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CHICO’S FREE NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY VOLUME 42, ISSUE 22 THURSDAY, JANUARY 24, 2019 WWW.NEWSREVIEW.COM

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In sickness and health

24-HOUR SHELTER

12 ONLINE ADDICT 22 BREAKING ART

A former Chico couple’s public battle against Alzheimer’s by Robert Speer page 18


FOR DENTURES WITH EXTRACTIONS ONLY

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CN&R 

January 24, 2019


CN&R

INSIDE

20th AnnuAl

Snow Goose Festival JAnuAry 23 – 27 | ChiCo, CAliforniA

Vol. 42, Issue 22 • January 24, 2019 OPINION

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Editorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Guest Comment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Second & Flume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 This Modern World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Streetalk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

NEWSLINES

FrEE

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Appointment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Weekly Dose. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

GREENWAYS

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Eco Event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS

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15 Minutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 The Goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

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COVER STORY

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ARTS & CULTURE

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Arts Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 This Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Fine Arts listings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Scene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Nightlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Reel World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Chow. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Arts DEVO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Brezsny’s Astrology . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

REAL ESTATE

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ON THE COVER: PHOTO OF PAM MONTANA AND BOB LINSCHEID BY JONATHAN LINSCHEID

Editor Melissa Daugherty Managing Editor Meredith J. Cooper Arts Editor Jason Cassidy Contributing Editor Evan Tuchinsky Staff Writer Ashiah Scharaga Calendar Editor Nate Daly Contributors Robin Bacior, Alastair Bland, Michelle Camy, Vic Cantu, Charles Finlay, Bob Grimm, Howard Hardee, Miles Jordan, Mark Lore, Landon Moblad, Brie Oviedo, Ryan J. Prado, Juan-Carlos Selznick, Ken Smith, Robert Speer, Carey Wilson Managing Art Director Tina Flynn Creative Services Manager Elisabeth Bayard Arthur Ad Designer Naisi Thomas Custom Publications Designer Katelynn Mitrano Director of Sales and Advertising Jamie DeGarmo Advertising Services Coordinator Ruth Alderson Senior Advertising Consultants Brian Corbit, Laura Golino Advertising Consultants Adam Lew, Jordon Vernau Office Assistant Jennifer Osa Distribution Director Greg Erwin Distribution Manager Mark Schuttenberg Distribution Staff Ken Gates, Bob Meads, Pat Rogers, Larry Smith, Placido Torres, Jeff Traficante, Bill Unger, Lisa Van Der Maelen, David Wyles

Saturday/Sunday January 26 - 27, 2019 Chico Masonic Family Center 1110 W. East Ave. Chico

Sat. Jan 26 11:00 am - 3:00 pm Sun Jan 27 11:00 am – 3:00 pm

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CLASSIFIEDS

Our Mission: To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live.

Events and Activities

RemaRkable lives: The inTeRTwined woRlds of biRds and humans

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Downstroke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Sifter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9

HEALTHLINES

www.snowgoosefestiv l.org www.snowgoosefestivA www.snowgoosefestivAl.org

President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Director of Nuts & Bolts Deborah Redmond Director of People & Culture David Stogner Director of Dollars & Sense Debbie Mantoan Nuts & Bolts Ninja Norma Huerta Project Coordinator Natasha vonKaenel Payroll/AP Wizard Miranda Hansen Accounts Receivable Specialist Analie Foland Developer John Bisignano System Support Specialist Kalin Jenkins N&R Publications Editor Michelle Carl N&R Publications Associate Editor Laura Hillen N&R Publications Writer Anne Stokes Marketing & Publications Consultants Steve Caruso, Joseph Engle, Elizabeth Morabito, Traci Hukill, Luke Roling, Celeste Worden 353 E. Second Street, Chico, CA 95928 Phone (530) 894-2300 Fax (530) 892-1111 Website www.newsreview.com Got a News Tip? (530) 894-2300, ext 2224 or chiconewstips@newsreview.com Calendar Events cnrcalendar@newsreview.com Calendar Questions (530) 894-2300, ext. 2243 Want to Advertise? Fax (530) 892-1111 or cnradinfo@newsreview.com Classifieds (530) 894-2300, press 2 or classifieds@newsreview.com Job Opportunities jobs@newsreview.com Want to Subscribe to CN&R? chisubs@newsreview.com Editorial Policies: Opinions expressed in CN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons, or other portions of the paper. CN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or review materials. Email letters to cnrletters@newsreview.com. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form and to edit them for libel. Advertising Policies: All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes the responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. CN&R is printed at PressWorks Ink on recycled newsprint. Circulation of CN&R is verified by the Circulation Verification Council. CN&R is a member of Chico Chamber of Commerce, Oroville Chamber of Commerce, Downtown Chico Business Association, CNPA, AAN and AWN. Circulation 38,650 copies distributed free weekly.

saTuRday only slow The flow Sat. 9:00 am - 12:00 pm

Location: *Valene L. Smith Museum of Anthropology, CSUC This exhibition will investigate the lives of birds and their impact and importance on human cultures, combining views from natural history and anthropological perspectives. The exhibit will show the deeply rooted cross-cultural connections between humans and birds, showcasing some beautiful artifacts from contemporary indigenous Maya, Hawaiian, and Northwest Pacific cultures. There will also be a free public opening reception on Thursday, January 24, from 5:00pm - 6:30pm.*The museum is located in the Meriam Library complex on Chico State Campus, across from the main library entrance.

Location: Chico Masonic Family Center Want to learn how to prevent water pollution?. We will discuss water-wise landscaping practices that prevent water pollution, including rain gardens, bioswales, pervious pavers, and use of native plants. Then we’ll take a field trip to Lost Park to see a constructed stormwater treatment project. We’ll also join The Stream Team in monitoring water quality in Big Chico Creek and in assisting Friends of Bidwell Park in planting native trees along the creek. Presenters: Timmarie Hamill and Lise Smith-Peters

The maze of maps

Sat. 10:00 am - 12:00 pm & 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Sat 9:00 am - 4:00 pm Sun 9:00 am - 3:00 pm

Location: Chico Masonic Family Center This year we will feature an eclectic assortment of interesting maps from around the North Valley and beyond. Get the bird’s eye view of our local landscape features. Stroll through maps in the CMFC hallway and let your curiosity take you on a tour.

Come see the Center for Reconnecting with Nature’s display of raptors and falcons. Live birds of prey will be present and the Center will be sharing about their mission, which focuses on reconnecting both youth and adults with nature. The exhibit of live raptors will be open from 10am to noon and 1pm to 3pm. sunday only wolves in califoRnia: The lonG JouRney home

exhibiTs & vendoRs GaloRe

Sun 9:00 am - 10:30 am

Sat 9:00 am - 4:00 pm Sun 9:00 am - 3:00 pm

Location: Chico Masonic Family Center Displays by State, Federal, and Non-profit organizations. Plus vendors selling everything from binoculars to bird books. fedeRal JunioR duck sTamp display Sat 9:00 am - 4:00 pm Sun 9:00 am - 3:00 pm

Location: Chico Masonic Family Center All 100 California winners from nearly 2,000 entries will be on display. Don’t forget to see the Chico winners. meeT smokey beaR and The blue Goose Sat 9:00 am - 4:00 pm Sun 9:00 am – 3:00 pm

Location: Chico Masonic Family Center Smokey Bear and the National Wildlife Refuge’s Blue Goose will be visiting at various times courtesy of the Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge. Also be sure to visit the US Fish & Wildlife Service fire safety exhibit booth. JunioR naTuRalisT acTiviTies Sat 10:00 am - 3:00 pm Sun 10:00 am – 3:00 pm

Location: Chico Masonic Family Center Along with the Live Raptor Presentation, Meet Smokey Bear and Blue Goose, Junior Duck Stamp Display, children may earn a Junior Naturalist Certificate by participating in a few activities designed just for children. There will be nature crafts, opportunities to build bird feeders, make a bird call and much, much more! skins & skulls Sat 10:00 am – 4:00 pm Sun 10:00 am – 3:00 pm

live RapToR expeRience

We’ll open a treasure box on loan to us from Lassen Volcanic National Park and explore a brand new educational set of over 20 demonstration skulls and pelts. Gently feel the sharp teeth of a large predator, the tip of an eagle’s beak, a beaver’s buck tooth, or a deer’s grinding molars. Skulls are beautiful in form and function. Each skull is full of clues as to what the animal eats and how it makes its living. Our high quality animal pelts include the thick fur of river otter and beaver, the silky fur of bobcat and rabbit as well as that of a rare red fox and more. Presenter: David Samuels

Location: Chico Masonic Family Center California is excited to celebrate the beginning of what could be one of our state’s most inspiring conservation stories: the return of the gray wolf. As a keystone predator, wolves provide a critical balance to the ecosystem in which they belong. No other animal in history has so captured the imagination of people than the wolf! Come learn about the true nature of this dynamic predator and what the return of this iconic species means to our golden state. Presenter: Bre Owens all abouT baTs! Sun. 11:00 am - 12:30 pm

Location: Chico Masonic Family Center They are one of the most beneficial, yet most misunderstood animals in the world. Learn more about the habits, habitats, and species of bats that reside within the unique ecosystems of California’s valleys and forests. Presenter: Linda Angerer biRds in sacRamenTo valley’s winTeR weTlands sun. 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm Location: Chico Masonic Family Center Birds in Sacramento Valley’s Winter Wetlands was filmed in the Gray Lodge Wildlife Refuge, the Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge, the Llano Seco Wildlife Refuge, and the wetlands and rice fields in and around the counties of Butte and Colusa in California. The new film gives viewers a close-up look at many of the migratory birds that come from as far away as Siberia and the Arctic Circle to make their homes in the Sacramento Valley’s wetlands each winter. opTics demo Sun 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm

Location: Chico Masonic Family Center Learn the basics about Binoculars and Spotting Scopes for bird watching! What do the numbers mean? Isn’t higher power always better? This will be a “show and tell” discussion about the differences in size, quality, and construction of optics so that you can make a good choice for your needs and budget. Sample optics will be available from numerous manufacturers to illustrate. Marilyn Rose from Out of This World Optics will be the presenter. Presenter: Marilyn Rose RapToR foRce assembly sun. 1:00 pm - 2:30 pm Location: Chico Masonic Family Center West Coast Falconry is coming to the Snow Goose Festival! Falconers have played a pivotal role in raptor conservation, captive breeding techniques, and educating the public on seeing the world through the eyes of nature’s elite predators. Get an up-close look at hawks, falcons, owls, and a precocious vulture. Bring your cameras and questions -- we will be flying several birds during the presentation.

See complete list on our website: www.snowgoosefestival.org

• (530) 592-9092

THANK YOU TO OUR MA JOR SPONSORS:

JANUARY 24, 2019

CN&R

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OPINION

Send guest comments, 340 words maximum, to gc@newsreview.com or to 353 E. Second St., Chico, CA 95928. Please include photo & short bio.

EDITORIAL

Why we care about ‘the homeless’ To say the CN&R publishes a lot of articles on home-

lessness is about as obvious as noting the paper comes out on Thursdays. Even the most occasional reader would notice the trend. We consider the plight of unsheltered Chicoans to be one of the city’s biggest problems—a human tragedy that long preceded the Camp Fire. Of course, not everyone agrees. Stories we run on homelessness tend to draw cynical, dismissive, even vitriolic rebuttals. Take the piece in our last issue about Nandi Crosby-Jordan, a Chico State sociology professor, speaking about economic justice (“Identity crisis,” Newslines, Jan. 17). On Facebook, among comments of support, dissenters waved off her message not to classify evacuees as more “deserving” of aid than “predisaster homeless,” and caricatured the latter as drug-addicted panhandlers who’ve chosen life on the streets instead of the hard work of so-called productive citizens. We know who “the homeless” are. We talk to our unhoused neighbors, provide a platform for them to relay their experiences and spend time with them at shelters, sometimes volunteering. We know many are,

in fact, battling addiction. Addiction is a disease and the reason a slice of the homeless population is out in the cold. But that reason isn’t everyone’s. Each homeless person is unique. Weekly readers have come across articles about college students living in cars and working families without housing in our tight rental market. Add women and men escaping abusive relationships, unaware of resources, and the picture becomes clearer: There’s no single type of “homeless person”—and that person could be anyone. Even someone you know. Few live without a roof by choice. A local gadfly, relatively new to Chico, loves to lament all the resources dedicated to what he calls “the homeless industrial complex.” It’s true, homeless people represent just about 10 percent of the population. We and others give them a lot of attention. Why do we care? Because they’re fellow humans. They aren’t obstacles, impediments to a smooth trip across City Plaza or downtown. They need help, even if they can’t ask or don’t ask in the most ingratiating manner. “Love thy neighbor” isn’t a platitude. Ω

GUEST COMMENT

A Chicoan whose legacy lives on AandChico State in 2016, the Chico Heat contacted me asked if I would throw out the first pitch before a few months after being appointed president of

home game that summer. I agreed to do it, and while that in and of itself was thrilling, when I strode to the pitcher’s mound I noticed Steve Nettleton also was there to throw out his own first pitch. I’ve always admired Steve Nettleton and his wife, Kathy, for their selfless community service for the city of Chico and, by extension, Chico State. From their charitable donations to the Boys by Gayle Hutchinson & Girls Clubs of the North Valley and American Red Cross, to the The author American Lung Association and is president the American Cancer Society, the of Chico State. Nettletons sought to help improve life for those in their community. It was the Nettletons’ $2.5 million donation in 1997 to renovate and beautify Ray Bohler Baseball Field on the Chico State campus that helped propel our ballpark

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CN&R

JANUARY 24, 2019

to become one of the finest and most scenic Division II baseball facilities in the nation. Steve and I shared a desire to advance a cause we strongly believe in. For me, that cause is higher education, from leading-edge research and inclusiveness, to preparing our students for life after graduation. For Steve, the cause was philanthropy, and folded within that was, of course, baseball. Rare is the higher education institution that is so intertwined with its wider community as is the case with Chico State and the city of Chico. Steve’s philanthropy strengthened that existing foundation and the result is on display on the west end of our beautiful campus, at Nettleton Stadium. So on that night, when we both took the field in front of a sold-out crowd at a stadium bearing his name, on a campus that means everything to me, we met each other for the first time. After our first pitches, we spoke and he gave me the warmest embrace that confirmed for me that he truly cared for his fellow Chico residents. I’m grateful to have met Steve Nettleton, I’m saddened to have lost him, but his legacy will live on forever. Ω

SECOND & FLUME by Melissa Daugherty m e l i s s a d @ n e w s r e v i e w. c o m

Double down Cue the damage control. After our story last week about the Red Cross’ pending closure of the emergency shelter at the Silver Dollar Fairgrounds and my not-so-subtle criticism of that plan (see “#RedCrossFailure,” Jan. 17), several representatives have contacted me via email to say how great the organization is. One public relations official noted statistics underscoring the organization’s response to the Camp Fire, including how many meals and snacks it has served (223,700) and the number of “contacts” its volunteer mental health, health services and spiritual care professionals have provided (46,000) following the disaster. The message carried this line justifying the closure: “Emergency shelters typically aren’t intended to stay open for long periods of time—that’s why organizations involved in relief efforts strive to help people find more suitable accommodations if their homes are left unlivable after a disaster.” Then there was the reassurance: “Prior to shelter closings, Red Cross caseworkers connect one-on-one with people to create recovery plans unique to their needs, help them navigate paperwork and connect with aid from other community agencies.” The message is two-fold. First, the organization believes its job sheltering folks is done. Second, it’s up to local groups to take over. Therein lies the rub. We know our community. Because of the depth of our reporting, we know there isn’t an adequate fallback plan for the 600 or so individuals at the fairgrounds. We get that the Red Cross can’t run the shelter forever, and we appreciate what it has done thus far, but it’s much too soon to pull out. Two weeks is not sufficient notice for either the folks still living there, or the local service providers who will see the fallout. Indeed, the latter told us last week they had no clue what would happen at the end of the day on Jan. 31. And the Red Cross has just started those aforementioned “one-on-one” conversations (see “Shelter no more,” Newslines, Jan. 17). Our hope was that its officials would reconsider. At points over the past couple of days, rumors circulated they may be doing so. I received emails from two Chico politicos, including City Councilman Karl Ory, indicating the contract at the fairgrounds had been extended into March. As of this newspaper’s deadline, however, that’s not what we’re hearing from Red Cross officials and the county’s spokeswoman. Last week, the executive director of the organization’s local chapter left a voicemail for me. The message said that she found my column “disturbing.” I agree wholeheartedly, although I’m certain we have different takes on what constitutes that descriptor. I’m sure she was referring to my call for readers to put pressure on the organization and to also direct Camp Fire donations to other groups working on relief efforts. What I find disturbing: the potential for hundreds of vulnerable folks to be put onto our streets or into unstable situations in remote locales. What’s also disturbing is that this newspaper is pretty much the only one making any noise about this looming humanitarian crisis. Where’s the outrage? Every single public official connected to Butte County—city leaders, supervisors, state and federal representatives, etc.—ought to be treating this scenario as an emergency. That’s exactly what it is.


