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CHICO’S FREE NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY VOLUME 42, ISSUE 10 THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 2018 WWW.NEWSREVIEW.COM

PROJECT

CENSORED The year’s top 10 underreported stories

4 VOTIN’ TIME!

10 COP ON TRIAL

PAGE

20

29 BLACK BOX FREAK SHOW


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november 1, 2018


CN&R

INSIDE

Vol. 42, Issue 10 • November 1, 2018 OPINION

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Editorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Second & Flume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 This Modern World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Streetalk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

NEWSLINES

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8

Downstroke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Sifter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9

HEALTHLINES

12

Weekly Dose. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

GREENWAYS

Eco Event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS

COVER STORY

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ARTS & CULTURE

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16 18

15 Minutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18 The Goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18

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Our Mission: To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. Editor Melissa Daugherty Managing Editor Meredith J. Cooper Arts Editor Jason Cassidy Contributing Editor Evan Tuchinsky Staff Writer Ashiah Scharaga Calendar Editor Nate Daly Contributors Robin Bacior, Alastair Bland, Michelle Camy, Vic Cantu, Bob Grimm, Howard Hardee, Miles Jordan, Mark Lore, Landon Moblad, Brie Oviedo, Ryan J. Prado, Juan-Carlos Selznick, Ken Smith, Robert Speer, Cathy Wagner, Carey Wilson Managing Art Director Tina Flynn Creative Services Manager Christopher Terrazas Web Design & Strategist Elisabeth Bayard Arthur Ad Designer Naisi Thomas Custom Publications Designer Katelynn Mitrano Director of Sales and Advertising Jamie DeGarmo Advertising Services Coordinator Ruth Alderson Senior Advertising Consultants Brian Corbit, Laura Golino Advertising Consultant Autumn Slone Office Assistant Jennifer Osa Distribution Director Greg Erwin Distribution Manager Mark Schuttenberg Distribution Staff Ken Gates, Bob Meads, Pat Rogers, Larry Smith, Placido Torres, Jeff Traficante, Bill Unger, Lisa Van Der Maelen, David Wyles

Music feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 This Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Fine Arts listings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Scene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Nightlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Reel World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Chow. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Arts DEVO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Brezsny’s Astrology . . . . . . . . . . . . 39

CLASSIFIEDS

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REAL ESTATE

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ON THE COVER: ILLUSTRATION BY ANSON STEVENS-BOLLEN

President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Director of Nuts & Bolts Deborah Redmond Director of People & Culture David Stogner Director of Dollars & Sense Debbie Mantoan Nuts & Bolts Ninja Norma Huerta Project Coordinator Natasha vonKaenel Payroll/AP Wizard Miranda Hansen Accounts Receivable Specialist Analie Foland Developer John Bisignano System Support Specialist Kalin Jenkins N&R Publications Editor Michelle Carl N&R Publications Associate Editor Laura Hillen N&R Publications Writer Anne Stokes Marketing & Publications Consultants Steve Caruso, Joseph Engle, Elizabeth Morabito, Traci Hukill, Celeste Worden 353 E. Second Street, Chico, CA 95928 Phone (530) 894-2300 Fax (530) 892-1111 Website www.newsreview.com Got a News Tip? (530) 894-2300, ext 2224 or chiconewstips@newsreview.com Calendar Events cnrcalendar@newsreview.com Calendar Questions (530) 894-2300, ext. 2243 Want to Advertise? Fax (530) 892-1111 or cnradinfo@newsreview.com Classifieds (530) 894-2300, press 2 or classifieds@newsreview.com Job Opportunities jobs@newsreview.com Want to Subscribe to CN&R? chisubs@newsreview.com Editorial Policies: Opinions expressed in CN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons, or other portions of the paper. CN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or review materials. Email letters to cnrletters@newsreview.com. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form and to edit them for libel. Advertising Policies: All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes the responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. CN&R is printed at PressWorks Ink on recycled newsprint. Circulation of CN&R is verified by the Circulation Verification Council. CN&R is a member of Chico Chamber of Commerce, Oroville Chamber of Commerce, Downtown Chico Business Association, CNPA, AAN and AWN. Circulation 38,650 copies distributed free weekly.

NOVEMBER 1, 2018

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Send guest comments, 340 words maximum, to gc@newsreview.com or to 353 E. Second St., Chico, CA 95928. Please include photo & short bio.

EDITORIAL

VOTE ★ 2018 ★

Endorsements

by Melissa Daugherty m e l i s s a d @ n e w s r e v i e w. c o m

Chico City Council: Rich Ober, Scott Huber and Alex Brown This election is a pivotal one for Chico. The conservative majority of the last four years has done a great disservice to the community—from its lack of progress on homelessness to its inability to foster civil discourse—and we were determined to endorse those we believe are best suited to change the city’s course on these and other important issues. Rich Ober, Scott Huber and Alex Brown are the three progressives in the field. All are smart, articulate and openminded. They have the temperament and willingness to serve all constituents—regardless of politics or economic status—and seek out best practices and data-driven approaches, rather than the knee-jerk ideological reactions that have divided the community of late. It’s true that the council will switch to a liberal majority if just one of the aforementioned candidates is elected to the seven-member panel. We’re endorsing all three because they have the innovative ideas, experience and will to move the city forward. Measure S (term limits): No Mandates a two-year hiatus for Chico City Council members elected to three consecutive terms. The idea is that it will bring “fresh blood” to the council. Our question: at what cost? Historical knowledge and wisdom gained from experience are key to effective government. Moreover, taking away voters’ choice is fundamentally anti-democratic.

provide a critical service to ailing kids, especially those with special needs who are enrolled in state programs, such as Medi-Cal, which provides abysmal reimbursement rates. Prop. 5 (portable Prop. 13): No. Allows older and disabled homeowners to keep their lower property tax rate no matter how many times and where they move in the state. It would take money from public schools. Prop. 6 (gas and vehicle tax repeal): No. Repealing the lawmaker-enacted fuel tax and vehicle fees means California’s crumbling transportation infrastructure—from highways to bridges to local streets—would not get the maintenance it desperately needs. Prop. 7 (daylight saving time): Yes. Puts Californians closer to getting rid of that antiquated time tradition. The goal is to switch to daylight saving time year-round. However, that effort hinges on congressional approval, so this is just the first step. Prop. 8 (dialysis clinic profit pruning): Yes. This one pits unions against two major dialysis companies raking in enormous profits from private insurers. There’s a complex gambit at play here, and the end result is increased insurance rates and insurers pulling out of health care exchanges. The measure caps the companies’ revenues. Prop. 10 (expanded rent control): Yes. Repeals a law that widely prohibited rent control. It’s not a housing crisis cure. Rather, it allows local government to take up the issue. Prop. 11 (paramedic break time): Yes. Makes a special exception in the labor code for private company EMTs and paramedics that requires them to remain on call during paid breaks, as a matter of public safety. This has long been the case, but a recent state Supreme Court ruling put companies at risk of lawsuits. Prop. 12 (farm animal welfare): Yes. Mandates that eggs sold in the state are produced by cage-free hens, starting in 2022. Additionally, mandates sales of veal and pork products are from animals that were not confined.

State

Federal

The Nov. 6 ballot is packed with important contests, from the local to the federal level. The CN&R editorial board has done its homework to make the following endorsements. Note: We are not weighing in on every race. As always, we urge voters to research candidates and issues and come to their own conclusions.

Local

Governor: Gavin Newsom Our choice is less an endorsement of the current lieutenant governor and more a rejection of his challenger. Republican John Cox has spent nearly two decades in the Midwest waging failed efforts to become a high-ranking public official. The change of scenery doesn’t change the fact that he’s not qualified for the job. Prop. 1 ($4 billion affordable housing bond): Yes. We need additional housing now, especially for low-income residents. This is one tool to get us there, and a quarter of the funding is earmarked for veterans. Prop. 2 (mental health money for housing): Yes. Allows $2 billion to be borrowed for use on supportive housing for mentally ill individuals with repayment from revenues collected via the voter-approved Mental Health Services Act. Prop. 3 ($8.9 billion water bond): No. Calls on taxpayers to pay for regional water conveyance systems used by big ag. Our take: Private industry is benefiting and should foot the bill. Prop. 4 ($1.5 billion for children’s hospitals): Yes. Funds upgrades at public and private nonprofit hospitals that

Congressional District 1: Audrey Denney Rep. Doug LaMalfa typifies the “do-nothing Congress.” The proof lies in his record—the three-term incumbent has voted against the interests of his overwhelmingly lowincome District 1 constituents time and again. Moreover, he’s a dishonest, greedy Trump toady—regularly falling on the wrong side of history. Audrey Denney, on the other hand, is nearly his polar opposite. She’s energetic, smart and resilient. Unlike LaMalfa, she is not under the thumb of corporate interests. We believe she has the best interests of North State residents at heart and will work hard in Washington to better our lives. U.S. Senate: Kevin de León This was a tough call for the CN&R—hence us waiting until now to make a final decision. In the end, after watching a debate with incumbent Dianne Feinstein, we’re going with de León. He and Feinstein don’t disagree on a lot—but we believe de León is better prepared to push back not only on bad state policy, such as the twin tunnels project championed by the state’s outgoing Democratic governor, but also on the disastrous plans of the demagogue in the White House (he’s called President Trump “soulless”; we agree).

