASHIAH SCHARAGA 220 W. Sixth St. Visit Night Market is in season. The duo also has peras h i a h s @new srev i ew. c o m bellysutrarocks.com for formed every year at the Chico News & Review’s class prices and times. MORE

WEIRD C O N T I N U E D

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O N PA G E 2 2 FEBRUARY 21, 2019

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Guest No. 66 (from left): Ken Smith, Steve Bragg, Bob Howard and Bryce Goldstein. PHOTOS BY SESAR SANCHEZ

Get lost in the trippy soundscapes of Guest No. 66

T

iny computer speakers are no match for the charisma of Bob Howard’s singular voice. In fact, such thin sonic range might contribute to the rueful, nostalgic vibe when he sings: “I fell in love with your voice on the radio …. All those lonely nights, music saved my life a time or two.” It’s a sentiment that perfectly complements the sound of winter rain on this writer’s roof, but the sound of the music on “Where Have All the DJ’s Gone?” by Howard’s latest Chico band, Guest No. 66, probably doesn’t match what you’re thinking. It’s actually an uptempo piece, with a locomotive snare pushing the action, while a soft-stepping bassline and Howard’s croaking talk-singing provide a spooky contrast to the bright energy. It’s weird as hell, but it’s not even the weirdest song on the Guest No. 66 debut

plays guitar in Empty Gate) as the selfthree-song demo, Radioland. The newly described “delegating dictator,” the band is born band made up of Chico music vets is rounded out by accordionist/bassist Bryce offering something completely different to Goldstein and local drumming legend Steve the scene, which is exactly its intention. Bragg (formerly of Vomit Launch and co“It’s really exciting for me personally,” conspirator with Howard in The Asskickers, said Ken Smith, local ukulele player for much-loved local bands the Michelin Embers Vesuvians, etc.) playing a bizarre cymbalfree drumkit made from converted beer kegs. and Hallelujah Junction (and former CN&R In a backyard studio in the nether regions staff writer) who is spreading his musical of the Barber neighborhood, this reporter had wings extra wide for this new project, incora chance to be a fly on the wall at a rehearsal porating all manner of noise-makers, including loop pedals, a Theremin, oscillator, chord of this new creative conglomeration. Upon arrival, the group was ensconced organ and more. at the private bar next to the studio watching “I get to try things I’ve always wanted some sort of stripper-themed music-videoto try. In my other bands, I show up with a awards show, which segued uke and I’m ready to go, but in into a BBC presentation of this band I’m trying to manifest championship darts, which prothe shit I hear in my head with Be their guests: Feb. 22, 9 p.m., at Downtown voked a conversation about the a bunch of weird instruments Ale House (Red Bluff) with mathematical intricacies of dartsand second-hand electronics. Dead Bird Son. scoring ending with Bragg’s It’s fun and challenging. I even March 29, 8 p.m., at The conclusion that “Darts should need to learn to solder.” Maltese with Preening and Beehive. be taught in grammar school. With Howard (who also It teaches math, and hand-eye sings for The Vesuvians and Listen to the Radioland demo at guestno66.bandcamp.com.

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FEBRUARY 21, 2019

coordination, and it’s got you throwing sharp objects at a target. Kids would love it.” At rehearsal, the band settled into the expansive, evocative sound that marks the bulk of its repertoire. A tune called “FBI” shimmered into existence riding waves emanating from Smith’s array of electronic toys. And as Howard’s spacey guitar chords meshed with a fluid bass line and muted snare-and-tom beat, a sample of police scanner chatter from Smith’s corner created an element of narrative tension. And like a confectioner adding a finishing touch, Smith sprinkled chiming autoharp across the top. Having been performing for only a few months, Guest No. 66 still has more live theatrical components it’d like to add to the band’s soundtrack sound. “We want it to be more than just a band,” Smith said, “and to experiment with building different narratives with each set, and for it to be open to incorporating art, film and other media as we progress.”

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February 21, 2019

CN&R

23


Arts &Culture Killing ‘ things’

Two of Zak Elstein’s unnamed shadow boxes.

Shadow boxes filled with beautiful death

Imost this planet doesn’t look bright for humans. Thanks to our overconf Zak Elstein is right, the future on

sumption and unsustainable growth, there will be a tipping point and Earth ultimately will win the battle. “She’ll shift a few gears, change a couple of settings, and humanity will no longer find this a comfortable place to be.” That’s how he puts it in the artist statement for his current Shadow Box Exhibit on the walls at the Winchester Goose through March 23. It’s for the humans who survive Earth’s reset that he’s made these shadow boxes filled with animal bones, dead flowers and various bits of rusted detritus. “I wonder what will have meaning story and for them in a world photos by Jason Cassidy that has rejected their kind.” jasonc @ That’s a heavy n ewsrev iew.c om notion to consider, Review: yet proves to be a Zak Elstein’s Shadow unique and enjoyBox Exhibit shows through March 23. able exercise while Closing reception touring the exhibit March 23, 6 p.m. and nursing a snifter of potent craft Winchester Goose 800 Broadway beer. Each shadow 895-1350 thewinchestergoose.com box is constructed with unfinished wood and contains a delicately arranged scene behind glass, and the scenes inside are further affected by battery-powered colored lights. The viewer is welcome to operate the three-way switch(es) on the front of the box—with at least two lighting options available on each piece—and alter the mood with different colors, light patterns and shifting shadows. Like shrines featuring relics of mysterious creatures, the boxes are darkly beautiful. In one, a small animal skull is suspended from a branch with a clutch of 24

CN&R

FEBRUARY 21, 2019

feathers dangling beneath an overgrown forest of dead star thistle on both sides. When the pink light comes on, dark shapes in the background transform into wings for the skull creature, but when switched to the red light, the shapes shift into a spooky mountain range. In another, against the glow of a fiery orange sky and surrounded by dry shrubs filled with thorns, is a bird skull fused to a rustcovered piece of metal on one side opposite a tree containing various rusted metal bits and what looks like a bird’s femur. It looks like the aftermath of a deadly confrontation in the dry desert of the Old West. By terrible coincidence, Elstein has recently found himself in a position to ponder meaning in a world upended by climatechange-enhanced disaster. He lost his Concow home in the Camp Fire, and some of the only things that survived are a dozen or so of the shadow boxes in his show. The morning of the fire, he scrambled to grab the pieces he’d been working on and he says by the time he’d packed them, his property was on fire. Had he known how close the flames were, he said he wouldn’t have started with the art. When asked about the parallels between his own life and the postdisaster scenario laid out in the show’s artist statement, Elstein answered via email: “I hadn’t really thought about it that way before. But the version of myself I was able to recollect has largely been based on the things I took

THIS WEEK 21

THU

Special Events BUTTE COUNTY NAMI ON LAURA’S LAW: Randall Hagar, director of governmental affairs for the California Psychiatric Association, discusses the benefits of Laura’s Law. Thu, 2/21, 6:30pm. First Christian Church, 295 E. Washington Ave.

GENEVIEVE GAIGNARD: Visiting photographer and artist discusses race, femininity, class, and their various intersections. Thu, 2/21, 5:30pm. Performing Arts Center, Room 134, Chico State. genevievegaignard.com

WHOSE STREETS?: An unflinching look at the Ferguso uprising. As the National Guard rolls in, a new generation mounts a powerful battle cry not just for their civil rights, but for the right to live. Official Selection, 2017 Sundance Film Festival. Thu, 2/21, 7pm. Free. Ayers 106, Chico State.

Music CHRIS ROBINSON BROTHERHOOD: Ex-Black Crowes frontman merges blues rock energy with jamband vibes. Thu, 2/21, 8pm. $25. El Rey Theater, 230 W. Second St.

GENEVIEVE GAIGNARD from the fire. Whereas the parts of me that were represented by the things I lost seem strange and distant.” There are a few items salvaged from his Concow property that made it into these shadow boxes, including some bird wings in one that have been arranged in a bouquet and surrounded by dry white flowers all bathed in a cool blue light. Elstein says he lost a couple cats in the fire, and this piece appears to be an homage. “My favorite was an absolute terror. I hope that those wings are the evidence that he made it, and is still out there killing things.” Ω

Tonight, Feb. 21 Chico State

SEE THURSDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS


FINE ARTS ON NEXT PAGE

PAT HULL & HANNAH JANE KILE

Camp Fire. Sat 2/23, 12pm. $25. Sierra Steel Harley-Davidson, 1501 Mangrove Ave.

Saturday, Feb. 23 Harlen Adams Theatre

RIPE OLIVE DAY: Celebrate seventh Annual Ripe Olive Day! Buffet at noon—everything made with olives. Tours of the Ehmann Home will be available. Sat 2/23, 11:30am. Ehmann Home, 1480 Lincoln St., Oroville. buttecountyhistoricalsociety.org

SEE SATURDAY, MUSIC

Music KATE BARRETT & ETHAN SWEET: Dynamic duo performs for brunch. Sat, 2/23, 11am. La Salles, 229 Broadway St. lasalleschico.com

NORTH STATE SYMPHONY, SOLOISTIC SENSATIONS:

Theater MAMMA MIA!: Bride-to-be Sophie wants nothing more than to have her father at her wedding, but she has no idea which of mom’s three former boyfriends might be the guy. So Sophie invites them all to the festivities at her mother’s Greek isle taverna, and mayhem ensues. The show’s tale of enduring love and friendship features beloved hit songs by ABBA. Thu, 2/21, 7:30pm. $16-$22. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. chicotheatercompany.com

RADIOLAND’S RETURN TO PARADISE: A miracle among the near total devastation of the Camp Fire, TOTR remains! Their season kicks off with special edition of the ever-popular Radioland. Celebrate hopes and dreams of Paradise with this musical love letter to the city. Thu, 2/21, 7:30pm. $16-$20. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Road, Paradise. totr.org

22

FRI

Special Events FEATHER FALLS CASINO TATTOO EXPO: Massive three-day tattoo event featuring artists from throughout the state, live tattooing, contests, music, art and beer, plus Ryan

Ashely from the TV series Ink Master. FriSun, 2/22-2/24. Free. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

