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CHICO’S FREE NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY VOLUME 42, ISSUE 24 THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2019 WWW.NEWSREVIEW.COM

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CN&R

INSIDE

Vol. 42, Issue 24 • February 7, 2019

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Editorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Guest Comment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Second & Flume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 This Modern World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Streetalk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

NEWSLINES

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Downstroke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Sifter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9

HEALTHLINES

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Weekly Dose. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

GREENWAYS

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Eco Event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS

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15 Minutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 The Goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

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COVER STORY

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ARTS & CULTURE

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Arts Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 This Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Fine Arts listings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Nightlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Reel World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Chow. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Arts DEVO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Brezsny’s Astrology . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35

CLASSIFIEDS

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REAL ESTATE

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OPINION

ON THE COVER: PHOTO OF RED TAVERN BY WENDY STEWART

Our Mission: To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. Editor Melissa Daugherty Managing Editor Meredith J. Cooper Arts Editor Jason Cassidy Contributing Editor Evan Tuchinsky Staff Writer Ashiah Scharaga Calendar Editor Nate Daly

Managing Art Director Tina Flynn Creative Services Manager Elisabeth Bayard Arthur Ad Designer Naisi Thomas Custom Publications Designer Katelynn Mitrano Director of Sales and Advertising Jamie DeGarmo Advertising Services Coordinator Ruth Alderson Senior Advertising Consultants Brian Corbit, Laura Golino Advertising Consultants Adam Lew, Jordon Vernau Office Assistant Jennifer Osa Distribution Director Greg Erwin Distribution Staff Ken Gates, Bob Meads, Pat Rogers, Larry Smith, Placido Torres, Jeff Traficante, Bill Unger, Lisa Van Der Maelen, David Wyles

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N&R Publications Editor Michelle Carl N&R Publications Associate Editor Laura Hillen N&R Publications Writer Anne Stokes Marketing & Publications Consultants Steve Caruso, Joseph Engle, Elizabeth Morabito, Traci Hukill, Luke Roling, Celeste Worden 353 E. Second Street, Chico, CA 95928 Phone (530) 894-2300 Fax (530) 892-1111 Website www.newsreview.com Got a News Tip? (530) 894-2300, ext 2224 or chiconewstips@newsreview.com Calendar Events cnrcalendar@newsreview.com Calendar Questions (530) 894-2300, ext. 2243 Want to Advertise? Fax (530) 892-1111 or cnradinfo@newsreview.com Classifieds (530) 894-2300, press 2 or classifieds@newsreview.com Job Opportunities jobs@newsreview.com Want to Subscribe to CN&R? chisubs@newsreview.com Editorial Policies: Opinions expressed in CN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons, or other portions of the paper. CN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or review materials. Email letters to cnrletters@newsreview.com. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form and to edit them for libel. Advertising Policies: All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes the responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. CN&R is printed at PressWorks Ink on recycled newsprint. Circulation of CN&R is verified by the Circulation Verification Council. CN&R is a member of Chico Chamber of Commerce, Oroville Chamber of Commerce, Downtown Chico Business Association, CNPA, AAN and AWN. Circulation 38,650 copies distributed free weekly.

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CN&R

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OPINION

Send guest comments, 340 words maximum, to gc@newsreview.com or to 353 E. Second St., Chico, CA 95928. Please include photo & short bio.

EDITORIAL

Be careful what you believe The CN&R over the years has been contacted by

people who can’t resist passing along a good conspiracy theory. One, a woman in Chico who’s genial but insistent, emails links to exposés of such hidden “truths” as an environmental regime plotting world domination and a sex trafficking ring, run out of a pizzeria, tied to Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign. Needless to say, her emails go in the round file. There’s a fine line between vigilance and paranoia. While we don’t claim to be mental health professionals, we’re pretty good at sorting out plausible explanations from dot-connecting that’s absurd. Take the growing buzz about lasers causing the Camp Fire. If you haven’t heard this already, feel free to pause and process: People believe lasers caused the Camp Fire. Writings, videos and photos—including one of a SpaceX rocket launching from Vandenberg Air Force Base—keep popping up online. Internet “experts” posit that the government used “directed energy weapons” to ignite the blaze. Why? One explanation cites creating a distraction from the mass shooting in Las Vegas—subject of other conspiracy theories, incidentally. Another explanation puts the Camp Fire in a continuum with other California wildfires that purportedly clear private properties for

a proposed high-speed rail route. As if the bullet train would ever stop in Paradise. This nonsense is relatively innocuous. Laser talk feeds off anti-government sentiment already rampant in far right-wing corners of the internet and far-Northern California; it’s not doing much damage that we can see. We’re more concerned about conspiracy theories that actually harm. In this, we point the finger squarely at anti-vaxxers. A measles outbreak that started in southwest Washington had spread to 10 states, including California, by the CN&R’s deadline. The initial outbreak occurred predominantly among unvaccinated children. That means this health crisis—measles can be fatal—was preventable. Parents let this happen, to their kids and others. The MMR vaccine (measles, mumps, rubella) is 97 percent effective after two doses, 93 percent after one. There’s no credible scientifically established link between the MMR vaccine and autism. Don’t believe us? Myriad medical sources offer this information. Anti-vaxxers on the progressive side may not like being lumped with the Infowars crowd. Sorry, the tinfoil hat fits. Conspiracy theories may be good for a laugh, but when they jeopardize lives, they’re no joke.Ω

GUEST COMMENT

The burning continues ICross: not want to hear are words like these, as from the Red “Prior to shelter closings, Red Cross caseworkers t is nearly three months on, and what fire people do

connect one-on-one with people to create recovery plans unique to their needs, help them navigate paperwork and connect with aid from other community agencies.” Or words like these, as from Supervisor Debra Lucero: “The case management model that had previously been used by the Red Cross was not achieving the results the DESS had desired. They began to employ a new model of by RED. It takes the most high-needs Kevin Jeys and barrier-prone individuals and The author, a former assesses their needs.” CN&R staff writer, There is no life in these words. is a Paradise resident No human beings. No suffering. who stayed on the Such words are masks. Obscuring Ridge throughout the the Real. The Real that people are Camp Fire and its burning. aftermath. What do such words even mean? Nothing.

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DESS. RED. Model. Case management. Barrierprone. Assesses their needs. Navigate paperwork. Recovery plans. Connect with aid. None of those words are real. What is real is that the people these words mask are people burning. They were burning three months ago. And they are burning today. This is why Melissa Daugherty’s serial Second & Flume columns on the Red Cross abandonment of fire people are so valuable. Because she speaks truth. And she is speaking it, seemingly, alone. “Where is the outrage?” she asks. The outrage, it seems, is confined to her alone. And to every fire person. Who are too at sea—afloat, abandoned, ignored, robbed, brushed off, told what a burden they are—to speak for themselves. All you all: You’re better than this. You acted like it in the days and weeks directly after the fire. Act like it now. This is the first time in the history of the modern United States that an entire town burned down. Nobody asked for this. Here. But it’s here. It erased the lives of your neighbors. It’s not going away. And these are still your neighbors. And not even your neighbors. What they really are is you. Ω

SECOND & FLUME by Melissa Daugherty m e l i s s a d @ n e w s r e v i e w. c o m

Pick the disaster It has snowed on a few occasions in Chico that I can recall. But my favorite time was back in the early 2000s while I was attending college. Back then, I lived deep in the orchards—on a former working almond and walnut farm, where my late granddad raised cattle— just outside of Hamilton City. There, I awoke to tend to my morning chores, including feeding my three horses. I think they were as surprised as I was when I opened the back door and entered a white winter landscape. They’d never seen snow stick, nor had my German shepherd, who shot up as soon as he heard me put on my jacket. That dog lived to accompany me every morning as I headed for the alfalfa piled in the barn, and the scratchy sound of the synthetic fibers of my favorite down coat resulted in Pavlov’s dog minus the food and drool. I had enough time to play in the snow, including snapping some photos as evidence, before heading to Chico State, where my classmates were similarly enthralled. Fast-forward to Tuesday morning of this week, when I awoke to a snow-covered yard, and my reaction was less enthusiastic. I shot out of bed when my husband called out to me about it, but my thoughts quickly turned to the folks who live on Chico’s streets. I cringe when I think about them enduring this bitter cold. Given the situation with the Red Cross—first booting the so-called “predisaster homeless” from the emergency shelter at the fairgrounds and then moving on to certain Camp Fire evacuees—there likely are more people unsheltered in Chico than ever before. There’s nothing like a natural disaster to bring people together, so I had a bit of hope after the wildfire that we’d see more support locally in terms of services for our poverty-stricken neighbors. And not just those who lost shelter due to the fire, but also those who’ve long struggled with homelessness. There are some potentially fruitful irons in the fire on that front in Chico—such as proposals for a year-round low-barrier shelter and a frigid-temperature emergency option (see Ashiah Scharaga’s City Council report, on page 10, to learn more about the latter)—but I’m also seeing a lot of negativity in response. That includes a woman who says she’s gathered 2,000 signatures of local people who want the panel to prohibit the aforementioned low-barrier shelter from being run near churches, neighborhoods or downtown. Evidently, she’s unaware of the one that’s been operating seasonally without issue for years. Sadly, I’ve come to the conclusion that people’s memories are short when it comes to disasters. Let’s remember that, over the last decade or so, plenty of them have laid waste to people’s lives. Take, for example, the Great Recession. That catastrophic economic nightmare—largely attributable to Wall Street and real estate fraud— destabilized the lives of at least 4 million homeowners, via foreclosure. Or, consider the opioid crisis—largely spurred because the drugs are cheap or were over-prescribed by doctors courted by pharmaceutical companies—a malady that has killed millions and left other dependent, broken and unhoused. Whatever disaster, we’re still talking about human beings. There’s no debating that.

Melissa Daugherty is editor of the CN&R


LETTERS

Send email to cnrletters@newsreview.com

About that wall

City slackers

To better reflect the spirit of our time, I submit the following rewrite of the first stanza of “America the Beautiful”: O pitiful, rapacious eyes, for amber waves of hair For purple mountains full of coal, let’s mine them ’til they’re bare. America, America, a place that’s just for me, To keep others out, let’s build a wall, from sea to shining sea.

Re “Ask the developers” (Letters, by Scott Huber, Jan. 31): Councilman Scott Huber makes this case: “Our developers appear to be better positioned than the city to assist with suitable land for emergency [FEMA] housing.” I respectfully disagree. It may be that there are FEMA units requiring the equivalent infrastructure of a mobile home park. And it may be that private property slated for development is the easiest, go-to sort of location. And, it may be that developers are balking at participating in a FEMA program. But, any suggestion that resistance on the part of private property owners can cover our three-month, city of Chico failure to act, is just too convenient. What incentives has the city offered private landowners, possibly with financial assistance from the North Valley Community Foundation? None. Is it true that FEMA would refuse to install

Dan Johnson Chico

President Trump is not going to get his wall because the majority of the people don’t want it. He can, however, still make good on his big promise to make America great again by following Richard Nixon’s example and resigning before he is indicted. Kelly Youngs Chico

Your plumbing mobile homes on park land or airport land or any of Chico’s surplus properties? No. All that aside, there are FEMA “camp” trailers now in other cities, sited in parking lots, requiring no sewer hookups. Any in Chico? Zero. Bottom line: By the threemonth anniversary of the Camp Fire, displacing 30,000 people, there will not be one person sheltered through a city of Chico initiative of any kind. Patrick Newman Chico

Sewer on the Ridge Everyone in Chico has been affected by the Camp Fire tragedy. Before the fire, Paradise was full of crap. Literally. There was talk of running a pipe down to Chico and hooking into the sewage treatment plant. The news just had a story about LETTERS c o n t i n u e d

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how the influx of people is putting a strain on the system. The people of Chico have opened our hearts, homes, wallets and toilets to the people of Paradise. What more can we do? Now is the perfect time for the town of Paradise to find a location on the Ridge and build their own sewage treatment plant if they want to properly rebuild the town. William Strom Chico

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LETTERS c o n t i n u e d f r o m pa g e 5

More Camp Fire talk I was watching KRCR news. One of the stories featured a man (didn’t catch is name) in some emergency authoritative position talking about the Camp Fire. The segment featured some 911 call replays wherein people were reporting they could see fire. The dispatcher told them, “No, you’re not.” The man concluded the interview saying something to the effect that everything was handled brilliantly and couldn’t imagine how it might have been better. And therein lies at least one problem. When those in authority respond to you as if you had marbles instead of brain cells in your head, you’re not likely to get the response you need. I have experienced this myself. Others have related to me similar results. In the news, from time-to-time, one can see similar situations. I know not all in authority think everyone else is stupid and can’t know what they’re talking about. But it seems enough do. Until those in response positions can be identified and retrained, we will continue to have tragedies worse than they might have been. So, emergency personnel, if I ever call you to report a, well, emergency, please do not condescendingly treat me like I’m a babbling idiot. Thank you. Sandra Jarosz Red Bluff

Debris questions The two [sorting] sites in Oroville were announced recently. Amazingly, the following day, they were all ready to accept the waste/debris from Paradise. One near Walmart and the other near Feather River. I feel this was done solely to slip into Oroville under everyone’s noses, so no one will have a say on

“By the three-month anniversary of the Camp Fire, displacing 30,000 people, there will not be one person sheltered through a city of Chico initiative of any kind.”

—patrick newman

where it is going. Not like Chico; they heard about it and said no. Obviously, someone somewhere told all concerned to not notify anyone. Was this done to avoid protests? I feel this debris will be loaded with toxic chemicals. The concrete had toxic material flowing through to the soil below. Loading it on trucks, they intend to “wash” the load free of surface dust/cinders. These loads will be wrapped “… to decrease the chance of toxic ash during transport” (Sacramento Bee, Jan. 10). Officials say loads will be toxin-free? I feel inside the concrete will contain a toxic “bomb” waiting to go off. When the trucks arrive for processing, [the contents] will be crushed. Where does this dust go? The metal during washing, will all toxic material be removed? Will any processing cause dust? Will toxins be present? Maybe yes, maybe no. Take your pick. Zane Libert Palermo

Dangerous POTUS Security lapses in the current Trump administration are not rare. For instance, for more than a year, senior adviser and son-in-law Jared Kushner had been allowed access to highly classified information while having only a downgraded interim security clearance. Besides repeatedly changing his answers to security application questions, his contacts with foreign government officials had raised concerns with White House security experts. Kushner was twice denied clearance; however, Carl Kline, Trump’s appointed director of the personnel security office of the president, overruled the denials. Thirty other White House officials were accorded the same preferential treatment.

Kushner has a $1.2 billion debt on a New York City office building due in 2019. After a failed loan agreement with a Chinese holding company in 2017, he turned to Qatar with his hand out. After meetings in the White House with senior officials from Apollo Management Group and Citigroup, Kushner received over $500 million in loans. How many of the 30 “cleared” White House officials are susceptible to influence by foreign agents? It depends on who has the propensity to be as stupid as Trump, who shared a foreign ally’s highly classified intelligence with two senior-level Russian officials during a visit to the Oval Office. Roger S. Beadle Chico

Note the vote Understand the Democratic House has put forth its first legislation concerning “the right to vote.” The bill would also include voting day, the first Tuesday in November, as a federal/national holiday. What a great step forward in the Democratic recovery this nation needs. Republicans hate the idea of “more people” voting! We can’t have this! Why not? An open, Democratic society in which “the vote” has finally come to the top of this country’s civil rights/constitutional framework [is something] we must look to and follow more than ever. Watch as the Republican Senate “votes” on this! Brian Johnson Orland

More letters online:

We’ve got too many letters for this space. please go to www.newsreview.com/chico for additional readers’ comments on past cn&r articles.


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NEWSLINES DOWNSTROKE GRANNY UNITS BUOYED

With the intent of encouraging housing development in the wake of the Camp Fire, the Chico City Council on Tuesday (Feb. 5) waived regulations requiring new sidewalks or sidewalk improvements for residents intending to build accessory dwelling units (ADUs). Sidewalks will be required if the unit is more than 1,000 square feet. The council also waived a requirement to connect sidewalks for any ADU if sidewalks do not already exist on both sides of the parcel. After gathering public input over the course of several council meetings, city staff found this to be a significant financial barrier to ADU production. Deputy Community Development Director Brendan Vieg said that, for a typical single-family residence, the cost savings would be approximately $1,750.

TAX ASSISTANCE

After a tumultuous few months, it seems impossible that it’s already tax season. But, for households that brought in less than $54,000 last year, there is some extra help to make the filing process less of a headache. Through April 6, the Community Action Agency of Butte County (CAA) and Chico State have partnered to provide free tax-preparation services through an IRS-guided service, Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) program. Go to tinyurl.com/taxprep2019 or call the CAA at 712-2600, ext. 883, for more info.