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SECOND & FLUME

LaMalfa’s pawn ✁

OPINION

Reanette Fillmer despises the media. Chico’s vice mayor tweeted as much recently and has thrown barbs at journalists, including yours truly, on numerous occasions (see “Trickle-down Trump,” Second & Flume, Aug. 23). I can’t help but see the irony of her running to Chico and Redding’s daily newspapers alleging she was illegally sacked from her job at a local lending company. Through her San Francisco-based lawyer—prominent GOP operative Harmeet Dhillon—Fillmer says the firing was a result of her participation in a TV commercial paid for by Rep. Doug LaMalfa. You know, one of the propaganda-filled campaign ads attacking his opponent, Audrey Denney. In those reports, Dhillon cites state labor laws that prohibit employers from 1) enacting policy that directs or controls employees’ activities or affiliations, and 2) preventing employees from engaging or participating in politics or from becoming candidates for public office. What Dhillon doesn’t say is that there are nuances when it comes to these worker protections. For example, wrongful termination exists only in cases in which dismissals are politically motivated. Employees can be fired if their political activities adversely affect the business for practical reasons—say, creating a conflict of interest. Point is, the laws do not give employees carte blanche to do or say whatever they want whenever they want. As a human resources professional, Fillmer ought to know that. Given that she is an unflinching partisan in the public sphere, and her employers would have known that prior to hiring her a few years ago, I can’t see how Fillmer’s termination would be politically motivated. The whole situation is odd. I’m most curious as to why and how Dhillon—committeewoman for the National Republican Committee and a former vice chairman of the California Republican Party— got hooked up with the one-term Chico councilwoman. Is there more to this story? I’d bet on it. Consider, for example, how Fillmer has conducted herself as a member of the City Council over the past four years. Here’s but a sampling of her behavior at public meetings: cursing, yelling, finger-wagging at those with opposing views, verbally attacking constituents. All of those things—and more—have been chronicled in this newspaper’s pages over the past four years. The thing about becoming a politician is that it tends to magnify a person’s flaws—whatever they might be. In Fillmer’s case, sitting at the dais has revealed that her base instincts are, among other things, to be immature, vindictive and snide. Fillmer has been a LaMalfa sycophant for years, and while I get that the two are ideologically synced, I can’t for the life of me understand why she would stick her neck out for the guy. From my perspective, she’s done so twice. Once by being featured in his ad, and again by airing her subsequent professional difficulties in public. The story does not reflect well on her—I can’t imagine it will help her job prospects. I’m not sure how this will play out, but as of now, Fillmer seems like a casualty in LaMalfa’s war. I almost feel sorry for her.

Melissa Daugherty is editor of the CN&R


LETTERS

ATTENTION BOOMERS

Send email to cnrletters@newsreview.com warned by President Eisenhower in his 1961 farewell address. If war was not profitable, there would be no wars.

One on the cover Re “The war inside” (Cover story, by Scott Thomas Anderson, Oct. 25): Last week’s cover story is one of the finest works to grace the inside of the News & Review in some time. Thank you for sharing it with us. The indigenous populations of Southeast Asia were drawn into that war by American interests with little thought of the long-term damage to societies much older than our own. The Korean Conflict, a decade earlier, was another misadventure by America. In its aftermath, we allowed a void that was filled by three generations of the Kim dynasty. Today, we are still stumbling ourselves through illogical overseas adventures that always yield body bags containing dead American troops. Will we ever stop? I am a veteran. I support veterans of all of our wars. But not since World War II has there been a conflict that was truly “our war.” Those other wars belong to “the military-industrial complex,” as

Ronald Angle Chico

as possible encourages alternative medical care—such as chiropractic, acupuncture, naturopathy, including vitamins, supplements such as CBD oil and medicinal marijuana—while as much as possible discouraging heavy prescription medicines. Walter Ballin Chico

CBD fan Re “ABCs of CBD” (Healthlines, by Evan Tuchinsky, Oct. 25): I have been having issues of being able to sleep properly. It was not until early this year that I found out that CBD oil could help me with this problem. I have been buying CBD oil at Hempful Farms and it has been very helpful for sleeping. It also helps to reduce anxiety. I also get a lotion there, which is very good for pain and aching joints. CBD oil has no THC and doesn’t make people high. It is better than taking prescription drugs like opioids, benzos and other sleeping pills prescribed by many regular doctors that often make people sicker and even result in death. We need improved Medicare for All that covers and as much

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Peeved at POTUS I am a small business owner and the president’s policies are having a direct negative affect on my business. I’m not writing this letter because I want to influence the upcoming election. I’m writing it because I’m pissed off. I make cider in Chico, the hard kind, using all apples grown by small farms in Northern California. The first negative effect is due to a decreased number of people available to pick the fruit. Labor costs for farmers are up to 30 percent higher this year due to the labor shortage from decreased immigrant labor. Of course, this translates to more LETTERS C O N T I N U E D

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LETTERS

c o n t i n u e d f r o m pa g e 5

expensive apples. The second negative effect is due to an increase in prices of bottles and kegs. No surprise, these are made in China, and because of the recent trade war, prices are going up. I could buy U.S.-made bottles and kegs, but prices tend to be 30-50 percent higher. The end result is that this increase in cost of goods will result in a higher retail price for the consumer. So all this is just contributing to inflation. Ben Nielsen Chico

Final endorsements Many people understand that the major issues facing our city are crime, homelessness, transients, financial issues. Andrew Coolidge has led the council on these issues and by far worked the hardest to remedy these problems. There are other accomplishments by Andrew, which are worth noting. Andrew is a pragmatic, caring and respectful leader. He always meets and talks with people on all sides of an issue. When the city was looking to put roundabouts on The Esplanade, which would basically destroy the historic aspects of the famous boulevard, it was Andrew who led the fight in the community to have other council members reverse their decisions and save the street. When citizens approached Andrew about trees dying in Lower Park and at One-Mile, it was Andrew who brought forward a tree-planting program to get new trees planted using donated time. When citizens were upset at the crime issues at 20th Street Park, it was Andrew who recently agendized the issue for the council to discuss and find solutions. When art projects in the city were crumbling and the city was losing thousands of dollars they had invested into the pieces, it was Andrew who brought forward a reasonable solution. Choose Coolidge. Kristine Anderson Litwak Chico

Who could have imagined these hateful, polarized and contentious times? Our beloved city cannot thrive in this kind of environment. We have to turn things around. This November, we are voting for candidates who are committed to the respectful discussion of facts, as 6

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a way to communicate and problem solve. That’s why Rich Ober, candidate for Chico City Council, is getting our votes. Rich has been our friend and neighbor for close to 20 years. We know him to be a thoughtful man, sincere in his commitment to collaboration and open channels of communication. He is, after all, a communications director in his professional life. Rich has demonstrated his commitment to Chico by his years of community service. Rich has volunteered at the Torres Shelter for many years. His solutions to homelessness and poverty are a result of hands-on experience. Ten years serving on the Park Commission indicate an expertise determined to restore our beloved Bidwell Park. Rich is a voice of experience and reason. Join us this November and cast your vote for Rich Ober, Chico City Council. As Rich says, “Together We’re Chico.” Anna Dove and Jeff Lindsay Chico

Make no mistake. In the Congressional elections next Tuesday, only one name will be on the ballot: Trump. Regardless of the individual merits of every House and Senate candidate across the nation, this midterm election, surely the most important ever in our lifetimes, is a solemn referendum on Trump and the social cancer of Trumpism. Here in California’s 1st Congressional District, we have a choice that is crystal clear. During the destructive and disgraceful past two years, incumbent Doug LaMalfa has proven himself a supine Trump toady, utterly incapable of performing his Constitutional duty as a congressman to check or restrain the grotesque demagogue who occupies the White House. Indeed, LaMalfa appears to have fully embraced the corrosive amorality of Trumpism, with its relentless pandering to all that is base and ugly in human nature. Challenger Audrey Denney, on the other hand, represents the nobler tradition of American leaders who, like Abraham Lincoln, have always appealed to “the better angels of our nature.” Denney embodies all of the uplifting values daily traduced by Trumpism: reason, civility, tolerance, generosity and optimism. We fail to uphold these values at our

peril. On Nov. 6, please join me in voting for Audrey Denney. Michael Magliari Chico

North State voters have an unprecedented opportunity in Audrey Denney. Raised on a small ranch, Audrey is a former FFA officer and advocate for the beef industry. She has a master’s degree in ag education and taught at Chico State for six years. She’s worked with Third World farmers to improve production techniques. Unlike the incumbent, who divided up inherited family holdings to maximize farm subsidies, the Denney ranch struggled to survive the 2008 recession. The daughter of a cancer survivor, Audrey understands the medical challenges and anxieties that can threaten a family’s financial stability. That’s why she is such a strong advocate for improving health care access in rural District 1. Some are surprised when they see the Denney sign in my yard—me, a businesswoman with 30-plus years experience in downtown Chico. I admit to missing a few investment opportunities in my career, but I learned from these mistakes. In this crucial election, I am raising my voice to encourage friends, former patrons, business associates and co-workers to choose Audrey Denney as our congressional representative in Washington. Becky Shadd Chico

As I passed a voter registration table, I heard a frustrated young man yell at its volunteer, “What’s the point?” The point is to register and exercise your hard-won voting rights to continue to build a more complete democracy and prevent the erosion of our democracy. Within just the lifetime of some, since 1920, progressive reforms have been won for women, minorities and 18- to 21-year-olds, giving them the right to vote. But like many things, rights not used wither and die. Many in America, encouraged by Trump, wish for a return to the days before these progressive advances in democracy when only white males over 21 could vote. By not registering and voting you concede the field to those who would turn back the clock. Protect

and strengthen your hard-won democratic rights by voting for the progressive candidates: Audrey Denney, Gavin Newsom, Kevin de León, Scott Huber, Rich Ober, Alex Brown. Not yet registered? Take advantage of another progressive reform to strengthen democracy, new this year, conditional voter registration. Call the Butte County Registrar of Voters at 538-7761 or see sos.ca.gov for details. Please vote as if your life depends on it. Doug Fogel Chico