LOCAL NURSERY CRAWL: Connect with local plant nurseries, discover amazing plants, garden supplies, decor, and resources each nursery has to offer. Each local nursery has a different focus and passion and can help you design your dream garden and landscape. Visit the website for complete details. Fri, 2/22, 9am. Ten Nurseries. LocalNurseryCrawl.com

Music ALEX & BEN MORRISON: The brothers from the Brothers Comatose tear one up in this partial benefit for Camp Fire survivors. The always excellent Hannah Jane Kile opens the show. Fri, 2/22, 7:30pm. $15-$20. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St. kzfr.org

Theater THE ADDAMS FAMILY: Just try saying the words “Addams Family” without breaking into its snappy theme song. Enjoy the demented adventures of this wickedly witty family with Inspire School of Arts & Sciences’ production of the raucous musical comedy. Fri, 2/22, 7pm. $10-$20. CUSD Center for the Arts, 1475 East Ave. inspirecusd.org

MASTERWORKS 3: SOLOISTIC SENSATIONS Saturday, Feb. 23 Laxson Auditorium

SEE SATURDAY, MUSIC

MAMMA MIA!: See Thursday. Fri, 2/22, 7:30pm. $16-$22. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. chicotheater company.com

RADIOLAND’S RETURN TO PARADISE: See Thursday. Fri, 2/22, 7:30pm. $16-$20. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Road, Paradise. totr.org

23

SAT

Special Events BIRDS OF BIDWELL HIKE: Enjoy the crisp morning air and fantastic birding. Bring your binoculars and be prepared to learn a little about bird behavior, how to identify birds by sight and sound, and the impact of humanity on California’s bird populations. Sat 2/23, 9:30am. Indian Fishery, 12161 River Road.

Be inspired by the soaring melodies in Rimsky-Korsakov’s rhythmically energized Capriccio Espagnol, then explore Nabucco, one of Verdi’s most famous opera overtures. Along the way, experience Liszt’s popular Hungarian Rhapsody No. 2, originally written for solo piano. This concert also showcases the winners of the Young Artist Auditions. Pre-concert talk with conductor Scott Seaton at 6:30pm. Sat, 2/23, 7:30pm. $18-$40. Laxson Auditorium, Chico State. northstatesymphony.org

PAT HULL & HANNAH JANE KILE: Two up-andcoming singer-songwriters, Pat Hull and Hannah Jane Kile, are teaming up to deliver an evening of soulful and poetic songs as part of Chico Performances’ Chico Voices series. Drawing on folk and country influences, these indie artists sing about their experiences of love, despondent times, and other realities of the human spirit. Sat, 2/23, 7:30pm. $15-$18. Harlen Adams Theatre, Chico State, PAC 144. 898-6333. chicoperform ances.com

Theater THE ADDAMS FAMILY: See Friday. Sat, 2/23, 7pm. $10-$20. CUSD Center for the Arts, 1475 East Ave. inspirecusd.org

LIVEWORD: Catch this first-ever collaboration between the North State Writers and Chico’s Blue Room Theatre. Twelve local authors will offer up a mix of short fiction, poetry and essays that will be read and interpreted by the actors of the Blue Room. Sat, 2/23, 7:30pm. $10. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. 877-5734.

MAMMA MIA!: See Thursday. Sat, 2/23, 7:30pm. $16-$22. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. chicotheatercompany. com

RADIOLAND’S RETURN TO PARADISE: See Thursday. Sat, 2/23, 7:30pm. $16-$20. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Road, Paradise. totr.org

24

SUN

Special Events ALMOND BLOSSOM RUN: Run a 5k or 10k through the orchards to support Durham sports. Sun, 2/24, 9am. $40. Durham High School, 9455 Putney Drive, Durham. durhamsportsboosters.com

THIS WEEK CONTINUED ON PAGE 26

CFOL BOOK SALE: Chico Friends of the Library weekly book sale. Sat 2/23, 9am. Chico Branch Library, 1108 Sherman Ave. buttecounty.net

EDITOR’S PICK

HARLAND WILLIAMS: Comedian and actor known for his hilarious movie roles and outlandish stand up and sketch comedy routines. A sharp, witty comic, he’s appeared on Letterman, The Tonight Show, Conan O’Brian, HBO, Comedy Central and everywhere else. Sat 2/23, 7:30pm. $25-$35. El Rey Theater, 230 W. Second St.

INTRODUCTION TO BRYOPHYTES: This two-day workshop will include lectures, a field trip, and plenty of hands-on microscope work to help you learn features important for bryophyte identification. Sat 2/23. $110-$230. Friends of the Chico State Herbarium, Holt Hall, room 129, Chico State. friendsofthe chicostateherbarium.com

LOCAL NURSERY CRAWL: See Friday. Sat 2/23, 9am. Ten Nurseries. LocalNurseryCrawl.com NICK SWARDSON: “A hand job is still a job!” Stand-up show is sold out! Sat 2/23, 8pm. Gold Country Casino & Hotel, 4020 Olive Highway, Oroville.

RIBS FOR THE RIDGE: Active 20-30 Club of Chico and Chico BBQ Enthusiasts host this rib cook-off with an Anchor Brewing beer garden, raffle and more. All proceeds will be going to support the survivors of the

FREE LISTINGS! Post your event for free online at www. newsreview.com/calendar, or email the CN&R calendar editor at cnrcalendar@newsreview.com. Deadline for print listings is Wednesday, 5 p.m., one week prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

SEVEN-MINUTE ABS If you missed out on tickets to Nick Swardson, have no fear. Harland Williams is bringing his own brand of unpredictable, hilarious stand-up to the El Rey Theater the same night (Saturday, Feb. 23). His roles in classic comedies like Dumb and Dumber and Something About Mary may have given him a name, but the man also writes short stories and children’s books, has his own podcast, and plays in a band called Cousins with his cousin. Known for his off-the-cuff stand-up style, creative facial hair, and interaction with the audience, Williams likely will be hanging out at the merch table after his set if you want to say “Hi.” FEBRUARY 21, 2019

CN&R

25


POETRY

99

Submit your poems—99 words or fewer—today!

THIS WEEK CONTINUED FROM PAGE 25

FINE ARTS

ANTIQUE APPRAISAL FUNDRAISER: That busted up chair in your garage could be worth thousands. but it’s probably not. Bring in all your cool, old stuff to this appraisal fundraiser for the American Association of University Women. They’ll use the proceeds to send eight-grade girls to tech camp at UC Davis. Sun, 2/24, 11am. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St. 891-3489.

CHICO READS: Read Across America event includes stories, crafts, games, special guests, a photo booth, snack, comics and, of course, books! Sun, 2/24. Free. CARD Center, 545 Vallombrosa Ave.

THE COMEDY ROAST OF MIKE G RIDE: Mike G Ride gets roasted on stage while you point and laugh ... What an honor! All the proceeds go to survivors of the Camp Fire via the North Valley Community Foundation. Sun, 2/24, 7pm. $15. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St.

Music THE BIDWELLS: Good-time music for brunch. Sun, 2/24, 11am. Tender Loving

EVAN HOBART

Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

Shows through Feb. 28 Butte College Art Gallery

Theater

The Chico News & Review is accepting entries for the 2019 Poetry 99 contest. The top Adult, High School, Junior High and Kid poets will be chosen by established local writing professionals, and winners’ work will be published in the CN&R’s annual Poetry 99 issue on March 28. Winners also will be invited to read their works (and receive prizes!) at the Poetry 99 reading.

East Ave. inspirecusd.org

LIVEWORD: See Saturday. Sun, 2/24, 2pm. $10. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. 877-5734.

MAMMA MIA!: See Thursday. Sun, 2/24, 2pm. $16-$22. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. chicotheatercompany. com

RADIOLAND’S RETURN TO PARADISE: See Thursday. Sun, 2/24, 2pm. $16-$20. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Road, Paradise. totr.org

26

TUE Online and email entries preferred: Submit at www.newsreview.com/poetry99, or send to poetry99@newsreview.com. Please specify Poetry 99, age and division—Adult, High School (grades 9-12), Junior High (grades 6-8), Kids (fifth grade and younger)—in the subject field. And for all divisions except “Adult” please include age.

Music NOAM PIKELNY & STUART DUNCAN: Pikelny is a founding member of the Punch Brothers and won the inaugural Steve Martin Prize for Excellence in Banjo and Bluegrass in 2010. Duncan is a world-class fiddler, member of the Nashville Bluegrass Band and has worked with George Strait, Dolly Parton, Guy Clark and Reba McEntire. Together, the duo lights up the Big Room stage. Tue, 2/26, 7:30pm. $28. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St. sierranevada.com

27

WED

Special Events

DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSIONS: WEDNESDAY, MARCH 6, AT 11:59 P.M.

MUTUAL AID SUPPORT FOR TRAUMA GRIEVING & RECOVERY: North Valley Mutual Aid and the Council for Grieving offer circles of support for deep listening and sharing grief, expressive art activities and supplies, movement for restoring ease, and self-care skills share. Wed, 2/27. Free. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St. 864-2134

FEBRUARY 21, 2019

BLACKBIRD: Crucial Times Photography Collective, group photo exhibit explores the manual, physical and chemical process. Featuring the artwork from six members of the collective, the display reflects the contents of their latest book, Volume 2. Through 2/28. 1431 Park Ave.

BUTTE COLLEGE ART GALLERY: Evan Hobart, ceramics, sculptures and lots of cool dinosaurs. Closing reception Feb. 28 at 4:30pm, with snacks and entertainment. Through 2/28. Free. Arts Building.

CHICO ART CENTER: Renew, Rebuild, Reimagine, featuring work by artists affected by the Camp Fire. In the spirit of renewal and regenerative ideas, CAC presents this group exhibit. Through 3/1. 450 Orange St.

ENLOE CANCER CENTER: Beth Bjorklund, oil paintings in our Healing Art Gallery by Northern California artist. The Enloe Cancer Center, Healing Art Gallery features artists whose lives have been touched by cancer. Through 4/19. Free. 265 Cohasset Road, 332-3856.

JACKI HEADLEY UNIVERSITY ART GALLERY: Aksum Belle – Afterwards, artist and printmaker Jacob Meders is a member of the Mechoopda Indian Tribe. Using book forms, prints, and sculpture, Meder’s work challenges perceptions of place, culture and identity built on the assimilation and homogenization of Indigenous peoples. Through 2/22. Arts & Humanities Building, Chico State.