PARKING PLAN ADVANCES

Seeking to add housing downtown, Chico’s Internal Affairs Committee recommended Monday (Feb. 4) that the full City Council reduce in-lieu parking fees—money collected in place of creating new spaces—and allow developers to spread the cost over 10 years. The IAC—Vice Mayor Alex Brown (pictured) and Councilmen Karl Ory and Scott Huber— voted unanimously to set the fee at $4,000 per space for residential units. That’s down from the $18,148 on the books and the $8,000 to $10,000 proposed at the previous meeting, when the committee told staff to return with other options, to foster development (see “New spaces, more places?” Newslines, Jan. 10). The alternatives brought forward this time by staff were $8,000 per space with 15-year amortization and $7,000 per space with 10-year amortization. During the City Council’s regular meeting the next day (Feb. 6), the panel, with Councilwoman Ann Schwab recused, came to a stalemate on an appeal filed by the developers of a downtown residential project who sought to reject the fees entirely. The deadlock effectively rejected the appeal. The council will take up the IAC’s recommendation at a future meeting. 8

CN&R

F E B R U A R Y 7, 2 0 1 9

What now? People must move off burned lots, but many questions loom

W Tuesday’s Board of Supervisors meeting (Jan. 29), he did so with the intent of hen Jim Carrell showed up for last

ensuring the promises made that he could place a mobile home on his property in Concow were realized. The panel was supposed by Meredith J. to vote to loosen rules Cooper regarding temporary housing within the Camp m ere d i t h c @ n ew srev i ew. c o m Fire burn zone. That didn’t happen. And now Carrell—and many others like him— More info: are in limbo. Anyone with questions “I now have a trailer about moving off their I don’t know what to do properties can call with. It’s sitting out in 552-3701 if they’re in the county or 872-6291 Reno,” Carrell told the x101 in the town of CN&R. Paradise. On Monday (Feb. 4), the board and the Paradise Town Council held separate emergency meetings to discuss what did happen and what they agreed they had no choice over: FEMA’s announcement that if they want any of its money for debris cleanup, people can’t stay on their burned-out property, even

though many are already doing so. “I had just put a pad in up at my place,” Carrell said. “I’d been down to the Planning Department, and they’d told me that the pad itself would be fine, and that once the approval was done with the board that I could go ahead and move this mobile in.” The biggest looming question: What now? With an undetermined number of people currently living in trailers on their properties, having spent an undetermined amount of money to do so and having given up any other temporary living situations, what now? Where do they go? How do they get there? And who is going to pay for it? Neither panel had a good answer aside from, “We’re sorry; we’re working on it.” The county and town are looking at options such as church parking lots that could be used as temporary RV parks. They also promised to work with CalRecycle, which is overseeing the state-run debris removal, to prioritize scheduling for those who had returned. Carrell and his wife, who has health

problems, are staying temporarily in a family member’s home in Rackerby. That

home is for sale, and they’ve agreed to leave if and when it sells. In the meantime, they spent $25,000 on that mobile home that they can’t live in, though Carrell is hoping to find a neighbor whose home didn’t burn to set it on temporarily. He considers himself lucky. “There are some people up there and now they’re gonna have a heck of a hard time getting them out,” Carrell said. “These poor folks, they have absolutely nothing.” Some of them came and spoke at Monday’s Board of Supervisors meeting, which was tame in comparison to the Paradise Town Council’s meeting earlier in the day. Mayor Jody Jones prefaced the discussion by saying local newspapers had sensationalized the problem and that the decision before her panel would affect only 100 people who had pulled permits. “There aren’t 100 of us—there are thousands of us,” one man told the council. Thing is, the actual number is anybody’s guess. Because both the county and town allowed people to live in RVs, which are self-contained, many of the people who returned to their properties never needed to pull a permit. “I bought a trailer with cash. It’s self-


People are allowed to stay in their standing homes, despite their proximity to fire debris. There are still health hazards in the burn area, however, county personnel warn.

‘Food aid’

PHOTO BY MELISSA DAUGHERTY

Chico State center gets $33.7 million to spread CalFresh message

contained. … Who is going to pay for me to move?” another man said. “I can’t move that trailer—it was delivered for free. I’m screwed.” The county and town of Paradise in

December passed ordinances saying people could return to their properties even if their homes had been destroyed. The county had done so with “good intentions and the goal of helping survivors get back to some sort of normalcy,” Chief Administrative Officer Shari McCracken said during Monday’s meeting. “Unfortunately … we put the justification for FEMA reimbursement for debris removal in jeopardy.” Andy Miller, Butte County’s public health officer, issued a health advisory following the fire that warned residents of the hazards of returning to the burn area. That warning provided a basis for FEMA to offer financial assistance for cleanup— equaling an estimated $1.7 billion. Some members of the public, addressing both panels, questioned why people with standing homes were allowed to return but others weren’t. “My house is standing and I’m surrounded by an apocalypse,” Walt Lane told the Board of Supervisors. “But, it’s OK for me to live there, right? That’s what you guys are saying, right? To me, that personally sounds like a bunch of BS.” While FEMA isn’t requiring people whose homes are standing to leave during the debris removal process, the county’s stance on the health hazards in the burn area stand, Butte County spokeswoman Casey Hatcher told the CN&R. Both panels voted unanimously to amend their policies to no longer allow temporary housing until properties are cleared. There are no fines involved if people don’t leave, and they are allowed to leave their trailers in place. But Hatcher told the CN&R that it isn’t as simple as turning a blind eye. “We want, of course, people to be eligible for the state program if they want to be,” she said. “We don’t want them to be disqualified.” “This isn’t about what we want to do,” Supervisor Bill Connelly said. “This is about FEMA telling us the way we have to do it. There’s no common sense here, there’s no discretion on our part. It’s, Do we want to risk losing $1.7 billion?” Ω

Natalie Jensen usually can spot someone walk-

ing into the Hungry Wildcat Food Pantry for the first time. The student will stroll slowly and “look around a little confused,” she said. “By the second or third time they come in, they’re super comfortable.” There’s no shame, or shaming, involved. Chico State’s student pantry distributed more than 35 tons of food to 4,000 students last year. According to a 2018 CSU survey, half of Chico State’s students have low or very low food security. Jensen sees the people behind the statistic. A senior, she works for the university’s Center for Healthy Communities, where she previously interned. CHC initiatives—primarily geared toward nutrition and physical activity—include outreach for CalFresh, the state’s Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP (also known as “food stamps”). At contact points such as the pantry, Jensen and others let students know that they may qualify, then facilitate the application process. Both Jensen and Spencer Malugani, a 2018 graduate who interned last spring and now works at CHC, said they’ve enrolled friends in CalFresh. “My friends were very willing,” Jensen said. “When you explain it as food aid, like how financial aid is money for school, they’re really drawn to that.” That message—CalFresh as financial aid

for food—has proved fruitful for CHC. The California Department of Social Services, which contracts with the center for CalFresh outreach in the North State, just signed a threeyear, $33.7 million contract with CHC to replicate this model on 42 additional campuses. “The demographics of our campuses are changing,” CHC Program Director Jenny Fales said. “More low-income college students are accessing higher-ed, which is fabulous. Now we have to provide those wraparound services.” The contract calls for CHC to train and support

CalFresh campus outreach staffs at 19 other CSUs; 15 community colleges, including Butte and Yuba; four UCs, including Davis; one private university, Mount Saint Mary’s; and two other schools to be added. CHC will continue its work with five North State organizations, including Community Action Agency of Butte County, on boosting CalFresh enrollment. Chancellors’ offices of the CSU and community

SIFT ER Semi smoke-free California continues to lead the nation in curtailing tobacco use, but there’s plenty of room for improvement in locations such as Butte County. That’s a major conclusion touted by the American Lung Association in its annual State of Tobacco Control report, released last Wednesday (Jan. 30). California joined Alaska, Hawaii, Maine and Massachusetts as the top five states—with the District of Columbia rating high as well—for regulations and programs. Each earned grades of A and B for preventing and reducing tobacco use (i.e., smoking, vaping and chewing); on the flip side, Mississippi, Missouri, Texas and Virginia got all F’s. Similarly, when breaking down California by jurisdiction, half of the population lives in cities with overall grades of D or F—including nine in 10 Butte County residents. Here’s how our communities graded out.

Biggs: F Chico: D Gridley: D Oroville: C Paradise: D Unincorp.: F

Spencer Malugani, Natalie Jensen and Jenny Fales show pantry items available for students who come to the Center for Healthy Communities office. PHOTO BY EVAN TUCHINSKY

colleges will receive funds to support implementation across their state-level systems. Chico State specifically will reap $6.5 million of the $14.7 million in federal reimbursements associated with the contract. The remainder comes through the state as an allocation of federal SNAP funding. The three-year goal is to add 72,000 enrollees to CalFresh, which would translate into nearly $222 million in food money and $377 million in economic activity. This expansion might not have occurred if not for, ironically, a contraction. Seven years ago, Fales “ran out of mileage money” in her CalFresh program budget; thus, she told interns and students, they’d have to do their outreach “within walking distance” of the center. “So they started going to campus,” Fales continued, “and they started finding a lot of college students who looked to be eligible for the CalFresh program. Fast-forward two years: We actually got pretty good at helping college students.” CHC and partner groups discovered messaging that made an impact “related to financial aid and food aid, which we call CalFresh.” By linking the two, students make a connection. “A student actually is the one who told me that,” Fales added. “‘Oh, that’s like food aid—that will complement my financial aid.’” Malugani concurred with Jensen when she said that “sometimes the myth of CalFresh is that the people who receive it are lazy and they don’t really work for it. But we help students who are so busy with just being students—and that’s a full-time job in itself.” —EVAN TUCHINSKY eva ntu c h insk y @ newsr ev iew.c o m

Source: lung.org

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NEWSLINES

Cn&r is looking for An Advertising ConsultAnt Do you love Chico? Do you want to help local businesses succeed? So do we! The Chico News & Review is a family owned business that has been part of the Chico community since 1977. Our mission is to publish great newspapers which are successful and enduring, create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow while respecting personal welfare, and to have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. If you want to make a difference and do something that matters then keep reading.

Advertising ConsultAnt The CN&R is looking for an individual who cares about building relationships and partnering with local businesses. If you have the heart, we have the tools to train you to be a successful Ad Consultant. You must be self-motivated, ambitious and an independent person who wants to be part of a great team. Successful reps will have a sincere desire to help our clients assess their needs and work together to create marketing campaigns that increase their business. Bilingual/fluency in Spanish is a plus.

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Dire directive Council prompted by cold snap to open emergency shelter, and tackles FEMA housing and pot during marathon meeting It was acknowledged across the

City Council dais as a seemingly impossible directive for Chico City Manager Mark Orme: Open a temporary winter shelter in less than 24 hours. Orme pleaded for more direction Tuesday (Feb. 5), but the panel had only suggestions on potential locations: vacated fire stations, perhaps? Tent-enclosed parking lots? The airport? City Hall? Each has its own roadblocks, and none are designed for human habitation. But the mandate was as stark as the snow that fell on Chico earlier that day: This has to happen now, before more people die in the cold of winter. It is intended as a temporary measure, only for belowfreezing nights. “I’m tired of looking for everybody else to take action on this,” Mayor Randall Stone said. “People are coming here expecting us to provide safety for them. It’s literally freezing cold outside. People die in this weather, and we’re going to wait for the county to take action?” The agenda item followed discussion about the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s plans to establish temporary housing for Camp Fire survivors—a thus-far unsuccessful effort in city limits— and yet another controversial topic, cannabis. The meeting concluded after 1 a.m. Regarding a cold-weather emergency facility, the panel mostly

spoke of the urgency to act, given recent freezing temperatures, and a vote in favor of the directive ultimately fell along party lines. Councilman Sean Morgan said the responsibility rests with the county and community nonprofits, not the city, which runs the risk of forever being in charge of emergency sheltering if it starts doing so now, despite it not being “in our wheelhouse.” Butte County is tasked with opening emergency cooling and warming centers during extreme weather, with its main consideration being a prediction of three consecutive days of extreme temperatures. Councilwoman Ann Schwab said she initially had the same concerns, considering the city had stepped in to fund the library, a county service, for a long time. However, this is a humanitarian crisis, she continued, and the council needs to act in the short-term as Orme works with nonprofits and other community organizations to formulate a long-term plan. Most of the speakers, 11 total, were

in favor of the emergency measure. Among the naysayers was Jamie Jin, who said she was in support of shelters, but did not want evacuees and families from Paradise being taken in at the same location as criminals or those who are addicted to drugs. Jin provided the council with

a petition purportedly with about 2,000 signatures of citizens who do not want a low-barrier shelter downtown or in neighborhoods or near churches. This petition was created in response to Safe Space Winter Shelter’s collaboration with the Jesus Center and Torres Community Shelter to establish a permanent, year-round low-barrier shelter, funded by a $1 million Walmart grant. For Dee Dee La Perle, herself a Camp Fire survivor, there was no pushback against mixing such populations. La Perle told the council she slept on the street last night, and the most pressing issue is getting everyone out of the elements. “You all are warm and people are freezing, and if they die, the blood is all on your hands,” she chided. “Get real and do something. I’m tired of empty promises.” Perhaps the most significant barrier: the operation. Safe Space board President Angela McLaughlin told the panel the nonprofit is struggling to find volunteers for its own lowbarrier shelter, which is full, and probably wouldn’t be able to help. Wednesday morning, Stone told the CN&R Orme is “working on two paths” and that, though the council authorized Orme to come up with a plan up to $100,000, the city is intending to secure private financing. Putting the emergency shelter dis-

cussion into context, there still are


Dan Horvath, of FEMA, and Katrina Palomar, of CalOES, tell the council they have faced barriers with developers and environmental constraints while attempting to set up temporary homes for Camp Fire survivors in Chico. Photo by ashiah scharaga

no FEMA housing units in Chico three months after the Camp Fire. There is some movement on that front, however, and in all likelihood, 48 furnished, temporary homes (modular or mobile) will be situated on 13 acres in the Hegan Lane Business Park. FEMA Northern Branch Director Dan Horvath told the council the project likely would move forward, with people getting settled within the next four months. While 48 homes are better than none, some speakers addressing the dais noted, it’s a far cry from what is needed. FEMA has a projected need of 1,800 total units. “It’s a very tedious process. We’re in negotiations with the land owners, the developers. We go through an environmental review process,” Horvath said. “We spend weeks at a lot of these sites, going through negotiations, only to find out in the end we aren’t able to come to an agreement.” Those against the location mainly mentioned the traffic impacts. For Nathaniel Perry, who works near the proposed development, at Build. com, that was a flimsy excuse. “If we’re going to get started, this seems like a good place,” he said. “I’ll deal with the traffic.” Also on Tuesday, the council directed

the Internal Affairs Committee— Chair Alex Brown and Councilmen Karl Ory and Scott Huber—to brainstorm the stakeholder groups for a marijuana advisory committee, with the stipulation—requested by Morgan—that at least one representative be from law enforcement. The committee will work with city staff and be tasked with determining the path for cannabis business in Chico, which overwhelmingly voted for state legalization in 2016. Those recommendations eventually will come to the council. Vice Mayor Brown said that the voter support “speaks loudly to me,” and is why she brought the issue forward. The city can choose to regulate more than the state if it desires, but she’d like to see all of the options brought to the table, and that “we’re creating opportunities for businesses to be successful.” —AshiAh schArAgA ashiahs@ n ewsr ev i ew. com

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HEALTHLINES

Golden state of health California jumps in U.S. rankings, though North State lags behind

by

Evan Tuchinsky evantuc hin sk y @ n ewsrev i ew. com

A Andy Miller sees a lot of statistics. He pores over charts and graphs to gauge how s Butte County’s public health officer, Dr.

our area compares with the rest of the state and the nation—even ourselves over time. So, when he got wind of the latest America’s Health Rankings report, touting big improvements in California, Miller gave the results close scrutiny. The report placed the Golden State at 12th best in the nation, a jump of five spots in a year (2017 to 2018). That’s the secondlargest leap; Maine went up seven places, to 16. Hawaii supplanted Massachusetts at the top, while Louisiana ranked last. 12

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“I’m always a little skeptical that in one year California can change five spots and another state can move seven spots when, from year to year, you can’t imagine there’s that much difference in some of these numbers,” Miller said by phone. “But better to be 12th rather than 48th, and better to be moving up than moving down.” Propelling California were comparatively low rates for premature death (5.7 percent, second-best nationally), smoking (11.3 percent, second), physical inactivity (20 percent, third) and obesity (25.1 percent, third), among others. Along with obesity prevalence, the report cited as strengths the state’s low rates of infant mortality and occupational fatalities; as challenges, high levels of air pollution and low immunization coverage. The state’s good news is not the North State’s. Locally, Miller said, we continue to

struggle in categories where California fares favorably—obesity and smoking, notably— plus have disproportionately high numbers of certain cancers and in deaths from opioid overdoses. Meanwhile, as the state and nation make gains in two professions with provider shortages, primary care and mental health, our rural region lags behind in both. The Butte County Public Health Department is partnering with hospitals and other health groups to address pressing concerns. Miller will make a presentation to the Chico City Council next month about tobacco—the first step in what a local coalition hopes will lead to regulating flavored tobacco and vaping. He’ll also participate in two summits for health care professionals at Enloe Medical Center in March: one on gastrointestinal cancers, one on opioids. “I always try to look at the individual things and think, How important is that? How can we move the needle up or down?— rather than the collective [statistics or rankings],” Miller said. “Sometimes you have to be careful about the conclusions you draw.” First released 29 years ago, the annual

America’s Health Rankings report represents what its sponsoring organization, the United Health Foundation, calls “the longestrunning annual assessment of the nation’s health on a state-by-state basis.” Researchers evaluate 35 points encompassing care, out-

comes, behaviors, environment, policies and communities. The data come from state agencies such as the California Department of Public Health. Contacted by the CN&R to elaborate on the measures, the state health department released a statement saying it “considers this improvement in America’s Health Rankings to be an acknowledgment of the strong collaborations undertaken to improve the health of the people in California.” To keep improving, the statement continued, “we must all work to address the conditions that can improve health equity so all Californians are able to reach their highest quality of life.” Miller, whose department shares data and works with the state on public health programs, also sees a connection to economics. California ranks 16th in public health funding ($108 per capita)—21st for uninsured residents (7.3 percent) and 28th for children in poverty (18 percent). In the latter, Butte County will continually trail the state average: “The more rural you get, the higher that number becomes,” he said. “We know that poverty brings with it poor health outcomes,” Miller added. “To the extent that the boat can all float up together, when we have times of economic prosperity—and the last few years have been, relative to 2008 [during the Great Recession]—we’d expect those [overarching] numbers to come up. “My concern is how we do in difficult times, whether we can all have less poverty and address income disparities, which help perpetuate health inequity and poorer outcomes among those that are at higher risk.” Among various local initiatives, Miller cited

three the report evoked. Butte County has particularly high rates of digestive-system cancers; Enloe will hold a day-long symposium for providers on March 15. The preceding Friday, March 8, Enloe will host a symposium on opioids, following up on a summit last spring at Chico State (see “Heart of the matter,” Healthlines, May 31, 2018). Tobacco—which encompasses smoking, vaping and chewing—concerns a cross-section of the health community. Miller’s agency is one of a dozen in the Nicotine Action Alliance, a Butte County coalition advocating for local regulations, and stronger enforcement of state regulations, related to retail. HEALTHLINES c o n t i n u e d

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SAVE THE DATE UNDERSTANDING AND MANAGING PTSD AND BRAIN INJURY In Recognition of March being Brain Injury Awareness Month, Brain Injury Coalition in collaboration with Passages Caregiver Resource Center Presents: Understanding and Managing Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and Brain Injury Presented By: Dr. Blair Cano PsyD, MSCP licensed psychologist, practicing Neuropsychologist and Veteran of U.S. Navy. She will address symptoms, underlying causes, impact on the family unit, methods and resources of recovery.

