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CHICO’S FREE NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY VOLUME 42, ISSUE 23 THURSDAY, JANUARY 31, 2019 WWW.NEWSREVIEW.COM

Don’t drink the

water

Contamination poses another complex hurdle for recovery in Paradise BY MEREDITH J. COOPER PAGE

8 KICKED TO THE CURB

9 CAMP FIRE JOBS

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22 CUMBIA CARNIVAL


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CN&R 

January 31, 2019

Vince and Kristina Clarkson, Owners


CN&R

INSIDE

Vol. 42, Issue 23 • January 31, 2019 4

Editorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Guest Comment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Second & Flume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 This Modern World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Streetalk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

NEWSLINES

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25

Downstroke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Sifter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9

HEALTHLINES

12

Appointment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Weekly Dose. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

GREENWAYS

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Eco Event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS

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15 Minutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 The Goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

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COVER STORY

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ARTS & CULTURE

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Music Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 This Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Fine Arts listings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Scene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Nightlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Reel World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Chow. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Arts DEVO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Brezsny’s Astrology . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31

CLASSIFIEDS

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REAL ESTATE

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This guy saves you money.

OPINION

ON THE COVER: DESIGN BY TINA FLYNN

Our Mission: To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. Editor Melissa Daugherty Managing Editor Meredith J. Cooper Arts Editor Jason Cassidy Contributing Editor Evan Tuchinsky Staff Writer Ashiah Scharaga Calendar Editor Nate Daly

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OPINION

Send guest comments, 340 words maximum, to gc@newsreview.com or to 353 E. Second St., Chico, CA 95928. Please include photo & short bio.

EDITORIAL

Time to prioritize temporary housing It’s been nearly three months since the Camp Fire

torched a significant portion of Butte County, destroying thousands of homes and displacing tens of thousands of residents, and yet the most significant commitment in terms of making room for temporary housing units has come from the city of Gridley. That farming town about 30 miles south of Chico is the second-smallest municipality in the county. Its population is roughly 6,700. Yet, a few weeks ago, city leaders unanimously voted to move forward on a plan to lease just over 72 acres of city-owned land to the federal government. There, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) plans to place hundreds of modular homes for qualified displaced residents. Of course, we’re not talking about charity here. Gridley is poised to rake in about $1.6 million from the federal government annually. The lease of the property—at a city-owned industrial park—is expected to be in place for a year or two. Though temporary, the FEMA units will give Camp Fire evacuees a much-needed place of their own. Our question: Why hasn’t Chico found a similar way to aid our neighbors from fire-charred areas? For one, we’re much closer to the Ridge and the

surrounding foothills. Many displaced residents work here and are unable to secure any type of housing in our ultra-tight market. Helping them is not only the neighborly thing to do, but also would help preserve Chico’s workforce. In a letter to the editor this week, a member of the Chico City Council suggests that the public should question local developers about the holdup. While it’s true that builders and landowners ought to step up, that sounds like a cop-out. We’re not convinced that the council has explored its options, including for city-owned land. We’d like to see a more thorough discussion at the dais on this front. Chico’s elected leaders aren’t the only ones on the hook here. The county Board of Supervisors, especially the Ridge representative and those newly elected to represent Chico, also must prioritize discussions on additional temporary housing locations. This is an urgent situation. We learned this week that FEMA won’t allow residents to live on their properties until they are deemed clean, a complication that will result in an unanticipated need for additional local temporary housing facilities (see page 10). The debris removal process is underway, so time is of the essence. Ω

GUEST COMMENT

In service during the Camp Fire crisis Alater,Crosswe board in October of 2018. Just four weeks were responding to the most destructive longtime corporate donor, I joined the local Red

wildfire in California history. Executive Director Amanda Ree called me Nov. 8 and asked if I wanted to support our work responding to the Camp Fire. Since then, I have volunteered hundreds of hours. First, I was on the team coordinating with Cal Fire at the Incident Command Center. As a community liaison, I engaged my local network to recruit dozens of volunteers to by go into our community, where we Jeff Collins registered more than 10,000 people The author has lived on Safe & Well, the Red Cross’ in Butte County reunification tool, which helped since 2000. the Butte County Sheriff’s Office locate hundreds of missing people. Next, I secured two warehouses to store unsolicited donations that streamed in as the Red Cross coordinated with partners to distribute. Finally, I provided

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JANUARY 31, 2019

leadership in the Long-Term Recovery Group, where I remain as an executive committee member. Since the day the fire started, the Red Cross has provided over 40,000 overnight stays at its shelters, providing safety and comfort to some of the most vulnerable fire-affected members of our community. We have provided more than 85,000 meals at our shelters and on the Ridge. Our health workers, mental health staff and spiritual care teams made thousands of contacts in our community. Our teams have been supporting the communities on the Ridge, distributing much-needed items such as water, shoes and blankets. A disaster like this overwhelms most organizations. Thankfully, the Red Cross mobilized more than 2,000 volunteers and staff from across the country to serve the community. The Red Cross continues to work one-on-one with clients at the shelter—our focus is on piecing together recovery plans that can buttress their overall recovery. I have always been service-oriented. Service with the Red Cross allows me to make a direct impact in my beloved community. I have seen our mission in action. I have been a part of it. And, I remain an everproud supporter and board member. Ω

SECOND & FLUME by Melissa Daugherty m e l i s s a d @ n e w s r e v i e w. c o m

Round three A few weeks after the Camp Fire erupted, I began making predictions about the future. One was that it wouldn’t be long before the throng of reporters from large, out-of-town media outlets would begin an exodus that would eventually leave just the local journalists to cover the ongoing recovery. Another was about a potential new wave of homelessness. “I worry most about those on the margins: folks on fixed, lowertier incomes who were able to get by living on the Ridge,” I wrote back on Nov. 29. And now, dear readers, those fears have been realized. Disasters in rural regions grip big-city readers for only so long, and the reporters from the metros have mostly gone back to covering stories closer to home. That’s disappointing for a number of reasons, including the loss of additional watchdogging. That’s true especially when it comes to homelessness, which I expect to spike dramatically in the coming months now that the Red Cross is winding down its operations. As we’ve reported over the past couple of weeks, the organization set a Jan. 31 closure date for its shelter operations at the Silver Dollar Fairgrounds. That was the plan despite the state-owned facility granting an extension into March. We’d heard about that extension through the grapevine prior to the publication of our last issue, but neither the county nor Red Cross confirmed that information until well after deadline. The reason the Red Cross kept it hush-hush: to motivate people to leave. When the county gave us the confirmation, hours after we went to press, its spokeswoman charged it was simply a contingency plan. That is, the shelter would stay open only if needed. Since then, the Red Cross has ramped down the number of fire refugees taking up residence there. Doling out 48-hour eviction notices, along with $125 gift cards, is one of the ways it has accomplished this goal. Some folks told the CN&R’s Ashiah Scharaga that the single gift card is the only help they’d received in terms of transitioning out of the facility. With nowhere to go, they planned to bed down in Chico’s parks (see page 8 for an update). The result: People who experienced a traumatic evacuation on Nov. 8 experience yet another one at the hands of the national relief organization. The Red Cross defends its move to extricate evacuees by saying that the facility isn’t meant for long-term sheltering (see the guest comment for a sunny take on its work). But, considering the alternative for some people is literally living on the streets, that rationalization is faulty. Moreover, the timing stinks. First off, a couple of weeks’ notice doesn’t suffice. In addition, many of the expulsions took place just prior to the county supervisors accepting an infusion of money from Wells Fargo, funds earmarked specifically to subsidize housing for people at the shelter. Some of the folks we’ve interviewed wondered where that aid is going. All of this certainly underscores my resolve to look further into how the Red Cross has handled the discharge of hundreds of vulnerable people. Watch this space for more updates on this dynamic situation. I’m committed.

Melissa Daugherty is editor of the CN&R


LETTERS

ATTENTION BOOMERS

Send email to cnrletters@newsreview.com

‘Unconscionable’  Re “Double down” (Second & Flume, by Melissa Daugherty, Jan. 24) and “Shelter no more” (by Meredith J. Cooper, Jan. 17): Thank you, Editor Melissa Daugherty and the staff of the Chico News & Review, for your role in encouraging the American Red Cross to shelter fire refugees beyond Jan. 31. In your coverage and editorial comment, I see journalism at its finest: A bright light shed on an issue, bringing the facts forward. Then, the articulation of a principled response to the facts on the ground; in this case, saying loudly and clearly that it is unconscionable for a massively funded charity to allow people to go unsheltered in the dead of winter. On Jan. 28, I stood with members of the Chico Homeless Union in a well-organized and inspiring protest against what appears to be an impending “soft closure” of the fairgrounds shelter— a closure now appearing more and

more like a public relations gambit, designed to blunt opposition. Notwithstanding the above, we are deluding ourselves in thinking charities can or will comprehensively address major social problems, like shelter deprivation. We have a full-scale, national, governmental failure in the realm of housing—and poverty in general. And, right here at home, once again, where are Chico’s share of the FEMA trailers? Patrick Newman Chico

Ask the developers Re “About the Red Cross” (Letters, by Patrick Newman, Jan. 24): A number of people have questioned what the city [of Chico] is doing about placing FEMA housing for Camp Fire victims. The question might be better posed to our local developers. The city owns parks, reserves and facilities that have purposes other than housing. Our local

developers have bare land that is earmarked for what FEMA needs—parcels zoned for dwellings. The developers have land-banked substantial acreage around town in the hopes of future development. One such parcel on Eaton Road was proposed for FEMA manufactured housing units, but the developer pulled the piece from consideration. Our developers appear to be better positioned than the city to assist with suitable land for emergency housing. If FEMA is not asking them about it, perhaps community members should be. Scott Huber Chico

Editor’s note: The author is a member of the Chico City Council.

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LETTERS c o n t i n u e d f r o m pa g e 5 and sense of “mission accomplished” that doesn’t do the current situation justice. There are over 500 unclaimed cats and over 100 unclaimed dogs, and more cats are found every single day (200-plus cats found in January alone). The county hopes that unclaimed pets will be adopted, but they are not promising anything. They are transferring these pets to other shelters and have stated it is up to these shelters to now deal with this issue. They are distancing themselves from any euthanasia that may occur. The fact is that many frantically searched for their pets in the initial weeks, but— having gone through the trauma of escaping and then viewing the devastation—have assumed their pets died. The pets were constantly moved and scattered, and the online resources have been equally chaotic. People stopped looking. If you lost a pet, please look for it again! Please post your lost pet photos to CampFirePetRescue.org and CampFireRescuedAnimals.com, and look for your animals on these photo sites. We also need people to adopt, foster and volunteer! Please help if you can. Alan Raetz Woodland

Rx for survival  Re “Why we care about ‘the homeless’” (Editorial, Jan. 24): I definitely agree “Love thy neighbor” isn’t a platitude. I believe it is a prescription for survival. We humans have always relied on those living nearby for help in times of need. Our pioneers helped raise each others’ barns and traded resources. New immigrants deliberately settled in the same neighborhood in order to support each other. During the Great Depression, employed neighbors fed unemployed ones. The first responders at the recent climate-related disasters of hurricanes, floods and fires were neighbors, not the federal government. The homeless among us, no matter why they are homeless or where they are from, are here now and, so, are our neighbors. The prescription for their survival, as well as our own, is “Love they neighbor.” Renee Renaud Chico

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Post-fire Chico The Paradise nightmare has provided a picture of what traffic will look like in the future: congested. Past overgrowth has given birth to serious crime, gangs, graffiti, the homeless, traffic pressure, threats to clear water and blue skies. Thirty years ago, none of these perils existed. Concerned citizens rallied under the flag of “No Way San Jose” to protect and preserve the bucolic Chico of old and its sensitive environment. The contractors, the city councils, the city staff, the Chico Enterprise-Record and the Chico Chamber of Commerce cost us our unsurpassed town. Their motives vary from “bigger is better” to plain greed and monopolybuilding. What a shame! Jerry Olio Chico

Huh? Is he serious? At a time like none other, a time when we need to know truth—not spins on truth—Giuliani is chastising media outlets and their audiences for not appreciating his flagrant intent to hoodwink the public? Is he oblivious to the ridicule visited upon Kellyanne Conway, the Trump associate who attempted to justify as “alternative fact” her grossly exaggerating the size of one of Trump’s audiences? I suppose we should not be surprised. If Trump can no less abashedly castigate Michael Cohen for having “ratted” him out, then it is only to be expected that he would welcome counsel from someone promoting spin as an acceptable substitute for honesty. William Todd-Mancillas Chico

Humpty Trumpty

Bernie’s folly “Oh, what a tangled web we weave, when first we practice to deceive.” Dust off the 2016 Ralph Nader trophy, and change the date to 2020: Bernie Sanders just tossed his hat into the 2020 Democratic presidential race. Fresh off the heels of apologizing to 12 of his campaign workers who were allegedly sexually harassed during his last ill-fated, Comrade Trump-enabling campaign, Bernie is basking in his third residence—a four-bedroom, three-bathroom summer home on Lake Champlain, in Vermont. Blend in pro-Kremlin former Viktor Yanukovych Campaign Manger Tad Devine, who worked alongside Paul Manafort to earn Yanukovych a charge of treason by the Ukranain government, and then worked as Bernie’s chief campaign strategist in 2016, it’s a recipe for another disaster next year. If the DNC has not brains enough to politely tell Bernie to run as an independent in 2020, the party deserves another four years of the Comrade Trump chaos that we all currently endure. Sir Walter Scott’s “tangled web” tells it all. Ray Estes Redding

I thought I was clever when I thought of the reference to Humpty Dumpty in relation to Trump’s wall. I was not. Online I saw T-shirts and other paraphernalia with Trump’s picture in the depiction of Humpty Dumpty. I looked further into the origins of the rhyme and found a more historic Humpty. Evidently, a cannon was called a Humpty Dumpty in the 1600s. This particular cannon had been mounted onto a castle wall and the gunner, one-eyed Jack Thompson, had managed to successfully attack the enemy many times. While that enemy could not challenge the cannon directly, they did manage to attack the wall, so both the wall and the cannon finally fell. Then, you know the outcome, “Humpty Dumpty had a great fall....” Is it possible that the Democrats, plus others opposed to the wall, can weaken Mr. Trump’s adamant stand? This would allow more reasonable approaches to immigration. It also would allow Congress to return to regular business rather than spending an inordinate amount of time on Mr. Trump’s insistence on an unneeded wall. Our opinions must be heard by Rep. LaMalfa and his men/women. Rebecca Cook Chico

Spin-man Rudy Rudy Giuliani complains that the media either do not understand or feign not understanding his “spins,” which he claims he can assert with impunity, given his masterful command of Trumperian facts.

More letters online:

We’ve got too many letters for this space. please go to www.newsreview.com/chico for additional readers’ comments on past cn&r articles.


STREETALK

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Priest Holmes, a great running back from the Kansas City Chiefs, who I grew up watching. I always admired him and thought he was a cool player.

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NEWSLINES DOWNSTROKE DEPUTIES SHOOT MAN ON LAM

Butte County Sheriff’s Office deputies fatally shot a Red Bluff man Monday afternoon (Jan. 28) after stopping him in connection with an attempted murder earlier that day. According to a BCSO news release, Richard Moulton, 52, had assaulted his estranged wife—biting her face and attempting to gouge out her eyes—and put a loaded gun in her mouth. When she escaped, he fired nine shots in her direction. He fled Red Bluff in his truck, which Butte County deputies spotted in the Durham area. A pursuit ended at Highway 162 and Aguas Frias Road; when Moulton exited the vehicle and raised the gun in deputies’ direction, they fired. Moulton was pronounced dead at the scene. All nine deputies involved have been placed on administrative duties pending an investigation by the Butte County Officer

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CHICO RITE AID ROBBED

Vaulting the counter to rob the pharmacy, two men made off with narcotics from the Rite Aid on Mangrove Avenue last Thursday evening (Jan. 25), according to the Chico Police Department. The suspects, described by police as black men approximately 20 years old, entered the store around 7:15 p.m. They allegedly ordered pharmacy staff to give them specific narcotic drugs, with one suspect assaulting an employee. The suspects ran off through an emergency door and left the scene in a white Toyota Camry, heading toward downtown. Witnesses provided the license plate number, but officers did not locate the suspects.

