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ChiCo’s FREE News & eNtertaiNmeNt WEEkly Volume 42, issue 25 thursday, February 14, 2019 www.NewsreView.Com

Special Business Issue: Workplaces going above and beyond for Camp Fire-affected colleagues

8 CODE BLUE

10 ‘JUSTIFIED’

32 PARADISE ACT 2


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CN&R

INSIDE

Vol. 42, Issue 25 • February 14, 2019 4

Editorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Guest Comment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Second & Flume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 This Modern World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Streetalk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

NEWSLINES 

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BUSINESS ISSUE

Downstroke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Sifter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9

HEALTHLINES 

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Appointment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Weekly Dose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

GREENWAYS 

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Eco Event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS 

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15 Minutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 The Goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

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COVER STORY  

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ARTS & CULTURE 

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Arts Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 This Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Fine Arts listings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Nightlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Reel World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Chow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Arts DEVO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Brezsny’s Astrology . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43

CLASSIFIEDS  

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REAL ESTATE  

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OPINION 

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OPINION

Send guest comments, 340 words maximum, to gc@newsreview.com or to 353 e. Second St., Chico, Ca 95928. Please include photo & short bio.

SECOND & FLUME

EDITORIAL

asleep at the wheel There’s a lot to chew on regarding the city of Chico’s

unprecedented recent step of opening a warming center, but the thing that is quite clear not only to this newspaper but also to several City Council members is that the county’s cold-weather emergency response is inadequate. Several Chico representatives said as much from the dais during that panel’s last meeting, lamenting that they’d been left holding the bag for a job their counterparts at the county ought to be tackling. Indeed, the county is the governmental body tasked with public health and safety. Thing is, the agency’s deficiency on that front during weather events is not exactly new news. Several years ago, this newspaper reported on criticism of its so-called Extreme Cold Weather Plan, a piece of the larger Emergency Operations Plan that dictates certain services be provided by the county during disasters (see “Freeze out,” Newslines, Dec. 18, 2014). Among the concerns: Some of the conditions that trigger action aren’t well-reasoned. One of them requires weather to drop below 25 degrees (when does that happen here?). Another checks capacity at local shelters (i.e., the Torres Community Shelter). As was noted at the time, that temperature demarcation is well below levels that pose life-threatening conditions for

by Melissa Daugherty m e l i s s a d @ n e w s r e v i e w. c o m

those without adequate shelter. In addition, as one former mayor noted, the Torres Shelter is not set up for last-minute intake driven by weather events. The county has previously stated that its plan isn’t meant to serve the chronically homeless, but rather is designed to address times of disasters—say, when a storm disables power and people can’t heat their homes. But news flash: Butte County is a federal disaster zone. That’s been true since shortly after the Camp Fire torched the Ridge and other portions of the county. One of the results is that more people are living on the streets, especially in Chico. As you’ll read this week, some of those who sought shelter in the emergency warming center established by the city were Camp Fire survivors (see “Extreme conditions,” page 8). Were it not for the city of Chico’s action, dozens of people would have endured nights outside during freezing temperatures. The council took that step on a day when Chico saw a light dusting of snow and temperatures were expected to remain around or below freezing for several days. We have no gripes with the $18,000 the city spent, but this isn’t its job and it’s not a viable long-term solution. The county needs to step up, and it needs to do so immediately. Ω

GUEST COMMENT

Climate change, the Camp Fire and action Eas toexposure report things that may cause harm to students, such to conditions that may result in psychologi-

ach year, teachers across the nation are mandated

cal trauma, including anxiety, chronic depression or post-traumatic stress disorder. Does this sound like what the children of Butte County are going through due to the Camp Fire? We can’t link a given wildfire directly to climate change, just as we can’t link an individual hurricane to it. However, wildfire damage directly increases with hotter, drier fuels that are now accumulating during longer by and drier summer seasons. It’s sort Julie Heath of like how warmer oceans lead to The author is co-leader stronger hurricanes. More damaging of the Chico Citizens’ energy from more heat. Climate Lobby. Large wildfires in the United States now burn more than twice the area per year that they did in 1970, and the average wildfire season is 78 days longer. In the 1980s, large wildfires increased suddenly and markedly, getting worse every year. Ask any firefighter.

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What does this have to do with teachers and school boards? Because they are mandated reporters, they don’t have to be silent witnesses to generational climate injustice. They can speak up to protect our students and future generations, helping build nonpartisan political will to move our representatives to act. Speaking out is what all of us should do. A groundswell of climate action resolutions from school boards, PTAs, student councils and educator’s unions all over will move Congress to act. Twenty-nine school districts in several states and nearly 10 percent of the boards of education in California have passed resolutions and sent them to Washington, D.C. The National School Boards Association has a resolution on its March agenda. This March 27, a group of young people from Schools for Climate Action will hand-deliver this stack of resolutions to every congressional office. To get involved, all resources, such as resolution templates and template outreach emails, are available at schoolsforclimateaction.org. Locally, the Chico Citizens’ Climate Lobby can be contacted to help you through every step of the process. Let’s get together to protect our children and grandchildren from the worst impacts of climate change. Ω

Woman’s day I’ve been watching with interest as Democrats enter the 2020 presidential fray. I’ll keep an open mind over the campaign cycle, but I’ve rolled my eyes upon the announcements of a few of the candidates who think they have a shot at unseating the current commander in chief. Some of them no doubt are surrounded by yes-men and -women. That happens when politicians reach a certain level—and it’s the only reason I can surmise some of them think they’re a viable challenger. As of press time, nine had officially jumped into the race. However, as we’ve seen over the past couple of months, there are many more would-be candidates forming so-called exploration committees. It’s anyone’s guess how large the field will become by the time debates begin. So far, more women than men have taken the plunge. Shockingly, ahem, some of the coverage they’re receiving is quite sexist. A few of the targets in question are well-known. East Bay native Kamala Harris, of course, is the most familiar to Californians. The state’s previous attorney general—now senator—is a former San Francisco district attorney and the candidate I believe, based on political coverage I’ve read over many years, most likely to eventually receive President Obama’s endorsement. Though common knowledge in the Bay Area, it’s resurfaced as a scandal that Harris once dated former longtime state Assemblyman and San Francisco Mayor Willie Brown, who, at the time, the early 1990s, had long been separated from his wife. The implication is that Harris is a homewrecker and opportunist who used her relationship to climb the political ladder. This has played out in garbage publications like Breitbart as well as more reputable news sources, including USA Today, Gannett’s flagship, which I’ve taken to calling the Walmart of newspapers (it’s everywhere and colorful). One of the other politicians getting special treatment is Amy Klobuchar, a popular Minnesota senator and former county prosecutor. Largely based on anonymous former employees, allegations of her mistreating staff began circulating days prior to her recent candidacy announcement, on Sunday (Feb. 10). To her credit, Klobuchar acknowledged that she “can be tough” and “push people.” Perhaps the criticism is valid. I can’t say. What I do know is that it’s generally acceptable when men are demanding leaders. Not so much when it’s a woman. We clearly have a long way to go. It’s probably no surprise that, come November 2020, I’ll be voting for the candidate who is best equipped to beat Trump, but I’d sure like to see that be a woman. I mean, it’s about damn time. I know a little something about succeeding a man in a job previously held exclusively by men. It hasn’t been easy over the past nearly six years here at the CN&R. In addition to being labeled as strident, along with many other descriptors—you know, bitch, whore, the C-word, etc.—I’ve received death threats. Multiple. Then again, I’ve gotten the kindest emails and phone calls, the most encouraging handwritten letters, and a beautiful art-filled calendar. Recently, strangely, a woman in Florida sent me a check for $100 with a sweet note referencing the Camp Fire. I didn’t cash it, but I certainly was touched. I love my job.

Melissa Daugherty is editor of the CN&R


LETTERS

ATTENTION BOOMERS

Send email to cnrletters@newsreview.com

‘Salutes and slams’ Re “Dire directive” (Newslines, by Ashiah Scharaga, Feb. 7): Thank you to Mayor Randall Stone, Scott Huber, Ann Schwab and Vice Mayor Alex Brown for insisting that the city put up an emergency warming center for the people experiencing homelessness. And thank you to Mark Orme and his staff for making it happen within 24 hours. Their consideration for people over money and politics is very gratifying and probably is saving lives. Sandra O’Neill Chico

As an homage to the EnterpriseRecord’s “Hits and Misses” column, some Salutes and Slams: Salute: With the creation of a warming center, for the first time in our city’s history, shelter and toilets were provided to the homeless, on city property, by the city of Chico. This is a welcome turning point and I salute our council, especially Councilman Scott

Huber and Mayor Randall Stone. Also, thanks to City Manager Mark Orme and his staff for a seemingly instant and effective response. Slam: Where are our FEMA trailers? No, not FEMA mobile homes, which take months to install, but camp trailers of the sort that were dropped in Orland months ago! Orland has 70 and proportional to our population, we should have nearly 1,000. So far, zip. Salute: I salute Sandra O’Neill for her steadfast advocacy for the homeless, well illustrated at the last council meeting. O’Neill asked our council to rescind our many homeless criminalization laws—including sit/lie. I hope our council is listening. Slam: Who removed the picnic tables at Children’s Playground? Those tables were often used by homeless people and that area was “adopted” by anti-homeless Chico Firsters. I smell a rat. Let’s get those tables back. Patrick Newman Chico

Anti-vet ordinance Twenty veterans commit suicide every day. Veterans Affairs, under Trump, still refuses to allow medical doctors to prescribe cannabis to wounded veterans suffering various ailments. Unfortunately, the VA prescribes opioids at excessive levels to veterans. In 1996, the people of California passed Proposition 215, making it legal for doctors to prescribe medical cannabis. In November 2017, the Chico City Council passed (4-3), an ordinance to prohibit medically prescribed cannabis to be delivered in Chico, including to wounded veterans. However, anyone who is addicted to opioids could continue to have those drugs delivered to their homes. Councilmembers Randall Stone (now mayor), Ann Schwab and Karl Ory voted against the antiveteran cannabis ordinance. Last November, the Chico voters elected two more Democrats, Scott Huber LETTERS c o n t i n u e d

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LETTERS c o n t i n u e d f r o m pa g e 5 and Alex Brown, giving Democrats a 5-2 margin. We are now 23 years since Prop. 215 was passed and Chico has not repealed the Republican ordinance that denies wounded veterans their medicine. Message to elected officials—the city staff work for you. Repeal the ordinance ASAP. Bob Mulholland Chico

Help for Trump? Re “Bernie’s folly” (Letters, by Ray Estes, Jan. 31): Ray Estes’ letter denouncing Bernie Sanders is a complete distortion of the 2016 presidential campaign. Sanders ran as a Democrat because he didn’t want to hurt the Democratic chances like Nader did as a third-party candidate in 2000. When Hillary Clinton became the Democratic candidate following the primaries, Sanders gave her his full support. After the 2016 primaries, I went to Butte College to represent the Democratic Party for registration purposes. Also present were tables for Republicans and the Green Party. No students came to my table and none to the Republicans. All students present went to the Green table to support Jill Stein. Clinton had lost the support of these young voters. Estes’ advice for the DNC to tell Sanders to run as an independent would be a blueprint for a Democratic defeat. A popular third-party candidate would sink Democratic chances in 2020. I suspect Estes’ letter is a Machiavellian effort to enhance Trump’s re-election prospects. Robert Woods Forest Ranch

‘Beadle-Mania’ I’m puzzled by the weekly inclusion of letters by one Roger Beadle. He must have achieved some milestone for submissions and printing of his anti-Trump opinions. While his opinions are certainly welcome, it’s apparent that “Beadle-Mania” occupies a weekly slot in your paper. I will wait to hear his take on Trump’s SOTU speech. A CBS poll shows that 76 percent of listeners approved (liked) what Trump said. That leaves an acute minority not approving. I expect Mr. Beadle’s next submission to be another rancor-filled and 6 

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february 14, 2019

juvenile spearing of the president. Perhaps, you could limit his letters and, instead, open the vacancy to sell ads. Bill Collins Paradise

Support this legislation Last year was the hottest year on record. Last year, carbon emissions increased to an unprecedented high. Last year, the Camp Fire, the deadliest and most destructive fire in California’s history, destroyed the town of Paradise. These are not coincidences. Climate change is real, and it is here. We need to act quickly to prevent climate catastrophe in the form of increasingly common mega-fires like the Camp and Carr fires, and increasingly destructive droughts, hurricanes, floods and famine that will destroy countless species and ecosystems and displace millions of people. Fortunately, there is something we can do. The Energy Innovation and Carbon Dividend Act, supported by Democrats and Republicans, by climate scientists and economists, will help to reduce carbon emissions and stimulate investment in clean energy by placing a fee on carbon pollution. All revenue will be returned directly to citizens’ pockets. This act was just introduced to Congress. We owe it to ourselves, our families, our children and our planet to work together, regardless of political affiliation, to preserve the one world that we have for future generations. Please contact our representative, Doug LaMalfa, and ask him to support the Energy Innovation and Carbon Dividend Act. Dory Schachner Chico

Shameful shutdown The possibility of another shutdown looms over the heads of federal employees and contractors who have entered into good-faith contracts to provide services. But it affects all of us—it is estimated that the economy lost $30 billion in the last debacle. Federal employees have no right to strike per a 1971 Supreme Court decision. The president and Congress are not held to any standard like this. If federal employees are considered intrinsic to government operations, then forcing them

to work unpaid is unfathomable. I proposed to Rep. Doug LaMalfa that, in the event a formal budget cannot be timely passed for all agencies (last done in 1991), there be an automatic imposing of a continuing resolution that funds all agencies at the level they were operating on Sept. 30. This would prevent employees from being pawns in political shenanigans. I have not heard back from him. During my 43-year career in federal civil service, I endured at least four shutdown actions. It is not right for employees, contractors and the general populace to be treated so disrespectfully by our elected officials. When a member of Congress is introduced, oftentimes the word “honorable” is added before his or her name, yet there is nothing honorable when they fail us. Ed Wrona Chico

Applaud the Fourth Estate  Further investigation is obviously necessary. We have only to remember President Nixon’s denial that he was “a crook” to know that unscrupulous presidents lie. Without knowing the truths of what President Trump and subordinates have done, we will not know what is broken, fix it, and impose just sanctions. We do know that his probable violations have been extensive (Holtzman, Impeaching Trump, 2018; Case for Impeachment, Lichtman & Woren, 2017). We need, however, to flesh out these accusations. That will be done in large part by Trump’s favorite red herring, the FairAccurateKnowledgeable Efficatious (FAKE) media. Just as Woodward and Bernstein’s dogged investigative reporting unearthed Nixon’s malfeasances, so will the media of today document as no other entity can the extent of Trump’s misdeeds—poetic justice, that. Our free press is again proving to be democracy’s indispensable fourth branch of government (Fourth Estate, Edmund Burke, parliament speech, 1787). William Todd-Mancillas Chico

More letters online:

We’ve got too many letters for this space. please go to www.newsreview.com/chico for additional readers’ comments on past cn&r articles.


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NEWSLINES DOWNSTROKE PARADISE HOSPITAL LAYS OFF 800

With Paradise’s hospital closed indefinitely due to Camp Fire damage, two-thirds of Adventist Health Feather River employees got laid off this week. Jill Kinney, regional spokeswoman for Adventist Health, told the CN&R that the organization retained or job-placed 407 of 1,205 Feather River employees. The remaining 798 received their final paychecks Feb. 5, though AH previously announced that their benefits would continue through May. The Alliance for Workforce Development, a North State job center, is holding a special session for Feather River Hospital employees Friday morning (Feb. 15) in Chico. It starts at 9 a.m. at 2445 Carmichael Drive.

Extreme conditions

PARADISE WATER FUNDED

Help is on the way for Paradise’s troubled water system. The Federal Emergency Management Agency has awarded about $1.4 million to the Paradise Irrigation District to repair and restore its water system damaged during the Camp Fire, according to a press release from Rep. Doug LaMalfa’s office. Paradise water test results came back positive for the chemical compound benzene, which is known to cause cancer. The district is now performing more extensive tests to determine the magnitude of the problem, starting with the Skyway. (See “Troubled water,” Cover story, Jan. 31.) Because the process of testing, isolating contaminated areas and then removing the contamination along 170 miles of pipe is complicated and costly, it could take a significant amount of time to get potable water running.

POST-FIRE TAX RELIEF

Butte County could receive assistance from the state to cover property tax revenue losses due to the Camp Fire. Assembly Bill 72, amending the Budget Act of 2018, was unanimously approved by the Senate on Monday (Feb. 11). If signed by Gov. Gavin Newsom, $31.3 million would backfill 2018-19 fiscal year wildfire-caused losses for Butte, Lake, Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, Shasta and Siskiyou counties. It would include estimated losses through 2021 for Butte and Lake counties, “due to the magnitude of the associated property damage.” The bill also would dedicate $50 million to an emergency preparedness campaign. “California is united in support of our communities devastated by wildfires and other natural disasters,” said Senate President Pro Tem Toni Atkins (D-San Diego, pictured) in a press release. 8

CN&R

FEBRUARY 14, 2019

Chico leaders, others say county shirked responsibility during cold snap

ARoberts, a Camp Fire survivor, rested under the canopy of a well-lit event tent in

s it drizzled Friday night (Feb. 8), James

Depot Park. His girlfriend dozed in a sleeping bag next to him, and he popped open a can of story and tuna to feed their kitten, photo by Ashiah Scharaga Beauty, who chowed down happily. as hi a h s @ After being given n ew sr ev i ew. c o m $250 and told to leave the Red Cross shelter at the Silver Dollar Fairgrounds at the end of January, Roberts and his family, along with their former Magalia neighbor Darrell Hankins, moved from place to place. Some nights were spent at motels, others in a rental van. When Roberts arrived at Depot Park, the site of the warming center set up by the city of Chico last week, he found two propaneheated tents with turf floors set up, along with portable toilets and hand-washing stations. “It was nice and quiet,” Roberts said. “[Darrell and I] passed out in five minutes because we were both tired.” Grappling with a cold snap, the Chico

City Council took an unprecedented step during its regular meeting last week (Feb. 5) to set up the warming center, an action members of the panel said typically falls under the purview of Butte County. (See “Dire directive,” Newslines, Feb. 7.) Mayor Randall Stone chided the county for its inaction. “The city felt that the county was incapable or unwilling to take action in what we considered an emergency,” he told the CN&R. “The county’s not willing to respond other than to continue to say, ‘We will continue to monitor the situation.’ Pure and simple, it is deadly to be on the streets in those conditions.” The center was set up last Wednesday (Feb. 6), when temperatures dropped below freezing, and remained open during the evenings until closing on Monday morning. An average of 35 people stayed per night and dozens came in and out. Not including staff time, it cost about $18,000, according to City Manager Mark Orme. The city is seeking private funding for reimbursement. Butte County’s Extreme Cold Weather Plan is

triggered in phases. In particular, the county monitors alerts from the National Weather

Service that indicate conditions endangering human life, such as extreme cold or freeze, wind chill and low daytime temperatures accompanied by nighttime temperatures of 25 degrees or lower. No such alert was received last week, according to county spokeswoman Casey Hatcher. Other circumstances that could prompt activation of its plan include power outages or its municipalities declaring a weather emergency, Hatcher added. The last time the plan was activated during winter was December 2014 in Paradise, said Cindi Dunsmoor, the county’s emergency services officer. A significant power outage accompanied a cold front and the county opened a warming center for one day at a local church. Another factor of the evaluation includes whether local municipalities or service providers are responding. “If the city has the resources to do it, it may never involve the county,” Hatcher said. The plan has met criticism before. In 2014,

homeless advocates charged it wouldn’t


James Roberts, a Camp Fire survivor, feeds his kitten, Beauty, while his girlfriend sleeps. They stayed at the city of Chico’s warming center over the weekend.

address the safety needs of those living on the street (see “Freeze out,” Newslines, Dec. 18, 2014). Former Chico mayor and homeless advocate Andy Holcombe continues to feel this way. He pointed to the fact that people can die at temperatures well above freezing. This is corroborated by the National Weather Service, which states on its website that hypothermia, the most common cause of death by winter weather, can set in between 30 and 50 degrees and is more likely to occur when people are wet. Holcombe, a retired attorney, said the state requires the county to have an emergency preparedness plan for natural disasters. “Even if there are local plans in place, local action taken … it doesn’t absolve them” of legal and moral responsibilities to their constituents, he said. Though County Supervisor Tami Ritter said she believes the city responded in an appropriate way by acting independently of the county, she also would like to see the plan updated, and the county and its municipalities work more collaboratively when developing disaster plans. “What I had wished is that we could have had someone there from the county [on Tuesday] to say, ‘This is what we can do,’ or, ‘This is what we can’t do,’ and, ‘These are our limitations, and this is what is possible,’” she said. Last week’s warming center was intended as a short-term solution to keep people alive during below-freezing nights. At the next council meeting, Tuesday (Feb. 19), the panel will decide what to do long-term, in what has been referred to as Code Blue. Orme said staff will present three options: a partnership between the city and nonprofits, a new city program or a fine-tuned version of the warming-tent solution. Talara Cavalli, a homeless Chicoan, told the CN&R she hopes for more centers like the one she sought refuge in over the weekend. “It’s very essential to survival and getting the rest we need to function,” she said. As for Camp Fire survivors Roberts and Hankins, they told the CN&R if the center hadn’t been there, they likely would have been on the streets. Hankins, who is 49, didn’t have a cushy setup: He slept on the turf and used his backpack as a pillow. “But I was warm,” he said. “I was happy, and I felt good.” Ω

Soaking ratepayers? Locals state their case on Cal Water increases Ronald Husa is like many Butte County residents. “As a retiree on

Social Security, I have to watch my pennies,” he said at a public hearing Tuesday night (Feb. 12) about rate increases proposed by Cal Water. So, when he saw rates in Chico would go up 15.2 percent in 2020—then another 3.6 percent in 2021 and 3.9 percent in 2022— should the California Public Utilities Commission approve the request, “it shook me up. I don’t get 15 percent [more] on Social Security to cover [that increase]; it’s lucky if we get 1 percent.” Marléne Del Rosario agreed. A former Orovile city councilwoman, whose 2014 campaign included a plank on lowering water rates, she spoke at the Chico hearing even though there’s one tonight (Feb. 14) at 6 p.m. at Oroville City Hall, specific to her district. There, increases are set at 9.9 percent for 2020, then 2.8 percent and 3.1 percent. Del Rosario told the administrative law judge presiding over the proceedings that this month’s water bill of $76 was her lowest in a year, and her household, which includes her granddaughter, subsequently may have to forgo showers. Later, during discussion of how the CPUC evaluates employee compensation—part of the increase is for payroll—she returned to the lectern and said, “I wish you’d look as carefully at the income of people in Oroville.” In all, six ratepayers spoke at the hearing, held at the Butte County Association of Governments office off Hegan Lane. Three were Chicoans, three Orovillians; a half-dozen other community members attended. “Ratepayer” replaced “customer” in Judge Charles Ferguson’s parlance after the first speaker, Scott Hubbard of Chico, stated that “customers have choice” but “Cal Water is a monopoly.” George Barber, Cal Water district manager for Chico and Oroville, said the largest share from rate increases in Chico would go to infrastructure. The district needs to replace 41,000 feet of water mains, around 8 miles. That earmark is $13.8 million. Other notable asks are $600,000 to update the billing system and $400,000 for payroll. Cal Water also cites infrastructure as the top cause in Oroville and Willows—the latter set for a 33.2 percent jump next year, fol-

SIFT ER Love for sale Over the last 10 years, the number of Americans celebrating Valentine’s Day has dropped 12 percent. According to the National Retail Federation, 51 percent of consumers will spend money for the holiday. That’s down from 63 percent in 2009. It’s up for debate whether that means people are less romantic these days or can’t afford to buy candy, flowers, cards,

George Barber, Cal Water district manager for Chico and Oroville, says customers see savings when infrastructure upgrades improve efficiency. PHOTO BY EVAN TUCHINSKY

lowed by 7.9 percent and 7.7 percent. That public hearing was scheduled for Wednesday night, after the CN&R’s deadline. If approved as-is, the proposed change will generate $5.7 million

total in Chico, $854,000 in Oroville, $1.3 million in Willows and $115.2 million overall, from all 14 districts included in the request. Cal Water’s Kevin McCusker, interim manager of general rate case outreach, told the CN&R that the state approves water rates by service area to account for varying conditions. In Willows, for instance, the utility must purify water from chromium-6, or hexavalent chromium, the toxin that gained notoriety in the film Erin Brockovich. In Chico, Barber said, replacing leaky pipes will make the delivery system more efficient. Hubbard had raised a rhetorical question: If efficiency increases, shouldn’t costs decrease? Barber said afterward that does happen: “When we save money, those savings get passed on to the customer … charges drop off the bill. It is something that changes in real time.” The companywide increase requested for 2020 is 7.6 percent—below requests for the three local districts—then 4.4 percent each of the following two years. Orovillians spoke about their rate being fancy dinners or other double Chico’s and even higher than the other disgifts for their lovers, tricts (Thermalito and South Feather) serving their friends or pets. But vicinity. not to fear, holiday“It’s not just the amount and what it’s going to economy machine, [be], it’s what we pay now that we object to,” Del those who are Rosario told the CN&R. “Seventy-six dollars a celebrating are month out of my income is unreasonable for water planning on going when we live on a river of water—and we’re shipbig, spending $161.96 ping it elsewhere and charging them less.” each on average, for

a total of $20.7 billion projected to be spent for V-Day 2019, which would be up $1.1 billion from last year and $6 billion over 2009.