MUSEUM OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA ART: Dennis Leon I am here, the sculptor’s work has been exhibited at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the Oakland Museum, the Corcoran Gallery and beyond. Panel discussion Sunday, March 10, 3-5pm. Through 3/24. $5. 900 Esplanade. Paint, showcasing works by Peter Piatt, Steve Crane, Sharon Crabill and Eve Berg-Pugh. Through 3/23. 732 Fourth St., Orland. orlandartcenter.com

FOR MORE MUSIC, SEE NIGHTLIFE ON PAGE 28

CN&R

Art

ORLAND ART CENTER: Perfection in Pencil and

For submission guidelines, visit www.newsreview.com/poetry99

26

SEE ART

THE ADDAMS FAMILY: See Friday. Sun, 2/24, 2pm. $10-$20. CUSD Center for the Arts, 1475

THE TURNER: Mǝǝmento – Before, curated from the Turner Collection by Jacob Meders, a member of the Mechoopda Indian Tribe, whose own work is

concurrently exhibited at the Jacki Headley University Art Gallery. Meders explains that the linked exhibitions function “as a before and after” that suggests ways to “see, share and learn — to open a dialogue that allows a healing process.” Through 2/22. Chico State. janetturner.org

Museums BOLT’S ANTIQUE TOOL MUSEUM: Bolt’s Antique Tool Museum, this fascinating, unique museum has over 12,000 hand tools on display, charting cataloging the evolution and history of tools. $3. 1650 Broderick St, Oroville.

CHICO CHILDREN’S MUSEUM: Ongoing exhibits, featuring tons of cool stuff for kids to explore, including a miniature city, complete with a junior vet clinic, dentist, cafe and farmer’s market, a giant fish tank, multisensory room, imagination playground and much more. Check the website for hours and admission information. $7-$9. 325 Main St. chicochildrensmuseum.org

CHICO CREEK NATURE CENTER: Living Animal Museum & Nature Play Room, learn all about local critters, plants and wildlife. $2-$4. 1968 E. Eighth St. chicorec.com

GATEWAY SCIENCE MUSEUM: From Here to There, explore the science of how things move by land, sea and air. Lift, launch and levitate as you experiment with hands-on learning about gravity, friction and the laws of motion. Also on display are The Foothills, and America’s Wolves: From Tragedy to Inspiration. Through 5/12. $5-$7. 625 Esplanade. csuchico.edu

PATRICK RANCH MUSEUM: Patrick Ranch Museum, working farm and museum with rotating exhibits open every Saturday and Sunday from 11am to 3pm. 10381 Midway, Durham. patrickranchmuseum. org

VALENE L. SMITH MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY: Remarkable Lives, exploring the intertwined worlds of birds and human, in partnership with the Altacal Audubon Society and Snow Goose Festival. Exhibits include bird songs and behaviors, local photography and a robotic recreation of the late Jurassic Archaeopteryx. Through 7/31. Chico State.


SCENE

Photo by rodger helwig

outside inside

Posthumous exhibit reveals the artist’s life of connecting with nature

W Leon sometimes accompanied her father, Dennis Leon, on hikes into the nearby Coast Ranges foothills. hen she was a girl growing up in Berkeley, Ann

It was her job, she says, to carry drinking water in a backpack he’d fashioned for that purpose. These were more than hikes, by however; like everything else Dennis Robert Speer Leon did, they had an artistic dimension. In this case, he was building rober tspeer@ newsrev i ew.c om site-specific artworks by moving rocks to create arrangements suggesReview: tive of the ancient ceremonial stones dennis leon: i am found in the moors of Yorkshire, here shows through England, where he grew up. The March 24. fact that almost nobody would see Panel discussion: March 10, 3-5 p.m., his stones did not matter to him, his with ann leon, Joan daughter says. leon, Steve oliver and Leon had a thing for stones, as robert herhusky. the current exhibition of his work, MONCA Dennis Leon: I Am Here, at the 900 esplanade Museum of Northern California Art 487-7272 (MONCA), in Chico, powerfully monca.org demonstrates. And not just stones: Lakes figure prominently in several large wall pieces, including the dramatic “Memory Lake” series of almost monumental collages in the museum’s Headley Gallery. And trees are an important element in the five pastels that comprise the similarly named “Lake” series in the Phillips Gallery. The collages are especially interesting for the way they seem to change, depending on whether the viewer is close by or standing back. Up close, they show the rough edges of the torn paper, which are almost sculptural in their tactile roughness. From farther back, however, that roughness is no longer visible, and the pieces seem more painterly—without losing their raw, monumental energy. They are complemented by a number of sculp-

tures in bronze or wood that are similarly suggestive of nature’s ineluctable presence through time. Leon has written: “Nature is made up of lots and lots of little pieces and things—yet its unity is implicit. … Nature doesn’t notice my dilemma of being simultaneously in it and an observer of it.” Ann Leon is a well-known local chef and cooking

instructor who owns Leon Bistro in downtown Chico. Her sister, Susan Leon Peterson, is a partner in the enterprise. Their mother, Joan Leon, lives in Berkeley. Together they are managing Dennis Leon’s artwork, which they keep in a Chico storage unit. Leon died in 1998, a victim, his family believes, of medical error. He was 65 years old and vigorous but had back problems from all the lifting he had done. He died just moments after surgery to fuse some vertebrae. By the time of his death, Leon had had more than 80 exhibitions at such institutions as the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the Oakland Museum, the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., and the legendary Oliver Ranch sculpture garden in Sonoma. Leon came to this country in 1951 and earned a master of fine arts at Temple University in Philadelphia before moving to Oakland in 1972. There he taught at the California College of Arts and Crafts (now California College of the Arts) for 20 years and chaired the Sculpture Department from 1972 to 1988. During this time he was also a prolific maker of art who worked out of a large studio adjoining his house. Winches and pulleys used to move the huge sculptures dominated the space. The MONCA exhibit showcases mostly large pieces, but it also contains a number of small (4 or 5 inches square) watercolors with titles such as “Rain and Shine” and “Delta Storm.” They are like exquisite windows into the weather conditions their titles suggest. Ω

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CN&R

27


NIGHTLIFE

THurSDay 02/21—WeDNeSDay 02/27 one up in this partial benefit for Camp Fire survivors. The always excellent Hannah Jane Kile opens the show. Fri, 2/22, 7:30pm. $15-$20. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St. kzfr.org

ALEX VINCENT: Live music from singer/ songwriter. Fri, 2/22, 7pm. The Exchange, 1975 Montgomery St., Oroville. theexchangeoroville.com

CHrIS rObINSON brOTHerHOOD

ANIMA EFFECT: Djent progressive metal band hits Oroville on their Terminal Encryption tour, plus The Deprived and Bullet Lobotomy. Fri, 2/22, 8pm. $8. The Spirit, 2360 Oro Quincy Highway, Oroville.

Tonight, Feb. 21 El Rey Theater See THurSDay

BLACKOUT BETTY: High-octane classic

21THurSDay

MERAKI & MATILDA KRULDER: Jazz

vocalist and accompaniment. Thu, 2/21, 6pm. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

CHICO UNPLUGGED: Acoustic music

from local singers and songwriters. Thu, 2/21, 7pm. Madison Bear Garden, 316 W. Second St., 916-873-3194.

THUMPIN’ THURSDAY ROCK ’N’ BLUES JAM: Hosted by the Loco-Motive Band plus special guests. All musicians and music enthusiasts welcome. Thu, 2/21, 7pm. Free. Studio Inn Lounge, 2582 Esplanade, 408-449-2179.

CHRIS ROBINSON BROTHERHOOD: Ex-Black Crowes frontman merges blues rock energy with jamband vibes. Thu, 2/21, 8pm. $25. El Rey Theater, 230 W. Second St.

W. Fourth St.

HILLTOP RATS: Tacoma, Wash., punk band plays with skate punks Boss’ Daughter, ümlaut-laden garage punks ¡Hörriblé! and Nothing Left. Fri, 2/22, 9pm. $7. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave. maltesebarchico.com

KOTTONMOUTH KINGS: Dope-smokin’

ERIC PETER: Solo jazz. Thu, 2/21,

6:30pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220

rock tribute band packs the dance floor. Fri, 2/22, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfallscasino. com

22FrIDay

ALEX & BEN MORRISON: The brothers from the Brothers Comatose tear

hip-hop trio known for their hits “Tangerine Sky,” “City 2 City” and “Cruizin’.” Fri, 2/22, 9pm. $20-$25. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave.

OPEN MIC: Tito hosts this regular

JIĀHŌu

event. Backline available. Fri, 2/22, 7:30pm. $1. Down Lo, 319 Main St., 5305134707.

PUB SCOUTS: Traditional Irish music

for happy hour. Fri, 2/22, 4pm. $1. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St.

SCOTT PEMBERTON BAND: Psych and roots rocker lays down the fuzz and the funk. The guitar wizard has thrilled audiences at High Sierra Music Festival and beyond. Excellent Sacramento guitarist Adrian Bellue opens the show with his trio. Fri, 2/22, 9pm. $10. Lost on Main, 319 Main St. lostonmainchico.com

Fresh off realeasing a brand-new album of lush folk rock and evocative lyrics, China (pictured) lands at 1078 Gallery this Saturday (Feb. 23) to perform with locals Garrett James Gray and Donald Beaman. Featuring players from Odawas, Papercuts and The Black Swans, the supergroup writes bittersweet stories, aching Americana and fabulously arranged indie pop led by singer Michael J. Tapscott. This is fine road-trippin’ landscape music that will make you pine for thoughtful solitude and a cold beer.

TANNER RICHARDSON: Singer/ songwriter performs for happy hour. Fri, 2/22, 4pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St. lasalleschico.com

TYLER DEVOLL: Happy hour tunes. Fri, 2/22, 4pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St. lasalleschico.com

THE WIZ KID: Country dance hits in

the lounge. Fri, 2/22, 8:30pm. Gold Country Casino & Hotel, 4020 Olive Highway, Oroville. goldcountry casino.com

YURKOVIC: Trio brings the lo-fi electric sweetness and their own version of delta swamp blues to the wine bar. Fri, 2/22, 8pm. $7. Unwined Kitchen & Bar, 980 Mangrove Ave., 321-9534.