LETTERS

Send email to cnrletters@newsreview.com

About the Red Cross Re “#RedCrossFailure” (Second & Flume, by Melissa Daugherty, Jan. 17) and “Shelter no more” (Newslines, by Meredith J. Cooper, Jan. 17): I agree, there is something amiss with the American Red Cross, an organization recently described by NPR and ProPublica as “so consumed with public relations that it hinders the charity’s ability to provide disaster services.” I’ll never understand why we place blind trust in charities with highly compensated administrators (ostensibly serving the poorest of people) and an infatuation with self-marketing. Yet, we do. Fact is: The Red Cross is pulling out of Chico on Jan. 31. This will leave several hundred people without shelter—in addition to the thousands already on edge. In light of this: Why is not one square foot of Chico city land available for use by fire survivors?! I’ve asked this question of the Chico City Council at four meetings since

Nov. 8. Yet, not one FEMA trailer is in place (while tiny Orland has 70 and Gridley is slated for 350). And, we have not one camp site or a single legal parking space available for nighttime use. For years, our city manager— “Skipper,” as Councilman Sean Morgan affectionately calls him— has been getting gold stars from a council obsessed with government minimalism. I hope the Skipper will chart a new course. Patrick Newman Chico

It is easy to find fault with any organization as large as the Red Cross. I am sure it is not always run as efficiently as desired, especially since a large proportion of its workers are volunteers. I have volunteered a few times at the Red Cross shelters both in Orland and Chico and have nothing but admiration for the regular volunteers who sign up for a minimum of two-week stretches at each disaster event. The ones I talked to came from all over the United States

and were probably reimbursed for travel but not paid for their time. So, if the travel expenses are part of the overhead, so be it. Their living quarters are large tents with cots for beds just as the evacuees. Hendrik Feenstra Orland

What’s the job of the Red Cross? It is primarily disaster relief, including providing shelters to evacuees in conjunction with the county. Regardless of what we wish, it is not sheltering the homeless. The Red Cross has shown us that it is possible to muster resources and provide shelter to hundreds. Through intense comprehensive interaction with all who seek shelter at the fairgrounds, hundreds of evacuees at the shelter have been given the financial resources and personal care necessary to relocate. Those in RVs, mostly without hookups, who are not evacuees deserve to be housed, as do hundreds more on our streets and parkways. Other LETTERS c o n t i n u e d

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LETTERS c o n t i n u e d f r o m pa g e 5 nonprofits are scrambling to find winter shelter and the city is and should be supporting those efforts in every way we can. Whether the fairgrounds is made available for shelter through January or February or March, congregate “temporary” long-term shelter is not healthy and will come to an end, and in most cases with better longterm care for those who lost their homes. I would like to acknowledge and state my appreciation for the care and assistance provided by Red Cross during this crisis. Karl Ory Chico

excellence

Editor’s note: Mr. Ory is a member of the local Red Cross advisory board. “The opinion in the letter is my own,” he tells the CN&R.

About the shutdown Science

Theater

Engineering

Arts

Dance

Open Enrollment Now - Jan 31 (530) 891-3090 www.inspirechico.org 6

CN&R

January 24, 2019

Re “Trump’s destructive showdown” (Editorial, Jan. 10): Congress cannot give the president what he is asking for under current conditions. As of today, Jan. 20, 2019, the president is asking for $5.7 billion to construct a wall on our southern border. He has rejected compromise proposals negotiated by both political parties that would fund border security— sometimes in amounts greater than he is now asking for. But because Congress won’t explicitly fund the wall, he has shut down portions of the federal government, denying hundreds of thousands of government employees and contractors their paychecks. (Some will get back pay when government reopens, many will not.) Families and businesses dependent on laid-off workers are also suffering. If the president successfully inflicts sufficient pain on American families that Congress surrenders to his wishes, then democracy itself is compromised. When one person overrules the entire Congress, that person is effectively a dictator—able to force Congress to do his or her bidding by threatening future damage to American families. Giving in to a president under these conditions guarantees similar behavior in the future, and is a large step down the road to the death of democracy in America. Congress must not give in to these tactics. Richard Young Chico

Time to let your representatives know you want them to “deal” with the president on: 1) the barrier—you can call it sealing—on our southern border; 2) deal with the DACA children; and 3) open the government! If you are thinking: “My one email or call won’t make a difference,” you’re wrong. Their staff keeps track of the numbers, yes or no! Also, don’t just make your feelings known to the party of your choice, send your opinions to all our representatives in Washington, D.C. Just so you know: President Trump is in his office waiting for Congress to do something! “It is the duty of a true patriot to protect its country from the government!”—Thomas Paine. Time to be a patriot! Email or write your thoughts to our elected officials. Loretta Ann Torres Chico

Our representative voted against any bill passed in the House to reopen essential branches of the federal government. Why? There are national parks in his district and lots of business owners who are dependent on those visitors’ dollars. Now onto federal workers who have to pay their mortgage/rent on the first. Our fearless representative must be of the same mindset of Trump, who said, “They’ll make adjustments, they always do.” Bring on the new homeless folks. Yes, this is what it comes to; those of you who voted for Trump should’ve seen it coming. He doesn’t pay his contractors either, so take it to court. Wait, they close this week. Oh well, at least Trump loves the “poorly educated.” All this over a wall for a fake crisis made up by a fake president who said Mexico would pay. Frank Oddo Oroville

Remembering Korematsu Jan. 30 is the 100th birthday of Fred T. Korematsu, in whose honor the date has become a California state holiday. Korematsu was an American civil rights activist who refused to go to this country’s incarceration camps for Japanese Americans during World War II. In 1942, after he was arrested and convicted of defying the government’s order, he appealed his case all the way to the Supreme

Court. In 1944, the Supreme Court ruled against him, arguing that the incarceration was justified due to military necessity. Supreme Court Justice Frank Murphy dissented in the case, declaring, “I dissent from this legalization of racism.” This is the first Supreme Court opinion ever to use the word “racism.” Young Korematsu was ordered to join his family in one of the 10 incarceration camps. The displacement and incarceration of all my elders into prison camps resembles what’s currently happening with the Latino immigrant community, those seeking refuge from violence and danger. One of the last things Fred Korematsu said was “protest, but not with violence and don’t be afraid to speak up.” Let’s honor our own immigrant ancestors by welcoming new incoming immigrants. Let’s meet them at our southern border with open arms and hearts. Diane Suzuki Chico

More on POTUS Do we really need a State of the Union speech? For those who have been paying attention, we already know: Our air is descending into filthy skies; our water is the marine life’s nightmare; our natural resources are being auctioned off for pillage; our standing in the world as the beacon of achievement has been darkened; President Trump has turned his back on America to enrich himself. Our Comrade-in-Chief is implementing programs that are benefiting Russia, and a complicit Republican Congress is colluding with him to execute these policies that are undermining our democracy. Corporations and self-serving billionaires are spending millions of dollars to buy politicians who will do their bidding: tax cuts for the rich; dismantle regulations; assault workers’ rights; deny climate change. The president’s cabinet is rife with dishonesty and ignorance. The very foundation of our society is threatened, which undermines the rule of law. We need the corruption removed from the Oval Office and Congress. We need leadership that will stand before the American people and deliver an honest assessment as to the fate of the union. Roger S. Beadle Chico

Questions about Koppers Crickets for Oroville when it comes to toxic debris questions about dumping of the Camp Fire debris in city limits. For days, officials have been ignoring the health and welfare and air quality questions of Orovillians. State Sen. Jim Nielsen and Assemblyman James Gallagher are unavailable; do not return calls regarding the use of the Koppers Superfund site. FEMA, California EPA and the OES are also without comment. The Butte County Air Quality Management District planner twice promised to email me resources and information during telephone calls, but that hasn’t happened. Why truck toxic debris 26 miles? Do cleanup in Paradise. It’s an opportunity to modernize Paradise. The water lines need to be replaced—so why not install underground electricity, phone, cable and sewers at that time, and ensure new construction has state-subsidized solar? Nineteenthousand structures without sewer is shameful. Update Paradise for residents and businesses. The Tubbs Fire lost 5,800 structures 15 months ago. Only 50 structures have been rebuilt. There is no hurry for Paradise. So, why the rush by FEMA, the collusion of the EPA, and crickets from all our elected officials? Thirty years I’ve asked for an air-quality monitor for the county seat. Oroville has not received one. Why? Pam Leis Oroville

Clarification In “Cleaning up a mess” (Newslines, by Meredith J. Cooper, Jan. 10), the state’s soil testing process was oversimplified. Crews test nearby undamaged soil prior to cleanup to set a baseline, then remove debris, then test to ensure soil in the debris area meets the baseline. Contaminants found will prompt further debris removal. Once cleared, a notice—not a certificate— of completion will be provided. We apologize for the confusion. The story has been clarified online.

More letters online:

We’ve got too many letters for this space. please go to www.newsreview.com/chico for additional readers’ comments on past cn&r articles.


STREETALK Rex Stromness Owner/Instructor

What’s your guilty pleasure?

Ashtanga based Vinyasa Yoga

Tom Hess Owner/Instructor

Asked at Chico Mall

Certified Iyengar Yoga Teacher at the Intermediate Level

Add Yoga to your life in 2019! Devin Scouten

Lisa Weber

Classes 7 days a week taught by our dedicated and experienced instructors

clerk

Buying makeup and makeup brushes when I have the money. You can never have too many makeup brushes. I have a Harry Potter set where all of the handles are different wands.

Instructor Yoga Alliance Registered Yoga Teacher (RYT)

Cheri Neal Instructor 250 Vallombrosa, Suite 150 next to Tbar

Yoga Teacher E-RYT, RPYT, LMT

530-342-0100 yogacenterofchico.com

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NEWSLINES DOWNSTROKE ENLOE, ANTHEM RE-EXTEND

Continuing a cycle, Enloe Medical Center and Anthem Blue Cross agreed to a brief extension of their contract for service payments, this time through Thursday (Jan. 31). As reported in the CN&R (“Service interruption,” Newslines, Nov. 8), Enloe and Anthem hit an impasse in rate negotiations and let their contract lapse Nov. 1. After the Camp Fire, they reinstated their previous agreement through Dec. 31, then extended through Jan. 15 and again through Jan. 22. The extension means Enloe will stay “in network” for Anthem’s private-plan subscribers. Coverage for Medicare and Medi-Cal patients remains unaffected by the negotiations.

Warmer welcome

COUNTY SUES PG&E

With PG&E already facing so many claims it’s filing for bankruptcy, Butte County sued the utility for damages from the Camp Fire. The county’s suit, filed Jan. 15 in Butte County Superior Court, asserts that damaged PG&E power equipment started the fire, which was “entirely preventable.” The county does not request a specific dollar amount, but instead seeks compensation for its losses. PG&E faces at least $7 billion in claims from the Nov. 8 fire. It announced Jan. 14 its intention to file for Chapter 11 protection, which it can do Tuesday (Jan. 29), under state law requiring advance notice. An investorowned utility, PG&E said in a news release that it “remains committed” to continuing electric and natural gas service under bankruptcy reorganization, and to “make investments in system safety.”

Torres Community Shelter expands operations to daytime hours

W transitioned to operating 24/7 last weekend, Shelby Lambert knew it would hen the Torres Community Shelter

CRITTENDEN RETRIAL OUT OF COUNTY

Steven Crittenden’s retrial for double-murder charges will take place in Placer County, the site of his first trial, after a local judge decided media coverage would impede a fair trial in Butte County. Superior Court Judge Tamara Mosbarger ruled last Thursday (Jan. 17) that local reporting on the 32-year-old crime has been sufficiently provocative and persistent to influence a wide pool of potential jurors. Similar rationale prompted the original trial’s change of venue. Crittenden (pictured) was convicted of killing a Chico couple, Dr. William Chiapella and Katherine Chiapella, in January 1987, when he was a 19-year-old Chico State studentathlete. Crittenden was sentenced to death, but a federal judge in 2013 cited racial bias in the prosecutor’s exclusion of a black juror. Crittenden, 51, has remained in custody awaiting the new trial. 8

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JANUARY 24, 2019

make a significant difference in her life. Lambert, a 58-yearold with multiple sclerostory and sis, has been a guest at photo by the shelter on and off for Ashiah the past two years. As of Scharaga Saturday (Jan. 19), she as h i a h s @ was one of more than n ew srev i ew. c o m 130 homeless people staying at the facility. “I don’t have to go out in the rain,” she told the CN&R on Monday afternoon. “A lot of times [before], I just went to Barnes & Noble, because I can’t travel far with this walker. … Even on windy, rainy days, I was out in it.” A day center for homeless people is a significant development for Chico, whose service providers historically have offered shelter only during late afternoon and evening hours. Previously at the Torres Shelter, people checked in around 4:30 p.m. each day and were ushered off the site by

6:45 a.m., after breakfast. Torres Shelter Executive Director Joy Amaro said there always has been a desire to provide this access. Now, because of grant funding, the shelter hired the additional staff needed to operate 24/7. The organization has a commitment of $131,000 of the $1 million awarded to local nonprofits by the Walmart Foundation in the wake of the Camp Fire (see “A place for everyone,” Newslines, Dec. 13, 2018). That money was earmarked to help the increased needs of the local homeless population, which includes chronically homeless people as well as evacuees. Indeed, the Torres Shelter already has taken in about 20 people displaced by the wildfire. The funding will keep the new hours operational through November, but Amaro said the shelter is applying for grants to remain open around the clock for as long as possible. The nonprofit’s staff recognizes the difference it can make for its guests, she said. “It’s a place for respite … a place to just be able to breathe for a while, because most homeless are always on the move,” she said. “Now it’s our job to provide that safe envi-

ronment so they can get adjusted to a new norm as we look to move them into stable housing.” To flesh out the shelter’s new daytime hours,

Torres Shelter staff will work on bringing in more formal activities, such as GED certification, cooking, life skills and art therapy classes—“something that really strikes their interest that could help motivate them” to pursue employment opportunities or hobbies, Amaro said. It isn’t just the hours of operation that are changing. The shelter also has started taking in vaccinated, well-behaved pets in an effort to reduce its barriers to those living on the street. In addition to providing dinner and breakfast, the facility now serves lunch. That mid-day meal is prepared by shelter guests who participate in a vocational kitchen program. For shelter guest Ryan Moss, a change like this “would have made all the difference” early last year. At the time, he had a job in which he worked graveyard shifts. Because he had nowhere to sleep during the day, he wandered around, often getting


Shelby Lambert takes a break at the Torres Shelter, where she’s now able to stay during the day.

jostled from businesses. He would be sent away from work sometimes because he was delirious from the lack of sleep. It’s nice not feeling the pressure to be out and about in public, he said, where many homeless people are shunned. And he knows if he lands another job working night shifts—the other fell through after a living situation soured—it’ll be much easier to handle because he will have a place to rest during the day. “I see so much good that could come from it,” Moss said. “It’s a step in the right direction for people who have the drive to grow in this situation.” During the changeover to new hours,

Amaro had planned to transition to a completely low-barrier facility, accepting folks as they are and forgoing drug testing. However, the organization is putting that plan on hold until a better family shelter option is arranged, she told the CN&R. There are four families and 11 children on-site; co-mingling the populations poses safety concerns. The shelter will continue to operate its existing, separate low-barrier program. Meanwhile, its staff has been working with other local service providers to help house or provide emergency shelter to those living at the American Red Cross shelter at the Silver Dollar Fairgrounds, which closes at the end of this month (see “Shelter no more,” Newslines, Jan. 17). The organization also has welcomed the overflow from Safe Space Winter Shelter—about three to 10 people per night. Perhaps the biggest unanswered question is where all of its guests will go long-term. Local housing options have dried up as Ridge residents have sought housing elsewhere in the county. “All I know is that our length of stays are going to be a lot longer,” Amaro said. Currently, the average stay is a little under two months. Since the Camp Fire, the shelter’s case managers have been asking longtime clients if they have friends or family they can stay with, and if they are open to relocating, since local housing options are sparse. “They do get really down and sad because their chance of being housed [locally] is not very high right now,” Amaro said of the shelter’s current guests. “[But] it’s our job to help keep that open mind and not let their hopes fade.” Ω

For the pets Area shelters prepare unclaimed Camp Fire animals for adoption Tamara Yates and her husband, Chris, were

beaming on Tuesday morning (Jan. 22) in the office of the Chico Animal Shelter. They were there to pick up Shadow, a Labrador mix they are taking in through a foster-to-adopt program. Rescued months earlier from fire-charred Concow, the mellow black dog wagged her tail and casually laid down in a sunny spot just inside the entrance. But to hear Yates tell it, that’s a far cry from the dog she met months ago while volunteering at emergency animal shelters established in the wake of the Camp Fire. Back then, Shadow chewed up blankets and even the medical records hanging from her crate, Yates recalled. “She was one of the very, very nervous dogs at the beginning,” she said. Her first contact with Shadow was at the now-closed shelter at the Chico Municipal Airport, but Yates didn’t get to know the dog well until she was moved to another temporary facility in Oroville. What helped calm her was the acupressure Yates is certified to give. Through that treatment, a bond developed. “She basically picked me,” Yates said. Shadow is one of several hundred Camp Fire

pets that, 2 1/2 months after the deadly wildfire, remain unclaimed and are likely to be adopted by the general public.