—EVAN TUCHINSKY eva ntu c h insk y @ newsr ev iew.c o m

NEWSLINES C O N T I N U E D FEBRUARY 14, 2019

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C O N T I N U E D F R O M PA G E 9

‘A very loving individual’ Family of woman slain by law enforcement questions justification

When the phone rang late on the

night of April 26, 2018, Brenda Abrew could never have predicted what would be relayed. She anticipated something about her older sister who was battling cancer. Instead, the news was about her younger sister, Myra Micalizio. She’d been shot and killed by Butte County sheriff’s deputies. “You hear about these things and never think it’s going to happen to you,” Abrew said. “Myra was a very loving individual. She never had any police contact. She wasn’t a druggie or an alcoholic. She basically kept to herself.” By all accounts, Micalizio was not herself on that April evening, when she drove into a neighborhood near her home in Palermo and began sifting through items in front of the trailer homes there. The 911 calls and photos of the scene were released Monday (Feb. 11), along with a detailed account of the incident and the results of the investigation into the officer-involved shooting—District Attorney Mike Ramsey’s conclusion is that the deputies were justified. Micalizio’s family—Abrew included—is not OK with that. “What Mike Ramsey was describing was not my sister,” she said during an interview in her Oroville home.

Micalizio grew up in a large house-

hold in Rio Linda—she was the ninth of 10 children; Abrew was No. 8. They all eventually migrated to Butte County, seeking a safer lifestyle for the younger generations. Micalizio had three children with her first husband, and after she remarried she became somewhat estranged from them, Abrew said. They now reside in Michigan. After a stint as a card dealer in Reno, Micalizio returned to California, living with Abrew for about 3 1/2 years starting in 2010. “By that time, I’d gotten to know my sister really, really well,” Abrew said. Micalizio worked for a time dealing at Gold Country Casino, but after joining the Kingdom Hall of Jehovah’s Witness in Palermo, her whole

life changed. “She decided she didn’t want to do that [deal cards] anymore—she said it was sinful work,” Abrew recalled. “She became a happier person. Her mission in life was to tell people about Jehovah. Jehovah was the man in her life.” Micalizio had her quirks, however. She had what she called “air friends” whom she spoke to regularly. Abrew said she’d overheard conversations and they sounded more like prayers, like her sister was talking to dead relatives, than imaginary people. It’s possible she had an undiagnosed mental illness, she said. It’s possible, too, that last April 26, she experienced some kind of mental break. That’s the only thing that could explain what witnesses described, Abrew said. According to the resident who called 911 at 6:37 that night, Micalizio thought there was a yard sale; in fact, it was a pile of household items from a recently deceased family member that had yet to be sorted. The caller described a screaming, crazy woman who asked for change for a trillion-dollar bill and threatened to shoot her and her two companions, flashing finger guns. “She’s threatening like she’s going to shoot me and kick my butt,” the woman told the dispatcher. Two sheriff’s deputies

Brenda Abrew (left) and Tommy Widener are grieving the loss of their sister, Myra Micalizio. They attended a press conference Monday (Feb. 11) with Micalizio’s niece Merissa Ainsworth at which her killing by sheriff’s deputies was declared justified. PHOTO BY MEREDITH J. COOPER

were sent to the Stanley Avenue address after the caller was told to go inside. When the deputies— Charles Lair and Mary Barker— arrived, however, the three residents were outside, pointing at Micalizio, who was reportedly on the passenger side of her black Mercury Sable. As Lair approached her, with Barker behind, she circled the car. Lair told investigators that she faced him the entire time and her hands were behind her back. He was concerned she may have a gun, so he unholstered his and “loudly commanded the woman to ‘show her hands,’” Ramsey’s report reads. As Micalizio turned to get into the driver’s seat, Lair noted that her hands were empty. But she allegedly “bolted” through the door, and he again feared she’d grab a weapon, Ramsey said. Instead, she got fully into her car, turned it on and shifted into reverse. That was her fatal mistake, as Lair opened fire on her, discharging nine rounds from his Glock .45 when the car came within 6 to 7 feet of him. Barker also fired her pistol, missing most of her five shots—


Your plumbing two lodged into the two trailers Micalizio’s car had been parked between, a third glanced off the hood and landed in the woods somewhere. The three residents who had been outside just seconds earlier hid behind one of the trailers, Ramsey said. They’d been standing between them when the deputies arrived. “Officers are trained to be aware of the background,” Ramsey told the CN&R when asked about firing a weapon toward innocent bystanders. “Sometimes things happen such that it’s a calculated risk that they take.” Micalizio was shot five times near the spine, an autopsy— performed by the Sacramento County coroner—revealed. After getting the news of

Micalizio’s killing last year, Abrew and her husband, Greg, immediately hired a private investigator. He’s still on the case, and they hope to have the car independently examined in the coming days. The family also hired an attorney and have filed a civil wrongful death lawsuit. Because of that, Sheriff Kory Honea declined to comment on specifics of the case. Micalizio’s brother Tommy Widener, who attended the press conference, questions the integrity of the witnesses, whom he believes were coerced. Abrew thinks her sister was merely trying to leave, fearing the deputy and his gun pointed at her, and believes less lethal means should have been used, or that the deputies could have simply moved out of the way. Ramsey countered that the law says an officer “is not required to retreat … he or she is entitled to stand his or her ground and defend himself or herself … this is so even if safety could have [been] achieved by retreating.” “We are not a cop-hating family,” Abrew said. In fact, two of her sons are police officers. “It’s not about the money. It’s about holding them accountable. “During her 56 years of life, Myra has never, ever, ever been hateful. She never wished ill on anyone.” —MEREDITH J. COOPER mere d i thc @ n ewsr ev i ew. com

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HEALTHLINES

Medical wasteland When it comes to health news, social media gets it wrong by

Evan Tuchinsky evantuc hin sk y @ n ewsrev i ew. com

Danyone health news on the internet. She, like else with a smartphone or computer, r. Linda Lewis often cringes when she sees

encounters a barrage of articles with clickenticing headlines about breakthroughs in research and cutting-edge treatments. Even after reading to the bottom, she said, “I often wonder, What’s the rest of the story?” She knows to be skeptical. Lewis is a medical professional—epidemiologist for the Butte County Department of Public Health and faculty member in the Health and Community Services Department at Chico State. She stud-

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ies and tracks how diseases spread; scientific studies are her mental lifeblood. Most readers lack her training. So, when a report misstates or oversimplifies findings, how many know the difference? Or, know to detect a discrepancy? When the report gets tweeted and retweeted, shared and reshared, blogged about and reposted, misinformation magnifies. “Fifteen years ago, and before Web 2.0, this information was blurry and difficult to start with,” said Stephen Caldes, a Chico State journalism professor who teaches online media literacy. “Digital media, and social media specifically, has probably made this even more of a cluster.” The extent to which internet distribution clouds health information got some quantification last week with the release of—shock!—a study that got covered in articles online.

Health Feedback, a group of international scientists who assess the credibility of health coverage from major media organizations, reviewed for accuracy the articles from last year that most engaged people on social media; that is, drew high totals of likes, shares and comments. Among the top 10, only three proved highly credible. Four had scientific accuracy but misleading elements, and the remaining three had major inaccuracies. Extended to the top 100, the scientists determined 45 percent to be highly credible and 35 percent highly inaccurate. Health Feedback conducted the study— titled “The Most Popular Health Articles of 2018, a Scientific Credibility Review,” out Feb. 4—in collaboration with an interdisciplinary media literacy group, the Credibility Coalition. They focused on articles about health and wellness as opposed to policy and politics. Their findings surprised neither Lewis nor Caldes. Both pointed to sensational headlines and head-spinning research results, sometimes in direct contradiction to previous reports. The No. 1 social media story last year had as its headline “Federal Study Finds Marijuana 100X Less Toxic Than Alcohol, Safer Than Tobacco”—courtesy of urhealthguide.com (now apparently defunct). The review found this article highly suspect. “Part of the scientific method, we never rely solely on one study,” Lewis said. “Studies have to be replicated. When there’s some new breakthrough—one study—it gets people’s attention, we’re interested, but [in medicine or public health] we’re not going to make changes until that study is replicated in a different institution by different people and the findings are consistent.” Caldes noted a seesaw phenomenon: “Eggs have gone through ‘they’re good for

you, they’re bad for you’; avocado, ‘it’s high in cholesterol, oh but it’s the good type of cholesterol’… “With health and wellness and fitness and diet, that information is so fickle.” Distinct from outright inaccuracy, Health

Feedback delineated as credibility impacts such issues as lack of detail, absence of context, misinterpretation of findings and overstatement of significance. The study authors wrote, “This illustrates the need for journalists to go beyond simply accurately describing results and research in health news.” Caldes feels readers also need to take extra steps. “A well-meaning reporter can still make mistakes,” he said, “and half the articles we’re reading online are by citizen journalists or amateur journalists who are not working with an editorial board, haven’t been trained. So I want to put a lot of the effort on the consumer themselves. It’s your job to check the information; it’s your job to look into this further if it’s piqued your interest.” Familiarity with the source of the material can serve as a good gauge of its accuracy. Lewis sticks to sites for institutions she considers reputable. Her go-to resources are the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and California Department of Public Health. She also trusts research hospitals such as the Mayo Clinic, Harvard and Johns Hopkins. In an article, look for hyperlinks. If they connect to the original study, or a report on it from the researchers’ university, check that out. If links lead to a rabbit hole of rehashes, Caldes said, that’s a red flag. “We’re now a nation of secondary sources,” he said. “We’re talking about articles HEALTHLINES C O N T I N U E D

O N PA G E 1 5

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that are using articles as their source material, rather than looking at studies, looking at statistics, looking at information from peerreviewed journals. “People can come up with questions on [the validity of] anything,” Caldes noted. “If something takes you to the CDC, I give that a certain amount of weight—or a Pew Research study, or a study coming out of Stanford. Could there be problems with it? Sure. But it’s not coming from these organizations that are just scouring the internet and writing things.” Caldes considers Facebook, in particular, “a dumpster fire” of online info-sharing. While he found value in it during the Camp Fire aftermath, with immediate updates and connections to aid, “that was the first bright light I’ve seen in social media in a while.” His recommendation: “Do not use Facebook to get your news and information. If you post and share,

c o n t i n u e d F r o m pa g e 1 2

Primary source:

go to tinyurl.com/healthcred to find Health Feedback’s report on its credibility review.

you are part of the problem— you’re just spreading information that was interesting to you that you didn’t do enough work to fully evaluate, but you’re willing to pass that on.” Lewis, too, sees certain lines of value in the social media sphere. She suggested Twitter feeds from the county public health department and other reputable sources as ways to stay informed. Yet, she well understands the double-edged sword that unsheathes. “It’s all in the way you use it,” she said of social media. As she tells her students, when going online, “there’s a wealth of information available. It’s a remarkable resource. Like any tool, you have to use it wisely.” Ω

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GREENWAYS

Recovering naturally

Matthew Trumm shows a spot in Butte Creek Canyon where bamboo acted as a fire break.

Permaculture project greens Camp Fire recovery story and photo by

Evan Tuchinsky

evantuc hin sk y @ n ewsr ev i ew. com

Ostill,fromMatthew overnight rain and the air chilled but Trumm surveyed a straightn a recent morning, the ground still wet

away of Honey Run Road. The Camp Fire had whipped through this part of Butte Creek Canyonthree months earlier; some houses burned, others remained. Trumm, a local designer certified in the ecological principles of permaculture, strode toward a property fronted by bamboo, where he’d met the owner previously. Several clusters stood tall—some rods green, some tan, some yellower; none singed. Back and to the side, heat-mangled metal lay piled amid the remnants of a home. Through the canyon, throughout the Ridge and Concow areas, Trumm has seen such juxtapositions of survival and destruction. He can cite a reason in cases like this: Bamboo is naturally flame-resistant, so stalks planted in rows can act like a fire break. Indeed, a neighboring structure with a wood fence behind a wall of bamboo appeared untouched. So, as residents in Butte County’s burn zones recover, he firmly believes in environmentally rooted solutions. “It’s so important if we’re going to rebuild these areas that we give everybody all the tools that are available to them,” Trumm said. Toward that end, he’s spearheading the Camp Fire Restoration Project, an effort to help private property owners and public agencies apply permaculture to restoring damaged lands. Trumm—who’s based in Berry Creek with a business, Treetop Permaculture, in Oroville—has prominent environmentalists on board, including soil biologist Elaine Ingham. The Soil Foodweb School, an agricultural cooperative she pioneered, confirmed Ingham’s involvement, replying to the CN&R that she’s “definitely endorsing” the project and “giving some advice,” though “her direct

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involvement on the ground is pending.” The endeavor itself is in its infancy. Ultimately, Trumm envisions experts such as Ingham and permaculturist Penny LivingstonStark, of the Regenerative Design Institute in Bolinas, training local citizens and public officials—first in classrooms, then at a base camp built in a burn area. Organizers would deliver the resources required to restore the landscape

“It’s so important if we’re going to rebuild these areas that we give everybody all the tools that are available to them.”

—Matthew Trumm

in a sustainable way, such as seed, biochar, mushroom spawn and trees. Construction and supplies cost money, of course. The Camp Fire Restoration Project launched a GoFundMe campaign Nov. 13, five days after the fire, to raise $100,000; as of early February, 53 people had contributed a total of $3,225. Nonetheless, Trumm and his group have embarked on phase one: setting up Get connected:

For more about the Camp Fire Restoration Project, visit Treetop Permaculture’s Facebook page (@ttpermaculture), which includes links to events and a project group page.

three staging areas for deploying restoration materials and helping residents on properties. The staging areas, each around a quarter acre, are in Butte Creek Canyon, Paradise and the Concow/Yankee Hill area. Teams currently are distributing waddles (for erosion-control fencing), straw bales (gardening) and wood chips (ground cover); Trumm hopes the offerings expand when supplies get replenished. “Creating the model is the most important thing with all this,” he said. “I tell everyone, ‘We’re late to the party.’ We’re coming in on the back end—we’re scrambling to try to get things done here…. “We’re basically calling for this area to be a hub, a melting pot, for all of the world’s technologies in sustainable design and ways to think about rebuilding in a way where we’re rebuilding with nature and the climatic realities we have.” Permaculture centers on designing with ecosys-

tems in mind. Practitioners—another locally is Rosa Maicas, founder of the Permafunk Institute in Chico—incorporate features that mimic natural systems. (See “Integrated living,” Greenways, March 15, 2015.) Trumm pointed to fire safety, food security, water supply and climate as four major considerations in planning a wildfire rebuild. In permaculture design, those translate to— among other things—natural fire breaks, plant selection, irrigation and shade. Trumm’s interest transcends land restoration, even if that’s a considerable focus of the Camp Fire Restoration Project. He’s invited Miguel Elliott from Living Earth Structures in Petaluma, specializing in cob and adobe construction, to visit and discuss ideas for the

local rebuild. Cob building combines clay and straw into a plaster that becomes a ceramic when exposed to high heat. “I would welcome a fire for one of my houses,” Elliott said by phone. “Some people intentionally burn their [cob] homes to make them stronger.” Coating wood with the earthen material is another option for fire resistance. Elliott plans to demonstrate his techniques locally at a workshop in August. For this and other sessions, Trumm hopes to secure classroom space at Butte College. “Our biggest thing,” Trumm said, “[is] we’re looking at alternative, sustainable design models for homes.” Whatever the choice, he hopes it’s made with ecology in mind. Trumm has a detailed explanation of the cause of California’s wildfire epidemic: Boiled down, it’s that we’ve separated animals—fuel-reducing grazers, but also ourselves—from traditional interactions with the wild environment. “We’ve been able to tidy up the world to a point where we don’t feel [as if] we’re a part of nature,” he said. “Unfortunately, we stay so disconnected most of our lives that we live in that comfort zone, we become compartmentalized from it. “But it’s events like this that wake us up, [show] that nature is right there and if we don’t start thinking about how to design ourselves into nature, she’s going to come with a fury.” Ω

ECO EVENT Water foul Hey! Want to go hang out at the sewage treatment plant? That might not top your list of weekend activities, but if you’re interested in seeing a huge variety of winter waterfowl and resident birds close to home, Altacal Audubon has the spot. You’ll get an up-close view of an amazing avian array during the easy, 2-mile walk, led by birding experts on Sunday morning (Feb. 17) at the Chico Oxidation Ponds Wildlife Sanctuary. Reservations are required at either findforster@yahoo.com or (619) 347-2269. The trip is offered in conjunction with the e-Birder program Monday night (Feb. 18) at the Chico Creek Nature Center.


EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS PHOTO BY VIC CANTU

15 MINUTES

THE GOODS

Treasure trove

Dressed to impress

One of the few businesses in Paradise to survive the Camp Fire was Mary Nieland’s Attic Treasures Antique Mall. It was also fortunate for many other local entrepreneurs, as her two-story complex on the Skyway houses wares from dozens of dealers, each in their own booth. Nieland, 68, was born and raised in Paradise, and opened Attic Treasures 23 years ago. She says since reopening after the fire, many customers have visited her store as a kind of therapy to reassure themselves that at least parts of what they remember of Paradise remain. Visit Attic Treasures at 7409 Skyway, WednesdaySunday, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. You can also find it on Facebook or call 876-1541 for more info.

Chico may have bid farewell to most of its department stores over the past decade, and it’s a bummer that we’ve never been able to attract a big name like Macy’s, but I’ve honestly never known this town to be overly concerned with brand names. That’s a good thing. Chico has always felt more individual than the larger metropolises I’ve called home. That’s because we have variety—we do have Old Navy and American Eagle Outfitters but also a bunch of cool locally owned shops with hand-picked threads. And we’re soon to have a cool new chain store: Tilly’s. When Aaron Brothers closed its Chico store last summer, it left a void in the shopping center anchored by Best Buy. It will be vacant no more. I was admittedly unfamiliar with Tilly’s when a co-worker alerted me to its impending arrival. But upon a little research, I understood her excitement. Tilly’s focuses on California style, mostly for younger people—teenagers and young adults—and features brands like O’Neill, Rip Curl, and Roxy. I look forward to checking it out.

How did Attic Treasures escape destruction? Well, our patio and a corner of the roof caught fire, but otherwise we did good. Mostly because there were two fire trucks parked right next door at the Paradise Skilled Nursing Home during the fire. It’s a convalescent home that I think the fire department really wanted to save, but unfortunately it burned down.

What kind of things are people buying most? Mostly household items, since we are one of the only places in town to sell them. Things like dishes, cooking utensils and small furniture. Also many people want arts and crafts supplies for something healing to do while they sit in their trailers, often with no TV or internet.

Did your home survive? Yes, because three days before the fire, I felt an internal warning that a fire was coming, so I

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soaked my grounds those three days with sprinklers and a garden hose. The morning of the fire, I saw it in the distance and placed my sprinklers on the roof, full blast. Mine was one of only three homes in my 22-house neighborhood to survive. Afterward, I heard from several people that they also felt something inexplicable was coming which they needed to prepare for. The difference is, I listened and acted on it. If you get messages out of the blue persistently, you need to listen.

How did you escape the fire? It was harrowing. My dog and I were stuck in my truck in Skyway traffic for 2 1/2 hours before Cal Fire officials told us to get out and run to where a bus was waiting at Walgreens. We were picked up by a random Filipino family and made it to Chico OK.

Did you lose many dealers because of the fire? Seven had to move, but we still have 30, and will add four more soon. We are one of the only antique stores left in Paradise, but I’d rather have my town back. —VIC CANTU

FOOD NEWS For anyone living in east Oroville or the foothills of Concow and Yankee Hill—or anyone who likes a good motorcycle ride—Scooters Cafe is a household name. It’s been a local favorite for decades, a fun place to gather over a good burger and pint of beer. The cafe survived the fire, owner Dan Salmon recently finished treatment for prostate cancer (congrats!), and he and wife Bonnie are ready to reopen. The Salmons recently announced on KRCR—and subsequently on the Scooters Facebook page—that they’re scaling back a bit, going back to a mom-and-pop operation. They expect to be open by Feb. 27, but are awaiting their alcohol license and a new phone hookup from AT&T before doing so. Scooter’s is located at 11975 State Highway 70; find it on Facebook for updates.