Sonia Aery for Assembly District 3 is a game-changer, a woman who will fight for all of us, not for corporate puppet masters. I’m a retired senior trying to survive on Social Security after working for nonprofit services. Sonia says our district average income is $19,000 a year, putting us average folks below the federal poverty line. Social Security folks average $12,000 a year. We need someone who will work for people like us, the working class and the marginalized. Sonia will fix outof-control housing prices. Sonia supports Prop. 10, which gives communities the right to set limits on rents. Sonia studied regional planning and community development for her college degrees, so she could come home and serve our district. Incumbent James Gallagher, representing Big Money in politics, is a climate-change denier and opposes Medicare for All. Sonia Aery does not take corporate donations. She will fight for living wages and affordable housing in our district. Unlike Aery, Gallagher works for his corporate donors, the largest is Big Telecom, voting against net neutrality. If you care about your kids, grandchildren and for all living beings, it has to be Sonia Aery for District 3. Our livable planet future depends on it. Mary Kay Benson Chico

Tom had to bargain for higher wages or health insurance when he was hired. He’s now stuck in his job. Medicare for All solves his problems. Also, his family saves $5,000 a year. Medicare for All ends co-payments and deductibles. There are fewer uncovered services (i.e.,

long-term care). You choose any doctor or hospital. We save $500 billion in “overhead” by cutting out blood-sucking insurance companies. We have the clout to bargain down drug prices by $113 billion. LaMalfa opposes Medicare for All because 1) Americans should have “options,” and 2) It’s “socialism.” He’s stupid. He can buy any insurance policy instead of MFA. Socialism? The the same tired argument Republicans used to oppose Medicare when Democrats established it decades ago. LaMalfa voted to repeal Obamacare without a replacement, trying to eliminate protection for our “pre-existing conditions.” He voted to support a $500 billion cut from Medicare for 2019. Audrey Denney supports Medicare for All. She doesn’t depend on “dark money” from corporate outsiders. They have LaMalfa in their back pockets. Please vote for Audrey Denney for Congress. Ralph Slater Chico

Andrew Coolidge is one of the hardest-working elected officials I have ever met. He has taken the lead on crime issues, bringing forward the Chico Safe Now proposals, which are passing through the council and bringing real change to our community. In addition to voting for balanced budgeting and strong fiscal constraint, Andrew brought the LED Street Light Program to Chico. He started working on this proposal before he was on the council. Through Andrew’s efforts, he was able to get all of Chico’s street lights changed to LED lights. His efforts were enormous and they paid off big for the city of Chico as the city now saves over $250,000 a year on street lights. We were on California’s cities most likely to go bankrupt list. Andrew worked together with all council members to avoid that fate. He listens carefully, speaks respectfully, does his research to make informed decisions, has a calm presence and good sense of humor. Please vote for Andrew Coolidge. Suzanne Brayton Chico More letters online:

We’ve got too many letters for this space. please go to www.newsreview.com/chico for additional readers’ comments on past cn&r articles.


STREETALK

What animal scares you? Asked in downtown Chico

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Praying mantis. Those little buggers have scythes on their arms ... and can snatch things super fast. That is terrifying at that little level. I’ve seen those things grab humming birds and that’s no bueno.

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Probably bears, because when [we’ve been] out camping or hiking in the wild, I would be afraid the bears would surprise and attack us.

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Even though it’s an insect, I’d say cockroaches. Where I grew up in Oahu they were huge—about an inch or two and could fly. You’d be walking around or sleeping and they would fly onto you or get stuck in your hair.

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The scariest animal for me is the tarantula. I don’t like how they can jump really high, and they’re really fuzzy and big. Eight legs is just too much for me. Fangs that come out of nowhere. Yeah, not a fan.

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NEWSLINES DOWNSTROKE PAY TO PARK

The city moved one step closer to requiring paid parking in Upper Bidwell Park at the Bidwell Park and Playground Commission meeting on Monday (Oct. 29). The proposed fees are supposed to help fund repairs to Upper Park Road, as well as additional staffing if the entire road is reopened to vehicles. The vote was 5-0 (with Commissioners Elaina McReynolds and Jeffrey Glatz absent) to recommend the City Council: require a $2 daily parking fee; establish a $25 annual parking pass; allow those who are 62 or older, disabled, veterans and low-income (who meet a certain income threshold) to park for free; provide free parking passes to members of organizations that lease Upper Bidwell Park facilities; and offer free parking during special events.

Less harm, more acceptance

BALLOT ISSUES MINOR

At last count, the Butte County Elections Office had sent out close to 94,000 mail-in ballots, according to Clerk-Recorder Candace Grubbs. That number is unprecedented, but reflects a growing trend. Of those 94,000, about 2,500 were returned as undeliverable. That is normal, Grubbs said, as people move often. There had been some issues with the post office, but they were minor—the ballot mailing was delayed, she said, and not all of Butte County’s went out at the same time, which caused some confusion. Those who did not receive their mail-in ballot can go into the Elections Office (155 Nelson Ave., Oroville) through Tuesday (Nov. 6) or to their polling place on Election Day. The office also will be open on Saturday (Nov. 3), 9 a.m.-4 p.m., for early voting.

ARREST MADE IN CAMPUS HOMICIDE

Just hours before Chico State classes began on Tuesday (Oct. 30), around 4:40 a.m., a University Police officer discovered the body of a woman on the south side of Kendall Hall. Police arrested suspect Samuel Eugene Johnson, 27 (pictured), for the 55-year-old woman’s killing. Her name had not been released by CN&R’s press time, pending notification of her family. In a message to the campus community, Chico State President Gayle Hutchinson confirmed the victim was not a student or employee. According to a University Police press release, the victim suffered blunt force injuries. Johnson was identified through witness accounts and other leads and was arrested around 9:20 a.m. on Broadway Street in downtown Chico. He was booked into the Butte County Jail and his bail has been set at $1 million. 8

CN&R

NOVEMBER 1, 2018

Grassroots harm reduction coalition aims to help drug addicts

Fstreet has volunteered her time by conducting outreach, speaking with some of the or the past two years, Siana Sonoquie

Chico community’s most disenfranchised citizens—many of them addicted to drugs. story and Lately, she’s been an photo by Ashiah advocate for a homeless Scharaga man, supporting him by providing transportation as hia h s @ n ew sr ev i ew. c o m to appointments and connecting him to food and hygiene services. He has Find out more tried to get into treatment Visit nvhrc.com or send an email to nvharm for his addiction to methreduction@gmail.com. amphetamine and alcohol, For the syringe hotline, but has been unsuccall 332-8065. cessful—the program covered by Butte County Behavioral Health requires him to be sober for several weeks before entering. “For the past three years, that has been a cycle for him, where he goes about a week and a half [sober], falls back [into using] and then he never gets the treatment that he needs,” she said. “And this is a person that is in and out of jail constantly.” Sonoquie shared this homeless man’s story during a presentation on Monday (Oct. 29) for the Butte County Bar Association, an advocacy group that promotes professional education and empathy and understanding between the court system

and community. She was there there to talk about a grassroots group recently formed to work toward eliminating barriers to treatment such as this. Sonoquie is one of about 25 founding members of the Northern Valley Harm Reduction Coalition. They come from a variety of backgrounds—public health, homeless services, LGBTQ advocacy, health care, environmentalism—and joined forces after recognizing that “in some capacity, our work shows the need for harm reduction.” Harm reduction “honors this human process and human relationship to drugs and alcohol,” Sonoquie said. Rather than requiring sobriety for programs or support, it aims to reduce harm by educating substance users and providing programs like syringe exchanges. The coalition formed in August, shortly after homeless service provider Stairways Programming closed the only harm reduction center in town. (See “Stepping down,” Newslines, Oct. 4.) The group hit the ground running: Its organizers quickly assembled a couple dozen members and secured a $45,000 state grant to provide free overdose prevention drug Naloxone to heroin and painkiller users. In addition, they’ve conducted street outreach, collected used syringes, provided harm reduction training and established a hotline for syringe clean-up requests.

The entirely volunteer-run effort aims to serve Butte and its surrounding counties with a client-centered approach—empowering former and current substance users, homeless or otherwise, to lead support groups and help create programs. During the presentation, co-founder Cassie Miracle said that is what “can bring about the most change.” Miracle recently resigned from Butte County Public Health after four years as an education specialist, and has now devoted her time to consulting and the coalition. “I felt like … I could serve the community better outside of local government,” Miracle told the CN&R. The coalition does not have a physical

location just yet, but its members hope to partner with a local organization or church to host harm reduction meetings, an alternative to the 12-step program. It may soon receive its second wave of financial support—enough to kick-start a pilot program that would get those meetings started and establish a relationship with the court system. Law practitioners of the Butte County Bar Association expressed interest in hearing a formal proposal during Monday’s meeting. The bar association also partnered with Stairways for the opening of its harm reduction center last summer, offering pro bono


Siana Sonoquie, left, and Cassie Miracle have joined about 25 other community members to launch a harm reduction coalition for the Butte County area.