KOPPERS SITE DEBRIS-FREE

The former Koppers wood-treatment plant in Oroville is officially out of consideration as a Camp Fire debris site, after state and federal officials determined processing capacity sufficient to preclude the need for a temporary sorting facility. Eric Lamoureux (pictured), deputy director of the California Department of General Services, told the Butte County Board of Supervisors on Tuesday (Jan. 29) that the concrete will stay local—handled by Franklin Construction, by the landfill, and Granite Construction in Oroville—while the metal will be processed by Odin Metal Processing in Oroville and shipped elsewhere. Officials from CalOES, the state Office of Emergency Services, originally identified the old Diamond Match property in Chico for debris sorting but switched to Koppers after protests from residents. Orovillians launched similar protests. 8

CN&R

JANUARY 31, 2019

Fire evacuees turn to Chico’s streets as Red Cross prepares to close shelter

W shelter at the Silver Dollar Fairgrounds recently, he was given a $125 gift card and hen Matt Collins left the Red Cross

headed to stay with his cousin. Collins, a Camp Fire evacuee from Paradise, wasn’t away long—his accommodations fell through. But when he came back to the shelter, he story and was turned away. photo by “I’m out here on Ashiah the street,” he said last Scharaga Thursday (Jan. 24). “I as h i a h s @ lost everything, with no n ew srev i ew. c o m money, no nothing, not even a phone. … $125 ain’t enough to survive on. You can’t even get a hotel with that.” Collins isn’t alone. Over the past week, half a dozen people have told the CN&R they were turned away from the shelter. They headed onto the streets of Chico with meager possessions, minimal funds and nowhere to go. The Red Cross intended to close today (Jan. 31), but representatives acknowledged this week the shelter will be open longer. In the weeks leading up to that target closure date, shelter numbers dwindled. As of Wednesday, there were an estimated 213

people staying in RVs and trailers, compared to more than 700 at the shelter’s peak count. Just under 80 people were staying inside, compared to about 250 on Jan. 15, according to Denise Everhart, the Red Cross coordinating officer for the Camp Fire. That’s when the organization brought in case workers to help those remaining form recovery plans. In response, activists with the California Homeless Union, including a few North State homeless people, rallied to protest what they see as an unjust eviction. About 20 showed up outside the fairgrounds Monday. They held up signs with messages such as, “Keep your promise, housing and dignity” and “The street is not shelter for anyone.” Berkeley-based attorney Anthony Prince, who serves as general counsel for the organization, said the group has heard numerous stories from those who’ve stayed at the shelter. Some people have driven hours away to stay at a hotel. Others have signed up for housing voucher wait lists, he said, or have been kicked out after missing case management appointments. The union is calling for the shelter to remain open until every person receives adequate housing.

“We’re concerned about the lack of due process in here,” Prince told the CN&R, “and we feel that people who are being helped should also be respected.” Over the weekend, dozens of shelter guests received 48-hour notices. Everhart said those asked to leave either had a plan in place and hadn’t moved on yet; had “refused to talk to a Red Cross case worker,” which is required “because [they] need to be actively involved in recovery”; or were considered “predisaster homeless” and referred to the Torres Community Shelter. Some RVs have been deemed abandoned and towed away, Everhart said; the rest have been moved to a back lot and hooked up to water and sewer. The state extended the lease at the fair-

grounds until mid-March. So why did the Red Cross plan on closing sooner? Everhart said that’s when the original lease ended, and that long-term congregate sheltering is not ideal. People have no privacy and are using portable toilets and showers. “If we can get them in a situation where they have better temporary housing, that’s everybody’s goal,” she said. For example,


Activists gather across the street from the Silver Dollar Fairgrounds to protest what they see as the unjust eviction of homeless people from the Red Cross shelter.

people have been provided with assistance for rent and for transportation. They have gone to live with friends and family, or stay in a FEMA-funded hotel. When asked about people like Collins, Everhart said: “If somebody dropped out of the system, for whatever reason—I’m not going to point fingers— and they were from the affected area and they are willing to work with a case worker, we can get them back into the system and work on solutions.” Getting back into the system isn’t as easy as walking up to the shelter gates. Everhart said they have to go to a Disaster Recovery Center and request that FEMA reopen their case. But some people seem to be getting lost in the midst of a complicated process. Todd Sexton’s mobile home is still standing in Magalia, but is unlivable, he said, torn apart by looters. He has been denied help from FEMA. Sexton told the CN&R he went to the fairgrounds about two weeks ago, seeking shelter, after living with family in Red Bluff didn’t pan out. He was turned away, then sneaked in to get some food and water. When they discovered he was wearing an old wrist band from his days at the Oroville Red Cross shelter, he was told to leave. He’s staying on the streets now. He’d like to go see family in Utah, but has no means to get there. FEMA spokeswoman Jovanna Garcia urged people like Sexton to appeal their cases. A majority of the time people are denied because they are missing documentation, like an ID or a property deed, she said. People such as these, denied access to the shelter, have the union fired up. “At the upper levels of the Red Cross, the policies they have we feel insult the dignity of homeless people, and they impose rules that aren’t necessary,” Prince said. “They have been unmindful of the circumstances of people evicted.” On Monday, fire survivor Ashley Ruud, who lived on the Ridge, planned to spend the night at a nearby park. Earlier that day, when she’d been asked to leave, all of her things already had been packed by shelter staff. “They said they were going to [help] with a plan, but they did not,” she said. Ω

Cleaning up Local workers start training for next phase of debris removal For the approximately 50 men and women

gathered in a large Butte College classroom on Monday (Jan. 28), the devastation wrought by the Camp Fire offered an unexpected opportunity: the possibility of snagging a well-paying job. These are some of the people who will be cleaning up the tons of debris left from the fire. They were gathered at the Butte College Training Place, at the corner of the Skyway and Notre Dame Boulevard in Chico, for the first day of a five-day, 40-hour training session that will be the initial step in certifying them to do the work. Qualified workers are in demand these days. There is so much debris resulting from the Camp Fire that CalRecycle, which is managing the removal, estimates cleanup will take at least a year. The work can be dangerous. Much of the ash contains hazardous chemicals; the training program is designed to teach workers how to handle the debris safely and what to do in case of emergencies. Three large companies have been selected to be the prime contractors, Butte County spokeswoman Casey Hatcher said during a recent business recovery forum. Two of the “primes,” as they are called, will focus on the town of Paradise, while the third will clean up sites in unincorporated areas. The two covering Paradise are Bay Areabased ECC Constructors LLC and SPSG Partners JV (each estimated to make $750 million), according to the CalRecycle website. The

third, Ceres Environmental Services Inc., dba Environmental & Demolition Services Group, out of Florida, will cover the rest ($200 million). ECC is working on cleanup for the Carr Fire as well. Each will be working with a number of subcontractors, and all will be hiring. And, because they are effectively extensions of the state, their employees will be paid the prevailing wage. Annie Rafferty, director of the Training Place, said prevailing wages can run from $55 to $75 an hour. That’s a welcome incentive for those who signed up for the training. Most of them are unemployed or underemployed, conditions that qualify them to have their fees and expenses, which can total as much as $1,000, waived entirely. All cleanup done by the state will be free to property owners, but it will be done according to the state’s timetable. Sites near

SIFT ER City in motion The Chico-metropolitan area placed 22nd in a ranking of the most “fitness-friendly” places in the U.S. in 2019, according to financial technology company SmartAsset. The study examined fast food availability; the percentage of people who walk or bike to work; the number of fitness professionals, such as nutritionists, recreational therapists, physical trainers and instructors; the number of fitness-related businesses, such as gyms and sporting goods stores; and the hourly cost of personal trainers. Among the results: About 6 percent of commuters walk or bike, there are roughly 47 fitness professionals per 10,000 people in the workforce, and about 44 percent of restaurants are considered fast food. Chico outranked Santa Rosa, but trailed behind the metropolitan areas of Napa, Santa Maria/Santa Barbara, Santa Cruz/ Watsonville and San Luis Obispo/Paso Robles/Arroyo Grande. La Crosse/Onalaska in the Wisconsin-Minnesota area and Missoula, Mont., ranked No. 1 and No. 2, respectively. Here are the regions that round out top 10:

3. Bend-Redmond, Ore. 4. Pittsfield, Mass. 5. Ann Arbor, Mich. 6. Iowa City, Iowa 7. State College, Pa. 8. BurlingtonSouth Burlington, Vt. 9. Fort Collins, Colo. 10. Boulder, Colo.

Potential workers learn the ropes for jobs in Camp Firescarred Butte County. PHOTO BY ROBERT SPEER

waterways and schools, for example, will be given higher priority than, say, residences on flat ground. Property owners who prefer not to use the state’s cleanup services are able to hire a private “alternative” contractor to do the work. Trainees who aren’t hired by one of the primes still can work for one of the alternatives, but not at prevailing wages. They can expect to earn from $20 to $30 an hour, Rafferty said. One of the things she’s noticed is that many of the trainees—30 percent or more—are from Paradise. While they are motivated by the potential of good pay, they also have a heartfelt desire to help their community rebuild. Phase I of the cleanup, which was completed this week, focused on clearing commercial and residential sites of household hazardous waste such as propane tanks, batteries, paint, herbicides, asbestos siding and e-waste. Phase II, the removal of pretty much everything else that burned, started Wednesday (Jan. 29)—and that is where the trainees come in. Once they complete the certification process—along with a further OSHA 10-hour safety course and a written fitness test—they get sized for a breathing mask and are good to go. In coming weeks, the Training Place will host a job fair bringing contractors and workers together. Later in the year, when cleanup is nearly done, it will begin training workers in construction so they can help rebuild the Ridge area. —ROBERT SPEER r ob e r tspe e r @ newsr ev iew.c o m

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Board gets bombshell Supes learn FEMA won’t let residents live on burned-out land All the folks who’ve moved into

trailers on their burned-out properties since the Camp Fire will very likely—and likely very soon—be told they must move. Again. It’s not a pleasant prospect, but the consequences could be dire. “I hate to be the messenger on this after everything …,” County Chief Administrative Officer Shari McCracken informed the Board of Supervisors late in Tuesday’s regular meeting (Jan. 29). “FEMA has said we are not eligible as a county, nor is the town [of Paradise], for debris removal [money] if we allow people to live on properties with structural fire debris on it.” A hush came over the room as audience members and supervisors alike exchanged looks of confusion. The board had just spent nearly two hours discussing a set of ordinances regarding emergency, short-term shelter. Public comments had been heard. After two of those speakers questioned being denied temporary power permits in recent days, Supervisor Bill Connelly asked staff to explain. That’s when McCracken dropped the bombshell that quieted the room. “FEMA, in re-evaluating our request for public assistance for debris removal, has determined that the town’s ordinance and the county’s ordinance could make us ineligible for the $1.7 billion in debris removal money,” she explained. “The only way FEMA can pay for debris removal is if there are imminent health risks. We negate saying it’s imminent if people are living there.” The announcement made the public’s pleas earlier in Residents will no longer be able to live on properties with burned structures until they are cleared. PHOTO BY CHARLES FINLAY

the meeting for faster action more relevant and more urgent, prompting the board to shift gears before taking a vote to ease restrictions on ag land and types of structures that will be allowed. The three ordinances being

discussed had been passed in December as emergency measures. One dealt with debris removal requirements; the other two with temporary shelter, both inside and outside the Camp Fire area. “Democracy is messy. Now it’s time to get a little messy,” Tim Snellings, director of community development, told the board by way of introduction. “There are a lot of balls in the air on this next item.” The board was being asked to repeal the ordinances, consider some amendments, and codify them to make them easier for everyone to find in the future, Snellings explained. Among additions to consider allowing: manufactured homes and yurts as temporary dwellings within the Camp Fire area, and temporary RV parks on ag land. From the get-go, the board appeared apprehensive about all but the manufactured homes. This riled some in the audience.

“The previous ordinances actually didn’t do anything—there was no housing built,” said Jennifer Ellingson, president of Northstate Relief, a local church group. “They were nice, but not practical. I’m sitting back there getting panicked, thinking I’m going to have to go back to the 80 or so families I’m worried about and tell them they’re going to have to keep camping, staying with their neighbors.” Ellingson’s concerns were repeated by half a dozen others in the room, all of whom said they were growing frustrated trying to find comfortable, semi-permanent housing for friends and family currently couch-surfing. “People can’t wait any longer,” she said. “I’m now housing 12 RVs of Camp Fire survivors,” Kimberly Young told the panel. She lives on 10 acres in Durham and would like to be able to continue to provide the help, though she’s not zoned to do so. “They have become my family. But under the urgency ordinance, I am illegal—I’m only able to house two. If that isn’t changed, I’ll have to be telling my family they have to leave and be on the street.” One of the survivors living on Young’s property is Bruce


Lawrence, who implored the panel act more urgently to create temporary solutions for people like him. “I’m a Camp Fire survivor, and also a retired fire captain from the Paradise Fire Department. I’m now living in a fifth-wheel on the Young property. It’s set up very well. We could go to Sacramento, but then we can’t be here to manage what we need to manage. Implement something to allow us to stay temporarily. “This is unprecedented—a fire has never devastated a city like this and put so many people with nowhere to live.” Yurts were another item of contention, if only because some of the supervisors found their definition to be too vague. In fact, despite freshman Supervisors Tami Ritter and Debra Lucero speaking in their favor, their mention drew chuckles from the dais. “I understand the snickering during your conversation,” Lauren Kennedy told the board, “and not to be cliché, but this is no laughing matter. This housing option has been working for hundreds, or thousands, of years—there’s no reason not to consider them for Butte County.” After public comment was closed and McCracken made her announcement, the board flipped on its head and requested staff come back with options for RV parks on ag land within the sphere of influence of local jurisdictions so as to be nearb services. “We might have to switch priorities for our cleanup plan,” added Ritter. The panel had originally set the priority for areas with the most right-of-entry forms, but maybe the priority should be more rural areas like Yankee Hill or Concow, where a person could own 100 acres and not be able to live on it. The board is due to come back next week for an emergency meeting. In other news: The North Valley Community Foundation has earmarked $1 million of $3.25 million donated by Wells Fargo to help Camp Fire survivors remaining at the shelter. That help could be anything from new tires to hotel stays to money to help fund property cleanups. It will be vetted by the Butte County Department of Social Services.

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HEALTHLINES PhOTO by byrhOnda LyOns

ing state coverage to some undocumented young adults. He’ll need approval from the Legislature, now a supermajority of Democrats, many of whom have supported similar ideas in recent years. Two intertwined proposals in his budget would offer hundreds of thousands of middle-income families additional state subsidies to buy health insurance, and require every Californian to obtain health coverage or pay a tax penalty. This “state mandate” would replace the controversial federal mandate—a central component of the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare—that the Trump administration recently canceled. A few other blue states were quicker to create a replacement state mandate, but California’s progressive lawmakers were wary of penalizing people who failed to buy health insurance unless the state also cushioned the blow by offering people more subsidies to lower the costs. Newsom also proposes to use $260 million in state funds to extend Medi-Cal, the

newsom’s move Not yet coverage for all, but for more

by

Elizabeth Aguilera

Icare Newsom to endorse single-payer health coverage for everyone than it is now t was way easier for candidate Gavin

for Gov. Newsom to deliver it. Yet hardcore advocates say they’re pleased with the moves he’s made thus far—even if it may take years to come to fruition. “This is a governor that is operating from a compass of action,” said Stephanie Roberson, government relations director for the politically powerful California Nurses Association, which hasn’t exactly been known for its patience on the issue. Newsom has taken two tacks. He’s asking the Trump administration to let the state create its own single-payer system offering coverage to all Californians—a move almost everyone regards as a very long shot. And he’s also pushing specific ideas to expand health care coverage to hundreds of thousands of still-uninsured

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Californians—a move that seems much more doable. During his campaign, Newsom promised the nurses that he would make it happen. But the state can’t do it alone. That’s why he sent a letter to the federal government right out of the gate, asking the administration and Congress to set up an “innovation waiver” to allow California to create its own single-payer system. Experts say there is little chance the Trump administration will give the state the go-ahead on this. “He’s making a statement, and sometimes making statements is important—

“ [Newsom’s initiative] shows some thoughtfulness about the challenges that middle-class Americans face.” —Peter Lee

even if there’s little chance of making progress in the immediate future,” said Gerald Kominski, senior fellow at the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research. “It’s a way of drawing a line in the sand.” It’s also a way to stave off criticism from advocates, said Jesus RamirezValles, director of the Health Equity Institute at San Francisco State University. “He can say, ‘I tried it,’ and there is no risk on him. If he doesn’t do what he promised, then he is risking opposition.” Federal permission also would require Congress to support a new waiver system—one that would allow the state to redirect funds that usually go to the federal government, such as Medicare income taxes, to a state funding authority that would manage and pay for a single-payer health care system, Kominski said. Current waiver systems do not allow for this type of financial management by the state. Other states have used existing waiver programs for permission to set prices or to implement additional requirements, but not to collect federal money. “You have to ask for the money,” said Roberson of the nurses union. “We are not going to sit on our hands and hope something is going to happen. This strengthens the governor’s commitment to Medicare for all.” Meantime, Newsom is tackling the block of

3 million uninsured California residents by chipping away at the edges—proposing spending to help struggling middle-income families buy health insurance, and provid-

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HEALTHLINES

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government health program for people who can’t afford insurance, to low-income undocumented immigrants ages 18 to 26. It’s a classic “Resistance State” action for Newsom, as California tries to counteract the Trump administration’s federal moves to undermine Obamacare. Last year, a joint UCLA and UC Berkeley study found that the uninsured rate in California would rise to nearly 13 percent by 2023 if nothing is done at the state level to prevent it. Since the Affordable Care Act was

enacted, California’s uninsured rate has dropped from about 17 percent to roughly 7 percent. Roughly half of those 3 million remaining uninsured are undocumented immigrant adults who don’t qualify for assistance. Peter Lee, who directs the state health insurance exchange Covered California, praised Newsom’s proposals during a recent board meeting. “Not only does his initiative propose an individual penalty show courage,” he said, “it shows some thoughtfulness about the challenges that middle-class

About the article:

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Americans face.” Enrollment for Covered California, which recently ended, was down 15 percent over last year. Lee said the elimination of the federal penalty is partly to blame. A draft affordability report Covered California is preparing for the Legislature concludes that if Newsom’s two proposals— expanded subsidies and a mandate—are adopted, enrollment could rise by nearly 650,000 people. Funding the subsidies with penalties is, of course, a bit of a Catch-22: The more successful California is in getting people to obtain health care, the smaller the penalty fund to pay for the subsidies that help fund that care. “You’re accomplishing your goal, but you’re taking away revenue,” Kominski said. “This is the kind of problem we should be happy to have.” Ω

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January 31, 2019

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GREENWAYS Green DOT’s Jeff Schwein and his three planners  take long-range views of transportation needs.