NEW DRINKIN’ SPOT Chico certainly isn’t hurting for places to throw one back, but

maybe that’s why the newest spots offer a little je ne sais quoi, a little something extra. Leave it to the James family to do it right. I actually haven’t made it over to Strong Water just yet and they’re keeping pretty mum on details, other than it focuses on “hand-crafted classic cocktails,” but I hear it’s pretty rad. Nestled in among the family’s Wine Time and Lost Dutchman Taproom drinking spots, I can’t imagine it’s not. Expect an update soon!

HAPPY V-DAY! I would be remiss to overlook the fact that this issue comes out on Valentine’s Day. Last week’s cover story, featuring sexy local dishes, was so much fun it really got me excited about food (but when am I not, really?). If you missed it, check out “Passion plates,” Feb. 7. It’s worth it, I swear.

Disability

Support Group

Are you interested in joining a support group for people living with disabilities? Please come check out our new disability support group! nd WHEN: 2Every otherof Monday, 2:30-4:00 Monday each month, 2:30pm-4pm, 4th Wednesday of each month, 10:30am-12pm

1209 Esplanade Ste 1 530.342.2895 • AmericanChi.net Mon & Thur 10am-6pm • Tues & Wed 9am-6pm Friday 9am-2pm • Sunday Noon- 4pm

meredithc@newsreview.com

MORE CLOTHING Chico isn’t the only one preparing for a new clothing store in town. Oroville’s Ross Dress For Less is poised to open any day. I drove by earlier this week and saw the huge “opening soon” sign above the door, and the internet tells me they’re hiring. Good stuff!

How has business been since the Camp Fire? It’s been very good. About half of our large clientele live in Paradise, and half come from surrounding towns to make sure we’re OK and support a Paradise business. Many locals say walking around inside here helps their mental health and has a healing effect on them.

by

Meredith J. Cooper

WHERE: Disability Action Center office, Formerly ILSNC 1161 East Ave, Chico 95926 QUESTIONS? Contact ContactSandra Anna Morales at 893-8527 or at 893-8527 x 104 anna.smith@ILSNC.org or sandra@actionctr.org

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>>>>>>>>> Caring enterprise I

t’s been three months since the Camp Fire was sparked in rural Butte County, but we all know it’s going to take years, perhaps even decades, for our region to heal from the most destructive wildfire in state history. The road ahead is indeed long and complex, fraught with many challenges. Here at the CN&R, we’re committed to telling the stories about those efforts, helping our readers with the journey ahead. That includes those about difficulties and loss, as well as kindness and generosity—and especially when those elements combine. Such is the case with this week’s cover package, our Business Issue. For this special annual look at the local business community, it seemed only fitting that we share some of the remarkable ways companies have cared for employees affected by the devastating blaze. They range from impressive fundraisers and donations to the literal creation of a small community. Of course, there are hundreds of examples around the region of businesses going above and beyond. Since we can’t write about all of them, readers are invited to share their examples via letter to the editor. Happy reading and writing!

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Write a letter:

Want to share the ways a local employer has gone above and beyond in response to the Camp Fire? Send the CN&r a letter to the editor of up to 200 words to cnrletters@newsreview.com. Letters must include the author’s name and city of residence.

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February 14, 2019

Difficult adjustment Collision Pros steps up after Paradise T shop, employees’ homes burn

he morning of Nov. 8, Tamora Parr Lay was already at work at Collision Pros in Chico when news of the Camp Fire and the possibility of evacuations on the Ridge hit. Her husband was still at their home in Paradise and was able to grab only a few essentials before driving through the firestorm to safety.


>>>>>>> Brian Von Tress, owner of Collision Pros, says all his Paradise employees continued work in other branches after the Camp Fire. He’s pictured here (third from left) at the Chico shop with employees affected by the fire. PHOTOS BY MICHELLE CAMY

“Right away, my bosses got together and sent us food, clothes and supplies,” Parr Lay said last week by phone. “They understood the urgency of the situation. I lost everything but the clothes on my back, and within a day or two, I had shoes and shirts and pants. “I’m so grateful. I don’t even know how to thank them.” Parr Lay wasn’t the only one in the Collision Pros family to be affected by the Camp Fire. Seven of her coworkers lost their homes as well, and the company itself lost its Paradise shop. Owner Brian Von Tress remembers the morning the blaze swept through Paradise well. His team there was forced to evacuate; it was days

before any information got through as to the fate of the shop. “We eventually found out we lost the business,” Von Tress told the CN&R. “We guaranteed everyone [from the Paradise shop] that we’d continue payroll as long as we could—we covered the first month— and ended up eventually employing everyone in the [other locations] since then.” Von Tress opened the first Collision

Pros in Auburn in 2013, though he’s “been doing this forever and ever and ever.” Since Auburn, he’s acquired shops in Chico, Paradise, Woodland and, most recently, Red Bluff. “I worked for bigger corporations and didn’t like the direction they were going; I wanted to be closer to the customer,” Von Tress said. “My business plan is to come into smaller towns and offer some of the later technology, equipment, training and sophistication that the bigger corporations have.” The closeness he hopes to foster with his customers translates into the workplace—his employees are more like family than means to an end. This was immediately apparent to Parr Lay after the fire. Right away, employees who’d lived on the Ridge were given $500 “to meet immediate needs,” Von ADJUSTMENT C O N T I N U E D

Tamora Parr Lay was already at work at Collision Pros in Chico when the fire hit her home in Paradise. A GoFundMe account gathered $37,000 for her and seven of her co-workers who lost their homes.

O N PA G E 2 0

“We guaranteed everyone [from the Paradise shop] that we’d continue payroll as long as we could—we covered the first month—and ended up eventually employing everyone in the [other locations] since then.”

52 Locally Made

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Green Friendly

Gaumer’s Jewerly Gaumer’s Jewelry started out as an old-time classic rock shop founded by a family of rockhounds and gold miners. In the 52 years since, Gaumer’s has evolved to include jewelry and jewelry services; rocks, minerals and fossils; and a mining and mineral museum to share with the public. Current owner Bill Gaumer is the third generation of the founding Guamer family to head up the business. Gaumer’s knowledgeable staff is honest and passionate about the beauty, quality and workmanship of the jewelry they make, and the jewelry they repair and restore for others. They have an artful eye for design, and they can create custom designs using their stones or stones customers bring in. Gaumer’s has

three jewelers, allowing them to do their work in-house. Gaumer’s carries a great selection of fine gold and silver jewelry, original hand-crafted jewelry, semiprecious and precious stones, lapidary equipment and jewelry-making supplies. The giftware portion of the business offers books, coasters, vases, unique decorative items and beautiful hand-crafted jewelry boxes. Come in and see this treasure in your community.

78 Belle Mill Road | Red Bluff | 530.527.6166 | www.gaumers.com

50 Locally Made

Years in Business

Chico Paper Company Eric Metcalf started his career as a custom framer in 2000. He worked hard to perfect his craft, and when he got the opportunity to buy Chico Paper Company a few years ago, he and Jessica Capen jumped on it! “I love the sentiment of custom framing,” Eric said. “The variety of items our clients provide us to frame is ever-changing and every one has its own unique story. We get to become a part of that story in making a permanent, archival home for it to be enjoyed for generations.”

of designers and custom framers love to make their clients feel comfortable and confident in their gallery. Buying and framing art doesn’t have to be an intimidating experience. Chico Paper Company’s staff spend a lot of time educating the public about different styles of art and the way each artist chooses to make it. Everyone’s taste is different; art is like wine: if you like it, drink it!

Chico Paper Company is a visual dessert: a feast for the eyes. They carry the largest selection of local art in the north state as well as gift items and cards. Eric, Jessica, and their talented crew

—Brian Von Tress

345 Broadway | Chico | 530.891.0900 | www.chicopapercompany.com F E BF Re bU rA uR aY r1y4 ,1 42 ,0 1290 1 9

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Pivot Charter School Pivot Charter School, North Valley is a public charter school serving students in Grades 6 – 12. They provide a blended learning program using an online curriculum coupled with classes and teacher support in a safe, caring environment. Schoolwork can be completed anywhere there is an internet connection, and the site in Chico is open daily for students who need one-onone and small group tutoring, hands-on project experience or social interaction. The school also offers field trips for education and socialization outside the classroom, as well as clubs like drone coding, music and art.

Pivot is doing in the community. She has worked in education for 30 years, and understands that while every child is capable of learning, not every child learns the same way. Pivot is providing an alternative for students who need to learn a little differently, and she finds great joy in watching a student who previously struggled in school find success at Pivot.

Executive Director Jayna Gaskell is passionate about education and very proud of the work

1350 E 9th St #150 | Chico | 530.636.4479 | www.pivotnorthvalley.com Tress said. Co-workers stepped up and took over shifts so she could take care of paperwork; the company paid her salary no questions asked. Von Tress launched a GoFundMe drive, which raised $37,000. Most of the donors, he said, were friends of his and vendors that do business with Collision Pros. That money was distributed to those affected, based on the level of loss. “I didn’t have to worry about my paycheck or my job,” Parr Lay said. “They told me, ‘We’ve got your back.’ I’ve never had that at a job before. They really care about people here.” Parr Lay had worked for Classic

25 Years in Business

Climent Construction Owner Chuck Climent

A good contractor is always busy. That ís why Chuck of Climent Construction has been working tirelessly since 1994. He started a local family run business, just like most people as a side job to pay the bills. After discovering his talent and newfound passion he strove to make it on his own. That feeling of finishing a project with an overwhelming sense of accomplishment is all Chuck needs to make sure every project is at its best. Every new project has its details and has needed personal touches that really show when the work is finished.

Chuck does not do shortcuts in his work, shorcuts show up in the long run. That’s why he brought along great craftsman, like John and Jerry, in order to make every house a home. Chuck has been constantly searching for new ways of improving homes and loves the ever-changing dynamic of home life. He is an expert from new smart home features like automatic skylights to gorgeous whole home restorations.

530.370.5086 | License #998460 | 20

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ClimentConstruction

“I didn’t have to worry about my paycheck or my job. They told me, ‘We’ve got your back.’ I’ve never had that at a job before. They really care about people here.” —Tamora Parr Lay

The Collision Pros shop in Paradise was among the casualties of the Camp Fire. A new space is expected to be open on the Ridge within a few months. PHOTO COURTESY OF BRIAN VON TRESS

Auto Body in Paradise for a decade before Von Tress bought it two years ago. He kept her on—she’s a claims adjuster—in the Chico office. As for business on the Ridge, Von Tress understands it might be slow for the foreseeable future—maybe in five years that shop will once again see the sales it saw pre-Camp Fire. Nevertheless, he is determined to maintain a presence there. He signed a lease on a new building on Pearson Road last week; he expects the shop will be up and running by May. “I’ll probably have a hard time staffing it,” he said of the Paradise shop. “One guy left us to go to work for hazardous-waste cleanup. Another gal lost her child care …. I’m just going to have to figure that out for a while. “We don’t mind losing a little bit,” he added, “because we want to be back in the community, to support the community.” —MEREDITH J. COOPER me r e d i th c @ newsr ev iew.c o m

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Green Friendly

Lewis Johnson

Reiko & Nabe Watanabe

Owner

Owners

Both Big Tuna and Izakaya Ichaban are locally owned and operated. Owners Reiko and Nabe attribute the success to three things; Fresh fish, trained Japanese sushi chefs, and a friendly & knowledgeable staff. Combine these three with a comfortable eating atmosphere and an awesome dining experience is guaranteed!

Izakaya Ichaban opened in 2012. It’s located just off 20th Street east of Best Buy. Their newly expanded dining room is beautifully decorated and designed to make you feel like you’re dining in Japan. Their motto, “To be any fresher you would have to catch it yourself” is exemplified in every piece of fish they serve.

In 2008 Big Tuna Sushi Bistro opened to high praise, being voted Best New Restaurant by CN&R readers. You’ll find a fabulous traditional Japanese menu, fresh sushi and new specialty plates constantly. When you walk in the door you’ll be greeted with a comfortable Bistro atmosphere.

Stop by either restaurant for lunch or Dinner. Arrigato.

BIG TUNA IZAKAYA ICHIBAN

Big Tuna | 1722 Mangrove | 530.345.4571 Izakaya Ichaban | 2000 Notre Dame Blvd. Suite 100 | 530.342.8500

Butte View Olive Co. and Stella Cadente, two wildly popular olive oil labels that serve cooks across the nation, are produced right here in Oroville by Lewis Johnson and his family. It all began in 1935, when Johnson’s grandfather first began farming the 150 acres of olive trees that they still have today. In 1999 Johnson produced the first bottle of Butte View olive oil after three years of fine-tuning his process. Today, Butte View produces a wide variety of extra virgin olive oils infused with flavors including: jalapeño, garlic, basil, lemon, lime, blood orange and rosemary. These pure, light and delicate hand crafted oils provide wonderful aromas and distinctive accents to any dish

making them truly unique and excellent – just one more reason why these olive oils are “Gold” and “Best of Class” medal winners. Mr. Johnson welcomes you to come experience California sunshine in a bottle! Available in Chico at Maisie Jane’s, Made in Chico, and S&S Produce, in Oroville at Collins & Denny Market, and Wagon Wheel Market, in 250ml and 500ml bottles.

2950 Louis Ave | Oroville | 530.534.8320 | www.butteview.com

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9 Years in Business

Locally Made

Years in Business

Teresa Larson

Chico’s Premier Property Management Company Blue Oak Property Management is a full service residential property management company that has deep roots in the Chico community. Owners Michael Roth, Cameron Goehring, and Chris Herbert, lead their team of experienced real estate professionals in helping many small business owners and property investors. The majority of their team are graduates of Chico State and all are dedicated to making our community a better place to live.

Years in Business

Realtor Double Centurian to inspections, bill paying and keeping up with California tenant laws, the amount of time spent managing your own property can be exhausting to say the least. These services Blue Oak provides take all of this off of your hands making life a whole lot easier. BRE # 01882206

Blue Oak is small enough to provide hands-on customer service but large enough to meet all your management needs. They understand that owning and managing your investment properties is time and labor intensive. From late night maintenance calls, showings and lease signings

530.636.2627 | www.blueoakchico.com

We all have experienced first hand or known someone that was drastically affected by the Camp Fire. It has been an experience that no one would ever have thought could happen to this degree of devastation. My heart goes out to all. Since November 8th, I had been able to assist people in their home searches and as difficult as it has been for them, it has also been rewarding to be able to see that these folks feel blessed to be able to start anew.

us how family, friends and strangers can pull together and build a community again. I have been a full time Realtor for 25 + years in Chico, born and raised with 4 generations and I am proud of the people of Chico that welcomed so many into their home, lives and community. May 2019 be a year of new beginnings, friendship, and community for everyone.

This experience makes us all realize how fast things can change in one’s lives. It also shows

1101 El Monte Ave. | Chico | 530.514.5925 | www.chicolistings.com February 14, 2019

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>>>>>>>>>>>>> Creating community

FIFTH SUN FOUNDER COLLABORATES WITH BUSINESS COLLEAGUES TO BUILD TEMPORARY EMPLOYEE HOUSING

S

ean McAndrew lights up when talking about Butte Creek Canyon. He moved from the Bay Area to the bucolic creekside community nine years ago, settling into his dream home along Honey Run Road about a mile from the historic covered bridge. Among the highlights of life in the canyon: the views of the surrounding ridge, the barbecues with friendly neighbors, and the wildlife he’d watch while sitting in his front yard in the evenings. Like so many others who lived there, McAndrew lost his home to the Camp Fire and has had to endure the trauma of being uprooted. He’s spent the last three months adapting to life on the other side of the disaster—a process that has not been easy, especially in the beginning. “The early stages of this were so hellish, because you’d wake up every morning and you’d think that it was a bad dream,” he said. “And then you’d realize you weren’t in your bed—every morning, day after day—and realAbove: Dan Gonzales said crews worked day and night to get the RV park up to code as soon as possible. PHOTOS BY MELISSA DAUGHERTY

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ize it wasn’t a bad dream.” McAndrew initially crashed with a friend, but he needed to find a place for an extended stay. The problem, of course, was that thousands of others were in the same position. Chico’s rental vacancy rate was about 3 percent the month before the Camp Fire, and that inventory was snatched up quickly. The dearth of housing is among the top crises playing out locally in the wake of the fire. It’s a factor that has prompted many displaced residents to flee the county—in some cases, even the state—in search of stability. McAndrew didn’t know it during the first

days after the fire, but help was on the way. Dan Gonzales, owner of Chico-based apparel manufacturing company Fifth Sun, where McAndrew works in sales, had come up with a plan to provide a safety net for employees in need. Gonzales is also the developer of Meriam Park, a mixed-use community west of Bruce Road best known as the location of the new Butte County Superior

Courthouse. Construction is well underway at the 270-acre site, but open land remains and Gonzales saw an opportunity to quickly put emergency housing into place on a parcel slated for the future development of single-family homes. “The idea is to provide them a place of immediate shelter so they can get

“If someone was detrimentally impacted, and they don’t have a place to stay, that is a real concern, because we don’t want them fleeing somewhere else and losing the amazing talent we have here.” –Chico City Manager Mark Orme

grounded and figure out what they’re going to do,” he told the CN&R back in late November, as work crews raced to prepare the site. Gonzales noted that the project is a collaboration between Fifth Sun, Meriam Park and Sierra Nevada Brewing Co.— whose founder, Ken Grossman, owns the majority of the property—to house employees from each of those companies, plus other folks from the community, in what is essentially an RV campground. Gonzales has taken to calling it Meriam Park Commons. The site may have been vacant, but it wasn’t exactly a snap getting it prepped. It meant putting in water, power and sewer connections for each of the spaces—about 50 altogether—as well as the required road base. Given the pressing need, and despite the workload, the effort came together exceedingly fast. “In seven days, we had a functional trailer park,” said Gonzales, adding that everything is to code and all the spaces spoken for. COMMUNITY C O N T I N U E D

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9

10 Years in Business

Years in Business

Green Friendly

Chris Hostettler

Susan Hearne Attorney at Law

Before Susan Hearne was an attorney, she served 25 years as a peace officer for the State of California. She worked for Riverside CA Probation Department and taught college for 15 years. Time and again she has helped families, students, & professionals with criminal charges. In the months following the Camp Fire, Susan has experienced a shift in the types of cases crossing her desk. Many residents on the ridge lost their homes and some were put in untenable living situations. The loss of home, neighborhood, and jobs, resulted in a great emotional and financial loss.

Owner In an unfortunate perfect storm of events some are now dealing with the aftermath of the fire’s destruction. People, with legal history or not, are finding themselves in precarious legal situations as a byproduct. We’re here to help with criminal defense issues. If you are in need, Ms. Hearne and her team will be there for you.

Chris Hostettler, owner of Chico Grocery Outlet, was born and raised in Chico. He graduated from the same high school where his father taught for over 30 years and worked his way through college bagging groceries at the local Albertsons’. ]What Chirs would most like you to know about his store is that it carries a huge selection of organic products. Look for the NOSH (Natural, Organic, Specialty, Healthy) logo throughout the store for natural organic foods. You’ll find 40-50% OFF the same organic products other stores carry.

and often the vegetables and meat are locally sourced. All at prices that will beat other grocery stores handily. Much of the stock is “opportunistic”, meaning great deals on brand name items disappear as quickly as they come. So it’s best to shop often. There is always something new to be found but the great service with a smile never changes!

chico

You’ll also find healthy products such as protein powders and power bars, Humboldt organic milk,

(530) 580-8529 | www.norcalcriminallaw.com | 2068 Talbert Dr #300

2157 Pillsbury Rd | Chico | 530.345.2666

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Locally Made

Brittany Winchester Realtor/Salesperson

Teresa E Smith Realtor/Broker

Teresa Smith has worked in the real estate industry for over 16 years. She grew up in the Northstate, which has aided her in connecting with and effectively guiding her clients through an everchanging market. Teresa loves driving through the tri-county area, admiring the scenery of all the places she visits. She has met many people in her 15 years as a realtor and is forever grateful for the relationships she’s built and the memories she’s experienced.

Brittany Winchester, Teresa’s assistant and a licensed agent, started working with Teresa at the young age of 18. Teresa’s passion for helping people with their real estate needs inspired Brittany to do the same. She is a major contributor to the evolution of 1st Choice Realty and helps with every transaction, either as a representing agent or trasaction coordinator. “We work as a a team to ensure every client is handled with the utmost care and attention.”

Spending the last year as a new grandmother has been eye opening and heartwarming. With each visit with her grandchildren Teresa is reminded of the importance of family. Her greatest joy is cherishing all the laughs and fun times she’s spent with them.

1607 Solano St | Corning | 530.824.4101 | www.1st-choicerealty.net DRE #01500355

Years in Business

Celestino Gencarelli & Enzo Perri Owners

The boy’s from Jersey had a simple plan...make the best authentic New York thin-crust pizza for the people of Chico. They did, and on April Fool’s Day in 1997 Celestino’s Pizza opened for business. Luckily for Chicoans it was no April Fools Joke. There’s a reason they’ve been voted # 1 BEST Pizza in Chico by CN&R readers 15 years! The recipes are authentic and time-tested. Favorites include fresh salads, salad/slice combo, chicken parmigiana hot sandwichs, homemade lasagna, calzones, and of course spaghetti with Meatballs.

Dine-in, take-out, order by phone or online at CelestinosNYpizza.com Planning an event? Call ahead and your food will be ready for pick-up or delivered to you. Open everyday from 10:30am-10pm. Pick It Up - Fold It - Eat It...That’s the NY Way!

101 Salem St | Chico | 530.896.1234 | celestinosnypizza.com February 14, 2019

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Years in Business

KCHO/North State Public Radio

Oroville Adult Education Center

Locally Made

Phil Wilke arrived in Chico after one fire and before another, and the Carr and Camp fires affect what he does every day. Wilke, the new General Manager of North State Public Radio, 91.7 FM, took over the station just after the Carr Fire burned down the network’s transmitter in Redding and two months before the Camp Fire devastated Butte County. Since then, the Redding transmitter has been brought back online and the station’s coverage of the Camp Fire – including their weekly, 30-minute show “After Paradise”, airing 6:30 p.m. Thursdays – have gained national attention. “After Paradise” is dedicated to post-fire recovery information.

Photo Credit: Jason Halley/CSU Chico

Wilke directs a staff of 10 and a dozen independent producers and on-air volunteers. NSPR is a member of National Public Radio, broadcasting their signature news shows “Morning Edition” and “All Things Considered”, as well as interviews on “Fresh Air”; locally hosted classical music and jazz; locally hosted author interviews, gardening, travel and science shows; and nationally syndicated music, news and entertainment shows. Listeners can tune in online at mynspr.org.