Shared sadness Chicoans unite at local synagogue after Pittsburgh shooting

legal services to the homeless population. (See “New center breeds hope,” Newslines, July 13, 2017.) Ron Reed, a public defender and president of the association, was drawn to the approach because the juvenile and adult probationers and parolees he serves weren’t seeing results with court orders directing them toward traditional 12-step programs, like Alcoholics Anonymous. “When you’re 18 years old and somebody says, ‘You have a disease, you can never drink a beer or do anything,’ they’re not going to buy that,” he said. “Wait until they’re 50 and they’re in the gutter.” Some people just need to figure out ways to reduce the harm they are causing, Reed continued, like making sure they don’t drive while drunk or that they process anger issues, so they don’t act aggressively. A common misconception is that participants in these kinds of programs are encouraged to use drugs, Sonoquie said. But harm reduction does not ignore or minimize the dangers of using. Some harm reduction programs have proven their efficacy: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that people who inject drugs and participate in a syringe services program (harm reduction programs that provide access to sterile needles and syringes and facilitate safe disposal) are five times more likely to seek treatment for substance use disorder than those who don’t. A nonjudgmental, noncoercive approach is the foundation of the work the coalition wants to conduct, creating spaces where drug users who want to make positive changes feel welcome and safe and maintain their dignity. The coalition has already connected with the Greater Chico Homeless Task Force and Stonewall Alliance Center. It has received support from the California Public Health Department and national Harm Reduction Coalition. Miracle told the CN&R she grew up in Butte County, and started her career as a case manager for people living with HIV. Her clients became her friends, and their stories resonated with her. There weren’t always resources to accommodate their needs. “Sometimes it takes a group of community members to get something going like this, and get the community on board …” she said. “I feel very strongly like, ‘These are my people. I need to help take care of them.’” Ω

Like many Chicoans, David Halimi first heard

of the mass shooting in a Pittsburgh synagogue Saturday morning (Oct. 27) from media accounts. Distance didn’t diminish its impact. For the co-president of Chico’s synagogue, Congregation Beth Israel (CBI), and a man deeply connected to his faith, the tragedy hit home. “It was a sad day for humanity,” he told the CN&R Tuesday (Oct. 30). “Of course, when tragedies of this sort happen, it’s not a Jewish tragedy, it’s not a black tragedy, it’s not a Muslim tragedy—it’s a tragedy for humans all over the world. It was closer to home in terms of the Jewish community, but any time you have any innocent people’s lives taken for no reason at all, it gives you pause for reflection on where we’re going as a society.” That morning, a gunman charged into the Tree of Life Congregation synagogue during sabbath services, shouting that all Jews must die, and killed 11 people. Suspect Robert Bowers appeared in court Tuesday and has a hearing set for today (Nov. 1). Halimi said he received a call “right away” Saturday morning from Chico Police Chief Mike O’Brien, who offered support and dispatched officers to meet with Rabbi Sara Abrams at CBI. O’Brien also spoke at a candlelight vigil the synagogue hosted Sunday night, which 60 attended. “I was very touched by that personal attention to the Jewish community’s need,” Halimi said. “He comforted everyone [at the

vigil] and assured everyone that he’s there and he promises to keep us safe—which is what people really needed to hear.” As O’Brien spoke, two guards secured the synagogue entrance and police made more frequent patrols. Abrams acknowledged in a letter to the community that “[a]lthough we have no reason to believe that we are in danger in Chico, CBI[’s] security committee and board will be brainstorming ways we can make our building more secure.” George Gold also attended the vigil. A longtime Butte County resident and social activist, he’s part of myriad groups, including Atheists of Butte County. He’s also the son of Holocaust survivors. “What struck me as I looked around the room, of all the social activists … here in Chico, I saw two people I know,” he said. “And one was the chief of police.” Shelby Chase feels a similar disconnect.

A new business owner in Chico, handling human resources and payroll for other companies, Chase grew up in Red Bluff before attending Chico State. She experienced overt discrimination in her hometown, “where anti-Semitism was more broadcasted; since I came to Chico, I feel it’s just not

SIFT ER Two blue? According to stat-crunching site FiveThirtyEight.com, there is an 84.5 percent chance that the U.S. House of Representatives will flip from Republican to Democrat control after the 2018 midterm elections. But what about the other house of Congress? Will there be two blue waves? Since so many Republican senators (42 of the current 51) are not up for re-election, it’s not likely. As it stands, 28 of the 35 Senate seats that are up for grabs would have to go blue for things to tip in the D’s favor this year—and FiveThirtyEight has the chances of that happening at a mere 17.5 percent. Here’s how Senate seats are currently projected go:

Solid D (95% or better chance) Likely D (75% or better) Leaning D (60% or better)

18 4 3

Toss up (less than 60% for each) 2 Leaning R (60% or better) Likely R (75% or better) Solid R (95% or better)

1 3 4

David Halimi, co-president of Congregation Beth Israel, owns Cafe Petra downtown with Mohammed Shabbar, a leader at the Chico Islamic Center. PHOTO BY EVAN TUCHINSKY

talked about at all.” Chase, who didn’t attend the vigil, is active in social causes, like Gold. She’s board chair of Chico’s chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union (though stressed she spoke with the CN&R on her own behalf, not for ACLU Chico). “I don’t know why the progressive community is so active in talking about other oppressed communities,” she said, “but I’ve never once heard them talk about oppression in the Jewish community. “Some people are so shocked that the shooting happened,” Chase added. “I think that there are a lot more anti-Semitic people out there than we know. They just don’t identify themselves—and I prefer that they do.” Both Chase and Gold said they feel less safe since Saturday’s shootings. Halimi said otherwise. He feels reassurance from Chico’s response. Along with the police, clergy from various houses of worship came Sunday “to show their solidarity.” Halimi also pointed to the Muslim community in Pittsburgh raising money for victims and the synagogue. His friend and business partner Mohammed Shabbar, chef-owner of Cafe Petra, is as involved at the Chico Islamic Center as Halimi is at CBI. “His reaction I don’t think was any different than if it had happened to 11 Muslims,” Halimi said. “He shared in the sadness just as much. “The ironic thing,” he added, “is when the worst of humanity comes out, many times more than that the best of humanity comes out.” —EVAN TUCHINSKY eva ntu c h insk y @ newsr ev iew.c o m

NEWSLINES C O N T I N U E D NOVEMBER 1, 2018

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Force on trial

Together We’re Chico “Rich Ober knows how to listen, respects differing viewpoints, and is clear on the basis for his actions. Rich has a well-articulated vision for Chico and how to move forward together as a community. I support Rich for City Council and encourage others to do so because he will work for the betterment of Chico as a whole.” - Andy Holcombe, former Mayor City of Chico

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Officer found not guilty of assault, but courtroom drama raises other questions about Chico Police Department Scott Rushing would have preferred

to spend Oct. 22 at his home in Ventura, celebrating what would have been his son Tyler’s 36th birthday. Instead, he found himself—for the first time—sitting in the same room as the man who shot his son twice the night he died, former Chico Police Sgt. Scott Ruppel. It was the first day of Ruppel’s five-day trial on a misdemeanor charge of assault by an officer, a case unrelated to Tyler’s July 23, 2017, killing, for which Butte County District Attorney Mike Ramsey declared Ruppel’s shooting justified. Ramsey’s job last week, however, was to prosecute Ruppel for a use-of-force incident that occurred just weeks after Tyler’s death. On Aug. 15 of last year, Ruppel was captured on Officer Alan Gilbert’s body camera choking a handcuffed and seat-belted 21-year-old suspect, William Michael Rowley, in the back seat of a patrol vehicle. On Friday (Oct. 26), after three days of testimony and just a few hours of deliberation, a jury that included several members with ties to law enforcement declared Ruppel— who faced up to $10,000 in fines and one year in county jail—not guilty. In the wake of last year’s two officer-involved deaths, this case focused more attention on what

some perceive as problems within the Chico Police Department— specifically its use of force. The department is the subject of at least three active lawsuits related to officer-involved fatalities. Rushing attended the entire trial, often accompanied by David Phillips—father of Desmond Phillips, who was killed by Chico police in March 2017—and other community members who’ve called for police reform and justice for victims of police violence. Evidence presented by both sides

largely centered around body camera footage from several officers who responded to two calls to the Overland Court apartment where Rowley lived with his father. Ruppel was not wearing a camera, as CPD sergeants were the last to be equipped with the devices when they were deployed last year. The prosecution focused on footage of the exact action Ruppel was tried for, a few seconds when he grabs Rowley in a “C-clamp” choke hold and slams him against the back of the vehicle’s cage. The defense built its narrative on film leading up to that moment, in which Rowley is visibly upset, argumentative and brandishes a machete. Rowley later pleaded guilty to felony vandalism and misdemeanor resisting arrest charges for his actions that day.