23SaTurDay

ATOMIC PUNKS: A tribute to early

Van Halen. Sat, 2/23, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfalls casino.com

BARREL AGED: Barrel-aged stouts

and barrel-aged music. Sat, 2/23, 7pm. The Commons Social Empourium, 2412 Park Ave.

15th Street

f a C é

Your Neighborhood Place for Coffee, Food & More

~

Featuring Specialty Coffees Pastries Breakfast & Lunch Local Wines and Craft Beers 7am to 3pm Monday through Saturday 8am to 2pm Sunday 1414 Park Ave, Ste 120 Chico 530-809-1087 ~ 28

CN&R

February 21, 2019

CHINA: Cinematic Bay Area indie rock group joined by songwriters Garrett James Gray and Donald Beaman. Sat, 2/23, 7pm. 1078 Gallery, 1710 Park Ave. 1078gallery.org

COMEDY MALFUNCTION: Jordan Antuan Riggins hosts a grip of great comics including headliner Emma Haney, Shahera Hyatt, Becky Lynn, Rhoda D. Ramone and Jason Mack. Sat, 2/23, 9pm. $7. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave. maltesebarchico.com


THIS WEEK: FIND MORE ENTERTAINMENT AND SPECIAL EVENTS ON PAGE 24

Adrenochrome

favorite musicals! Come geek out

TERREMOTO, ADRENOCHROME, KALT-TIER & IVER Tuesday, Feb. 26 Naked Lounge SEE TUESDAY

with the Malteazers. Sun, 2/24, 6pm. $10. Birdcage Theatre, 1740 Bird St., Oroville. birdcagetheatre.org

OPEN MIC COMEDY NIGHT: Working on a bit? See if it’s a hit or heckleworthy, and enjoy cheap beer specials. Sun, 2/24, 8pm. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave. maltesebar chico.com

Australia/Oakland post punk and Bay Area dark punk, plus local darkwavers Kalt-Tier and dreamboat goth people Iver. Tue, 2/26, 8pm. $7. Naked Lounge, 118 W. Second St.

27WEDNESDAY

THE BIDWELLS: Local duo performs in Country Casino & Hotel, 4020 Olive Highway, Oroville. goldcountry casino.com

25MONDAY

HOT POTATO!: Gypsy jazz trio. Wed,

TERREMOTO & ADRENOCHROME:

the lounge. Wed, 2/27, 6pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St. hoteldiamondchico.com

2/27, 6pm. Free. Red Tavern, 1250 Esplanade, 891-3354.

OPEN POETRY READING: Poetry and spoken word hosted by Bob the

Poet and Travis Rowdy. Wed, 2/27, 5:30pm. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

YOU POOR DEVIL: Folk-rock dirtbag Americana group celebrates the release of their new album, plus sets from Truck Stop and Thin Air. Wed, 2/27, 7:30pm. $5. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

PITY PARTY & SUNNY ACRES: Bay Area 2/23, 7pm. The Exchange, 1975

THE FRITZ: Salsa, latin, rock and

funk. Sat, 2/23, 8pm. Unwined Kitchen & Bar, 980 Mangrove Ave. unwinedchico.com

Montgomery St., Oroville.

NASHVILLE PUSSY: Boozin’ guitar slingers spray revved-up Southern rock all over the place, with opening act Prima Donna. Sat, 2/23, 9pm. $15. Lost on Main, 319 Main St. loston mainchico.com

INSIGHT: Rock ’n’ roll hits in the

lounge. Sat, 2/23, 8:30pm. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

MAKER’S MILE & FURLOUGH FRIDAYS:

POPPY: Pop sensation and social media star translates her viral YouTube videos to the stage. Australian emopop singer AViVA opens the show. Sat, 2/23, 9pm. $20. Senator Theatre, 517 Main St. jmaxproductions.net

Funk, rock, reggae and hip-hop. Sat, 2/23, 9pm. $5. Studio Inn Lounge, 2582 Esplanade.

MERCEDES MACIAS & DALLAS DARNELL: Alliterated musicians, plus special guest, Rebecca Kuehne. Sat, 2/23, 6:30pm. Free. Farm Star Pizza, 1395 W. Lindo Ave., 530-343-2056.

MIKE RUSSELL: Stone cold blues, roots

RETROTONES: Classic rock and country tunes. Sat, 2/23, 9:30pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St. lasalleschico.com

THE WIZ KID: Country dance hits in

rock and a bit of Americana. Sat,

the lounge. Sat, 2/23, 8:30pm. Gold

24SUNDAY

emo pop and local psych rock, plus more bands TBA. Mon, 2/25, 7:45pm. $5. Ike’s Place, 648 W. Fifth St.

THE COMEDY ROAST OF MIKE G RIDE:

Mike G Ride gets roasted on stage while you point and laugh ... What an honor! All the proceeds go to survivors of the Camp Fire via the North Valley Community Foundation. Sun, 2/24, 7pm. $15. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St.

GOOD DOG!: Good ol’ fellas with funky guitars, banjos, dobro, and doghouse bass in the vein of Ry Cooder, Taj Mahal, Big Easy Delta, and mountain porch music. Sun, 2/24, 3pm. Free. Secret Trail Brewing Co., 132 Meyers St., Ste. 120.

MUSICAL MADNESS BURLESQUE:

26TUESDAY

COMEDY NIGHT: Whatchoo laughing

at? Tue, 2/26, 9pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St. lasalleschico.com

OPEN MIC: Hosted by veteran Chico singer/songwriter Andan Casamajor. There’s always a guitar to borrow and a house cajón for frisky fingers, so come on down and get on the list. Tue, 2/26, 6pm. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

CAT POWER

Twenty-plus years and seven albums later, Nashville Pussy (pictured) still sleazes it up better than anyone else. The band’s new album, Pleased to Eat You, is layered with AC/ DC riffs, Alice Cooper schtick and ZZ Top boogie and opens with the innuendo-less “She Keeps Me Coming, and I Keep Coming Back,” to put your mind in the gutter from the get-go. Added bonus is watching lead guitarist Ruyter Suys tear through a fretboard—damn fun. Live at Lost on Main with L.A. rockers Prima Donna on Saturday (Feb. 23).

Burlesque troupe takes on your

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CN&R

29


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CN&R

February 21, 2019

CBestisForeign one of the more prominent Oscar nominees for Language Film, is a strangely fascinating old War, the bleakly stylish drama from Poland that

mixture of love story and historical epic. And there’s a provocative strangeness in that mixture’s key ingredients—the love by story is crazed, grim, erratic and bafJuan-Carlos Selznick flingly passionate, while the sprawl of Cold War history lurches along in the background, seemingly somewhere between theater of the absurd and the world of paranoid thrillers. The chief figures in the story, the Cold War lovers, first meet in post-World War II Poland in the late 1940s amid the Opens Friday, Feb. 22. Starring Joanna fervor for the newly established comKulig and Tomasz Kot. munist regime. Wiktor (Tomasz Kot) Directed by Pawel is a musician involved in managing Pawlikowski. Pageant theatrical events. Zula (Joanna Kulig) Theatre. rated r. is among a crowd of young women auditioning for roles in what is set to be a government-sponsored touring group performing traditional music of the common folk. Wiktor has his eye on Zula right from the start, and singles her out for inclusion on the tour, as much for her blonde beauty and bold demeanor as for any musical talent. Soon, they are romantically involved, and soon after that their romance is running hot and cold as their lives, together and separately, take on several abrupt changes of direction. Writer-director Pawel Pawlikowski takes the story through a series of shifts of time and place. The couple plan to defect while on tour in East Berlin, but Zula changes her mind at the last moment and Wiktor cross-

4

es over alone. He finds work in Paris, and she returns to Poland and marries a party official. Both have moderately successful careers as musical performers, and they reunite briefly in Paris a few years later, and subsequently there will be further brief (but increasingly fraught) reunions in Yugoslavia and back in Poland, despite the legal risks to Wiktor as a defector. What emerges in all this, at least in part, is a kind of smoldering allegory in which a wildly irrational tale of amour fou (“mad love”) plays out against a backdrop of massive oppression and stifling conformity. And that may shake out a little too easily as a sweeping protest against the Cold War era as system-wide freezeout of individual passion and identity. But there’s also the possibility that these odd, inexplicably devoted lovers have their indifference to the norms of the Cold War era as their only real, desperately irresistible bond. Kulig gives the film’s standout performance. Her Zula might be a film noir femme fatale, but she also exudes the ambiguous resourcefulness of a born survivor. The character and the actor both demand our attention while also refusing to be categorized. Kot is something of a cipher as Wiktor, but with just enough gravitas and “presence” to consistently claim our attention as well. In the Paris sequences, actor/singer Jeanne Balibar and actor/director Cédric Kahn have some strong moments in secondary roles. Ω

1 2 3 4 5 Poor

Fair

Good

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Excellent


Reviewers: Bob Grimm and Juan-Carlos Selznick.

Opening this week

4

Cold War

See review this issue. Pageant Theatre. Rated R —J.C.S.

Fighting With My Family

A biopic based on the life of English wrestler Paige (played by Florence Pugh), her wrestling family and her journey to the WWE. Also starring Vince Vaughn and The Rock. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World

The third entry in the animated franchise picks up a year after the events in the previous film, with Hiccup the dragon (voice of Jay Baruchel) searching for a dragon utopia. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

Oscar Movie Week

All week leading up to the Academy Awards (Feb. 24), Cinemark is showing different Best Picture nominees each day. Check with theater for showtimes. Cinemark 14. Rated PG.

Now playing Alita: Battle Angel

Robert Rodriguez (Sin City) directs this film adaptation of Yukito Kishiro’s Japanese cyberpunk manga series, Gunnm, featuring a cyborg heroine named Alita (Rosa Salazar) who was rendered for the big screen using CGI technologies developed for James Cameron’s Avatar. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

Aquaman

Jason Momoa takes his superhuman physique from Game of Thrones to the title character in this film adaptation of DC Comics’ half-human/half-Atlantean heir to the underwater kingdom of Atlantis. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13.