35 Main Street #101 | Chico | 530.898.5896 | www.mynspr.org

Oroville Adult Education Center has been providing educational programs for adults in Butte County since 1924. The two locations in Oroville and Chico have a variety of offerings for adults wanting to further their education or training.  Oroville Adult offers high school diploma and high school equivalency exam (HiSet), English as a Second Language and Citizenship, career training programs and community education classes.  The Career Training programs include Certified Nurse Assistant (CNA), Emergency Medical Technician (EMT), EKG Technician, Medical Billing and Coding (online), Business Office Technology Academy, and Business Leadership courses.  Oroville Adult also partners with Butte

2750 Mitchell Ave | Oroville | 3760 Morrow Lane #C | Chico 530.538.5350 | www.orovilleadulted.com

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Years in Business

Locally Made

Nick Andrew Kevin Riley Mike Wear

Franky’s offers a diverse wine selection and a full bar that is unrivaled in the North State. Franky’s bartenders are renowned for their knowledge of cocktail preparation, and chef Cordy has been keeping the kitchen running for over 20 years.

Owner and Manager

caesar salad, fresh-tossed pizzas and so much more. With deals for students and families too, there is always a meal to satisfy everyone at Franky’s. Franky’s is the perfect choice for dates, Friday business lunches, family dinners, birthdays, or whatever the occasion may be! Get together and enjoy friends, family and fine food and drink at Franky’s. A little bit of Italy, hidden right here in Chico! Wine down, Eat up, and Raise Your Spirits!

The menu offers a variety of fresh-made pasta,

506 Ivy St. | Chico | Take-out: 530.898.9947 | Reservations: 530.898.9948 www.frankyschico.com 24

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Years in Business

Caleb Klungtvet

Owners

Now celebrating 26 years, Franky’s was originally built with “family” in mind. Nick Andrew and Kevin Riley started Franky’s back in1992 with the concept of a casual and friendly “Cheers” type atmosphere in a restaurant setting. Nick’s two sons, and all of their friends grew up at the restaurant. Today, Franky’s is still a family oriented restaurant as well as a great spot for a date night.

County Career Tech in offering other training programs in the medical and dental fields.   Some of our most popular courses are the community education courses for adults that want to learn a new hobby or improve their technology skills.  There are classes in computers, tablets and smartphones, healthy life options, and arts and crafts each semester.    Please check www. orovilleadulted.com or call the office at 530538-5350 for more information.

Established in 1973, Art Etc. has been a downtown area business known for their knowledge and expertise of art and artists, especially local ones. 6 months ago, Caleb Klungtvet and family took over the well-known shop. Klungtvet, having 10 years experience in multiple frame shops and a degree in art, made him and his family of artists the perfect choice for continuing on the Art Etc. legacy.

framer, Michelle Garrison, what makes Klungtvet proud in their on-site computerized mat cutter, which keeps the product consistent and saves time in production. This all means quicker turnaround times for their customers. So, if you are looking for a custom frame shop that provides you with endless options for preserving your most valued possessions, check out Art Etc. and Frame What You Love!

“I just enjoy being around art and talking to an interesting and eclectic group of people. I know it’s cliché, but I just like to make people happy,” said Klungtvet. In addition to their diverse collection of art prints and having an extremely knowledgeable

256 East First Street | Chico | 530.895.1161 | artinchico.com


99 Locally Made

1

Years in Business

Locally Made

Square Deal Mattress Factory

Chef James Rosenbalm

2 nd Generation Lois Lash, 4 th Generation Jessica Lash & Jamie Anderson & 3 rd Generation Richard Lash

In 1920, Ennis Rife wanted to give people a Square Deal so began Square Deal Mattress Factory & Custom Upholstery. In 1970, Richard Lash came to work for his Grandparents as he went to Chico State. In 1982, Ennis retired giving the business to his daughter, Lois Lash and grandson, Richard Lash. Upgrades were made to the mattress factory including new sewing machines, foam saws and quilter. Any manufacturer can buy these, but it’s the design that creates firmness consistency, breathability and durability that sets Square Deal Mattress Factory apart. We engineer our mattresses to provide you a great night’s sleep, using proven craftsmanship, new sleep innovations and quality USA materials.

Diamond Steakhouse

In 2013, great granddaughters Jessica Lash and Jamie Anderson became Dreamologists contributing to the family’s legacy and traditions in the belief that building a higher quality mattress means a higher quality sleep for you and your family—and a higher quality sleep equals a higher quality of life. Get the rest you need to live the life you want.

1354 Humboldt Ave. | Chico | 530.342.2510 | www.squaredealmattress.com

Chef James Rosenbalm, a classically trained American chef, hospitality professional and restauranteur, was born in McMinnville, Oregon and is a graduate of the Pacific Northwest Based Western Culinary Institute founded by Portland chef and restauranteur Horst Megar in Portland Oregon. James worked for the prestigious Hyatt Regency in Waikoloa Hawaii under the close mentorship of Swiss Certified Master Chef Rene Metter where he learned the classic kitchen brigade system of cooking and spent four years as a teppanyaki chef. James has also been very involved in opening and running casinos in Oregon and California for the last 21 years and has a special passion for volunteering for non-profit charities. He founded the Corning Wine Food and Art Festival, which raises money for the Corning Rotary Foundation, and co-founded the

Ribs and Rods BBQ rib competition which raises money for the Handi-Riders, therapeutic horseback riding program for handicap children, philanthropic efforts are very near and dear to Chef Rosenbalm’s heart. At 49, Chef Rosenbalm is the father of five paternal children and three step-children, and grandfather of three, and is currently the executive chef and general manager of the recently rebranded Diamond Steakhouse located in the historic Hotel Diamond in downtown Chico. Rosenbalm and his team bring in the best quality prime ingredients they can source and properly execute the cooking technique to provide an outstanding dining experience.

Located in the Historic Hotel Diamond Downtown Chico Booking now for parties & special events: Call 895-1515 or visit www.diamondsteakhousechico.com

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Years in Business

Locally Made

Sierra Central Credit Union In 1955, Beale AFB Credit Union was established. Merging with Shasta Cascade Credit Union in 1963, Sierra Central Credit Union was formed. Beale AFB Credit Union served military personnel and Shasta Cascade served the lumber industry. After becoming Sierra Central Credit Union, a community-based credit union, the emphasis became focused on providing the best financial services at competitive rates to their members in their Northern California footprint. These members live, work or attend school in branch location counties.

Years in Business

Years in Business

The Handle Bar care about the needs of their members. Their team of nearly 200 employees all live and work in Northern California. In addition, Sierra Central Credit Union is locally governed and managed, as all decisions are made by the individuals living in these northern communities. If you are looking for a friendly and helpful financial institution that provides a full range of financial services, check out Sierra Central Credit Union. A better banking option!

Now with 18 branches (soon to be 19!), their team of employees are committed to providing exceptional service on a daily basis and truly

Corporate Headquarters | 1351 Harter Pkwy | Yuba City, CA 95993 Chico Branch | 352 East 1st St | Chico, CA 95928 Plus 17 additional branch locations | 1.800.222.7228 | www.sierracentral.com

For more than six years, The Handle Bar has been one of the go-to spots in Chico for a casual atmosphere, world-class beer and great food! The popular south Chico hangout quickly became a fixture of the local craft beer community, taking top honors as Best Watering Hole for Townies in their first three years in business! In 2017, Brian and Carolyn Kanabrocki decided the time was right for an upgrade.  With AMain Performance Cycling moving in next door, the expansion was an opportunity to do something bold and unique.  The new space includes an upgraded draught system with 28 beers on tap, an expanded kitchen which allowed them to become a full-service restaurant, and new

dining space which allows customers to see into AMain’s bike shop next door. They accomplished all of this while retaining the soul of The Handle Bar, something that was very important to the Kanabrocki’s. The two aren’t done.  2019 will see The Handle Bar’s offerings expand into cocktails and, ultimately, a patio expansion.  They will ensure that The Handle Bar always embraces the casual, comfortable lifestyle that is Chico.

2070 E 20th St #160 | Chico | 530.894.BEER (2337) | facebook.com/handlebarchico February 14, 2019

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COMMUNITY C O N T I N U E D

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Gonzales commended the city of Chico for

Years in Business

Clinton & Nicole

Owners, Earl’s Plumbing “Plumbers are late (if they even show up at all!) It seems they charge you whatever they feel like, and if there is an issue with the work performed, good luck getting them back out!” This was the image that the Earls set out to change when they opened in the fall of 1998.

“We are proud of our commitment to the environment and offer products and services geared toward energy efficiency.” With goals of complete customer satisfaction, and the health and well-being of their North State Community, the Earls are on the road to success.

The Earls believe that by looking at how they conduct business from their customer’s point of view, they can provide the absolute best plumbing experience. A live operator answers the phone 24/7 and appointments are scheduled in a two hour window, 92% of their customers receive same day service, all their technicians wear booties to protect your home, and a complete written quote is given before any work begins.

530.343.0330 | www.earlsplumbing.net

19 Locally Made

Years in Business

Kevin Riley Michael Wear Nick Andrew Michael Hall Owners

Locally owned and operated 5th Street Steakhouse opened in August 2000, featuring U.S.D.A. prime cuts of beef, fresh seafood, a full service bar, and an extensive wine list. The owners and staff pride themselves in providing consistent and excellent personal service along with the finest quality food. This passion for quality food, top-notch service and a lively atmosphere has made 5th Street Steakhouse a memorable and cherished landmark of the Chico community as well as a Best of Chico Living Legend 14 years running.

fundraisers, holiday parties, and private meetings. With an array of menu options and an extensive wine list,

5th Street Steakhouse also offers a banquet room which

you are sure to find 5th Street Steakhouse to be the ideal

is attached to the main dining room area, but provides

fit for your event.

a private section for any special event. This beautiful facility is perfect for birthdays, wedding rehearsal dinners, anniversaries, religious celebrations, graduations,

Everyone at 5th Street Steakhouse looks forward to serving you soon!

345 West 5th Street | Chico | 530.891.6328 | www.5thstreetsteakhouse.com 26

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F R O M PA G E 2 2

fast-tracking a response that lets the private sector help address the crisis. That came by way of an emergency ordinance that— among other things—allows for permitted temporary dwellings on both developed and undeveloped residential, commercial and industrially zoned property. During an interview a few weeks after the City Council moved forward with that policy, City Manager Mark Orme reiterated the city’s commitment to taking steps to support the displaced, an effort that subsequently buoys the economy. “We can’t afford to lose the professionals that we have here,” he said. “If someone was detrimentally impacted, and they don’t have a place to stay, that is a real concern, because we don’t want them fleeing somewhere else and losing the amazing talent we have here.” That was a concern for Gonzales as well—17 of his employees lost their homes. Thus, the hundreds of thousands of dollars of infrastructure spent to make the RV park viable. Some who live there already had their own rigs, and are simply renting the space. Others are paying for the space and renting a trailer, many of which Grossman purchased. The fees will help the companies recoup the investment. The businessmen will absorb any remaining costs. “We have a responsibility to our employees, and we also are in a position to be able to make a difference, so to me, it’s a T-shirts: great feeling to be able Fifth Sun has to work with other comraised more than panies, to collaborate, $100,000 for Camp and to see a community Fire relief through a T-shirt fundraiscome together and show er. For purchases, empathy and be able to go to 5sun.com/ do something like that,” camp-fire/. said Gonzales, who also launched a T-shirt fundraiser shortly after the fire. “I mean, everybody tries to help do what they can do—if that’s sheltering somebody, or giving them food or working on a Saturday.” Gonzales said the facility will be a yearplus-long housing solution. Multifamily units are slated for construction at Meriam Park in the coming months, followed by single-family homes. Both should help relieve the housing shortage. For McAndrew’s part, he was pretty stunned

by the overture. He recalled going to the RV park one evening a few weeks after the fire with the company’s human resources personnel. There, he found Gonzales personally handing out keys to the brand-new units. “The fact that he’s out there in the dark, in the cold, helping get us into these trail-

Sean McAndrew spent months living in the RV park in what he described as a “beautiful one-bedroom trailer.” PHOTO BY MELISSA DAUGHERTY

ers, I was really touched by this,” he said. McAndrew, who’s worked at Fifth Sun for four years, said the trailer provided a safe place of respite for him and his miniature fox terrier/chihuahua mix. He described heading there after work and drawing the blinds—a coping mechanism of sorts, since he could imagine the RV was parked anywhere. “It was kind of just like a cozy retreat, like a little hideaway,” he said. “And it was so quiet.” McAndrew handed those keys back last Friday (Feb. 8) after having found another place to stay. He’s already seen the first draft of architectural plans for a rebuild of his home and is looking forward to new beginnings in the canyon. That outlook now is a far cry from the first weeks after the blaze, a time during which he felt numb. What kept him going were the tasks he needed to get done— things like getting a P.O. box and dealing with insurance paperwork—and the kind words and gestures from friends, family and the folks at work. Early on, Fifth Sun provided donations of new clothing and bedding. A short time later, after taking two weeks off to take care of the related complexities, McAndrew learned his fellow employees had donated vacation hours to him and other displaced co-workers. He’s been heartened by all of the efforts to make life easier during this hardship. “Having that support from Fifth Sun meant a lot, it really, really did,” he said. —MELISSA DAUGHERTY me lissad @ newsr ev iew.c o m MORE

BUSINESS C O N T I N U E D

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70 Locally Made

Years in Business

41 Green Friendly

Years in Business

John Dahlmeier

David Halimi Owner

Owner

The insurance business has changed dramatically since Dahlmeier Insurance Agency first opened its doors in Oroville in 1948. The family owned and operated business has grown and prospered by adhering to the same core values it began with 70 years ago when John Dahlmeier’s dad, Hal, and his uncle Ed were running it. “Old fashioned customer service never gets old” John says. “We continue to hear from new customers that tell us one of the main reasons we earned their business is because we were the only ones to respond to their inquiry in a timely manner”

development of its employees and embracing the tools of developing technologies, the company has combined the past and the present to chart a bright future. The agency remains independent, selling a range of policies—residential, commercial, automotive, health, life, etc.—from a variety of companies. Call Dahlmeier Insurance today for a free quote. Oroville- 530.533.3424, Chico- 530.342.6421 CA LICENSE #0680951

With a commitment to the professional

2080 Myers Street | Oroville | 530-533-3424 1368 Longfellow Ave. | Chico | 530-342-6421 | dahlmeier.com

Diamond W Western Wear, an icon in Downtown Chico, since 1978! Locally owned for 41 years, offering a lot more than Western Wear for the entire family. Diamond W has grown over the years to be Northern California’s largest full service Western Wear store by simply providing exemplary customer service with “Lowest Prices Guaranteed”. Inside Diamond W’s award winning two-story store, you will also find Pat’s Shoe Repair, in business since 1949, and Diamond Productions, producing quality events since 1978. The employees are like one big happy family and treat their customers as their extended family. David Halimi believes that if you want to be in business long-term, you need to think longterm. They don’t look to make money on every transaction with a customer, rather do whatever it takes to keep their customers happy and com-

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Years in Business

Locally Made

Years in Business

Carol Munson

John J. Rank

Owner

Attorney at Law

John and his wife Sherry raised their three children in Paradise, and he continues to be involved in the Paradise community.

“We take pride in our business, value our customers, and love being in our beautiful Downtown Chico. We are here to stay.”

181 E 2ND ST | Chico | 530.891.1650 | www.diamondwonline.com

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John has practiced law in Paradise for over 24 years. He is a Certified Specialist in Estate Planning, Trust and Probate Law, as certified by the State Bar of California, Board of Legal Specialization. This means John has passed an extensive written examination, has satisfied requirements for wide ranging experience in these practice areas, and has fulfilled ongoing educational requirements.

ing back. Diamond W’s friendly and knowledgeable staff will take the time to find whatever you need and special order anything you want at no additional charge with 100% satisfaction guaranteed! Diamond W offers a lot more than just Western Wear for Men, Ladies, and Kids.

Unfortunately John lost his office and other properties in the Camp Fire. John has moved his office to Chico. He would like to let everyone know he is 100% operational and taking care of business as usual. Many of John’s clients are Camp Fire evacuees. He has been working diligently since the fire to help his clients with their legal needs. “It has been a tough three months for me and for everyone that was affected by the Camp Fire. My hope is that Paradise will rebuild into the great community it was.”

NEW OFFICE: 116 Henshaw Ave, Ste C | Chico | 530.891.4000 | 530.877.2600

It all started in the Fall of 1978 on the corner of 5th and Salem, that Carol Lynn Rhoades open her doors for the first time. Little did she know she would become a Chico landmark.

continue the 5th Street Clothing legacy. Their partnership will ensure this local landmark will continue dressing women and changing lives for years to come.

Since then, her business has grown, made a lasting impression at the Fashion Market and has become a premier retailer of Eileen Fisher on the west coast.

With style, quality and customer service, 5th Street Clothing has the perfect selection to making your wardrobe just right.

Carol’s passion and style has drawn and entertained lifelong customers. “I love my customers and I love what I do! It’s all by GOD’S wonderful Grace I am able to do what I do. Hey that rhymes! I am very grateful.”

Follow us on Facebook and find us on BROADWAY!

Carol’s influence extends into the next generation through her daughter Jennie. Who has the same passion for the business as her mother, she has become the ideal partner to

328 Broadway | Downtown Chico | 530.345.5754 www.5thstreetclothing.com February 14, 2019

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>>>>>>>>>> ‘A lot of love’ RAY MORGAN RAISES OVER $600,000 FOR DISPLACED EMPLOYEES, CAMP FIRE RELIEF

T

hough it had been only about a week since the Camp Fire incinerated her home, her family’s Paradise business and everything she owned, Diane Lewandowski found she couldn’t sit still. She helped her colleagues at her other job, at Ray Morgan Co. in Chico, organize donations at a drop-in center set up in one of the company’s warehouses. The donations—clothes as well as miscellaneous toiletries and toys—poured in from the office technology and supply company’s employees across California, to help Lewandowski and 16 others who were displaced by the deadliest fire in state history. “By the time it was over, I knew what everybody’s clothing sizes were,” Lewandowski said with a smile. “‘Hey, Jennifer, this will fit

Donate:

Visit raymorgan.com/camp-fire-community-fund

you! This will fit your daughter!’” Ray Morgan focused its efforts on helping employees immediately, said Chris Scarff, executive vice president and owner, opening the building for anybody needing shelter. Shortly after, each survivor received a $1,000 Walmart gift card. Considering about 100 people work out of the corporate office in Chico, the fire impacted a significant percentage of the staff, Scarff said, about 17 percent. Ray Morgan was founded in 1956

and is headquartered in Chico, with about 480 employees throughout California and Nevada and 20 branches across the Western U.S. It provides office supplies and related services, IT assistance and document management software. In addition to hosting clothing drives for the drop-in center, employees across the company’s branches provided long-term support to “adopted” families, and sent in items listed on gift registries. Meanwhile, the company launched GoFundMe and Golden Valley Bank fundraisers. As of publication, it had raised about $620,000, including the $200,000 Ray Morgan has contributed. The company also plans to donate a portion of its December earnings. Half of the money raised will be dedicated to the larger community relief effort. The other half is already being directed to the company’s employees via monthly stipends of several thousand dollars each. “They’re using that on whatever they need to do to rebuild their lives,” Scarff said. For Laura and Andrew Rotton, who are married and both work for Ray Morgan, the money has helped them set up their new apartment in Chico. The same can be said for Lewandowski. Everything, RAY MORGAN C O N T I N U E D

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Ray Morgan Co.’s Chico branch, including several Camp Fire survivors, pose in their Fifth Sun Apparel Butte Strong shirts. Executive Vice President and owner Chris Scarff purchased about 200 for interested employees (all of the shirt proceeds go to relief efforts). PHOTO COURTESY OF RAY MORGAN COMPANY

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63 Locally Made

19 Locally Made

Years in Business

Marilyn & Susan Evers

Nick Andrew Kevin Riley Mike Wear

Caring for pets is our family tradition At Evers Veterinary Clinic, caring for pets is our family tradition. Established in 1956 Dr. Hank Evers and wife Marilyn began their dream to provide quality veterinary care to people of the their hometown. In 1981 their daughter, Dr. Susan Evers, joined the practice. Thus began a unique environment of a true family business.

Years in Business

Throughout the years, we have continued the tradition of providing the highest quality veterinary care for generations of our clients and their pets. The confidence and friendship of those we have touched is the foundation of our success.

Dr. Evers retired in 1992, but he and Marilyn continued to own the practice and were actively involved. Upon Dr.Evers’ passing in 2006, the business and its legacy were left to his wife and daughter. The current veterinarians who offer professional veterinary care are Dr. Susan Evers, Dr. Paul Wise, Dr. Anne Ripke, Dr. Julia Hutler, Dr. Amy Schantz, and Dr. Clarence Luther.

1150 El Monte Ave. | Chico | 530.343.0713 | www.eversvetclinic.com

Owners

La Salles has provided wonderful memories for many over the years, and now new memories can be created! Owners Nick Andrew, Kevin Riley and Mike Wear have been working hard to bring you a fresh destination for dining, drinking, and socializing. Re-opened in March, 2018, La Salles is a warm and welcome place to enjoy indulgent eats, creative cocktails, a finely curated beer and wine selection, and local live music.

have embraced its memories, we have been dreaming of this new space for so long that it is refreshing to see it finally open and providing new memories for our patrons.” If you are looking for great food and a fun atmosphere to enjoy a night out with friends or loved ones, stop by for a great downtown experience!

“We feel that we are in touch with our customers and want to provide them with the same quality product and atmosphere we expect when we go out to dine or grab a drink.” said Andrew. “We truly enjoy watching the community take part in our new venture. While we respect the history that La Salles brings to Chico and

229 Broadway | Chico | 530.487.7207 | www.lasalleschico.com

81 Locally Made

Years in Business

Green Friendly

Kasey PulliamReynolds Nathan Pulliam Owners

Nathan Pulliam and Kasey Pulliam-Reynolds, owners of Shubert’s Ice Cream & Candy, are the fourth generation carrying on a family tradition of serving up great homemade ice cream and candy. Nathan and Kasey credit their ability to multitask and juggle lots of treats at once as a key to their success.

Shubert’s sweet treats are hand made with high quality products, many of them local. Much of the butter, cream, honey and nuts are purchased from family-owned farms surrounding Chico. The fourth generation plans to stay rooted in that same tradition while always keeping their eyes open for future opportunities.

In the eighty one years Shubert’s has been in business, they’ve seen generations of customers come into the shop and make Shubert’s a part of their lives. Shubert’s makes their ice cream in the same machine Leonard C. Shubert started with in 1938, and to this day their ice cream is made with careful attention to quality. All of

Come into the shop and make Shubert’s part of your family tradition!

C el eb ra ti ng

81 ye ar s!