The choking was captured from the opposite side of the CPD SUV’s back seat. As Ruppel attaches the vehicle’s separate lap and shoulder belts from outside the vehicle, Rowley turns his head to shout in Ruppel’s face; Ruppel then grabs Rowley by the throat and pushes him back with an apparent great deal of force. Rowley gasps as Ruppel grips his neck, and Ruppel says, “Knock it off.” The view from Gilbert’s camera then moves away from the back seat. Off-camera, Ruppel can be heard exclaiming, “Do you understand? OK, we’re not going to tolerate this!” as Rowley struggles for breath and implores the officer to stop choking him. None of the officers on the scene reported the incident, and several testified they didn’t realize it was happening at the time. It was discovered and charges against Ruppel filed after investigators with the DA’s office viewed the footage to bolster their case against Rowley. Ruppel retired from the CPD Sept. 15, just before he was scheduled to be interviewed for the department’s internal affairs investigation into the incident. That fact, and Ruppel’s current employment status, were not presented in court due to a motion filed by the defense before the trial began. The defense argued that


Former Chico Police Sgt. Scott Ruppel testifies  that he “didn’t miss a single day of work” after  shooting Tyler Rushing last year and that he was  working overtime when a separate choking incident, for which he was being tried, occurred.  Photo by KeN Smith

Rowley, though restrained, still presented a threat in that he could have bitten, head-butted or spit on Ruppel. Both sides called expert witnesses on police use of force, both of whom have served as police officers and Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST) instructors for the state. Their interpretations of the incident differed greatly, with the prosecution’s witness, David Blake, saying Ruppel’s action violated useof-force standards. The defense’s expert, Jeffery Martin, claimed he acted reasonably and reflexively to a dangerous situation. The defense also detailed a later arrest in which Rowley hit his head against a police car’s plexiglass shield after being restrained in the back seat in its effort to prove the suspect was a threat to Ruppel. During Rowley’s testimony, he admitted that he’d acted like a “jerk” that day, but insisted he had no intention of spitting at or assaulting Ruppel. Rowley said he struggles with anger issues as a result of childhood abuse, and that he’s been receiving mental health assistance since the incident. Arguably the strongest testimony against Ruppel came from one of his former co-workers, Officer Todd Lefkowitz, who’s served as a use-of-force instructor for the CPD for about 20 years. Lefkowitz testified that a C-clamp hold to the throat can inflict serious damage and that the maneuver is not approved by or taught within the department. A request submitted to the city for the CPD’s use-of-force policy was denied by the City Attorney’s Office on the basis that “the public interest in nondisclosure of secret investigative techniques or procedures clearly outweighs the public interest in disclosure.” Tyler Rushing’s name was never

mentioned in court, though his killing was vaguely alluded to at the outset of Ramsey’s cross-examination of the defendant. “About three weeks before [Rowley’s arrest], you had an event that caused some stress in your life,” Ramsey said, and Ruppel replied affirmatively. Ramsey’s subsequent questions revealed that

Ruppel had visited a psychological counselor once in the wake of the fatal shooting, and that he immediately returned to active duty. “I never missed a day of work,” said Ruppel, who was stabbed in the neck with a pen during that encounter, according to Ramsey’s report. Ramsey said post-trial that it is common protocol for officers to take some administrative leave after a fatal encounter, and that he was previously unaware Ruppel did not. He also said it’s possible Ruppel had regular off-time scheduled before the incident, but he was uncertain if that was the case. Ramsey said he couldn’t focus more on Tyler’s death during trial because Ruppel’s responses gave him no reason to question him about the psychological impacts of that incident. He added that a look into Ruppel’s 29-year career revealed a clean record. After the verdict, Rushing— who in June filed a federal wrongful death suit against the city of Chico, Ruppel, Armed Guard Private Protection and a security guard also involved in his son’s killing—said he found footage of the Rowley incident “sickening.” He also said he feels it stands as evidence that Ruppel is capable of resorting to unnecessary violence, which he believes happened in his son’s death. Rushing, who observed the jury selection process, said he felt the jury was stacked in order to ensure a not guilty verdict, noting the panel included a criminal justice student who said he wants to pursue a career in law enforcement, a former officer of 25 years, and a man—who ended up serving as the jury’s foreman—who stated he was acquaintances with several Chico police officers, including some who were announced as potential witnesses. “I’m not surprised,” Rushing said of the verdict. “I expected it.” Ramsey said he allowed those jurors to serve because in preparing for the case, he found “there was not a great deal of sympathy among rank-and-file police officers for Sgt. Ruppel and the actions he took [against Rowley]. “I’d hoped jurors like the veteran officer would help lead the rest to water,” he said. “It’s just very difficult to accomplish when any defendant claims self-defense.” —Ken SmiTh

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HEALTHLINES Charlotte Elmore says she knows of 38 chronic pain sufferers who took their own lives after their opioid prescriptions were either reduced dramatically or cut off.

Pained patients

Opioid crisis measures put pinch on prescriptions

story and photo by

Evan Tuchinsky

evantuc hin sk y @ n ewsr ev i ew. com

Ecoverage the opioid crisis. She trembles at media of overdoses. She, like 40,000 peovery day, Charlotte Elmore suffers through

ple in her Facebook group, mourns deaths connected to prescription painkillers. Elmore’s concerns center not on the scourge of addiction. Rather, she fears for the fate of people such as herself: patients who use their opiates as prescribed, under physician care, yet nonetheless find their medicine restricted. The U.S. government has prioritized reducing opioid abuse by reducing prescriptions—for hydrocodone, morphine and oxycodone, notably. The feds have done so, primarily, by intensifying scrutiny of practitioners and pharmacists; state regulators have followed suit. (See “Clamped down,” Healthlines, Aug. 23.) Butte County is

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among the areas with community prescribing guidelines that recommend a judicious approach to pain pills. (See “An uphill battle,” Healthlines, Nov. 2, 2017.) Elmore, an Oroville resident, feels these cures have side effects. She says she knows patients who have had their dosages reduced by doctors or pharmacies to meet governmental targets—some “so drastically” that the medication “doesn’t help them any longer.” She knows patients who have gotten cut off entirely. She knows of 38 who subsequently committed suicide, “and there are a lot more people in the [Facebook] pain group that are talking about suicide, thinking about it.” Elmore relates. Early into 23 years of chronic pain from a spinal injury, she decided to forgo medication. Being homebound for months, relegated to the bed or couch, changed her mind. She’s adamant about not reliving that experience. “I do understand that there are people who take [opiates] for pleasure. But the pain people are not like that,” Elmore said. “We don’t take it to ‘get high.’ We just take it to

be able to do a load of laundry or dishes …. “When you don’t have any quality of life, and you have no hope, it’s really easy to get depressed.” The Chronic Pain Support Group on Facebook led her to Don’t Punish Pain, an organization that coordinates rallies to lobby for legislation and give a voice to chronically ill and pained patients. Elmore, a state organizer, joined around four-dozen Don’t Punish Pain activists Sept. 18 in Sacramento; she is arranging another rally at California’s Capitol for Jan. 29. A major point of contention for Elmore and

Don’t Punish Pain relates to statistics. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or CDC, has released figures often cited by media showing overdose fatalities continuing to rise as prescriptions have fallen. Minimized or overlooked, Elmore says, is how the CDC lumps all opioids into this metric—including heroin, an illicit street drug; and fentanyl, a highly concentrated narcotic, manufactured both as a legal pharmaceutical and illegally.

According to a study by the nonprofit American Action Forum, utilizing CDC reports, “the annual growth rate of deaths involving prescription opioids slowed from 13.4 percent before 2010,” when prescribing reduction measures began, “to 4.8 percent after.” Death rate increases from heroin “surged from 4.1 percent before 2010 to 31.2 percent after”; fentanyl, “from 13.7 percent to 36.5 percent.” Dr. Andrew Miller, Butte County’s public health officer, said by phone that parsing the data this way presents an oversimplification. Referencing the book Dreamland: The True Tale of America’s Opiate Epidemic, Miller noted that 80 percent of new heroin users in the authors’ study had used prescription opioids first. “These are not groups that are necessarily divorced,” he said. “I actually try to avoid any time when we’re separating people into the ‘good people’ who are doing the right thing and the ‘bad people’ who are doing the wrong thing, because we’re losing lives from both of those groups. I just don’t find that a useful distinction.” Miller had not heard of Don’t Punish Pain, he said, but “I deal with lots of people who are similarly concerned about access to medications.” He also hadn’t heard of suicide related to access, whether through studies or individual accounts. “Anecdotal stories are not the way we can make decisions [on public policy],” Miller added. “I think that you have to look at all of the different pluses and minuses—and that’s definitely one that can be considered—but it’s certainly not that simple.” A family practice doctor in Chico for 14 years before becoming county health officer, Miller understands that patients and providers are both “in a really difficult spot, and are going to be in a difficult spot for a while, because we had one approach to this family of medicines and now that approach is evolving.” Elmore has seen the evolution firsthand. She

recalls the 1990s and 2000s when physicians considered pain the “fifth vital sign” and prescribed opioids liberally. “Twenty years ago, doctors were giving me tons of medication, to the point where I didn’t want that much,” she recalled. “Two years ago, the pendulum swung totally in the opposite direction.” HEALTHLINES C O N T I N U E D

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Caregiver Support The Power Of Optimism

for Caregivers

Join us for our 12th Annual Caregiver Conference presented by Kelsi Halvarson. This class will present on how to be and remain optimistic as you take on your daily role as a family caregiver.

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Passages Caregiver Resource Center is funded by the California Department of Healthcare Services, the Area Agency on Aging (PSA2, PSA3), and the California Department of Aging.