Cold Pursuit

Norwegian director Hans Petter Moland does an American remake of his own 2014 film, In Order of Disappearance. This one stars Liam Neeson as a snowplow driver-turnedvengeful vigilante as he hunts down the drug dealers and crime boss responsible for his son’s death. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

4

The Favourite

Glass

The third film in writer/director M. Night Shyamalan’s Unbreakable trilogy (which includes previous entries Unbreakable and Split) pits a hero with superhuman strength (Bruce Willis) against two “supervillains”— a dangerously unstable man with 24 personalities (James McAvoy) and a genius mass-murderer with brittle bones (Samuel L. Jackson). Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13.

The sequel picks up where the 2017 original left off, but this time multiple people are being murdered and reliving the same day over and over as a slasher in a baby-face mask hunts them down. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

Isn’t It Romantic

A fantasy-satire starring Rebel Wilson as an unlucky-in-love woman who finds herself stuck in a stereotypical rom-com universe. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

3

The LEGO Movie 2: The Second Part

Another healthy dose of family-friendly fun at which both kids and parents should laugh heartily. The Second Part picks up five years after the end of the first movie, and our hero Emmet (Chris Pratt) is happily buying coffee in Apocalypseburg, a devastated LEGO-land of sullen tones and broken dreams where master builder Wyldstyle (Elizabeth Banks) has taken to dramatic narration at all times as things in their world have turned from awesome to bleak. The culprits are aliens called Duplos, invading forces that are at once undeniably adorable and unabashedly destructive. It’s a crazed world where Batman (Will Arnett) gets engaged to Queen Waterva Wa’Nabi (Tiffany Haddish), leader of the Duplo, and Emmett winds up running with a Kurt Russell-type antihero named Rex Dangervest, who is suspiciously like him (and who is also voiced by Pratt). The movie feels a bit repetitive in places, and some of the action is too fast to be fully taken in, but flaws aside, it’s still a lot of fun. There’s a slightly dark underbelly at play here, and it’s fun to see a kid’s flick that doesn’t totally play it safe. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG —B.G.

The Prodigy

Is a boy’s behavior a sign of genius or something far more sinister? Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

5

Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse

No movie adaptation has captured the rush of reading an exciting comic book like this blast of energy from directors Bob Persichetti, Peter Ramsey and Rodney Rothman. They go for broke with a seamless mixture of visual styles—hand-drawn and computer animated—and the story is pretty great, to boot. Teenager Miles Morales (voiced by Shameik Moore) is bitten by a strange spider and then, with his new-found powers in effect, crosses paths with the original Spider-Man, Peter Parker (Chris Pine). Turns out a portal from a parallel universe has opened up, allowing a whole fleet of different Spider-Verse characters to come into his orbit—the older Peter B. Parker (the invaluable Jake Johnson), Gwen Stacy (Hailee Steinfeld), Spider-Ham (a mishmash of Spidey and Porky Pig voiced by John Mulaney), Peni Parker (Kimiko Glenn) and her robot and, best of all, Nicolas Cage as the black-and-white Spider-Man Noir. So, Miles is one of many heroes with Spider powers tasked with battling bad dudes. Spider-Verse is surely one of the best movies of the year and the best Spider-Man movie to date. Cinemark 14. Rated PG —B.G.

The Upside

A buddy dramedy about the relationship that develops between a wealthy quadriplegic (Bryan Cranston) and the ex-con (Kevin Hart) hired to take care of him. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13.

What Men Want

A decades-old Mel Gibson flick gets the gender-flip treatment here, when Taraji P. Henson stars as a sports agent who finally gets a leg up on the boy’s club of her profession when she somehow gains the ability to hear men’s private thoughts. Cinemark 14. Rated R.

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Tragedy intertwines with farce in the portrait of Queen Anne (Olivia Colman), who is simultaneously a figure of obvious pathos and surprising resilience. And that portrait is further intensified via her attachments to Lady Sarah (Rachel Weisz) and the no longer well-to-do Abigail (Emma Stone), two resourceful strivers who find themselves in increasingly fierce competition for status as the Queen’s “favourite.” Each of the three is a kind of flawed heroine, at one point or another. Colman is superb as Queen Anne, but Weisz and Stone also deliver exceptional work in strikingly nuanced roles. Directed by Yorgos Lanthimos (The Lobster, Dogtooth, etc.), the film is challenging yet richly rewarding experience. Pageant Theatre. Rated R —J.C.S.

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31


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CN&R

FEBRUARY 21, 2019

Cforgrains have supported humans ages. In the 20th century, orn and rice: These staple

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they became key ingredients of mainstream American lagers. by These grains, it Alastair Bland turns out, help provide the sugar necessary for making alcohol but without adding much, if any, extra bodyweight to the beer. The result is often beers light in color and body and, and by some opinions, bland tasting. As craft beer emerged in the 1970s and ’80s, the people making a new type of small-scale beer scorned mainstream brands and the methods used to make them. In the process, rice and corn got thrown under the bus as inferior to more flavorful barley. Craft beer enthusiasts took to labeling rice and corn “adjuncts,” and they said these ingredients were merely additives to help brewers cut corners in the brewing process, saving money while watering down the beer. How times have changed. Today, some craft brewers are giving these grains a second chance as corn and rice find their way into craft brewery beer kettles around the country. Lagunitas, Almanac, the Bruery, Ballast Point,

Midnight Sun, Dogfish Head and many more have made beers containing rice. Rice, it turns out, adds subtle flavors to the beer—light and fragrant grain notes, compared to the heavier flavors of barley. Corn is seeing its own revival as a craft beer ingredient, after many years as enemy No. 1 for critics of industrial-scale agriculture and food production. Cicerone and writer Miles Liebtag put it succinctly in a December 2017 essay in which he wrote, “[M]ore and more breweries are experimenting with the use of corn to make approximations of styles and brands they otherwise mock and deride.” In fact, the recent rise of craft lagers—a beer category historically dominated by the companies that make Coors, Miller, Bud and the like—has coaxed many craft brewers to give rice and corn a chance. Trevor Martens, co-owner and head brewer at Pond Farm Brewing Co., in San Rafael, says there is nothing inherently wrong with lagers produced largely with rice and corn at industrial scales. Even the fact that these types of beers have relatively little flavor is not necessarily a great flaw. “By brewing a rice lager, craft brewers are giving consumers

a light beer option that’s still produced on small scale by an independent brewer,” Martens writes in an email. Indian Valley Brewing Co. in Novato has added corn to the recipe of its lager 50 Trips to Pini. Fifteen years ago, this might have been a shameful affront to craft brewing ethics. Today, it’s quite the opposite—just one more way to make a diversity of beer styles. Among the more charismatic corn-based beers is Dogfish Head’s Chicha, a beer inspired by an Andean tradition of chewing kernels of corn before brewing, thereby facilitating the fermentation process with human salivary enzymes. Dogfish Head’s rendition, first made in 2009, has involved company parties at which employees stood side by side chewing purple Peruvian corn and spitting it into the brew pot. The fact is corn and rice are charismatic grains in their own right. They have rich cultural histories and form the foundation of entire regional cuisines. They also, not surprisingly, can add flavor and nuance to beers. In a venue where creativity and innovation are valued virtues, excluding rice and corn on arbitrary grounds goes, well, against the grain. Ω


February 21, 2019

CN&R

33


ARTS DEVO by JASON CASSIDY • jasonc@newsreview.com

REFUGEE SONG This is a tough watch. Longtime local musician John-Michael

Sun sits in a chair in the ashes of his destroyed Paradise home and plays guitar and sings in response to the tragedy. “Well I had me a garden, and everything I grew there/kept me thinking, ‘I’m OK,’ here in my easy chair/I finally had me some roses that weren’t eaten by deer/It was a good life, but now I cry me a tear.” The beautiful folk tune was posted on the Facebook page for Climate Uprising (see it at goo.gl/pVm4YJ), a local group born in the wake of the Camp Fire that is spearheading a global call to action for responding to the climate crisis. The video also features John-Michael Sun Sun’s partner, musician/ open-mic promoter Susan Dobra, and the images of them surveying their burned home for the first time are heartbreaking, especially as the song’s achingly sad refrain plays in the background: “I’m a refugee, and I wanna go home.” The song’s title is “Refugee,” and it’s one of three tunes on Sun’s new EP called The Ashes of Paradise, available for free download on his Soundcloud page at soundcloud.com/jm-sun.

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CN&R

FEBRUARY 21, 2019

WHAT WAS LOST Local artists Rebecca Wallace and Rebecca Shelly are spearheading an

ambitious art project designed to connect Camp Fire survivors with artists who will create artworks to give back to those who’ve suffered loss. Working with galleryproduction students from Butte College and the 1078 Gallery, they’ve created a Facebook group (facebook.com/groups/whatwaslost) where they are posting images and stories of what was lost that artists will in turn “adopt” and create a piece of art from. The works will be shown at 1078 Gallery April 26-27 during the Remembered: Art Honoring Loss from the Camp Fire exhibit before being given to those being honored. To share a story or inquire about creating art, visit the Facebook group or email whatwaslostinthecampfire@gmail.com.

MORE TUUUNES! Dude! The local emo crews know how to record. Chico

four-piece Creekside just dropped a self-titled EP, and the sound is huge and clean without sacrificing any energy. Five songs of fist-pumping post-punky power pop, with whiplash stops and starts and emotional-boy lyrics. Hot track: melodic closer “Nails.” Get it at creeksideca.bandcamp.com and find ’em on Facebook to see where the house party is this weekend. At the other end of the emo timelime, those grandfathers of the local indie scene in Surrogate have been teasing a someday-to-be-released album called Space Mountain by leaking five tracks over the past several months on Spotify (and a few on Bandcamp). Hot track: the gorgeously recorded slice of baroque pop, “Song Cover art for Surrogate’s Space Mountain No. 4.” Find Surrogate on Spotify or by Oliver Hutton. visit surrogatemusic.bandcamp.com.