SIFT ER

According to Lisa Almaguer, Butte County Public Health’s public information officer, approximately 3,000 animals were taken into Butte County Animal Control’s emergency shelters following the disaster. Some were brought by owners or strangers who picked them up during the evacuation. Others came by way of first responders or the North Valley Animal Disaster Group’s animal evacuation teams. Each has been posted on campfire rescuedanimals.com since shortly after the Nov. 8 firestorm, Almaguer said. Still, reunification is proving elusive for many animals, primarily cats. In mid-December, Shadow and the other pets in temporary shelters were transferred to year-round facilities throughout the region, including the Northwest SPCA, Paradise Animal Shelter, Butte Humane Society and Chico Animal Shelter. (Still others are housed at veterinary clinics.)

1. Oregon 2. Illinois

Cali drivers lose out A new study by WalletHub shows that California is the fourth worst state for drivers, at least when it comes to their pocketbooks. Among the criteria considered in the study were cost of ownership and maintenance (California placed 49th out of 50) and traffic and infrastructure (44th). It also ranked 47th for rates of car theft, 42nd for rush-hour traffic congestion, and 49th for gas prices. The silver lining is the Golden State did place well in the final two categories: safety (fifth) and access to vehicles and maintenance (first). Here are the best and worst states to drive in in 2019:

3. Indiana 4. Iowa 5. Texas

50. Hawaii 49. Alaska 48. Washington 47. California 46. New Hampshire

Chico Animal Shelter’s Tracy Mohr pets a tortoise shell cat that likely will be put up for adoption soon. PHOTO BY MELISSA DAUGHERTY

Once at those facilities, the animals were to be held for 30 days. After that, beginning last Friday (Jan. 19), they could be legally adopted, Almaguer said. But that doesn’t mean it’s too late for people to retrieve their beloved pets. According to Tracy Mohr, animal services manager for the Chico Animal Shelter, the city-run facility is working to reunite owners with the dozens of Camp Fire animals in its care, both unidentified and owned animals. That includes, for example, sending letters to the residences at which the animals were picked up. “Our goal is always reunification,” she said. Along those lines, the shelter isn’t charging for the animals’ care. Mohr emphasized that it’s important for pet owners

to communicate with shelter staff, who are willing to be flexible on pick-up dates for those still establishing stable housing. Silence will trigger a letter giving them a date by which to respond. After that, the animals will be screened for health and temperament before being put up for adoption. All of them also must be spayed or neutered. “Legally, they are ours now, so we’re following our standard protocols,” she said. As far as adoptions, the shelter will begin with the animals whose owners have surrendered them. Those interested should check out chicoanimalshelter.org. Dogs are shown only by appointment, she noted. By Tuesday afternoon, Yates said Shadow the Lab mix was settling in nicely at her home in Cohasset. The dog tested positive for heartworm and will have to undergo treatments, but is otherwise healthy. Yates had recently lost her 19-year-old Jack Russell terrier, so the rescuing goes both ways. “This dog has just helped,” she said. “We’re healing each other.” —MELISSA DAUGHERTY me lissad @ newsr ev iew.c o m

NEWSLINES C O N T I N U E D JANUARY 24, 2019

O N PA G E 1 0

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More time for baby Golden State’s new governor backs plan to extend paid family leave Californians who like the idea of

getting more paid time off work to care for a new baby may find good news and bad news in the details of Gov. Gavin Newsom’s proposed budget. The bad news: The proposal is not quite as generous as it initially seemed. It doesn’t call for each worker to get six months of paid leave, as early news coverage implied. Instead, it calls for each baby to get up to six months of care from a family member, dividing the time between two adults each taking a paid leave of two to four months. The good news: That’s still more than the six weeks of partially paid family leave most workers get under current state law. And as a more modest increase, the plan may be more likely to win approval. Not that it will be easy. The proposal foreshadows a pitched battle between labor unions and business interests, both powerful forces in the state Capitol. It’s an expensive proposition—Newsom hasn’t even released an estimate yet—and the plan to pay for it is still in formation. One option is an increased payroll tax, which would

mean taking more deductions from most workers’ paychecks. Even though Democrats hold more than a supermajority in the state Legislature, support for a new tax is not certain. But if successful, a law giving all families six months to bond with a new baby would reinstate California as the nation’s vanguard of progressive family policy, a position that has slipped in recent years. California was the first state in the country to embrace paid family leave when, in 2002, then-Gov. Gray Davis signed the law giving most workers six weeks of partial pay to care for a new baby or sick family member. It now provides low-income workers 70 percent of their wages while on family leave and other workers 60 percent of their pay—funded by a 0.9 percent tax taken out of most paychecks. In addition, women who give birth get an additional six weeks of disability pay. But in the last few years, a handful of blue states have gone further. Massachusetts and Washington passed laws giving 12 weeks of paid family leave, set to go into effect in 2020 and 2021,

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JANUARY 24, 2019

PEOPLE POWER

The third annual Women’s March on Chico drew an estimated 350 to 400 participants on Saturday (Jan. 19) to downtown Chico. PHOTO BY CHARLES FINLAY

respectively. Newsom’s proposal would boost the amount of time California workers can take, though by exactly how much has not been decided. Families likely would split the time between two parents, or a single parent and another family member. By prioritizing a six-month period during which babies would get family care—as About this story: opposed to a It was produced by Cal Matters, an indepenprecise amount dent public journalism of leave for venture covering a worker— California state politics Newsom is and government. Learn reframing more at calmatters.org. paid leave as a health-andeconomic benefit for children and families. “I am committed to this,” he said. “Why? For no other reason: It’s a developmental necessity …. Do you want a parent spending time helping build the architecture of a young child’s brain? Or do you want government to do it for you?” Infant care costs a lot—on average,

more than $13,000 per year in California—so the proposal could save some families money.


How much it would cost workers—or their bosses—remains to be seen, and is certain to be the most controversial aspect of the proposal. “The devil is in the details. How do you fund it? Is there going to be an increase in the payroll tax? That would be a big concern for our members,” said Shawn Lewis, spokesman for the National Federation of Independent Businesses, a lobbying group that represents small companies. The current family leave plan is paid for entirely by workers, through the payroll tax. Labor unions want to see employers pay into the plan as well, said Steve Smith, spokesman for the California Labor Federation. They also want to increase the amount workers receive during leave, arguing that the partial pay under current law forces many low-wage workers to forgo the leave—even though their taxes pay into the fund. “If you are a low-wage worker working two jobs to get by, having your paycheck reduced significantly so you can stay home with your baby just doesn’t work for you,” Smith said. “So those who take advantage of it are on the upper end of the scale.” Democrats in the Legislature have begun introducing bills to give workers full pay during family leave and expand the amount of time off, though the legislation doesn’t yet carry many specifics. Newsom is forming a task force that will examine ways to structure and pay for the expanded leave. “There are a lot of smart people talking about this and figuring out the best way to do it,” said Sen. Connie Leyva, a Chino Democrat who chairs the women’s caucus. “I absolutely think it can get done.” Assembly Republican leader Marie Waldron said Republicans like the idea of giving children more time with their parents, but are concerned about the costs. She called a larger payroll tax “a direct hit to the already strained middle class.” Newsom has expressed interest in a larger overhaul of California’s tax system, including potential changes to property taxes and sales taxes. He said a plan to pay for family leave may become part of a broader tax reform proposal. —LaureL rosenhaLL

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HEALTHLINES Cory Hunt browses Facebook while relaxing on the stoop of his home in Chico.

Emotional stress also can occur when people experience FOMO, or fear of missing out, when they see their friends engaged in activities and feel excluded, Minden said. This also can happen when they compare their lives to others who appear to be happier, healthier and more successful, and feel they cannot measure up. Chico State counselor Stephanie Chervinko told the CN&R that, even if people know that “I’m comparing my blooper reel to everybody’s highlight reel,” their self-esteem still can take a hit. Chervinko has worked with students, for example, who have had difficulty adjusting to college life. When they get on social media and see their friends appearing to have “the time of their life” at their universities, “that can contribute or add to these feelings of, ‘There’s something wrong with me that I’m not having a better experience.’” HEALTHLINES c o n t i n u e d

Social studies New research underscores the addictive nature of online networking story and photo by

Ashiah Scharaga ashiahs@ n ewsrev iew. com

Snect with people. Just ask Cory Hunt. He’s often found himself wrapped up in

ocial media can be a powerful way to con-

online conversations about complex issues. When he is able to find common ground, “there’s nothing like it, that is such powerful medicine to me,” he told the CN&R. “I’ve personally been able to connect with people who haven’t been able to connect with someone like myself, a person of color,” Hunt continued. “With the safety of having the distance of the screen, interacting with people who have troubling ideas and coming out on the other side—where they’re people I consider friends today—I think that’s the powerful side of it.” He knows that’s not always the case, however. Many of his friends have told him they’ve had to take a break from social media because it has become too negative

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of a space for them. What Hunt has noticed compares to what local mental health professionals have seen when it comes to social media. It can be an incredibly valuable tool when it comes to maintaining relationships and making connections, for example. But it also can be used to avoid problems, take people away from more rewarding activities or exacerbate feelings of isolation, jealousy, anxiety and depression. Approximately 88 percent of Americans ages

18 to 29 use social media, according to the Pew Research Center. An overwhelming majority (77 percent) of those ages 30 to 49 use social media as well. Its prevalence has led to dozens of studies analyzing the role social media plays in humans’ lives—two were published earlier this month. One at Texas State University surveyed 504 millennials who regularly use Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and/or Snapchat. Researchers there discovered those who had major depressive disorder showed more negative social media behaviors, scoring

higher on a “social media addiction scale.” They also were more likely to compare themselves to others better off than they were or feel bothered by unflattering photos of themselves. In another study, conducted by Michigan State University, 71 participants took a survey that measured their psychological dependence on Facebook. Ultimately, researchers found the most excessive social media users exhibited the same deficiency in decision-making as gamblers and drug addicts. The reason people use social media is important when it comes to mental health, according to Dr. Joel Minden, a Chico psychologist. He specializes in cognitive behavior therapy for people struggling with anxiety, depression or relationship issues. People with social anxiety, for example, often find that online interactions aren’t always fulfilling and do not give them an opportunity to work on their social effectiveness. In those cases, it can be really detrimental when people rely too heavily on social media to observe and connect with others. “Social media can exacerbate or contribute to problems with anxiety and depression if people use [it] as a way to avoid the activities they might consider pleasurable or meaningful because they’re too uncomfortable to take those risks,” he said. “Sometimes that can really contribute to a sense of isolation … loneliness and depression, and might make symptoms worse.”

o n pa g e 1 5

appointMent

Input sought The Butte County Department of Behavioral Health will host two community forums in Chico to discuss the future use of Mental Health Services Act (MHSA) funding. The MHSA imposes a 1 percent tax on that portion of a taxpayer’s income that exceeds $1 million and allocates the funds to county mental health programs. Behavioral Health annually seeks public input on its MHSA initiatives. The first forum takes place today (Jan. 24) at 11:30 a.m. at the Chico Community Counseling Center (109 Parmac Road, Ste. 1); the second is Jan. 31 at 5 p.m. at the Chico Branch Library (1108 Sherman Ave.). For more information, email mhsa@ buttecounty.net or call 879-3971.


January 24, 2019

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HEALTHLINES

changes that are meaningful and achievable. If social media is interfering with face-to-face contact with friends, for example, Minden encourages people to increase their own accountability: form a study group, meet up with a friend once a week for lunch, make a commitment and stick to it. Instead of scrolling through Instagram or Facebook, plan to devote some of that time to exercising, painting or creating music. Hunt, who creates music and poetry under the name Himp C, said the “addictive nature” of social media is the hardest part for him. “I look up and I’m like, Man, I just burned an hour I could be jammin’,” he said. He tries to be mindful of that, and not get sucked into things he doesn’t enjoy. “It’s always important to think about, What would I like to be doing instead?” Minden added, “and figure out a way to make that happen.” Ω

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Moderation is key, according to Scott Kennelly, assistant director for Butte County Behavioral Health. The more screen time, the more people—particularly young people—can be influenced by what they see, and that can “significantly impact someone and create more depression and anxiety.” He added: “The biggest impact is on kids’ self-esteem and mental health, if they believe too much of what they see on the internet or social media and they take feedback from others—particularly negative feedback—to heart.” Chervinko encourages people to explore what it is they like about social media use, and what isn’t really working for them— “increasing mindfulness and awareness and intentionality” around its use. Sometimes creating a schedule that dictates when to log on, and for how long, can help. Taking a break is sometimes the best option, Minden said. He likes to advocate for small

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GREENWAYS Dan Efseaff, a Snow Goose Festival guide since the first year, plans to show trekkers how the Butte Creek Ecological Preserve is recovering from the Camp Fire.

In full flight Snow Goose Festival sticks to plan for 20th anniversary

story and photo by

Evan Tuchinsky

evantuc hin sk y @ n ewsrev i ew. com

Dthreetheyears Snow Goose Festival. For all but scattered throughout the event’s an Efseaff has many fond memories of

two decades, he’s guided bird watchers and nature seekers on treks through some of the North State’s most breathtaking areas. Last week, gearing up for an excursion he’ll lead through the Butte Creek Ecological Preserve, he was reminded of a particularly personal moment. Carly, one of his triplet daughters, mentioned a photograph showing her holding a hummingbird in a fine-weave net. She was 5, maybe 6, at the time. The bird had been caught as part of a species survey, and just before its release, Carly got the chance to examine the elusive avian. “It’s hard to see a hummingbird,” Efseaff noted. “To have one that close to you is really pretty special.” She’s 18 now, in her first year at Butte College, interested in environmental studies and biology. “It wasn’t just that one event, of course,” her father said, “but I think she has an appreciation for nature—and it doesn’t hurt to have a bird in your hand.” Jennifer Patten, one of the festival’s cofounders, has heard countless such stories. They fuel her. Reflecting just ahead of the 20th installment, which started Wednesday and goes through Sunday, she said her goal has remained to “educate the youth, get the youth excited about what they have outside their door” in and around Butte County. “I feel fortunate to live in such a wonderful, rich birdlife area,” Patten added. “That I’ve actually helped educate thousands of

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people about wintering waterfowl, in all the hard work I’ve done over 20 years, actually gives me goosebumps.” Last year was a record-setter for the Snow Goose Festival with 2,000 attendees. That’s a significant leap from the inaugural event, which drew 150 for a weekend of 12 field trips and six workshops. This year’s encompasses 83 field trips, 13 workshops, three art exhibits and dozens of youth activities. “We started small and grew a little every

“That I’ve actually helped educate thousands of people ... gives me goosebumps.”

—jennifer Patten

year,” said Patten, who felt inspired to start a local festival after attending several major bird watches with her friend Debbie Chakarun. Chakarun worked as a naturalist at the Grey Lodge Wildlife Area in Gridley. Patten volunteered there as a bird guide, plus participated with the Altacal Audubon Society chapter. Once Chakarun secured seed money from the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, they partnered with local environmentalists John Merz, Susan Mason and Marilyn Gamette to establish the Snow Goose Festival of the Pacific Flyway, as it’s formally titled. Event info:

The Snow Goose Festival continues through Sunday (jan. 27). Visit snowgoosefestival.org for the schedule and registration.

Efseaff, working at the time as a restoration ecologist for Chico-based nonprofit River Partners, got recruited to guide a walk along the Sacramento River. “The first year was, ‘Golly, gee-whiz, they need help with field trips,’” he recalled. “We didn’t have a sense of what it could become.” After all the expansion, organizers strongly

considered contraction for the 20th festival. The Camp Fire struck several areas where they’d planned excursions: Butte Creek Canyon and lower Paradise. That seemingly eliminated two treks in the ecological preserve, two by Lime Saddle Marina and a pontoon-boat ride in Lake Oroville launching from Lime Saddle. “After three or four weeks, we started talking to the leaders of these trips, and they said, ‘No, no—we’re going to take people on the route we intended and show them the burned areas,’” Patten said. “‘Let’s see what birds have taken up residence … let’s see what plants have come back just a few months later.’ “So we’re going to Paradise.” She and Kathy Trevino, registration coordinator for the festival, stressed that the routes head into wild areas. “The places they’re going are not where the structures were burned,” said Trevino, a Paradise resident. Efseaff, too, attested to the terrain. He’s director of the Paradise Recreation and Park District, where he’s worked since July 2017, following his departure as Chico’s parks and natural resources director. His field trip Saturday morning— “Explore the Wild Side of Butte Creek”— will spotlight resilience. “Nature has responded,” he said. “There’s an abundance of grasses that have

sprung up. In the spring, all of these species by the creek, they’re made for sprouting. They’re used to being buried or torn up in a flood event, and from the roots they’ll resprout. Same thing happens after a fire.” Bird watchers can check for a wide variety flying overhead and flitting among the trees. His list includes swans, geese, ducks, quail, pigeons, doves, hawks, eagles, herons, vultures—and that’s just in the canyon. Snow Goose Festival excursions extend to Vina, Corning, Lassen Volcanic National Park and Yuba County. Plenty of sites are close: “There are many back roads where you just drive and see 10,000 snow geese in a field,” Patten said, “just 10 minutes out of Chico.” Some field trips’ entryways are, in fact, back roads—susceptible to damage from mass traffic, especially with wet weather. Patten said organizers “very much encourage carpooling … some leaders stress it’s mandatory.” They arrange ride-shares when each trip departs. Preserving their access to farms, ranches and reserves is crucial to providing a wideranging festival. “We feel like we’re one of the leastexplored areas [of the Pacific Flyway],” she said. “People should be aware that our winter birdlife here is incredibly healthy.” Ω

ECO EVENT

Help on Humboldt The old Humboldt Wagon Road was established in 1864 as a toll road connecting Chico and Susanville, an important route for transporting silver and mining supplies. Paralleling Highway 32, Humboldt Road now runs along the defunct trail, where you still can see wagon ruts from over 100 years ago pressed into the earth. Sadly, the road has become a dumping ground for construction debris and household waste due its accessibility and minimal traffic. Every fourth Saturday, Respect the Walls, a community organization, heads out for a cleanup. Join the crew Saturday (Jan. 26) at 9 a.m. to help. Find out more by following Respect the Walls on Facebook.


EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS PHOTO BY VIC CANTU

15 MINUTES

THE GOODS

12-round fitness

Leaders of the pack

Fifteen years ago, Cody Sweet, then 20, was living in San Luis Obispo. He was a big fan of mixed martial arts (MMA) and Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC) legend Chuck Liddell. Liddell happened to train at an MMA gym in the area, so Sweet joined. He ended up falling in love with the sport—so much so that he moved to Thailand to hone his MMA skills and became a trainer there. Sweet eventually moved back to California, graduated from Chico State with a degree in business, and on Dec. 17 opened Sweet Fitness Kickboxing. Over 100 people joined within the first month. Visit his gym at 1390 E. Ninth St., Ste. 170, online on Instagram and Facebook, or call 521-3059.

What sets you apart from other gyms? We offer an awesome, fun, highenergy workout that people love. You can beat the crap out of our heavy bags for 47 minutes, or 12 rounds. People say, “I was in a really bad mood before I got here, but afterward I feel great!” It’s hard to be in a bad mood when you’re exercising to good music in a physically exciting environment. We also have a grand opening special of a free week of classes.

What are your workouts like? People sweat, burn calories and have fun. We have heavy bags, but no actual sparring, so nobody gets punched in the face. We go 12 full rounds of three minutes each, with one minute rest in between. The first two rounds are warm-up exercises, then eight rounds of kickboxing techniques. The last two rounds focus on abdominal exercises. We always try to mix things up and do something new.

What inspired you to start Sweet Fitness? I love being in a gym, interacting socially, and feel I’m really good at making gyms fun and awesome. After I moved back to the U.S., I made plans to open a gym and it evolved into this. I also love to coach, and being a business major with an option

in entrepreneurship, I felt I was really good at marketing.

Can you tell me more about living in Thailand? I had heard that Thailand was a really great place to train for MMA and that it was inexpensive to live there. I loved Bangkok— it’s my favorite city in the world. I stayed five years, then coached Western-style boxing in the Philippines before moving back to the U.S.

What are the main reasons people join your gym? First, they want to get fit and lose weight. Secondly, to have a fun, interesting hobby after work or school. And thirdly, they want to be a part of a group or a community, and make new friends. People don’t get all three at other gyms. —VIC CANTU

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When it comes to succeeding in the workforce, one often is faced with opportunities to rise in the ranks. That’s all fine and good, except a significant number of people moving into management positions have never been trained in leadership. That’s according to stats from CareerBuilder, which in 2011 surveyed employers and workers throughout the U.S. and concluded that 26 percent of managers said they weren’t ready for the added responsibility and 58 percent had never received any management training. Michael DaRe uses those stats to advertise his leadership classes, which are set to begin through the Oroville Adult Education Career & Technical Center next week (Jan. 28). “Teaching leadership is my passion,” DaRe told me by phone. After retiring as a corporate field manager for 7-Eleven, he and his wife moved to Oroville, where he hooked up with the adult education program and last fall launched an 18-week leadership class at its Chico center. “We learned very quickly that 18 weeks is just much too long,” he said, “so we revised everything.” This term, he’ll offer two eight-week management classes—one in Oroville, one in Chico—with others geared toward new managers and retail management specifically set to start later in the year. DaRe says his entry-level courses are great for those with limited educational backgrounds or those hoping to propel their careers. He also says he sees a lot of moms and military veterans looking for refreshers before re-entering the workforce. Interested students can go to orovilleadulted.com for information.

KUDOS The Good Food Awards are given out each January to craft food producers and farmers around the United States as a way to celebrate foods that are “tasty, authentic and responsibly produced.” Congratulations are in order for Lassen Traditional Cider’s Ben Nielsen, who was just recognized for his 2017 Farmhouse Dry. I scanned the list of finalists for familiar names. Forgive me if I missed someone, but the only other local craft foodmaker among them was Chico’s Pacific Culture, a finalist in the “pickles” category for its Kabu Chimayo Turnips. Well done! MOVIN’ ON UP Local chef Mary Chin has been creating pre-prepped meals in Chico through her My Oven’s Meals catering business for a while now and it was time for an upgrade. You can still preorder for the week ($30 minimum), but now you also can find her mobile kitchen, aka “The Box,” when the mood strikes. Chin specializes in fresh, healthy, farm-to-table meals. For more on weekly orders, go to myovensmeals.com and find her on Facebook for where The Box will be parked. PICKIN’ In March, Mike Wolfe and Frank Fritz—you know, those goofy guys who drive around the country digging through people’s old barns on American Pickers—are coming to California. In preparation, they’re putting a call out for potential places to pick. If you think you qualify (must be a private collection, not open to the public), call (800) OLD-RUST or email AmericanPickers@cineflix.com.

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1-800-767-8276 Ask for Rosa! JANUARY 24, 2019

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In sickness and health Since her diagnosis, former Chicoan Pam Montana has become a featured speaker before such groups as the National Alzheimer’s Association.

BY ROBERT SPEER r ob e r tspe e r @ newsr ev iew.c o m PHOTOS COURTESY OF PAM MONTANA AND BOB LINSCHEID

B Former Chico couple say Alzheimer’s diagnosis has given their lives new purpose but doesn’t define them 18

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ob Linscheid remembers exactly when he became convinced that something was seriously wrong with his wife, Pam Montana. It was December 2015, and they were on vacation in Hawaii. He was driving them back to their hotel when Montana asked, “Where are we going?” “Back to the hotel,” he replied, explaining that he needed to take a business call there. Two minutes later, she asked again: “Where are we going?” Again, he told her they were going to the hotel. Two or three minutes passed. Then she asked once more: “Where are we going?”


What is Alzheimer’s disease? At that point, Linscheid pulled off the road, looked her in the eyes and said: “Do you realize you’ve asked me the same question three times in the past seven minutes?” She didn’t remember any of it. Montana’s neurologist referred her to

specialists at UC San Francisco Medical Center. What followed were numerous visits with the doctors and cognitive tests to measure Montana’s memory loss, as well as CT/PET scans and an MRI. Finally, on July 20, 2016, seven months after that roadside conversation, in a UCSF hospital room crowded with research physicians, interns and family members, she received her diagnosis: younger-onset Alzheimer’s disease. She was 61 years old. As Montana later wrote in her blog— titled “My Journey with Alzheimer’s”— in some ways she felt validated. “I knew something was wrong and almost everyone kept saying my symptoms were ‘normal.’ But it’s not normal for a 58-yearold to repeat herself, or to struggle with learning new things, to forget conversations so much so that my role managing a sales team at Intel Corporation became such a huge burden.” For Montana and Linscheid, life had taken a sharp and unavoidable turn. It would never be the same. They have known each other since the

mid-1970s, when Linscheid was student body president at Chico State and Montana worked at the Kopy Kat, the copying center located in the student union. Their paths crossed often, but they didn’t date and after graduation went separate ways. For Montana, that meant the Bay Area and a long career—17 years—at the giant computer chip maker Intel, where she worked her way up to the executive level as director of a sales team. She’s by nature an articulate, outgoing and upbeat woman, and by all accounts she had a gift for inspiring and energizing her large staff. Meanwhile, Linscheid had embarked Montana and her husband, Bob Linscheid, have become dedicated activists since her Alzheimer’s diagnosis in 2016. They are shown here at the 2017 Alzheimer’s Advocacy Forum in Washington, D.C.

on a diverse career in economic development centered mostly in Chico, where, among other things, he was president and CEO of the Chico Chamber of Commerce for seven years. That was followed by 10 years as president and CEO of the Chico Economic Planning Corp., during which time he founded his own consulting firm, Linscheid Enterprises, and played a major role in creating and managing the Chico Heat professional baseball team. In 2005, the California State University Alumni Council elected him to serve on the CSU board of trustees, a position he held for nine years, the last two of them as board chairman. It was the best unpaid job he ever had, he says. This upward trajectory culminated in January 2013, when he was hired as president and CEO of the San Francisco Chamber of Commerce, one of the largest (2,500 members) and most influential organizations of its kind on the West Coast. He had no contact with Montana

Alzheimer’s disease is an irreversible, progressive, terminal brain disorder that slowly destroys memory and thinking skills and, eventually, the ability to carry out the simplest tasks. Some 5.7 million Americans have Alzheimer’s. In most people with the disease—those with the late-onset type—symptoms first appear in their mid-60s. Younger-onset Alzheimer’s occurs between a person’s 30s and mid-60s and is very rare. People with Alzheimer’s have trouble doing everyday things like driving a car, cooking a meal, or paying bills. They may ask the same questions over and over, get lost easily, lose things or put them in odd places, and find even simple things confusing. The time from diagnosis to death varies— as little as three or four years if the person is older than 80 when diagnosed, to as long as 10 or more years if the person is younger. To learn more, go to alz.org, the website of the Alzheimer’s Association, which operates a 24/7 helpline at (800) 272-3900. —ROBERT SPEER

until 2007, when he received, out of the blue, an email from her. She’d seen his picture on the cover of the Chico State alumni magazine and wanted to say hello and offer congratulations. They met for coffee, something clicked, and things took off from there. At that point in their lives both were single after being married twice. He had three sons and a daughter, all grown, and she had two adult daughters. They married in 2012. Life was good then. Linscheid and Montana

were both doing important work that they enjoyed, they were living in a lovely home next to a golf course in Danville, and grandchildren were arriving on the scene. But Montana was starting to notice that she was having memory problems, especially while working. Though she was in sales, she needed to understand the company’s high-tech products, and she was failing at that. Eventually, she realized that she no longer could work and went on medical leave from Intel. And Linscheid, knowing that he couldn’t care for his wife while working long hours in San Francisco, resigned from the Chamber of Commerce. For both of them, leaving jobs they loved was wrenching. “It was the first time in my life that I’d been without employment,” Linscheid said during a recent interview in the couple’s kitchen. “It was scary.” For Montana, leaving behind her many Intel friends was deeply saddening. Linscheid was out of work for eight months. Then he got a call from Jeffrey Armstrong, president of Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo, offering him a job. As a CSU trustee, Linscheid had been on the search committee that hired Armstrong, and the latter was well aware of Linscheid’s wide-ranging and unique experience not only in economic development, but also in higher education. The job Armstrong offered was as a senior adviser on economic development reporting directly to the president. Linscheid also will be the university’s representative to the Diablo Canyon ALZHEIMER’S

C O N T I N U E D O N PA G E 2 0

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F R O M PA G E 1 9

nuclear-power plant’s decommissioning process. Best of all, the job allows him to work at home most days.

Montana is participating in a clinical trial of a new drug that she hopes will counter Alzheimer’s disease. She is shown here getting an infusion.

Prior to receiving her diagnosis,

Montana and Linscheid had kept knowledge of her memory issues largely to themselves in order to protect her privacy and also because they weren’t sure of the cause. Immediately following the diagnosis, and heeding her doctor’s advice that she do “whatever makes you happy,” she decided to go back to work. This time, however, her job would be raising money for Alzheimer’s research and increasing awareness of the disease’s symptoms. Going public was an act of courage. There’s a stigma attached to Alzheimer’s, and many patients withdraw from society. Montana was determined not to do that and, indeed, to wage a public fight against the stigma. She wanted people to know that the stereotypical image of an Alzheimer’s sufferer as a doddering grandma with crippling dementia doesn’t apply to people like her. “This is what

Left: Montana first went public with her disease at an October 2016 Alzheimer’s walk in Chico, where she and her husband formerly lived. Below: Montana with fellow Alzheimer’s activist Maria Shriver.

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Alzheimer’s looks like,” she often says. She began the very next day by joining the advocacy team at the national Alzheimer’s Association. Montana next participated in an Alzheimer’s walk organized by Intel employees in Portland, where she once had worked. A week later she walked in Walnut Creek, raising $16,000, mostly from Intel employees. Her third walk was in Chico’s Bidwell Park, in early October 2016. There, for the first time, she and Linscheid spoke publicly about her disease. Shortly after that walk she began her blog. Here is what Montana wrote about her husband’s speech: “My husband … is my rock and a strong, intelligent and loving man. We are fighting this together and I love his tenacity and strength. But when he got on stage in Chico, which was his home for over 20 years, and publicly said that his wife had Alzheimer’s, he could barely get the words out. His emotions were so raw, and even though we talk about it all the time, it’s not the same as telling 1,000 people that your wife has a terminal illness.” Then, after taking a deep breath, Montana stepped up and told her story. “It was amazing and wonderful and empowering

to publicly share the personal side of this disease,” she later wrote in her blog. “My goal was to raise awareness of the symptoms, and I stressed the importance of fighting for testing if you thought something was wrong.” Little did she know that a video of her speech would be picked up by people involved with Part the Cloud, a major Silicon Valley Alzheimer’s fundraiser. Montana was invited to attend and speak, and while there she met Maria Shriver, who has been crusading against Alzheimer’s for years (her father, Sargent Shriver, died from the disease). That led to Montana’s joining Shriver in testifying before the U.S. Senate Special Committee on Aging, in Washington, D.C. Chico was the beginning of what

has become more than two years of activism on Montana’s part, with major assistance from her husband. She has served on the board of directors of the Northern California/Northern Nevada chapter of the Alzheimer’s Association as well as the board of the national Alzheimer’s Association. She has continued to speak to Alzheimer’s groups, including the National Alzheimer’s Advocacy Forum in Washington, D.C., and the Move for Minds fundraiser in San Francisco, among others. She also has been the subject of several newspaper articles and featured in a number of television shows, including a “Brief but Spectacular” segment on the PBS NewsHour. Montana stays busy. On her blog—now grown to more than 75 entries—she posted a list of a dozen things she tries to do every day to forestall the disease’s progress, from exercising and writing in her journal to meditation and prayer. She spends time with her friends, her kids and her grandchildren. “I do what makes me happy,” she writes, “which may include watching TV or a movie or just sitting outside and looking at the sky.” She has down days but generally remains upbeat. Every moment is precious, she says. “Alzheimer’s does not define me, it does not bring me down,” she writes in her blog. “I have a new purpose in life! I have been given an opportunity to help others and raise awareness and hopefully to help find a cure. What a gift!” Ω


10 early warning signs A

lzheimer’s is a brain disease that causes a slow decline in memory, thinking and reasoning skills. There are 10 warning signs and symptoms. If you notice any of them, don’t ignore them. Schedule an appointment with your doctor.

1. Memory loss that disrupts daily life: Forgetting recently learned information, important dates or events. Asking for the same information over and over and increasingly having to rely on memory aids (reminder notes, etc.). What is a typical age-related change? Sometimes forgetting names or appointments, but remembering them later.

2. Challenges in planning or solving problems: Changes in the ability to develop and follow a plan or work with numbers. Difficulty concentrating, and taking longer to do things than before. What’s a typical age-related change? Making occasional errors when balancing a checkbook.

3. Difficulty completing familiar tasks: Sometimes people with Alzheimer’s may have trouble driving to a familiar location, managing a budget at work or remembering the rules of a familiar game. What is a typical age-related change? Needing help to use the settings on a microwave or record a TV show.

4. Confusion with time or place: People with Alzheimer’s can lose track of dates, seasons and the passage of time. Sometimes they may forget where they are and how they got there. What is a typical age-related change? Getting confused about the day of the week but figuring it out later.

5. Trouble understanding visual images and spatial relationships: Some people with Alzheimer’s may have difficulty reading, judging distance and determining color or contrast, which may cause problems with driving.

What is a typical age-related change? Vision changes related to cataracts.

6. New problems with words in speaking or writing: People with Alzheimer’s may may repeat themselves, struggle with vocabulary, have trouble finding the right word, or call things by the wrong name. What is a typical age-related change? Sometimes having trouble finding the right word.

7. Misplacing things and inability to retrace steps: People with Alzheimer’s may put things in unusual places, lose things, and be unable to go back over their steps to find them again. What is a typical age-related change? Misplacing things from time to time and retracing steps to find them.

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8. Decreased or poor judgment: People with Alzheimer’s may experience changes in judgment or decision-making (e.g., giving large amounts to telemarketers). They may pay less attention to grooming or keeping themselves clean. What is a typical age-related change? Making a bad decision once in a while. 9. Withdrawal from work or social activities: People with Alzheimer’s may start to remove themselves from hobbies, social activities, work projects or sports. What is a typical age-related change? Sometimes feeling weary of work, family and social obligations.

10. Changes in mood and personality: People with Alzheimer’s can become confused, suspicious, depressed, fearful or anxious. They may be easily upset at home, at work, with friends, or in places where they are out of their comfort zone. What is a typical age-related change? Developing very specific ways of doing things and becoming irritable when a routine is disrupted. —RobeRt SpeeR

January 24, 2019

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Arts &Culture “Broken Open: Ghost Cup,”  by Evelyn Ficarra.