Getting from a to Green Chico firm helps rural counties plan sustainable transportation

story and photo by

Evan Tuchinsky

evantuc hin sk y @ n ewsrev i ew. com

Jmunicipalities as a transportation planner, helping rural improve thoroughfares. His

eff Schwein has worked nearly two decades

particular passion is what his profession calls “mode shift”: when a driver finds the inspiration or incentive to walk, bike or ride public transit. First in local government, then in the private sector, Schwein has drafted documents massive in scope and size. He’s often asked for a long-range view that assesses a community’s needs 10 years, sometimes 20 years, down the road. Recently he got a ground-level appreciation of transportation planning. Schwein, who lives and works in Chico, needed to get a new battery for his mother’s motorized scooter. She is like many elderly and disabled residents of other Northern California counties for whom his firm, Green DOT Transportation Services, has plotted accessible curbs and sidewalks. Schwein decided to experience a scooter trip himself. He went from East Lindo Avenue to East First Avenue, where the medical supply store is located, and continued to the Chico branch of the Butte County Library. “It was such a different perspective to me to have to navigate a crack in the sidewalk that’s over an inch and a half,” he said, “or a gap in the sidewalk where you had to go out into the street, because there was no curb ramp at the intersection. You get the perspective of people in wheelchairs, or children, trying to cross these roads without proper placement of crosswalks or a stop control for the cars.

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“All of these things came to light for me when I was riding in my mom’s scooter.” Schwein has ideas to improve traffic flow and mode shift in Chico—but, ironically, he doesn’t have contracts in his home city and county. Green DOT focuses on local entities that lack departments or ample staff for this specialized planning. Clients span a wide geographic swatch from Crescent City to Calaveras County. Funding comes from the state through the government agencies that engage Green DOT. “We fill a gap,” said Bryce Goldstein, one of three planners working for Schwein. “We help especially small rural agencies fulfill their requirements with the state and also plan for better communities…. We work with people, collaborate.” Goldstein joined Green DOT around 18 months ago, soon after completing her CivicSpark fellowship with the city of Chico (see “Challenge met, work continues,” Greenways, Sept. 7, 2017). The other assistant planner—Taylor Riner, a Chico State grad— has been there almost a year. Senior Planner Stephanie Alward joined Green DOT three years ago. Schwein’s interest in transportation plan-

ning took root after he graduated from Chico State, where he earned undergraduate and graduate degrees. He thought he’d become a watershed planner, but right out of college he was hired by the Tehama County More info:

Visit greendottransportation.com for details on the firm and its projects.

Transportation Commission. “It was all new to me; I didn’t know what transportation planning was,” he said, “but I fell in love with it. It was really interesting to me, really tangible—and well-funded.” After four years with Tehama County, Schwein opened a Chico office for an engineering firm and managed a department analogous to what he’d create in 2011 with Green DOT. He coined the name to evoke the abbreviation for Department of Transportation (DoT) and attached his favorite color; that green represents sustainability is coincidental, as he’d initially selected orange—for highway work—but found “Orange Dot” in use. In their office, an industrial loft nestled between Nantucket Home and Tin Roof Bakery on Broadway, a dry-erase board lists over a dozen projects and proposals underway. “Obviously, we’re very in tune that people need their cars; we know that, we need our cars,” Schwein said. “So we’re not advocating for ditching cars. But we do want to focus our energy on creating a more sustainable lifestyle for communities in Northern California.” These aren’t pipe dreams; the company’s plans get greenlit. Schwein cited three examples. • In Orleans, a Karuk Tribe community along the Klamath River where few own cars, residents had difficultly safely traversing Highway 96 between housing and the health clinic. Green DOT developed a plan that secured a Tribal Transportation Safety grant to replace a bridge, widen a shoulder, and make road improvements to accommodate pedestrians and cyclists. • Redding hoped to revitalize a pedestrian mall, waning in popularity, when a developer

approached the city about a mixed-use building that would include affordable housing. The plan: Reopen Market Street to traffic and connect the area via protected bike lanes to another bikeway to downtown. Redding got state funding. • The Shasta Regional Transportation Agency sought to develop a transit line along Interstate 5 between Redding and Sacramento, with a Chico connector, utilizing only electric buses. Goldstein worked intensively on this proposal, which received a state grant. Goldstein, who finished high school in Redding after moving from Livermore, finds such success stories validating in a profession she sometimes struggles to explain to friends. “It’s a really tangible thing to tell people about,” she explained. “When I say, ‘I’m working on a project to have a bus go from Redding to Sacramento,’ people go, ‘Oh, that’s cool.’ Whereas when I describe regional transportation plans, they’re kind of like, ‘So—what does that mean again?’ “A lot of what we do is a little less concrete…. It’s all really helpful and part of the process, but I really like transit projects.” Ω

ECO EVENT

Swappin’ seeds Get free seeds and scions, make garden space connections, buy cool plants, and support a variety of local nonprofit organizations during the Chico Seed Lending Library’s 10th annual Seed Swap on Saturday (Feb. 2) at the Trinity United Methodist Church. This year’s event opens up with a Home Grown Seed Share at 11:30 a.m. for people who have seeds grown in their own gardens to share with other seed-savers and for gardeners affected by the Camp Fire. At noon, the potluck-style event opens to everyone planning for the 2019 growing season. Providing seeds or plants to share is not required, but please plan on bringing your own pen, and envelopes or containers to store your bounty.


EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS Photo By ashiah scharaga

15 MINUTES

THE GOODS

a personal touch

reopening, relocating

Nicolette Gamache felt helpless on Nov. 8, the day the Camp Fire brought about so much destruction for her friends, family and community members. The next day, she had an idea: why not bring joy and comfort to survivors through jewelry? Gamache, who has been a jewelry designer for more than 30 years and sells her products at Made in Chico and on Etsy (NicolettesJewelry), gathered 100 pieces and went to the evacuation camp at the Walmart parking lot. Since then, she founded Jewelry For Survivors on Facebook, and has collected donations to continue giving free accessories to the displaced. All told, she has hand-crafted and given away more than 2,100 pieces of jewelry, including earrings, necklaces, bracelets, brooches and headbands. She’s distributed at the Disaster Recovery Center at the old Sears building, the American Red Cross evacuation shelter at the Silver Dollar Fairgrounds, and has met with survivors privately. To find out more, contact Gamache at facebook.com/ jewelryforsurvivors.

How have people reacted? First, I get a look of disbelief I’m offering them free jewelry. Some smile and cry, and they try on the jewelry and I hug them. And they thank me, and I tell them how people from all

over the country are sending me jewelry and supplies; that we care and that they matter. I[’ve] talked to just lots of people who would talk about their mother’s jewelry collection or their grandma’s jewelry collection, and they would pick out a piece that reminded them of something that their mother or grandmother would have had, so that was really sweet. I have learned that, in a time of necessity, a simple nonessential becomes such an unexpected luxury that’s very powerful and emotional.

What have you been able to give to survivors? I’ve got a little bit of everything under the sun to offer, so there’s more [of an] ability for someone to connect with a piece. When something comes in, I’ll see all the stuff they have [donated] and say, “Oh, she’s got kind of a boho thing going on, or she’s [into] more conservative, office[appropriate] stuff, or this per-

son only likes silver, or this person was super into beads.” One lady dropped off over 100 pieces, and they’re all vintage.

What motivated you to do this? I know that jewelry is a very sentimental thing for people, and it’s something that maybe isn’t clothes, food [or] shelter, but it actually comes quickly after that, as a way of personal identification, as adornment. Most people lost every piece of jewelry they had, all [of] their mom’s collection, their grandmother’s collection. Some people that didn’t lose everything—maybe they didn’t lose their home— they don’t feel like they deserve it. And I say, “Hey, if you’ve been through trauma, you deserve something nice, something that makes you feel good.” I can’t do anything to change what happened. But I can put a smile on someone’s face for a minute, and maybe longer. —ASHIAH SCHARAGA as h i a h s @new srev i ew. c o m

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It seems just about everything these days revolves around the Camp Fire and recovery efforts. It is exciting to see progress being made, however slowly. This past week, I had a chance to talk with Lok Keobouahom, who owns Sophia’s Authentic Thai Cuisine in Paradise. He was so cheerful, even when talking about the hardships involved with reopening (see “Troubled water,” page 18). Not many other restaurants are ready to take that step. Jaki Snead, owner of Jaki’s Hilltop Cafe, which survived the fire in Magalia, announced recently via Facebook that she is selling the business. She’d reopened the popular restaurant in October after closing due to a kitchen fire over a year earlier. She lost her home, she wrote, and it’s time to move on to something else. She is selling the business to the owner of the Cozy Diner in Paradise, which she said experienced damage that will take time to repair. Stay tuned for more on a name change and other updates as they become available. Best of luck to Jaki.

Back in Business Many businesses have reopened since being displaced by the

Camp Fire. The Paradise Ridge Chamber of Commerce has launched a database to track them—and keep customers up to date—at paradisechamber.com/ updated-business-status. Some have returned to their original locations (Theatre on the Ridge and Lisa Family Pharmacy in Paradise, and Beary Sudsy Soap Co. and Ampla Health in Magalia, to name a few). But others have relocated—several to Chico (Paradise Drug, Paradise Medical Group), and Oroville (Gloss Nail Salon, Rose Chapel Mortuary and Crematory). I assume some of those who’ve stayed close will return to the Ridge, though many may not. Still others have moved farther away (Moll’s Legal Doc Prep has moved to Vista, Gary Bess Associates to Rocklin). And a Facebook post this week revealed Ikkyu Japanese Restaurant has been spied in Red Bluff applying for a beer and wine license.

closing time Not all businesses affected by the Camp Fire were on the Ridge. Of course, we’ve all been affected some way or another. Rouse & Revolt is no different. The downtown Chico store announced earlier this week that the popular consignment shop would be closing Jan. 31. I reached out and was told by an employee that all of the management had lost their homes in the fire. In addition, slow sales in November and December, typically the most important for retailers, affected the store significantly. Sadly, I don’t think they’ll be the last. taquito time I found myself in Oroville earlier this week around lunch time and, as I made my way from county center to Oro Dam Boulevard in search of a quick meal, I came upon Bulldog Express Drive-Thru at the Washington Avenue and Montgomery Street roundabout. The new spot, which opened a few months ago, is a vast improvement over the run-down, abandoned gas station that occupied the space before. I’ve missed Bulldog’s taquitos, so I had to get one. Delicious as always!

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Troubled water story and photos by

Meredith J. Cooper mered i thc@newsr ev iew.com

Paradise recovery slows as contamination leaves residents, businesses without critical services 18

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here are few things in life as essential as clean water. Just try opening a restaurant without it. Lok Keobouasom has been attempting that feat, and this week he was working to clear the final hurdle: getting the county Health Department’s green light to open his doors.


Lok Keobouasom had this large water tank installed in order to have running water to wash dishes in his restaurant, Sophia’s Authentic Thai Cuisine.

“It’s a little bit of a long process,” he said by phone from his eatery, Sophia’s Authentic Thai Cuisine, on the Skyway in Paradise. With no potable water available via tap, he purchased a large storage tank with a compressor pump that will feed clean, drinkable water into the restaurant. He’ll have to purchase water to fill it. Keobouasom isn’t complaining about the work. His restaurant survived the Camp Fire, which destroyed nearly 90 percent of the town around it. By some miracle, his house also is still standing; he’s living there now with his wife and their 10-year-old twin daughters. He admits, however, that “it’s kind of lonely.” He hopes Sophia’s open sign will help bring more people back. Others share that hope. In fact, the Skyway

business corridor, which includes Sophia’s, is the top priority for the Paradise Irrigation District (PID), which provides water to the town. After recent test results came back positive for the chemical compound benzene, which is known to cause cancer, the PID issued a warning recommending customers not drink water from the tap—or use it for brushing teeth, making ice or preparing food. The district is now performing more extensive tests to determine the magnitude of the problem, starting with the Skyway. It could take a significant amount of time to solve, as the process of testing, isolating contaminated areas and then removing the contamination along 170 miles of pipe is complicated, as well as costly. The lack of precedence, aside from Santa Rosa—whose water system is considerably different from Paradise’s—could present unforeseen obstacles. But without potable water, some businesses are installing expensive equipment to operate, while others postpone reopening. Residents face similar challenges, slowing the recovery process. “If those tests [along the Skyway] come back clear, all of our effort will go into the Skyway,” Kevin Phillips, interim PID manager, told the CN&R last week. “Our No. 1 priority is the Skyway business corridor, to make sure those businesses can come back up and reopen. We’re working extremely hard to get that back open.” Thus far, the majority of businesses that have returned to the Ridge can get by without running water—they’re auto shops, retail stores and banks, to name a few. Food service is understandably different, as workers must adhere to sanitation guidelines. Last week, Starbucks on the Skyway installed a tank and pump system similar to the one at Sophia’s. Dutch Bros. has announced its plans to reopen soon. Others, like Celestino’s, are in wait-andsee mode, with potable water a major factor. For Keobouasom, it wasn’t even a question. “I’ve lived here for 14 years—I don’t want to abandon the town,” he said. A decade ago, he bought the restaurant from his uncle and has carried on its tradition of serving affordable, authentic Thai dishes in a comfortable, homey environment. He’s eager to get back to it. “I want to encourage people to come back to town. It doesn’t matter how hard of a process we have to go through—as long as we help each other and support each other, we’ll go on.” A month after the Tubbs Fire roared through

wine country in October 2017, a resident of the Fountaingrove neighborhood in Santa Rosa returned to her home and, upon turning on her faucet, smelled a strange odor. She called her water company, which conducted tests

that detected an elevated level of benzene, a known carcinogen most commonly found in gasoline, cigarette smoke and plastics. Further tests found varying levels of the chemical in the water system, primarily in the Fountaingrove area. The maximum amount of benzene allowed in California drinking water, per State Water Resources Control Board regulations, is 1 part per billion; some areas tested as high as 918 ppb. Officials issued a water advisory recommending anyone living in one of the 13 homes left standing in Fountaingrove after the fire to stop using tap water for drinking, cooking, even bathing. That advisory was finally lifted 11 months later. Santa Rosa was a unique case—benzene had never been found in the water after a wildfire before. Testing underwent several phases as the effort to determine the cause of

Kevin Phillips, interim manager of the Paradise Irrigation District, says customers can come to the main office on Clark Road to get bottled water while officials work to get the town’s plumbing system back up and running.

the benzene eluded officials. It’s now believed that when the fire came through, the intense heat melted plastic meter boxes as well as plastic piping, leaching benzene into the water system. The same may have happened in Paradise. Depressurization during the fire also could have caused contamination. “Ninety percent of our service connections burned, and water was flowing through their pipes uncontrolled,” Phillips said. “Based on that, our system was not able to keep up with the water demand—so it depressurized, WATER C O N T I N U E D JANUARY 31, 2019

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WATER C O N T I N U E D

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– it became like a vacuum. In that vacuum, there could have been particulates, ash ... or any kind of contaminant sucked back into the system.” PID shut most of the system down as soon as personnel were able, leaving just a core along the Skyway active so firefighters could access hydrants to fight spot fires. Then workers went property to property and shut off water at each meter, including those serving homes or businesses that were still standing. After checking the status of the district’s four holding tanks throughout town, one of which was destroyed, PID began pumping water back into the transmission lines. As of last week, Phillips said, they were about 60 percent to 70 percent finished reconnecting service to standing structures. “Through this process, we’ve been talking with Santa Rosa,” Phillips said. “The big difference between Santa Rosa and us is 10 percent of their district burnt; we had 90 percent burn.” PID initially issued a boil water advisory, while testing began. That was elevated to a bottled-water-only directive after benzene was discovered earlier this month. Prolonged exposure to more than 1 ppb of the chemical can affect the body’s red blood cells and lead to leukemia, according to the water board. While ingestion causes the most harm, benzene also can enter the body through the skin. Steam from heating water with benzene in it can get into the air and is highly flammable. Customers of the Del Oro Water Co., which serves Magalia and its environs, have been told their water is safe to drink after preliminary

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Do’s and Don’ts: Do not use tap water for: • drinking (including baby formula, juice or for pets) • brushing teeth • making ice • food preparation In addition: • Don’t try and treat the water yourself. Boiling or disinfecting your water will not make it safe to drink. • Do not take baths, and limit shower time (use lukewarm water and ventilate area). • Use a dishwasher to wash dishes and use air-dry setting. • Wash clothing in cold water. • Limit use of water for cleanup of properties and follow Butte County recommendations for protective clothing when on property.