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY For the week oF February 21, 2019 ARIES (March 21-April 19): In December

1915, San Diego was suffering through a drought. City officials hired a professional “moisture accelerator” named Charles Hatfield who promised to make it rain. Soon, Hatfield was shooting a secret blend of chemicals into the sky from the top of a tower. The results were quick. A deluge began in early January 1916 and persisted for weeks. Thirty inches of rain fell, causing floods that damaged the local infrastructure. The moral of the story, as far as you’re concerned, Aries: When you ask for what you want and need, specify exactly how much you want and need. Don’t make an open-ended request that could bring you too much of a good thing.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Ac-

tors Beau Bridges and Jeff Bridges are brothers born to parents who were also actors. When they were growing up, they already had aspirations to follow in their parents’ footsteps. From an early age, they summoned a resourceful approach to attracting an audience. Now and then they would start a pretend fight in a store parking lot. When a big enough crowd had gathered to observe their shenanigans, they would suddenly break off from their faux struggle, grab their guitars from their truck and begin playing music. In the coming weeks, I hope you’ll be equally ingenious as you brainstorm about ways to expand your outreach.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): According

to Edward Barnard’s book New York City Trees, a quarter of the city is shaded by its 5.2 million trees. In other words, one of the most densely populated, frantically active places on the planet has a rich collection of oxygen-generating greenery. There’s even a virgin forest at the upper tip of Manhattan, as well as five botanical gardens and 843-acre Central Park. Let’s use all this bounty amid the bustle as a symbol of what you should strive to foster in the coming weeks: refreshing lushness and grace interspersed throughout your busy, hustling rhythm.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): As a poet

myself, I regard good poetry as highly useful. It can nudge us free of our habitual thoughts and provoke us to see the world in ways we’ve never imagined. On the other hand, it’s not useful in the same way that food and water and sleep are. Most people don’t get sick if they are deprived of poetry. But I want to bring your attention to a poem that is serving a very practical purpose in addition to its inspirational function. Simon Armitage’s poem “In Praise of Air” is on display in an outdoor plaza at Sheffield University. The material it’s printed on is designed to literally remove a potent pollutant from the atmosphere. And what does this have to do with you? I suspect that in the coming weeks you will have an extra capacity to generate blessings that are like Armitage’s poem—useful in both practical and inspirational ways.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): In 1979, psycholo-

gist Dorothy Tennov published her book Love and Limerence: The Experience of Being in Love. She defined her newly coined word “limerence” as a state of adoration that may generate intense, euphoric and obsessive feelings for another person. Of all the signs in the zodiac, you Leos are most likely to be visited by this disposition throughout 2019. And you’ll be especially prone to it in the coming weeks. Will that be a good thing or a disruptive thing? It all depends on how determined you are to regard it as a blessing, have fun with it and enjoy it regardless of whether or not your feelings are reciprocated. I advise you to enjoy the hell out of it!

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Based in

Switzerland, Nestle is the largest food company in the world. Yet it pays just $200 per year to the state of Michigan for a permit to suck up about 210 million gallons of groundwater, which it bottles and sells at a profit. I nominate this vignette to be your

by rob brezsny cautionary tale in the coming weeks. How? 1. Make damn sure you are being fairly compensated for your offerings. 2. Don’t allow huge, impersonal forces to exploit your resources. 3. Be tough and discerning, not lax and naïve, as you negotiate deals.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Sixteenth-

century Italian artist Daniele da Volterra wasn’t very famous for his own painting and sculpture. We remember him today for the alterations he made to Michelangelo’s giant fresco The Last Judgment, which spreads across an entire wall in the Sistine Chapel. After Michelangelo died, the Catholic Church hired da Volterra to “fix” the scandalous aspects of the people depicted in the master’s work. He painted clothes and leaves over genitalia and derrieres. In accordance with astrological omens, I propose that we make da Volterra your anti-role model for the coming weeks. Don’t be like him. Don’t engage in coverups, censorship, or camouflage. Instead, specialize in the opposite: revelations, unmaskings and expositions.

CLASSIFIEDS Call for a quote. (530) 894-2300 ext. 2 Phone hours: M-F 9am-5pm. Deadlines for print: Line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Display ad deadline: Friday 2pm

All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. Further, the News & Review specifically reserves the right to edit, decline or properly classify any ad. Errors will be rectified by re-publication upon notification. The N&R is not responsible for error after the first publication. The N&R assumes no financial liability for errors or omission of copy. In any event, liability shall not exceed the cost of the space occupied by such an error or omission. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes full responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. *Nominal fee for some upgrades. after prob period. View full job description & apply on-line at www.jm.com/careers - search on: U.S. and Canada, Click on California on the map, Select the JM icon at Willows, Select job title

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): What is the quality of your access to life’s basic necessities? How well do you fulfill your need for good food and drink, effective exercise, deep sleep, thorough relaxation, mental stimulation, soulful intimacy, a sense of meaningfulness, nourishing beauty and rich feelings? I bring these questions to your attention, Scorpio, because the rest of 2019 will be an excellent time for you to fine-tune and expand your relationships with these fundamental blessings. And now is an excellent time to intensify your efforts.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

Michael Jackson’s 1982 song “Beat It” climbed to number three on the charts in Australia. On the other hand, “Weird Al” Yankovic’s 1984 parody, “Eat It,” reached number one on the same charts. Let’s use this twist as a metaphor that’s a good fit for your life in the coming weeks. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you may find that a stand-in or substitute or imitation will be more successful than the original. And that will be auspicious!

AUTO INSURANCE STARTING AT $49/ MONTH! Call for your fee rate comparison to see how much you can save! Call: 855780-8725 (AAN CAN) ATTENTION: OXYGEN USERS! Gain freedom with a Portable Oxygen Concentrator! No more heavy tanks and refills! Guaranteed Lowest Prices! Call the Oxygen Concentrator Store: 866-6423015 (AAN CAN) Attention Viagra users: Generic 100 mg blue pills or Generic mg yellow pills. Get 45 plus 5 free $99 + S/H. Guaranteed, no prescription necessary. Call Today 1-844-879-5238 Need a roommate? Roommates.com will help you find your Perfect Match today! (AAN CAN)

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): The

Space Needle in Seattle is 605 feet high and 138 feet wide—a tall and narrow tower. Near the top is a round restaurant that makes one complete rotation every 47 minutes. Although this part of the structure weighs 125 tons, for many years its motion was propelled by a mere 1.5 horsepower motor. I think you will have a comparable power at your disposal in the coming weeks—an ability to cause major movement with a compact output of energy.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): In 1941,

the Ford automobile company created a “biological car.” Among its components were bioplastics composed of soybeans, hemp, flax, wood pulp and cotton. It weighed 1,000 pounds less than a comparable car made of metal. This breakthrough possibility never fully matured, however. It was overshadowed by newly abundant plastics made from petrochemicals. I suspect that you Aquarians are at a phase with a resemblance to the biological car. Your good idea is promising but unripe. I hope you’ll spend the coming weeks devoting practical energy to developing it.

www.RealAstrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888.

Out of State Home for Sale by owners Baulden, AZ ‘05 2551 sq ft custom 3 bdrm plus office 2 1/2 bath chef’s ktchn 3 car garage 4 acres private well quiet & beautiful area $415K motivated sellers. For more info call 1 (928) 718-0441 PENIS ENLARGEMENT PUMP. Get Stronger & Harder Erections Immediately. Gain 1-3 Inches Permanently & Safely. Guarenteed Results. FDA Licensed. Free Brochure: 1-800-354-3944 www.DrJoelKaplan.com (AAN CAN)

A Unique Touch by Deja. Full-Body Shower and Massage. $140 per 1hr & 20min session. Ask 4 special rates 4 fire victims (530) 321-0664 A Relaxing Massage In a cool, tranquil studio. $40 special. By appointment only. 10:30am - 7pm. 530893-0263. No texting. Ultra Soothing Massage. You will feel better now. Hours 10-6 M-Su. Michelle (530) 566-6477

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Car-

tographers of Old Europe sometimes drew pictures of strange beasts in the uncharted regions of their maps. These were warnings to travelers that such areas might harbor unknown risks, like dangerous animals. One famous map of the Indian Ocean shows an image of a sea monster lurking, as if waiting to prey on sailors traveling through its territory. If I were going to create a map of the frontier you’re now headed for, Pisces, I would fill it with mythic beasts of a more benevolent variety, like magic unicorns, good fairies and wise centaurs.

1999 Class C RV, Jamboree, 24 foot, Excellent Condition, 47K miles. $12,500. (707) 217-5956

AIRLINE CAREERS begin here Get started by training as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Mainetenance 800725-1563 (AAN CAN) Johns Manville is hiring for INDUSTRIAL MAINTENANCE MECHANICS and INDUSTRIAL ELECTRICIANS at our Willows, CA facility. Starting age $29.04/hr, increase to $31.79/hr

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CREATIVE RECLAIMED WOODS at 2568 Fair St. Chico, CA 95928. RACHEL NICOLE MCMILLAN 2235 Dorado Cerro Chico, CA 95928. SCOTT ERIC MCMILLAN 2235 Dorado Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: RACHEL MCMILLAN Dated: December 21, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001547 Published: January 31, February 7,14,21, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as MORRISON at 10 Landing Circle, #5 Chico, CA 95973.

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MORRISON AND COMPANY CONSULTING, INC 10 Landing Circle, #5 Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: R. BRENT MORRISON, PRESIDENT Dated: January 10, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000051 Published: January 31, February 7,14,21, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as KEN’S PARADISE HITCH AND WELDING at 919 Easy Street Paradise, CA 95969. DALE JOSEPH GOMES 3254 Indian Springs Rd Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: DALE J GOMES Dated: January 14, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000077 Published: January 31, February 7,14,21, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CARING CHOICE HOUSES LLC at 878 Palermo Road Oroville, CA 95965. CARING CHOICE HOUSES LLC 878 Palermo Road Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: PHILLIP L. WILSON, PRESIDENT Dated: January 22, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000111 Published: January 31, February 7,14,21, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as HANDYCRAFT at 6369 Cohasset Road Chico, CA 95973. JOSEPH DANNIEL PARCHER 6369 Cohasset Road Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JOSEPH PARCHER Dated: January 3, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000015 Published: January 31, February 7,14,21, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as FUROCIOUS PETS at 679 E 9th St Apt 3 Chico, CA 95928. DANIEL THOMAS LEVULETT 679 E 9th St Apt 3 Chico, CA 95928. TAYLOR LEVULETT 679 E 9th St Apt 3 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed; DANIEL LEVULETT Dated: January 25, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000133 Published: January 31, February 7,14,21, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as ARTISTS OF RIVER TOWN, STUDIO AT THE BRUSHSTROKES GALLERY at 1967 Montgomery Street Oroville, CA 95965. ARTISTS OF RIVER TOWN 277 Olive Hwy Suite A Oroville, CA 95965.