THIS WEEK 1078 Gallery exhibit seeks light through the cracks

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THu

Special Events BUTTE COUNTY RESTAURANT WEEK: Rural to urban, valleys to

OspaceGallery’s new Broken Open: Sound/Word/Object exhibit, the looked quiet and empty from the outside. n the gray, rainy afternoon of the opening (Jan. 17) of 1078

As soon as I crossed the threshold, however, I was greeted by a loud “clang” of invisible piano wires being struck. The discordant sound was story and surprising and thrilling, and it was also a photo by Jason Cassidy reminder that things aren’t always what they seem—which, conveniently, is partly what the j aso nc@ three-person show is about. newsrev i ew.c om In the artist statement, it’s explained that, for the exhibit, the three artists—ceramicist Review: Cameron Crawford, poet Elise Ficarra, and Broken Open: Sound/ Word/Object shows composer/sound artist Evelyn Ficarra— through Feb. 10. “demonstrate the results of breaking and openreception: Saturday, ing,” in the process “revealing that the act of Jan. 26, 6-8 p.m. breaking can create an opening to a new form 1078 Gallery or meaning.” And through the expression of 1710 Park ave. multiple mediums—poetry, sound art, video, 433-1043 sculpture and ceramics—they’ve succeeded in 1078gallery.org bringing those revelations to light. Visually, the show’s layout is stark. Crawford’s large ceramic plates are lined up in a row along the long back wall; two small black speakers sit in opposite corners of the room; and tucked onto the small stage are Evelyn’s four multimedia pieces, one in each corner. But the space nonetheless feels busy, as a variety of overlapping sounds—female voices; random piano-string vibrations; and assorted clicking, scraping and cracking—fills the room and draws the listener to its various sources to make sense of each sonic element. Approaching either of the two speakers, the sound layer featuring muffled female whispers gradually clears up to reveal Elise’s hushed voice reciting her “Vessel” poem. The effect is one of eavesdropping on snippets of private thoughts: “Who was I hiding from when I was hiding from you?” “Trouble breathing, trouble breathing …” “History is a nightmare.” 22

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There’s a complementary broadside featuring a portion of the poem, and its opening line—“It is told they came wielding axes and split the vessels”—is a fitting introduction to her sister Evelyn’s sculptures, each of which features items—namely teacups and a piano—that have been broken. Extracted piano keys are discarded in piles, and there are broken teacups everywhere—in a kettle, falling from wires into a ceramic bowl; and in a video being tossed onto piano strings. The clicking, tinkling sounds of the teacups rolling and breaking emanate from the actual items themselves. In “Broken Open: Ghost Cup,” an ill-fated teaset is wired to both play back audio of its demise as well as randomly physically vibrate the teacups in a wooden tray that rests on two chairs. The most individually engaging piece on the stage is “Broken Open: Piano Bench Variations.” A loop of videos is projected onto an open piano bench, and in addition to the image and sounds of teacups hitting the strings, there are scenes of rocks and teacups being tossed and dragged around inside a busted piano. For his part of the show, Crawford hasn’t physically broken anything. What the Chico State ceramics instructor has cracked open via the scenes etched into his large plates is the truth (environmental crises, human rights issues, etc.) beneath the shiny surface of modern society. The layout on the plates is a central image in the middle circle, with additional layers to the story played out in scenes around the rim. Many of Crawford’s pieces feature trains, especially oil tank cars, as on “Three Estates: No Evil,” which has three subway riders in the center looking at, listening to and speaking into cellphones and not seeing, hearing or speaking of the evils around the edges—oil cars on the other tracks, smokestacks spewing pollution, etc. While studying the narratives playing out on the plates, as one moves farther away from the bulk of sounds playing out on stage, the room fills back up with a mix of background noises. It’s both an appropriately busy soundtrack to Crawford’s little industrial worlds, and a return to the unbroken surface. Ω

mountains, Butte County eateries offer bountiful Perfect Pairings. Through Jan. 27. $15-50. Various locations. 918-4584. explorebuttecounty.com

OPEN AND ALTERNATIVE RELATIONSHIP DISCUSSION GROUP: Learn about non-monogamy as a relationship model. Share, learn and listen in an open space to be yourself without judgment. Thu, 1/24, 6pm. Free. Stonewall Alliance Center, 358 E. Sixth St. 893-3336.

SNOW GOOSE FESTIVAL: An action-packed five-day event celebrating the remarkable journey of millions of waterfowl and raptors along the Pacific Flyway that call the Northern Sacramento Valley their home during the winter months. Workshops, activities, banquet and silent auction. Check the website for a detailed schedule. Through Jan. 27. Free. Chico Masonic Family Center, 1110 W. East Ave. 592-9092. snowgoosefestival.org

MaGICIan PETEr SaMELSOn Sunday & Monday, Jan. 27 & 28 Museum of Northern California Art & The Pour House

SEE SunDay & MOnDay, SPECIAL EVENTS


FINE ARTS On nEXT PaGE

Discussion follows the film. $20 suggested donation; nobody turned away due to lack of funds. Fri, 1/25, 7:30pm. Chico Peace & Justice Center, 526 Broadway St.

Music MADONNA - UNCLE DAD’S ART COLLECTIVE: See Thursday. Fri, 1/25, 7:30pm. $15-$26. Laxson Auditorium, Chico State. 898-6333. chicoperformances.com

BraHMS, BraHMS, BraHMS! Saturday, Jan. 26 Zingg Recital Hall

SEE SaTurDay, MUSIC

Theater Theater HAND TO GOD: Robert Askins’ raucous twisted

Music ACE FREHLEY: Considered by those in the know to be KISS’ musical genius, Ace Frehley was an original member of the band when it formed in 1973, and was a mainstay of the group until his departure in 1982 to pursue a solo career. Having written and recorded some of KISS’s most identifiable tunes such as “Cold Gin,” “Shock Me” and “Parasite,” Ace was also known for his blistering riffs and (literally) smoking guitar. Thu, 1/24, 8:30pm. $25. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfalls casino.com

BULGARIAN SONG & DANCE WORKSHOP: Professional Bulgarian singer Rumyana Filkova teaches songs and dances. Thu, 1/24, 6:30pm. Chico Area Recreation & Park, 2320 North Ave.

MADONNA - UNCLE DAD’S ART COLLECTIVE: With amazingly talented local artists and a heavy dose of pop nostalgia, Uncle Dad’s Art Collective presents its tribute show to Madonna Louise Ciccone. Thu, 1/24, 7:30pm. $15-$26. Laxson Auditorium, Chico State, 898-6333. chicoperformances.com

sock puppet comedy centers on the young students of Texas Christian Puppet Ministry. Things take a darkly comic turn when one devout young man’s hand puppet develops a shocking personality that no one could have expected. Thu, 1/24, 7:30pm. $15. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. blueroom theatre.com

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Special Events CELEBRATION OF CHOICE: Commemorate the anniversary of Roe v. Wade and a woman’s right to liberty, equality and economic security with performances from Desiree Dallagaicomo, Erin Lizardo, The Moes Family Band and Hmong Dancers, plus a ceremonial opening by Veronica Saray. Fri, 1/25, 7pm. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St.

MAKING WAVES - REBIRTH OF THE GOLDEN RULE: A short documentary about Quaker peace activists who in 1958 set sail to the Marshall Islandsand influenced public demand to end underwater, atmospheric and outer space nuclear bomb tests in 1963.

HAND TO GOD: See Thursday. Fri, 1/25, 7:30pm. $15. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. blueroomtheatre.com

HELLO, DOLLY!: California Regional Theatre presents an American musical theater favorite that’s entertained audiences for more than 50 years, winning 15 Tonys and three Oscars. Featuring such memorable songs as “It Only Takes a Moment,” “Put on Your Sunday Clothes” and, of course, the title number. Fri, 1/25, 7:30pm. $15.50-$30. CUSD Center for the Arts, 1475 East Ave. crtshows.com

MAMMA MIA!: Bride-to-be Sophie wants nothing more than to have her father at her wedding, but she has no idea which of mom’s three former boyfriends might be the guy. So Sophie invites them all to the festivities at her mother’s Greek isle taverna, and mayhem ensues. The show’s tale of enduring love and friendship features the beloved hit songs of ABBA. Fri, 1/25, 7:30pm. $16-$22. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. chicotheatercompany.com

OUR TOWN: Thirty years after author Thornton Wilder’s death, his play was finally made into an operatic masterpiece with music by Ned Rorem and a libretto by J. D. McClatchy. Revisit the nostalgia of the early 20th century fictional town, Grover’s Corner, set to glorious music. Fri, 1/25, 7:30pm. $6-$20. Harlen Adams Theatre, Chico State, PAC 144. 898-5152. csuchico.edu

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SaT

Special Events CFOL BOOK SALE: Chico Friends of the Library weekly book sale. Sat 1/26, 9am. Chico Branch Library, 1108 Sherman Ave. buttecounty.net

DEBRIS REMOVAL INFORMATION SESSION: Drop-in information available for property owners to learn about the Consolidated Debris Removal program. Ask questions of specific agencies involved in recovery efforts, complete rightof-entry (ROE) forms and more. Sat 1/26, 10am. Free. Terry Ashe Recreation Center, 6626 Skyway, Paradise. buttecounty recovers.org

Music BRAHMS, BRAHMS, BRAHMS!: Explore beloved and lesser-known works by Johannes Brahms in an intimate setting with North State Symphony concertmaster Terrie Baune on violin and audience favorites Carol Jacobson on cello, Dan Nebel on horn and special guest John Chernoff on piano. Sat, 1/26, 7:30pm. $10-$25. Zingg Recital Hall, Chico State, ARTS 279. 898-5984. northstate symphony.org

ERIC PETER & LEANNE COOLEY: Brunch tunes to get your Saturday moving. Sat, 1/26, 11am. La Salles, 229 Broadway St. lasalleschico.com

MADONNA - UNCLE DAD’S ART COLLECTIVE: See Thursday. Sat, 1/26, 7:30pm. $15-$26. Laxson Auditorium, Chico State. 898-6333. chicoperformances.com

Theater HAND TO GOD: See Thursday. Sat, 1/26, 7:30pm. $15. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First

MAMMA MIA!: See Friday. Sat, 1/26, 7:30pm. $16$22. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. chicotheatercompany.com

OUR TOWN: See Friday. Sat, 1/26, 7:30pm. $6-$20. Harlen Adams Theatre, Chico State, PAC 144. 898-5152. csuchico.edu

27

Sun

Special Events ANTHONY PORTER & CLAIRE BRAZ-VALENTINE: Enjoy an illuminating discussion when author-educators discuss their writing workshops with inmates at High Desert State Prison. Sun, 1/27, 2pm. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St.

DEATH CAFE: Having open, honest discussions about death and dying can help alleviate our fears and make educated decisions, and remind us to live life to the fullest. Join us for casual conversations where you are welcome to share your curiosities, hopes, fears and experiences in a safe, judgmentfree environment. Refreshments will be provided. Sun, 1/27, 5:30pm. Free. Butte County Library, Chico Branch, 1108 Sherman Ave. 592-3651.

PETER SAMELSON: Magician puts on so much more than a show, with this presentation of mind-expanding material that will leave you wiser and wonderfully mystified. Sun, 1/27, 7pm. $7-$20. Museum of Northern California Art, 900 Esplanade. monca.org

HELLO, DOLLY!: See Friday. Sat, 1/26, 2pm & 7:30pm. $15.50-$30. CUSD Center for the

aIr PLay

SEE TuESDay, SPECIAL EVENTS

Post your event for free online at www. newsreview.com/calendar, or email the Cn&r calendar editor at cnrcalendar@newsreview.com. Deadline for print listings is Wednesday, 5 p.m., one week prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

St. blueroomtheatre.com

Arts, 1475 East Ave. crtshows.com

Tuesday, Jan. 29 Laxson Auditorium

FrEE LISTInGS!

THIS WEEK COnTInuED On PaGE 24

EDITOR’S PICK

On STaGE Three separate theater productions open this week, putting all of our talented local thespians to work and delighting theatergoers. At Chico Theater Company through Feb. 24 is the fun Broadway fan favorite Mamma Mia!, a show packed with buoyant pop hits by ABBA. In a timely tribute to the late Carol Channing, Chico Regional Theatre performs Hello, Dolly! at the CUSD Center for the Arts through Feb. 3. And Chico State’s Music and Theatre Department presents the opera adaptation of Thornton Wilder’s classic Our Town in Harlen Adams Theatre, transporting you to the white picket fences of Grover’s Corners.

January 24, 2019

CN&R

23


THIS WEEK CONTINUED FROM PAGE 23

Music

FINE ARTS

WEBSTER MOORE: Local songwriter blends funk, R&B, jazz and hiphop. Sun, 1/27, 11am. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

Theater HELLO, DOLLY!: See Friday. Sun, 1/27, 2pm. $15.50-$30. CUSD Center for the Arts, 1475 East Ave. crtshows. com

MAMMA MIA!: See Friday. Sun, 1/27, 2pm. $16-$22. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. chicotheatercompany.com

28

MON

Special Events DEBRIS REMOVAL COMMUNITY MEETING: See Saturday. Mon, 1/28, 6:30pm. Manzanita Place, 1705 Manzanita Ave.

MAGIC MONDAY: An evening of magic, comedy and mentalism await with performers Dean Waters, Stephen Chollet and the amazing Peter Samelson. All proceeds from ticket sales benefit Camp Fire victims. Mon, 1/28, 6pm. $20. The Pour House, 855 East Ave., Ste. 270. eventbrite.com

29

TUE

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Circus and science collide in a gorgeous homage to the power of air. Flying umbrellas, larger-than-life balloons, giant kites floating over the audience and the biggest snow globe you’ve ever seen. Air Play is a circus-style adventure of two siblings journeying through a surreal land of air, transforming the ordinary into objects of uncommon beauty. Tue, 1/29, 7:30pm. $15-$42. Laxson Auditorium, Chico State. 898-6333. chicoperformances.com

DEBRIS REMOVAL COMMUNITY MEETING: See Saturday. Tue, 1/29, 6:30pm. Oroville State Theatre, 1489 Myers St., Oroville.

30

WED

Special Events ADULT CRAFT CLUB: Bring your latest project and connect with other crafters. Wed, 1/30, 10am. Butte County Library, 1820 Mitchell Ave, Oroville. buttecounty.net

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Special Events

JANUARY 24, 2019

Community organizing for police accountability. Wed, 1/30, 6:30pm. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave. of food, fun, education, music and entertainment, plus a talk from author Anthony Peyton Porter. Suggested donation: $10-$35. Wed, 1/30, 2pm. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St.

FOR MORE MUSIC, SEE NIGHTLIFE ON PAGE 26

SNOW GOOSE FESTIVAL Art 1078 GALLERY: Broken Open,

Shows through Feb. 10 Museum of Northern California Art SEE ART

tripartite show from ceramicist Cameron Crawford, poet Elise Ficarra and sound-artist/ composer Evelyn Ficarra. Artist reception Saturday, Jan. 26, 6-8pm. Through 2/10. 820 Broadway St. 1078gallery.org

B-SO GALLERY: Pleasures, culminating BFA exhibition for artist Naomi Herring, translating stories about pleasure and satisfaction into abstract screen prints. Reception Thursday, Jan. 31, 5-6:30pm. Through 2/1. Free. Chico State, Ayres Hall, Room 105, 354-6949.

BLACKBIRD: oni e dakini, surreal mixed media paintings. Through 1/31. 1431 Park Ave.

CHICO ART CENTER: Member Showcase, annual show featuring the artwork of CAC members. Through 2/1. 450 Orange St. chicoartcenter.com

ENLOE CANCER CENTER: Beth Bjorklund, oil paintings in our Healing Art Gallery by Northern California artist. The Enloe Cancer Center, Healing Art Gallery features artists whose lives have been touched by cancer. Through 4/19. Free. 265 Cohasset Road, 332-3856.

JACKI HEADLEY UNIVERSITY ART GALLERY: Aksum Belle: Afterwards, artist and printmaker Jacob Meders is a member of the Mechoopda Indian Tribe. Using book forms, prints, and sculpture, Meder’s work challenges perceptions of place, culture and identity built on the assimilation and homogenization of Indigenous peoples. Through 2/22. Chico State.

MUSEUM OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA ART: Snow Goose Festival, exhibit looks at our remarkable wildlife and habitats along the Pacific Flyway in a variety of media, including sculpture, clay, oils, fiber arts, watercolor, acrylics, mixed media, glass and photography. Opening reception Friday, Jan. 25, 5-8pm with live music, refreshments and a no-host bar. Through 2/10. $5. 900 Esplanade. monca. org

ORLAND ART CENTER: Celebrating the Season, works by Denise Granger Kerbs, plus Magalia watercolorist Lynn Miller, acrylics by Sandy Obester from

Douglas City and Sacramento artist Linda Clark Johnson’s cyanotype and collage images. Through 1/24. 732 Fourth St., Orland. orlandartcenter.com

THE TURNER: Mǝǝmento: Before,

curated from the Turner Collection by Jacob Meders, a member of the Mechoopda Indian Tribe, whose own work is concurrently exhibited at the Jacki Headley University Art Gallery. Meders explains that the linked exhibitions function “as a before and after” that suggests ways to “see, share and learn – to open a dialogue that allows a healing process.” Through 2/22. Chico State. janetturner.org

Museums CHICO CREEK NATURE CENTER: Living Animal Museum & Nature Play Room, learn all about local critters, plants and wildlife. $2-$4. 1968 E. Eigth St. chicorec.com

GATEWAY SCIENCE MUSEUM: From Here to There, explore the science of how things move by land, sea and air. Lift, launch and levitate as you experiment with hands-on learning about gravity, friction and the laws of motion. Ride a hovercraft, adjust wind speed to form fabric into an airfoil, float a sailboat and much more. Also on display are The Foothills, a Glenn E. and Ruth Gray Cunningham Memorial Exhibit, and America’s Wolves: From Tragedy to Inspiration. Through 5/12. $5-$7. 625 Esplanade. csuchico.edu

PATRICK RANCH MUSEUM: Working farm and museum with rotating exhibits open every Saturday and Sunday from 11am to 3pm. 10381 Midway, Durham. patrick ranchmuseum.org

VALENE L. SMITH MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY: Remarkable Lives, exploring the intertwined worlds of birds and humans, in partnership with the Altacal Audubon Society and Snow Goose Festival. Exhibits include bird songs and behaviors, local photography and a robotic recreation of the late Jurassic Archaeopteryx. Through 7/31. 400 W. First St.