Date: February 28, 2019

Time: 8:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Registration Begins at 8AM

Location: Enloe Conference Center 1528 Esplanade in Chico FOR MORE INFORMATION OR TO REGISTER, PLEASE CALL (530) 342-3118 OR ONLINE HTTPS://BIC2019CONFERENCE.EVENTBRITE.COM CEUS TO BE ANNOUNCED

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HEALTHLINES

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Read the report:

The group has two major aims. First, it seeks stricter restrictions on flavored products whose packaging and taste appeal to minors. Second, it wants cities to establish tobacco business licenses and earmark the revenue to policing merchants. Butte County’s smoking rate is 16 percent—a third higher than the state stat. Tobacco use, in all forms, among youths is at 22 percent; that’s nearly double the state rate (13.6 percent). While California ranks among the top five states in regulation, prevention and use-reduction, according to the American Lung Association’s newly released State of Tobacco report, Butte County communities fall short of the mark (see Sifter, page 9). Miller will make a presentation to the Chico City Council at its

Visit tinyurl.com/healthreport2018 for an overview and full reporting of america’s Health rankings.

Feb. 19 meeting, at which time the group hopes council members will be inspired to act. “The focus is on flavored tobacco,” said Ellen Michels, Public Health’s project manager for the Tobacco Education Program. “But we’d like to see the broader policy [including licenses] passed; that’s what the coalition wants and would recommend.” Michels and a contingent from Chico Unified School district, including students, met with Chico Mayor Randall Stone last year when he was a councilman. He told the CN&R he’s open to considering such regulations; none are on the table at this point. Ω

WEEKLY DOSE Plasma power The immediate tragedy and aftermath of the Camp Fire caused a surge in demand for blood donations, and throughout Northern California, generous people heeded the call to help get us through. But there is a constant need for blood at hospitals and treatment centers. Transfusions are needed after serious injuries and surgeries, sometimes after child birth, and for people with anemia and blood disorders. People suffering iron deficiency receive red blood cells to increase their hemoglobin and iron levels. Chemotherapy patients need platelets to stay healthy. And plasma is used for patients with liver failure, severe infections and serious burns. Every two seconds, someone in the U.S. needs blood, and a single donation can potentially save up to three lives. Interestingly, some people—such as those with hemochromatosis, a condition arising from excessive iron absorption—actually experience health benefits from giving blood. Almost 40 percent of the population can donate, but only 10 percent actually do. If you can, consider regular donations. Orchard Hospital takes blood donations in Gridley and Oroville, BloodSource has donation centers in Chico and Yuba City, and the Red Cross has a blood drive finder online (redcrossblood.org).

POETRY99 Submit your poems—99 words or fewer—today!

The Chico News & Review is now accepting entries for the 2019 Poetry 99 contest. The top Adult, High School, Junior High and Kid poets will be chosen by established local writing professionals, and winners’ work will be published in the CN&R’s annual Poetry 99 issue on March 28. Winners also will be invited to read their works (and receive prizes!) at the Poetry 99 reading.

Online and email entries preferred: Submit at www.newsreview.com/poetry99, or send to poetry99@newsreview.com. Please specify Poetry 99, age and division—Adult, High School (grades 9-12), Junior High (grades 6-8), Kids (fifth grade and younger)—in the subject field. And for all divisions except “Adult” please include age.

DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSIONS: WEDNESDAY, MARCH 6, AT 11:59 P.M.

For submission guidelines, visit www.newsreview.com/poetry99

Source: Orchard Hospital & Red Cross

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GREENWAYS Victoria Davila stands among her paper  birds adorning the entrance of Chico  State’s anthropology museum.

birds of a feather Chico State museum examines avian-human connections story and photo by

Evan Tuchinsky

evantuc hin sk y @ g mai l . com

Acardsherofwhole life. As a child, she had flashavian species; when her family took drienne Scott has loved birds virtually

camping trips, she’d look to the treelines and listen for birdsong. As an adult, a museum curator in Chico, she’s become an avid birdwatcher, including trekking with the Altacal Audubon Society. They never cease to surprise her. A few weeks ago, her shopping complete at the Saturday farmers’ market, Scott returned to her car in the Lost Park parking lot along Big Chico Creek. Her cellphone buzzed; she returned a text message, put the phone down. She looked up from the driver’s seat and—ignoring the magnitude of the rainswollen, fast-flowing waterway—focused on a scrub jay as it landed on a creekside rock. The bird jumped in and out of ripples, “giving himself a bath,” she described, “taking such pleasure in this day—and it gave me such pleasure. I just stopped and watched this whole little vignette of life, happening far away, really, from the parking lot; but I had almost missed it because I was busy shopping and texting on my phone.” That moment encapsulates the spirit of her museum’s new exhibition. Remarkable Lives: The Intertwined Worlds of Birds and Humans opened at Chico State’s anthro-

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pology museum during the Snow Goose Festival in late January. It’s a partnership between the festival, Audubon chapter and multiple university departments, running through the summer (see infobox). About 20 students, most in professor Georgia Fox’s fall course on exhibit creation, contributed pieces. Ashlyn Weaver made a replica of a Hawaiian royal cape, covered in feathers, for a corner display on cultural heritage. William Stephen crafted a diorama depicting man-made causes of birds’ deaths: windmills, skyscrapers, roads, power lines, oil spills. Victoria Davila, a recent Art Department alumna hired as artist-in-residence for the exhibition, designed feathery skins for a robotic Archaeopteryx fabricated by mechatronic engineering students. (The connection: “Dinosaurs are not extinct; we just call them birds,” Scott said.) Davila also etched a wallmounted puzzle, placed in another exhibit, to help children learn about beaks; she made 20 paper birds via 3-D modeling that decorate the museum entrance. In consultation with Audubon members, Assistant Curator Heather McCafferty put Exhibition bits: remarkable Lives: The Intertwined Worlds of birds and Humans runs through July at the Valene L. Smith

Museum of anthropology, in the Meriam Library complex at Chico State. Hours are 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesdays-Saturdays. Museum Family Day—Saturday (Feb. 9)—includes a workshop by artist-in-residence Victoria Davila. Visit www.csuchico.edu/anthmuseum or call 898-5397 for more information.

together an exhibit on local birds and birding that includes original writings and maps from John Cowan, a noted Pacific Flyway ornithologist. Having his works preserved in the university’s archives prompted Scott, McCafferty and Fox, the museum’s director, to choose this topic. “There are multiple stories in here,” Scott said, “and each bird has its own remarkable life. We have them around us all the time [but] we don’t really pay that much attention to them; they’re in the background ...” “But they’re really interwoven into our lives in so many ways,” McCafferty added. “Every day, you hear a bird,” Scott continued. “Every day, there’s a bird in your backyard. But we haven’t been accountable for how our actions have interfered with their lives. Little by little, [now] we are.”

sources on the islands. “Birds, in Hawaiian culture, are very prominent,” she said. “Feathers are everything over there.” Weaver decided on a cape for a chief or chiefess as the best showcase piece. Her creation—comprising red, yellow and black feathers with a golden-rope neck piece—is a scale version, framed and wall-mounted; a full-size garment would extend to the feet. Davila, who graduated last year, hadn’t incorporated birds into many of her works before getting this commission. Now she’s affectionately called “the bird lady” on campus and in the community. The paper models hanging at the museum constitute a third of those Davila made; she sold the others. Walking through Remarkable Lives, seeing everything all together, Davila was struck most by the perils birds face. “The exhibit in the back about pollution really broke my heart,” she said. “I love birds, and thinking about the pollution, and the fires that make birds have to leave, and the environment—I want to do more.” The exhibition suggests means—efforts by Altacal Audubon and the concept of citizen science—in which anyone can participate in research and preservation. “We don’t really think we’re necessarily changing the world here,” Scott said, “but hearts and minds can become aware of the ways in which you can make a difference in your backyard.” Ω

ECO EVENT

The exhibition explores an array of bird-

human interrelationships. A field of anthropology, ethno-ornithology, covers this area; after research, McCafferty said, “it became very difficult to whittle down the number of topics.” Students did so with their interests. Weaver, for instance, gravitated immediately toward culture. She’s second-generation Hawaiian, born and raised in Vacaville, working toward her master’s after receiving an undergraduate degree in Hawaiian language and history in Maui. As one of just three dozen Pacific Islanders on campus, she felt it was important to highlight her heritage. “Birds represent the closest form you can get to the realms of the gods in the natural world,” Weaver explained. “They’re looked at like a heavenly type of figure.” Terrestrially, they’ve long helped Hawaiians navigate at sea and locate food

Lassen reboot Lassen Volcanic National Park has resumed full winter operations following the 35-day government shutdown. POTUS is threatening to shut it all down again next Friday (Feb. 15), so get up the hill, strap on your boots and enjoy the winter wonderland of Lassen while you can. The park offers free ranger-led snowshoe walks every Saturday and Sunday at 1:30 p.m. through March 31 (winter park entry is $10). Visit nps.gov/lavo for alerts on conditions and tips to prepare for your visit.


EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS PHOTO COURTESY OF BRIAN KENDALL

15 MINUTES

THE GOODS

Working out, feeding folks

Switching gears A lifelong resident of the Paradise/Magalia area, Brian Kendall returned to his home, post-Camp Fire, to find that while his house had survived, his consignment store business, This n That, had not. After seven years of buying storage lockers and selling the contents at his second-hand shop, he was suddenly out of work. During a meal at Red Lion Pizza—one of the only open eateries in Paradise— Kendall brainstormed a new business venture. Realizing that there were very few food options for the residents who have returned and relief workers, he decided to open and operate a food trailer in Paradise. With the help of his father, Jerry, they started Camp Fire BBQ, which launched Dec. 30 and serves comfort food Monday-Friday, starting at 7:30 a.m. You’ll often find Kendall in the parking lot of Beyond Fitness, on the Skyway, though he does move around. Call 966-6533 for more information.

What kind of food do you make? Starting at 7:30 in the morning, we have our breakfast menu of biscuits, breakfast burritos and scrambles. For lunch, we do a variety of things: pulled pork, brisket, ribs and chicken. We’re getting ready to do tri-tip and sausages. We also have potato salad, baked beans, coleslaw and cornbread muffins. Everything is

made from scratch. I enjoy making brisket the most; it’s a labor of love!

early. Today we ran out at noon after someone placed a to-go order of 35 items.

Did you have an interest in cooking before this?

What’s been the most inspiring part about this business enterprise?

I had enjoyed it, and cooked for friends and family. I had always wanted to get more into it, but I was so busy with my other business that I never had time to. This is a completely different operation than my last job. I used to buy and sell storage units for my consignment shop, and now my dad and I are cooking all day! And we didn’t have the trailer beforehand. We had to buy it, renovate it, and have it inspected. It was a lot of work.

How’s business been? Great! We close whenever we run out of food, and we run out fairly

Seeing the smiles on people’s faces. What we’re making is comfort food, and it’s nice to see people have some sense of comfort when they’re away from home or have lost everything. We get people who’ve been displaced, along with people doing tree maintenance, working for PG&E, FEMA and so on. There are a couple other food trucks, too, and thank god for them. We’ll be here in business as long as we can be! —RACHEL BUSH

news

meredithc@newsreview.com

A few years ago, Chicoans looking for a place to work out had a handful of places to choose from. There were the big two—In Motion Fitness and Chico Sports Club— and a few smaller, more niche establishments focusing on specific things like yoga or crossfit. Today, they’re everywhere. We at the CN&R noticed this trend was ramping up last summer, when we decided to add the category of Best Boutique Gym to our Best of Chico award list. Based on the response, it was warranted. Even still, they continue to pop up in strip malls across town. (I have to imagine, with 10,000-20,000 extra people in Chico, the gyms are filling up along with everything else!) Recently, Creed Strength & Fitness opened in my neck of the woods, at the corner of Walnut and Sixth streets. I stopped in to see what it’s about and was impressed with the place. Owner Taylor Catrett gave me the spiel—he works with people in small groups, so it’s kind of like having a personal trainer, but you also get workout buddies and a smaller bill at the end. Catrett is no joke, either—he’s got a master’s in kinesiology and is certified in specializations like weightlifting and corrective exercise. A U.S. Army veteran, Catrett trains first responders and offers “sport-specific training” for athletes. I could tell he was pumped about opening the gym, and wish him luck. To find out more, go to creed-strength-fitness.triib.com or find it on Facebook.

BIZ IN PARADISE In an effort to spur the reopening of businesses in Paradise, the Town Council recently voted to extend the deadline for existing businesses to purchase a business license until July 1, 2019. The original date was set to Dec. 31, 2018. Annual $25 renewal fees will still be required.

SPEAKING OF … As I was driving down the hill last week, on my way from Paradise to Oroville, I silently cursed to myself as I spied my favorite food truck, The Lamb & the Wolf, driving the other direction. The truck had been slightly damaged in the Camp Fire but has since been fixed. I went online to see the L&W’s schedule (it’ll be in Paradise Feb. 11-13), and happened upon food truck schedules for Paradise listed by Susie Rees, owner of the popular Cupcake Obsession food cart. While her cart sadly didn’t survive the fire, the woman behind Food Truck Paradise wants to make sure all the people living and working up there have full bellies—and that the trucks get some business in the meantime. There’s a pretty steady lineup around town: Fiesta Fresh Grill, Tacos el Paraiso, Campfire BBQ, Burritos el Caporal, Slyderz and Fiesta Tacos are all regulars. I’m excited that the L&W will be rejoining their ranks. As for Rees, she tells me she’s living in Corning currently and is working to build her new kitchen. Find out what she’s got cookin’ at facebook.com/Cupcake Obsession62. She posts food truck schedules on the Paradise & Magalia – Rants and Raves FB page as often as she can.

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Heartfelt and hearty

Portuguese Seafood Stew a labor of love at Red Tavern

Passion

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his issue hits stands exactly a week before Valentine’s Day. Consider this your final heads up to prep for this season of romance—whether that’s picking up a card and some treats for your sweetheart, or making dinner plans. If you’re like those of us at the CN&R—all about the food— Feb. 14 is an excuse to partake in some of the finer things, be it with your special someone or solo (don’t deprive yourself just because you’re not attached!). In the spirit of indulgence, we selected a handful of local chefs and asked them to woo us with their sexiest dishes. If the photos alone don’t make your heart beat a little faster, we’re not sure what will.

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ed Tavern Executive Chef Patricia Harding sounded almost scientific while chatting about cooking the restaurant’s Portuguese Seafood Stew. She listed its many ingredients—herbs, spices, vegetables and a house-made fumet, a fish sauce—and described the cells of tomatoes plumping and the flavors combining for a rich, delicious base that complements the accompanying shrimp, mussels, clams and linguica sausage. The cioppino-like dish is a feast for the eyes as well as the belly— grilled lemons as garnish pop, while the shellfish contrasts with bright vegetables and the saffron-tinged tomato sauce. Served with focaccia bread, it’s also a sizable meal. When the large bowl is presented to customers, their eyes grow wide. “I hear a ‘whoa,’ and then they immediately ask for another napkin,” said restaurateur Rich Garcia,

who runs the beloved eatery on The Esplanade with his wife, Chris. The dish is exceedingly popular. That’s part of the reason it’s been on the menu often over the past six or so months in a restaurant where the Garcias focus on seasonal offerings. It’s also an entree to savor. In fact, Red Tavern specializes in a fine-dining environment that encourages customers to adopt a slower pace. “With this recipe, and with basically all of our entrees, we want you to sit back and relax and take your time,” said Rich, who got his start in the food business as a teenager working in the kitchen of a Central Valley Italian restaurant. “This day and age, we just get so wrapped up into speed and doing so many things at one time, and that is part of the way we eat. And we like to take a step back here. “We want you to slow down and

Executive Chef Patricia Harding makes Red Tavern’s Portuguese Seafood Stew from scratch. That includes the house-made fumet, a fish sauce. PHOTOS BY WENDY STEWART

embrace it and enjoy it.” Harding and the Garcias chose to feature this particular entree when sitting down with the CN&R because it hits all the marks in terms of taste and presentation. In this season of romance, Harding noted the shellfish are perfect for plucking out and offering to a dinner date. Rich suggests pairing the dish with a Portuguese red wine, a vino tinto. (For Valentine’s Day, the restaurant is offering a four-course prix fixe menu. See redtavern.com/events for details.) For Chris, the stew is close to the heart. It’s a take on a dish prepared by her late grandmother. “My grandma would make that,