78 Belle Mill Road | Red Bluff | 530.527.6166 | www.gaumers.com February 14, 2019

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45 Locally Made

Years in Business

Adult survivors live with these memories for a long time. Some survivors keep the abuse a secret for many years. Often when people are in recovery, experience partner abuse or if their perpetrator dies, all of these unwanted feelings come flooding back. They may have tried to speak to an adult or felt there was no one they could trust when the abuse occurred. For these reasons and many others, the effects of child sexual violence can occur many years after the abuse has ended. There is no set timeline

Owner

for dealing with, and recovering from, this experience. If someone you care about suffered sexual violence as a child your reaction can have a big impact on the survivor. It is not always easy to know what to say, but you can help the healing process begin. Rape Crisis intervention and Prevention is the perfect resource and are always there to help and listen.

Butte/Glenn: 530.891.1331 | Tehama: 530.529.3980 24hr: 530.342.RAPE | M-F 10a-6p Exc. Holidays | www.rapecrisis.org

7 Locally Made

Years in Business

Green Friendly

Show Love Thrift If you are looking for a friendly place to shop with great prices and daily sales, then Show Love Thrift is the place for you! Terri Blessing, owner of Show Love Thrift, wanted to do something where she could give back and help those in need. Blessing understands that people need help sometimes and so she set out to create a space where everyone feels welcome, no matter what their current situation might be.

Those who come to Show Love Thrift understand that Terri and her devoted volunteers care about their fellow man. “It only takes a moment for us to ‘show love’ to someone and let them know that they are not alone.”

Warm and inviting paint and murals adorn the walls, friendly and helpful staff await to assist shoppers, and there are free sections of clothing and miscellaneous items for shoppers with a greater need. There is a sense of kindness and happiness in the air at Show Love Thrift, and it is noticeable!

1405 Park Ave | Chico | 530.892.9198 | www.facebook.com/ShowLoveThrift 30

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February 14, 2019

Green Friendly

Marc Moretti

Rape Crisis Intervention & Prevention Adults who experienced sexual violence as a child are not alone. No matter what, the abuse was not their fault.

Years in Business

Marc Moretti owns and operates Eighth & Main Antique Center in Chico. Marc has assembled 90 of the best antique vendors in the northstate at one location at Eighth & Main in Downtown Chico. Each vendor brings to the 30,000 sq.ft. antique mall a collection of their finest wares. They’ve spent years gathering items visitors can’t find in big box, novelty or 2nd hand stores. From Furniture to tie clasps. From home & garden to retro lifestyle. From Classic toys to unique art. You could spend hours wandering through the store. You’re sure to find what you are looking for or discover a treasure you never thought you’d find, antiques, up-cycled & re-purposed treasures, and gifts from local creative artisans.

There’s a reason Eighth & Main has won Best of Chico #1 Antique Store every year since 2004! Put this on your calendar...Coming in May 11 of 2019 Chico Antique & Design Faire at Patrick Ranch Museum. Enjoy a beautiful day of treasure hunting and socializing. A must for professional and amature antique hunters.

745 Main St. | Downtown Chico | 530.893.5534 | www.chicoantiquecenter.net


Ray Morgan employees Laura Rotton, left, and Diane Lewandowski have resettled in apartments in Chico with their families after the Camp Fire. PHOTO BY ASHIAH SCHARAGA

Locally Made

Anna May Wong -HoLLyWood LegendBy William Wong Foey

Chinese-American author William Wong Foey proudly announces the release of his fifth novel, Anna May Wong – an inspiring fictional account of the world’s first and only major female Asian movie star. Anna May Wong is the powerful story about one woman’s fight against crushing racism and chauvinism in the era of the 1930s and ‘40s. Ms. Wong fought both the major film studios and her own demons for significant screen roles that normally went to white actresses made up to look Asian.

RAY MORGAN C O N T I N U E D

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from spatulas to towels, needed to be replaced. That adds up quickly. “It was just incredible. I feel like they took care of the needs we didn’t even know we needed,” Laura Rotton said. “It’s been just a huge blessing.” On top of that, the amount of assistance has been stress-relieving, she added. The couple have been able to buy things that they want instead of “thinking about pinching pennies.” That’s what they did while saving up to buy their first home in

“It was just incredible. I feel like they took care of the needs we didn’t even know we needed. It’s been just a huge blessing.” —Laura Rotton

Paradise two years ago. It’s now in ashes. The company has helped in other ways as well, Rotton said, giving its employees flexibility in terms of time off to help them schedule appointments related to fire recovery and getting their lives back in order. Scarff said Ray Morgan knows the recovery will not happen overnight, and he is confident the company will continue to rally behind those who need help. It also has been fortunate that so many of its employees have been able to resettle in the area—only four have left Butte County, and two of them were able to transfer to other Ray Morgan branches.

“We always use the term RMC family. And that’s the way we feel about our employees. They needed help and we wanted to help,” he said. “It was a horrific event, but it sure is incredible to watch so many people within our organization, along with friends within our industry, how much they’ve rallied to support those that needed help.” Rotton told the CN&R she has been

touched not only by how her employer has provided assistance but also by how her coworkers have stepped up. Her colleagues held a mini fundraiser for her, and one day surprised her with cash. A co-worker told Rotton, “We’re going shopping.” “It’s meant so much. This was already our forever career place,” Rotton said, “and this just really showed the true spirit of the RMC family.” Though it was initially difficult for Lewandowski to take in the overwhelming generosity after Nov. 8, that feeling shifted, becoming one of heartwarming acceptance. Months out, everyone has continued to check in with survivors. They’ve formed a tight-knit group, Lewandowski said, trading advice on virtually everything related to the recovery effort, from debris removal to purchasing new cars. Like Rotton, she has experienced countless instances of generosity. In those early weeks especially, “if somebody needed something, they’d bring it in.” Even the little things that aren’t necessities mean a lot. One of Lewandowski’s co-workers started bringing her coffee every day. Several brought in homemade meals to share, like tamales and rice. “It’s things like that, where we’re a big company, but we’re very family-oriented,” she said. “It’s a lot of love.” —ASHIAH SCHARAGA as h i a h s @new srev i ew. c o m

Before there was #metoo there was Anna May Wong. It was an era where the only roles available to Asian actresses were those of either stereotypical prostitutes or maids. The reader will learn about one woman’s struggle for her own self-worth against the powerful movie moguls of the Golden Age of movie making, and during the rising Nazism in pre-World War II.

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delivery, and competitive financing. This dedication to their customers continues to this day. Whether you’re current appliance just stopped working, you’re looking to update your old appliances, or you need help designing your kitchen, trust the people who have been serving the needs of Butte County for 66 years...Ginno’s Kitchen & Appliance Center.

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Arts &Culture Return

Theatre on the Ridge’s Judy Clemens (executive director) and Jerry Miller (artistic director) and a smattering of the cast and crew from Radioland’s Return to Paradise.

to

Paradise Theatre on the Ridge reopens after fire with musical love letter to its community

THIS WEEK

Nin Paradise goes down. As with many areas post-Camp Fire, there are

eal Road is eerily dark after the sun

few buildings, let alone lights, that remain along the road, and as soon as the Skyway is out of sight, it feels as though one is driving into nothing. However, about three-quarters of a mile down Neal is a literal sign of hope. The lighted marquee of Theatre on the Ridge seems to float like a single guiding star on the horizon, and it’s hard to not story and get a little emotional photo by Jason Cassidy upon reading the words “Return to Paradise” j aso nc@ and “#paradisestrong” newsrev i ew.c om in the welcoming glow. Preview: Theatre on the Radioland’s Return to Paradise shows Ridge (TOTR) is still Thursday-Saturday, standing. And tonight 7:30 p.m. and Sunday, (Feb. 14), the play2 p.m., through March 3. Tickets: $16-$20 ers will be back on its stage to open the Theatre on the first show at the venue Ridge since the Camp Fire, 3735 Neal Road 877-5760 Radioland’s Return totr.org to Paradise, a radioshow-style musical curated specially for the stricken community as a “love letter to Paradise.” Founded in 1975—and at the Neal Road location since 1979—TOTR is the longest-running community theater in Butte County. Executive Director Judy Clemens has been with the company for 42 years, and she is among the dozen or so from the theater’s core who lost everything in the fire. (Only three of the homes of TOTR’s board and staff of volunteers who lived on the Ridge survived.) “Everybody’s so happy and hopeful that the theater survived,” Clemens said. 32

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THU

Special Events CALWATER RATE INCREASE PUBLIC FORUM: CalWater is seeking a rate

It took two weeks for crews to clean and repair the smoke damage at the theater before the actors could come back in. And Clemens and Jerry Miller, the theater’s artistic director (whose Magalia home was spared), agreed that launching the Radioland production—and doing so this soon—was the right thing to do. “Let’s go up there and they will come,” was Miller’s response. Even though there are still so many displaced residents, some even forced to move from the area—including a portion of the theater’s season-ticket holders— the hope is to bring people together to heal through theater. “I think we are really going to serve a purpose,” Clemens said. Since Radioland’s debut more than a decade ago, the radio-show format of Miller’s musical revue—featuring a variety of vocalists taking on both popular songs and spoofs of familiar tunes—has proven malleable. It’s met different themes for many subsequent productions. This time, Miller—who is also directing—has assembled a playlist with Paradise in mind, and watching the cast rehearse the mix of broken-hearted and celebratory tunes, it’s easy to imagine that the audience—and the performers— will experience a much-needed release. John Mellencamp’s “Small Town” is transformed by Steve and Kelly

Oberlander (performing as the Mount Joys duet) from a nostalgic roots-rocker into a quietly beautiful and achingly poignant tear-jerker: “Well I was born in a small town/And I live in a small town/ Probably die in a small town/Oh, those small communities.” And guitar-and-gut-bucket duo Jeff Hohimer and Patrick Allen Brown (aka the GarFinkles) have some fun with John Denver’s “Take Me Home, Country Roads” and Miller’s updated lyrics: “Take me home, Butte County roads.” In addition to an impressive roster of lead vocalists—including a rotating list of special guest stars, such as The Bidwells, Loki Miller and members of The Railflowers—the show is powered by a four-piece band of local acoustic ringers, Rich Reiner (mandolin, guitar), Rebecca Herring Reiner (bass), Ken Lawson (guitar) and David Bilinksi (banjo, Dobro). Clemens gets into the act as well, singing her hand-chosen song, the rousing “Home,” by Phillip Phillips. “I picked that specifically because it’s just what I want to say,” she explained. The song’s theme of finding comfort during crisis is a perfect fit, and Clemens sticks to the original lyrics almost all the way through, only deviating right at the end to sing with a lump in her throat: “Paradise is still our home.” Ω

increase for Oroville of 7.6 percent in 2020, an additional 4.4 in 2021, and further 4.4 in 2021. Voice your opinion to help the California Public Utilities Commission. Thu, 2/14, 6pm. Oroville Council chambers, 1735 Montgomery St., Oroville. cpuc.ca.gov

IT HAPPENED ONE NIGHT: Frank Capra’s acclaimed romantic comedy starring Claudette Colbert, Walter Connolly and Clark Gable. This special Valentine’s Day movie event includes popcorn, wine, champagne, chocolates and roses available for purchase in the lobby. Thu, 2/14, 7pm. $15. Oroville State Theatre, 1489 Myers St., Oroville. orovillestatetheatre.com

POTTERY & CERAMICS SALE: Handmade crafts created by Chico State students. Thu, 2/14, 9am. Across from Glenn Hall, Chico State.

ROCKING FOR PARADISE: STEALING NICKS & PETTY LUV Saturday, Feb. 16 El Rey Theater

SEE SATURDAY, MUSIC


FINE ARTS ON NeXT PaGe

arGuS QuarTeT Sunday, Feb. 17 Zingg Recital Hall See SuNDay, MUSIC

range and some of the “old” tools that were used in those times. Sat 2/16, 10am. $3. Bolt’s Antique Tool Museum, 1650 Broderick St., Oroville. boltsantiquetools.com

ROMANTIC SHAKESPEARE: Slow Theatre performs scenes and songs highlighting the romantic side of Shakespeare to build excitement (and funds) to bring back full productions of the Bard in Chico. Sat, 2/16, 2pm. $15. 1078 Gallery, 1710 Park Ave..

SOILS 101: Natural Resource Conservation Service class covers the basics of healthy soils as well as soils that your plants find just plain dirty! Sat 2/16, 10am. Free. Butte County Farm Bureau, 2580 Feather River Blvd., Oroville. 951-453-2651.

Music DARK STAR ORCHESTRA: “Turn on Your Love Light” with one of the world’s premier Grateful Dead tribute bands. The septet’s extensive catalog will stagger even the most die-hard deadhead. DSO is donating their proceeds to Camp Fire relief funds. Thu, 2/14, 6:30pm. $30 - $35. Durham Memorial Hall, 9319 Midway, Durham. chicotickets.com

JOHN MCEUEN & THE STRING WIZARDS: Founding member of the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band and consummate performer. Will the Circle be Unbroken opens the show. Thu, 2/14, 7pm. Red Bluff State Theater, 333 Oak St., Red Bluff. statetheatreredbluff.com

VALENTINE DUETS: Dinner concert featuring musical performances by Peter & Tricia Berkow, Vera Bridges, David Bilinski & Dana Hanson, Stevie Cook & Diane Garner, Willow & Ron Dejesus and more. Thu, 2/14, 7pm. $15 - $25. Chico Guild Hall, 2775 Nord Ave. eventbrite.com

Theater THE ADDAMS FAMILY: Just try saying the words “Addams Family” without breaking into the TV show’s snappy theme song. Enjoy the demented adventures of this wickedly witty family with Inspire School of Arts & Sciences’ production of the raucous musical comedy. Thu, 2/14, 7pm. $10-$20. CUSD Center for the Arts, 1475 East Ave. inspirecusd.org

FRESH INK 2019: Four writers are each given one week to write a one-act play and four crews split up the plays and bring the creations to life—while the ink is still fresh! Thu, 2/14, 7:30pm. $10. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. 895-3749. blueroomtheatre.com

eVeNING OF WONDer Wednesday, Feb. 20 Unwined Kitchen & Bar

See WeDNeSDay, SPECIAL EVENTS

MAMMA MIA!: The story of a mother, a daughter, three possible dads and one unforgettable trip down the aisle. Bride-to-be Sophie wants nothing more than to have her father at her wedding, but she has no idea which of mom’s three former boyfriends might be the guy. So Sophie invites them all to the festivities at her mother’s Greek isle taverna, and mayhem ensues. Featuring beloved hit songs of ABBA. Thu, 2/14, 7:30pm. $16-$22. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. chicotheatercompany.com

RADIOLAND’S RETURN TO PARADISE: A miracle among the total devastation of the Camp Fire, TOTR remains! Their season kicks off with a special edition of the ever-popular local radio-show musical. Celebrate hopes and dreams of Paradise with this theatrical love letter to the city. Thu, 2/14, 7:30pm. $16$20. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Road, Paradise. totr.org

SHAKESPEARE’S LOVERS: Slow Theatre presents scenes from Cymbeline, As You Like It and The Tempest. Thu, 2/14, 7:30pm. $30. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St..

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FrI

Special Events BUSINESS SUMMIT & STATE OF THE CITY ADDRESS: Official State of the City address from Mayor Randall Stone, plus the 2019 economic and business climate outlook, downtown report, and a Q&A session with your civic leaders. Seating is limited, please RSVP at 891-5556 or info@chicochamber.com Fri, 2/15, 8:30am. CARD Center, 545 Vallombrosa Ave.

CRAB FEED: Annual event hosted by the Valley Contractors Exchange. Sold out! Fri, 2/15, 6pm. Chico Masonic Family Center, 1110 W. East Ave. vceonline.com

THE PRINCESS BRIDE: “Life isn’t fair, it’s just fairer than death, that’s all.” Screening of the swashbuckling classic, plus popcorn from the Boy Scouts. Fri, 2/15, 7pm. Free. Chico Mall, 1950 E. 20th St.

Music CELEBRATION GOSPEL CHOIR: A signature event from Chico State’s Black History Month lineup; a uniting gospel concert from this diverse community choir. Fri, 2/15, 3:30pm. Free. Performing Arts Center, room 144, Chico State.

Theater THE ADDAMS FAMILY: See Thursday. Fri, 2/15, 7pm. $10-$20. CUSD Center for the Arts, 1475 East Ave. inspirecusd.org

FRESH INK 2019: See Thursday. Fri, 2/15, 7:30pm. $10. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First

17

SuN

Music

Special Events

STEALING NICKS & PETTY LUV: Tribute acts play

DRAG STORYBOOK HOUR: Stonewall Alliance hosts

the music of Stevie Nicks/Fleetwood Mac and Tom Petty during this Rocking for Paradise session to benefit survivors of the Camp Fire. Sat, 2/16, 7pm. $15-$20. El Rey Theater, 230 W. Second St.. elreychico.com

STEVE JOHNSON: Fingerstyle guitarist plays light rock, country and more for brunch. Sat, 2/16, 11am. La Salles, 229 Broadway St. 530345-4128. lasalleschico.com

this family event featuring drag performers reading stories about self expression, diversity and being yourself. Most books will have a focus on LGBTQ characters. Free, all ages and kids are invited to bring pillows and stuffed animals. Sun, 2/17, 10:30am. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

MUCH ADO ABOUT IMPROV: Live and unscripted Shakespeare. Sun, 2/17, 7pm. $5. Chico Live Improv Comedy, 561 East Lindo Ave.

Theater THE ADDAMS FAMILY: See Thursday. Sat, 2/16, 7pm. $10-$20. CUSD Center for the Arts, 1475 East Ave. inspirecusd.org

Music ARGUS QUARTET: Praised for playing with “supreme melodic control and total authority” and “decided dramatic impact” (Calgary Herald), this stunning chamber group is one of today’s most dynamic and versatile young ensembles. Sun, 2/17, 2pm. $15-$36. Zingg Recital Hall, Chico State, ARTS 279. 898-6333. csuchico.edu

FRESH INK 2019: See Thursday. Sat, 2/16, 7:30pm. $10. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. 895-3749. blueroomtheatre.com

MAMMA MIA!: See Thursday. Sat, 2/16, 7:30pm. $16-$22. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. chicotheater company.com

TAJAC: Featuring Chico State Jazz X-press alums, this jazz combo busts out the Bossa nova, funk and swing for brunch. Sun, 2/17, 11am. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

RADIOLAND’S RETURN TO PARADISE: See Thursday. Sat, 2/16, 7:30pm. $16-$20. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Road, Paradise. totr.org

THIS WEEK CONTINueD ON PaGe 34

St. 895-3749. blueroomtheatre.com

MAMMA MIA!: See Thursday. Fri, 2/15, 7:30pm. $16-$22. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. chicotheatercompany. com

EDITOR’S PICK

MURDER IN VEGAS: Murder-mystery dinner theater set in ’50s Sin City. Sold out! Fri, 2/15, 6:30pm. Gold Country Casino & Hotel, 4020 Olive Highway, Oroville.

RADIOLAND’S RETURN TO PARADISE: See Thursday. Fri, 2/15, 7:30pm. $16-$20. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Road, Paradise. totr.org

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SaT

Special Events CFOL BOOK SALE: Chico Friends of the Library weekly book sale. Sat 2/16, 9am. Chico Branch Library, 1108 Sherman Ave. buttecounty.net

HISTORY OF THE SUTTER BUTTES: Mike Hubbartt, author, historian and head interpreter for the Lake Oroville Visitor Center, talks about the history of the Sutter Buttes mountain

Free LISTINGS! Post your event for free online at www. newsreview.com/calendar, or email the CN&r calendar editor at cnrcalendar@newsreview.com. Deadline for print listings is Wednesday, 5 p.m., one week prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

SKILLeD STuDeNTS On Sunday, (Feb. 17), at Rowland-Taylor Recital Hall, savor the talents of Nor Cal’s best young musicians when they audition to perform with the North State Symphony. Sponsored by the Chico Guild, the League of Redding and the NSS, these Young Artist Auditions feature high school and university divisions. Students from throughout Northern California will perform stunning and emotive pieces during this free event, with the best of the competition taking home cash prizes and first-place winners soloing at an upcoming NSS concert. February 14, 2019

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FINE ARTS

YOUNG ARTIST AUDITIONS: The North State Symphony hosts this annual event where high school and college-aged musicians compete for cash awards and the chance to perform with the symphony. Free and open to the public. Sun, 2/17, 12pm. Free. RowlandTaylor Recital Hall, Chico State, Performing Arts Center 134.

Theater FRESH INK 2019: See Thursday. Sun, 2/17, 2pm. $10. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. 895-3749. blueroomtheatre.com

MAMMA MIA!: See Thursday. Sun, 2/17, 2pm. $16$22. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. chicotheatercompany.com

RADIOLAND’S RETURN TO PARADISE: See Thursday. Sun, 2/17, 2pm. $16-$20. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Road, Paradise. totr.org

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Tue

CruCIaL TIMeS Shows through Feb. 28 Blackbird See arT phoTo by John SIMCox

Special Events MY FATHER’S WARS: City University of New York Professor Alisse Waterston presents a dramatic personal story, part memoir and part social history, about the dramatic forces of history, the experience of exile and immigration, the legacies of culture, and the enduring power of memory. Tue, 2/19, 7:30pm. Free. Rowland-Taylor Recital Hall, Chico State, Performing Arts Center 134.

Music JOHN MEDESKI’S MAD SKILLET: Avant-jazz keyboardist John Medeski and Grammynominated guitarist Will Bernard (Medicine Hat, Party Hats) team up with Dirty Dozen Brass Band’s legendary rhythm section, sousaphone player Kirk Joseph and drummer Terence Higgins. Eclectic and far-reaching, the unconventional combo produces some trailblazing music. Tue, 2/19, 7:30pm. $25. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St. sierranevada.com

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Wed

Special Events ADULT CRAFT CLUB: Bring your latest project and connect with other crafters. Wed, 2/20, 10am. Butte County Library, 1820 Mitchell Ave., Oroville. buttecounty.net

AN EVENING OF WONDER: Magicians Dean Waters and Stephen Chollet entertain, confound and astonish. Wed, 2/20, 7pm. $15. Unwined Kitchen & Bar, 980 Mangrove Ave. eventbrite.com

HYPERTEXT BEYOND NARRATIVE: Hypertext is often associated with “choose your own adventure” narratives, in which a reader makes choices that affect the path a narrative takes. This talk includes a workshop and audience members are encouraged to bring an electronic device with them. Wed, 2/20, 6pm. Free. Meriam Library, Chico State.

Art B-SO GALLERY: Print Club Miniprint Exhibition & Sale, Chico State Print Club hosts annual sale to help fund a trip to the SGC International Print Conference in Texas. Works are available for $10 and up. Through 2/15. Chico State, Ayres Hall, room 105.

BLACKBIRD: Crucial Times Photography Collective, photo exhibit explores the manual, physical and chemical process. Featuring the artwork from six members of the collective, the display reflects the contents of their latest book, Volume 2. Through 2/28. 1431 Park Ave.