SCENE

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on an emotional ride with its intense depiction, or dissection, of universally relatable small-town humanity in the throes by of sexual passion suffused with and Carey Wilson confused by religious fervor. We know things are going to be strange when the play opens on the Review: darkened stage with a monologue Hand to God shows Thursday-Saturday, delivered by a hand puppet thrust 7:30 p.m., through through the backstage curtain. Feb. 2. The seemingly innocent character, Tickets: $15 Tyrone, offers a profanity-laced Blue Room summation of the natural history of Theatre civilization, ending with: “So the 139 W. First St. same motherfucker who invented … 895-3749 virtue, that ballsy piece of pig shit blueroomtheatre.com topped all his previous work and he invented … the devil. [So] when I have acted badly, in order that I may stay around the campfire, all I have to do is say … ‘The devil made me do it.’” Lights come up to show us a small-town church basement. The recently widowed Margery (Samantha Shaner) is there to teach puppet theater techniques to three teenage students—her son Jason (Leif Bramer), who manipulates the puppet Tyrone; their girl-nextdoor neighbor, Jessica (Terra Jones), who operates the buxom Jolene; and Timmy (Joseph Slupski), a slightly older punk who “forgot” his puppet and is there to pursue his crush on Margery and kill time while his mom attends an AA meeting. Playwright Robert Askins’ use of the puppets as a means of allowing his characters to access and express emotions or perceptions that they normally would not

is brilliant. That’s especially true in the case of Jason’s alter ego, Tyrone, who is either a genuine manifestation of supernatural demonic possession or the channel through which the timid and insecure Jason can eloquently express his most transgressive and subversive ideas and observations regarding his companions in the hellish crucible of the church basement. Director Lara Tenckhoff and her cast obviously have put hours of concentrated effort into perfecting their characters. Shaner, one of Chico’s most fearlessly uninhibited actresses, allows the confused vulnerability and barely repressed passion of Margery to emerge in a spectrum of emotions that entwine the audience’s compassion, horror and hilarity. It’s all woven in an inextricable braid as she is pursued with (and rejects) the smarmy comeons of Pastor Greg (Alejandro Padilla), and submits at least momentarily to the urge to get it on with bad-boy Timmy in a scene of explosively physical comedy. Bramer and Jones combine their characters’ adolescent innocence and naivety with the dawning of sexual desire in a scene enacted by their expertly manipulated puppets—to hilarious effect. The mix of comic sexual fiasco, religious satire and humanistic drama in Hand to God is sustained throughout its hour-plus run of nonstop verbal and physical action. In description, and absent any spoilers, the elements may sound a bit random and incohesive. But placed within set designer Amber Miller’s finely appointed Sunday school basement setting; cued by sound designer Joe Hilsee’s introductory soundtrack of classic oldies and country songs; and brought to electrifying life by a thoroughly engaged cast, the play delivers a rollicking and sometimes scary outburst of comic theater that will provoke thoughts and conversations long after the cast takes its final bow. Ω

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CN&R

25


NIGHTLIFE

THurSDay 01/24—WEDnESDay 01/30

25FrIDay

COMEDY NIGHT: Hosted by the marvelous Becky Lynn, with headliner Keith Lowell Jensen, plus featured comics Travis Dowdy, Don Ashby, Chris Smith and Wendy Lewis. Fri, 1/25, 8:30pm. $5. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St.

MaDOnna: unCLE DaD’S arT COLLECTIVE

FLAT BUSTED: Country music in the

lounge. Fri, 1/25, 8:30pm. Gold Country Casino & Hotel, 4020 Olive Highway, Oroville. goldcountrycasino.com

Thursday-Saturday, Jan 24-26 Laxson Auditorium

JACOB NOLAN: Singer/songwriter

SEE THurSDay-SaTurDay

24THurSDay

MADONNA - UNCLE DAD’S ART COLLECTIVE: With amazingly talented local artists and a heavy dose of pop nostalgia, Uncle Dad’s Art Collective presents its tribute show to Madonna Louise Ciccone. Thu, 1/24, 7:30pm. $15-$26. Laxson Auditorium, Chico State, 898-6333. chicoperformances.com

ACE FREHLEY: It’s the Spaceman! Thu, 1/24, 8:30pm. $25. Feather Falls

Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfallscasino.com

BOB KIRKLAND TRIO: Mandolin jazz. Thu, 1/24, 6:30pm. Free. Farm Star Pizza,

SURF NOIR TRIO: Guitarists Miles Corbin and Robert Karch ride the wave with Jerry Morano on percussion. Thu, 1/24, 6pm. Free. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St., 775-0776.

2359 Esplanade, 343-2056.

DOWNTOWN TECHNO: Underground beats from the Perfect Dark crew. Thu, 1/24, 8pm. $7. Naked Lounge, 118 W. Second St.

THUMPIN’ THURSDAY ROCK ’N’ BLUES JAM: Hosted by the Loco-Motive

ERIC PETER: Solo jazz. Thu, 1/24,

6:30pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St.

Band plus special guests. All musicians and music enthusiasts welcome. Thu, 1/24, 7pm. Free. Studio Inn Lounge, 2582 Esplanade, 408-449-2179.

pours his heart out on stage. Fri, 1/25, 7pm. The Exchange, 1975 Montgomery St., Oroville. theexchangeoroville.com

JOHN SEID, LARRY PETERSON & CHRIS WENGER: Tasteful trio performs a wide variety of music during dinner. Fri, 1/25, 6:30pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St.

KOSMIC KEV DJ DANCE PARTY: Shake your booty to help raise money for Safe Space Winter Shelter. Fri, 1/25, 8pm. $5-$10. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

LOCAL SHOWCASE: Indie rockers Similar Alien and The Lizard Brains, ghost hunters Guest No. 66, plus rappers NateyNate and Cornfield. Fri, 1/25, 8pm. $7. The Spirit, 2360 Oro Quincy Highway, Oroville.

MADONNA - UNCLE DAD’S ART COLLECTIVE: See Thursday. Fri, 1/25,

7:30pm. $15-$26. Laxson Auditorium, Chico State, 898-6333. chicoper formances.com

NORTHERN TRADITIONZ: Country band plays classic hits, modern favorites and original tunes in the lounge. Fri, 1/25, 9pm. Gold Country Casino & Hotel, 4020 Olive Highway, Oroville.

OPEN MIC: Tito hosts this regular

event. Backline available. Fri, 1/25, 7:30pm. $1. Down Lo, 319 Main St., 513-4707.

PUB SCOUTS: Traditional Irish music

for happy hour. Fri, 1/25, 4pm. $1. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St.

RAP FOR RELIEF: Local rappers perform during this Camp Fire benefit.

Donations collected at the door. Fri, 1/25, 9pm. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park

SOUL POSSE: Dance band rocks it out, plus wine and pizza available for purchase. Fri, 1/25, 6pm. Almendra Winery & Distillery, 9275 Midway Road, Durham., 828-8040.

TENNESSEE RIVER: Seven-piece band

pays tribute to Alabama. Fri, 1/25, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfallscasino.com

Art Show

Feb. 28–March 3, 2019 1078 Gallery

Chico needs you. And the Chico News & Review wants to celebrate your strange, freaky, bizarre, unique approach to making art! Submissions are now being accepted for the sixth annual Keep Chico Weird Art Show, happening Feb. 28-March 3 at the 1078 Galley. (No talent show this year, but we are looking for a few performers to entertain the weirdos during the reception, March 2.)

NOW ACCEPTING ENTRIES! ▼ Art in all mediums is eligible ▼ Must be 18-over to submit Deadline for submissions is Jan. 31, 2019.

For more info and updates visit:

keepchicoweird.com or facebook.com/keepchicoweird 26

CN&R

January 24, 2019

Knock! Knock! Get ready to party. Eschewing many of EDM’s overused production gimmicks, The Knocks prove they just want to get down on their latest album, New York Narcotic, which features collaborations with Big Boi, Foster the People and Method Man. Yes, you’ll still get your big drops and auto-tuned vocal passages, but the duo embraces pop, disco and humor to great effect. Cath ’em live at the Senator Theatre with Young & Sick and Blu Detiger on Tuesday, Jan. 29.

Ave. tackleboxchico.com

d ir e W o ic h C p e e 2019 K Dearest weird artists ...

WHO’S THErE?

TYLER DEVOLL: Happy hour music with local singer/songwriter. Fri, 1/25, 4pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

26SaTurDay

AMANDA GRAY: Talented and prolific

singer/songwriter performs country, Americana and more. Sat, 1/26, 7pm. The Exchange, 1975 Montgomery St., Oroville.

BLACKED OUT: EDM and bass with Brian Brotano (Chicago), Otter, Xim, Bionix and GenrÆssassiN. Sat, 1/26, 9pm. $10. The Spirit, 2360 Oro Quincy Highway, Oroville.

DECKS & DRUMS: Late happy hour featuring Cootdog and Riley. Sat, 1/26, 9:30pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St. lasalleschico.com


THIS WEEK: FInD MOrE EnTErTaInMEnT anD SPECIaL EVEnTS On PaGE 22

27SunDay 30WEDnESDay

Wayfairy

WayFaIry, MECHanICaL GOLDFISH, TEEny nyMPH & L.S.G. Saturday, Jan. 26 Blackbird SEE SaTurDay

MIKE SHERM: Bay Area fire-spitter EMO NIGHT: DJs spinning Taking Back Sunday, Fall Out Boy, Panic! at the Disco, My Chemical Romance and more. Sat, 1/26, 8pm. $10-$12. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

ERIC PETER & LEANNE COOLEY: Duo performs an eclectic mix of music for your dining pleasure. Sat, 1/26, 6:30pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St.

FLAT BUSTED: See Friday. Sat, 1/26, 8:30pm. Gold Country Casino &

Hotel, 4020 Olive Highway, Oroville. goldcountrycasino.com

FOLK PUNK: Six-piece Oakland group Wayfairy swings from mournful to riotous. Plus, Mechanical Goldfish, Teeny Nymph and L.S.G. Sat, 1/26, 7pm. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

HIGH NOON: Country music featuring four-part vocal harmonies and journeys into Southern rock, blues and beyond. Sat, 1/26, 8:30pm. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfallscasino.com

brings the hip-hop action to Chico. Sat, 1/26, 7:30pm. $20. El Rey Theater, 230 W. Second St. elreychico.com

NORTHERN TRADITIONZ: See Friday. Sat,

THE BIDWELLS & KEVIN BRIGGS: Sweet

name your Bon Jovi tribute act? We’re going with Blaze of Glory, mostly cuz Young Guns 2 and Lou Diamond Phillips! Sat, 1/26, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

RUNNING IN THE SHADOWS: Fleetwood

MADONNA - UNCLE DAD’S ART COLLECTIVE: See Thursday. Sat, 1/26,

UP TO 11: Hard rock and metal cover

7:30pm. $15-$26. Laxson Auditorium,

Mac tribute act, scarves and all, plus more classic rock favorites. Sat, 1/26, 8pm. Unwined Kitchen & Bar, 980 Mangrove Ave. unwinedchico.com

SURF NOIR KINGS: Original Surf Music with Miles Corbin, Robert Karch, Mark Wilpolt and Jerry Morano. Wed, 1/30, 6:30pm. Free. Izakaya Ichiban, 2000 Notre Dame Blvd., 342-8500.

ERIC BACHMANN: The lead singer of Crooked Fingers and Archers of Loaf performs with his full acoustic band at someone’s house. Visit the website for details and tickets. Sun, 1/27, 8pm. $30. undertowshows.com

OPEN MIC COMEDY: Get your free

hosts of the Tritonia radio show hit the stage to shake the body electric. Wed, 1/30, 8pm. $25. El Rey Theater, 230 W. Second St. elreychico.com

TRIVIA NIGHT: Trivial questions

for serious people. Wed, 1/30, 8pm. Woodstock’s Pizza, 166 E. Second St.

FrEHLEy’S COMET

comedy fix when locals test their mettle on stage. Got some new material? Signups start at 8pm. Sun, 1/27, 9:30pm. Free. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

1/26, 9pm. Gold Country Casino &

TRITONAL: Austin, Texas, DJ duo and

the lounge. Wed, 1/30, 6pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St. hoteldiamondchico.com

voices and savory guitar stylings. Sun, 1/27, 3pm. Secret Trail Brewing Company, 132 Meyers St., Ste. 120. secrettrailbrewing.com

Paul Daniel “Ace” Frehley comes to Feather Falls Casino tonight (Jan. 24) for a dose of no-frills, knock-it-out rock ’n’ roll. A self-taught musician, The Spaceman was KISS’ original lead guitarist until 1982 and did another run with the band in the late ’90s. Along with original drummer Peter Criss, Frehley finally left the band in frustration after their infamous Farewell Tour. You’ll hear some KISS classics as well as solo material from the Rock & Roll Hall of Famer.

29TuESDay

Hotel, 4020 Olive Highway, Oroville.

LIVIN’ ON A PRAYER: What would you

THE BIDWELLS: Local duo performs in

THE KNOCKS: Production duo B-Roc

and JPatt kick out anthemic dance tunes and laid-back vibes with Young & Sick and Blu Detiger. Tue, 1/29, 8:30pm. $20. Senator Theatre, 517 Main St. jmaxproductions.net

tunes. Sat, 1/26, 9pm. Studio Inn Lounge, 2582 Esplanade.

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27


REEL WORLD

FILM SHORTS Due to the Monday holiday, not all film listings were updated as of press time. Please check with theaters for up-to-date information.

Reviewers: Bob Grimm and Juan-Carlos Selznick.

Opening this week The Kid Who Would Be King

A modern-day kid finds King Arthur’s legendary Excalibur sword and, possessing newfound powers, joins forces with a crew of classmates and the wizard Merlin to try and stop an evil sorceress from taking over the world. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

Serenity

A neo-noir thriller starring Matthew McConaughey as a fishing boat captain living on a tropical island whose ex (Anne Hathaway) tracks him down and asks him to murder her current husband (Jason Clarke). Also starring Djimon Hounsou and Diane Lane. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

4

Stan & Ollie

See review this issue. Pageant Theatre. Rated PG-13 —J.C.S.

another fine mess

Now playing

4

The Favourite

A fond look back at iconic slapstick duo

Sand,from the golden age of Hollywood and the first arguably, the greatest and most indelible comedy

tan Laurel and Oliver Hardy were two great comedians

team in movie history. Reruns of their films, dozens of shorts and more than 20 features were ubiquitous in the first few by decades of television, and they Juan-Carlos Selznick have long been ranked among the comedy greats of the silent movie era (alongside Charlie Chaplin, Buster Keaton, Harold Lloyd, Harry Langdon, etc.). Their work together flourished through much of the 1930s, the first decade of the sound era, Stan & Ollie Starring John C. as well. In the 1940s, after their reilly and Steve break with Hal Roach Studios, Coogan. Directed by their films and careers slid markJon S. Baird. Pageant edly downhill, but with the help Theatre. rated PG-13. of all those reruns on TV, their popularity stayed strong and maybe even kept growing. Stan & Ollie, written by Jeff Pope and directed by Jon S. Baird, takes up a tale from the pair’s later years, with particular focus on a 1953 tour of shows undertaken by the two of them across the British Isles, when both were in their 60s and hoping to generate some much-needed income and maybe work out a deal for one more movie as well. Baird, Pope and a very good cast (with Steve Coogan and John C. Reilly shining in the title roles) have come up with mixtures of comedy and pathos that serve both as a fragmentary kind of biopic and as a latter-day Laurel and Hardy movie, a wistful sort

4

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CN&R

January 24, 2019

of retrospective that finds moments of surprisingly strong sentiment in the tentative notion that those two aging comic icons were in a sense saved by the mystique of the characters they played, together, in all those movies. Baird and company seem genuinely attached to every aspect of the film’s subject matter, and there is modest wisdom in the lightness of touch that prevails over nearly everything in this seriocomic enterprise. But the movie’s chief saving grace resides in matters of performance and characterization. Reilly, with at least some help from costume and makeup, is a brilliantly immersive incarnation of Oliver Hardy, and while Coogan’s Stan Laurel is more in the vein of skillful impersonation, it too is mimicry of a very high order. The actors’ wives, tiny Shirley Henderson as Lucille Hardy and the imperious Nina Arianda as Ida Kitaeva Laurel, are contrasting comic shrews with amusingly mismatched temperaments. The film’s versions of comedy mogul Hal Roach (Danny Huston) and iconic farceur Jimmy Finlayson (Keith MacPherson) seem well cast and smartly played. And Rufus Jones is a superb blend of devious charm and genial evasiveness as the glad-handing, double-dealing agent and producer Bernard Delfont. Ω

Tragedy intertwines with farce in the portrait of Queen Anne (Olivia Colman), who is simultaneously a figure of obvious pathos and surprising resilience. And that portrait is further intensified via her attachments to Lady Sarah (Rachel Weisz) and the no longer well-to-do Abigail (Emma Stone), two resourceful strivers who find themselves in increasingly fierce competition for status as the Queen’s “favourite.” Each of the three is a kind of flawed heroine, at one point or another. Colman is superb as Queen Anne, but Weisz and Stone also deliver exceptional work in strikingly nuanced roles. Feather River Cinemas. Rated R —J.C.S.