November 1, 2018

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Vote

Ken Rensink for ChiCo City CounCil

You have the privilege of voting for 3 Chico City Council Candidates. If you generally vote for one side or the other I am asking you to make a change this election. Tell the political parties with your three votes that you are not a lockstep partisan. Vote for your two favorite Democrats or two favorite Republicans, and with your third vote select Ken Rensink, the only experienced Independent. The time is now for the membership of the City Council to become truly inclusive and represent all of Chico. www.KenForChico.com Paid for by Ken Rensink for City Council 2018

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november 1, 2018


HEALTHLINES Elmore’s pain comes from nerve damage in her spine. While working as a certified nursing assistant at a senior care home in Arkansas, she ruptured a disk while picking up a patient to put on her pants. “I know I’m not supposed to [lift patients],” she said, “but that’s the last thing I had to do before I could go home for the day. I felt a pop, and a few months later I started feeling pain—and that’s when my journey began.” She’s run the gamut of treatment forms. She currently has a neurostimulator, an implanted device that acts like a pacemaker for pain by sending faint electrical pulses to override nerves transmitting pain signals. Only opiates have provided significant relief. “I can understand wanting to help addicts, because they are dying,” Elmore said. “The way pain patients are being treated, in my book, it’s torture—there’s no

c o N t i N u e D f r o m Pa g e 1 2

Resource pages:

Don’t Punish Pain: dontpunishpainrally.com/ files-section Public Health: buttecounty.net/opioids

other way to put it.” That patients feel so frightened, and would go so far as suicide, worries Miller. “I feel for anybody [who’s] in pain,” he said, “and I don’t think anybody should be punished. I actually think the effort to be more responsible with pain medication is an effort to keep people from being punished—from losing their lives, from losing their quality of life [with addiction]—and I want those medications to be governed by the same rules we use for every other medication, which is a balance of the good and the harm. “I will suggest, for two decades, harm was not factored into that calculation at all and that’s what people got used to.” Ω

NOTICE TO CITY OF CHICO RESIDENTS: OPPORTUNITY TO SERVE ON BOARD AND COMMISSIONS

The Chico City Council is seeking applications from volunteers to serve on the City of Chico’s Board and Commissions. Applicants must be residents of the City of Chico and qualified voters (18 years or older). Persons may apply to one or more of the following Board or Commissions: Airport Commission, Architectural Review and Historic Preservation Board, Arts Commission, Bidwell Park and Playground Commission and Planning Commission. All appointments will be four-year terms beginning January 2019, and expiring December 31, 2022. There is one unscheduled vacancy on the Airport Commission and one unscheduled vacancy on the Planning Commission, both with two years remaining on the term. Applications are available from the City Clerk’s Office, 411 Main Street, 3rd Floor and on the City’s website, www. ci.chico.ca.us. Please call 896-7250 if you have any questions.

WEEKLY DOSE

ALL APPLICATIONS MUST BE RECEIVED IN THE CITY CLERK’S OFFICE BY 5:00 P.M. FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2018.

Tremor tips On October 18, millions of Californians took part in the annual Great California ShakeOut, practicing how to react during an earthquake. This may seem like a waste of time in the North State, but consider this projection from the California Earthquake Authority: Butte County, within 20 miles of an active fault, has a 76 percent chance of a 7.0-magnitude temblor within the next 30 years. In addition to step five (below), for during a tremor, the Southern California Earthquake Center at the University of Southern California recommends prequake measures and post-quake skills to improve your chance of survival.

1. Secure your space: Fasten heavy objects and furniture to walls and move them away from areas where people sleep and sit. 2. Plan to be safe: Create a disaster and communication plan. 3. Organize disaster supplies: Keep kits in your home, car and workplace. 4. Minimize financial hardship: Collect important documents in one place, strengthen your property and consider earthquake insurance.

5. Drop, cover and hold on: During an earthquake, drop to your knees, cover your head and hold on until the shaking stops.

6. Improve safety: Immediately after an earthquake, evacuate unsafe structures, help the injured and prevent further injuries or damage 7. Reconnect and recover: Follow your disaster plan. Reconnect with others, repair damage and rebuild your community. Further information: earthquakecountry.org

November 1, 2018

CN&R

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GREENWAYS Josh Fox integrates visuals  and lighting into his solo  performance piece. Photo courtesy of INterNatIoNal WoW

“Every piece of information online is targeted at people individually, to mess with people’s heads.”

—Josh fox

Gaslight land Eco-documentarian brings show on disinformation to Chico by

Evan Tuchinsky evantuc hin sk y @ n ewsr ev i ew. com

Jwinning in 2010 with the release of his Emmydocumentary GasLand, which

osh Fox came to many people’s attention

exposed the dangers of fracking. Years before, and in the years since, he’s been the focus of attention by the petroleum industry. Fox has publicly discussed public relations, media and internet campaigns to discredit him, on which he estimates fossil fuel interests have spent at least $50 million. Yet he continues. Fox produced GasLand Part II and How to Let Go of the World and Love All the Things the Climate Can’t Change—the latter occasioning a visit to Chico in 2016. He returns Saturday afternoon (Nov. 3) to perform his one-man show, The Truth Has Changed, laying out how the sort of disinformation created about him has become endemic in America. Recordings from previous dates will form a film for HBO. Chico will be the last stop on his 40-city tour, scheduled to rally progressives ahead of the midterm election. During a recent day off, he spoke by phone with the CN&R.

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What brings you to Chico?

This is my second time in Chico. Basically, we do grassroots tours for all of my projects, so that we can bring my work directly to the activists and organizers and front-line communities that are fighting the major fossil fuel industry, or fighting fracking, or are involved in a progressive campaign of some kind. This particular tour, we brought it to Chico because organizers from Chico[350. org] asked us to come … but also to continue this dialogue I’ve had with my audience on the road since 2010, since GasLand. The show is titled The Truth Has Changed—what  has changed since you were here the last time?

The entire world has changed the last two years! The Trump administration has gone off the rails and turned America into a madhouse. But, most specifically, we’re talking about fracking, climate change and the media …. Trump has logged something like 12 lies a minute [laugh] and he has completely destroyed the notion of truth within our civic dialogue. But it’s not just the Trump administraEvent info:

Josh fox performs the truth has changed on saturday (Nov. 3), 2 p.m., at the el rey theater, with a panel discussion at 4 p.m. tickets are $10-$20, sold online ( joshfoxchico.eventbrite.com).

tion; it’s also very, very powerful forces that exist behind the scenes that have completely altered the ecosystem of truth and the ecosystem of journalism and reporting. I’m talking about Cambridge Analytica and how they manipulated Google and Facebook specifically, through the way that every piece of information online is targeted at people individually, to mess with people’s heads. We’re talking about psychological warfare that’s going on every single day. This piece chronicles how Steve Bannon and the fossil fuel industry followed me around for nearly a decade—and they spent $50 [million] to $100 million attacking me, my journalism, my films and the [anti-] fracking movement specifically—and those people are now in charge of the way media and the government work.

industry … and I was in a very specific position to unearth the connection. Why did you choose this performance format versus  a more “traditional” documentary?

I’ve always been a person of the theater. All the films I’ve made over the past 10 years were really a weird side project from what I’ve done for most of my life .... So, when Sheila Nevins at HBO said, “We want you to do a one-man show, a performance,” it was right up my alley, and I took the challenge. In the last 10 years, I’ve been out on the road, 500 cities, touring with these films, so I’ve kind of developed a personal approach to talking to the audience, which I really enjoy. So, we decided to put that front and center. It’s been a year and a half in development, with 30 performances coast to coast and now it’s ready. We’ve filmed it, we’re editing the film now, and I’m really excited to bring it to the audience there in Chico. Ω

ECO EVENT

Along with your personal experience, were there  things you learned going down the rabbit hole of  research?

Absolutely. First, let me go back and say this is a personal, deeply cathartic, incredibly emotional roller coaster of a story. It deals with my personal recollections in this incredible front-line action from 9/11 to the fracking wars to the Iraq War to being on the front lines at Standing Rock to being inside the Bernie Sanders campaign, the Hillary Clinton campaign and a member of the Democratic platform committee—nearly a 20-year arc. But certainly, when I started to look into research, it was only because I had this extraordinary history with the fossil fuel industry that I realized that all of these stories intersect. We think about Cambridge Analytica as the thing that tampered with our news [feeds] during the election of 2016. We also have this huge story of Russia tampering with the election. What people don’t realize is this all connects to the fossil fuel

Food-maker meetup The VINE—Verde Innovation Network for Entrepreneurship—comes to the North State on Tuesday (Nov. 6) with its Food and Agriculture Innovation Meetup focusing on the technology of food processing. Ag processing companies, farmers, ranchers, faculty, students, technology companies and entrepreneurs will meet to discuss the future of food in the Sacramento Valley. The first in a series, the VINE meetup seeks to connect farmers and ranchers with food processors to spur innovation and job growth. The event takes place at 4 p.m. in Colusa Hall on the Chico State campus; registration is free (visit tinyurl.com/VineAG).


© ANAND VARMA

JOIN THE AS WE PRESENT

Anand Varma BEAUTY AND THE BIZARRE WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 7 | 7:30 PM LAXSON AUDITORIUM

© MARK THIESSEN

W

hen Anand Varma takes a photograph of a parasitic wasp consuming a caterpillar from the inside, he doesn’t want to you to be disgusted—he wants you to be amazed! He’s devoted years of his life to perfecting his techniques to create dramatic, bizarre—and beautiful—images of the miniature world around us. In these unique images, he reveals the secret life cycle of the honeybee and captures the lightning-fast behaviors of hummingbirds.

3 PHOTOS © ANAND VARMA

TICKETS: $32 Premium | $25 Adult | $23 Senior | $15 Youth & Chico State Student Available at the University Box Office • Corner of 3rd & Chestnut Streets | 530.898.6333 Sponsored by Presented by Supported by Gwen Quail

MORE INFORMATION:

WWW.CHICOPERFORMANCES.COM | 898-6333 November 1, 2018

CN&R 

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EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS Photo by Cathy wagNer

15 MINUTES

THE GOODS

time to play

Nothing stays the same

Creekside Toys, formerly Creekside Variety and Gifts, has moved from Longfellow Avenue to the Chico Mall just outside of Dick’s Sporting Goods. Owners Mike and Paula Pembroke opened the store with their daughter Courtney in October 2016, and changed the name last year. Paula went to cosmetology school and Mike studied history at Chico State. After that, Paula opened Sublime Hair Salon, which she still runs today, and Mike had a 40-year career with the California Water Service Co. After retiring, he wanted to try something new and decided to create a store with the values—and products—he enjoyed as a child. His four grandchildren, ages 1 to 6, are thrilled—“It’s like they never want to leave!” Check out their selection of vintage toys inside the mall at 1950 E. 20th St.