Leave it to the chef

S

ushi chefs make visual art as much as they assemble flavors. The presentation often is deliberately dramatic, with colorful mini-sculptures arranged in geometrical designs against a minimalist background of a white plate or unadorned wooden plank. Plus, the often-raw, always-fresh ingredients are inherently beautiful, even sexy. Just the sight of carefully sliced pieces of reddish-pink tuna flesh on a dish is enough make a sashimi fan’s toes curl. One look at the images on the Instagram account for Jimmy Lee’s Aonami Sustainable Sushi restaurant, and it’s obvious he is an especially fine food artist. “You eat with your eyes first, right?” asked the chef/owner with a sly smile during a recent visit to the downtown sushi bar. “Yes” is the answer, and nearly every one of the luscious photos would cause one to salivate. There’s the delicate tuna rose, with light, pink tombo tuna sashimi arranged as rose petals around a green and dark-red pickle blend. And the abalone sashimi, fanned out on a bed of greens and pickled red cabbage inside half of its shimmery silver-blue shell. But maybe the sexiest of all on the Instagram feed (@aonamichico) is the brightly colored sushi roll with flowers on top and an inviting sliver of meaty tuna dangling from one end. None of these dishes is named, but that last one bears the caption, “Here hon, I got you some flowers.” And on a recent visit to his downtown restaurant, it’s the dish Lee agreed to re-create for this Valentine’s-themed feature.

like, every other Christmas,” she said of the Sousa family recipe. “They came from the islands in Portugal, so it’s a recipe that’s been passed down through the generations. When we do it here, we kind of bring it to the new age.” Red Tavern is known for its new American cuisine, but the Garcias have adopted a French influence, and their cultural dinners—featuring a multicourse menu of Spanish, French and, of course, Portuguese fare—have been embraced by customers, whom Chris gushed about. “It’s an entertaining job because you really build those connections, those relationships and friendships,” she said. “It’s so fun. You’ll see Rich sitting at a table when it slows down, talking to customers. We love what we do.” —MELISSA DAUGHERTY me lissad@ n ewsrev iew. com

Goin omakase with Aonami s Jimmy Lee

Aonami chef/owner Jimmy Lee presents a one-of-a-kind creation. PHOTOS BY JASON CASSIDY

When asked what he calls that particular roll, Lee shrugged and said, “It doesn’t have a name.” It’s an example of the more elaborate chef’s-special dishes one may eat by ordering omakase—which translates to “I’ll leave it up to you.” Freed from the constraints of the regular menu, sushi chefs choose their favorite, freshest ingredients to create something and show off their skills of multisensory allurement. In the spirit of using what’s on hand at the given time, as well as exercising artistic license, the roll wasn’t an exact replica of his Instagram creation. This was a new work of art built with rice, yellowfin tuna, mango, jalapeños, pickled onion, avocado, jalapeño syrup, sprouts, edible flowers and a mandarin kosho sauce. The vibrant colors were layered—not blended—with yellow, red, light green, dark green, pink, purple, orange and white each standing out. It was a work of art (Instagram-worthy for sure), but of course nothing is ever actually too pretty to eat. And as distinct as the different parts were visually, so too were the flavors, which awoke each of the tongue’s sweet, salty, spicy, bitter and savory taste receptors. The most subtly distinct ingredient was the housemade kosho sauce—with local mandarin oranges blended together with Szechuan peppercorns, chili and sea salt. It passed quickly across the tongue with the slightest marmalade/orange zest spike at the back of each bite that made this masterpiece a a pleasure to experience. —JASON CASSIDY jaso nc @ newsr ev iew.c o m

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LOVE is a many splendored thing Celebrate it with your special someone at one of these local merchants this Valentines Day!

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Color of love A

ngel Lang doesn’t consider herself a chef. Yes, she prepares food professionally—the past 4 1/2 years at Bacio Catering & Carry Out in Chico, after moving on from a caterer and co-op in Nevada City— and creates dishes in a specific way. She even holds the title, serving as Bacio’s interim head chef as Paige Nies takes time off for maternity leave. But, without formal culinary training and amid a collaborative atmosphere, Lang bristles at the designation. “It’s a word people often overuse,” she said, seated at a picnic table behind the kitchen. “I love cooking and feel I’m pretty good at it. I would say I work with other chefs. But no one calls me ‘Chef Angel.’ “It’s less of a hierarchy, more of a family.” Collectively, the Bacio chefs—er, family—put together a set of dishes for Valentine’s Day. They offer a special menu for couples who’d prefer fine-dining meals at home instead of a crowded restaurant. This year’s has three entrees: poultry, beef and vegetarian pasta. Lang created the lead dish, which she refined with Angel Lang, interim head chef at Bacio Catering & Carry Out, created Ruby Chicken as a collaborative dish. The Valentine’s Day version will feature saffron rice, broccoli and carrots. PHOTOS BY EVAN TUCHINSKY

‘Event of the year’ Bacio s Ruby Chicken appeals to eyes, taste buds, hearts owner Amanda Leveroni, whom she calls “an idea factory.” New for 2019, it’s called Ruby Chicken. The name comes from cherries, imbued with port wine, that define the appearance and flavor. “The idea was a way to incorporate romance, with the deep red color,” Lang explained. “The beautiful red sauce gives the plate a Valentine’s Day feel.” That evening, saffron rice and vegetables—broccoli and carrots with crispy shallots—will accompany the grilled thighs. A palette of red, yellow, green and orange will lure the eye; savory flavors, drawing on the freshness of ingredients, will tempt the tongue. In Lang’s estimation, this is the most romantic item from the Valentine’s Day menu. “It’s so visual and colorful,” she said. And, culinarily speaking, “the cherry and port go well together.” To prepare the dish, Bacio chefs will let the chicken set in a balsamic-citrus marinade, then grill the thighs over mesquite wood. The sauce will feature aged port, cherries and citrus. For sides dishes, they’ll cook basmati rice in a bouillon spiced with saffron and roast the vegetables with olive oil, garlic and chili flakes. In the kitchen last Thursday afternoon (Jan. 31), Lang assembled an early version of Ruby Chicken, with mashed potatoes instead of rice and a medley of vegetables. The centerpiece, however, was fully finalized. The fillets emerged moist, cherries plump, sauce piquant— neither too sharp nor too delicate. When creating dishes, Lang said, for her “it’s always flavor first: how to make the most wonderful, flavorful food I can.” She looks to what’s growing in gardens and available at farmers’ markets to capture freshness. “Nature is driving where I want food to go.” She uses intuition in combining ingredients, she continued. “I also rely on the experience of other chefs and chefs’ inspiration. The process of learning to be a really good cook is relying on the experience of really talented, good cooks as well.” —EVAN TUCHINSKY eva nt u c h i ns k y @new srev i ew. c o m

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W

hen James Taylor was a kid, he lived next door to his Sicilian grandparents’ restaurant in Watsonville. He recalls playing in the back of The Italian Gardens with his sister like it was yesterday. They’d create mini pizzas on the tops of bottle caps, using dough and other food scraps. It was only natural that Taylor would find his calling in the kitchen. He started working in the restaurant industry when he was just 14. Last month, his Chico restaurant, Sicilian Cafe, celebrated its 35th anniversary. For about 25 of those years, Taylor has put a tremendous amount of thought into Valentine’s Day, treating it as the “event of the year.” Indeed, it’s an elaborate culinary experience. Taylor has crafted a five-course meal with this day of love and romance in mind. It starts with an aperitif: He likes to serve a sparkler—either prosecco, champagne or cider—paired with an antipasto plate (pickled and fresh veggies, cheese and salami). Then comes the appetizer: supple oysters on the half-shell with a cucumber mignonette, followed by a candied walnut citrus salad topped with blue cheese. For the main dish, a tender, 8-ounce, bacon-wrapped filet mignon is served with prawn scampi (a 50-year-old family recipe), sauteed asparagus and rosemary fingerling potatoes. It’s paired with a cabernet and followed by a flourless, warm chocolate cake with a decadent, bittersweet center, complete with a scoop of organic vanilla ice cream and fresh blackberries. Taylor calls the experience “a marriage of good food.” “What I try to do is make something … diverse from what you had last time, to make your palette have every sense,” he said. “You want your bitters, you want your sweets, you want your salts. … But it’s not overwhelming— nothing’s too salty, nothing’s too peppery. It’s a complement of everything.” While Taylor chose to highlight these five courses for the CN&R, there are several options, including vegetarian, on the special holiday menu. He noted that the dishes can be requested year-round, provided he has notice, and taking seasonal availability into account. Taylor has found working in the culinary field to be so rewarding because “people give me an opportunity to make them happy or blow them away.” He has been a part of some of his clients’ most significant memories—in particu-


John Dean and Elizabeth Young run the show at Drunken Dumpling, where his Thai Sticky Meatballs are a hot seller. PHOTOS BY MEREDITH J. COOPER

Sicilian Cafe s fine-dining feast inspires amore

Creative cravings lar, weddings and engagements. This also is true for the upcoming holiday meal, often a meaningful night for diners. Taylor sees many familiar faces each year. “Someone told me, ‘That was our first date ... and we’ve been coming back for 10 years.’ “We try to invoke the nuance of the day, but also the history of our restaurant,” Taylor said. “Valentine’s Day is the most romantic thing ever, and we have to go crazy for that … because it is the beginning or the continuation of a great relationship. We have to be there for them.” —ASHIAH SCHARAGA ashiahs@newsreview.com

James Taylor has been serving a special five-course meal for Valentine’s Day at his restaurant, Sicilian Cafe, for about 25 years. PHOTOS BY ASHIAH SCHARAGA

J

ohn Dean’s love affair with food was kindled decades ago and has taken him to high-end restaurants in San Francisco and New York City— including getting a degree, with honors, from the Culinary Institute of America— to Chico establishments like Tin Roof Bakery and Monks Wine Lounge. All hold a special place in his heart. It was The Wine Room in Paradise, however, that propelled him to take the next step. “That’s the first place where I got to really express myself with food,” he said while sipping a beer at The Commons Social Empourium, where his Drunken Dumpling food truck was set up for the night. “That’s when I realized I could do what was inside my head, and it gave me the courage to start my own business.” Drunken Dumpling, which he runs with business partner/partner in life Elizabeth Young, offers Dean an opportunity to let his creativity go wild, with very few constraints. There’s an “Asian bent” to everything they make, he said, but considering all cultures have their own versions of dumplings, he sees infinite possibilities to incorporate new ingredients and flavors. Also, he said, Drunken Dumpling isn’t your average mobile kitchen. “We want to change the way food is done on a food truck,” he said. “We’ll mark your table, we’ll bring you your food. If it’s raining outside, we’ll come

Drunken Dumpling kicks food-truck concept up a notch

tableside and take orders.” He views the business as more of a traveling restaurant than a mobile kitchen, with venues like Nor Cal Brewing Co. or Secret Trail Brewing Co. his dining rooms (they’ll be at The Commons on Valentine’s Day; check facebook.com/Drunkendumplingchico for a full schedule). Customers often express surprise when their soup and dumplings get delivered to their table, beautifully garnished in a real dish, not a takeout container—but that, to Dean and Young, is what they’re all about. That and great food, with a side of good humor. A case in point: For his sexiest dish, Dean offered up his popular Thai Sticky Meatballs in Sum Yun Gai broth. “People see that on the menu and just have to try it,” he said with a laugh. The ingredient list is almost unwieldy: Llano Seco pork, housemade Thai green chili paste, jalapeño, onion,

lemongrass, ginger and fish sauce. They’re braised in a kefir lime lemongrass barbecue pork braising liquid and coated in a sticky Thai chili sauce. Top that off with some mandarin, pickled jalapeño, cilantro, peanuts and deep-fried rice paper, and ladle in the mysterious (and delicious) Sum Yun Gai broth, and you have a complex, flavorful dish more suitable for slow savoring than one might expect from a food truck. “It’s a sexy dish,” Dean said, “and a little spicy.” Drunken Dumpling’s menu changes regularly. That’s part of the fun, Dean says, as it gives him an opportunity to try new things. Rather than viewing the mobile kitchen as a disadvantage, he said, “I’m far more creative because of it.” Drunken Dumpling opened just last year, but Dean and Young made quick

work of finding their niche. Having worked for so many years in local restaurants, Dean says opening his own business was the logical next step. “I’m at the point now where I can give back to the community that’s given me so much,” he said. —MEREDITH J. COOPER me r e d i th c @ newsr ev iew.c o m

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Arts &Culture Jacob Meders’  Mǝǝmento: Before  installation.

The land

PHOTO by rOberT SPeer

remembers mechoopda artist explores before and after of european colonization in two exhibits

Jhadlenge. The Arizona-based artist been invited to mount an exhibit

THIS WEEK

acob Meders faced a unique chal-

of new works in Chico State’s Jacki Headley University Art Gallery. He’d also been asked to curate a show in The Turner print museum. The galleries are in the Arts & Humanities Building by and share lobby Robert Speer space just outside their doors. Meders’ r ober t spe er@ commission was to newsrev iew.c om create two very different exhibits—one Review: of prints from the Mǝǝmento: Before university’s vast and Aksum Belle: Turner collection, Afterwards, showing the other of his own through Feb. 23. large-scale sculpartist’s talk: Tonight, tural pieces, to be Feb. 7, 5:30 p.m., Zingg installed in the two recital Hall. neighboring (but Turner exhibition talk: not contiguous) galSaturday, Feb. 9, 2 p.m., The Turner. leries. Complicating reception in galleries to follow each talk. matters further, Meders is a member The Turner and Jacki Headley of the Mechoopda University Art Indian Tribe and is Gallery intimately aware arts & Humanities that the univerbuilding sity and the city of Chico State csuchico.edu/soa Chico occupy land that once was the home of his tribe. Meders’ goal was to merge these various elements into a multipart exhibition that cohered thematically and otherwise. Whether he’s been successful is up to each viewer. Those who give it only a cursory look will miss its many nuances and connections, but those who take the time to carefully contemplate the exhibit 24  

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in its entirety and to read the several artist’s and curators’ statements will benefit greatly from this powerful exploration of indigenous history and art. It’s best to begin with Aksum Belle: Afterwards, the exhibit of new works—curated by Kelly Lindner in conjunction with Meders—in the Headley gallery. It has five large pieces suggestive of the Mechoopda Maidu world, including: a tinted-blue print on curved, hardened paper that hangs from the ceiling and depicts salmon swimming upstream; a large woven basket structure suggestive of a fish trap; an earth-colored rug hanging from the ceiling and, beneath it, what appears to be a patch of soil; and a vinyl ribbon that extends Mechoopda images of mountains and rivers along the entire perimeter of the exhibit space. The designs are by Mechoopda artist Billy Preacher. In an effort to expand the scope of the exhibit to include the entire city Jacob Meders  and Uti.

of Chico, Meders calls attention to the role newspapers played in justifying white appropriation of indigenous lives and culture. He has placed three newspaper racks around town, including one in the gallery lobby, another downtown in front of The Bookstore and the third at the Mechoopda offices (125 Mission Ranch Blvd.). It’s unlikely that most viewers will make the effort to locate all three racks, but those who do will find they contain one-sheet prints made by Meders’ Warbird Press studio. Each has a different pointed message, one being “Remember your greed, California. The land remembers us.” The three prints are also included in the Turner exhibit, titled Mǝǝmento: Before, as are several other prints made by Meders. They are part of his overarching effort to broaden the imagery and significance of the exhibit by establishing connections with indigenous art on a global as well as a local level. And working with Turner curator Catherine Sullivan, Meders also selected a remarkable collection of indigenous prints from the musuem’s collection, pieces ranging from the Tlingit living in far northern Canada to native aboriginals in Australia. Their quality is stunning. Meders is an assistant professor in the art department at Arizona State University, and he will be in town this week for two talks—tonight, Feb. 7, at Zingg Recital Hall and Saturday, Feb. 9, at The Turner. Both talks will be followed by receptions in the galleries. Ω

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THu

Special Events INTRODUCTION TO COMMUNITY PROPERTIES: Housing-first advocate Lauren Kennedy provides an introduction to the basics of planning, tools, finance, common pitfalls and resources needed to kick start community property projects. Meet others interested in developing communal living in our area. Thu, 2/7, 5:30pm. Free. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

PEOPLE’S STATE OF THE UNION: Slow Theatre’s third annual People’s State of the Union gives members of our community an opportunity to offer their views. This year’s theme is “Something I Want You to Know” and features talks by local luminaries Alondra Adame, Vice Mayor Alex Brown, David Little, Aidee Orejel and Hilary Tellesen Thu, 2/7, 7pm. 1078 Gallery, 1710 Park Ave. slowtheatre.com

PeOPLe’S STaTe OF THe uNION Tonight, Feb. 7 1078 Gallery

See THurSDay, SPECIAL EVENTS


FINE ARTS ON NEXT PAGE MID-CENTURY MODERN, VOL. 2 Sunday, Feb. 10 Zingg Recital Hall SEE SUNDAY, MUSIC

FREE LISTINGS! Post your event for free online at www. newsreview.com/calendar, or email the CN&R calendar editor at cnrcalendar@newsreview.com. Deadline for print listings is Wednesday, 5 p.m., one week prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

Mitchell Ave, Oroville. buttecounty.net

REBUILDING PARADISE: Community event addresses the future of Paradise and life on the Ridge. You choose what to regrow from these ashes to best serve the community. Meet like-minded neighbors, build networks, and learn about permaculture, survivor support and unification for the greater good. Sat 2/9, 11am. Terry Ashe Recreation Center, 6626 Skyway, Paradise. notjustnews.org

Music ALPIN HONG: Stunning pianist, unmatched in his vitality and charisma. Thu, 2/7, 7pm. $10 $34. Red Bluff State Theatre, 333 Oak St., Red Bluff. statetheatreredbluff.com

Theater MAMMA MIA!: The story of a mother, a daughter, three possible dads and one unforgettable trip down the aisle. The show’s tale of enduring love and friendship features beloved hit songs by ABBA. Thu, 2/7, 7:30pm. $16-22. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. chicotheatercompany.com

8

FRI

Special Events INTERFAITH MEMORIAL SERVICE FOR CAMP FIRE VICTIMS: A ceremony to memorialize the lives lost in the Camp Fire. The service will include multi-faith traditions and will promote healing and hope for the Butte County area. Each life will be celebrated and remembered during this time of prayer, poems, music and

moments of silence and reflection. Out of tragedy come hope and resilience! Fri, 2/8, 4pm. Paradise Performing Arts Center, 777 Nunneley Road, Paradise.