3

Green Book

Mahershala Ali and Viggo Mortensen start in this feel-good movie about race relations in America that goes light on the grit and heavy on the sentiment. Based on a true story, it starts off with Tony Lip (Mortensen), an Italian-American bouncer who gets a gig as a driver and bodyguard for Dr. Don Shirley (Ali), a black classical pianist who is touring the Deep South. It’s a road movie, with Tony driving and Don sitting in the back seat. The two use the book of the movie’s title—a guide offering a listing of safe havens for black travelers in segregated Southern states—to find places where Don can find shelter and eat. Things get ugly when Don tries to do such mundane things as buy a suit or eat in a restaurant where he’s been hired to play. Tony steps in for his boss during these racially charged episodes, and occasionally cracks a few skulls. As his eyes are opened to the realities of life for Dr. Don, Tony learns lessons about loving people no matter the color of their skin and perhaps about how to drop fewer racial slurs before the credits roll. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R —B.G.

4

Shoplifters

1 2 3 4 5 Poor

Fair

Good

Very Good

Excellent

A richly humane social drama that seems simple and direct at first, but grows—gradually and irresistibly—into something far more complex, surprising, grimly honest, and mysteriously moving. The chief characters

are, in spirit if not in fact, a family—two adult parent figures, a young adult daughter, and a couple of pre-adolescent kids. The adults have jobs of one sort or another, but they live in very meager circumstances. As such, they might be taken as mere textbook examples of “the working poor.” But they are also, quite distinctively, a family of shoplifters, and the teamwork and carefully orchestrated maneuvers of their thievery gives them a zesty connectedness—a strong but unconventional kind of family bond, in other words. The first half has an almost picaresque flair to it, rather as if the family of shoplifters were immersed in a semi-comic adventure and winning small victories of rebellion against an unjust social system. But in the second half, harsher realities and moral pungencies start coming home to roost. Pageant Theatre. Rated R —J.C.S.

5

Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse

No movie adaptation has captured the rush of reading an exciting comic book like this blast of energy from directors Bob Persichetti, Peter Ramsey and Rodney Rothman. They go for broke with a seamless mixture of visual styles—hand-drawn and computer animated—and the story is pretty great, to boot. Teenager Miles Morales (voiced by Shameik Moore) is bitten by a strange spider and then, with his newfound powers in effect, crosses paths with the original Spider-Man, Peter Parker (Chris Pine). Turns out a portal from a parallel universe has opened up, allowing a whole fleet of different Spider-Verse characters to come into his orbit—the older Peter B. Parker (the invaluable Jake Johnson), Gwen Stacy (Hailee Steinfeld), SpiderHam (a mishmash of Spidey and Porky Pig voiced by John Mulaney), Peni Parker (Kimiko Glenn) and her robot and, best of all, Nicolas Cage as the black-and-white Spider-Man Noir. So, Miles is one of many heroes with Spider powers tasked with battling bad dudes. Spider-Verse is surely one of the best movies of the year and the best Spider-Man movie to date. Cinemark 14. Rated PG —B.G.

Still here Aquaman

Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

Bumblebee

Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13.

A Dog’s Way Home

Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

Escape Room

Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13.

Glass

Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

Mary Poppins Returns

Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

The Mule

Cinemark 14. Rated R.

On the Basis of Sex

Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13.

Ralph Breaks the Internet Cinemark 14. Rated PG.

Replicas

Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

Second Act

Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13.

The Upside

Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.


CHOW

When life gives you lemons ...

NO.

It Is A Complete sentenCe

Make limoncello! And other citrus-y treats

IIt ready to drop their flavorful goodness for us to enjoy. can be intimidating, however, to figure out what to

Serving Butte, Glenn & Tehama Counties

342-RAPE

24 hr. hotline (Collect Calls Accepted) www.rapecrisis.org

t’s citrus season in Chico, with all the trees dropping or

do with so many lemons—or mandarins, oranges, etc. A few weeks ago, a woman in one of my Facebook groups offered boxes full of Meyer lemons from her yard and I jumped on it, promising some edible treats in return. First I wanted to make limoncello, an Italian liquer; I’d story and made it last year to rave results. I photos by Meredith J. didn’t want to waste the flesh of Cooper the lemons, however, so I decided to also try my hand at lemon curd. mer ed i thc @ newsrev i ew.c om Between the two, it was timeconsuming and labor-intensive, but oh so worth it. (I refrigerated the lemons for a few days between projects, which helped.) So, go out and pick a few—or a lot—and make some homemade lemon treats yourself! Limoncello 10 lemons 1 liter strong vodka (Everclear or 100 proof recommended) 3 cups white sugar 4 cups water

First, wash—even scrub—your lemons. Then zest them. This is by far the most time-consuming part. I recommend using a veggie peeler to carefully remove the rind, avoiding as much pith as possible (pith makes it bitter). I had more lemons than I could count, so I bought a couple 1.75-liter bottles of vodka and split the rinds between them. Some recipes call for pouring the mixture into a separate container, but I just emptied a half cup or so of the vodka from each bottle and dropped the peels right in. Let sit for at least a week at room temperature or below (not in the refrigerator). When ready, create a simple syrup by adding sugar to water in a saucepan and bringing to a boil for 15 minutes, or until sugar has incorporated. While mixture is cooling, strain vodka and remove peels. Once syrup is cool, add to vodka. Let sit for two to three weeks at room temperature or below. Once ready, freeze and then A mini lemon meringue pie enjoy! Also makes made with fresh lemon curd. great gifts.

Lemon peels steeped in vodka, the first step to making homemade limoncello.

Lemon curd (adapted from a recipe by David Lebovitz) 1/2 cup freshly squeezed lemon juice lemon zest, as desired 1/3 cup sugar 2 large egg yolks 2 large eggs pinch of salt 6 tablespoons unsalted butter, cubed

Squeeze lemons into a bowl, using a strainer to keep seeds out. I had enough juice to quadruple the recipe, with some left over that I poured into ice cube trays for later use. After using the peels for limoncello, I saved about one lemon’s worth and zested that, adding the zest to the juice. More zest equals a brighter lemon flavor. In a large metal bowl, add the sugar, salt, eggs and yolks to the lemon juice and whisk. (I eventually switched to a hand mixer, as recipe calls for about 10-15 minutes of whisking.) Place sauce pan with water on stove and bring to a boil. Set heat to simmer and place metal bowl on top (to create a double boiler). Add butter cubes to the mix and whisk until melted. Bring heat up to medium and continue to whisk until mixture thickens and begins to hold its shape. Take off heat, press through a strainer to remove the zest, and cover with plastic wrap, ensuring plastic touches curd. Allow to cool. Enjoy! I used the curd to make a batch of mini lemon meringue pies, which were delicious, and bottled the rest. It’ll keep about a week in the fridge or a year in the freezer. I gifted one bottle to the woman who gave me the lemons and froze the rest. Ω

JANUARY 24, 2019

CN&R

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CN&R 

January 24, 2019

businEss oFFiCEs hours: Monday – Friday (excluding holiday) 10a-6pm butte/glenn: 530-891-1331 or 877-452-9588 @ 2889 Cohasset road, suite 2 Chico, Ca 95973 tehama: 530-529-3980 Calling from Corning: 530-824-3980 @ 725 pine street, red bluff, Ca 96080


You should be getting it once a week.

ARTS DEVO by Jason Cassidy • jasonc@newsreview.com

I wonder If It’s stIll there? At some point early in arts dEVo’s senior

shock me! ace Frehley’s show tonight (Jan. 24) at Feather Falls Casino is sold out! I do not have one of those tickets. My very first album was alive ii by Kiss. When I was 8 years old, my parents enrolled in one of those mail-order record clubs with the introductory offer of 11 albums for a penny, and they let me make one of the selections. Since double-albums counted as one choice, I randomly picked the KISS one. That choice turned out to be the beginning of, well, basically everything for me. Like a scene out of some cheesy coming-ofage movie, I sat in front of the record player with my headAce phones on and was lifted out of that tiny apartment and into a fantasy world where 8-foot-tall demons spit fire and a spaceman played a guitar with such intensity that smoke billowed forth. From that moment on I was a rocker, concerned with little more than listening to records and going to shows (and eventually playing guitar and writing songs) from that day to this day. I chose Ace “The Spaceman” Frehley as my favorite character, and my mom made a super-sweet homemade costume so I could be Space Ace for Halloween. And today, even though most of the charm of KISS has worn off for me (dig the anthemic crowd-pleasers, not so much the crass cheesiness and misogyny), I still enjoy Frehley’s contributions—his melodic guitar riffs and way-cool relaxed vocals on the rare tracks he sang. And he’s still at it, having released a new solo album (titled Spaceman, naturally) that retains the gritty guitar and glam-rock swagger that he’s known for. If you got tix, it promises to be a killer show! Ω

n e w s r e v i e w . c o m

year at Central Valley High school (in what is now the city of Shasta Lake), one of his fellow Falcons had the inspired idea to fling a slice of American cheese through the air inside the cafeteria. His spiral was so true that the limp square took off like a tiny helicopter in a vertical trajectory that sent it straight up to the ceiling, where it landed with a slap in the middle of one of the acoustic tiles some 20 feet above. To everyone’s amazement, the gummy cheese product stuck there for the rest of the day. And the next day. And every day for months. To say that I was pleased at this development is an understatement. Every day, just as the sun would rise, so too would my shining orange star, never fading. Seriously, it never dulled, cracked or got moldy. And I got no end of enjoyment from its presence, saying out loud or in my head upon viewing it: “I can’t believe it’s still there!” I’ve always gotten a cheap thrill from such out-of-place oddities, and I’m always on the lookout for them. When they show up, I make it a point to check in on them regularly because the thrill only intensifies the longer they endure. For example, as soon as the leaves started falling this past autumn, I made it a point to cruise by the Chico Unified school district office near my house to see if the bear and dog were still there. And sure enough, high up in the branches of two tall trees out front are the white stuffed puppy and red teddy bear that some smartasses tossed up there more than three years ago! They’ve survived wind and rain and the heat of intense summers, and discovering them entirely intact each year when the leaves are out of the way makes me shout with excitement. Go see for yourself. And if you know of any other trivial attractions in town, please share.

310346_4.9_x_5.4.indd 1

1/17/19 12:02 PM

The Chico News & Review is now accepting entries for the 2019 Poetry 99 contest.

POETRY Submit your poems— 99 words or fewer—today!

99

Online and email entries preferred: Submit at www.newsreview.com/poetry99, or send to poetry99@newsreview.com. Please specify Poetry 99, age and division—Adult, High School (grades 9-12), Junior High (grades 6-8), Kids (fifth grade and younger)—in the subject field. And for all divisions except “Adult” please include age.

DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSIONS: WEDNESDAY, MARCH 6, AT 11:59 P.M. For submission guidelines, visit www.newsreview.com/poetry99 January 24, 2019

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31


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY For the week oF January 24, 2019 ARIES (March 21-April 19): We might

initially be inclined to ridicule Stuart Kettell, a British man who spent four days pushing a Brussel sprout up 3,560-foot-high Mount Snowden with his nose. But perhaps our opinion would become more expansive once we knew that he engaged in this stunt to raise money for a charity that supports people with cancer. In any case, the coming weeks would be a favorable time for you, too, to engage in extravagant, extreme or even outlandish behavior on behalf of a good or holy cause.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): The Taurus

guitar wizard known as Buckethead is surely among the most imaginative and prolific musicians who has ever lived. Since producing his first album in late 2005, he has released 306 other albums that span a wide variety of musical genres—an average of 23 per year. I propose that we make him your patron saint for the next six weeks. While it’s unlikely you can achieve such a gaudy level of creative self-expression, you could very well exceed your previous personal best in your own sphere.

by rob brezsny numbers or strength.” We see its presence in the modern English, French and Italian word “crescendo.” In accordance with astrological omens, I have selected crescere and its present participle crescentum to be your words of power for the next four weeks. May they help mobilize you to seize all emerging opportunities to come forth, spring up, grow, thrive, swell and increase in numbers or strength.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): When

animals hibernate, their metabolism slows down. They may grow more underfur or feathers, and some add extra fat. To conserve heat, they may huddle together. In the coming weeks, I don’t think you’ll have to do what they do. But I do suspect it will be a good time to engage in behaviors that have a resemblance to hibernation: slowing down your mind and body; thinking deep thoughts and feeling deep feelings; seeking extra hugs and cuddles; getting lots of rich, warm, satisfying food and sleep. What else might appeal to your need to drop out of your fast-paced rhythm and supercharge your psychic batteries?

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Novelist Ar- SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): thur Conan Doyle created Sherlock Holmes, a fictional character who personifies the power of logic and rational thinking. And yet Doyle was also a devout spiritualist who pursued interests in telepathy, the occult and psychic phenomena. It’s no surprise that he was a Gemini, an astrological tribe renowned for its ability to embody apparent opposites. Sometimes that quality is a liability, and sometimes an asset. In the coming weeks, I believe it’ll be a highly useful skill. Your knack for holding paradoxical views and expressing seemingly contradictory powers will attract and generate good fortune.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): In 2006, a

176-year-old tortoise named Harriet died in an Australian zoo owned by “Crocodile Hunter” TV personality Steve Irwin. Harriet was far from her original home in the Galapagos Islands. By some accounts, evolutionary superstar Charles Darwin picked her up and carried her away during his visit there in 1835. I propose that you choose the long-lived tortoise as your power creature for the coming weeks. With her as inspiration, meditate on questions like these: 1. “What would I do differently if I knew I’d live to a very old age?” 2. “What influence that was important to me when I was young do I want to be important to me when I’m old?” 3. “In what specific ways can my future benefit from my past?” 4. “Is there a blessing or gift from an ancestor I have not yet claimed?” 5. “Is there anything I can do that I am not yet doing to remain in good health into my old age?”

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): John Lennon

claimed that he generated the Beatles song “Because” by rendering Beethoven’s “Moonlight Sonata” backwards. Even if that’s true, I don’t think it detracts from the beauty of “Because.” May I suggest you adopt a comparable strategy for your own use in the coming weeks, Leo? What could you do in reverse so as to create an interesting novelty? What approach might you invert in order to instigate fresh ways of doing things? Is there an idea you could turn upside-down or inside-out, thereby awakening yourself to a new perspective?

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): The Tsonga

language is spoken by more than 15 million people in southern Africa. The literal meaning of the Tsonga phrase I malebvu ya nghala is “It’s a lion’s beard,” and its meaning is “something that’s not as scary as it looks.” According to my astrological analysis, this will be a useful concept for you to be alert for in the coming weeks. Don’t necessarily trust first impressions or initial apprehensions. Be open to probing deeper than your instincts might influence you to do.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The old Latin verb crescere meant “to come forth, spring up, grow, thrive, swell, increase in

When people tell me they don’t have time to read the books I’ve written, I advise them to place the books under their pillows and soak up my words in their dreams. I don’t suggest that they actually eat the pages, although there is historical precedent for that. The Bible describes the prophet Ezekiel as literally chewing and swallowing a book. And there are accounts of 16th century Austrian soldiers devouring books they acquired during their conquests, hoping to absorb the contents. But in accordance with current astrological omens, I suggest that in the next four weeks you acquire the wisdom stored in books by actually reading them or listening to them on audio recordings. In my astrological opinion, you really do need, for the sake of your psychospiritual health, to absorb writing that requires extended concentration.

CN&R

January 24, 2019

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CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

Among the top “how to” search inquiries on Google are “how to buy Bitcoin,” “how to lose belly fat fast,” “how to cook spaghetti in a microwave” and “how to make slime.” While I do think that the coming weeks will be prime time for you to formulate and launch many “how to” investigations, I will encourage you to put more important questions at the top of your priority list. “How to get richer quicker” would be a good one, as would “how to follow through on good beginnings” and “how to enhance your value” and “how to identify what resources and allies will be most important in 2019.”

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AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): A

motivational speaker and author named Nick Vujicic was born without arms or legs, although he has two small, unusually shaped feet. These facts didn’t stop him from getting married, raising four children and writing eight books. One book is entitled Life Without Limits: Inspiration for a Ridiculously Good Life. He’s a positive guy who has faith in the possibility of miracles. In fact, he says he keeps a pair of shoes in his closet just in case God decides to bless him with a marvelous surprise. In accordance with current astrological omens, Aquarius, I suggest you make a similar gesture. Create or acquire a symbol of an amazing transformation you would love to attract into your life.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): About 11

percent of the Philippines’ population is comprised of Muslims who call themselves the Bangsamoro. Many of them resist being part of the Philippines and want their own sovereign nation. They have a lot of experience struggling for independence, as they’ve spent 400 years rebelling against occupation by foreign powers, including Spain, the United States and Japan. I admire their tenacity in seeking total freedom to be themselves and rule themselves. May they inspire your efforts to do the same on a personal level in the coming year.

www.RealAstrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888.