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This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: DAVID I TAMORI, PRESIDENT Dated: January 24, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000131 Published: January 31, February 7,14,,21, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following person has abandoned the use of the fictitious business name SCOOTERS CAFE at 11975 Highway 70 Oroville, CA 95965. MICHAEL SCOTT ENGLUND 3819 Grizzly Creek Rd Yankee Hill, CA 95965. This business was conducted by an Individual. Signed: MICHAEL ENGLUND Dated: January 29, 2019 FBN Number: 2016-0001506 Published: February 7,14,21,28, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as COMANCHE CREEK FARMS, HAND IN GARDEN INC at 260 Speedway Avenue Chico, CA 95928. HAND IN GARDEN INC 260 Speedway Avenue Chico, CA 95928. GWENDOLYM M MILLER 260 Speedway Avenue Chico, CA 95928. JAMES GAYL MILLER 260 Speedway Avenue Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: JAMES G. MILLER, PRESIDENT Dated: January 25, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000132 Published: February 7,14,21,28, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BEST CLEANING AND WINDOW SERVICE, BEST WINDOW CLEANING SERVICE at 1711 Mulberry St Chico, CA 95928. LARRY ROBERT LACZKO 1711 Mulberry St Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: LARRY LACZKO Dated: January 22, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000113 Published: February 7,14,21,28, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATMENT The following persons are doing business as COMPANIONS ANIMAL HOSPITAL at 2607 Esplanade Chico, CA 95973. VALERIE DYINA CARUSO 1178 Hill View Way Chico, CA 95926. REBECCA MANNINEN 1178 Hill View Way Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: VALERIE CARUSO, PRES Dated: January 28, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000137 Published: February 7,14,21,28, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as HATHA HOUSE at

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13948 Lindbergh Circle Chico, CA 95973. TATIANA LOONEY 13948 Lindbergh Circle Chico, CA 95973. ZURI OSTERHOLT 725 Alder Street Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: ZURI OSTERHOLT Dated: January 31, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000161 Published: February 7,14,21,28, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as AN HONEST DEFENSE INVESTIGATIVE SERVICE at 8010 Reservoir Rd Oroville, CA 95966. MARY ANN BARR 8010 Reservoir Rd Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: MARY ANN BARR Dated: January 24, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000127 Published: February 7,14,21,28, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as HAPPY DAY RESTAURANT at 14455 Skyway Magalia, CA 95954. MERRY YANG NO. ONE, INC. 2848 Cactus Ave Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: ZHONGMEI YANG, PRESIDENT Dated: January 17, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000101 Published: February 7,14,21,28, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as G TOWN HOT SHOP AND GLASS ART GALLERY at 2280 Ivy St Suite 120 Chico, CA 95928. ANDREW LIBECKI 2280 Ivy St Suite 120 Chico, CA 95928. BRYON SUTHERLAND 2280 Ivy St Suite 120 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: BRYON SUTHERLAND Dated: January 17, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000104 Published: February 7,14,21,28, 2019

FICTITOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as SCOOTERS CAFE at 11975 Highway 70 Oroville, CA 95965. BONNIE SALMON 4132 Deadwood Rd Oroville, CA 95965. DANIEL RICHARD SALMON 4132 Deadwood Rd Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: DAN SALMON Dated; January 29, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000143 Published: February 7,14,21,28, 2019

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FICTITOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BARON TRANSPORT SERVICES at 6346 Baston Lane Paradise, CA 95969. GREGORY ALAN BARON 6346 Baston Lane Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: GREGORY A. BARON Dated: January 30, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000152 Published: February 7,14,21,28, 2019

Cn&r is looking for An Advertising ConsultAnt Do you love Chico? Do you want to help local businesses succeed? So do we! The Chico News & Review is a family owned business that has been part of the Chico community since 1977. Our mission is to publish great newspapers which are successful and enduring, create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow while respecting personal welfare, and to have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. If you want to make a difference and do something that matters then keep reading.

Advertising ConsultAnt The CN&R is looking for an individual who cares about building relationships and partnering with local businesses. If you have the heart, we have the tools to train you to be a successful Ad Consultant. You must be self-motivated, ambitious and an independent person who wants to be part of a great team. Successful reps will have a sincere desire to help our clients assess their needs and work together to create marketing campaigns that increase their business. Bilingual/fluency in Spanish is a plus.

for more informAtion, visit www.newsreview.Com/ChiCo/jobs

equAl OppORTuNITY emplOYeR

FICTITOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as X TECH at 2707 Fay Way Oroville, CA 95966. NENG XIONG 2707 Fay Way Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: NENG XIONG Dated: January 29, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000145 Published: February 7,14,21,28, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PINKACHII, PINKACHII.COM at 1125 Sheridan Avenue Apt 67 Chico, CA 95926. FAIRE PAJ HUAB YANG 1125 Sheridan Avenue Apt 67 Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: FAIRE YANG Dated: January 22, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000121 Published: February 14,21,28, March 7, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS ANME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CHINA MASSAGE at 236 W East Avenue, Suite F Chico, CA 95926. JAMES RANDALL HILLYARD 249 E. Tehama Street Orland, CA 95963. XIUFENG LI 249 E. Tehama Street Orland, CA 95963. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: JAMES HILLYARD Dated: February 5, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000180 Published: February 14,21,28, March 7, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CRUNCH BOOK at 272 Rio Bravo Court Corning, CA 96021. APRIL MARIE HAMBEK 272 Rio Bravo Court Corning, CA 96021. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: APRIL HAMBEK Dated: January 22, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000119 Published: February 14,21,28, March 7, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as GEODEV SOLUTIONS, GEOSPATIAL DEVELOPMENT SOLUTIONS at 14023 Pineland Circle Magalia, CA 95954. MATTHEW KYLE BRUSH 14023 Pineland Circle Magalia, CA 95954. This business is conducted by

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an Individual. Signed: MATT BRUSH Dated: February 6, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000182 Published: February 14,21,28, March 7, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BUYVET at 10 Mione Way Chico, CA 95926. KURT STEVEN LARSEN 10 Mione Way Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: KURT LARSEN Dated: February 1, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000167 Published: February 14,21,28, March 7, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CHICO USED CARS at 2405 Esplanade Chico, CA 95926. DR AUTO INC 2405 Esplanade Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: ROBERTO J. LUGO, PRESIDENT Dated: February 6, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000183 Published: February 14,21,28, March 7, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PARADISE STRONG COFFEE HUT at 6840 Skyway Paradise, CA 95969. KIM RENEE REINOLDS 573 Castle Dr Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: KIM REINOLDS Dated: January 4, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000024 Published: February 14,21,28, March 7, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as AGS CONSTRUCTION SERVICES at 1252 Wagstaff Road Paradise, CA 95969. ALPHONSE G SPERSKE 1252 Wagstaff Road Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ALPHONSE SPERSKE Dated: February 8, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000196 Publsihed: February 14,21,28, March 7, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as FOTOVISION PRODUCTIONS at 2990 Alamo Avenue Chico, CA 95973. PHIL FOTO 2990 Alamo Avenue Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: PHIL FOTO Dated: February 6, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000187 Published: February 21,28, March 7,14, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as DANIEL PATRICK

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ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, DANIEL PATRICK GRAPHIC DESIGN at 3760 Morrow Ln, Suite E Chico, CA 95928. DANIEL PATRICK ESCUDERO 30 Shari Ln Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: DANIEL P. ESCUDERO Dated: February 11, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000202 Published: February 21,28, March 7,14, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CERTIFIED FORTRESS at 2952 Esplanade, Suite 150 Chico, CA 95973. KEITH NELSON MITTEN II 3174 Rogue River Drive Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: KEITH MITTEN Dated: February 13, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000210 Published: February 21,28, March 7,14, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as LA FONDA at 330 Main Street Chico, CA 95928. HENRI SPITERI 1308 Kentfield Road Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ENRIQUE SPITERI Dated: February 7, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000191 Published: February 21,28, March 7,14, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as LOOMCHI at 184 E Washington Ave Chico, CA 95926. CHEYENNE KRISTINE NG 184 E Washington Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: CHEYENNE NG Dated: February 13, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000209 Published: February 21,28, March 7,14, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ROPP PAINTING COMPANY at 4658 Hicks Lane Chico, CA 95973. DAVID C ROPP 4658 Hicks Lane Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: DAVID C. ROPP Dated: February 14, 2019 FBN Number; 2019-0000215 Published: February 21,28, March 7,14, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing busienss as CLARK FAMILY MILLING at 85 Bull Creek Lane Cohasset, CA 95973. KENNETH G CLARK 85 Bull Creek Lane Cohasset, CA 95973. TRENTON G CLARK 1740 Vilas Road Cohasset, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: KENNETH G. CLARK Dated: February 8, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000198 Published: February 21,28, March 7,14, 2019

NOTICES NOTICE OF LIEN SALE Pursuant to CA Business Code 21700, in lieu of rents due, the following units contain clothes, furniture, boxes, etc. 072cc DOLORES DAVENPORT 6x9 (Bags, Totes, Boxes) 173ss DOLORES DAVENPORT 7x12 (Boxes, Bins, Luggage) 300ss SHANE GOINS 5x10 (Bed set, Boxes) 238ss JOSE ARTEAGA 6x10 (Couch Set, Furniture, TV) 233ss PAUL JONES 6x12 (Boxes, Bins, Luggage) 332ss ANTOINETTE GRIFFITH 6x12 (House hold items, Boxes, Bins) 205ss CARA MAYS 6x12 (Boxes Bins) 476cc BRADLEY JOHN MCPETERS 5x6 (Bins, Boxes, Bags, Deco) Contents to be sold to the highest bidder on: Saturday March 2, 2019 Beginning at 1:00pm Sale to be held at: Bidwell Self Storage, 65 Heritage Lane, Chico, CA 95926. (530) 893-2109 Published: February 14,21, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner MICHAEL STILLWELL and ANGELA WENTZELL filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: SHANE OWEN WENTZELL Proposed name: SHANE OWEN STILLWELL THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: February 27, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: December 31, 2019 Case Number: 18CV03097 Published: January 31, February 7,14,21, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner CHRISTINA OXLEY filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: KINZLEE ANN QUINN Proposed name: KINZLEE ANN OXLEY THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at