Source: pidwater.com

testing came back negative for benzene. They should alert officials of any strange smells—benzene has a sweet, gasoline-like odor—as more in-depth testing is currently underway. Phillips has worked for PID for

12 years, and took over Jan. 1 as interim manager after the departure of Ed Fortner, who had held the position since being hired in July. He’s comfortable in the role, despite the overwhelming amount of work ahead—he’d held it for the 18 months prior to Fortner’s hiring. “I’m dedicated to this district and this community,” he said during Plastic meter boxes and lids used by the PID will be replaced with concrete ones that have metal lids.

an interview at PID’s headquarters off Clark Road. Fortner left of his own volition, Phillips said, and there are no hard feelings. A transplant from Kentucky, he was still learning the ropes at PID when the Camp Fire hit, destroying his family’s home. The enormity of the situation was understandably overwhelming, Phillips said. Phillips knows he’s lucky; his house, in Durham, stands. The same cannot be said of 30 of the 38 people employed by the PID on Nov. 8. Since then, the staff has dwindled to 28. With all of the personal time those 28 have needed to get through the recovery process, “we’re operating with between 10 and 14 employees each day.” That said, the staff has been incredibly resilient. They watched as thousands of PG&E workers flooded the hill to tackle the monumental task of putting in new power lines and poles. “And here we are, 28 employees, and what we’re dealing with is every bit, if not more, damaged,” Phillips said. The California Water Service Co. has pitched in, providing 25 workers to assist the PID. South Feather Water and Power, out of Oroville, likewise has dedicated seven employees to the effort, plus equipment. Phillips pointed to the map of the utility district that was hanging on the wall beside him. Red dots represented structures serviced by PID that burned; black dots indicated those that survived. Jim Ladrini, assistant field superintendent for the district, pointed out the locations of its storage tanks and transmission lines. In all, the water system includes 170 miles of pipe. The water treatment facility, located below Magalia Dam, ships clean water south via a gravitybased system. Large transmission lines lead to upper Paradise, where a bladder tank—much like a water bed—held up to 3 million gallons of water. Farther south, along the main thoroughfares, three other tanks, all of them steel, hold additional water. Of all of PID’s infrastructure, the biggest Camp Fire casualty was that bladder tank. The steel ones survived and are operational. “That being gone is really critical,” Ladrini said. But right now, less storage capacity is needed, so the district’s main focus is on water quality.

PARADISE

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The intricacies of PID’s network of pipes are vast. For one, materials vary—sometimes property to property. The district was formed in 1916, and standards have changed over the years. Some pipes are made of steel, cast iron or asbestos cement. Others, mostly those connected to new construction, are made of PVC. About 10 years ago, the district replaced all meters more than a decade old with new, plasticencased ones. They learned the hard way that plastic melts. Nearly every meter in town was damaged in the Camp Fire, Phillips said. Because of the benzene found in

Santa Rosa’s water following the Tubbs Fire, the water board’s Division of Drinking Water collected samples from residences in Butte County to see if a pattern emerged. Three came back positive for more than 1 ppb of benzene. One was on lower Pentz Road, one on upper Pentz, and one off of Pinewood Drive in east Paradise. The fact that they were all discovered on the customer side of the meter is worrying, but might not spell complete disaster, Phillips and Ladrini agreed. “Here’s an analogy: The treat-

Customers can now stay up-to-date with water testing and results on the Paradise Irrigation District’s website (pidwater.com), which shows its boundaries, plus test sites (red dots came back positive for benzene).

ment plant is the heart of the water system,” Phillips said. “We know we’re pushing out good water. It pumps through all these arteries and veins, and finally gets to the capillary at the end. That’s where the benzene is. If we find it in the capillaries, we need to make sure it’s not in the arteries.” Last week, the PID began the process of testing 54 sites, ranging from businesses to fire hydrants, along the Skyway. First, water is flushed through the system. Twice. Then it is allowed to sit in the pipes undisturbed for 72 hours. While many of the sites chosen are standing structures, none are using PID water at the moment—it was important not to interrupt service to anyone using it, Phillips said. On Monday (Jan. 28), samples were collected and sent to a lab for testing. Results typically take five days to be returned. While those samples are at the lab, a second phase of testing will begin, in the area above Wagstaff Road. There,


Jim Ladrini, assistant field superintendent for the PID, with a melted water meter. Almost all of the district’s meters melted during the Camp Fire, as they—and the boxes and lids that protect them—are made of plastic. They will be replaced with concrete ones.

they’ll collect about 200 samples. “Maybe we’ll find that the benzene is just in the service lines and not in the main lines,” Ladrini said. He admits he’s an optimist, but says he’s committed to conducting a thorough check. “I don’t want to tell customers, ‘I think we’re OK.’” A best-case scenario will reveal no contamination in either test area. Then they can start systematically narrowing the search. With the Skyway as the first priority, if tests come back clear, Ladrini says they’ll likely need to hire an engineer to design a system that will prevent backfill—when a pressure change causes water to reverse course—so as to protect those clean pipes, which branch out to service properties off the main road. The whole process, just for one area, could take anywhere from one month to several. The ultimate goal is to get services up and running cleanly for every standing structure in Paradise, even the lone house at the end of a burned-out neighborhood. After that’s complete, they’ll shift gears to the properties that are being rebuilt. If no contamination is found in the PID’s miles of pipes, it is likely confined to service lines—the capillaries, or the parts of pipe that stretch from the meter to the tap. Those sections of pipe are maintained by the customer, Phillips said, and testing there will be the customer’s responsibility. “I’m looking into private funding options to help folks pay for

that testing,” Phillips said. For now, the PID is distributing free bottled water. The board of directors voted to forgo charging customers for service between Nov. 8 and Dec. 31. The first bills will go out in March and will be a flat fee, as meters will have to be replaced. Some residents have purchased their own water tanks for cooking, drinking and showering. Others are content—for now—to shower elsewhere and use bottled water for other uses. Still others are waiting for all services to be up and running, or until the cleanup is complete. “I had one customer give me a hug and say, ‘I don’t care if I can’t drink it—all I need to do is flush the toilet,’” Ladrini said. “That function right there becomes one of the most important things in life—it’s one of the simple things we take for granted.” But that luster could wear off before too long. Residents in Santa Rosa’s Fountaingrove neighborhood balked at the city’s estimated timeline of two years to repair its issue, with some refusing to return to their homes or begin rebuilding without potable water. Chelsea Dwyer shares that stance. She and her husband, Addison, bought their first home in central Paradise in June. Tired of renting and unable to afford a place in Chico, she said, they looked to the Ridge. While repairs are being done to their property—looters had kicked in their front door and fire-

fighters had cut holes in the roof— they are back to renting in Chico. “The advisory right now is they don’t want us brushing our teeth, they say not to use hot water to shower, not to let our pets drink it, not to cook our food with it,” she said. “We’d have to buy one of those portable storage tanks and pay a company for water. It just seems like a huge hassle.” While they wanted to move back in the beginning, the Dwyers are reconsidering. The lack of water is a factor in their decision. “If water isn’t available by the time the repairs are done and our insurance company says it’s liveable, we’re going to fight them; we’re going to say, ‘You have to pay for that portable system,’” she said. Looking to the future, Phillips said

the Camp Fire has taught the PID some valuable lessons. For one, all of the plastic meters and the boxes that contain them—even those that survived—will be removed and replaced with concrete boxes with metal lids. New pipe likely will be steel or some other metal. New construction, especially in such a mass quantity, will bring its own set of challenges, namely the fact that in 2011 the state passed a law requiring all newly built single-family homes be equipped with sprinklers. It also mandates a water pressure to each home that will require larger service lines be installed. As far as the contamination and repair to fire-damaged infrastructure, Phillips said he’s working with the Federal Emergency Management Agency and California Office of Emergency Services to ensure as much of the work is covered by grants and other funding as possible. The district’s financial footing is wobbly at best, as 95 percent of its operating costs are born by ratepayers—and 90 percent of PID’s ratepayers are gone. At least for now. “We’re trying really hard,” Ladrini said of the PID’s efforts to get everything up and running quickly and safely. “This is new territory.” Ω

Cn&r is looking for An Advertising ConsultAnt Do you love Chico? Do you want to help local businesses succeed? So do we! The Chico News & Review is a family owned business that has been part of the Chico community since 1977. Our mission is to publish great newspapers which are successful and enduring, create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow while respecting personal welfare, and to have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. If you want to make a difference and do something that matters then keep reading.

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for more informAtion, visit www.newsreview.Com/ChiCo/jobs

equAl OppORTuNITY emplOYeR JANUARY 31, 2019

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Arts &Culture

Tropa Magica: (from left) Rene and David Pacheco.

JOIN THE

PHOTO BY CLARIZA REYES

caravan THIS WEEK

Run away to the psychedelic carnival with East L.A.’s Tropa Magica

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Special Events

Bmusical have a history of mashing up odd genres. Their first band, Thee rothers David and Rene Pacheco

Commons, drew equally from the ska and punk scenes of East Los Angeles and cumbia, Colombian folk music heavily influenced by the rhythm and dance of the by country’s indigHoward Hardee enous people. But now, with their Preview: new project, Tropa Tropa Magica performs Saturday, Magica, they’re Feb. 2, 9:30 p.m. diving headlong Pervert and Beehive into a theatrical open. Tickets: $7 hybrid of surf, (brownpapertickets.com) disco and circus Duffy’s Tavern music—all while 337 Main St. retaining the Latin 343-7718 flavor of their heritage. Compared with the straightforward punk-based songs of the duo’s early work, Tropa Magica is an exercise in musical maximalism. The change occurred after the brothers witnessed a performance by a fellow L.A.-area band they had long admired, Chicano Batman. “When we saw them, we were like, ‘Whoa, these guys are like Chicano Led Zeppelin over here,’ because those guys all know their instruments really well,” David said. “We were used to seeing bands in the Burger [Records] scene that didn’t need to

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know their instruments; you can learn a simple chord progression and fuck around and have a fanbase. When we saw Chicano Batman, it was like, ‘Shit, we’d better get our musical chops down.’” Tropa Magica dropped a 10-song, self-titled LP in September, and the improved chops are indeed evident. The album is a disorienting mishmash of genres: The brothers jam out smooth disco one minute and break into a traditional half-time shuffle the next. David’s gravelly vocals are consistent throughout, as he sings in a mix of English and Spanish. Speaking with the CN&R by phone ahead of their upcoming show at Duffy’s Tavern this Saturday (Feb. 2.), David (guitar and vocals) and Rene (drums) explained how all of their musical endeavors have been part of a continuing effort to blend the disparate influences of their childhood. Their parents immigrated from Mexico to East L.A. in the early 1980s and worked in factories as seamsters. As children, David and Rene were exposed to the music their parents listened to, mostly traditional norteño and banda music. Like typical kids, they rejected what their parents liked in favor of American rock bands such as The Doors, The Strokes and The White Stripes, but they came to appreciate their parents’ tastes eventually. “When we started our band and got

more serious, I finally started paying attention the music our parents had been playing the whole time,” Rene said. “I got to learn different rhythms and beats and revisit songs I knew growing up.” In 2012, they formed Thee Commons, a trio that performed with a rotating series of bassists. They developed a following and a reputation as a wildly energetic live band, but the brothers eventually got bored with the cumbia-punk sound they had created. “Cumbia was fun, but it’s very simple in its chord progressions and its rhythmic syncopations, so we wanted to do something different,” David said. “Now, we’re exploring elements of ‘vaudevillian gypsy-punk.’” Indeed, they’ve taken a carnivalesque turn with Tropa Magica, making great use of diminished seventh chords and off-beat rhythms for a darker, off-kilter sound. (David cites The Doors’ cover of “Alabama Song” as an example of the circus style they’re shooting for.) Adding to Tropa Magica’s variety-show vibe, the band is frequently joined onstage by a rotating cast of guest musicians, jugglers and sword-swallowing clowns. And the theatrics are a natural part of the art-expanding journey for the Pacheco brothers. “In order to grow and keep creating,” David said, “we needed to push ourselves.” Ω

SCAVENGER RELAY: A fun night of shoe demos, relays and prizes as teams race through clues in this friendly competition. Thu, 1/31, 6:15pm. Fleet Feet Chico, 241 Main St. TODDLER STORYTIME: Toddlers and families will love this interactive storytime featuring stories, songs and movement! Thu, 1/31, 10am. Chico Branch Library, 1108 Sherman Avenue. buttecounty.net

Theater HAND TO GOD: Robert Askins’ raucous twisted sock puppet comedy centers on the young students of a Texas Christian Puppet Ministry. Things take a darkly comic turn when one devout young man’s hand puppet develops a shocking personality that no one could have expected. Thu, 1/31, 7:30pm. $15. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. blueroom theatre.com

WITH A LITTLE HELP FROM OUR FRIENDS Saturday, Feb. 2 Butte Creek Country Club

SEE SATURDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS


FINE ARTS On nEXT PaGE WILDFIrES & CLIMaTE CHanGE FOruM Saturday, Feb. 2 Gateway Science Museum

FrEE LISTInGS!

SEE SaTurDay, SPECIAL EVENTS

Post your event for free online at newsreview.com/ calendar, or email the Cn&r calendar editor at cnrcalendar@newsreview.com. Deadline for print listings is Wednesday, 5 p.m., one week prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

JAPANESE STORYTIME: Classic tales, Kamishibai, songs and crafts. Sat 2/2, 1pm. Chico Branch Library, 1108 Sherman Ave. buttecounty.net

MAMMA MIA!: The story of a mother, a daughter, three possible dads and one unforgettable trip down the aisle. Bride-to-be Sophie wants nothing more than to have her father at her wedding, but she has no idea which of mom’s three former boyfriends might be the guy. So Sophie invites them all to the festivities at her mother’s Greek isle taverna, and mayhem ensues. Featuring the beloved hit songs of ABBA. Thu, 1/31, 7:30pm. $16-$22. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. chicotheatercompany.com

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Music BUTTE STRONG SESSION: Benefit show featuring Joe Craven, Alex De Grassi and Laurie Lewis with Nina Gerber, performing separately and together. Musicians join forces to benefit Camp Fire survivors through KZFR and the Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. Fri, 2/1, 6:30pm. $15. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St. kzfr.org

Theater HAND TO GOD: See Thursday. Fri, 2/1, 7:30pm. $15. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. blueroomtheatre.com

HELLO, DOLLY!: An American musical theater favorite, Hello, Dolly! has entertained audiences for over 50 years, winning 15 Tonys and three Oscars and featuring the memorable songs “It Only Takes a Moment,” “Put on Your Sunday Clothes” and, of course, the title number. Fri, 2/1, 7:30pm. $15.50-$30. CUSD Center for the Arts, 1475 East Ave. crtshows.com

MAMMA MIA!: See Thursday. Fri, 2/1, 7:30pm. $16-$22. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. chicotheatercompany. com

PETER PAN: Young actors perform the classic tale adapted as a musical from J.M Barrie’s story. Fri, 2/1, 6pm. $5-7. Hooker Oak Elementary School, 1238 Arbutus Ave. hookeroaktheater.ticketleap.com

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Special Events BLOCK PARTY WITH A PURPOSE: Butte Environmental Council hosts this community cleanup. Wear closed-toed shoes and help make a difference in your town. Heavy rain cancels. Sat 2/2, 9am. Cypress & Humboldt avenues. becnet.org

BOTANICAL ILLUSTRATION WORKSHOP: Renowned botanical illustrator Joan Keesey leads this class, concentrating on accurate botanical drawing and graphite techniques. Sat 2/2, 9:30am. $30-$40. Holt Hall, Room 129, Chico State. friendsofthechicostateherbarium.com

CFOL BOOK SALE: Chico Friends of the Library weekly book sale. Sat 2/2, 9am. Chico Branch Library, 1108 Sherman Ave. buttecounty.net

OFOL BOOK SALE: Oroville Friends of the Library book sale Sat 2/2, 10am. Oroville Branch Library, 1820 Mitchell Ave, Oroville. butte county.net

CRAB FEED FUNDRAISER: Rotary Club of Paradise hosts its annual all-you-can-eat crustacean binge with all net proceeds going directly to rebuilding the community of Paradise. Help support the cause, eat crab, tri-tip and jumbo shrimp, dance to the Rockhounds and a take part in a massive wine raffle. Sat 2/2, 5:30pm. $75. Chico Elks Lodge, 1705 Manzanita Ave. ParadiseRotary.org

SEED SWAP: Get your garden on! Free seeds and

DADDY DAUGHTER DANCE: Enjoy a night of dancing,

speakers Jerry Hinkle, an expert in economics and climate policy, and environmental scientist and climate journalist Dana Nuccitelli discuss the connections and solutions we need for a sustainable future. Sat 2/2, 7pm. Free. Gateway Science Museum, 625 Esplanade. 530-518-6535. chicocitizens climatelobby.wordpress.com

ties, tiaras and dinner. All father figures are welcome to bring their special little girls. Sat 2/2, 6pm. $20. Feather River Recreation Park, 1875 Feather River Blvd., Oroville. frrpd.com

FIRE CAUSE & EFFECT: Hike along the Yahi Trail to check out the aftermath of the fire that burned through Upper Park. Chico Creek Nature Center naturalists will talk about fire ecology along the way and fire’s role in California’s ecosystems. Sat 2/2, 10am. Free. Bidwell Park Parking Area E, Horsehoe Lake. chicorec.com

fun networking with fellow growers. Tenth anniversary event opens with a homegrown seed share for folks affected by the Camp Fire, followed by a potluck-style seed swap at noon. Sat 2/2, 11:30am. Free. Trinity United Methodist Church, 285 E. Fifth St.

WILDFIRES & CLIMATE CHANGE FORUM: Guest

WITH A LITTLE HELP FROM OUR FRIENDS: Yes, the Chico Children’s Museum is finally open! Their annual gala takes inspiration from

THIS WEEK COnTInuED On PaGE 24

HELLO, DOLLy!