32

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as 3-D CONSTRUCTION at 1530 Mulberry #B Chico, CA 95926. DENNIS JOSEPH DIETZ 1530 Mulberry #B Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: DENNIS DIETZ Dated: December 31, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001566 Published: January 10,17,24,31, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BEACON RESULTS at 1536 Bird St Oroville, CA 95965. AMY ANN CHRISTIANSON 1195 Hill View Way Chico, CA 95926. DARLENE LOUISE DURAN-WALSH 1536 Bird St Oroville, CA 95965. MICHAEL WARREN WALSH 1536 Bird St Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: MICHAEL W. WALSH Dated: December 7, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001475 Published: January 10,17,24,31, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as DESTINY DESIGNS at 2126 Durham-Dayton Hwy G Chico, CA 95938. KELLY MARIE TIPTON 2126 Durham-Dayton Hwy G Chico, CA 95938. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: KELLY M. TIPTON Dated: January 2, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000001 Published: January 10,17,24,31, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PLAN WELL LIVE WELL at 140 Amber Grove Chico, CA

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95973. PHILLIP J MOTTINI 8885 Providence Lane Granite Bay, CA 95746. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: PHILLIP J. MOTTINI Dated: December 10, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001466 Published: January 10,17,24,31, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BUTTE NATURAL DISTRIBUTING at 2063 Top Hand Dr Chico, CA 95928. RICHARD LEWIS CSER 2063 Top Hand Dr Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: RICHARD CSER Dated: January 2, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000004 Published: January 10,17,24,31, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as NASCERE VINEYARDS at 3471 Durham Dayton Hwy Chico, CA 95928. NESSERE VINEYARDS LLC 3471 Durham Dayton Hwy. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed; VANESSA PITNEY, OWNER Dated: January 3, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000019 Published: January 10,17,24,31, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BW WELDING at 3486 Padre Lane Chico, CA 95973. BETSY MARIE WEISGERBER 3486 Padre Lane Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: BETSY MARIE WEISGERBER Dated: January 4, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000023 ublished: January 10,17,24,31, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as MASSARI GRAPHICS at 484 E. 5th Street Chico, CA 95928. KATHERINE DOLLINGER 484 E. 5th Street Chico, CA 95928. DANIEL MASSARI 484 E. 5th Street Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: KATHERINE DOLLINGER Dated: January 4, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000020 Published: January 10,17,24,31, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ENLIVEN DIGITAL MARKETING, THE AWOKEN WITCH at 2375 Notre Dame Blvd., #10 Chico, CA 95928. ADRIANA MARIE LOPEZ 2375 Notre Dame Blvd., #10 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by

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an Individual. Signed: ADRIANA LOPEZ Dated: January 7, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000028 Published: January 10,17,24,31, 2019

FICTITOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CHICO CURBSIDE TAXI at 2337 Ritchie Circle Chico, CA 95926. CHRISTOPHER R MURPHY 2337 Ritchie Circle Chico, CA 95926. ELIZABETH J MURPHY 2337 Ritchie Circle Chico, CA 95926. This busines is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: CHRIS MURPHY Dated: January 2, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000005 Published: January 10,17,24,31, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as EPIC TIE DYES at 1129 Nevada Ave Oroville, CA 95965. ROBERTA ANNA POWELL 1129 Nevada Ave Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ROBERTA ANNA POWELL Dated: January 7, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000030 Published: January 17,24,31, February 7, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as GORDO BURRITO at 1295 E 8th St Chico, CA 95928. URIARTE GORDO BURRITO, INC. 2301 Bar Triangle St Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: JOSE J URIARTE, SECRETARY Dated: January 9, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000045 Published: January 17,24,31, February 7, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as RYON FAMILY PARTNERSHIP at 7225 Durnel Road Nelson, CA 95958. JANET L HEWITT 7229 Durnel Drive #53 Nelson, CA 95958. PATRICIA J JONES 15953 Katydid Lane Magalia, CA 95954. ELIZABETH A ROLLAND 5179 Woodside Ct Carmel, IN 46033. CHARLES H RYON 7229 Durnel Dr #81 Nelson, CA 95958. EDWIN E RYON 7229 Durnel Rd #888 Nelson, CA 95958. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: PATRICIA J. JONES Dated: January 7, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000027 Published: January 17,24,31, February 7, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as THROUGH AND THROUGH

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HOME INSPECTIONS at 854 Virginia St Chico, CA 95928. RICH ALLEN MORARRE 854 Virginia St Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: RICH MORARRE Dated: January 11, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000062 Published: January 17,24,31, February 7, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as JOHNSON STORAGE at 405 Panama Ave Chico, CA 95973. L & B JOHNSON FAMILY LIMITED PARTNERSHIP 405 Panama Ave Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Limited Partnership. Signed: RYNE JOHNSON Dated: January 11, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000064 Published: January 17,24,31, February 7, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as NAIL FABULOUS SALON at 2055 Forest Ave Suite #2 Chico, CA 95928. LYNAE BEGBIE 1661 Forest Ave #186 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: LYNAE BEGBIE Dated: January 8, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000037 Published: January 17,24,31, February 7, 2019 FICTIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BRENDAN PROPERTIES at 3355 Shallow Springs Terrace Chico, CA 95928. DAVID A LANDECK 3355 Shallow Springs Terrace Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: DAVID A LANDECK Dated: January 8, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000039 Published: January 17,24,31, February 7, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as WILD COUNTRY COURIER at 23 Ranchita Way Chico, CA 95928. CATHY ATKINSON 23 Ranchita Way Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: CATHY A. ATKINSON Dated: January 14, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000070 Published: January 24,31, February 7,14, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as SNACKING VENDING at 467 E 9th St Chico, CA 95928. CAMERON WADE MATTEUCCI 467 E 9th St Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: CAMERON MATTEUCCI Dated: January 11, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000063 Published: January 24,31, February 7,14, 2019


FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CHICO CREEK SIGNS at 195 E Shasta Ave. Rear Bldg Chico, CA 95973. BENJAMIN LLOYD ANDERSON 408 Weymouth Way Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: BENJAMIN L. ANDERSON Dated: January 15, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000078 Published: January 24,31, February 7,14, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ACORNS TO OAKS DAYCARE at 93 St. Francis Dr Chico, CA 95926. SHANNON FAE SIVADON 93 St. Francis Dr Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: SHANNON SIVADON Dated: January 16, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000087 Published: January 24,31, February 7,14, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as RUSTIC SHEARS at 225 Main Street, Suite E Chico, CA 95926. BONNIE SUE PATTERSON 539 Castle Drive Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: BONNIE PATTERSON Dated: January 15, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000081 Published: January 24,31, February 7,14, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CAST AND CUSTOM METAL FABRICATION INC., CAST AND CUSTOM WELDING at 1384 Durham Dayton Highway Durham, CA 95938. CAST AND CUSTOM METAL FABRICATION INC. 1384 Durham-Dayton Hwy Durham, CA 95938. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: BRETT PRUETT, OWNER Dated: December 26, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001550 Published: January 24,31, February 7,14, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as STRUCTURAL SOLUTIONS at 2176 Esplanade Chico, CA 95926. JEREMY PEARCE 12 Creekwood Court Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JEREMY PEARCE Dated: January 14, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000072 Published: January 24,31, February 7,14, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as 432 at 1929 Mangrove Ave Chico, CA 95926. ALEXANDRA KRIZ 555 Vallombrosa Ave #48 Chico, CA 95926. JAMES ANTHONY SPALLINA III 702 Mangrove Ave #125 Chico,

this Legal Notice continues

CA 95926. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: JAMES SPALLINA Dated; January 16, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000089 Published: January 24,31, February 7,14, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as IRON STATE PRESS at 978 Salem St., Unit B Chico, CA 95928. ALEC MARTIN BINYON 978 Salem St., Unit B Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ALEC BINYON Dated: January 18, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000105 Published: January 24,31, February 7,14, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PARADISE SALON at 1600 Mangrove Ave Ste 140 Chico, CA 95926. TERRI L COOPER 830 Alynn Way #A Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: TERRI L. COOPER Dated: January 3, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000013 Published: January 24,31, February 7,14, 2019

NOTICES ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner MICHELLE RENEE FOX filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: MICHELLE RENEE FOX Proposed name: MICHELLE RENEE MACKENZIE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: February 20, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: December 20, 2018 Case Number: 18CV04044 Published: January 3,10,17,24, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner LILLIAN GEORGE filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: LILLIAN GEORGE Proposed name:

this Legal Notice continues

ZHI DI LILLIAN GEORGE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: March 6, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: December 20, 2018 Case Number: 18CV04096 Published: January 3,10,17,24, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner ROBERTA PAYNE filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: J. R. PAYNE Proposed name: IZO C. HOSFER THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: February 20, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: December 18, 2018 Case Number: 18CV03894 Published: January 10,17,24,31, 2109

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner MELISSA ANN GAMETTE filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: MELISSA ANN GAMETTE Proposed name: MELISSA ANN GEORGE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing

this Legal Notice continues

to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: February 27, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: December 28, 2018 Case Number: 18CV04157 Published: January 10,17,24,31, 2109

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner CHARLES STEPHENS filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: CHARLES STEPHENS Proposed name: CHARLES KELLY THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: February 20, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: December 31, 2018 Case Number: 18CV03413 Published: January 17,24,31, February 7, 2109

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner LAURA LIZETTE ARRIAZA filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: LAURA LIZETTE ARRIAZA Proposed name: LAURA LIZETTE HOLGUIN THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: March 13, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER

this Legal Notice continues

Dated: January 16, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00144 Published: January 24,31, February 7,14, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner CYNTHIA MARIE CAMPAGNA filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: CYNTHIA MARIE CAMPAGNA Proposed name: CINZIA MARIE CAMPAGNA THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: March 6, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: January 9, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00067 Published: January 24,31, February 7,14, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner ANDREA NARCISO filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: WARNER BURKE ALLEN Proposed name: WARNER BURKE ALLEN NARCISO THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: March 13, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: January 9, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00062 Published: January 24,31, February 7,14, 2019

PLAINTIFF’S CLAIM AND ORDER TO GO TO SMALL CLAIMS COURT NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: DEBORAH SUE DONNELLY YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIF: MICHAEL SCOTT DONNELLY

this Legal Notice continues

The plaintiff claims the defendant owes $9875.00 You and the plaintiff must go to court on the trial date listed below. If you do not go to court, you may lose the case. If you lose, the court can order that your wages, money, or property be taken to pay this claim. Bring witnesses, receipts, and any evidence you need to prove your case. The plaintiff’s claim is available for examination in the file kept by the court. Court date: February 15, 2019 Time: 8:30am Dept: TBA The name and address of the court is: Superior Court of California, County of Butte 1775 Concord Avenue Chico, CA 95928 SMALL CLAIMS COURT Dated: December 28, 2018 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Case Number: 17SC03158 Published: January 3,10,17,24, 2019

SUMMONS SUMMONS NOTICE TO RESPONDENT ANTHONY BUNCE You are being sued by plaintiff: JANET DONNELLY You have 30 calendar days after this Summons and Petition are served on you to file a Response (form FL-120) at the court and have a copy served on the petitioner. A letter, phone call, or court appearance will not protect you. If you do not file your Response on time, the court may make orders affecting your marriage or domestic partnership, your property, and custody of your children. You may be ordered to pay support and attorney fees and costs. For legal advice, contact a lawyer immediately. Get help finding a lawyer at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courts.ca.gov/selfhelp) at the California Legal Services website (www.lawhelpca.org), or by contacting your local county bar association. FEE WAIVER: If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the clerk for a fee waiver form. The court may order you to pay back all or part of the fees and costs that the court waived for you or the other party. The name and address of the court are: Superior Court of California, County of Butte 1775 Concord Avenue Chico, CA 95928 The name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner’s attorney, or the petitioner without an attorney, are: MICHAEL M. ROONEY/ JEFFREY MONSELL 1361 Esplanade Chico, CA 95926-4900 (530) 345-5678 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Dated: November 2, 2018 Case Number: 18FL02331 Published: January 24,31, February 7,14, 2019

PETITION NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE CARMELITA A. LANTZ (also known as CARMELITA ANN LANTZ, CARMELITA ANN CESSNA LANTZ) To all heirs and beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may

this Legal Notice continues

otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: CARMELITA A. LANTZ, CARMELITA ANN LANTZ CARMELITA ANN CESSNA LANTZ A Petition for Probate has been filed by: SUSAN L. LANTZ and LINDA L. RAK in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: SUSAN L. LANTZ and LINDA L. RAK be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: February 19, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: NICOLE R. PLOTTEL 466 Vallombrosa Ave. Chico, CA 95926 (530) 893-2882 Case Number: 19PR00030 Dated: January 17, 2019 Published: January 24,31, February 7, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE CAROL SUZANNE ZEIMIS, aka CAROL S. ZEIMIS, CAROL S. TEN NAPEL To all heirs, beneficiaries,

this Legal Notice continues

creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: CAROL SUZANNE ZEIMIS, aka CAROL S. ZEIMIS, CAROL S. TEN NAPEL A Petition for Probate has been filed by: VINCENT STERLING ZEIMIS in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: VINCENT STERLING ZEIMIS be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: February 19, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: TBA Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: DIRK POTTER Jacobs, Anderson, Potter & Chaplin 20 Independence Circle Chico CA, 95973 (530)342-6144 Case Number: 19PR00033 Dated: January 17, 2019 Published: January 24,31, February 7, 2019

January 24, 2019

CN&R

33


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Homes Sold Last Week ADDRESS

TOWN

128 Brookvine Cir 3379 Summit Ridge Ter 2283 Burlingame Dr 1452 Creekhaven Pl 180 Eagle Nest Dr 26 Lobelia Ct 1933 Preservation Oak Dr 481 Silver Lake Dr 1281 E Lindo Ave 3194 Sespe Creek Way 822 Black Walnut Way

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico

34

CN&R

January 24, 2019

Butte County is Experiencing an Extreme Housing Shortage! It is great to time sell - give me call to see if the time is right for YOU

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PRICE $916,575 $804,650 $786,500 $764,720 $677,600 $629,200 $617,705 $607,750 $605,000 $574,750 $532,400

BR/BA 4/3 3/3 4/3 4/3 2/3 4/2 3/3 3/2 3/2 3/2 4/2

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Sponsored by Century 21 Select Real Estate, Inc. SQ. FT. 3303 2599 2110 2814 2907 1916 2102 1904 1692 1867 1800

ADDRESS

TOWN

3270 Sierra Springs Dr 2605 Chantel Way 1991 E 8th St 141 Delaney Dr 1393 Lucy Way 6 Plaza Way 438 Black Oak Dr 2170 Talbert Dr 1631 Sherman Ave 105 Delaney Dr 758 Lindo Ln

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico

PRICE $531,190 $514,250 $508,200 $482,790 $465,850 $459,800 $459,800 $451,330 $441,650 $441,650 $435,600

BR/BA 3/2 4/2 3/2 3/2 4/2 5/3 3/3 4/2 9/3 3/2 3/1

SQ. FT. 1904 1773 1575 1503 1402 2130 1846 1746 2824 1496 1575


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The following houses were sold in Butte County by real estate agents or private parties during the week of January 7 - January 11, 2019 The housing prices are based on the stated documentary transfer tax of the parcel and may not necessarily reflect the actual sale price of the home. ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

SQ. FT.

ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

SQ. FT.

1 Carson St

Chico

$434,390

6/4

2100

3561 Clark Rd

Oroville

$719,950

4/3

2200

352 Panama Ave

Chico

$399,300

3/3

1285

4972 Par Four Way

Oroville

$605,000

4/3

2603

30 Glenshire Ln

Chico

$389,015

3/3

1324

5648 Old Olive Hwy

Oroville

$477,950

4/3

1981

1727 Arcadian Ave

Chico

$387,200

3/1

1390

5 Short Ave

Oroville

$470,690

3/2

1492

1090 E 8th St

Chico

$349,690

2/1

902

220 Riverview Dr

Oroville

$431,970

3/2

1734

2504 White Ave

Chico

$333,960

3/1

960

5313 Mount Ratchel Ct

Oroville

$410,795

3/2

2391

1224 Whitewood Way

Chico

$326,700

3/2

1242

178 Moms Ln

Oroville

$350,900

3/2

1440

38 Franciscan Way

Chico

$312,180

3/2

1156

14 Oak Hill Dr

Oroville

$338,800

3/3

1918

951 Cleveland Ave

Chico

$298,265

3/2

1062

9939 Ahart Rd

Oroville

$320,650

3/2

1340

649 Royce Ln

Chico

$231,110

3/2

1652

11 Parkwood Dr

Oroville

$301,290

3/2

1260

555 Vallombrosa Ave #55

Chico

$211,750

2/1

857

3647 Sunview Dr

Paradise

$605,000

3/3

2852

January 24, 2019

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h c n u l y a frid 15

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