CHICO ART CENTER: Renew, Rebuild, Reimagine, featuring work by artists affected by the Camp Fire. In the spirit of renewal and regenerative ideas, CAC presents this latest exhibit. Through 3/1. 450 Orange St.

ENLOE CANCER CENTER: Beth Bjorklund, oil paintings in our Healing Art Gallery by Northern California artist. The Enloe Cancer Center, Healing Art Gallery features artists whose lives have been touched by cancer. Through 4/19. Free. 265 Cohasset Road, 530-332-3856.

JACKI HEADLEY UNIVERSITY ART GALLERY: Aksum Belle – Afterwards, artist and printmaker Jacob Meders is a member of the Mechoopda Indian Tribe. Using book forms, prints, and sculpture, Meder’s work challenges perceptions of place, culture and identity built on the assimilation and homogenization of Indigenous peoples. Through 2/22. Chico State.

MUSEUM OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA ART: Dennis Leon I am here, the sculptor’s work has been exhibited at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the Oakland Museum, the Corcoran Gallery and beyond. Opening Reception Friday, Feb. 15, 6-8pm. Through 3/24. $5. 900 Esplanade.

ORLAND ART CENTER: Perfection in Pencil and Paint, showcasing works by Peter Piatt, Steve Crane, Sharon Crabill and Eve BergPugh. Through 3/23. 732 Fourth St., Orland. orlandartcenter.com

THE TURNER: Mǝǝmento – Before, curated For More MUSIC, See NIGHTLIFE on page 36

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February 14, 2019

from the Turner Collection by Jacob Meders, a member of the Mechoopda Indian Tribe, whose own work is

concurrently exhibited at the Jacki Headley University Art Gallery. Meders explains that the linked exhibitions function “as a before and after” that suggests ways to “see, share and learn — to open a dialogue that allows a healing process.” Through 2/22. Chico State. janetturner.org

Museums BOLT’S ANTIQUE TOOL MUSEUM: Bolt’s Antique Tool Museum, this fascinating, unique museum has over 12,000 hand tools on display, charting cataloging the evolution and history of tools. Through 6/15. $3. 1650 Broderick St., Oroville.

CHICO CHILDREN’S MUSEUM: Chico Children’s Museum, featuring tons of cool stuff for kids to explore including a miniature city, complete with a junior vet clinic, dentist, cafe and farmer’s market, a giant fish tank, multi-sensory room, imagination playground and much more. Check the website for hours and admission information. Through 8/3. $7-$9. 325 Main St. chicochildrensmuseum.org

CHICO CREEK NATURE CENTER: Living Animal Museum & Nature Play Room, learn all about local critters, plants and wildlife. Through 5/25. $2-$4. 1968 E. Eigth St.. chicorec.com

GATEWAY SCIENCE MUSEUM: From Here to There, explore the science of how things move by land, sea and air. Also on display are The Foothills, and America’s Wolves: From Tragedy to Inspiration. Through 5/12. $5-$7. 625 Esplanade. csuchico.edu

PATRICK RANCH MUSEUM: Patrick Ranch Museum, working farm and museum with rotating exhibits open every Saturday and Sunday from 11am to 3pm. Through 5/26. 10381 Midway, Durham. patrickranchmuseum.org

VALENE L. SMITH MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY: Remarkable Lives, exploring the intertwined worlds of birds and human, in partnership with the Altacal Audubon Society and Snow Goose Festival. Exhibits include bird songs and behaviors, local photography and a robotic recreation of the late Jurassic Archaeopteryx. Through 7/31. Chico State.


MUSIC David “Serengeti” Cohn’s other alter ego, Kenny Dennis. PHOTO BY KELLY MICHAEL ANDERSON

‘Under the underground’ Chicago emcee Serengeti is as much performance artist as rapper

Imuch “underground” doesn’t make as sense as it used to, not since dentifying hip-hop artists as

music-streaming platforms have made even the most obscure rapby Howard Hardee pers easily accessible—provided that you know who Preview: they are in the Serengeti performs first place. That is Sunday, Feb. 17, unless it’s an artist 6 p.m., with Redfield like Serengeti, a Clipper, Similar Alien, Esquire Ali, truly underground Calex, Uncle Pill and MC in the sense Worldcoast. that he has recordCost: $7 ed dozens of full1078 Gallery length albums and 1710 Park Ave. EPs since 2003, 433-1043 but most of them 1078gallery.org remain difficult— or in some cases, impossible—to find. The Chicago-based artist has never been big on self-promotion, and only recently found out that people can “just upload songs and stuff” to Spotify. “This whole time I’ve just been making music, not really concerned with branding and all of that,” he said. “But as time passes, I think maybe that’s not the way to go. Maybe I do need to step it up a bit. … If you don’t do it, you just stay in the netherworld, under the underground.” Ahead of his performance at 1078 Gallery on Sunday (Feb. 17),

Serengeti (real name David Cohn) told the CN&R he started rapping strictly for himself, “in lieu of therapy” for lifelong depression. “I was like, ‘I’ll write my way out of these feelings.’” But that changed when he “put out that one song that people actually liked.” He’s referring to 2006 single “Dennehy” off an album of the same title, now considered a classic example of underground rap out of the upper Midwest. Catch the Chicago references in his flow: “I’ll buy a little lager like I ate a piece of Big Red/ Grow a mustache the size of Mike Ditka’s forehead.” Not only did the song gain Serengeti an audience, it was the world’s introduction to the white, middle-class, middle-aged character of Cohn’s creation, Kenny Dennis. A true alter ego, Dennis was the opposite of Cohn in every way; he rocked a comically oversized mustache and drank O’Doul’s because he actually liked the taste. And perhaps most significantly, he didn’t struggle with feelings of anxiety and self doubt, but rather was “somebody who had a lot of friends and got invited to the barbecue. “I had the opportunity to rap from somebody else’s perspective and live in someone else’s brain,” he said. “This whole world sort of appeared in front of me. People liked the ‘Dennehy’ song, but then [I] was like, ‘Why does this guy

rap?’ I kept asking all these questions, and I just filled it in.” In fact, Cohn has filled in Dennis’ backstory across nine Serengeti albums, diving deep into the imaginary man’s psyche to understand his every motivation. And after spending so much time in someone else’s shoes, the lines between his alter ego and true self gradually dissolved. He often falls into the character when he’s with his friends, walking down the street alone, or standing outside of a party, frozen from anxiety. “If I’m questioning myself, Kenny will come in and set it straight,” he said. “He’ll be like, ‘No, just open the door and go in.’ … His voice pops in my head when I get indecision, like, ‘OK, Dave, just calm it down.’” Cohn stopped performing as Dennis last year because he believes the story is complete, but now he’s working with a visual artist to create a graphic novel following Dennis’ narrative arc from start to finish. In the meantime, he’s posting old songs and EPs on Spotify and Bandcamp, giving many listeners their first opportunity to hear the most obscure parts of his enormous catalog. Though he figures it’s well past time to emerge from the netherworld, he still feels weird about promoting himself because he’s not a brand, but a person—OK, maybe two people sharing a mustache. Ω

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NIGHTLIFE DeVIN THe DuDe, bLaZe1 & DJ LIL 50 Friday, Feb. 15 Tackle Box See FrIDay donating their proceeds to Camp Fire relief. Thu, 2/14, 6:30pm. $30$35. Durham Memorial Hall, 9319 Midway, Durham. chicotickets.com

ERIC PETERS & LEANNE COOLEY: Duo performs an eclectic mix of music. Thu, 2/14, 6:30pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

SCOUT & MICHAEL BONE: Local songwriters tug at your heart strings. Thu, 2/14, 6pm. Free. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

SHIGEMI MINETAKA & FRIENDS: Live

jazz. Thu, 2/14, 6:30pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St.

14THurSDay

VALENTINE DUETS: Dinner concert with by Peter & Tricia Berkow, Vera Bridges, David Bilinski & Dana Hanson, Stevie Cook & Diane Garner, Willow & Ron Dejesus and more. Thu, 2/14, 7pm. $15-$25. Chico Guild Hall, 2775 Nord Ave. eventbrite.com

CHICO UNPLUGGED: Acoustic music from local singers and songwriters. Thu, 2/14, 7pm. Madison Bear Garden, 316 W. Second St., 916-873-3194.

DARK STAR ORCHESTRA: One of the world’s premier Grateful Dead tribute bands. The septet’s extensive catalog will stagger even the most die-hard deadhead. DSO is

15FrIDay

DEVIN THE DUDE: Underground Houston hip-hop hero, beer brewer and dope

THurSDay 2/14—WeDNeSDay 2/20 aficionado known for his laid-back flow and oddball beats, plus Blaze1, DJ Lil 50 and more local openers TBA. Fri, 2/15, 9pm. $20-$25. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave.

HABSTRAKT: French producer, beatmaker and remixer drops the bass. Subfer and Dustycloud open the show. Fri, 2/15, 8pm. $15-$25. El Rey Theater, 230 W. Second St. eventbrite.com

JOHN SEID, LARRY PETERSON & BOB LITTELL: An eclectic mix of dinner

tunes. Fri, 2/15, 6:30pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St.

JOSH BUDRO BAND: Nor-Cal outlaw country. Fri, 2/15, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

LOCALS ONLY: Angry Son, Citysick and Little Black Cloud rock it out to raise money for Camp Fire survivors. Fri, 2/15, 7:30pm. Ike’s Place, 648 W. Fifth St.

METAL NIGHT FEATURING BLOODY ROOTS: Big fistful of metal with Sepultura tribute Bloody Roots, Red Handed, Burial Grounds, Atomic Flounder, Banger. Fri, 2/15, 7pm. $10. The Spirit, 2360 Oro Quincy Highway, Oroville. 530-864-5525.

NEW WAVE PROM: Synthpop, post-punk, goth, EuroBeat and hella hairspray with DJ J-ho and DJ Jeff Spincoli on the decks and an opening set by Iver. Prom king and queen crowned at midnight! Fri, 2/15, 8pm. $10-$13.

Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St. brownpapertickets.com

OBE & LOKI: Guitarists Steven Oberlander and Loki Miller perform, plus wine and pizza available for purchase. Fri, 2/15, 6pm. Almendra Winery & Distillery, 9275 Midway Road, Durham.

SKIP CULTON PROJECT: Rock ’n’ soul outfit plays soul, reggae, pop and much more in the lounge. Fri, 2/15, 8:30pm. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

SOUL POSSE: Fun and funky quintet plays a wide variety of party favorites at this family-friendly venue. Food truck, bocce and wine available. Fri, 2/15, 6pm. Purple Line Urban Winery, 760 Safford St., Oroville, 530-828-8040.

TYLER DEVOLL: Live tunes. Fri, 2/15, 4pm. TYLER DEVOLL: Singer/songwriter breaks out the pop hooks. Fri, 2/15, 7pm. The Exchange, 1975 Montgomery St., Oroville. theexchangeoroville.com

16SaTurDay

AFROLILCIOUS AND WORDSAUCE: A

Lost on Main favorite, Afrolicious, returns, plus groovy S.F. party band Sat, 2/16, 9pm. $10. Lost on Main, 319 Main St., 892-2445.

• Over 1,000 Wines Available • Huge selection of Beer & Spirits too • Amazing Specials every day

958 East Ave. (Next to Donut Nook) | 530.592.3171 | 8am - 10pm Sun - Thu 8am - 11pm Fri - Sat CN&R

February 14, 2019

Two Oregon artists grace 1078 Gallery this Tuesday (Feb. 19) when MAITA (pictured) and Misé perform with local songwriter Fera and dreamrock duo Valleys. Maria Maita-Keppeler’s brand-new single, “Japanese Waitress,” describes the Portland folk singer’s dark experiences in the service industry—something many musicians can relate to. From Astoria, experimental outfit Misé gets both folky and funky with a set of eclectic tunes.

La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

Largest seLection of Wine around

36

M&M

AMANDA & DIEGO: Argentine heart throbs perform to cap off a week a love. Sat, 2/16, 7pm. $60-$90. Gold Country Casino & Hotel, 4020 Olive Highway, Oroville. eventbrite.com

AMANDA GRAY: Singer/songwriter

gets soulful. Sat, 2/16, 7pm. The Exchange, 1975 Montgomery St., Oroville.

CLEMENTINE WAS RIGHT: Gritty Santa Fe rock act Clementine Was Right, plus Fearless Frequencies and Travis & Glisel. Sat, 2/16, 7pm. 1078 Gallery, 1710 Park Ave. 1078gallery.com

DARKMYSTICWOODS: Washington bong wizards melt faces, plus Mr. Bang, Redding’s Ghost Town Atlas and garage punkers Bill Nihilist. Sat, 2/16, 8pm. $5. Ike’s Place, 648 W. Fifth St.


THIS WEEK: FIND MORE ENTERTAINMENT AND SPECIAL EVENTS ON PAGE 32

18MONDAY

MAD SKILLET

ACOUSTIC CAMP FIRE BENEFIT: Singer/

Tuesday, Feb. 19 Sierra Nevada Big Room

songwriter duos The Bidwells and Sunday Iris are joined by Caitlin Jemme & the Goodness for a night of restorative vibes and good tunes to raise money for Camp Fire relief. Mon, 2/18, 6pm. Unwined Kitchen & Bar, 980 Mangrove Ave.

SEE TUESDAY

Fleetwood Mac and Tom Petty during this Rocking for Paradise session to benefit victims of the Camp Fire. Sat, 2/16, 7pm. $15-$20. El Rey Theater, 230 W. Second St. elreychico.com

17SUNDAY

DECADES: Local cover band celebrates their third album, packed full of hits from the 1970s. Sat, 2/16, 7:30pm. $10. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave. tackleboxchico.com

DRAG SHOW: Drag queens and kings

bring hot fire. Sat, 2/16, 10:30pm. $7. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

DRIVER: Rock ’n’ roll trio Sat, 2/16, 9pm. JAX Bar, at Berry Patch Restaurant, 900 Newville Road, Orland.

night long in the lounge. Sat, 2/16, 9pm. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

LED ZEPAGAIN: Big Ludwigs, doublenecked guitars and maybe a gong in this spot-on tribute act. Sat, 2/16, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

MAX MINARDI: Indie rock singer/ songwriter with a country-tinged voice. Sat, 2/16, 9:30pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St. lasalleschico.com

JOHN SEID, LARRY PETERSON & BOB LITTELL: An eclectic mix of dinner

SOUL POSSE: Super fun party band

KELLY TWINS DUELING PIANOS: Jon

STEALING NICKS & PETTY LUV: Tribute

tunes. Sat, 2/16, 6:30pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St. and Chris play your requests all

310346_4.9_x_5.4.indd 1

rocks it out. Sat, 2/16. Wine Time, 26 Lost Dutchman Drive.

acts play the music of Stevie Nicks/

JOHN SEID & LARRY PETERSON: Eclectic mix for dinner. Sun, 2/17. 5th Street Steakhouse, 345 W. Fifth St.

MUCH ADO ABOUT IMPROV: Live and

unscripted Shakespeare. Sun, 2/17, 7pm. $5. Chico Live Improv Comedy, 561 East Lindo Ave.

PARADISE BIG BAND: Come out and dance to big band music on a Sunday evening. Sun, 2/17, 7pm. $8. Studio One Ballroom, 707 Wall St., 530-906-0441.

SERENGETI: Chicago rapper Serengeti, post-punk indie rock band Similar Alien, jazzy hip-hop Redfield Clipper, plus Calex, Uncle Pill and Esquire Ali. Sun, 2/17, 7pm. $7. 1078 Gallery, 820 Broadway St. 1078gallery.org

2/4/19 2:50 PM

19TUESDAY

THUMPASAURUS: L.A. punk/funk outfit

astonish. Wed, 2/20, 7pm. $15. Unwined Kitchen & Bar, 980 Mangrove Ave. eventbrite.com

mixes heavy metal, free jazz and musical theater for a wild stage show. Funk band Big Sticky Mess opens the show. Tue, 2/19, 8pm. $8. Lost on Main, 319 Main St.

THE BIDWELLS: Local duo performs in

20WEDNESDAY AN EVENING OF WONDER: Magicians Dean Waters and Stephen Chollet entertain, confound and

the lounge. Wed, 2/20, 6pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St. hoteldiamondchico.com

FIREFLY: Gifted storyteller Erin Haley sings originals and covers in the vein of Emmylou Harris and Sheryl Crow. Wed, 2/20, 6pm. Red Tavern, 1250 Esplanade.

HARDCORE SHOW: Dying for It, With War and The Choice get heavy. Tue, 2/19, 7pm. Ike’s Place, 648 W. Fifth St.

JOHN MEDESKI’S MAD SKILLET: Avantjazz keyboardist John Medeski and Grammy-nominated guitarist Will Bernard (Medicine Hat, Party Hats) team up with Dirty Dozen Brass Band’s legendary rhythm section, sousaphone player Kirk Joseph and drummer Terence Higgins. Eclectic and far-reaching, the unconventional combo produces some trailblazing music. Tue, 2/19, 7:30pm. $25. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St. sierranevada.com

MAITA & MISÉ: Fun, freaky and experimental folk musicians from Oregon perform with local act Fera, plus dreamy duo Valleys. Tue, 2/19, 7:30pm. $5. 1078 Gallery, 1710 Park Ave. 1078gallery.org

HELP ON THE WAY

One of the premier tribute acts carrying on the legacy of the Grateful Dead, Dark Star Orchestra, will jam one out for Paradise tonight (Feb. 14) at the Durham Memorial Hall. Praised for its dead-on performances, the band is a Butte County favorite, bringing waves of energy as well as relief to those affected by the Camp Fire.

FEBRUARY 14, 2019

CN&R

37


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February 14, 2019

Here?) is in some ways a very mixed and uneven accomplishment, but its generous assortment of rewards and pleaby sures make it into an especially Juan-Carlos memorable experience. Selznick The main setting is a povertystricken area of contemporary Beirut, and the chief characters are a 12-year-old named Zain (played by Syrian refugee Zain Al Rafeea), an undocumented Capernaum Ethiopian and single mom named Opens Friday, Feb. Rahil (Yordanos Shiferaw), Zain’s 15. Starring Zain al brutally conflicted parents, and rafeea and yordanos several of his variously at-risk Shiferaw. Directed by younger siblings. Nadine Labaki. Pageant Theatre. rated r. The production is shaped as a latter-day version of classic neorealism—nonprofessional actors, stories of the everyday struggles of ordinary people, passionate social protest, documentary-style filming on actual locations, etc. And in this case, the ensuing trials and tribulations touch on a volatile set of contemporary issues—grinding urban poverty, racial prejudice, child abuse, immigration, the shadow economies of sex, drugs, petty theft and child prostitution. Ultimately, the central dramas in Capernaum revolve around Zain’s rebellion against his parents and his subsequent involvement with Rahil, who gives him shelter in her back-alley hovel and later

4

puts him to work as a live-in babysitter for the infant son that she keeps hidden from her employers and the authorities. Zain is a resourceful rascal and a team player in a desperate family of petty criminals, but he is also endowed with a fierce sense of empathy. And it is the latter that emerges full-force when his parents cravenly sell his beloved sister Sahar, age 11, into a marriage with their sleazy landlord. Most of this comes to light in intriguingly roundabout fashion. At the outset, Zain is already doing a five-year prison term for stabbing someone, and when we first meet him he’s back in court and filing suit against his own parents. The courtroom testimonies serve as a kind of framing device for most of the film, but it’s the extended flashbacks that those courtroom moments give rise to that dominate the overall action. The precocious charisma of young Al Rafeea in the central role is a thing of wonder all by itself. He exudes an almost casual gravitas that’s well beyond his years, and that proves convincing with the character’s rages as well as his boldly sympathetic actions. Shiferaw’s Rahil is excellent as well, while Zain’s extravagantly feckless parents (Kawsar Al Haddad and Fadi Kamel Youssef) probably need (and deserve) fuller development than Labaki is able to give them here. Ω

1 2 3 4 5 Poor

Fair

Good

Very Good

Excellent


FILM SHORTS

Opening this week Alita: Battle Angel

Robert Rodriguez (Sin City) directs this film adaptation of Yukito Kishiro’s Japanese cyberpunk manga series, Gunnm, featuring a cyborg heroine named Alita (Rosa Salazar) who was rendered for the big screen using CGI technologies developed for James Cameron’s Avatar. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

4

Capernaum

See review this issue. Pageant Theatre. Rated R —J.C.S.

Happy Death Day 2U

The sequel picks up where the 2017 original left off, but this time multiple people are being murdered and reliving the same day over and over as a slasher in a baby-face mask hunts them down. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

Isn’t It Romantic

A fantasy-satire starring Rebel Wilson as an unlucky-in-love woman who finds herself stuck in a stereotypical rom-com universe. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

Reopening this week

4

The Favourite

Tragedy intertwines with farce in the portrait of Queen Anne (Olivia Colman), who is simultaneously a figure of obvious pathos and surprising resilience. And that portrait is further intensified via her attachments to Lady Sarah (Rachel Weisz) and the no longer well-to-do Abigail (Emma Stone), two resourceful strivers who find themselves in increasingly fierce competition for status as the Queen’s “favourite.” Each of the three is a kind of flawed heroine, at one point or another. Colman is superb as Queen Anne, but Weisz and Stone also deliver exceptional work in strikingly nuanced roles. Directed by Yorgos Lanthimos (The Lobster, Dogtooth, etc.), the film is challenging yet richly rewarding experience. Pageant Theatre. Rated R —J.C.S.

Now playing Aquaman

Jason Momoa takes his superhuman physique from Game of Thrones to the title character in this film adaptation of DC Comics’ half-human/half-Atlantean heir to the underwater kingdom of Atlantis. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13.

A Dog’s Way Home

Cold Pursuit

Norwegian director Hans Petter Moland does an American remake of his own 2014 film, In Order of Disappearance. This one stars Liam Neeson as a snowplow driver-turnedvengeful vigilante as he hunts down the drug dealers and crime boss responsible for his son’s death. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

Glass

The third film in writer/director M. Night Shyamalan’s Unbreakable trilogy (which includes previous entries Unbreakable and Split) pits a hero with superhuman strength (Bruce Willis) against two “supervillains”— a dangerously unstable man with 24 personalities (James McAvoy) and a genius mass-murderer with brittle bones (Samuel L. Jackson). Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13.