Shows through Feb. 3 CUSD Center for the Arts

EDITOR’S PICK

SEE FrIDay-SunDay, THEATER

BuTTE rOCKS There’s been no shortage of Camp Fire benefits. If you can, keep opening your pockets to help your neighbors, and take in some great music and entertainment while you’re at it. This Friday, Feb. 1, KZFR has organized a Butte Strong Session featuring some incredibly talented musicians sure to put on a splendid show. Join music scholar and multinstrumentalist Joe Craven, guitarist Alex de Grassi, fiddler Laurie Lewis, guitarist Nina Gerber and more for a special night of music at the Chico Women’s Club. Proceeds from the event will be donated to Sierra Nevada Brewing Co.’s Camp Fire relief fund.

January 31, 2019

CN&R

23


THIS WEEK CONTINUED FROM PAGE 23

secrets of

success.

FINE ARTS

The Beatles to help support the new museum’s education efforts in our community. With dinner and live music by Decades. Sat 2/2, 5:30pm. $135. Butte Creek Country Club, 175 Estates Drive. chicochildrensmuseum.org

Music MAX MINARDI: Folky singer/songwriter performs during brunch. Sat, 2/2, 11am. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

Theater

BROKEN OPEN

HAND TO GOD: See Thursday. Sat, 2/2, 7:30pm. $15. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. Loca Mad lly e

Year Busi s in ness

HELLO, DOLLY!: See Friday. Sat, 2/2, 2pm & 7:30pm. $15.50-$30. CUSD Center for

Cele st Genc ino a & En relli z o Own Perri ers

the Arts, 1475 East Ave. crtshows.com

MAMMA MIA!: See Thursday. Sat, 2/2, 7:30pm. $16-$22. Chico Theater

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10

e o& nab Reik e Wata Nab 83

Lewis Johnson

Shows through Feb. 10 1078 Gallery

First St. blueroomtheatre.com

21

UNA BIG T A ICHIBAN Y IZAKA

2950 Louis Ave | Orov ille | 530.534.8320 | www.butteview.com

Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. chicotheatercompany.com

PETER PAN: See Friday. Sat, 2/2, 6pm. $5-$7. Hooker Oak Elementary School, 1238 Arbutus Ave. hooker oaktheater.ticketleap.com

Pick up this issue to read the stories of businesses in our community.

Art 1078 GALLERY: Broken Open, tripartite show from Cameron Crawford, Elise Ficarra and Evelyn Ficarra exploring sounds, words and objects. Cameron works in ceramics, Evelyn is a composer and sound artist, and Elise is a poet. Through 2/10. 1710 Park Ave. 1078gallery.org

B-SO GALLERY: Pleasures, culminating BFA exhibition for artist Naomi Herring, translating stories about pleasure and satisfaction into abstract screen prints. Through 2/1. Also, Joint Student Exhibition, art students from Butte College and Chico State show their works. Through 2/4. Free. Chico State, Ayres Hall 105, 354-6949.

3

SUN

Music

BLACKBIRD: Crucial Times Photography

BOGG: Jazz for brunch. Sun, 2/3, 11am. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

Theater HELLO, DOLLY!: See Friday. Sun, 2/3, 2pm. $15.50-$30. CUSD Center for the Arts, 1475 East Ave. crtshows.com

MAMMA MIA!: See Thursday. Sun, 2/3, 2pm. $16-$22. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. chicotheatercompany.com

PETER PAN: See Friday. Sun, 2/3, 12pm. $5-$7. Hooker Oak Elementary School, 1238 Arbutus Ave. hookeroaktheater.ticketleap.com

Collective, photo exhibit explores the manual, physical and chemical process. Featuring the artwork from six members of the collective, the display reflects the contents of their latest book, Volume 2. The release party takes place on Saturday, Feb. 2, 6pm, with DJ Ratboi spinning punk and goth records. Through 2/28. 1431 Park Ave.

CHICO ART CENTER: Member Showcase, annual show featuring the artwork of CAC members. Through 2/1. 450 Orange St. chicoartcenter.com

ENLOE CANCER CENTER: Beth Bjorklund, oil paintings in our Healing Art Gallery by Northern California artist. The Enloe Cancer Center, Healing Art Gallery features artists whose lives have been touched by cancer. Through 4/19. Free. 265 Cohasset Road, 530-332-3856.

IDEA FAB LABS CHICO: Terraform, Elijah

6

WED The CN&R’s annual Business Issue will be on stands february 14.

SEE ART

Special Events ADULT CRAFT CLUB: Bring your latest project and connect with other crafters. Wed, 2/6, 10am. Butte County Library, 1820 Mitchell Ave, Oroville. buttecounty.net

Pfotenhauer’s work explores this reciprocal and symbiotic relationship between individual and environment. Built from wooden bones and acrylic flesh, this body of work stands as a living reflection of its creator. Saturday, Feb. 2, 3-6pm. 603 Orange St., 592-0609. ideafablabs.com

JACKI HEADLEY UNIVERSITY ART GALLERY: Aksum Belle: Afterwards, artist and printmaker Jacob Meders is a member of the Mechoopda Indian Tribe, and using book forms, prints and sculpture, he challenges perceptions of place, culture and identity built on the assimilation and homogenization of Indigenous peoples. Through 2/22. Chico State.

MUSEUM OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA ART: Snow

For more information about advertising in this issue, call your News & Review advertising representative today at (530) 894-2300. FOR MORE MUSIC, SEE NIGHTLIFE ON PAGE 26

24

CN&R

JANUARY 31, 2019

Goose Festival, exhibit looks at our remarkable wildlife and habitats along the Pacific Flyway in a variety of media, including sculpture, clay, oils, fiber arts, watercolor, acrylics, mixed media, glass and photography. Through 2/10. $5. 900 Esplanade. monca.org

ORLAND ART CENTER: Perfection in Pencil and Paint, showcasing works by Peter Piatt, Steve Crane, Sharon Crabill and Eve

Berg-Pugh. Through 3/23. 732 Fourth St., Orland. orlandartcenter.com

PARADISE ART CENTER: Out of the Box, artists reflect what the term means to them. Through 2/2. 5564 Almond St., Paradise. paradise-art-center.com

THE TURNER: Meemento: Before, curated from the Turner Collection by Jacob Meders, a member of the Mechoopda Indian Tribe, whose own work is concurrently exhibited at the Jacki Headley University Art Gallery. Meders explains that the linked exhibitions function “as a before and after” that suggests ways to “see, share and learn.” Through 2/22. Chico State. janetturner.org

Museums BOLT’S ANTIQUE TOOL MUSEUM: Permanent Exhibit, this fascinating, unique museum has over 12,000 hand tools on display, charting cataloging the evolution and history of tools. Through 6/15. $3. 1650 Broderick St, Oroville.

CHICO CHILDREN’S MUSEUM: Permanent Exhibit, featuring tons of cool stuff for kids to explore including a miniature city, complete with a junior vet clinic, dentist, cafe and farmer’s market, a giant fish tank, multi-sensory room, imagination playground and much more. Check the website for hours and admission information. Through 8/3. $7-9. 325 Main St. chicochildrensmuseum.org

CHICO CREEK NATURE CENTER: Living Animal Museum & Nature Play Room, learn all about local critters, plants and wildlife. Through 5/25. $2-$4. 1968 E. Eigth St. chicorec.com

GATEWAY SCIENCE MUSEUM: From Here to There, explore the science of how things move by land, sea and air. Also on display are The Foothills, a Glenn E. and Ruth Gray Cunningham Memorial Exhibit, and America’s Wolves: From Tragedy to Inspiration. Through 5/12. $5-$7. 625 Esplanade. csuchico.edu

PATRICK RANCH MUSEUM: Working farm and museum, rotating exhibits open every Saturday and Sunday from 11am to 3pm. Through 5/26. 10381 Midway, Durham. patrickranchmuseum.org

VALENE L. SMITH MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY: Remarkable Lives, exploring the intertwined worlds of birds and human, in partnership with the Altacal Audubon Society and Snow Goose Festival. Exhibits include bird songs and behaviors, local photography and a robotic recreation of the late Jurassic Archaeopteryx. Through 7/31. Chico State.


SCENE

Help Wanted!

Dancing queens

Service Technician Starting at

$15 an Hour Benefits Available 1-800-767-8276 Ask for Rosa!

SaveS you money! The music of ABBA fills up Chico Theater Company

Pthecamps, it seems: those who love the music of 1970s and ’80s Swedish hit makers ABBA and

those who wouldn’t mind it a bit if they never heard “Dancing Queen” again. That split no doubt also applies to Mamma Mia!, the mega-hit musical built on ABBA’s songs that enjoyed a 14-year run on Broadway and, according to the website of the by musical’s brainchild and original Robert Speer producer, Judy Craymer, has been rober tspe er@ seen by more than 60 million people newsrev iew.c om worldwide. You can add additional numbers Review: to that figure, thanks to the producMamma Mia! shows tion of Mamma Mia! now being preThursday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m. and sented by Chico Theater Company Sunday, 2 p.m., at its Eaton Road playhouse. On through Feb. 24. Saturday (Jan. 28), when I attended, Tickets: $16-$22 the theater was packed. More than a few reviewers of Chico Theater Company other productions of Mamma Mia! 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F have noted that the play doesn’t 894-3282 bear close scrutiny. One critic’s chicotheatercompany.com assessment that it’s “hokey, implausible and silly” is shared by many others. And yet it offers a dizzying kind of fun that fans find irresistible. As one writer advises, “Audiences should come prepared to check their cynicism at the door and become dancing queens, boogying giddily into the night.” I didn’t see anyone actually dancing while the audience was filing out of the theater, but they were certainly a happy bunch. For all its success on Broadway and in other major cities, Mamma Mia! is solid community theater fare. A jukebox musical with two dozen songs from ABBA’s heyday—from “Honey, Honey” (1972) to “Thank You for the Music” (1983)—it rarely slows down. If one tune features a vocalist who struggles with pitch, the

5

$

118 W est 2 nd Str Nake eet | d Lou nake dlou nge ngec hico.c om

PHOTO COURTESY OF BLACK CAT PHOTOGRAPHY

next will be sung by someone like Leah Christie, the powerhouse performer who plays Donna Sheridan, the “mamma” of the title. The stage lights up every time she’s on it. The plot requires some suspension of disbelief. Cobbled together by British playwright Catherine Johnson to accommodate all those ABBA songs, it’s predicated on the notion that some 20 years ago Donna had a series of three brief affairs on the Greek island where she now operates a small resort. One of them is the father of her 20-year-old daughter, Sophie (nicely played by Talia Rempel), who is to be married in a day or so. But which one? That’s the driving mystery of the play. All her life Sophie has yearned to know who her father is, and when she finds her mother’s diary and learns about the three men, she secretly invites them to the wedding, hoping to find out which is her dad. Shenanigans and sentiment follow. The three men (played by Bill Petree, Michael Walker and Tom O’Connor) are joined by two women (Christi Harrington and Judi Stricklan) who, years ago, were members of Donna’s rock band, Donna and the Dynamos. Overall, these key players—guided by Music Director Tamara Allspaugh—do justice to ABBA’s songs, and fans of the pop group will greatly enjoy them. Those who don’t jump for joy when they hear “Waterloo,” well, they probably should stay home. The production’s choreography is a mixed bag. There sometimes are as many as 22 people on the stage, not all of them skilled dancers. Then again, this is community theater, and they make up in enthusiasm and joyful spirit what they lack in training. An especially impressive aspect of this production is the set, designed by the play’s director, CTC founder and head honcho Marc C. Edson. It revolves, thereby creating as many as three or four different sets, some inside, some outside, allowing for quick transitions between songs. Ω

off

$5 Value You pay $2

Channeling the disco spirit (from left): Judi Stricklan, Leah Christie and Christi Harrington.

op music fans of the world are divided into two

60%

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JANUARY 31, 2019

CN&R

25


NIGHTLIFE

THurSDay 1/31—WEDnESDay 2/6 WEBSTER MOORE: Singer/songwriter, plus Drunken Dumpling food truck. Thu, 1/31, 7pm. The Commons, 2412 Park Ave.

YUPPIE LIBERATION FRONT: Band leader and Chico alum Thomas Molina combines jazz, reggae, neo soul, Latin and R&B, plus standards and fun arrangements of popular music. Thu, 1/31, 6pm. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

FrOnT COunTry Tonight, Jan. 31 Sierra Nevada Big Room

31THurSDay

#BROKEAF: Celebrate Aquarius

birthdays with an exclusive lineup of Aquarian DJs rocking the decks. Thu, 1/31, 9pm. The Patio, 177 E. Second St.

FIFTH THURSDAY SHOWCASE: Singer/ songwriters Matilda Krulder and Oliver Moore, Makenzi Allen and Elliot Walsh, and special guests. Thu, 1/31, 6:30pm. Free. Farm Star Pizza, 2359 Esplanade, 343-2056.

SEE THurSDay

show featuring Joe Craven, Alex De Grassi and Laurie Lewis with Nina Gerber, performing separately and together. Musicians join forces to benefit Camp Fire survivors through KZFR and the Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. Fri, 2/1, 6:30pm. $15. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St. kzfr.org

LEFTY’S BLUES JAM: Open jam session with tips supporting musicians who lost gear in the Camp Fire. Thu, 1/31, 7pm. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave. tackleboxchico.com

REVEREND HORTON HEAT: The Rev will bring you to your knees with rollicking rockabilly tunes and pomade. Plus, boogie with western swing allstar Big Sandy, punk ’n’ ska outfit Voodoo Glow Skulls and rockin’ blues punkers Delta Bombers. Thu, 1/31, 8pm. $17.50. Senator Theatre, 517 Main St. jmaxproductions.net

FRONT COUNTRY: Americana/rock band has played RockyGrass, MerleFest and Telluride festivals. Now the San Francisco-based group returns to the Big Room with a rollicking stage show and impressive vocal harmonies. Thu, 1/31, 7:30pm. $17.50. Big Room, 1075 E 20th St. sierra nevada.com

1FrIDay

BUTTE STRONG SESSION: Benefit

CARAVANSERAI: Santana tribute. Come for Abraxas, but get out before “Smooth.” Fri, 2/1, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

DAVE NACHMANOFF: Singer/philosopher

SHIGEMI MINETAKA & FRIENDS: Tasty tunes for your dining experience. Thu, 1/31, 6:30pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St.

and multi-instrumentalist toured with Al Stewart for 15 years and has shared the stage with Alison Krauss, Cheryl Wheeler, Firefall and John Wesley Harding. Email MDaguerre@csuchico.edu for information about this house show. Fri, 2/1, 7pm. davenach.com .

PSyCHOBILLySKaPunK

Headlined by the Reverend Horton Heat (pictured), this bill features a big ol’ heap of rock ’n’ roll going down tonight (Jan. 31) at the Senator Theatre. The godfather of modern rockabilly, the Rev is joined by longtime bassist Jimbo Wallace; the pair have been playing together for nearly 35 years. You’ll also see a set by western swing king Big Sandy, SoCal ska punks Voodoo Glow Skulls and The Delta Bombers.

LOW FLYING BIRDS: Americana and bluegrass from this fun, highenergy band. Fri, 2/1, 8pm. $7. Unwined Kitchen & Bar, 980 Mangrove Ave. unwinedchico.com

MAKER’S MILE: Funk, rock, reggae and hip-hop, plus and opening set from One-Up’s Aaron Stroh. Fri, 2/1, 9pm. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave. tackleboxchico.com

MATT MCBRIDE: McBride opens the show with a solo set and closes with his full band, plus music from Manimals and blues-y rock trio Yurkovic. Fri, 2/1, 8:30pm. $5. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

PSyCHOBILLySKaPunK

Headlined by the Reverend Horton Heat (pictured), this bill features a big ol’ heap of rock ’n’ roll going down tonight (Jan. 31) at the Senator Theatre. The godfather of modern rockabilly, the Rev is joined by longtime bassist Jimbo Wallace; the pair have been playing together for nearly 35 years. You’ll also see a set by western swing king Big Sandy, SoCal ska punks Voodoo Glow Skulls and The Delta Bombers.

MOJO GREEN: Funked-out Reno septet brings their mobile dance party to town, with a ripping horn section, deep pockets of soul and a captivating lead singer. Opening set by DJ Amburgers. Fri, 2/1, 9pm. $10. Lost on Main, 319 Main St., 892-2445. lostonmainchico.com

PUB SCOUTS: Traditional Irish music for happy hour. Fri, 2/1, 4pm. $1. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St.

RECKLESS ENVY: Cover band from Reno plays everything from Journey, ZZ Top and Heart to Bruno Mars and Maroon 5. Fri, 2/1, 8:30pm. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

ROBERT KARCH & SHIGEMI MINETAKA: Jazz, R&B and pop duets on guitar and piano. Fri, 2/1, 6:30pm. Free. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St., 895-1515.

TANNER RICHARDSON: Singer/song-

writer performs for happy hour. Fri, 2/1, 4pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St. lasalleschico.com

2019 Keep Chico Weird

Art Show Deadline for submissions is Jan. 31, 2019.

Feb. 28–March 3, 2019 1078 Gallery

▼ Art in all mediums is eligible ▼ Must be 18-over to submit

Dearest weird artists ...

Chico needs you. And the Chico News & Review wants to celebrate your strange, freaky, bizarre, unique approach to making art! Submissions are now being accepted for the sixth annual Keep Chico Weird Art Show, happening Feb. 28-March 3 at the 1078 Galley. (No talent show this year, but we are looking for a few performers to entertain the weirdos during the reception, March 2.)