JAMEL BRINKLEY: Author of A Lucky Man: Stories, a finalist for the National Book Award in Fiction, discusses his work as part of Writer’s Voice, Chico State’s literary arts reading series. Fri, 2/8, 3pm. Free. Zingg Recital Hall, Chico State, ARTS 279.

NALOXONE TRAINING: Learn how to identify and respond to an opioid overdose using Narcan (naloxone). Northern Valley Harm Reduction Coalition will provide free training and Narcan. Fri, 2/8, 6pm. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

WILL DURST: Bay Area political comedian is back in Chico to roast the politics of today. No one will be spared. Hank Duke and Big Uncle Steve open the show. Fri, 2/8, 7:30pm. $20 - $25. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St. kzfr.org

Theater MAMMA MIA!: See Thursday. Fri, 2/8, 7:30pm. $16-$22. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. chicotheatercompany.com

9

SAT

Special Events ALI SARSOUR’S WORLD FOOD FEST: This annual event celebrates Ali Sarsour’s retirement and birthday with homemade international dishes to share, a silent auction, live music and mind-blowing dessert. Donate on a sliding scale to benefit the Shalom Free Clinic and the Chico Housing Action Team. Sat 2/9, 6pm. $5-$20. Trinity United Methodist Church, 285 E. Fifth St. 518-9992.

VALENTINE’S GALA: The Boys & Girls Clubs of the certificates, a vacation cabin, beautiful kitchen items, baked goods, gift baskets, fine and costume jewelry and much more, plus refreshments, treats and community. Sat, 2/9, 6:30pm. Congregation Beth Israel, 1336 Hemlock St.

CONTRA DANCE: Traditional folk dancing with a live caller. Newcomers are welcome to attend. Sat 2/9. $5-10. Chico Guild Hall, 2775 Nord Ave.

North Valley hosts their 20th annual event to bring people together to show the strength as a community in putting kids first. After the Camp Fire, the organization has been serving 1,794 kids and 481 displaced Paradise youth. Help out by attending an evening of live music, drinks and hors d’oeuvres, with a catered dinner by Bacio. Sat 2/9, 5:30pm. Manzanita Place, 1705 Manzanita Ave. bgcnv.org

OROVILLE FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY BOOKSALE:

Oroville Friends of the Library Booksale Sat 2/9, 10am. Oroville Branch Library, 1820

THIS WEEK CONTINUED ON PAGE 26

BABY & FAMILY EXPO: Growing Up Chico Magazine hosts this free event featuring informational booths, workshops, performances, kids crafts and activities, giveaways, face painting and more. Sat 2/9, 11am. Chico Mall, 1950 E. 20th St. shop chicomall.com

EDITOR’S PICK

CFOL BOOK SALE: Chico Friends of the Library weekly book sale. Sat 2/9, 9am. Chico Branch Library, 1108 Sherman Ave. buttecounty.net

CONGREGATION BETH ISRAEL SILENT AUCTION: CBI’s biggest fundraiser of the year offers a large selection of goods and services in a wide price range. Furniture, special dinners, gift

JAZZ MESSENGERS ALI SARSOUR’S BIRTHDAY PARTY FUNDRAISER Saturday, Feb. 9 Trinity United Methodist Church

SEE SATURDAY, MUSIC

Founded 80 years ago, Blue Note Records initially released “hot” jazz and boogie-woogie before founders Alfred Lion and Max Margulis embraced the blazing tempos and chord progressions of bebop in the late-1940s. Thelonious Monk and legendary drummer Art Blakey both recorded their first sessions as bandleaders with the label, which would go on to release records by Sonny Rollins, Dexter Gordon and Herbie Hancock, and helped launch launch the avant-garde careers of Eric Dolphy and Ornette Coleman. Travel through the discography of the venerated record label on Sunday, Feb. 10, with Jazz Reach’s Metta Quintet when Poppin’: The Story of Blue Note Records comes to Laxson Auditorium. F E B R U A R Y 7, 2 0 1 9

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THIS WEEK CONTINUED FROM PAGE 25

You should be

getting it once a week. n e w s r e v i e w . c o m

FINE ARTS

Music RON MATHEWS: Brunch tunes. Sat, 2/9, 11am. La Salles, 229 Broadway St. lasalleschico.com

Theater MAMMA MIA!: See Thursday. Sat, 2/9, 7:30pm. $16-$22. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. chicotheatercompany. com

10

SUN

Music

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24 27

Alaska’s Fiddler Poet Tim Hernandez, Book In Common Lecture

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National Geographic Live

29 HANNAH JANE KILE & PAT HULL

30

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Monica Bill Barnes & Company

APRIL 4

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sible works from the mid-20th century, including masterworks of Schulhoff, Muczynsky, Casella, and Martinu performed by Chico State students and faculty, plus guest musicians, the Towne Quartet. Sun, 2/10, 2pm. $10-20. Zingg Recital Hall, Chico State, ARTS 279. 898-5152.

ERIC PETER: Brunch and awesome guitar work. Sun, 2/10, 11am. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

POPPIN’ – THE STORY OF BLUE NOTE RECORDS: Metta Quintet’s multimedia musical concert looks at the impact that Blue Note Records and its unparalleled roster of groundbreaking artists has had on jazz. The five, tight musicians are dedicated to preserving the history and expanding the boundaries of jazz performance. Sun, 2/10, 7:30pm. $15-$38. Laxson Auditorium, Chico State. 898-6333. chicoperformances.com

Theater MAMMA MIA!: See Thursday. Sun, 2/10, 2pm. $16$22. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. chicotheatercompany.com

12

TUE

Special Events PRISONER LETTER WRITING: The North Valley Prisoner Support crew gathers to write letters to incarcerated individuals. Tue, 2/12, 6pm. Free. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

13

WED

Special Events ADULT CRAFT CLUB: Bring your latest project and connect with other crafters. Wed, 2/13, 10am. Butte County Library, 1820 Mitchell Ave, Oroville. buttecounty.net

THE HATE U GIVE: Based on the bestselling book, this film explores the world of a 16-year-old girl that is shattered after she witnesses the fatal shooting of her childhood best friend. Wed, 2/13, 7pm. The Hub, Chico State.

PRAY IT AWAY - THE BLACK CHURCH AND ITS ROLE IN THE COMMUNITY: Chico State’s Office of Diversity and Inclusion kicks off its spring series of conversations with by Pastor Loretta Dickerson-Smith from Bethel AME Church. Wed, 2/13, 12pm. BMU, room 210, Chico State.

MORE INFO AT: WWW.CHICOPERFORMANCES.COM 898-6333

26

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F E B R U A R Y 7, 2 0 1 9

RENEW, REBUILD, REIMAGINE

CHAMBER MUSIC RECITAL MID-CENTURY MODERN, VOL. 2: Rarely-heard, attractive and acces-

FOR MORE MUSIC, SEE NIGHTLIFE ON PAGE 28

Feb. 8-March 1 Chico Art Center SEE ART

Art 1078 GALLERY: Broken Open, tripartite show from Cameron Crawford, Elise Ficarra and Evelyn Ficarra exploring sounds, words and objects. Cameron works in ceramics, Evelyn is a composer and sound artist, and Elise is a poet. Through 2/10. 1710 Park Ave. 1078gallery.org

BMU THIRD FLOOR ART GALLERY: Resist, Persist & Rise, student works on display. Through 2/12. Chico State.

BLACKBIRD: Crucial Times Photography Collective, photo exhibit explores the manual, physical and chemical process. Featuring the artwork from six members of the collective, the display reflects the contents of their latest book, Volume 2. Through 2/28. 1431 Park Ave.

BUTTE COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY: Butte County Through the Eye of the Artist, a showcase of Butte County’s historic features through the works of local artists and a tribute to the historic treasures that were lost in the Camp Fire. Raffles, refreshments and a chance to win an art excursion into the Sutter Buttes. Saturday, Feb. 9, 2-5pm. $5. 1749 Spencer Ave., Oroville.

CHICO ART CENTER: Renew, Rebuild, Reimagine, featuring work by artists affected by the Camp Fire. In the spirit of renewal and regenerative ideas, CAC presents this latest exhibit. Reception Friday, Feb. 8, 5-7pm. Through 3/1. 450 Orange St.

ENLOE CANCER CENTER: Beth Bjorklund, oil paintings in our Healing Art Gallery by Northern California artist. The Enloe Cancer Center, Healing Art Gallery features artists whose lives have been touched by cancer. Through 4/19. Free. 265 Cohasset Road, 332-3856.

JACKI HEADLEY UNIVERSITY ART GALLERY: Aksum Belle - Afterwards, artist and printmaker Jacob Meders is a member of the Mechoopda Indian Tribe. Using book forms, prints, and sculpture, Meder’s work challenges perceptions of place, culture and identity built on the assimilation and homogenization of Indigenous peoples. Artist talks tonight (Feb. 7), 5:30pm in Zingg Recital Hall; and Saturday, Feb. 9, 2:30pm in the Turner. Through 2/22. Chico State.

MUSEUM OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA ART: Snow Goose Festival, exhibit looks at our remarkable wildlife and habitats along the Pacific Flyway in a variety of media, including sculpture, clay, oils, fiber arts, watercolor, acrylics, mixed media, glass and photography. Through 2/10. $5. 900 Esplanade. monca.org

ORLAND ART CENTER: Perfection in Pencil and Paint, showcasing works by Peter Piatt, Steve Crane, Sharon Crabill and Eve BergPugh. Through 3/23. 732 Fourth St., Orland. orlandartcenter.com

THE TURNER: Mǝǝmento - Before, curated

from the Turner Collection by Jacob Meders, a member of the Mechoopda Indian Tribe, whose own work is concurrently exhibited at the Jacki Headley University Art Gallery. Artist talks tonight (Feb. 7), 5:30pm in Zingg Recital Hall; and Saturday, Feb. 9, 2:30pm in the Turner. Through 2/22. Chico State. janetturner.org

Museums BOLT’S ANTIQUE TOOL MUSEUM: Bolt’s Antique Tool Museum, this fascinating, unique museum has over 12,000 hand tools on display, charting cataloging the evolution and history of tools. $3. 1650 Broderick St, Oroville.

CHICO CHILDREN’S MUSEUM: Chico Children’s Museum, featuring tons of cool stuff for kids to explore including a miniature city, complete with a junior vet clinic, dentist, cafe and farmer’s market, a giant fish tank, multi-sensory room, imagination playground and much more. Check the website for hours and admission information. $7-$9. 325 Main St. chicochildrensmuseum. org

CHICO CREEK NATURE CENTER: Living Animal Museum & Nature Play Room, learn all about local critters, plants and wildlife. $2-4. 1968 E. Eighth St. chicorec.com

GATEWAY SCIENCE MUSEUM: From Here to There, explore the science of how things move by land, sea and air. Lift, launch and levitate as you experiment with hands-on learning about gravity, friction and the laws of motion. Also on display are The Foothills, and America’s Wolves: From Tragedy to Inspiration. Through 5/12. $5-$7. 625 Esplanade. csuchico.edu

PATRICK RANCH MUSEUM: Patrick Ranch Museum, working farm and museum with rotating exhibits open every Saturday and Sunday from 11am to 3pm. Through 5/26. 10381 Midway, Durham. patrick ranchmuseum.org

VALENE L. SMITH MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY: Remarkable Lives, exploring the intertwined worlds of birds and human, in partnership with the Altacal Audubon Society and Snow Goose Festival. Exhibits include bird songs and behaviors, local photography and a robotic recreation of the late Jurassic Archaeopteryx. Through 7/31. Chico State.


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Heavy Nedal

All the neighborinos (from left): Dread Ned, Bed Ned, Head Ned, Zed Ned and Shred Ned. PHOTO COURTESY OF OKILLY DOKILLY

Metal chops meet Simpsons quotes with Phoenix’s Okilly Dokilly Simpsons-themed metal band HOkilly Dokilly, says the group was ead Ned, the lead singer of The

conceived while he was standing in line at a grocery store and joking about names that wouldn’t match “a heavy death-metal band with pyrotechnics and a Metalocalypse-type vibe.” He settled on the catchby Howard Hardee phrase used by Ned Flanders, the Simpsons’ aggraPreview: Okilly Dokilly performs vatingly goodTuesday, Feb. 12, natured neighbor 8 p.m. Playboy with devoutly Manbaby opens. Christian sensibilTickets: $12 (ticketweb.com) ities and a perfect family. Lost on Main “It started 319 Main St. as, ‘What if the jmaxproductions.net lead singer of the band was dressed as Ned Flanders?’ Then it became, ‘What if we’re all Ned Flanders?’” explained Head Ned. “He’s the antithesis of everything associated with metal—Satan, aggressiveness, things that are coarse and brutal. Ned Flanders is the least aggressive person, the most PG-rated guy, so that’s why we thought it would be interesting to combine the two things.” Okilly Dokilly is playing Lost on Main with Playboy Manbaby on Tuesday, Feb. 12. The Neds will come ready with onstage props such as an inflatable TV, like the one in the cartoon family’s living room, a fog machine and a pack of inflatable donuts. Head Ned says their live

shows draw a mix of metalheads and fans of The Simpsons, and that there’s usually a surprising amount of crossover between the crowds. “The crowd is in the mood to thrash, but also have a good time and chuckle,” he said. Head Ned never thought Okilly Dokilly would make it beyond a one-off show in Phoenix, the band’s hometown. “We thought this would only appeal to our weird sense of humor, that you would have to be a metal fan and a Simpsons fan. How would we ever reach such a small group of people? But we put it on the internet, there was a huge reaction, and we realized how wrong we were about that.” Indeed, their first music video for the single “White Wine Spritzer” has nearly 6 million views on YouTube. After recording their 2016 debut album, Howdilly Doodilly, they went on an international tour and played to enthusiastic audiences as far away as Dublin. Perhaps they unwittingly tapped into a cultural undercurrent; The Simpsons was a full-on phenomenon when most millennials were growing up, so the references aren’t as obscure as they thought. Now they’re on the verge of dropping sophomore album, Howdilly Twodilly. Head Ned doesn’t identify as a songwriter, per se—rather, he’s the band’s vocalist “and Ned quote compiler.” In composing the band’s forthcoming album (due out in late March), he watched the first 10

seasons of The Simpsons and wrote down all of Flanders’ quotes, which he uses as lyrics “pretty much verbatim.” This time around, the excerpts resulted in such fine titles as “I Can’t Fit the Geo” and “Purple Drapes.” “There are two types of quotes that go into the songs—just silly stuff Ned says that sounds funny as death metal lyrics, and then anything Ned says that can be taken out of context to sound pretty creepy,” he said. For example, one of the new songs is called “Here’s the Noose.” It references an episode in the third season of the show during which Flanders struggles to get his new left-handed store off the ground. “There’s a small bit where he takes off his tie and says, ‘Here’s the noose I had to wear for 10 years.’ That became the chorus because the quote is pretty dark and it drove the song,” Head Ned said. Instrumentally, he says the band has upped the musicianship compared with its debut album. “It’s a little bit more technical, there’s a little bit more to the songs this time,” he said. The joke band has gotten more serious than Head Ned could have imagined, but he still has a hard time picturing how far it will go. “We’re just taking it month-tomonth,” he said. “I don’t know how long we’ll keep going.” But he already has the next project in mind, drawing from another animated show created by Matt Groening—Futurama: “I’ve always wanted to do a Scruffy-the-janitorthemed band called Boilin’ Toilet.” Ω

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CN&R

27


NIGHTLIFE

THurSDay 2/07—WeDNeSDay 2/13 BOB KIRKLAND TRIO: Cool jazz for a

colder night. Fri, 2/8, 6:30pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St.

DJ EMVEE: Spinning for late happy

hour. Fri, 2/8, 9:30pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St. lasalleschico.com

NOrTH MISSISSIPPI aLLSTarS

FEATHER RIVER GYPSIES: Gypsy jazz and swing. Fri, 2/8, 7pm. The Exchange, 1975 Montgomery St., Oroville.

Monday, Feb. 11 Sierra Nevada Big Room

JEFF PERSHING BAND: Guitarist and songwriter performs funk,

See MONDay

rock and world jams. Fri, 2/8, 8:30pm. Unwined Kitchen & Bar, 980 Mangrove Ave.

LOCAL SHOWCASE: Grungey blues from

7THurSDay

welcome. Thu, 2/7, 7pm. Free. Studio Inn Lounge, 2582 Esplanade., 408-449-2179.

A NIGHT IN HARLEM: Unity Sistas host an all-inclusive night of poetry slam, art and knowledge to raise awareness of the struggles the black community faced during the Harlem Renaissance. Thu, 2/7, 7pm. Free. The Hub, Chico State, 531 Legion Ave.

8FrIDay

ANIMAL LIBERATION ORCHESTRA: Freewheeling light-rock jam band returns to town with opening act Horseshoes & Hand Grenades. Fri, 2/8, 8pm. $27.50. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St. sierra nevada.com

LOKI MILLER: Guitarslinger extraordinaire plays country, blues and classic rock hits. Thu, 2/7, 6pm. Free. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

THUMPIN’ THURSDAY ROCK ’N’ BLUES JAM: Hosted by the Loco-Motive

AUDIOBOXX: Top 40 hits and dancing

Band plus special guests. All musicians and music enthusiasts

in the lounge. Fri, 2/8, 8:30pm. Gold Country Casino & Hotel, 4020 Olive Highway, Oroville.

Precariat, hard rockers stoicB4dark and rock ’n’ blues duo Little Black Cloud. Fri, 2/8, 9pm. $5. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave. maltese barchico.com

O.B.E.: Happy hour tunes. Fri, 2/8,

4pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St. lasalleschico.com

OPEN MIC: Tito hosts this regular

event. Backline available. Fri, 2/8, 7:30pm. $1. Down Lo, 319 Main St., 5305134707.

PUB SCOUTS: Traditional Irish music for happy hour. Fri, 2/8, 4pm. $1. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St.