The LEGO Movie 2: The Second Part

Another healthy dose of family-friendly fun at which both kids and parents should laugh heartily. The Second Part picks up five years after the end of the first movie, and our hero Emmet (Chris Pratt) is happily buying coffee in Apocalypseburg, a devastated LEGO-land of sullen tones and broken dreams where master builder Wyldstyle (Elizabeth Banks) has taken to dramatic narration at all times as things in their world have turned from awesome to bleak. The culprits are aliens called Duplos, invading forces that are at once undeniably adorable and unabashedly destructive. It’s a crazed world where Batman (Will Arnett) gets engaged to Queen Waterva Wa’Nabi (Tiffany Haddish), leader of the Duplo, and Emmett winds up running with a Kurt Russell-type antihero named Rex Dangervest, who is suspiciously like him (and who is also voiced by Pratt). The movie feels a bit repetitive in places, and some of the action is too fast to be fully taken in, but flaws aside, it’s still a lot of fun. There’s a slightly dark underbelly at play here, and it’s fun to see a kid’s flick that doesn’t totally play it safe. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG —B.G.

Miss Bala

Gina Rodriguez plays an American who, while trying to survive and save a friend in trouble, has to work with both sides in a dangerous fight between a Mexican drug cartel and the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13.

The Prodigy

Is a boy’s behavior a sign of genius or something far more sinister? Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

Ralph Breaks the Internet

In this sequel to the 2012 animated feature Wreck-It Ralph, the soft-hearted giant (voice of John C. Reilly) and the cast of video-game characters have broken free of their arcade machine and head for new adventures across the internet-gaming world. Cinemark 14. Rated PG.

5

Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse

No movie adaptation has captured the rush of reading an exciting comic book like this blast of energy from directors Bob Persichetti, Peter Ramsey and Rodney Rothman. They go for broke with a seamless mixture of visual styles—hand-drawn and computer animated—and the story is pretty great, to boot. Teenager Miles Morales (voiced by Shameik Moore) is bitten by a strange spider and then, with his new-found powers in effect, crosses paths with the original Spider-Man, Peter Parker (Chris Pine). Turns out a portal from a parallel universe has opened up, allowing a whole fleet of different Spider-Verse characters to come into his orbit—the older Peter B. Parker (the invaluable Jake Johnson), Gwen Stacy (Hailee Steinfeld), SpiderHam (a mishmash of Spidey and Porky Pig voiced by John Mulaney), Peni Parker (Kimiko Glenn) and her robot and, best of all, Nicolas Cage as the black-and-white Spider-Man Noir. So, Miles is one of many heroes with Spider powers tasked with battling bad dudes. Spider-Verse is surely one of the best movies of the year and the best Spider-Man movie to date. Cinemark 14. Rated PG —B.G.

The Upside

A buddy dramedy about the relationship that develops between a wealthy quadriplegic (Bryan Cranston) and the ex-con (Kevin Hart) hired to take care of him. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

What Men Want

A decades-old Mel Gibson flick gets the gender-flip treatment here, when Taraji P. Henson stars as a sports agent who finally gets a leg up on the boy’s club of her profession when she somehow gains the ability to hear men’s private thoughts. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

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Will faithful dog Bella find her way 400 miles back to her owner? Probably. Cinemark 14. Rated PG.

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Reviewers: Bob Grimm and Juan-Carlos Selznick.

February 14, 2019

CN&R

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February 14, 2019

the trees of Bidwell Park are brown and bare. by Winter has beset Alastair Butte County. In Bland such cold, hard times, our bodies work overtime, burning calories just to stay warm—and we crave strong beers. Well, that’s the traditional lore of wintertime brews, anyway, which holds that people drink bigger beers to fight the winter elements, downsizing to more summery lagers and IPAs as the weather warms. Despite a recent dusting of morning snow (that melted by lunchtime), winter’s impact on the lifestyle of those in Chico—or anywhere else between here and the Bay Area—hardly compares to those states in the path of the polar vortex. Still, Nor Cal beer drinkers like to play along with the rest of the world, and each winter, the brewers celebrate the short days and gray skies with strong beers like barleywines, super-sized Belgian styles and imperial, well, everything—stouts, porters, IPAs, reds, browns and lagers. (“Imperial,” if you haven’t figured it out, just means “high-alcohol.”) At Sierra Nevada Brewing Co., it’s clear wintertime is here as

Bigfoot—the popular barleywine (9.6 percent alcohol-by-volume)— has been sighted in six-packs in local beer coolers. And up in Redding, another creature, Fall River Brewing’s appropriately named Colossus (a 13 percent ABV imperial stout), was just released into the wild. Over in Petaluma, Lagunitas Brewing Co. releases high-alcohol beers most of the year. Still, the seasonal appearance of its Cappuccino Stout, a 9.1 percent ABV beer brewed with coffee, and its 9.6 percent ABV Undercover Investigation Shut-Down Ale, mark the winter strong-beer pattern. The brewery also releases its 11 percent ABV Olde GnarlyWine barleywine about this time each year. The beer is a personal favorite—about as rich and delicious as barleywines get. In Santa Rosa, Russian River Brewing Co. has been serving its highly anticipated annual release Pliny the Younger—a 10-plus percent ABV triple IPA—for the first two weeks of February, while in San Francisco, Magnolia Pub and Brewery and 21st Amendment Brewery are getting directly to the point with their annual Strong Beer Month celebration, which they recognize throughout February. This year—the 18th rendition— the two breweries are each featuring six beers containing at least

8 percent ABV. 21st Amendment’s February beer list includes Triple Crisis, an 11 percent ABV triple IPA; the Red Giant, an imperial red ale tipping the scales at 13.0 ABV; Two Lane Blacktop, an imperial black IPA of 9.8 percent ABV; and three other bigguns. At Magnolia, the Haight Street brewery will be featuring Old Thunderpussy, a barleywine measuring just shy of 12 percent ABV; the Promised Land imperial IPA, which goes 11.9 percent ABV; two more beers in the 10 percent range; and a couple between 8 and 9. Strong Beer Month’s website suggests drinking “responsibly” during times like these. Whether or not strong beers are falling out of favor isn’t clear. Over the past few years, session beers—those low in alcohol—have become the nexus of beer-nerd excitement. Strong beers, by comparison to these other, more nuanced styles, can sometimes seem just a tad crude or even vulgar. Made well, though, they can be beautiful things, whether consumed fresh from the tank or after years of aging. And anyway, nothing but a parka takes the edge off the February chill as swiftly a giant stout or barleywine, whether it’s 40-below in Omaha or 40-above in Hamilton City. Ω


ARTS DEVO by JASON CASSIDY • jasonc@newsreview.com

THE BARD IS BACK? The deliberate thespians of Slow Theatre are creeping

their way toward bringing Shakespeare in the Park back to Chico. The most recent development is the Romantic Shakespeare event at the 1078 Gallery this Saturday (Feb. 16), at 2 p.m., “a matinee of scenes and songs highlighting the romantic side of Shakespeare.” It’s a fundraiser and a means for building excitement for future full-scale productions of Shakespeare in the great outdoors, and Arts DEVO thinks it might make for a pretty badass date for you and your Valentine. Speaking of Shakespeare, in a sister event the following day (Sunday, Feb. 17, at 7 p.m.), the new kids on the block over at Chico Live Improv Comedy (561 E. Lindo Ave.) are hosting Much Ado About Improv, a night of “Shakespeareinspired improv games and long-form sets.” Our revels are neverending!

WAIT A SECOND! That’s not the biggest Slow Theatre news to come out this

week. The announcement for Garage Fest 2019 has been officially transmitted, and I have a feeling that we might be on the cusp of a new community tradition. In the spirit of the backyard beginnings of the Butcher Shop theater fest, Slow Theatre is organizing five different backyard/garage/house shows at five different locations over two days, March 8-9. Each show will be presented three times each day and will feature collaborations with various local performance organizations, including Butte College Drama Club, Chico State Theatre Club, Chico Live Improv Comedy and the Chico Dance Lab. Tickets go on sale (for $30) on Feb. 18. Venues will be disclosed upon purchase. Visit slowtheatre.com for info and updates.

REST IN PEACE, RENAISSANCE MAN Butte County lost one of its most prolific and interesting performers last week. After a brief battle with cancer, Mikkel McDow died last Thursday (Feb. 7). He was 63. McDow was best known around these parts as a member of Beltain, purveyors of a wide range of early music and folk styles—both traditional tunes and original songs that sometimes blended the old styles with rock music—and regulars at Renaissance faires and other period-specific events. There was also a Bay Area version of Beltain, with different players, that McDow described as “metal fusion!” But Beltain was just one of his musical hats. Back in the day, McDow was a founding member of Berkeley punk/garage-rock/ RIP Mikkel McDow early new wave crew The Jars. And, in between recording and releasing several Beltain albums, he worked as a soundman, put out a handful of solo rock albums of varying styles as Mik Dow, and performed shows in duet with his wife and fellow Beltain member, Morgan McDow. A memorial concert is in the works, but no date has been set. To contribute to Morgan’s efforts to compile and share the music she and Mikkel made together, visit patreon.com/MorganMcDow. DEVOTIONS:

The Chico News & Review is now accepting entries for the 2019 Poetry 99 contest.

POETRY Submit your poems— 99 words or fewer—today!

99

Online and email entries preferred: Submit at www.newsreview.com/poetry99, or send to poetry99@newsreview.com. Please specify Poetry 99, age and division—Adult, High School (grades 9-12), Junior High (grades 6-8), Kids (fifth grade and younger)—in the subject field. And for all divisions except “Adult” please include age.

• Pop Muzik: Do the Safety Dance or just Wang Chung all night long at the Chico New Wave Prom this Friday (Feb. 15), 8 p.m., at Chico Women’s Club. Get tix for only $10 at Bootleg or Ultra Beautician ($13 at the door). • Funk monster: If you’ve grown tired of funk that slips into the jam groove, Lost on Main has something completely different coming this Tuesday (Feb. 19), 7:30 p.m. Super-high-energy L.A. crew Thumpasaurus rocks a seriously weird brand of spazz-funk that is as infectious as it is funny.

For submission guidelines, visit www.newsreview.com/poetry99

DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSIONS: WEDNESDAY, MARCH 6, AT 11:59 P.M. FEBRUARY 14, 2019

CN&R

41


Men Get Huge Surprise From Rub on Cream PAID ADVERTISEMENT

Research shows a new sex cream may be all that’s needed to improve a failing sex life; works directly where its applied, enhancing erections, arousal, and so much more. By Dr. Henry Esber, PhD BOSTON − New research has uncovered that men’s sexual failures may also result from lack of sensation vs. lack of blood flow as we originally suspected. That’s why men are turning to an amazing new sex cream for help. The sex cream categorized as a male cosmetic, called Sensum+®, activates a sensation pathway on the penis known as TRPA1. When applied as directed, it leads to incredible arousal and much more satisfying erections. It also promotes powerful climaxes and ultimately results in significant improvements in performance. “Men can expect outstanding sexual improvements with regular use. The penis will become hyper sensitive, making them easily aroused and excitable” explains Dr. Henry Esber, the Boston based scientist who introduced Sensum+® to market. “And that’s because Sensum+® does what no other sex pill or drug has done before − it stimulates a special sensory pathway right below the skin, which leads to phenomenal sensation.” Overtime, constant exposure (especially if circumcised) leads to decreased penis sensitivity, which can cause problems with arousal and erection quality. There just isn’t enough feeling to get excited.” “Diabetes, anti-depressants and normal aging also leads to desensitization, a can make the situation even worse.” “This is what makes Sensum+® so effective and why the clinical studies and clinical use studies have been so positive.”

MISDIAGNOSIS LEADS TO UNNEEDED PRESCRIPTIONS After years of clinical research and testing, Dr. Esber and his team have discovered an incredible compound that triggers arousal while helping men achieve erections more easily. This compound isn’t a drug. It’s the active ingredient in Sensum+®. And according to users, it produces sensational results. Many men report remarkable improvements in sexual performance and overall satisfaction. They are more sexually active than they’ve been in years with the average Sensum+® user over the age of 50. Clinical studies show Sensum+®’s key ingredient activates the TRPA1 sensation pathway right below the skin of the penis. According to research, many men adults and seniors who suffer sexually have lost sensation in their penis due to constant rubbing and exposure and health related issues such as diabetes, hernia surgery, use of some anti-depressants, multiple sclerosis, and other type of illnesses. This desensitization often makes sex extremely challenging. Without a 100% feeling in the penis, its next to impossible to

get truly aroused. Worse, modern day sex drugs have absolutely no effect on sensation and are laden with side effects. They simply stimulate an erection by enhancing blood flow. It’s why most men are rarely satisfied after taking them and why Sensum+® users are always stocking up on more and couldn’t be happier. “We knew the science behind Sensum+® was there, but we never expected results like we’re seeing. It’s far exceeded our expectations” said a spokesperson for the company.

A STAGGERING 80% IMPROVEMENT IN SENSITIVITY Researchers have conducted several clinical studies on Sensum+® and the results from the most recent are undoubtedly the most impressive. A data analysis of three clinical surveys of 370 men showed that an amazing 80% of Sensum+® users experienced dramatic improvements while using the cream and as a result were aroused easier and a phenomenal boost in performance. Additionally, 77.4% of men also reported much more satisfying climaxes, making sex for both them and their partners nearly 300% more satisfying. “I have full feeling and sensitivity back in my penis. Everything feels better. My erections are harder, I’m more easily aroused, I can finally climax again. This stuff honestly works like magic in the bedroom. I couldn’t be happier at 66!” raves one Sensum+® user.

HOW SENSUM+® WORKS Sensum+® is a new sex cream for men that’s to be applied twice a day for the first two weeks then just once every day after. There are no harmful side effects for either the user or partner. It also does not require a prescription. The active ingredient is an organic compound known as cinnamaldehyde with a patented combination of sexually rousing extracts. Research shows that as men get older, they often lose sensitivity to the penis. Although very subtle, this desensitization can significantly hinder sexual performance and lead to serious problems with becoming aroused and staying/getting hard. The cinnamaldehyde in Sensum+® is one of the only known ingredients to activate a special sensation pathway on the penis called TRPA1. Once activated, it restores tremendous sensation to the penis, stimulating arousal and powerful erections. This would explain why so many users are experiencing impressive results so quickly and why the distributors of Sensum+® offer their low cost cream with an amazing guarantee.

RESEARCH FINDS RESTORING SENSATION VITAL FOR RESTORING SEX LIFE: Sensum activates a special sensory pathway on the penis, enhancing erections and triggering arousal.

GUARANTEE DISCOUNTED SUPPLY TAKES RISK OFF CONSUMERS A large percentage of men report life changing results with Sensum+®. That’s why it is now being sold with an above-industry standard guarantee. “We can only make this guarantee because we are 100% certain this cream works,” says Esber. “We want to take risk off the consumers. So besides offering massive discounts, we’re also offering this guarantee, so they don’t have to risk a cent.” Here’s how it works: Use the cream exactly as directed and you must feel a significant improvement in sexual sensations. You must be more easily aroused with harder, longer lasting erections and be having the best sex you’ve had in years. Otherwise, simply return the empty bottles. Then, the company will refund your money immediately.

HOW TO GET SENSUM+® This is the official release of Sensum+®. As such, the company is offering a special discounted supply to any reader who calls within the next 48 hours. A special hotline number and discounted pricing has been created for all California residents. Discounts will be available starting today at 6:00AM and will automatically be applied to all callers. Your Toll-Free Hotline number is 1-800-530-4661 and will only be open for the next 48 hours. Only a limited discounted supply of Sensum+® is currently available in your region. Consumers who miss out on our current product inventory will have to wait until more becomes available and that could take weeks. The company advises not to wait. Call 1-800-530-4661 today.

THESE STATEMENTS HAVE NOT BEEN BY THE U.S. FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION. THESE PRODUCTS ARE NOT INTENDED TO DIAGNOSE, TREAT, CURE OR PREVENT ANY DISEASE. RESULTS BASED UPON AVERAGES. MODELS ARE USED IN ALL PHOTOS TO PROTECT PRIVACY.

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY For the week oF February 14, 2019 ARIES (March 21-April 19): When

directors of movies say, “It’s a wrap,” they mean that the shooting of a scene has been finished. They may use the same expression when the shooting of the entire film is completed. That’s not the end of the creative process, of course. All the editing must still be done. Once that’s accomplished, the producer may declare that the final product is “in the can” and ready to be released. From what I can determine, Aries, you’re on the verge of being able to say, “It’s a wrap” for one of your own projects. There will be more work before you’re ready to declare, “It’s in the can.”

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): In ac-

cordance with astrological omens, I invite you to create your own royal throne and sit on it whenever you need to think deep thoughts and formulate important decisions. Make sure your power chair is comfortable as well as beautiful and elegant. To enhance your ability to wield your waxing authority with grace and courage, I also encourage you to fashion your own crown, scepter and ceremonial footwear. They, too, should be comfortable, beautiful and elegant.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): In 1995,

astronomer Bob Williams got a strong urge to investigate a small piece of the night sky that most other astronomers regarded as boring. It was near the handle of the constellation known as the Big Dipper. Luckily for him, he could ignore his colleagues because he had been authorized to use the high-powered Hubble Space Telescope for ten days. To the surprise of everyone but Williams, he soon discovered that this seemingly unremarkable part of the heavens is teeming with more than 3,000 galaxies. I suspect you may have a challenge akin to Williams, Gemini. A pet project or crazy notion of yours may not get much support, but I hope you’ll pursue it anyway. I bet your findings will be different from what anyone expects.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): A study by

the Humane Research Council found that more than 80 percent of those who commit to being vegetarians eventually give up and return to eating meat. A study by the National Institute of Health showed that only about 36 percent of alcoholics are able to achieve full recovery. And we all know how many people make New Year’s resolutions to exercise more often, but then stop going to the gym by February. That’s the bad news. The good news, Cancerian, is that during the coming weeks you will possess an enhanced power to stick with any commitment you know is right and good for you. Take advantage!

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Are there two

places on Earth more different from each other than Europe and Africa? Yet there is a place, the Strait of Gibraltar, where the two continents are just 8.7 miles apart. Russia and the United States are also profoundly unlike each other, but only 2.5 miles apart where the Bering Strait separates them. I foresee a metaphorically comparable phenomenon in your life. Two situations or influences or perspectives that may seem to have little in common will turn out to be closer to each other than you imagined possible.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Virgo basket-

ball star Latrell Sprewell played professionally for 13 years. But in 2004, he turned down a $21 million contract extension from Minnesota, complaining that it wouldn’t be sufficient to feed his four children. I will ask you not to imitate his behavior, Virgo. If you’re offered a deal or opportunity that doesn’t perfectly meet all your requirements, don’t dismiss it out of hand. A bit of compromise is sensible right now.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): In 1992, an

Ethiopian man named Belachew Girma became an alcoholic after he saw his wife die from AIDS. And yet today, he is renowned as a Laughter Master, having dedicated himself to explore the healing

by rob brezsny powers of ebullience and amusement. He presides over a school that teaches people the fine points of laughter, and he holds the world record for longest continuous laughter at three hours and six minutes. I nominate him to be your role model in the next two weeks. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you will be especially primed to benefit from the healing power of laughter. You’re likely to encounter more droll and whimsical and hilarious events than usual, and your sense of humor should be especially hearty and finely tuned.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): A study

published in the journal Social Psychological and Personality Science suggests that people who use curse words tend to be more candid. “Swearing is often inappropriate but it can also be evidence that someone is telling you their honest opinion,” said the lead researcher. “Just as they aren’t filtering their language to be more palatable, they’re also not filtering their views.” If that’s true, Scorpio, I’m going to encourage you to curse more than usual in the coming weeks. It’s crucial that you tell as much of the whole truth as is humanly possible. (P.S. Your cursing outbursts don’t necessarily have to be delivered with total abandon everywhere you go. You could accomplish a lot just by going into rooms by yourself and exuberantly allowing the expletives to spill out.)

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec.

21): In the mid-1980s, a California carrot farmer grew frustrated that grocery stories didn’t want to buy his broken and oddly shaped carrots. A lot of his crop was going to waste. Then he got the bright idea to cut and shave the imperfect carrots so as to make smooth little baby carrots. They became a big success. Can you think of a metaphorically comparable adjustment you could undertake, Sagittarius? Is it possible to transform a resource that’s going to waste? Might you be able to enhance your possibilities by making some simple modifications?

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

Mongolia is a huge, landlocked country. It borders no oceans or seas. Nevertheless, it has a navy of seven sailors. Its lone ship is a tugboat moored on Lake Khovsgol, which is 3 percent the size of Lake Superior. I’m offering up the Mongolian navy as an apt metaphor for you to draw inspiration from in the coming weeks. I believe it makes good astrological sense for you to launch a seemingly quixotic quest to assert your power, however modestly, in a situation that may seem out of your league.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “A

freshness lives deep in me which no one can take from me,” wrote poet Swedish poet Gunnar Ekelöf. “Something unstilled, unstillable is within me; it wants to be voiced,” wrote philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche. I propose we make those two quotes your mottoes for the next four weeks. In my opinion, you have a mandate to tap into what’s freshest and most unstillable about you—and then cultivate it, celebrate it and express it with the full power of your grateful, brilliant joy.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): According

to the Encyclopedia of Occultism and Parapsychology, the word “obsession” used to refer to the agitated state of a person who was besieged by rowdy or unruly spirits arriving from outside the person. “Possession,” on the other hand, once meant the agitated state of a person struggling against rowdy or unruly spirits arising from within. In the Western Christian perspective, both modes have been considered primarily negative and problematic. In many other cultures, however, spirits from both the inside and outside have sometimes been regarded as relatively benevolent, and their effect quite positive. As long as you don’t buy into the Western Christian view, I suspect that the coming weeks will be a favorable time for you to consort with spirits like those.

www.RealAstrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888.

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PUBLIC NOTICE OF VACANCY AND APPOINTMENT TO THE BUTTE COUNTY BOARD OF EDUCATION NOTICE is hereby given pursuant to Section 5092 of the Education Code of the State of California that due to a vacancy caused by the resignation of Butte County Board of Education Member Ryne Johnson as Trustee Area 1 Chico District of the Butte County Board of Education effective January 14, 2019, an appointment pursuant to Education Code Section 5091 will be made. Any legally qualified citizen of Butte County who is interested in serving on the County Board can contact Ann Bates, Senior Executive Assistant, at (530) 532-5761 or abates@bcoe.org or go online to www.bcoe.org to obtain the required Candidate Information Sheet. To be considered, interested persons must deliver a completed Candidate Information Sheet to the Board Secretary no later than 4:00p.m., Friday, February 15, 2019 to Butte County Office of Education C/O Anne Bates or by email abates@bcoe.org. Following the announcement of candidates by the Board President, interviews of qualified candidates will take place at the Butte County Office of Education, 1859 Bird Street, Oroville, California, on a date and time to be determined. On a date and

time to be determined, the Board of Education shall make a provisional appointment to the County Board Trustee area 1 Chico District. Unless a petition calling for a special election containing a sufficient number of signatures is filed in the office of the Butte County Superintendent of Schools, 1859 Bird Street, Oroville, CA 95965, within thirty (30) days of the appointment, it shall become final. AIRLINE CAREERS begin here - Get started by training as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Mainetenance 800725-1563 (AAN CAN) Johns Manville is hiring for INDUSTRIAL MAINTENANCE MECHANICS and INDUSTRIAL ELECTRICIANS at our Willows, CA facility. Starting wage $29.04/hr, increase to $31.79/hr after prob period. View full job description & apply on-line at www.jm.com/careers - search on: U.S. and Canada, Click on California on the map, Select the JM icon at Willows, Select job title

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as WILD COUNTRY COURIER at 23 Ranchita Way Chico, CA 95928. CATHY ATKINSON 23 Ranchita Way Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: CATHY A. ATKINSON Dated: January 14, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000070 Published: January 24,31, February 7,14, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as SNACKING VENDING at 467 E 9th St Chico, CA 95928. CAMERON WADE MATTEUCCI 467 E 9th St Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: CAMERON MATTEUCCI Dated: January 11, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000063 Published: January 24,31, February 7,14, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CHICO CREEK SIGNS at 195 E Shasta Ave. Rear Bldg Chico, CA 95973. BENJAMIN LLOYD ANDERSON 408 Weymouth Way Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: BENJAMIN L. ANDERSON Dated: January 15, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000078 Published: January 24,31, February 7,14, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ACORNS TO OAKS DAYCARE at 93 St. Francis Dr Chico, CA 95926. SHANNON FAE SIVADON 93 St. Francis Dr Chico, CA 95926.