For more info and updates visit:

keepchicoweird.com or facebook.com/keepchicoweird 26

CN&R

January 31, 2019

2SaTurDay

BLACKOUT BETTY: High-octane ’80s rock tribute band packs the dance floor. Sat, 2/2, 9pm. Studio Inn Lounge, 2582 Esplanade.

BOB MARLEY TRIBUTE: Kick off Bob Marley’s birthday month with Sol Horizon and Triple Tree. Celebrate


SaD SaX COMEDy COnFESSIOnS anD TOnGuE & CHEEKy BurLESQuE Saturday, Feb. 2 The Maltese SEE SaTurDay

THIS WEEK: FInD MOrE EnTErTaInMEnT anD SPECIaL EVEnTS On PaGE 22 RECKLESS ENVY: See Friday. Sat, 2/2, 8:30pm. Feather Falls Casino &

Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfallscasino.com

SAD SAX COMEDY CONFESSIONS: Local

comedians yuck it up. Sat, 2/2. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

STOICB4DARK: Original hard rock. Sat, 2/2, 9pm. Down Lo, 319 Main St.

TONGUE & CHEEKY BURLESQUE: A night of silly, sexy fun as we ramp up to V-Day. Sat, 2/2, 10pm. $7. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

TROPA MAGICA: East L.A. brothers kick out an awesome blend of psych, cumbia and punk. Local hip-hop crew Pervert and garage-rock duo Beehive open this rad show. Go to it! Sat, 2/2, 9:30pm. $7. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St.

the life of the legendary musician and the message of reggae. Sat, 2/2, 9pm. $10-$15. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave. tackleboxchico.com

BRAD PETERSEN & FRIENDS: Country, some rock and Americana music. Sat, 2/2, 7pm. $7. Unwined Kitchen & Bar, 980 Mangrove Ave.

CINDER VALLEY: Live music. Sat, 2/2,

9:30pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St. lasalleschico.com

JOURNEY UNAUTHORIZED: Don’t start

3SunDay

believin’ that it’s actually Journey. Because it’s not. Who’s crying now? Sat, 2/2, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfallscasino. com

OPEN MIC COMEDY: Get your free

KORBY LENKER: Singer/songwriter per-

SAMMY KAY: New Jersey blues-

forms a solo set during this house show. Email michelle@korbylenker. com for details. Sat, 2/2, 7pm. korbylenker.com

comedy fix when locals test their mettle on stage. Got some new material? Signups start at 8pm. Sun, 2/3, 9:30pm. Free. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

SuSPICIOuS MInDS

THE SHORT TIMERS IMPROV SHOW: Short-form improv group performs classic short-form games and CLIC originals! BYOB. Sun, 2/3, 7pm. $5. Kingmaker Studios, 561 E Lindo Ave., 408-509-3981.

5TuESDay

OPEN MIC: Hosted by veteran

Chico singer/songwriter Andan Casamajor. There’s always a guitar to borrow and a house cajón for frisky fingers, so come on down and get on the list. Tue, 2/5, 6pm. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

6WEDnESDay

THE BIDWELLS: Local duo performs in

the lounge. Wed, 2/6, 6pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St. hoteldiamondchico.com

MEMORIES OF ELVIS: Chris MacDonald lovingly brings back the magic of the King with this tribute. Wed, 2/6, 6:30pm. $10-$40. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfallscasino.com

man performs with Shelby Cobra and Seth Anderson. Sun, 2/3, 7pm. Sacred Art Tattoo Parlor, 804 Broadway St.

A heartfelt tribute to Elvis Presley from his early recordings at Sun, to the halcyon days of superstardom and the late period bacon, peanut butter and grape jelly sandwich binges. Chris MacDonald covers the King’s career in his tribute show, Memories of Elvis. A veteran of the Legends in Concert productions, MacDonald has also performed with Elvis’ original backing singers, the Jordanaires, and drummer D.J. Fontana. The show is Wednesday, Feb. 6, at Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, and is expected to sell out.

support survivors for

DropiN Center

in down town c h ic o

Butte/Glenn: 530-891-1331 Tehama: 530-529-3980 24hr CRISIS LINE: 530-342-RAPE (7273) Collect Calls Accepted January 31, 2019

CN&R

27


REEL WORLD

FILM SHORTS Reviewers: Bob Grimm and Juan-Carlos Selznick.

Opening this week If Beale Street Could Talk

Director Barry Jenkins (Moonlight) has adapted James Baldwin’s 1974 novel about a young woman living in Harlem who falls in love, gets engaged and pregnant, and then has to fight for the freedom of her fiance, who was arrested for a crime he didn’t commit. Pageant Theatre. Rated R.

Miss Bala

Gina Rodriguez plays an American who, while trying to survive and save a friend in trouble, has to work with both sides in a dangerous fight between a Mexican drug cartel and the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency. Cinemark 13, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

They Shall Not Grow Old

This documentary by Lord of the Rings director Peter Jackson was created using archival footage of British servicemen during World War I, and applying color and 3-D, as well as sound effects and voiceovers to create a more immersive experience. Cinemark 14. Rated R.

Now playing

Kids of the round table

Aquaman

Jason Momoa takes his superhuman physique from Game of Thrones to the title character in this film adaptation of DC Comics’ half-human/half-Atlantean heir to the underwater kingdom of Atlantis. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

A sweet but lackluster update of the King Arthur legend

A and is tasked with saving the world. The Kid Who Would Be King is writer-director Joe Cornish’s

modern day, bullied kid pulls a sword out of a stone

attempt to capture the youthful, magical wonder of Harry Potter and mix it with the by legend of King Arthur. While he Bob Grimm doesn’t completely fail, an overall bg r i mm@ drab directorial style, messy action newsrev i ew.c om and many moments that are far less clever than he seems to have intended keep this fantasy film from being a true crowd-pleaser. That said, the film does feature a pretty good performance The Kid Who from Louis Ashbourne Serkis Would Be King (son of motion-caption actor Louis ashbourne Andy Serkis—Gollum, Snoke, Serkis, rebecca Ferguson and Patrick et al.) as Alex, a fed-up British kid Stewart. Cinemark who sticks his neck on the line to 14, Feather river protect best bud Bedders (Dean Cinemas. rated PG. Chaumoo) from the bully, Lance (Tom Taylor). Serkis is a little overwrought in some of the film’s more emotionally demanding parts, but he hits the right notes when it comes to Alex’s heroic proclamations after he procures Excalibur from a big rock in the middle of a construction site. Alex happens to notice that “Bedders” sounds a lot like “Bedivere,” the Round Table knight who threw Excaliber into the lake, and that Lance could be short for Lancelot. So, he figures destiny requires him to knight the two, along with Kaye (Rhianna Dorris), Lance’s partner in crime (King Arthur had a knight named Sir Kay … get it?). They form an unlikely alliance against Morgana (Rebecca Ferguson), the banished half-sister of King Arthur who threatens to

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January 31, 2019

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Bohemian Rhapsody

return in flying-dragon-lady form and make England the hub for the apocalypse. Ferguson, so good in the Mission: Impossible movies, gets little opportunity to really make a mark as the villain. And when she’s fully transformed into her dragon persona, the monster looks a little bit like Ray Harryhausen’s stop-motion Medusa from the original Clash of the Titans (1981), but it’s not enough of an homage to be cool. It’s just kind of derivative and sketchy. Looking a little lost, with wild hair and a Led Zeppelin T-shirt, Patrick Stewart has too few scenes as an aged version of Merlin. He gives his few moments a fun, goofy touch, but he’s just a guest star. For the most part, the Merlin character appears in the form of a teenager (Angus Imrie) and (whenever he sneezes) an owl. All the different versions of Merlin add up to an odd, less-than-unified character. While Cornish showed a scrappy ingenuity with his only other directorial feature—the relatively low-budget Attack the Block (2011)—the overall effect of this haphazard adventure is surprisingly dull, even with much more money to spend on special effects and action. I will say there are worse movies for kids to see. There’s a good central message about making nice with your classmates despite differences. There’s also a sweet, semi-moving element involving Alex’s single mom and his missing father. Cornish does all right with the humanity stuff; he just doesn’t bring much magic to the fantasy realm. Ω

Rami Malek gives it his all as Freddie Mercury, the late lead singer of Queen, in the new biopic, Bohemian Rhapsody. That and a competent recreation of Queen’s famous Live Aid domination at Wembley Stadium are just about the only good things you can say about this mostly embarrassing effort that falls way short of telling the actual story of this incredible person and his sadly short life. The movie screws with Mercury’s timeline, invents a bunch of unnecessary events and homogenizes this hard-living rock star’s life for a generic PG-13 film that doesn’t feel anything close to authentic. Why distort the story like this, especially when the life in focus is so damned interesting and could fuel five incredible movies instead of one hokey, mostly made-up soap opera? The musical sequences, including the Live Aid gig, are fun to watch. But if I wanted to simply experience music by Queen, I’d just seek out the albums and videos of music by Queen. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13 —B.G.

A Dog’s Way Home

Will faithful dog Bella find her way 400 miles back to her owner? Probably. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

Escape Room

Six strangers are forced to band together and use their wits to survive an exceedingly elaborate—and deadly—escape room. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13.

Glass

The third film in writer/director M. Night Shyamalan’s Unbreakable trilogy (which includes previous entries Unbreakable and Split) pits a hero with superhuman strength (Bruce Willis) against two “supervillains”— a dangerously unstable man with 24 personalities (James McAvoy) and a genius mass-murderer with brittle bones (Samuel L. Jackson). Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

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Green Book

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Fair

Good

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Excellent

Mahershala Ali and Viggo Mortensen start in this feel-good movie about race relations in America that goes light on the grit and heavy on the sentiment. Based on a true story, it starts off with Tony Lip (Mortensen), an Italian-American bouncer

who gets a gig as a driver and bodyguard for Dr. Don Shirley (Ali), a black classical pianist who is touring the Deep South. It’s a road movie, with Tony driving and Don sitting in the back seat. The two use the book of the movie’s title—a guide offering a listing of safe havens for black travelers in segregated Southern states—to find places where Don can find shelter and eat. Things get ugly when Don tries to do such mundane things as buy a suit or eat in a restaurant where he’s been hired to play. Tony steps in for his boss during these racially charged episodes, and occasionally cracks a few skulls. As his eyes are opened to the realities of life for Dr. Don, Tony learns lessons about loving people no matter the color of their skin and perhaps about how to drop fewer racial slurs before the credits roll. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R —B.G.

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The Kid Who Would Be King

See review this issue. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG. —B.G.

Mary Poppins Returns

Rob Marshall (Chicago, Into the Woods) takes on another movie musical, this one an update on the 1964 classic, set a couple of decades after the events in Mary Poppins, with Emily Blunt playing the title character. Also starring Lin-Manuel Miranda (Hamilton), Colin Firth and Meryl Streep. Cinemark 14. Rated PG.

Second Act

Jenny from the block tricks her way into a Madison Avenue gig and is forced to prove that “street smarts equal book smarts.” Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13.

Serenity

A neo-noir thriller starring Matthew McConaughey as a fishing boat captain living on a tropical island whose ex (Anne Hathaway) tracks him down and asks him to murder her current husband (Jason Clarke). Also starring Djimon Hounsou and Diane Lane. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

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Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse

No movie adaptation has captured the rush of reading an exciting comic book like this blast of energy from directors Bob Persichetti, Peter Ramsey and Rodney Rothman. They go for broke with a seamless mixture of visual styles—hand-drawn and computer animated—and the story is pretty great, to boot. Teenager Miles Morales (voiced by Shameik Moore) is bitten by a strange spider and then, with his new-found powers in effect, crosses paths with the original Spider-Man, Peter Parker (Chris Pine). Turns out a portal from a parallel universe has opened up, allowing a whole fleet of different Spider-Verse characters to come into his orbit—the older Peter B. Parker (the invaluable Jake Johnson), Gwen Stacy (Hailee Steinfeld), Spider-Ham (a mishmash of Spidey and Porky Pig voiced by John Mulaney), Peni Parker (Kimiko Glenn) and her robot and, best of all, Nicolas Cage as the black-andwhite Spider-Man Noir. So, Miles is one of many heroes with Spider powers tasked with battling bad dudes. Spider-Verse is surely one of the best movies of the year and the best Spider-Man movie to date. Cinemark 14. Rated PG —B.G.

The Upside

A buddy dramedy about the relationship that develops between a wealthy quadriplegic (Bryan Cranston) and the ex-con (Kevin Hart) hired to take care of him. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

Vice

The latest from writer/director Adam McKay (The Big Short, Anchorman, Step Brothers) takes on the larger-than-life character of Dick Cheney (played by Christian Bale), who, during his tenure as vice president to George W. Bush (Sam Rockwell), reshaped the office into one with unprecedented power. Also starring Amy Adams, Steve Carell and Tyler Perry. Cinemark 14. Rated R.


CHOW Cnrsweetdeals.newsreview.Com

Blanket of mashed potatoes C H I CO P E R F O R M A N C E S It’s cold, you’re sick, tuck into a warm shepherd’s pie

Iholeandinside. I need more than some wimpy broth to fill the If I am at home alone, all congested, don’t want no chicken soup. When I’m sick, I’m sad,

achy and pathetic—as I was last week—all I want is a large helping of stick-to-my-ribs comfort food, or as comedian story and Patton Oswalt says: “I would like a photo by Jason Cassidy failure pile in a sadness bowl.” He’s referring to KFC’s popular j aso nc@ Famous Bowl, which combines newsrev i ew.c om several menu items—corn, fried chicken strips, mashed potatoes, gravy and cheese— into one glorious food item. “Just pile my food in a brown mound in a bowl,” he continues before asking, “And is there a way that the bowl can play Pink Floyd’s ‘Great Gig In the Sky’ while I eat alone in my apartment at two in the morning with all the lights off?” Yes, that’s exactly where I was at last week. Oswalt is, of course, poking fun at America’s gluttonous consumerism, but for those of us who don’t mind our food touching on the plate, stirring together all the good stuff into one pile sounds very comforting. Besides, in all cultures there is a long history of extending leftover ingredients into extra meals by combining them with fillers (like potatoes), and in that tradition there’s one peasant-food staple that looks an awful lot like an English grandmother’s version of the Famous Bowl: shepherd’s pie. Historically, a shepherd’s pie is made with lamb (if beef is used, it’s a cottage pie), but in practice it can be any leftover meat and vegetables combined with a gravy and covered with a layer of mashed potatoes and cheese. For my sick week, I wanted comfort, but not too much of a gut bomb, so I found a Whole30 recipe that kept the ingredients to a minimum. Then I tweaked it by leaving out thyme, replacing half the sweet potatoes with yukon golds, and using the leaner turkey instead of beef or lamb. That’s the beauty of shepherd’s pie; the recipe is

Upcoming Events FEBRUARY 10 17 23

endlessly adaptable. Just throw in whatever will bring you comfort. Turkey shepherd’s pie

JAZZ REACH

MARCH

(adapted from The Whole30 book) 2 medium sweet potatoes, peeled and cubed 4 medium yukon gold potatoes, peeled and cubed 6 tablespoons ghee or clarified butter 4 tablespoons olive oil 1 large yellow onion, diced (1 1/2 cups) 2 carrots, peeled and diced 4 stalks celery, diced 4 cloves garlic, minced 2 pounds ground turkey 1 teaspoon dried oregano salt, to taste

Directions: Place cubed sweet potatoes in one small pot, and cubed yukons in another, cover contents of each with water and boil until potatoes are fork tender. Drain both and mash together with ghee/ clarified butter. Salt to taste and set aside. Preheat oven to 350. Put olive oil and onions in a large saucepan over medium-high heat and saute until onions are soft. Add carrots, celery and garlic and continue cooking until all veggies are soft and onions begin to caramelize around the edges. Add ground turkey and press/ stir into vegetable mixture to incorporate. Add salt to taste and oregano and cook until browned. Pour meat/vegetable mixture in a 3 quart casserole. Spread mashed potatoes in a layer across top, place dish on middle rack and bake for 30 minutes. Switch oven to broil and continue for another 5-10 minutes until top is lightly browned. Serve in a pile in a bowl and eat until the sadness goes away. Ω

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POETRY99 Submit your poems—99 words or fewer—today!

ARTS DEVO by JASON CASSIDY • jasonc@newsreview.com

DEVOTIONS: PURGE EDITION School is back in and Arts DEVO’s lists overfloweth. Here are the bullet points of what’s in the air and on my mind:

• Uncle Kelly rocked! There were many noteworthy interpretations of the Queen of Pop’s songs during Uncle Dad’s tribute to Madonna on Saturday, (Jan. 26), but the two that stuck out for me were the dynamic avant-jazz deconstruction of the previously forgettable dance track “4 Minutes” (featuring an arrangement by Joshua Hegg and vocals by Michael Bone) and the Matthew Weiner-arranged “Like a Virgin,” with a badass (and exceedingly endearing) vocal performance by longtime local actor/singer Kelly Houston decked out in sparkling pink Kelly Houston jacket and shoes. PHOTO BY KEN PORDES

The Chico News & Review is now accepting entries for the 2019 Poetry 99 contest. The top Adult, High School, Junior High and Kid poets will be chosen by established local writing professionals, and winners’ work will be published in the CN&R’s annual Poetry 99 issue on March 28. Winners also will be invited to read their works (and receive prizes!) at the Poetry 99 reading.