ROCKIN’ DOWN THE HIWAY: Extreme

ParTy TrICK

dad-rock combo performs songs about cars and the hits of the Doobie Bros. Fri, 2/8, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfallscasino.com

SOUL POSSE TGIF: Food, drinks and

dancing. Fri, 2/8. Chico Elks Lodge, 1705 Manzanita Ave.

Super catchy, shimmery indie-rock group Louiza brings the summer vibes to the Maltese on a chilly Saturday, Feb. 9. Led by artist Rebecca Mimiagia, the band takes angular, tripped-up rhythms and chord progressions and combines them with delicate pop sensibilities. Mimiagia’s vocals are delightful, weaving through the music with nimble dexterity. Two gloriously weird/awesome local groups, The Empty Gate and Guest No. 66, perform with the Oakland band.

SYMBLANCE: Hard rock and metal. Fri, 2/8, 9pm. $5. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave.

THIN AIR: Breathy, experimental musician releases his latest album with an opening set from Solar Estates. Fri, 2/8, 8pm. Naked Lounge, 118 W. Second St.

TYLER DEVOLL: Happy hour tunes. Fri, 2/8, 4pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St. lasalleschico.com

9SaTurDay

AUDIOBOXX: Top 40 hits and dancing in the lounge. Sat, 2/9, 8:30pm. Gold Country Casino & Hotel, 4020 Olive Highway, Oroville.

BLACK FONG: Masters of crusty buttfunk kick out the soul, R&B and rock jams. Sat, 2/9, 8pm. $7. Unwined Kitchen & Bar, 980 Mangrove Ave.

GENERATION IDOL: Spot-on Billy Idol tribute act. Rock the cradle of love,

yo. Sat, 2/9, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfallscasino. com

THE HIGGS: Melting faces. Blowing minds. Cerebral jams. Named after a particle. Sat, 2/9, 7pm. Lost on Main, 319 Main St. lostonmainchico.com

LEGAL ADDICTION: Sacramento band with a confounding name plays

classic rock, R&B and country. Sat, 2/9, 8:30pm. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

Full-Scale Musical with Live Orchestra 6 Dates · Feb 14 - Feb 24 Center for the Arts 1475 East Ave. Chico

inspirechico.org 28

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F e b r u a r y 7, 2 0 1 9

LOUIZA: Oakland indie pop band, plus the Empty Gate and sonic goofballs Guest No. 66. Sat, 2/9, 9pm. $7. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave. maltesebar chico.com

MAX MINARDI: Indie rock singer/ songwriter with a country-tinged voice. Sat, 2/9, 8pm. The Exchange, 1975 Montgomery St., Oroville.

NOCHE LATINA: Disfruta de una noche de música con Banda Las Inolvidables, Banda TierraAzteca, Enrique Djmonstermack Aguilar y


THIS WEEK: FIND MORE ENTERTAINMENT AND SPECIAL EVENTS ON PAGE 24 XDS, BLACK MAGNET & DONALD BEAMAN BAND Saturday, Feb. 9 Duffy’s Tavern SEE SATURDAY

YOLO PYRATE PUNX CAMP FIRE BENEFIT: A whole mess of bands with all benefits going to help Camp Fire victims: Serpentera, Döpemess, Endless Yawn, Splitjaw, Throat Rip, Khaos Assault, GOOD SHIT H.C., Get Out, Voyeur, Ridgejob, Public Trash and Rebel Scientist. Sat, 2/9, 12pm. $5. The Spirit, 2360 Oro Quincy Highway, Oroville.

XDS DJ Lil 50. Sat, 2/9, 8pm. $20. El Rey Theater, 230 W. Second St.

ONOFF: Irish rock trio performs with Amahjra and funk/reggae group The Manimals. Sat, 2/9, 9pm. $8. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave. tackleboxchico.com

REESE WEILS: Singin’ and guitar slingin’

for late happy hour. Sat, 2/9, 9:30pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St. lasalleschico.com

SHIGEMI ZACH ETHAN TRIO: Piano combo gets jazzy. Sat, 2/9, 8pm. $7. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

SUNDAY IRIS: Tasteful dinner

music. Sat, 2/9, 6:30pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St.

TEMPO REGGAE PARTY: Day and night party featuring reggae, dancehall, dub and roots from NorCal’s top DJs, bands and sound systems, plus a delicious $15 buffet. Sat, 2/9, 5pm. Sipho’s, 1228 Dayton Road.

XDS, BLACK MAGNET & DONALD BEAMAN BAND: Rad night of local music featuring three of faves. Sat, 2/9, 9pm. $7. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St.

10SUNDAY

OPEN MIC COMEDY: Get your free

comedy fix when locals test their mettle on stage. Got some new material? Signups start at 8pm. Sun, 2/10, 9:30pm. Free. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

POPPIN’– THE STORY OF BLUE NOTE RECORDS: Metta Quintet’s multimedia musical concert looks at the impact that Blue Note Records and its unparalleled roster of groundbreaking artists has had on jazz. The five tight musicians are dedicated to preserving the

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history and expanding the boundaries of jazz performance. Sun, 2/10, 7:30pm. $15-$38. Laxson Auditorium, Chico State, 898-6333. chicoper formances.com

11MONDAY

NORTH MISSISSIPPI ALLSTARS: Led

by brothers Luther and Cody Dickinson, the band overflows with fatback funk, electronic innovation, slippery soul, and pure unadulterated rock ’n’ roll. Check their cover of R.L. Burnside’s “Long Haired Doney.” Mon, 2/11, 7:30pm. $20. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St. sierranevada.com

12TUESDAY

OKILLY DOKILLY & PLAYBOY MANBABY: Fun show alert! The guys in this Ned Flanders-themed metal band put on their secret Christian underpants one leg at a time, just like normal people. Help raise the spirit of Maude with Okilly Dokilly and super deluxe Arizona party boyz Playboy Manbaby. Tue, 2/12, 8pm. $12. Lost on Main, 319 Main St. jmaxpro ductions.net

OPEN MIC: Hosted by veteran Chico singer/songwriter Andan Casamajor. There’s always a guitar to borrow and a house cajón for frisky fingers, so come on down and get on the

list. Tue, 2/12, 6pm. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

13WEDNESDAY

THE BIDWELLS: Local duo performs in

the lounge. Wed, 2/13, 6pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St. hoteldiamondchico.com

TRIVIA NIGHT: Trivial questions

for serious people. Wed, 2/13, 8pm. Woodstock’s Pizza, 166 E. Second St.

Y LA BAMBA: A traditional Mexican influence anchors Portland singer/ songwriter’s intricate songs. Lo and Behold opens the gig. Wed, 2/13, 9pm. $10. Argus Bar + Patio, 212 W. Second St.

SUSAN SCHRADER & ERIC PETER: Cool tunes for happy hour and dinner. Wed, 2/13, 6pm. Red Tavern, 1250 Esplanade.

OJOS DEL SOL

Y la Bamba rolled through town in July, and by all accounts the show at the Big Room was mesmerizing, emotional and transcendent. Luz Elena Mendoza reignited what was previously a full band as a solo project in 2016 to explore her dual identity and accept herself as a Mexican-American. Her beautiful, bilingual vocals lift up plaintive and expressive folk tunes on her acclaimed brandnew album, Mujeres. See her perform with Lo & Behold on Wednesday, Feb. 13, at Argus Bar + Patio.

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LEGO franchise snaps together another animated comedy for both kids and parents Mad Max: Fury Road— TTheandSecond the Book of Revelations—The Lego Movie 2: Part is another healthy dose of familyaking some cues from

friendly fun at which both kids and parents should laugh heartily. One of my favorite movie-going by Bob Grimm experiences is to hear an adult blast out laughing and then their kid folbg ri m m @ low suit. Either the kid is, indeed, new srev i ew. c o m in on the film’s joke, or he/she just wants to be like Mom or Dad. Either way, it’s a lot of fun and really cute, and this movie produces these kinds of reactions throughout. Part two picks up five years after The Lego Movie 2: the end of the first movie, and our The Second Part hero Emmet (Chris Pratt) is happily Opens Friday, Feb. 8. Starring the voices of buying coffee in Apocalypseburg, Chris Pratt, Elizabeth a devastated LEGO-land of sullen Banks, Tiffany Haddish tones and broken dreams where and Will Arnett. master builder Wyldstyle (Elizabeth Directed by Mike Mitchell. Cinemark 14, Banks) has taken to dramatic narFeather River Cinemas. ration at all times as things in their Rated PG. world have turned from awesome to bleak. The culprits are aliens called Duplos, invading forces that are at once undeniably adorable and unabashedly destructive. It’s a crazed world where Batman (Will Arnett) gets engaged to Queen Waterva Wa’Nabi (Tiffany Haddish), leader of the Duplo, and Emmett winds up running with a Kurt Russell-type antihero named Rex Dangervest, who is suspiciously like him (and who is also voiced by Pratt). I won’t reveal all the reasons for the craziness—take

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the kids and find out for yourself. Phil Lord and Christopher Miller do not return as directors, but they do produce and contribute to the screenplay. Directorial duties go to Mike Mitchell, whose illustrious career has included a slew of animated films (such as Alvin and the Chipmunks: Chipwrecked and Shrek Forever After) as well as a handful of comedies (e.g., Deuce Bigalow: Male Gigolo). While this is easily Mitchell’s best directorial effort, some of the charm and zest of the original is lost in the transfer of the reins. The movie feels a bit repetitive in places, and some of the action is too fast to be fully taken in. Flaws aside, it’s still a lot of fun, especially when Arnett’s cranky Batman is at the forefront. There’s also a slightly dark underbelly at play here, and it’s fun to see a kid’s flick that doesn’t totally play it safe. As mentioned before, there’s plenty here for adults to appreciate. There are some great gags involving raptors and a terrific small role for an iconic action hero who spends a lot of time in air ducts. The Lego Movie 2: The Second Part has a feeling of finality to it, as if these characters in this story arc are being closed out. But there are other LEGO films already in development—a sequel to LEGO Batman as well as a racing-movie parody called The Billion Brick Race—so even if Emmet and company are done, you can bet LEGO movies will continue stacking up. Ω

1 2 3 4 5 Poor

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FILM SHORTS Reviewers: Bob Grimm and Juan-Carlos Selznick.

Opening this week Cold Pursuit

Norwegian director Hans Petter Moland does an American remake of his own 2014 film, In Order of Disappearance. This one stars Liam Neeson as a snowplow driver-turned-vigilante as he hunts down the drug dealers and crime boss responsible for his son’s death. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

I Want to Eat Your Pancreas

English-dubbed version of the anime adaptation of the 2014 novel of the same name by Yoru Sumino. Cinemark 14. Not rated.

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The LEGO Movie 2: The Second Part

See review this issue. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG —B.G.

Oscar-Nominated Shorts (2019)

Short films nominated for this year’s Academy Awards. Visit pageantchico.com for info on show times for the three different genres—animated, live-action and documentary. Pageant Theatre. Not rated.

The Prodigy

Is a boy’s behavior a sign of genius or something far more sinister? Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

Valley Girl (1983)

Put on your skinniest tie and get in the mood for this year’s New Wave Prom (Feb. 15 at Chico Women’s Club) with this cult classic of the era starring Nicolas Cage (with an appearance by The Plimsouls!). One showing: Saturday, Feb. 9, 10 p.m. Pageant Theatre. Rated R.

What Men Want

A decades-old Mel Gibson flick gets the gender-flip treatment here, when Taraji P. Henson stars as a sports agent who finally gets a leg up on the boy’s club of her profession when she somehow gains the ability to hear men’s private thoughts. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

Nowp laying Aquaman

Jason Momoa takes his superhuman physique from Game of Thrones to the title character in this film adaptation of DC Comics’ half-human/half-Atlantean heir to the underwater kingdom of Atlantis. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13.

Glass

The third film in writer/director M. Night Shyamalan’s Unbreakable trilogy (which includes previous entries Unbreakable and Split) pits a hero with superhuman strength (Bruce Willis) against two “supervillains”— a dangerously unstable man with 24 personalities (James McAvoy) and a genius mass-murderer with brittle bones (Samuel L. Jackson). Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

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Green Book

Mahershala Ali and Viggo Mortensen start in this feel-good movie about race relations in America that goes light on the grit and heavy on the sentiment. Based on a true story, it starts off with Tony Lip (Mortensen), an Italian-American bouncer who gets a gig as a driver and bodyguard for Dr. Don Shirley (Ali), a black classical pianist who is touring the Deep South. It’s a road movie, with Tony driving and Don sitting in the back seat. The two use the book of the movie’s title—a guide offering a listing of safe havens for black travelers in segregated Southern states—to find places where Don can find shelter and eat. Things get ugly when Don tries to do such mundane things as buy a suit or eat in a restaurant where he’s been hired to play. Tony steps in for his boss during these racially charged episodes, and occasionally cracks a few skulls. As his eyes are opened to the realities of life for Dr. Don,

Tony learns lessons about loving people no matter the color of their skin and perhaps about how to drop fewer racial slurs before the credits roll. Cinemark 14. Rated R —B.G.

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Director Barry Jenkins (Moonlight) has adapted James Baldwin’s 1974 novel about a young woman living in Harlem who falls in love, gets engaged and pregnant and then has to fight for the freedom of her fiance who was arrested for a crime he didn’t commit. Pageant Theatre. Rated R.

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The Kid Who Would Be King

A modern day, bullied kid pulls a sword out of a stone and is tasked with saving the world. This is writer-director Joe Cornish’s attempt to capture the youthful, magical wonder of Harry Potter and mix it with the legend of King Arthur. While he doesn’t completely fail, an overall drab directorial style keeps this fantasy film from being a true crowd-pleaser. It does feature a pretty good performance from Louis Ashbourne Serkis as Alex. He’s a little overwrought in some of the film’s more emotionally demanding parts, but he hits the right notes when it comes to Alex’s heroic proclamations after he procures Excalibur from a big rock in the middle of a construction site. While Cornish showed a scrappy ingenuity with his only other directorial feature—the relatively low-budget Attack the Block (2011)—the overall effect of this haphazard adventure is surprisingly dull, even with much more money to spend on special effects and action. I will say that there’s a good central message about making nice with your classmates despite differences. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG —B.G.

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No movie adaptation has captured the rush of reading an exciting comic book like this blast of energy from directors Bob Persichetti, Peter Ramsey and Rodney Rothman. They go for broke with a seamless mixture of visual styles—hand-drawn and computer animated—and the story is pretty great, to boot. Teenager Miles Morales (voiced by Shameik Moore) is bitten by a strange spider and then, with his new-found powers in effect, crosses paths with the original Spider-Man, Peter Parker (Chris Pine). Turns out a portal from a parallel universe has opened up, allowing a whole fleet of different Spider-Verse characters to come into his orbit—the older Peter B. Parker (the invaluable Jake Johnson), Gwen Stacy (Hailee Steinfeld), Spider-Ham (a mishmash of Spidey and Porky Pig voiced by John Mulaney), Peni Parker (Kimiko Glenn) and her robot and, best of all, Nicolas Cage as the black-and-white Spider-Man Noir. So, Miles is one of many heroes with Spider powers tasked with battling bad dudes. Spider-Verse is surely one of the best movies of the year and the best Spider-Man movie to date. Cinemark 14. Rated PG —B.G.

They Shall Not Grow Old

This documentary by Lord of the Rings director Peter Jackson was created using archival footage of British servicemen during World War I, and applying color and 3-D, as well as sound effects and voiceovers to create a more immersive experience. Cinemark 14. Rated R.

Still here A Dog’s Way Home

Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

Escape Room

Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13.

The Upside

Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

Pick up this issue to read the stories of businesses in our community.

Green Friendly

Lewis Johnson

Owner

Butte View Olive Co. and Stella Cadente, two wildly popular olive oil labels that serve cooks across the nation, are produced right here in Oroville by Lewis Johnson and his family. It all began in 1935, when Johnson’s grandfather first began farming the 150 acres of olive trees that they still have today. In 1999 Johnson produced the first bottle of Butte View olive oil after three years of fine-tuning his process. Today, Butte View produce s a wide variety of extra virgin olive oils infused with flavors including: jalapeño, garlic, basil, lemon, lime, blood orange and rosemary . These pure, light and delicate hand crafted oils provide wonderful aromas and distinctive accents

to any dish making them truly unique and excellent – just one more reason why these olive oils are “Gold” and “Best of Class” medal winners. Mr. Johnson welcome s you to come experience California sunshine in a bottle! Available in Chico at Maisie Jane’s, Made in Chico, and S&S Produce , in Oroville at Collins & Denny Market, Wagon Wheel Market, and in Paradise at Noble Orchard in 250ml and 500ml bottles.

For more information about advertising in this issue, call your News & Review advertising representative today at (530) 894-2300.

Gina Rodriguez plays an American who, while trying to survive and save a friend in trouble, has to work with both sides in a dangerous fight between a Mexican drug cartel and the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency. Cinemark 13, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse

The CN&R’s annual Business Issue will be on stands february 14.

Years in Business

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FOR MORE INFORMATION, CALL THE UNIVERSITY BOX OFFICE AT (530)-898-6333 OR VISIT OUR WEBSITE AT WWW.CHICOPERFORMANCES.COM F E B R U A R Y 7, 2 0 1 9

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it’s time to

DisCoVeR Butte County A guide to visiting and living in the North Valley FALL 2018 • WINTER 2019

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A FREE Guide for Visitors and Locals, too. Advertising in Discover Butte County will enrich the stay of visitors to Butte County by directing them to the best places to shop, eat and stay. Most importantly, it can help them find you and your business. To be a part of the next Discover Butte County, call your Chico News & Review advertising representative today. Publication Date: March 15 Call your News & Review advertising representative today, (530) 894-2300 32

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CHOW

Let’s get cookin’ Are there aphrodisiacs in your pantry?