How does Creekside Toys distinguish itself? We’ve made it so it’s a really friendly atmosphere and there’s a lot of displays out for the kids to come in and play with, and the adults come in and play with the toys, too. That was part of our philosophy, for people to come in to a friendly atmosphere, a small atmosphere, and they can come in and play and relax and have fun. I have a lot of people that come in the store and say,

by

Meredith J. Cooper meredithc@newsreview.com

When I first moved to Chico and got settled into the CN&R offices downtown, one of my go-to lunch spots was Pluto’s. I’m a picky salad eater, so I enjoyed the choose-your-toppings-style menu. Admittedly, I haven’t eaten there for some time—years, probably. I did pop in recently, though, to try one of their daily specials advertised on the board out front. A sandwich with mac and cheese on it? I was intrigued. But they were out of that key ingredient. So I ventured elsewhere. Then earlier this week, a big sign went up in the window announcing Pluto’s impending closure after 15 years at the corner of Second and Main streets. It’s a great spot—I look forward to seeing what it turns into.

more goodbyes As quickly as Uncle Skinny’s BBQ went into the Phoenix Building, it went right out. On Oct. 20, they posted a message bidding farewell to 300 Broadway. It was a little cryptic, so I had a hunch they weren’t closed for good—just closed for there. I was right! They’re going mobile—so look for Uncle Skinny’s on wheels.

“Oh wow, I remember that from when I was a kid!” And that was kind of what we were after.

What’s the best part about having the store? I definitely think it’s the customers. I mean, seeing the kids come in, and the parents and the grandparents, and seeing the smiles on their faces and interacting with them, that’s the best part. And seeing people relate to the products we’re carrying—a lot of them are vintage products that they played with when they were kids—that’s enjoyable also. And introducing those toys to the next generation, that’s really fun.

What are your most popular vintage toys? Paddle Ball is one of the most popular. And we’ve got the

Gyroscope—it celebrated its 100th anniversary in 2017. A basic toy, gravity in motion, it’s kind of in the science category, and I’ve sold a lot of those. Most kids don’t even know what they are, but once we’ve got one out, once it gets demo’d or their parents or grandparents know what it is, they love it. It’s just something really simple they’ve been making forever, but they’re still really popular once you show the kids what they are.

How do you like being in the mall? The mall’s been great. They moved the train station down here [to this end] and they have kind of a kids area down here, they show their movies down here once a month ... so it’s worked out really well. —CATHY WAGNEr

PlatiNum aNNiversary Next month marks 70 years in business for La Hacienda. The restaurant will be celebrating Nov. 5-11, with something different planned for each day (I bet more than a few margaritas will be had!). To get in the mood, here’s a little “La Hac” trivia for ya: When original owners Nat and Tonasa Ybanez opened up shop back in 1948, they did so on Nord Avenue, in the building now occupied by Thai Express. (It’s now at 2635 Esplanade.) Tonasa’s original “secret sauce” is still served by the current owners—and it’s bottled, so you can take it with you. taProom iN the works Last week Kevin Jaradah, owner of The Lab Bar & Grill and co-founder of Chico Beer Enthusiasts, announced he’s planning to open a taproom. He’s received most of the permits needed, he said, and the matter will be taken up by the Chico City Council on Tuesday (Nov. 6). Jaradah tells me he’s dubbed his newest venture The Brew Kettle and plans to locate it across Nord Avenue from Safeway, where The Hookah Spot once was. In addition to beer, there’ll be kombucha, coffee and real root beer on tap, plus small bites. move over The Chico Chamber of Commerce, which will be saying goodbye to longtime Executive Director Katie Simmons Friday (Nov. 2), is moving. The office, which is combined with the Chico visitor center, will close Thursday-Friday (Nov. 1-2) while staff relocates to 180 E. Fourth St., Ste. 120. Best of luck on the transition. art for aNimals Last week, I got word that A Seekers Boutique & Art Studio in

Paradise, owned by Desiree Johnson, donated nearly $4,500 to Paradise Animal Shelter Helpers. It was all part of her Chairs for Charity event, in which participants painted chairs and other small items and put them up for silent auction. Find the boutique at 6424 Skyway.

giviNg thaNks To the reader who dropped off the cute-as-can-be Boston terrier mug for me, thank you! You made my day!

Endorsed by: Abe Baily Adam Fedeli Allen Harthorn Amy L. Pugel Andy Holcombe Angela C Cook Ann Schwab Anne Stephens

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CN&R

November 1, 2018

Anthony Watts Brian and Joan Rea Butte County Democrats California Nurses Association Charles and Marvey Mueller Charles Nelson Cheryl King Chico Business Network Dan Carter Dan Lacko Dawn Garcia Democratic Action Club of Chico

Dennis and Eddi Deromedi Diana Fogel Donn Marshall Douglas Calbreath Elizabeth Thomas Ellen Simon Frank Pugel George and Leanna Rawley Grace Marvin Irv Schiffman Jain Redmond Jane Coleman Jasper Lerch Jay Bogiatto Jeff and Sharon Sloan

Jeffrey Samorano Joe and Leslie Russo John Martin John Merz John Scott John Shovein John T. Lewis Jon Luvaas Judy Cadet Julian Zener Karl Ory Katherine Pugel Katie Pugel Katrina Woodcox Kay Simenc Kenneth Sobon Laura Burghardt

Leeds Rich Mark and Cynthia Gailey Mark Forest Harlan Mark Stemen Martha Wescoat-Andes Marvey Mueller Mary Gardner Mary Muchowski Matthew York Maureen Kirk Melanie Enloe Michael McGinnis Mike Stearns Milly Polllock Mobilize Chico

Nancy McGie Natalie Carter North State Labor Federation OJ and Gene Anna McMillan Pamela Posey Patrice York Patricia Ansorge Patrick Conroy Paul Friedlander Paul Stephens Paula Creighton Peter and Kim Tichinin Randall Stone Rich Leeds Robert Stornetta

Robert Trausch Robert Zadra Robin Keehn Sandy Goulart Shelly Kirn Sheryl Krambo Skip Augur Steve Carson Steve Kay Steve McDonald Suellen Rowlison Susan Mason Susan Scott Tami Ritter Thomas Jordan Tim Ruckle Tom and Kathy Reed Tom McCready

Tom Nickell Tom Tarman United Food and Commercial Workers Union local 8 Vic and Kay Simenc Victor Krambo Vincent Commendatore Walter Schafer Wesley Dempsey William L McCauley Woody Elliot

Paid for by Scott Huber Chico City Council 2018


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CN&R 

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The real

FIGHT against

Revealing the top 10 underreported stories of the year

FAKE NEWS BY PAUL ROSENBERG

F

ake news is not a new thing. With the return of its annual list of censored stories in Censored 2019: Fighting the Fake News Invasion, Project Censored’s vivid cover art recalls H.G. Wells’ War of the Worlds. The situation today may feel as desolate as the cover art suggests. “But Censored 2019 is a book about fighting fake news,” editors Andy Lee Roth and Mickey Huff observed in the book’s introduction. In the end, they argued that “critical media education—rather than censorship, blacklists, privatized fact-checkers or legislative bans—is the best weapon for fighting the ongoing fake news invasion.” Project Censored has long been engaged in much more than just uncovering and publicizing stories kept down and out of the corporate media. Over the years, it’s added new analytical categories: sensationalist and titillating Junk Food News stories. Through it all, the list of censored stories remains central to Project Censored’s mission, which, the editors point out, can be read in two different ways, “as a critique of the shortcomings of U.S. corporate news media for their failure to adequately cover these stories, or as a celebration of independent news media, without which we would remain either uninformed or misinformed about these crucial stories and issues.” With all that in mind, here is About this story: To learn more about Project Censored, Project Censored’s annual Top 10 list including reading the expanded list of 25 underreported stories or purchasing of underreported stories: the book, visit projectcensored.org. Paul Rosenberg is senior editor at Random Lengths News.

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ILLUSTRATIONS BY ANSON STEVENS-BOLLEN


1

Declining rule of law, human rights

According to the World Justice Project Rule of Law Index 2017-2018, released in January 2018, a striking worldwide decline in basic human rights has driven an overall decline in the rule of law since October 2016, the month before Trump’s election. Fundamental rights—one of eight categories measured— declined in 71 out of 113 nations surveyed. Overall, 34 percent of countries’ scores declined, while just 29 percent improved. The United States ranked 19th, down one from 2016, with declines in checks on government powers and deepening discrimination. Fundamental rights include absence of discrimination, right to life and security, due process, freedom of expression and religion, right to privacy, freedom of association and labor rights. Constraints on government powers, which measures the extent to which those who govern are bound by law, saw the second greatest declines (64 countries out of 113 dropped). This is where the United States saw the greatest deterioration, the World Justice Project stated in a press release. “While all sub-factors in this dimension declined at least slightly from 2016, the score for lawful transition of power— based on responses to survey questions on confidence in national and local election processes and procedures— declined most markedly,” the press release stated. The United States also scored notably poorly on several measurements of discrimination. “With scores of .50 for equal treatment and absence of discrimination (on a scale of 0 to 1), .48 for discrimination in the civil justice system, and .37 for discrimination in the criminal justice system, the U.S. finds itself ranked 78 out of 113 countries on all three subfactors,” the World Justice Project stated. The four Nordic countries—Denmark, Norway, Finland and Sweden—remained in the top four positions. New Zealand, Canada and Australia were the only top 10 countries outside of Europe. “The WJP’s 2017-2018 Rule of Law Index received scant attention from U.S. corporate media,” Project Censored noted. The only coverage they found was a Newsweek article drawing on The Guardian’s coverage. This pattern of ignoring international comparisons, across all subject matter, is pervasive in the corporate media. It severely cripples our capacity for objective self-reflection and self-improvement as a nation.