• Eric B. and rad beings: Personal songwriting hero Eric Bachmann (of Archers of Loaf and Crooked Fingers fame) put on a fantastic show in a Chico home filled with all sorts of good local people last Sunday (Jan. 27). With an intensely good backing band keeping things very chill, the mood ranged from somber (the depressing/ not-quite-sweet lullaby “Bad Man Coming”) to almost joyful (the depressing/ celebratory Neil Diamond-esque “New Drink for the Old Drunk”). • Kidzine: Chico illustrator Aye Jay Morano has released his first kid-centric publication, Kidzinesz, Volume One. It’s actually two interactive zines: one the story of a lyin’ lion and the other a two-sided activity book with both the ABC’s of Heavy Metal and the ABC’s of Hip-Hop. Buy for $20 at ayejayart. bigcartel.com

• Idea Fab Labs: Postponed in

Online and email entries preferred: Submit at www.newsreview.com/poetry99, or send to poetry99@newsreview.com. Please specify Poetry 99, age and division—Adult, High School (grades 9-12), Junior High (grades 6-8), Kids (fifth grade and younger)—in the subject field. And for all divisions except “Adult” please include age.

November due to the Camp Fire, the Terraform exhibit at Idea Fab Labs, featuring the painted-wood works of Elijah Pfotenhauer, is back and will be on display this Saturday, Feb. 2, 3-6 p.m.

Elijah Pfotenhauer

• Read all about it: In conjunction with the interconnected Before and Afterwards shows currently up at Janet Turner Print Museum and Jacki Headley University Art Gallery at Chico State, curator/artist Jacob Meders has placed three mysterious newspaper boxes around town—downtown in front of The Bookstore, in the Mechoopda Indian Tribe’s office (125 Mission Ranch Blvd.), and in the lobby that the two galleries share. Pick up some art today. (And read more about Meders’ exhibits in next week’s CN&R.)

• Voices Strong! Props to the National Association of Music Merchants for

DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSIONS: WEDNESDAY, MARCH 6, AT 11:59 P.M.

inviting students impacted by the Camp Fire to perform at the annual NAMM Show last Sunday (Jan. 27). And congrats to the students from Inspire School of Arts & Sciences, Paradise High and Achieve Charter School for taking the Voices Strong Choir to Anaheim and singing their hearts out.

For submission guidelines, visit www.newsreview.com/poetry99 Brontez Purnell PHOTO BY BEOWULF SHEEHAN

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CN&R CN&RJ A N U AjRaYn3u1a,r2y0 31 91 , 2 0 1 9

• Rad show(s) alert: Just got word that Oaklandbased writer, zine-maker, dancer/choreographer and musician (formerly of Younger Lovers and Gravy Train!!!) Brontez Purnell is coming to Chico March 30 for a day’s worth of fun. It starts with an afternoon reading of his new children’s book, The Nightlife of Jacuzzi Gasket, at Blackbird, followed by a performance at the 1078 Gallery that evening. Stay tuned for more details.


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY For tHe week oF January 31, 2019

Here are your fortune cookie-style horoscopes for the next five months: ARIES (March 21-April 19): FEBRUARY:

You’ll be invited to make a pivotal transition in the history of your relationship with your most important life goals. It should be both fun and daunting! MARCH: Don’t waste time and energy trying to coax others to haul away the junk and the clutter. Do it yourself. APRIL: The growing pains should feel pretty good. Enjoy the uncanny stretching sensations. MAY: It’ll be a favorable phase to upgrade your personal finances. Think richer thoughts. Experiment with new ideas about money. JUNE: Build two strong bridges for every rickety bridge you burn. Create two vital connections for every stale connection you leave behind.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): FEBRUARY:

You have access to a semi-awkward magic that will serve you well if you don’t complain about its semi-awkwardness. MARCH: To increase your clout and influence, your crucial first step is to formulate a strong intention to do just that. The universe will then work in your behalf. APRIL: Are you ready to clean messes and dispose of irrelevancies left over from the past? Yes! MAY: You can have almost anything you want if you resolve to use it for the greatest good. JUNE: Maintain rigorous standards, but don’t be a fanatic. Strive for excellence without getting bogged down in a counterproductive quest for perfection.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): FEBRUARY:

Be alert for vivid glimpses of your best possible future. The power of self-fulfilling prophecy is even stronger than usual. MARCH: High integrity and ethical rigor are crucial to your success—and so is a longing for sacred adventure. APRIL: How can you make the best use of your likability? MAY: Cheerfully dismantle an old system or structure to make way for a sparkling new system or structure. JUNE: Beginner’s luck will be yours if you choose the right place to begin. What’s a bit intimidating but very exciting?

CANCER (June 21-July 22): FEBRUARY:

Your sensual magnetism peaks at the same time as your spiritual clarity. MARCH: You want toasted ice? Succulent fire? Earthy marvels? Homey strangeness? All of that is within reach. APRIL: Sow the seeds of the most interesting success you can envision. Your fantasy of what’s possible should thrill your imagination, not merely satisfy your sense of duty. MAY: Deadline time. Be as decisive and forthright as an Aries, as bold as a Sagittarius, as systematic as a Capricorn. JUNE: Go wading in the wombtemperature ocean of emotion, but be mindful of the undertow.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): FEBRUARY: There’s

a general amnesty in all matters regarding your relationships. Cultivate truces and forgiveness. MARCH: Drop fixed ideas you might have about what’s possible and what’s not. Be keenly open to unexpected healings. APRIL: Wander out into the frontiers. Pluck goodies that have been off-limits. Consider the value of ignoring certain taboos. MAY: Sacrifice a small comfort so as to energize your ambitions. JUNE: Take a stand on behalf of your beautiful ideals and sacred truths.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): FEBRUARY:

Master the Zen of constructive anger. Express your complaints in a holy cause. MARCH: You finally get a message you’ve been waiting to receive for a long time. Hallelujah! APRIL: Renew your most useful vows. Sign a better contract. Come to a more complete agreement. MAY: Don’t let your preconceptions inhibit you from having a wildly good time. JUNE: Start your own club, band, organization or business. Or reinvent and reinvigorate your current one.

by rob brezsny LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): FEBRUARY:

Be open to romantic or erotic adventures that are different from how love has worked in the past. MARCH: You’ll be offered interesting, productive problems. Welcome them! APRIL: Can you explore what’s experimental and fraught with interesting uncertainty even as you stay well-grounded? Yes! MAY: You can increase your power by not hiding your weakness. People will trust you most if you show your vulnerability. A key to this season’s model of success is the ability to calmly express profound emotion. JUNE: Wild cards and X-factors and loopholes will be more available than usual. Don’t be shy about using them.

CLASSIFIEDS Call for a quote. (530) 894-2300 ext. 2 Phone hours: M-F 9am-5pm. Deadlines for print: Line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Display ad deadline: Friday 2pm

All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. Further, the News & Review specifically reserves the right to edit, decline or properly classify any ad. Errors will be rectified by re-publication upon notification. The N&R is not responsible for error after the first publication. The N&R assumes no financial liability for errors or omission of copy. In any event, liability shall not exceed the cost of the space occupied by such an error or omission. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes full responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. *Nominal fee for some upgrades.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Here are

your fortune cookie-style horoscopes for the next five months. FEBRUARY: The world may finally be ready to respond favorably to the power you’ve been storing up. MARCH: Everything you thought you knew about love and lust turns out to be too limited. So expand your expectations and capacities! APRIL: Extremism and obsession can be useful in moderation. MAY: Invisible means of support will become visible. Be alert for half-hidden help. JUNE: Good questions: What do other people find valuable about you? How can you enhance what’s valuable about you?

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

FEBRUARY: You’ll have the need and opportunity to accomplish some benevolent hocus-pocus. For best results, upgrade your magical powers. MARCH: Make sure the turning point happens in your power spot or on your home turf. APRIL: You should be willing to go anywhere, ask any question and even risk your pride if necessary so as to coax your most important relationships into living up to their potentials. MAY: If at first you don’t succeed, change the definition of success. JUNE: You can achieve more through negotiation and compromise than you could by pushing heedlessly ahead in service to your singleminded vision.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

FEBRUARY: A new phase of your education will begin when you acknowledge how much you have to learn. MARCH: Initiate diplomatic discussions about the Things That Never Get Talked About. APRIL: Revise your ideas about your dream home and your dream community. MAY: You have the power to find healing for your oldest lovesickness. If you do find it, intimacy will enter a new Golden Age. JUNE: Solicit an ally’s ingenuity to help you improvise a partial solution to a complex problem.

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AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): FEBRU-

ARY: Start a new trend that will serve your noble goals for years to come. MARCH: Passion comes back into fashion with a tickle and a shiver and a whoosh. APRIL: As you expand and deepen your explorations, call on the metaphorical equivalents of both a telescope and a microscope. MAY: This is the beginning of the end of what you love to complain about. Hooray! JUNE: You’ll have an abundance of good reasons to celebrate the fact that you are the least normal sign in the zodiac. Celebrate your idiosyncrasies!

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): FEBRUARY:

You’ll have a knack for enhancing the way you express yourself and present yourself. The inner you and the outer you will become more unified. MARCH: You’ll discover two original new ways to get excited. APRIL: Be bold as you make yourself available for a deeper commitment that will spawn more freedom. MAY: What are the gaps in your education? Make plans to mitigate your most pressing area of ignorance. JUNE: Your body’s ready to tell you secrets that your mind has not yet figured out. Listen well.

www.RealAstrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888.

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PUBLIC NOTICE OF VACANCY AND APPOINTMENT TO THE BUTTE COUNTY BOARD OF EDUCATION NOTICE is hereby given pursuant to Section 5092 of the Education Code of the State of California that due to a vacancy caused by the resignation of Butte County Board of Education Member Ryne Johnson as Trustee Area 1 Chico District of the Butte County Board of Education effective January 14, 2019, an appointment pursuant to Education Code Section 5091 will be made. Any legally qualified citizen of Butte County who is interested in serving on the County Board can contact Ann Bates, Senior Executive Assistant, at (530) 532-5761 or abates@bcoe.org or go online to www.bcoe.org to obtain the required Candidate Information Sheet. To be considered, interested persons must deliver a completed Candidate Information Sheet to the Board Secretary no later than 4:00p.m., Friday, February 15, 2019 to Butte County Office of Education C/O Anne Bates or by email abates@bcoe.org. Following the announcement of candidates by the Board President, interviews of qualified candidates will take place at the Butte County Office of Education, 1859 Bird Street, Oroville, California, on a date and time to be determined. On a date and time to be determined, the Board of Education shall make a provisional appointment to the County Board Trustee area 1 Chico District. Unless a petition calling for a special election containing a sufficient number of signatures is filed in the office of the Butte County uperintendent of Schools, 1859 Bird Street, Oroville, CA 95965, within thirty (30) days of the appointment, it shall become final.

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as 3-D CONSTRUCTION at 1530 Mulberry #B Chico, CA 95926. DENNIS JOSEPH DIETZ 1530 Mulberry #B Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: DENNIS DIETZ Dated: December 31, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001566 Published: January 10,17,24,31, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BEACON RESULTS at 1536 Bird St Oroville, CA 95965. AMY ANN CHRISTIANSON 1195 Hill View Way Chico, CA 95926. DARLENE LOUISE DURAN-WALSH 1536 Bird St Oroville, CA 95965. MICHAEL WARREN WALSH 1536 Bird St Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: MICHAEL W. WALSH Dated: December 7, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001475 Published: January 10,17,24,31, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as DESTINY DESIGNS at 2126 Durham-Dayton Hwy G Chico, CA 95938. KELLY MARIE TIPTON 2126 Durham-Dayton Hwy G Chico, CA 95938. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: KELLY M. TIPTON Dated: January 2, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000001 Published: January 10,17,24,31, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PLAN WELL LIVE WELL at 140 Amber Grove Chico, CA 95973. PHILLIP J MOTTINI 8885 Providence Lane Granite Bay, CA 95746. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: PHILLIP J. MOTTINI Dated: December 10, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001466 Published: January 10,17,24,31, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BUTTE NATURAL DISTRIBUTING at 2063 Top Hand Dr Chico, CA 95928. RICHARD LEWIS CSER 2063 Top Hand Dr Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: RICHARD CSER Dated: January 2, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000004 Published: January 10,17,24,31, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as NASCERE VINEYARDS at 3471 Durham Dayton Hwy Chico, CA 95928. NESSERE VINEYARDS LLC 3471 Durham Dayton Hwy. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed; VANESSA PITNEY, OWNER Dated: January 3, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000019 Published: January 10,17,24,31, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BW WELDING at 3486 Padre Lane Chico, CA 95973. BETSY MARIE WEISGERBER 3486 Padre Lane Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: BETSY MARIE WEISGERBER Dated: January 4, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000023 ublished: January 10,17,24,31, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as MASSARI GRAPHICS at 484 E. 5th Street Chico, CA 95928. KATHERINE DOLLINGER 484 E. 5th Street Chico, CA 95928. DANIEL MASSARI 484 E. 5th Street Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: KATHERINE DOLLINGER Dated: January 4, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000020 Published: January 10,17,24,31, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ENLIVEN DIGITAL MARKETING, THE AWOKEN WITCH at

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2375 Notre Dame Blvd., #10 Chico, CA 95928. ADRIANA MARIE LOPEZ 2375 Notre Dame Blvd., #10 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ADRIANA LOPEZ Dated: January 7, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000028 Published: January 10,17,24,31, 2019

FICTITOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CHICO CURBSIDE TAXI at 2337 Ritchie Circle Chico, CA 95926. CHRISTOPHER R MURPHY 2337 Ritchie Circle Chico, CA 95926. ELIZABETH J MURPHY 2337 Ritchie Circle Chico, CA 95926. This busines is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: CHRIS MURPHY Dated: January 2, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000005 Published: January 10,17,24,31, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as EPIC TIE DYES at 1129 Nevada Ave Oroville, CA 95965. ROBERTA ANNA POWELL 1129 Nevada Ave Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ROBERTA ANNA POWELL Dated: January 7, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000030 Published: January 17,24,31, February 7, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as GORDO BURRITO at 1295 E 8th St Chico, CA 95928. URIARTE GORDO BURRITO, INC. 2301 Bar Triangle St Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: JOSE J URIARTE, SECRETARY Dated: January 9, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000045 Published: January 17,24,31, February 7, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as RYON FAMILY PARTNERSHIP at 7225 Durnel Road Nelson, CA 95958. JANET L HEWITT 7229 Durnel Drive #53 Nelson, CA 95958. PATRICIA J JONES 15953 Katydid Lane Magalia, CA 95954. ELIZABETH A ROLLAND 5179 Woodside Ct Carmel, IN 46033. CHARLES H RYON 7229 Durnel Dr #81 Nelson, CA 95958. EDWIN E RYON 7229 Durnel Rd #888 Nelson, CA 95958. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: PATRICIA J. JONES

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Dated: January 7, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000027 Published: January 17,24,31, February 7, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as THROUGH AND THROUGH HOME INSPECTIONS at 854 Virginia St Chico, CA 95928. RICH ALLEN MORARRE 854 Virginia St Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: RICH MORARRE Dated: January 11, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000062 Published: January 17,24,31, February 7, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as JOHNSON STORAGE at 405 Panama Ave Chico, CA 95973. L & B JOHNSON FAMILY LIMITED PARTNERSHIP 405 Panama Ave Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Limited Partnership. Signed: RYNE JOHNSON Dated: January 11, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000064 Published: January 17,24,31, February 7, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as NAIL FABULOUS SALON at 2055 Forest Ave Suite #2 Chico, CA 95928. LYNAE BEGBIE 1661 Forest Ave #186 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: LYNAE BEGBIE Dated: January 8, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000037 Published: January 17,24,31, February 7, 2019

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FICTIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BRENDAN PROPERTIES at 3355 Shallow Springs Terrace Chico, CA 95928. DAVID A LANDECK 3355 Shallow Springs Terrace Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: DAVID A LANDECK Dated: January 8, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000039 Published: January 17,24,31, February 7, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as WILD COUNTRY COURIER at 23 Ranchita Way Chico, CA 95928. CATHY ATKINSON 23 Ranchita Way Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: CATHY A. ATKINSON Dated: January 14, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000070 Published: January 24,31, February 7,14, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as SNACKING VENDING at 467 E 9th St Chico, CA 95928. CAMERON WADE MATTEUCCI 467 E 9th St Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by

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an Individual. Signed: CAMERON MATTEUCCI Dated: January 11, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000063 Published: January 24,31, February 7,14, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CHICO CREEK SIGNS at 195 E Shasta Ave. Rear Bldg Chico, CA 95973. BENJAMIN LLOYD ANDERSON 408 Weymouth Way Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: BENJAMIN L. ANDERSON Dated: January 15, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000078 Published: January 24,31, February 7,14, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ACORNS TO OAKS DAYCARE at 93 St. Francis Dr Chico, CA 95926. SHANNON FAE SIVADON 93 St. Francis Dr Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: SHANNON SIVADON Dated: January 16, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000087 Published: January 24,31, February 7,14, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as RUSTIC SHEARS at 225 Main Street, Suite E Chico, CA 95926. BONNIE SUE PATTERSON 539 Castle Drive Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: BONNIE PATTERSON Dated: January 15, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000081 Published: January 24,31, February 7,14, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CAST AND CUSTOM METAL FABRICATION INC., CAST AND CUSTOM WELDING at 1384 Durham Dayton Highway Durham, CA 95938. CAST AND CUSTOM METAL FABRICATION INC. 1384 Durham-Dayton Hwy Durham, CA 95938. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: BRETT PRUETT, OWNER Dated: December 26, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001550 Published: January 24,31, February 7,14, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as STRUCTURAL SOLUTIONS at 2176 Esplanade Chico, CA 95926. JEREMY PEARCE 12 Creekwood Court Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JEREMY PEARCE Dated: January 14, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000072 Published: January 24,31, February 7,14, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

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The following persons are doing business as 432 at 1929 Mangrove Ave Chico, CA 95926. ALEXANDRA KRIZ 555 Vallombrosa Ave #48 Chico, CA 95926. JAMES ANTHONY SPALLINA III 702 Mangrove Ave #125 Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: JAMES SPALLINA Dated; January 16, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000089 Published: January 24,31, February 7,14, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as IRON STATE PRESS at 978 Salem St., Unit B Chico, CA 95928. ALEC MARTIN BINYON 978 Salem St., Unit B Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ALEC BINYON Dated: January 18, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000105 Published: January 24,31, February 7,14, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PARADISE SALON at 1600 Mangrove Ave Ste 140 Chico, CA 95926. TERRI L COOPER 830 Alynn Way #A Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: TERRI L. COOPER Dated: January 3, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000013 Published: January 24,31, February 7,14, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CREATIVE RECLAIMED WOODS at 2568 Fair St. Chico, CA 95928. RACHEL NICOLE MCMILLAN 2235 Dorado Cerro Chico, CA 95928. SCOTT ERIC MCMILLAN 2235 Dorado Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: RACHEL MCMILLAN Dated: December 21, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001547 Published: January 31, February 7,14,21, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as MORRISON at 10 Landing Circle, #5 Chico, CA 95973. MORRISON AND COMPANY CONSULTING, INC 10 Landing Circle, #5 Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: R. BRENT MORRISON, PRESIDENT Dated: January 10, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000051 Published: January 31, February 7,14,21, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as KEN’S PARADISE HITCH AND WELDING at 919 Easy Street Paradise, CA 95969. DALE JOSEPH GOMES 3254 Indian Springs Rd Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by an Individual.