Teasy.free—but love isn’t necessarily People have known this he best thing in life may be

through many ages of trembling voices, wobbly knees and throbbing chests—and some of the greatest works of art, music and literature were created from the gloomy depths by of heartache. Alastair Bland Wouldn’t it be nice, so many have wondered, if affection could be won via some medicine, potion or food? Indeed, the notion of the aphrodisiac may be as old as humanity. The word itself, of course, derives from the Greek goddess of love, Aphrodite, and for ages the Greeks and Romans, the Egyptians, cultures of East Asia, and indigenous peoples of the New World have been touting certain herbs, spices and miscellaneous odd edibles as enhancers of libido and affection. But has an aphrodisiac ever truly worked? Most scientific sources seem to believe not—and the fact that so many items in so many cultures are named as love enhancers may indicate that people are still looking for that secret powder or potion that actually does the trick. Should you want to experiment this Valentine’s Day, you might as well start cheap and simple: Get some onions simmering at low heat in a pan of olive oil—for even this vulgar bulb of the farm field has been credited by some as bearing aphrodisiacal powers. Garlic and ginger are also believed to induce feelings of desire; so mince them and add to the simmering onions, and have the house fragrant and hot by the time your sweetie gets home.

Doubt that cheap bulbs and roots will work? Then boost your budget and move to the fancy-food aisle, where dark chocolate, caviar, lobster, truffles (both the chocolate ones and the fungal), and fresh figs are often said to be passion promoters. In Imperial County, in an attempt to capitalize on the perceived sexual powers of figs, farmers have used advanced farming methods to extend the annual autumn harvest of figs through the fall, past the winter, and well into the new year with the chief objective of selling fresh figs on Valentine’s Day. Shape and form are obvious reminders of sexuality, and it’s the physical build of certain fruits and vegetables that have garnered them reputations as aphrodisiacs. Indeed, such ubiquitous staples as bananas and asparagus can supposedly spark passion. Aroma, too, undoubtedly affects the brain and memory—and if a smell hits your lover just right, it could get him or her purring (not that you should necessarily hang your Valentine’s Day evening on a saucepan of onions). One of the oddest foods I’ve ever heard touted as an aphrodisiac is burro meat, which cowboys in Baja California have told me will

charge a man’s engine like a jumper cable from a Chevy. Other sorts of folks, meanwhile, may get witchy on Valentine’s Day; among their favored libido builders are frog bones, a lover’s hair, bird brains, and even human skin burned to ashes and mixed into blood. But let’s get real: Many sources say the chemical effects of aphrodisiacs are imaginary and that the only results, if any, of applied love potions can be attributed simply to placebo. If that’s the case, then no sense in stealing bones from the cemetery and grinding them into a powder (another supposed trick) and secretly sprinkling it over your lover’s morning latte. Instead, make it plain and obvious what you’re up to: Put a bottle of sparkling wine in a pail of ice cubes, bring it to your partner in bed, tell them it’s organic and add that it cost you $50. Then push a tray of oysters at them, plus some of those figs, if you can land a handful. No, these foods won’t have any chemical effects that turn your lover on. Instead, like so much else in the game of love, it’s the thought that counts—and if this gourmet platter doesn’t win you a kiss, heck, get the shovel and wait until sundown. Ω


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ARTS DEVO by Jason Cassidy • jasonc@newsreview.com

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all the buns and weiners Sexiest food in Chico? It has to be Zot’s! That was the first thing to enter arts dEVo’s head when we began brainstorming for this alluring food issue. When it comes to food porn, I prefer mine all flushed, sweaty and kind of messy, and there are few foods in town that match that description as perfectly as one of Zot’s hot steamed dogs. It’s way more of a turn on for me than most of the fancy and expensive plates in town. Everything you need for a good time Hot dog art by Sea Monster is right there in your face. shoegazing Dude, where’s Brandon McKie been hiding? It’s like he appeared out of … oh, never mind. Thin air—McKie’s lush electro-acoustic indie-pop experiment—is a low-key affair, and he is dropping Hello Hollow, his second album this year, on Friday (Feb. 8), at naked Lounge. Show starts at 8 p.m. and also features like-minded locals solar Estates. 86 lives The Paradise Performing arts Center is hosting its first event since the Camp Fire, a celebration for the 86 people who lost their lives during the disaster. The Community interfaith Memorial takes place Friday (Feb. 8), at 4 p.m., and will feature more than a dozen different traditions—including Bahai, Buddhist, Centers for Spiritual Living, Christian, Christian Scientist, Jewish, Muslim, Native American, Quaker Friends and Rastafarian. Local television anchor Linda Watkins-Bennett will emcee and entertainers will include doin’ it Justice Choir, guitarist Charlie Robinson, poet Krystlynn Martin and many more. The celebration will be followed by a free concert with family-friendly entertainer Red Grammer. art From the ashes For February, the Chico art Center has put together Renew, Rebuild, Reimagine, a show in response to the Camp Fire that’s “de-

signed to give communities a safe place to share visually expressive acts of resilience.” The exhibit opens this week—reception is Friday (Feb. 8), 5-7 p.m.—and it will be filled with original works plus artifacts from the aftermath of the fire, including photos of sculptures by Patricia Wickes, whose art studio was destroyed. From her artist statement: “For me these images convey something I cannot even name. They are like the ghosts of my work transmitting a haunting message about the impermanence of life and the resilience and strength that emerges during catastrophic times.”

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“From the Ashes No. 2” (detail),  by Patricia Wickes

unbelievable, part two In response to my Kraft-single-on-the-ceiling story in this space a couple weeks ago (Jan. 24), reader danny Wilson emailed one that blows my processed cheese off the page. As a boy I would take my mitt [and] a tennis ball and go to the street in front of our Grass Valley house. Hours were spent slamming the ball against a 3-foot-high sidewalk, catching it, then repeating. Sometimes a thrown ball would strike the paved walkway’s top edge. From there, it would fly in one of two directions: If it flew forward, it sent a high pop fly my way. However, if it went backwards, the ball would roll up neighbor Mr. Terrell’s roof, roll back partway, then lodge in his rain gutter. I went back to the spot three years ago on New Year’s and played another round that day. And, yes, three tennis balls, or corpses thereof, were still up on that roof. That’s good preservation knowing that the games were played on North School Street back in 1954.


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY For the week oF February 7, 2019 ARIES (March 21-April 19): Climbing

mountains has been a popular adventure since the 19th century, but there are still many peaks around the world that no one has successfully ascended. They include the 24,591-foot-high Muchu Chhish in Pakistan, the 23,691-foot Karjiang South in Tibet and the 12,600-foot Sauyr Zhotasy on the border of China and Kazakhstan. If there are any Aries mountaineers reading this horoscope who have been dreaming about conquering an unclimbed peak, 2019 will be a great time to do it, and now would be a perfect moment to plan or launch your quest. As for the rest of you Aries, what’s your personal equivalent of reaching the top of an unclimbed peak?

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Eminem’s

song “Lose Yourself” was a featured track in the movie 8 Mile, and it won an Academy Award for Best Original Song in 2003. The creator, himself, was not present at the Oscar ceremony to accept his award, however. He was so convinced his song would lose that he stayed home. At the moment that presenter Barbra Streisand announced Eminem’s triumph, he was asleep in front of the TV with his daughter, who was watching cartoons. In contrast to him, I hope you will be fully available and on the scene for the recognition or acknowledgment that should be coming your way sometime soon.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): While

enjoying its leisure time, the peregrine falcon glides around at 50 mph. But when it’’ motivated by the desire to eat, it may swoop and dart at 220 mph. Amazing! In accordance with your astrological omens, Gemini, I propose that we make the peregrine falcon your spirit creature for the next three weeks. I suspect you will have extraordinary speed and agility and focus whenever you’re hunting for exactly what you want. So here’s a crucial question: What exactly do you want?

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Now and

then, the sun shines and rain falls at the same time. The meteorological name for the phenomenon is “sunshower,” but folklore provides other terms. Hawaiians call it “liquid sunshine” or “ghost rain.” Speakers of the Tangkhul language in India imagine it as “the wedding of a human and spirit.” Some Russians refer to it as “mushroom rain,” since it’s thought to encourage the growth of mushrooms. Whatever you might prefer to call it, Cancerian, I suspect that the foreseeable future will bring you delightful paradoxes in a similar vein. And in my opinion, that will be very lucky for you, since you’ll be in the right frame of mind and spirit to thrive amidst just such situations.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): A study by the Fidel-

ity financial services company revealed that in 43 percent of all couples, neither partner has an accurate knowledge of how much money the other partner earns. Meanwhile, research by the National Institutes of Health concludes that among heterosexual couples, 36 percent of husbands misperceive how frequently their wives have orgasms. I bring this to your attention in order to sharpen your focus on how crucial it is to communicate clearly with your closest allies. I mean, it’s rarely a good idea to be ignorant about what’s going on with those close to you, but it’ll be an especially bad idea during the next six weeks.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Torre Mayor

is one of the tallest skyscrapers in Mexico City. When workers finished its construction in 2003, it was one of the world’s most earthquake-proof buildings, designed to hold steady during an 8.5-level temblor. Over the course of 2019, Virgo, I’d love to see you erect the metaphorical equivalent of that unshakable structure in your own life. The astrological omens suggest that doing so is quite possible. And the coming weeks will be an excellent time to launch that project or intensify your efforts to manifest it.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Multitalented Libran singer and actor Donald Glover uses the name Childish Gambino when he

by rob brezsny performs his music. How did he select that alias? He used an online random name generator created by the rap group WuTang Clan. I tried the same generator and got “Fearless Warlock” as my new moniker. You might want to try it yourself, Libra. The coming weeks will be an excellent time to add layers to your identity and expand your persona and mutate your self-image. The generator is at tinyurl.com/yournewname. (P.S.: If you don’t like the first one you’re offered, keep trying until you get one you like.)

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Leonardo

da Vinci’s painting “Salvator Mundi” sold for $450 million in 2017. Just twelve years earlier, an art collector had bought it for $10,000. Why did its value increase so extravagantly? Because in 2005, no one was sure it was an authentic da Vinci. It was damaged and had been covered with other layers of paint that hid the original image. After extensive efforts at restoration, the truth emerged. I foresee the possibility of a comparable, if less dramatic, development in your life during the next ten months, Scorpio. Your work to rehabilitate or renovate an underestimated resource could bring big dividends.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

We can behold colors because of specialized cells in our eyes called cones. Most of us have three types of cones, but a few rare people have four. This enables them to see far more hues than the rest of us. Are you a tetrachromat, a person with super-vision? Whether you are or not, I suspect you will have extra powerful perceptual capacities in the coming weeks. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you will be able to see more than you usually do. The world will seem brighter and deeper and more vivid. I urge you to deploy your temporary superpower to maximum advantage.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): There are two kinds of minor, boring little tasks. One is when you’re attending to a detail that’s not in service to a higher purpose; the other is when you’re attending to a detail that is a crucial step in the process of fulfilling an important goal. An example of the first might be when you try in vain to scour a permanent stain on a part of the kitchen counter that no one ever sees. An example of the second is when you download an update for an existing piece of software so your computer works better and you can raise your efficiency levels as you pursue a pet project. The coming weeks will be an excellent time to keep this distinction in mind as you focus on the minor, boring little tasks that are crucial steps in the process of eventually fulfilling an important goal.

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Call for a quote. (530) 894-2300 ext. 2 Phone hours: M-F 9am-5pm. Deadlines for print: Line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Display ad deadline: Friday 2pm

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS FICTIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BRENDAN PROPERTIES at 3355 Shallow Springs Terrace Chico, CA 95928. DAVID A LANDECK 3355 Shallow Springs Terrace Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: DAVID A LANDECK Dated: January 8, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000039 Published: January 17,24,31, February 7, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as EPIC TIE DYES at 1129 Nevada Ave Oroville, CA 95965. ROBERTA ANNA POWELL 1129 Nevada Ave Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ROBERTA ANNA POWELL Dated: January 7, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000030 Published: January 17,24,31, February 7, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as GORDO BURRITO at 1295 E 8th St Chico, CA 95928. URIARTE GORDO BURRITO, INC.

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2301 Bar Triangle St Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: JOSE J URIARTE, SECRETARY Dated: January 9, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000045 Published: January 17,24,31, February 7, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as RYON FAMILY PARTNERSHIP at 7225 Durnel Road Nelson, CA 95958. JANET L HEWITT 7229 Durnel Drive #53 Nelson, CA 95958. PATRICIA J JONES 15953 Katydid Lane Magalia, CA 95954. ELIZABETH A ROLLAND 5179 Woodside Ct Carmel, IN 46033. CHARLES H RYON 7229 Durnel Dr #81 Nelson, CA 95958. EDWIN E RYON 7229 Durnel Rd #888 Nelson, CA 95958. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: PATRICIA J. JONES Dated: January 7, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000027 Published: January 17,24,31, February 7, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as THROUGH AND THROUGH HOME INSPECTIONS at 854 Virginia St Chico, CA 95928. RICH ALLEN MORARRE 854 Virginia St Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: RICH MORARRE Dated: January 11, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000062 Published: January 17,24,31, February 7, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as JOHNSON STORAGE at 405 Panama Ave Chico, CA 95973. L & B JOHNSON FAMILY LIMITED PARTNERSHIP 405 Panama Ave Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Limited Partnership. Signed: RYNE JOHNSON Dated: January 11, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000064 Published: January 17,24,31, February 7, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as NAIL FABULOUS SALON at 2055 Forest Ave Suite #2 Chico, CA 95928. LYNAE BEGBIE 1661 Forest Ave #186 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: LYNAE BEGBIE Dated: January 8, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000037 Published: January 17,24,31, February 7, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as WILD COUNTRY COURIER at 23 Ranchita Way Chico, CA

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95928. CATHY ATKINSON 23 Ranchita Way Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: CATHY A. ATKINSON Dated: January 14, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000070 Published: January 24,31, February 7,14, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as SNACKING VENDING at 467 E 9th St Chico, CA 95928. CAMERON WADE MATTEUCCI 467 E 9th St Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: CAMERON MATTEUCCI Dated: January 11, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000063 Published: January 24,31, February 7,14, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CHICO CREEK SIGNS at 195 E Shasta Ave. Rear Bldg Chico, CA 95973. BENJAMIN LLOYD ANDERSON 408 Weymouth Way Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: BENJAMIN L. ANDERSON Dated: January 15, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000078 Published: January 24,31, February 7,14, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ACORNS TO OAKS DAYCARE at 93 St. Francis Dr Chico, CA 95926. SHANNON FAE SIVADON 93 St. Francis Dr Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: SHANNON SIVADON Dated: January 16, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000087 Published: January 24,31, February 7,14, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as RUSTIC SHEARS at 225 Main Street, Suite E Chico, CA 95926. BONNIE SUE PATTERSON 539 Castle Drive Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: BONNIE PATTERSON Dated: January 15, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000081 Published: January 24,31, February 7,14, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CAST AND CUSTOM METAL FABRICATION INC., CAST AND CUSTOM WELDING at 1384 Durham Dayton Highway Durham, CA 95938. CAST AND CUSTOM METAL FABRICATION INC. 1384 Durham-Dayton Hwy Durham, CA 95938.

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This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: BRETT PRUETT, OWNER Dated: December 26, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001550 Published: January 24,31, February 7,14, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as STRUCTURAL SOLUTIONS at 2176 Esplanade Chico, CA 95926. JEREMY PEARCE 12 Creekwood Court Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JEREMY PEARCE Dated: January 14, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000072 Published: January 24,31, February 7,14, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as 432 at 1929 Mangrove Ave Chico, CA 95926. ALEXANDRA KRIZ 555 Vallombrosa Ave #48 Chico, CA 95926. JAMES ANTHONY SPALLINA III 702 Mangrove Ave #125 Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: JAMES SPALLINA Dated; January 16, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000089 Published: January 24,31, February 7,14, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as IRON STATE PRESS at 978 Salem St., Unit B Chico, CA 95928. ALEC MARTIN BINYON 978 Salem St., Unit B Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ALEC BINYON Dated: January 18, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000105 Published: January 24,31, February 7,14, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PARADISE SALON at 1600 Mangrove Ave Ste 140 Chico, CA 95926. TERRI L COOPER 830 Alynn Way #A Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: TERRI L. COOPER Dated: January 3, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000013 Published: January 24,31, February 7,14, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CREATIVE RECLAIMED WOODS at 2568 Fair St. Chico, CA 95928. RACHEL NICOLE MCMILLAN 2235 Dorado Cerro Chico, CA 95928. SCOTT ERIC MCMILLAN 2235 Dorado Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: RACHEL MCMILLAN Dated: December 21, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001547 Published: January 31, February 7,14,21, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are

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doing business as MORRISON at 10 Landing Circle, #5 Chico, CA 95973. MORRISON AND COMPANY CONSULTING, INC 10 Landing Circle, #5 Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: R. BRENT MORRISON, PRESIDENT Dated: January 10, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000051 Published: January 31, February 7,14,21, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as KEN’S PARADISE HITCH AND WELDING at 919 Easy Street Paradise, CA 95969. DALE JOSEPH GOMES 3254 Indian Springs Rd Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: DALE J GOMES Dated: January 14, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000077 Published: January 31, February 7,14,21, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CARING CHOICE HOUSES LLC at 878 Palermo Road Oroville, CA 95965. CARING CHOICE HOUSES LLC 878 Palermo Road Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: PHILLIP L. WILSON, PRESIDENT Dated: January 22, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000111 Published: January 31, February 7,14,21, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as HANDYCRAFT at 6369 Cohasset Road Chico, CA 95973. JOSEPH DANNIEL PARCHER 6369 Cohasset Road Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JOSEPH PARCHER Dated: January 3, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000015 Published: January 31, February 7,14,21, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as FUROCIOUS PETS at 679 E 9th St Apt 3 Chico, CA 95928. DANIEL THOMAS LEVULETT 679 E 9th St Apt 3 Chico, CA 95928. TAYLOR LEVULETT 679 E 9th St Apt 3 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed; DANIEL LEVULETT Dated: January 25, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000133 Published: January 31, February 7,14,21, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as ARTISTS OF RIVER TOWN, STUDIO AT THE BRUSHSTROKES GALLERY at 1967 Montgomery Street Oroville, CA 95965. ARTISTS OF RIVER TOWN 277 Olive Hwy Suite A Oroville, CA 95965.