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least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: March 27, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: D1 Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: January 25, 2019 Case Number: 18CV03574 Published: January 31, February 7,14,21, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner CONNIE ANN RODDEN filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: CONNIE ANN RODDEN Proposed name: CONNIE ANN MULLEN THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: March 27, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: January 23, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00111 Published: February 14,21,28, March 7, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner JORDAN LANE MONATH and KATIE ELIZABETH ARRIGONI filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: JAYDON LANE BRASIER-MONATH Proposed name: JAYDON LANE MONATH THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: April 10, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: The address of the court is:

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Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: February 4, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00413 Published: February 14,21,28, March 7, 2019

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NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE BARBARA JEAN CARLSON aka BARBARA CARLSON aka BARBARA J. CARLSON To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: BARBARA JEAN CARLSON, aka BARBARA CARLSON, aka BARBARA J. CARLSON a petition for Probate has been filed by: GLENN CARLSON in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: GLENN CARLSON be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: March 5, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: 10 Room: 2 Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of

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NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE SHIRLEY HALEY, aka SHIRLEY ANN HALEY, aka SHIRLEY A. HALEY To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: SHIRLEY HALEY, aka SHIRLEY ANN HALEY, aka SHIRLEY A. HALEY A Petition for Probate has been filed by: GLENN CARLSON in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: GLENN CARLSON be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: March 5, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: 10 Room: 2 Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of

supp rt

SUMMONS NOTICE TO RESPONDENT ANTHONY BUNCE You are being sued by plaintiff: JANET DONNELLY You have 30 calendar days after this Summons and Petition are served on you to file a Response (form FL-120) at the court and have a copy served on the petitioner. A letter, phone call, or court appearance will not protect you. If you do not file your Response on time, the court may make orders affecting your marriage or domestic partnership, your property, and custody of your children. You may be ordered to pay support and attorney fees and costs. For legal advice, contact a lawyer immediately. Get help finding a lawyer at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courts.ca.gov/selfhelp) at the California Legal Services website (www.lawhelpca.org), or by contacting your local county bar association. FEE WAIVER: If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the clerk for a fee waiver form. The court may order you to pay back all or part of the fees and costs that the court waived for you or the other party. The name and address of the court are: Superior Court of California, County of Butte 1775 Concord Avenue Chico, CA 95928 The name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner’s attorney, or the petitioner without an attorney, are:

PETITION

estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: STEVAN N. LUZAICH 700 El Camino Real Millbrae, CA 94030 (650) 871-5666 Case Number: 19PR00043 Dated: January 24, 2019 Published: February 7,14,21, 2019

’s Independent Journalism Fund at www.independentjournalismfund.org

SUMMONS

estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: STEVAN N. LUZAICH 700 El Camino Real Millbrae, CA 94030 (650) 871-5666 Case Number: 19PR00045 Dated: January 24, 2019 Published: February 7,14,21, 2019

Donate to

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner MARIJANE RHEANN DAVIS filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: MARIJANE RHEANN DAVIS Proposed name: MARIJANE RHEANN STAUSS THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: April 10, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: February 4, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00403 Published: February 21,28, March 7,14, 2019

MICHAEL M. ROONEY/ JEFFREY MONSELL 1361 Esplanade Chico, CA 95926-4900 (530) 345-5678 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Dated: November 2, 2018 Case Number: 18FL02331 Published: February 21,28, March 7,14, 2019

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february 21, 2019

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REAL ESTATE

fOr MOre INfOrMaTION abOuT aDVerTISING IN Our reaL eSTaTe SeCTION, CaLL 530-894-2300

Love’s Real estate

Mad at God

5036 Chasity Ct | Paradise | $925,000 AMAZING VIEWS from this one-of-a-kind custom home in gated Mt. Oaks Estates community! 4201 sq ft with 4BR, 3 and 1/2 BA, Two levels that can easily house 2 families and still maintain privacy. Enter into the elegant foyer, 11ft ceilings, crown molding, formal dining room. The views from almost every window will take your breath away. Solid Maple flooring, three unique fireplaces, grand office/library, so much more. This is by appointment only. SN19035872 Broker/owner

Julie Rolls

CalBRE#01844065 • DRE#01991235 1834 MangRovE avEnuE, ChiCo, Ca REMaxofPaRaDisE.CoM • REMaxofChiCo.CoM

Roberto is a guy I run into from time to time at the gym in the mornings. He lived in Paradise, where he worked as a VA in-home caregiver, and in the construction business. When I ran into him after the Camp fire, he told me of his harrowing experience that tragic Thursday, November 8. “You did crazy stuff,” I said. “Risking your life!” “I know,” he said, “but I was mad at God! How could He take away our beautiful home, our beautiful life? Paradise was really paradise!” Roberto lived on five acres. A nice house, room for his tools, trailer and trucks, and room for the kids. All eight of them. At 7:30 that Thursday morning, Roberto left home and went to the fitness club in Paradise. A sign on the door said it was closed “due to fire.” He hadn’t heard yet. A lady pulled into the parking lot and yelled, “Fire!” He thought first of his two patients in Magalia, a 95-year-old invalid, and an 80- year-old in a wheelchair. Roberto races to Magalia and convinces the 95-yearold to leave with his son. The roads are now blockaded

by emergency vehicles. He calls a sheriff’s officer he knows, who finds the 80-year-old and takes him to safety. Roberto shoots back down through Paradise. On Pentz Road he sees a disoriented elderly man and pulls him into his Suburban. The sky has blackened. He drives back home. “Now the embers are flying in the wind, and flames are growing high,” he tells me. “God, why would you take this all away?” he shouts. His wife calls his cell phone. She is driving to Chico in the evacuating mass of vehicles. “Get out!” she shouts. “Don’t do this to me and the kids!” “You will be safe,” he tells her. “I will join you later.” His house is on fire now. Time to go. He backs the Suburban up, past his other two pickup trucks, the white Silverado and the black Silverado. Roberto suddenly decides he is taking all three of his trucks. How will he do this? To be Continued...

Doug Love is Sales Manager at Century 21 in Chico. Call 530-680-0817 or email dougwlove@gmail.com License #950289

Office: 530-520-4094 • cell: 530-520-8545

Homes are Selling in Your Neighborhood Shop every home for sale at www.C21SelectGroup.com

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Homes Sold Last Week ADDRESS

TOWN

2929 Dos Rios Rd 3966 Spyglass Rd 30 Lakoda Ct 1970 Preservation Oak Dr 3513 Shadowtree Ln 1836 Almendia Dr 16 Laguna Point Rd 647 Burnt Ranch Way 3183 Sawyers Bar Ln 4243 Keefer Rd 23 Avenida Brisa Ct

Biggs Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico

38

CN&R

february 21, 2019

Butte County is Experiencing an Extreme Housing Shortage! It is great to time sell - give me call to see if the time is right for YOU

Whether you’re buying or selling, choose me as your trusted Realtor to open the door of possibilities.

PRICE $447,000 $813,000 $650,000 $630,000 $600,000 $590,000 $550,000 $525,000 $520,000 $519,500 $500,500

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Sponsored by Century 21 Select Real Estate, Inc. SQ. FT. 1666 3288 2287 2101 2894 2196 1977 2511 2541 1880 1667

ADDRESS

TOWN

11 Jean Ln 3311 Prairie Creek Dr 829 Alynn Way 8 Blanqueta Ct 2893 Beachcomber Cv 488 Cimarron Dr 2931 Kennedy Ave 1275 Glenshire Ln 1702 Oak Vista Ave 2204 Moyer Way 10020 Cohasset Rd

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico

PRICE $475,909 $455,000 $455,000 $430,000 $420,000 $414,000 $400,000 $396,500 $345,000 $332,000 $295,000

BR/BA 3/2 3/2 5/4 3/2 3/2 3/2 4/1 3/2 3/2 3/2 3/2

SQ. FT. 1545 1956 2426 1673 1348 1317 1440 1402 1583 1217 1884


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3 bed 2 bath in Magalia with lots of upgrades! Call now for more info & private showings! CalDRE #02056059

Olivia Larrabee l (530) 520-3169 Olivia.Larrabee@c21selectgroup.com

Mark Reaman l (530) 228-2229 Lic# 01265853

Mark.Reaman@c21selectgroup.com

The following houses were sold in Butte County by real estate agents or private parties during the week of February 4 - February 8, 2019 The housing prices are based on the stated documentary transfer tax of the parcel and may not necessarily reflect the actual sale price of the home. ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

SQ. FT.

ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

SQ. FT.

1412 Laurel St

Chico

$294,000

3/1

1172

91 Pine Oaks Rd

Oroville

$369,000

2/3

1975

1291 Pennisue Way

Chico

$276,000

3/2

1270

457 Simmons Rd

Oroville

$332,000

2/2

2108

1482 Dayton Rd

Chico

$270,000

3/2

1120

5416 Sugarloaf Ct

Oroville

$325,000

3/2

2053

969 Humboldt Ave

Chico

$269,000

3/1

1086

59 Gaylor Ave

Oroville

$310,000

3/2

1682

1350 Oakdale St

Chico

$254,000

2/2

1096

1708 Biggs Ave

Oroville

$301,000

3/1

1092

8499 Cohasset Rd

Chico

$199,000

2/1

868

169 Canyon Highlands Dr

Oroville

$285,000

3/3

2001

1920 Mars Way

Chico

$188,000

1/1

1280

100 Glen Cir

Oroville

$256,500

3/2

1215

4507 Olive Hwy

Oroville

$490,000

6/4

1912

18 Northview Dr

Oroville

$246,000

4/2

1407

6229 Woodman Dr

Oroville

$410,000

3/3

2475

43 Meadowview Dr

Oroville

$230,000

4/2

1274

6381 S Fork Ct

Oroville

$375,000

3/2

2025

67 Tuscan Dr

Paradise

$698,500

4/3

2929

430 Oakvale Ave

Oroville

$372,500

3/3

2120

5258 Xeno Pl

Paradise

$330,000

3/2

1817

february 21, 2019

CN&R

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