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Signed: DALE J GOMES Dated: January 14, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000077 Published: January 31, February 7,14,21, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CARING CHOICE HOUSES LLC at 878 Palermo Road Oroville, CA 95965. CARING CHOICE HOUSES LLC 878 Palermo Road Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: PHILLIP L. WILSON, PRESIDENT Dated: January 22, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000111 Published: January 31, February 7,14,21, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as HANDYCRAFT at 6369 Cohasset Road Chico, CA 95973. JOSEPH DANNIEL PARCHER 6369 Cohasset Road Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JOSEPH PARCHER Dated: January 3, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000015 Published: January 31, February 7,14,21, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as FUROCIOUS PETS at 679 E 9th St Apt 3 Chico, CA 95928. DANIEL THOMAS LEVULETT 679 E 9th St Apt 3 Chico, CA 95928. TAYLOR LEVULETT 679 E 9th St Apt 3 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed; DANIEL LEVULETT Dated: January 25, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000133 Published: January 31, February 7,14,21, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as ARTISTS OF RIVER TOWN, STUDIO AT THE BRUSHSTROKES GALLERY at 1967 Montgomery Street Oroville, CA 95965. ARTISTS OF RIVER TOWN 277 Olive Hwy Suite A Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: DAVID I TAMORI, PRESIDENT Dated: January 24, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000131 Published: January 31, February 7,14,,21, 2019

NOTICES ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner ROBERTA PAYNE filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: J. R. PAYNE Proposed name: IZO C. HOSFER THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to

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show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: February 20, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: December 18, 2018 Case Number: 18CV03894 Published: January 10,17,24,31, 2109

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner MELISSA ANN GAMETTE filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: MELISSA ANN GAMETTE Proposed name: MELISSA ANN GEORGE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: February 27, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: December 28, 2018 Case Number: 18CV04157 Published: January 10,17,24,31, 2109

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner CHARLES STEPHENS filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: CHARLES STEPHENS Proposed name: CHARLES KELLY THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING

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Date: February 20, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: December 31, 2018 Case Number: 18CV03413 Published: January 17,24,31, February 7, 2109

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner LAURA LIZETTE ARRIAZA filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: LAURA LIZETTE ARRIAZA Proposed name: LAURA LIZETTE HOLGUIN THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: March 13, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: January 16, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00144 Published: January 24,31, February 7,14, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner CYNTHIA MARIE CAMPAGNA filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: CYNTHIA MARIE CAMPAGNA Proposed name: CINZIA MARIE CAMPAGNA THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: March 6, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: January 9, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00067 Published: January 24,31, February 7,14, 2019


ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner ANDREA NARCISO filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: WARNER BURKE ALLEN Proposed name: WARNER BURKE ALLEN NARCISO THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: March 13, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: January 9, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00062 Published: January 24,31, February 7,14, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner MICHAEL STILLWELL and ANGELA WENTZELL filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: SHANE OWEN WENTZELL Proposed name: SHANE OWEN STILLWELL THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: February 27, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: December 31, 2019 Case Number: 18CV03097 Published: January 31, February 7,14,21, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner CHRISTINA OXLEY filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: KINZLEE ANN QUINN Proposed name: KINZLEE ANN OXLEY THE COURT ORDERS that all

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persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: March 27, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: D1 Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: January 25, 2019 Case Number: 18CV03574 Published: January 31, February 7,14,21, 2019

SUMMONS SUMMONS NOTICE TO RESPONDENT ANTHONY BUNCE You are being sued by plaintiff: JANET DONNELLY You have 30 calendar days after this Summons and Petition are served on you to file a Response (form FL-120) at the court and have a copy served on the petitioner. A letter, phone call, or court appearance will not protect you. If you do not file your Response on time, the court may make orders affecting your marriage or domestic partnership, your property, and custody of your children. You may be ordered to pay support and attorney fees and costs. For legal advice, contact a lawyer immediately. Get help finding a lawyer at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courts.ca.gov/selfhelp) at the California Legal Services website (www.lawhelpca.org), or by contacting your local county bar association. FEE WAIVER: If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the clerk for a fee waiver form. The court may order you to pay back all or part of the fees and costs that the court waived for you or the other party. The name and address of the court are: Superior Court of California, County of Butte 1775 Concord Avenue Chico, CA 95928 The name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner’s attorney, or the petitioner without an attorney, are: MICHAEL M. ROONEY/ JEFFREY MONSELL 1361 Esplanade Chico, CA 95926-4900 (530) 345-5678 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Dated: November 2, 2018 Case Number: 18FL02331 Published: January 24,31, February 7,14, 2019

PETITION NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE CARMELITA A. LANTZ (also known as CARMELITA ANN LANTZ, CARMELITA ANN

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CESSNA LANTZ) To all heirs and beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: CARMELITA A. LANTZ, CARMELITA ANN LANTZ CARMELITA ANN CESSNA LANTZ A Petition for Probate has been filed by: SUSAN L. LANTZ and LINDA L. RAK in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: SUSAN L. LANTZ and LINDA L. RAK be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: February 19, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: NICOLE R. PLOTTEL 466 Vallombrosa Ave. Chico, CA 95926 (530) 893-2882 Case Number: 19PR00030 Dated: January 17, 2019 Published: January 24,31, February 7, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE

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CAROL SUZANNE ZEIMIS, aka CAROL S. ZEIMIS, CAROL S. TEN NAPEL To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: CAROL SUZANNE ZEIMIS, aka CAROL S. ZEIMIS, CAROL S. TEN NAPEL A Petition for Probate has been filed by: VINCENT STERLING ZEIMIS in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: VINCENT STERLING ZEIMIS be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: February 19, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: TBA Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: DIRK POTTER Jacobs, Anderson, Potter & Chaplin 20 Independence Circle Chico CA, 95973 (530)342-6144 Case Number: 19PR00033 Dated: January 17, 2019 Published: January 24,31, February 7, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE RICHARD W. ROGERS, also known as RICHARD WILLIAM ROGERS To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: RICHARD W. ROGERS, also known as RICHARD WILLIAM ROGERS A Petition for Probate has been filed by: RYAN J. ALLEN in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: RYAN J. ALLEN be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: February 19, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: NICOLE R. PLOTTEL 466 Vallombrosa Ave. Chico CA, 95926 (530)893-2882 Case Number: 19PR00040 Dated: January 23, 2019 Published: January 31, February 7,14, 2019

o t p u e v Sa

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January 31, 2019

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33


REAL ESTATE

FOr MOrE InFOrMaTIOn aBOuT aDVErTISInG In Our rEaL ESTaTE SECTIOn, CaLL 530-894-2300

Love’s Real estate

Storm

823 Oak Lawn ave ChiCO 95926 | 3 bdrm and 2 fuLL bths | 1,156sq.ft. $299,000

Great three bedroom home with open kitchen with bar to living room. Kitchen has updated granite counters, stainless appliances including gas cookstove, microwave and dishwasher. Covered rear patio and lawn area in fenced rear yard.

Larry Knifong team CALBRE:00913120 2061 DR. MARtin LuthER king Pkwy suitE 167 & 169 offiCE: 530-872-5400 CELL:530-680-6234 EMAiL: LARRy@knifongtEAM.CoM

Ron, the Realtor from Reno called me. “You guys have quite a storm going, huh?” “Yeah,” I said, “flash flood warnings and everything,” My cell phone screen had flashed weather alerts several times that day. “No, bud,” he said, “I mean your real estate market storm.” “Oh, that storm,” I said. “True. After the Camp fire, we’ve been flooded with buyers making huge offers, routinely thirty to forty thousand over, and throwing cash around. People have insurance checks from their burned down houses, and they want a house right now.” “That doesn’t sound like a bad problem,” said Ron. “Yeah, but its escalated to something like we’ve never seen,” I said. “We feel like we should try and keep a lid on this, and not fuel the fire, so to speak.” “Too late,” said Ron. “It’s already happened, right? You can’t stop a free market. It’s not like you can tell sellers they have to cap their price. And you can’t tell buyers to freeze their offers.” Therein lies the rub, as my old mentor KDV would say. He also would say, “The real estate market is like the Mississippi River. It moves in curious ways. Up, down, fast and slow, which way next, we do not know.”

People want to know if real estate sales prices can be limited, like rentals have been. In fact, a guy called me about the very subject. “I can’t believe the price-gouging going on out there right now!” he yelled. “How can you people sleep at night, charging these crazy prices for run-of-the-mill houses!” I brought that up. “So, Ron,” I said, “what do you tell people who think we are participating in price-gouging when it comes to real estate sales?” Ron raised his voice, maybe even yelled, “People need to understand that a real estate market is an ongoing, changing landscape, beyond our control. It does its own thing, up, down, and sideways. It’s fluid!” “Like the Mississippi River?” I asked. “Huh?” said Ron from Reno.

Doug Love is Sales Manager at Century 21 in Chico. Call 530-680-0817 or email dougwlove@gmail.com License #950289

Homes are Selling in Your Neighborhood Shop every home for sale at www.C21SelectGroup.com

530.345.6618 Steve KaSpRzyK (KAS-peR-ziK)

13988 Persimmon 4 bd 3 ba 1 acre

You don’t have to spell it out for me to sell it! 27 years representing clients in our area Century 21 Select Chico California c21falconer@gmail.com

14056 Hereford 2 homes on 1 lot w/ Large shops $989,000 385 E.12th - 6 unit Apartment complex $699,000

(530) 518–4850 License#01145231

$813,988

Paul Champlin | (530) 828-2902 Making Your Dream Home a Reality

3 bed 2 bath in Magalia with lots of upgrades! Call now for more info & private showings! CalDRE #02056059

Olivia Larrabee l (530) 520-3169 Olivia.Larrabee@c21selectgroup.com

Homes Sold Last Week ADDRESS

TOWN

35 Quail Covey Ct 1614 Oleander Ave 677 Cromwell Dr 2680 Passiflora Ct 1925 Waxwing Way 880 Manzanita Ave 55 Herlax Cir 1625 Meadow Rd 2619 Kennedy Ave 1908 Potter Rd 51 Brenda Dr

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico

34

CN&R

January 31, 2019

PRICE $731,500 $675,000 $610,000 $576,000 $540,000 $500,000 $474,000 $451,000 $450,000 $444,500 $425,000

BR/BA 3/2 6/3 3/3 4/3 4/3 3/2 4/2 3/3 3/2 4/2 3/2

AFFORDABLE... move in ready! Cozy home, 2 bd/1 bath, sits on large lot w/large side area for parking andS RVO access to back yard. LD Home includes a basement (3 rooms) A Must See...

COMING SOON

SMILeS ALWAyS!

Reduced educed to

$219,900

Lic# 01506350

Joyce Turner

(530) 570–1944 • joyce_turner@ymail.com

Sponsored by Century 21 Select Real Estate, Inc. SQ. FT. 2084 3507 2416 2481 2416 1727 2016 1724 1847 1758 1670

ADDRESS

TOWN

3189 Rogue River Dr 2219 Robailey Dr 2846 Beachcomber Cv 14 Allie Ct 1284 Glenshire Ln 354 E 1st Ave 1 Alden Ct 1974 Belgium Ave 2573 Kennedy Ave 204 Mission Serra Ter 752 E 7th St

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico

PRICE $425,000 $419,000 $419,000 $406,000 $392,000 $389,000 $385,000 $377,000 $376,000 $365,000 $362,000

BR/BA 3/2 4/2 3/2 3/2 4/2 3/1 4/2 3/2 4/2 3/2 2/1

SQ. FT. 1682 1746 1348 1444 1603 1333 1643 1406 1964 1447 1031


15th Street Cafe

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15th Street Cafe

Great Northern Coffee

Momona Noodle + Bao

$10 Value

$10 Value

$5 Value

$10 Value

You pay $5

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bidwell TiTle & esCrOw

With locations in:

Chico: 894-2612 • Oroville: 533-2414 Paradise: 877-6262 • Gridley: 846-4005 www.BidwellTitle.com

r able fo deem as store en Not re . 49.6. will be giv ount used ge .45-17 1749 uity. Chan nus any am Sec. at mi CA CC for gr umer ing to be used the cons rd co ot by Cann paid pire ac not ex & offers. e amount es & do discounts ual to th eq ficate r t certi with othe rtificate is ce ed is a gif This Can be us for this cash. Cash value credit.

Dream Catcher Trading Post You pay $2.50

Need a$10hand with Value You pay purchase? $5 your home

You pay $2

Community Supported

You pay $7.50

Buy online anytime with a credit card or in person with cash, check or credit card M-F 9am – 5pm at 353 E. Second Street, Downtown Chico.

Donate to ’s Independent Journalism Fund www.independentjournalismfund.org

How Much is Your Home Worth Today? Ask the Professionals at Century 21 Select

530.345.6618 | www.C21SelectGroup.com LiSTinGS

In gated community, 2,628 sq ft, built in 2001, 3 bedrooms, P E N D I N2Gbaths, 3 car garage, family room plus den. Home is beautifully landscaped and has solar, $565,000.00.

235 acres located in the Beautiful setting of Butte Valley. Offering 2 newer stunning custom homes, horse set up, out buildings, and fully fenced property. Wonderful opportunity to have privacy with $1,650,000 enough acres to have horses, cattle or just the peaceful setting that this has to offer

Teresa Larson (530) 899-5925 DRE #01177950 chiconativ@aol.com

Fully Furnished Butte Meadows Cabin ready for new owners. You can live here while you rebuild. $219,000 20 acres with views $145,000

GORGEOUS CUSTOM HOME

..........

adoraBle 3 bed/2.5 bth, 1,502 sq ft with front and back porches plus a formal dining room and living room with an open floor plan, in door laundry room, 2-car garage and all furnishing in the home are included.

$350,000

Kimberley Tonge l 530.518.5508 Lic# 01318330

Alice Zeissler l 530.518.1872 CalBRE #01312354

The following houses were sold in Butte County by real estate agents or private parties during the week of January 14 - January 18, 2019 The housing prices are based on the stated documentary transfer tax of the parcel and may not necessarily reflect the actual sale price of the home. ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

SQ. FT.

1404 Heather Cir

Chico

$355,000

2/1

976

66 Lacewing Ct

Chico

$353,000

3/2

1233

ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

SQ. FT.

374 E 7th Ave

Chico

$308,000

2/1

950

3034 Monticello Ln

Chico

$290,000

3/2

1317

41 Forest Creek Cir

Chico

$347,500

3/2

1677

827 W 2nd Ave

Chico

$280,000

3/2

1162

8 Capshaw Ct

Chico

$346,273

4/3

2929

2099 Hartford Dr #1

Chico

$250,000

3/2

1375

2615 Pillsbury Rd

Chico

$339,000

3/2

2018

1414 Boucher St

Chico

$247,500

2/1

704

1017 Raven Ln

Chico

$335,000

3/2

1930

2906 Pennyroyal Dr

Chico

$201,000

2/2

1103

29 Glenshire Ln

Chico

$325,000

3/2

1236

2720 Monterey St

Chico

$132,000

4/2

1731

2037 Huntington Dr

Chico

$321,000

3/2

1142

332 Forbestown Rd

Oroville

$690,000

4/5

4546

87 Key West Loop

Chico

$318,000

3/2

1126

3686 Hildale Ave

Oroville

$425,000

4/3

2172

4 Knotts Glen Ct

Chico

$313,000

3/2

1494

3611 Sunview Dr

Paradise

$800,000

3/3

3197

3 Casa Del Lago

Chico

$310,000

2/2

1300

4839 Pentz Rd

Paradise

$500,000

4/2

2208

January 31, 2019

CN&R

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