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This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: DAVID I TAMORI, PRESIDENT Dated: January 24, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000131 Published: January 31, February 7,14,,21, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following person has abandoned the use of the fictitious business name SCOOTERS CAFE at 11975 Highway 70 Oroville, CA 95965. MICHAEL SCOTT ENGLUND 3819 Grizzly Creek Rd Yankee Hill, CA 95965. This business was conducted by an Individual. Signed: MICHAEL ENGLUND Dated: January 29, 2019 FBN Number: 2016-0001506 Published: February 7,14,21,28, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as COMANCHE CREEK FARMS, HAND IN GARDEN INC at 260 Speedway Avenue Chico, CA 95928. HAND IN GARDEN INC 260 Speedway Avenue Chico, CA 95928. GWENDOLYM M MILLER 260 Speedway Avenue Chico, CA 95928. JAMES GAYL MILLER 260 Speedway Avenue Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: JAMES G. MILLER, PRESIDENT Dated: January 25, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000132 Published: February 7,14,21,28, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BEST CLEANING AND WINDOW SERVICE, BEST WINDOW CLEANING SERVICE at 1711 Mulberry St Chico, CA 95928. LARRY ROBERT LACZKO 1711 Mulberry St Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: LARRY LACZKO Dated: January 22, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000113 Published: February 7,14,21,28, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATMENT The following persons are doing business as COMPANIONS ANIMAL HOSPITAL at 2607 Esplanade Chico, CA 95973. VALERIE DYINA CARUSO 1178 Hill View Way Chico, CA 95926. REBECCA MANNINEN 1178 Hill View Way Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: VALERIE CARUSO, PRES Dated: January 28, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000137 Published: February 7,14,21,28, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as HATHA HOUSE at 13948 Lindbergh Circle Chico, CA 95973. TATIANA LOONEY 13948 Lindbergh Circle Chico,

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CA 95973. ZURI OSTERHOLT 725 Alder Street Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: ZURI OSTERHOLT Dated: January 31, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000161 Published: February 7,14,21,28, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as AN HONEST DEFENSE INVESTIGATIVE SERVICE at 8010 Reservoir Rd Oroville, CA 95966. MARY ANN BARR 8010 Reservoir Rd Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: MARY ANN BARR Dated: January 24, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000127 Published: February 7,14,21,28, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as HAPPY DAY RESTAURANT at 14455 Skyway Magalia, CA 95954. MERRY YANG NO. ONE, INC. 2848 Cactus Ave Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: ZHONGMEI YANG, PRESIDENT Dated: January 17, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000101 Published: February 7,14,21,28, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as G TOWN HOT SHOP AND GLASS ART GALLERY at 2280 Ivy St Suite 120 Chico, CA 95928. ANDREW LIBECKI 2280 Ivy St Suite 120 Chico, CA 95928. BRYON SUTHERLAND 2280 Ivy St Suite 120 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: BRYON SUTHERLAND Dated: January 17, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000104 Published: February 7,14,21,28, 2019

FICTITOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as SCOOTERS CAFE at 11975 Highway 70 Oroville, CA 95965. BONNIE SALMON 4132 Deadwood Rd Oroville, CA 95965. DANIEL RICHARD SALMON 4132 Deadwood Rd Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: DAN SALMON Dated; January 29, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000143 Published: February 7,14,21,28, 2019

FICTITOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BARON TRANSPORT SERVICES at 6346 Baston Lane Paradise, CA 95969. GREGORY ALAN BARON 6346 Baston Lane Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: GREGORY A. BARON Dated: January 30, 2019

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FBN Number: 2019-0000152 Published: February 7,14,21,28, 2019

FICTITOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as X TECH at 2707 Fay Way Oroville, CA 95966. NENG XIONG 2707 Fay Way Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: NENG XIONG Dated: January 29, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000145 Published: February 7,14,21,28, 2019

NOTICES ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner CHARLES STEPHENS filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: CHARLES STEPHENS Proposed name: CHARLES KELLY THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: February 20, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: December 31, 2018 Case Number: 18CV03413 Published: January 17,24,31, February 7, 2109

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner LAURA LIZETTE ARRIAZA filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: LAURA LIZETTE ARRIAZA Proposed name: LAURA LIZETTE HOLGUIN THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: March 13, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM

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Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: January 16, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00144 Published: January 24,31, February 7,14, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner CYNTHIA MARIE CAMPAGNA filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: CYNTHIA MARIE CAMPAGNA Proposed name: CINZIA MARIE CAMPAGNA THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: March 6, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: January 9, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00067 Published: January 24,31, February 7,14, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner ANDREA NARCISO filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: WARNER BURKE ALLEN Proposed name: WARNER BURKE ALLEN NARCISO THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: March 13, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: January 9, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00062 Published: January 24,31, February 7,14, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner MICHAEL STILLWELL and ANGELA WENTZELL filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: SHANE OWEN WENTZELL Proposed name: SHANE OWEN STILLWELL THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: February 27, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: December 31, 2019 Case Number: 18CV03097 Published: January 31, February 7,14,21, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner CHRISTINA OXLEY filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: KINZLEE ANN QUINN Proposed name: KINZLEE ANN OXLEY THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: March 27, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: D1 Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: January 25, 2019 Case Number: 18CV03574 Published: January 31, February 7,14,21, 2019

SUMMONS SUMMONS NOTICE TO RESPONDENT ANTHONY BUNCE You are being sued by plaintiff: JANET DONNELLY You have 30 calendar days after this Summons and Petition are served on you to file a

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Response (form FL-120) at the court and have a copy served on the petitioner. A letter, phone call, or court appearance will not protect you. If you do not file your Response on time, the court may make orders affecting your marriage or domestic partnership, your property, and custody of your children. You may be ordered to pay support and attorney fees and costs. For legal advice, contact a lawyer immediately. Get help finding a lawyer at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courts.ca.gov/selfhelp) at the California Legal Services website (www.lawhelpca.org), or by contacting your local county bar association. FEE WAIVER: If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the clerk for a fee waiver form. The court may order you to pay back all or part of the fees and costs that the court waived for you or the other party. The name and address of the court are: Superior Court of California, County of Butte 1775 Concord Avenue Chico, CA 95928 The name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner’s attorney, or the petitioner without an attorney, are: MICHAEL M. ROONEY/ JEFFREY MONSELL 1361 Esplanade Chico, CA 95926-4900 (530) 345-5678 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Dated: November 2, 2018 Case Number: 18FL02331 Published: January 24,31, February 7,14, 2019

PETITION NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE CARMELITA A. LANTZ (also known as CARMELITA ANN LANTZ, CARMELITA ANN CESSNA LANTZ) To all heirs and beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: CARMELITA A. LANTZ, CARMELITA ANN LANTZ CARMELITA ANN CESSNA LANTZ A Petition for Probate has been filed by: SUSAN L. LANTZ and LINDA L. RAK in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: SUSAN L. LANTZ and LINDA L. RAK be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: February 19, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate

this Legal Notice continues


Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: NICOLE R. PLOTTEL 466 Vallombrosa Ave. Chico, CA 95926 (530) 893-2882 Case Number: 19PR00030 Dated: January 17, 2019 Published: January 24,31, February 7, 2019

this Legal Notice continues

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE RICHARD W. ROGERS, also known as RICHARD WILLIAM ROGERS To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: RICHARD W. ROGERS, also known as RICHARD WILLIAM ROGERS A Petition for Probate has been filed by: RYAN J. ALLEN in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: RYAN J. ALLEN be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to

this Legal Notice continues

the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: February 19, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: NICOLE R. PLOTTEL 466 Vallombrosa Ave. Chico CA, 95926 (530)893-2882 Case Number: 19PR00040 Dated: January 23, 2019 Published: January 31, February 7,14, 2019

the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: March 5, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: 10 Room: 2 Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: STEVAN N. LUZAICH 700 El Camino Real Millbrae, CA 94030 (650) 871-5666 Case Number: 19PR00045 Dated: January 24, 2019 Published: February 7,14,21, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE SHIRLEY HALEY, aka SHIRLEY ANN HALEY, aka SHIRLEY A. HALEY To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: SHIRLEY HALEY, aka SHIRLEY ANN HALEY, aka SHIRLEY A. HALEY A Petition for Probate has been filed by: GLENN CARLSON in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: GLENN CARLSON be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE BARBARA JEAN CARLSON aka BARBARA CARLSON aka BARBARA J. CARLSON To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: BARBARA JEAN CARLSON, aka BARBARA CARLSON, aka BARBARA J. CARLSON a petition for Probate has been filed by: GLENN CARLSON in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: GLENN CARLSON be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to

this Legal Notice continues

this Legal Notice continues

the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: March 5, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: 10 Room: 2 Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: STEVAN N. LUZAICH 700 El Camino Real Millbrae, CA 94030 (650) 871-5666 Case Number: 19PR00043 Dated: January 24, 2019 Published: February 7,14,21, 2019

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NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE CAROL SUZANNE ZEIMIS, aka CAROL S. ZEIMIS, CAROL S. TEN NAPEL To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: CAROL SUZANNE ZEIMIS, aka CAROL S. ZEIMIS, CAROL S. TEN NAPEL A Petition for Probate has been filed by: VINCENT STERLING ZEIMIS in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: VINCENT STERLING ZEIMIS be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the

authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: February 19, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: TBA Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: DIRK POTTER Jacobs, Anderson, Potter & Chaplin 20 Independence Circle Chico CA, 95973 (530)342-6144 Case Number: 19PR00033 Dated: January 17, 2019 Published: January 24,31, February 7, 2019

➡ f e b r u a r y 7, 2 0 1 9

CN&R

37


REAL ESTATE

fOr MOre INfOrMaTION abOuT aDVerTISING IN Our reaL eSTaTe SeCTION, CaLL 530-894-2300

Love’s Real estate

Opting in

3 beds 2 full baths, 1 partial bath | 2,377 sq.ft. | $719,000 On 10 acres built in 2000 6271 san diegO ave, cOrning 96021

TThis fabulous open floor plan has custom Knotty Alder wood cabinets and beautiful built in appliances. Flooring is partial hardwood and stained concrete. This property is located on a quiet county road in the very desirable Richfield area. They have a beautiful small grape vineyard that they used to make their own wine. There is both a residential well and Ag well. 2 car attached Garage. Central Heating/Cooling. Whole House Fan, Wood Stove Insert, Covered Patio, In Ground Spa. A true beauty and a must see! $719,000!!

Teresa e. smiTh

1st ChoiCe realty state liCense #: 01500355 Cell Phone: 530-680-3848 1firstChoiCerealty@gmail.Com 1607 solano street Corning, 96021

My daughter and son-in-law are among the thousands of people who lost their homes in the Camp Fire. My son-in-law is a heavy equipment operator, and thankfully, still has heavy equipment to operate. His tractors and trailers came out of the fire with minor scorching, a lot luckier than the nearby house, which was annihilated. It made sense that my son-in-law would be the one to operate his own equipment to haul away the debris from the remains of their house when it came time to rebuild. His cost of doing the work would be far less than hiring it out. He trusts his own work better than anyone else, anyway. But that debris removal stuff got complicated. I began hearing of tricky and possibly expensive governmental requirements for cleaning up debris from burned property. Toxic inspections, soil sampling, not just debris removal. I went to a meeting of government officials explaining the latest rules and requirements for the 12,000 or so people who own property with burned down houses. “Each property owner must either opt in or opt out of the government debris removal program,” said a state representative. “Government workers will be responsible for the

entire cleanup, at our cost, and we expect it to cost an average of $80,000 per lot. Anyone who opts out must take care of it on their own, including sampling for toxics, and removing dirt until it is certified toxic-free.” “What if a property owner doesn’t even know about opting in or out?” somebody asked. “Then we will do the work and put a lien against their property. We need help finding all the property owners,” said the representative. I called my son-in-law and told him about the government program, particularly the $80,000. Also, the deadline for opting in was in a couple of days. There is a website to visit for opting in, buttecountyrecovers.org. “How much insurance is in your policy for lot-clearing?” I asked. “Fifteen thousand,” he said. He paused, then said, “What was the address of that website?”

Doug Love is Sales Manager at Century 21 in Chico. Call 530-680-0817 or email dougwlove@gmail.com License #950289

Homes are Selling in Your Neighborhood Shop every home for sale at www.C21SelectGroup.com

530.345.6618 Fully Furnished Butte Meadows Cabin ready for new owners. You can live here while you rebuild. $219,000 3/1 Chico large lot $265,000

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EmmEtt Jacobi (530)519–6333 calbRE#01896904

CalBRE #01312354

Homes Sold Last Week ADDRESS

TOWN

4144 Augusta Ln 107 Donald Dr 88 Kendal Ct 19 Sunshine Rd 340 Mansion Ave 2368 Sausalito St 27 Fairway Dr 713 Burnt Ranch Way 1683 Hooker Oak Ave 2384 England St 929 Netters Cir

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico

38

CN&R

f e b r u a r y 7, 2 0 1 9

Butte County is Experiencing an Extreme Housing Shortage! It is great to time sell - give me call to see if the time is right for YOU

Looking for a Realtor? Check out what our clients have to say about our service and ability on our review links on our website: www.JacobiTeam. C21SelectGroup.com

PRICE $825,000 $810,000 $733,500 $689,000 $665,000 $650,000 $600,000 $549,000 $460,000 $430,000 $420,000

BR/BA 4/3 4/3 3/3 4/3 4/4 4/3 3/3 4/3 3/2 4/4 4/3

Kim Jacobi (530)518–8453 calbRE#01963545

Jennifer Parks | 530.864.0336 BRE# 01269667

Sponsored by Century 21 Select Real Estate, Inc. SQ. FT. 3005 3082 3383 2269 2766 1906 2996 2523 1672 1472 2096

ADDRESS

TOWN

1948 Waxwing Way 3018 California Park Dr 2511 Duffy Dr 244 Mission Serra Ter 204 Mission Serra Ter 10 Saint Helens Ln 1273 Howard Dr 3000 Burnap Ave 236 W 1st Ave 2034 Salem St 2088 Marilyn Dr

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico

PRICE $405,000 $400,000 $395,000 $390,000 $365,000 $361,500 $330,000 $321,000 $285,000 $280,000 $268,000

BR/BA 3/2 3/3 3/2 3/2 3/2 3/2 3/1 2/1 2/1 2/1 3/2

SQ. FT. 1308 1878 1477 1414 1447 1248 1075 1054 1068 875 1306


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adoraBle 3 bed/2.5 bth, 1,502 sq ft with front and back porches plus a formal dining room and living room with an open floor plan, in door laundry room, 2-car garage and all furnishing in the home are included.

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Teresa Larson (530) 514-5925

$350,000

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Olivia Larrabee l (530) 520-3169 Olivia.Larrabee@c21selectgroup.com

6ac Creekside on Butte Creek $249,000 3.4 ac, well, septic and power in place $115,000 5 ac lot. Owner carry $29,500 LD S Oremodeled Campus condo tastefully $159,000 26.6 ac walnuts with 5800 sq ft home SOLD $1,455,000

Mark Reaman l (530) 228-2229 Lic# 01265853

Mark.Reaman@c21jeffrieslydon.com

The following houses were sold in Butte County by real estate agents or private parties during the week of January 21 - January 25, 2019 The housing prices are based on the stated documentary transfer tax of the parcel and may not necessarily reflect the actual sale price of the home. ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

SQ. FT.

ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

SQ. FT.

555 Vallombrosa Ave #49

Chico

$201,000

2/1

902

2605 Foothill Blvd

Oroville

$329,000

4/3

2428

2503 El Paso Way

Chico

$190,000

3/2

1597

3975 Hildale Ave

Oroville

$315,000

3/3

2603

630 W 9th St

Chico

$160,000

2/2

1204

193 Winding Creek Way

Oroville

$300,000

3/3

2420

2579 White Ave

Chico

$139,500

3/2

1589

5 Westelle Dr

Oroville

$264,508

3/2

1342

2375 Notre Dame Blvd #5

Chico

$105,000

1/1

600

42 Coarse Gold Rd

Oroville

$240,000

3/2

1140

35 Dean Way

Chico

$103,000

3/2

1325

48 Highlands Blvd

Oroville

$240,000

2/1

1326

4968 Beckwourth Ct

Oroville

$535,000

2/4

2751

1626 Grand Ave

Oroville

$215,000

3/1

1100

88 Pine Oaks Rd

Oroville

$459,000

3/3

2813

3486 Argonaut Ave

Oroville

$212,000

3/1

1199

151 Valley View Dr

Oroville

$425,000

3/4

2412

15 Casa Loma Way

Oroville

$198,000

2/2

1026

1484 Hammon Ave

Oroville

$400,000

3/2

2068

5268 Harrison Rd

Paradise

$425,000

3/3

2095

18 Coventry Dr

Oroville

$330,000

3/3

1744

1394 Wagstaff Rd

Paradise

$275,000

3/2

1504

f e b r u a r y 7, 2 0 1 9

CN&R

39


stop

the cycle

start the healing

sexual violence is not a gender issue, but a human issue Fact: 9-10% of all rape survivors outside of a criminal institutions are male 16 years of age Fact: Many men experienced sexual abuse by the age of 18 Fact: The greatest age risk for males being sexual violated is age 4

we are here to listen

24hr crisis line: 530-342-raPe (7273) collect calls accepted

Butte/Glenn: 530-891-1331 or 877-452-9588 Tehama: 530-529-3980 Calling from Corning: 530-824-3980 2889 Cohasset Rd., Ste 2, Chico • 725 Pine St., Red Bluff Business office: Monday-Friday 10am-6pm, excluding holidays

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