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This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: SHANNON SIVADON Dated: January 16, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000087 Published: January 24,31, February 7,14, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as RUSTIC SHEARS at 225 Main Street, Suite E Chico, CA 95926. BONNIE SUE PATTERSON 539 Castle Drive Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: BONNIE PATTERSON Dated: January 15, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000081 Published: January 24,31, February 7,14, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CAST AND CUSTOM METAL FABRICATION INC., CAST AND CUSTOM WELDING at 1384 Durham Dayton Highway Durham, CA 95938. CAST AND CUSTOM METAL FABRICATION INC. 1384 Durham-Dayton Hwy Durham, CA 95938. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: BRETT PRUETT, OWNER Dated: December 26, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001550 Published: January 24,31, February 7,14, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as STRUCTURAL SOLUTIONS at 2176 Esplanade Chico, CA 95926. JEREMY PEARCE 12 Creekwood Court Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JEREMY PEARCE Dated: January 14, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000072 Published: January 24,31, February 7,14, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as 432 at 1929 Mangrove Ave Chico, CA 95926. ALEXANDRA KRIZ 555 Vallombrosa Ave #48 Chico, CA 95926. JAMES ANTHONY SPALLINA III 702 Mangrove Ave #125 Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: JAMES SPALLINA Dated; January 16, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000089 Published: January 24,31, February 7,14, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as IRON STATE PRESS at 978 Salem St., Unit B Chico, CA 95928. ALEC MARTIN BINYON 978 Salem St., Unit B Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ALEC BINYON Dated: January 18, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000105 Published: January 24,31, February 7,14, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PARADISE SALON at 1600 Mangrove Ave Ste 140 Chico, CA 95926. TERRI L COOPER 830 Alynn Way #A Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: TERRI L. COOPER Dated: January 3, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000013 Published: January 24,31, February 7,14, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CREATIVE RECLAIMED WOODS at 2568 Fair St. Chico, CA 95928. RACHEL NICOLE MCMILLAN 2235 Dorado Cerro Chico, CA 95928. SCOTT ERIC MCMILLAN 2235 Dorado Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: RACHEL MCMILLAN Dated: December 21, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001547 Published: January 31, February 7,14,21, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as MORRISON at 10 Landing Circle, #5 Chico, CA 95973. MORRISON AND COMPANY CONSULTING, INC 10 Landing Circle, #5 Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: R. BRENT MORRISON, PRESIDENT Dated: January 10, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000051 Published: January 31, February 7,14,21, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as KEN’S PARADISE HITCH AND WELDING at 919 Easy Street Paradise, CA 95969. DALE JOSEPH GOMES 3254 Indian Springs Rd Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: DALE J GOMES Dated: January 14, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000077 Published: January 31, February 7,14,21, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CARING CHOICE HOUSES LLC at 878 Palermo Road Oroville, CA 95965. CARING CHOICE HOUSES LLC 878 Palermo Road Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: PHILLIP L. WILSON, PRESIDENT Dated: January 22, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000111 Published: January 31, February 7,14,21, 2019

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as HANDYCRAFT at 6369 Cohasset Road Chico, CA 95973. JOSEPH DANNIEL PARCHER 6369 Cohasset Road Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JOSEPH PARCHER Dated: January 3, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000015 Published: January 31, February 7,14,21, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as FUROCIOUS PETS at 679 E 9th St Apt 3 Chico, CA 95928. DANIEL THOMAS LEVULETT 679 E 9th St Apt 3 Chico, CA 95928. TAYLOR LEVULETT 679 E 9th St Apt 3 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed; DANIEL LEVULETT Dated: January 25, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000133 Published: January 31, February 7,14,21, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as ARTISTS OF RIVER TOWN, STUDIO AT THE BRUSHSTROKES GALLERY at 1967 Montgomery Street Oroville, CA 95965. ARTISTS OF RIVER TOWN 277 Olive Hwy Suite A Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: DAVID I TAMORI, PRESIDENT Dated: January 24, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000131 Published: January 31, February 7,14,,21, 2019

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following person has abandoned the use of the fictitious business name SCOOTERS CAFE at 11975 Highway 70 Oroville, CA 95965. MICHAEL SCOTT ENGLUND 3819 Grizzly Creek Rd Yankee Hill, CA 95965. This business was conducted by an Individual. Signed: MICHAEL ENGLUND Dated: January 29, 2019 FBN Number: 2016-0001506 Published: February 7,14,21,28, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as COMANCHE CREEK FARMS, HAND IN GARDEN INC at 260 Speedway Avenue Chico, CA 95928. HAND IN GARDEN INC 260 Speedway Avenue Chico, CA 95928. GWENDOLYM M MILLER 260 Speedway Avenue Chico, CA 95928. JAMES GAYL MILLER 260 Speedway Avenue Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: JAMES G. MILLER, PRESIDENT Dated: January 25, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000132 Published: February 7,14,21,28, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BEST CLEANING AND WINDOW SERVICE, BEST WINDOW CLEANING SERVICE at 1711 Mulberry St Chico, CA 95928. LARRY ROBERT LACZKO 1711 Mulberry St Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: LARRY LACZKO Dated: January 22, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000113 Published: February 7,14,21,28, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATMENT The following persons are doing business as COMPANIONS ANIMAL HOSPITAL at 2607 Esplanade Chico, CA 95973. VALERIE DYINA CARUSO 1178 Hill View Way Chico, CA 95926. REBECCA MANNINEN 1178 Hill View Way Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: VALERIE CARUSO, PRES Dated: January 28, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000137 Published: February 7,14,21,28, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as HATHA HOUSE at 13948 Lindbergh Circle Chico, CA 95973. TATIANA LOONEY 13948 Lindbergh Circle Chico, CA 95973. ZURI OSTERHOLT 725 Alder Street Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: ZURI OSTERHOLT Dated: January 31, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000161 Published: February 7,14,21,28, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as AN HONEST DEFENSE INVESTIGATIVE SERVICE at 8010 Reservoir Rd Oroville, CA 95966. MARY ANN BARR 8010 Reservoir Rd Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: MARY ANN BARR Dated: January 24, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000127 Published: February 7,14,21,28, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as HAPPY DAY RESTAURANT at 14455 Skyway Magalia, CA 95954. MERRY YANG NO. ONE, INC. 2848 Cactus Ave Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: ZHONGMEI YANG, PRESIDENT Dated: January 17, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000101 Published: February 7,14,21,28, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as

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G TOWN HOT SHOP AND GLASS ART GALLERY at 2280 Ivy St Suite 120 Chico, CA 95928. ANDREW LIBECKI 2280 Ivy St Suite 120 Chico, CA 95928. BRYON SUTHERLAND 2280 Ivy St Suite 120 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: BRYON SUTHERLAND Dated: January 17, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000104 Published: February 7,14,21,28, 2019

FICTITOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as SCOOTERS CAFE at 11975 Highway 70 Oroville, CA 95965. BONNIE SALMON 4132 Deadwood Rd Oroville, CA 95965. DANIEL RICHARD SALMON 4132 Deadwood Rd Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: DAN SALMON Dated; January 29, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000143 Published: February 7,14,21,28, 2019

FICTITOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BARON TRANSPORT SERVICES at 6346 Baston Lane Paradise, CA 95969. GREGORY ALAN BARON 6346 Baston Lane Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: GREGORY A. BARON Dated: January 30, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000152 Published: February 7,14,21,28, 2019

FICTITOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as X TECH at 2707 Fay Way Oroville, CA 95966. NENG XIONG 2707 Fay Way Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: NENG XIONG Dated: January 29, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000145 Published: February 7,14,21,28, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PINKACHII, PINKACHII.COM at 1125 Sheridan Avenue Apt 67 Chico, CA 95926. FAIRE PAJ HUAB YANG 1125 Sheridan Avenue Apt 67 Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: FAIRE YANG Dated: January 22, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000121 Published: February 14,21,28, March 7, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS ANME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CHINA MASSAGE at 236 W East Avenue, Suite F Chico, CA 95926. JAMES RANDALL HILLYARD 249 E. Tehama Street Orland, CA 95963. XIUFENG LI 249 E. Tehama Street Orland, CA 95963. This business is conducted by

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a Married Couple. Signed: JAMES HILLYARD Dated: February 5, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000180 Published: February 14,21,28, March 7, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CRUNCH BOOK at 272 Rio Bravo Court Corning, CA 96021. APRIL MARIE HAMBEK 272 Rio Bravo Court Corning, CA 96021. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: APRIL HAMBEK Dated: January 22, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000119 Published: February 14,21,28, March 7, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as GEODEV SOLUTIONS, GEOSPATIAL DEVELOPMENT SOLUTIONS at 14023 Pineland Circle Magalia, CA 95954. MATTHEW KYLE BRUSH 14023 Pineland Circle Magalia, CA 95954. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: MATT BRUSH Dated: February 6, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000182 Published: February 14,21,28, March 7, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BUYVET at 10 Mione Way Chico, CA 95926. KURT STEVEN LARSEN 10 Mione Way Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: KURT LARSEN Dated: February 1, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000167 Published: February 14,21,28, March 7, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CHICO USED CARS at 2405 Esplanade Chico, CA 95926. DR AUTO INC 2405 Esplanade Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: ROBERTO J. LUGO, PRESIDENT Dated: February 6, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000183 Published: February 14,21,28, March 7, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PARADISE STRONG COFFEE HUT at 6840 Skyway Paradise, CA 95969. KIM RENEE REINOLDS 573 Castle Dr Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: KIM REINOLDS Dated: January 4, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000024 Published: February 14,21,28, March 7, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as AGS CONSTRUCTION

this Legal Notice continues

SERVICES at 1252 Wagstaff Road Paradise, CA 95969. ALPHONSE G SPERSKE 1252 Wagstaff Road Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ALPHONSE SPERSKE Dated: February 8, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000196 Publsihed: February 14,21,28, March 7, 2019

NOTICES NOTICE OF LIEN SALE Pursuant to CA Business Code 21700, in lieu of rents due, the following units contain clothes, furniture, boxes, etc. 072cc DOLORES DAVENPORT 6x9 (Bags, Totes, Boxes) 173ss DOLORES DAVENPORT 7x12 (Boxes, Bins, Luggage) 300ss SHANE GOINS 5x10 (Bed set, Boxes) 238ss JOSE ARTEAGA 6x10 (Couch Set, Furniture, TV) 233ss PAUL JONES 6x12 (Boxes, Bins, Luggage) 332ss ANTOINETTE GRIFFITH 6x12 (House hold items, Boxes, Bins) 205ss CARA MAYS 6x12 (Boxes Bins) 476cc BRADLEY JOHN MCPETERS 5x6 (Bins, Boxes, Bags, Deco) Contents to be sold to the highest bidder on: Saturday March 2, 2019 Beginning at 1:00pm Sale to be held at: Bidwell Self Storage, 65 Heritage Lane, Chico, CA 95926. (530) 893-2109 Published: February 14,21, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner LAURA LIZETTE ARRIAZA filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: LAURA LIZETTE ARRIAZA Proposed name: LAURA LIZETTE HOLGUIN THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: March 13, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: January 16, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00144 Published: January 24,31, February 7,14, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner CYNTHIA MARIE CAMPAGNA filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows:

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Present name: CYNTHIA MARIE CAMPAGNA Proposed name: CINZIA MARIE CAMPAGNA THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: March 6, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: January 9, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00067 Published: January 24,31, February 7,14, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner ANDREA NARCISO filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: WARNER BURKE ALLEN Proposed name: WARNER BURKE ALLEN NARCISO THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: March 13, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: January 9, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00062 Published: January 24,31, February 7,14, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner MICHAEL STILLWELL and ANGELA WENTZELL filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: SHANE OWEN WENTZELL Proposed name: SHANE OWEN STILLWELL THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described

this Legal Notice continues


above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: February 27, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: December 31, 2019 Case Number: 18CV03097 Published: January 31, February 7,14,21, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner CHRISTINA OXLEY filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: KINZLEE ANN QUINN Proposed name: KINZLEE ANN OXLEY THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: March 27, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: D1 Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: January 25, 2019 Case Number: 18CV03574 Published: January 31, February 7,14,21, 2019

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ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner JORDAN LANE MONATH and KATIE ELIZABETH ARRIGONI filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: JAYDON LANE BRASIER-MONATH Proposed name: JAYDON LANE MONATH THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: April 10, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: February 4, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00413 Published: February 14,21,28, March 7, 2019

PETITION NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE RICHARD W. ROGERS, also known as RICHARD WILLIAM ROGERS To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: RICHARD W. ROGERS, also known as RICHARD WILLIAM ROGERS A Petition for Probate has been filed by: RYAN J. ALLEN in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: RYAN J. ALLEN be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration

this Legal Notice continues

authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: February 19, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: NICOLE R. PLOTTEL 466 Vallombrosa Ave. Chico CA, 95926 (530)893-2882 Case Number: 19PR00040 Dated: January 23, 2019 Published: January 31, February 7,14, 2019

authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: March 5, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: 10 Room: 2 Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: STEVAN N. LUZAICH 700 El Camino Real Millbrae, CA 94030 (650) 871-5666 Case Number: 19PR00045 Dated: January 24, 2019 Published: February 7,14,21, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE SHIRLEY HALEY, aka SHIRLEY ANN HALEY, aka SHIRLEY A. HALEY To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: SHIRLEY HALEY, aka SHIRLEY ANN HALEY, aka SHIRLEY A. HALEY A Petition for Probate has been filed by: GLENN CARLSON in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: GLENN CARLSON be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE BARBARA JEAN CARLSON aka BARBARA CARLSON aka BARBARA J. CARLSON To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: BARBARA JEAN CARLSON, aka BARBARA CARLSON, aka BARBARA J. CARLSON a petition for Probate has been filed by: GLENN CARLSON in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: GLENN CARLSON be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration

this Legal Notice continues

this Legal Notice continues

authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: March 5, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: 10 Room: 2 Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: STEVAN N. LUZAICH 700 El Camino Real Millbrae, CA 94030 (650) 871-5666 Case Number: 19PR00043 Dated: January 24, 2019 Published: February 7,14,21, 2019

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ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner CONNIE ANN RODDEN filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: CONNIE ANN RODDEN Proposed name: CONNIE ANN MULLEN THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: March 27, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA

Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: January 23, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00111 Published: February 14,21,28, March 7, 2019

➡ FEBRUARY 14, 2019

CN&R

45


REAL ESTATE

FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT ADVERTISING IN OUR REAL ESTATE SECTION, CALL 530-894-2300

Love’s Real estate

Boom and Bust

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Well maintained home in a quiet residential neighborhood. Good sized bedrooms, dine in kitchen with newer flooring, wood stove insert in living room with original hardwood flooring. Newer roof, HVAC & ductwork, water softener and vinyl windows.

Mark reaMan

realtor century 21 select real estate lIc #01265853 (530) 228-2229

People ask for predictions from people like me in the real estate business, about the future of the local real estate market in the aftermath of the Camp Fire. Our market went crazy immediately after the fire. Houses are selling way above asking price, and inventory is reduced to almost nothing. The question is whether this fast-paced market can be sustained or not. Unfortunately, my crystal ball is smoky-hazy. I stare into that ball, spin it, shake it, hold a hammer over it, and no picture comes through. I talk to a lot of Realtors, builders, businesspeople and bartenders. The ones who have the guts to make predictions about our real estate future seem strongly divided into two camps: The boom camp and the bust camp. One Realtor friend of mine, Carl, is never shy about his opinions or his willingness to predict the future. Carl is in the bust camp. “Tell me, Doug,” said Carl, “what was your take on the local real estate market as of November 7, 2018, the day before the Camp Fire?” “Well,” I said, “at that time we were seeing trends toward a softening market, and we were cautioning our sellers against over-pricing, and–” “And why was the market softening at that time?” asked Carl.

He was bearing down on me in his annoying attorney crossexamination style, angling toward pinning me to the mat with my own words. “Interest rates were on the rise,” I said, “and–” “Interest rates were on the rise!” pounced Carl. “And have interest rates fallen since then?” “Well, no, but–” “Then why would we expect the market to do anything other than return to the normal of last November, once we get past this frenzy caused by the Camp Fire?” he asked. “Well,” I said, “one theory is that an economic boom will be generated by the rebuilding of Paradise.” “Can anyone offer a shred of certainty as to when this rebuild will begin?” asked Carl. “Not exactly.” “No further questions,” said Carl.

Doug Love is Sales Manager at Century 21 in Chico. Call 530-680-0817 or email dougwlove@gmail.com License #950289

Homes are Selling in Your Neighborhood Shop every home for sale at www.C21SelectGroup.com

530.345.6618 Steve KaSpRzyK (KAS-peR-ziK)

13988 Persimmon 4 bd 3 ba 1 acre

You don’t have to spell it out for me to sell it! 27 years representing clients in our area Century 21 Select Chico California c21falconer@gmail.com

14056 Hereford 2 homes on 1 lot w/ Large shops $989,000 385 E.12th - 6 unit Apartment complex $699,000

(530) 518–4850 License#01145231

$813,988

Paul Champlin | (530) 828-2902 Making Your Dream Home a Reality

3 bed 2 bath in Magalia with lots of upgrades! Call now for more info & private showings! CalDRE #02056059

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Homes Sold Last Week ADDRESS

TOWN

54 Abbott Cir 4755 Frazier Ln 61 Temperance Way 790 W 11th Ave 611 Windham Way 3246 Rogue River Dr 601 El Varano Way 3177 Wood Creek Dr 72 River Wood Loop 2862 Beachcomber Cv 833 Saint Amant Dr

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico

46

CN&R

FEBRUARY 14, 2019

PRICE $705,000 $695,000 $500,000 $497,000 $490,000 $489,000 $475,000 $475,000 $470,000 $450,000 $450,000

BR/BA 4/3 3/2 3/2 2/1 4/3 4/2 3/2 3/2 3/2 3/2 3/2

AFFORDABLE... move in ready! Cozy home, 2 bd/1 bath, sits on large lot w/large side area for parking andS RVO access to back yard. LD Home includes a basement (3 rooms) A Must See...

FOR SALE

SMILeS ALWAyS!

Reduced educed to

$219,900

Lic# 01506350

Joyce Turner

(530) 570–1944 • joyce_turner@ymail.com

Sponsored by Century 21 Select Real Estate, Inc. SQ. FT. 3073 2355 1722 936 2523 2216 1656 1800 1662 1580 1856

ADDRESS

TOWN

409 Idyllwild Cir 129 Delaney Dr 29 Bunker Ct 1433 Oleander Ave 6 Windmill Ct 2848 Burnap Ave 59 Glenbrook Ct 816 Penstemon Way 2088 Marilyn Dr 206 Mission Serra Ter 13 Hemming Ln

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico

PRICE $446,000 $439,000 $425,000 $415,000 $408,000 $405,000 $405,000 $405,000 $385,000 $380,000 $375,000

BR/BA 3/2 3/2 3/2 4/2 2/2 3/2 3/2 3/2 3/2 3/2 3/3

SQ. FT. 1653 1565 1653 1388 1481 1364 1882 1393 1306 1734 1286


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CN&R Is LookINg FoR AN AdveRtIsINg CoNsuLtANt the Chico news & review is a family owned business that has been part of the Chico community since 1977. our mission is to publish great newspapers which are successful and enduring, create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow while respecting personal welfare, and to have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live.

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In gated community, 2,628 sq ft, built in 2001, 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, 3 car sold garage, family room plus den. Home is beautifully landscaped and has solar, $565,000.00.

235 acres located in the Beautiful setting of Butte Valley. Offering 2 newer stunning custom homes, horse set up, out buildings, and fully fenced property. Wonderful opportunity to have privacy with $1,650,000 enough acres to have horses, cattle or just the peaceful setting that this has to offer

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Kimberley Tonge l 530.518.5508 Lic# 01318330

Alice Zeissler l 530.518.1872 CalBRE #01312354

The following houses were sold in Butte County by real estate agents or private parties during the week of January 28 - February 1, 2019 The housing prices are based on the stated documentary transfer tax of the parcel and may not necessarily reflect the actual sale price of the home. ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

SQ. FT.

ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

1021 Isaac James Ave

Chico

$352,773

3/2

2054

1259 Hobart St

Chico

$280,000

3/1

1150

1732 Diamond Ave

Chico

$352,000

3/2

1552

1112 Marian Ave

Chico

$280,000

3/1

1508

2612 White Ave

Chico

$350,000

5/2

1656

2612 Tuolumne Dr

Chico

$275,000

3/2

1585

11 Turnbridge Welles

Chico

$348,000

3/2

1540

2115 Mansfield Ct

Chico

$236,000

3/2

1215

17 Dean Way

Chico

$345,500

4/2

1569

3187 Rodeo Ave

Chico

$208,000

3/2

1907

43 Morning Rose Way

Chico

$339,000

3/2

1600

555 Vallombrosa Ave #40

Chico

$169,000

1/1

702

1618 E Lassen Ave

Chico

$330,000

2/2

999

522 Nord Ave #16

Chico

$152,500

2/2

960

721 Wayne Ln

Chico

$330,000

3/2

1177

683 E 19th St

Chico

$120,000

4/2

1176

722 Victorian Park Dr

Chico

$325,000

3/2

1131

120 Mclaughlin Way

Chico

$119,000

1/1

720

21 San Ramon Dr

Chico

$300,000

3/2

1160

106 Shelterwood Ln

Oroville

$615,000

4/3

2710

2223 Hutchinson St

Chico

$299,000

3/3

1920

70 Harry Ln

Oroville

$450,000

4/3

2432

FEBRUARY 14, 2019

SQ. FT.

CN&R

47


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