2

Secrets sold to highest bidders

In March 2017, WikiLeaks released Vault 7, a trove of 8,761 leaked confidential CIA files about its global hacking programs, which WikiLeaks described as the “largest ever publication of confidential documents on the agency.” It drew significant media attention. But almost no one noticed what George Eliason of OpEdNews pointed out. “Sure, the CIA has all these tools available,” Eliason pointed out. “Yes, they are used on the public. The important part is [that] it’s not the CIA that’s using them. That’s the part that needs to frighten you.” As Eliason went on to explain, the CIA’s mission prevents it from using the tools, especially on Americans. “All the tools are unclassified, open-source, and can be used by anyone,” Eliason explained. “It makes them not exactly usable for secret agent work. That’s what makes it impossible for them to use Vault 7 tools directly.” Drawing heavily on more than a decade of reporting by Tim Shorrock for Mother Jones and The Nation, Eliason’s OpEdNews series reported on the explosive growth of private contractors in the intelligence community, which allows the CIA and other agencies to gain access to intelligence gathered by methods they’re prohibited from using. In a 2016 report for The Nation, Shorrock estimated that

3

80 percent of an estimated 58,000 private intelligence contractors worked for the five largest companies. He concluded that “not only has intelligence been privatized to an unimaginable degree, but an unprecedented consolidation of corporate power inside U.S. intelligence has left the country dangerously dependent on a handful of companies for its spying and surveillance needs.” Eliason reported how private contractors pioneered open-source intelligence by circulating or selling the information they gathered before the agency employing them had reviewed and classified it. Therefore, “no one broke any laws.” As a result, according to Eliason’s second article, “People with no security clearances and radical political agendas have state-sized cyber tools at their disposal, [which they can use] for their own political agendas, private business, and personal vendettas.” Corporate media reporting on Vault 7 sometimes noted, but failed to focus on, the dangerous role of private contractors, Project Censored pointed out—with the notable exception of a Washington Post op-ed in which Shorrock reviewed his previous reporting and concluded that overreliance on private intelligence contractors was “a liability built into our system that intelligence officials have long known about and done nothing to correct.”

Richest 1 percent get richer

In November 2017, financial services company Credit Suisse released its eighth annual Global Wealth Report, which The Guardian reported on under the headline “Richest 1% own half the world’s wealth, study finds.” The wealth share of the world’s richest people increased “from 42.5% at the height of the 2008 financial crisis to 50.1% in 2017, or $140tn (£106tn),” The Guardian reported, adding that “The biggest losers … are young people who should not expect to become as rich as their parents.” “[Despite being more educated than their parents,] millennials are doing less well than their parents at the same age, especially in relation to income, home ownership and other dimensions of well-being assessed in this report,” Credit Suisse Chairman Urs Rohner said. “We expect only a minority of high achievers and those in high demand sectors such as technology or finance to effectively overcome the ‘millennial disadvantage.’” “No other part of the wealth pyramid has been transformed as much since 2000 as the millionaire and ultra-high net worth individual (known as UHNWI) segments,” the report said. “The number of millionaires has increased by 170%, while the number of UHNWIs (individuals with net worth of USD 50 million or more) has risen five-fold, making them by far the fastest-growing group of wealth holders.” There were 2.3 million new millionaires this year, taking the total to 36 million. “At the other end of the spectrum, the world’s 3.5 billion poorest adults each have assets of less than $10,000,” The Guardian reported. “Collectively these people, who account for 70% of the world’s working-age population, account for just 2.7% of global wealth.” “Tremendous concentration of wealth and the extreme poverty that results from it are problems that affect everyone in the world, but wealth inequalities do not receive nearly as much attention as they should in the establishment press,” Project Censored noted. “The few corporate news reports that have addressed this issue—including an August 2017 Bloomberg article and a July 2016 report for CBS-MoneyWatch—focused exclusively on wealth inequality within the United States. As Project Censored has previously reported, corporate news consistently covers the world’s billionaires while ignoring millions of humans who live in poverty.”

4

Wireless companies and cellphone safety Are cellphones and other wireless devices as safe as we’ve been led to believe? Don’t bet on it, according to decades of buried research reviewed in a March 2018 investigation for The Nation by Mark Hertsgaard and Mark Dowie. “The wireless industry not only made the same moral choices that the tobacco and fossil-fuel industries did, it also borrowed from the same public relations playbook those industries pioneered,” Hertsgaard and Dowie reported. “Like their tobacco and fossil-fuel brethren, wireless executives have chosen not to publicize what their own scientists have said about the risks of their products. ... On the contrary, the industry—in America, Europe, and Asia—has spent untold millions of dollars in the past 25 years proclaiming that science is on its side, that the critics are quack, and that consumers have nothing to fear.” Their report comes at the same time as several new developments are bringing the issue to the fore, including a Kaiser Permanente study (published December 2017 in Scientific Reports) finding much higher risks of miscarriage, a study in the October 2017 American Journal of Epidemiology, finding increased risk for glioma (a type of brain tumor), and a disclosure by the National Frequency Agency of France that nine out of 10 cellphones exceed government radiation safety limits when tested in the way they are actually used, next to the human body. As the The Nation reported, George Carlo was a scientist hired by the Cellular Telecommunications and Internet Association in 1993 to research cellphone safety

TOP 10 C O N T I N U E D NOVEMBER 1, 2018

O N PA G E 2 2

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TOP 10 C O N T I N U E D

F R O M PA G E 2 1

and allay public fears, heading up the industry-financed Wireless Technology Research project. But he was fired and publicly attacked by the Cellular Telecommunications and Internet Association in 1999, after uncovering disturbing evidence of danger: Carlo sent letters to each of the industry’s chieftains on Oct. 7, 1999, reiterating that the Wireless Technology Research project had found the following: “The risk of rare neuro-epithelial tumors on the outside of the brain was more than doubled … in cellphone users”; there was an apparent “correlation between brain tumors occurring on the right side of the head and the use of the phone on the right side of the head”; and “the ability of radiation from a phone’s antenna to cause functional genetic damage [was] definitely positive. ...” The Kaiser Permanente study involved exposure to magnetic field nonionizing radiation associated with wireless devices as well as cellphones and found a 2.72 times higher risk of miscarriage for those with higher versus lower exposure. Lead investigator De-Kun Li warned that the possible effects of this radiation have been controversial because, “from a public health point of view, everybody is exposed. If there is any health effect, the potential impact is huge.” “The wireless industry has ‘war-gamed’ science by playing offense as well as defense, actively sponsoring studies that result in published findings supportive of the industry, while aiming to discredit competing research that raises questions about the safety of cellular devices and other wireless technologies,” Project Censored summarized. While some local media have covered the findings of a few selected studies, Project Censored notes, “the norm for corporate media is to report the telecom industry line—that is, that evidence linking Wi-Fi and cellphone radiation to health issues, including cancer and other medical problems, is either inconclusive or disputed. ... As Hertsgaard and Dowie’s Nation report suggested, corporate coverage of this sort is partly how the telecom industry remains successful in avoiding the consequences of [its] actions.” 22

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NOVEMBER 1, 2018

5

WaPo suppresses employees’ criticism

On May 1, 2017, The Washington Post introduced a policy prohibiting its employees from criticizing its advertisers and business partners, and encouraging them to snitch on one another. “A new social-media policy at The Washington Post prohibits conduct on social media that ‘adversely affects The Post’s customers, advertisers, subscribers, vendors, suppliers or partners,” Andrew Beaujon reported in The Washingtonian the next month. “In such cases, Post management reserves the right to take disciplinary action ‘up to and including termination of employment.’” Beaujon also cited “A clause that encourages employees to snitch on one another: ‘If you have any reason to believe that an employee may be in violation of The Post’s Social Media Policy … you should contact The Post’s Human Resources Department.’” At the time, the Washington-Baltimore News Guild, which represents the Post’s employees, was protesting the policy and was seeking removal of the controversial parts in a new labor agreement. A follow-up report by Whitney Webb for MintPress News highlighted the broader possible censorship effects, as prohibiting social media criticism could spill over into reporting as well. “Among The Washington Post’s advertisers are corporate giants like GlaxoSmithKline, Bank of America and Koch

6

Russiagate: the two-headed monster

This entry seems to reflect a well-intentioned effort to critically examine fake news-related issues within a “censored story” framework. What Project Censored calls attention to is important: “Corporate media coverage of Russiagate has created a two-headed monster of propaganda and censorship. By saturating news coverage with a sensationalized narrative, Russiagate has superseded other important, newsworthy stories.” As a frustrated journalist with omnivorous interests, I heartily concur—but what’s involved is too complex to simply be labeled “propaganda.” On the other hand, the censorship of alternative journalistic voices is a classic, well-defined Project Censored story, which suffers from the attempt to fit both together. In April 2017, Aaron Maté reported for The Intercept on a quantitative study of MSNBC’s The Rachel Maddow Show from Feb. 20 to March 31, 2017, which found that “Russia-focused segments accounted for 53 percent of these broadcasts.” Maté wrote: “Maddow’s Russia coverage has dwarfed the time devoted to other top issues, including Trump’s escalating crackdown on undocumented immigrants (1.3 percent of coverage); Obamacare repeal (3.8 percent); the legal battle over Trump’s Muslim ban (5.6 percent), a surge of anti-GOP activism and town halls since Trump took office (5.8 percent), and Trump administration scandals and stumbles (11 percent).” Well and good. But is this propaganda? At Truthdig, Norman Solomon wrote: “As the cable news network most trusted by Democrats as a liberal beacon, MSNBC plays a special role in fueling rage

Industries,” Webb wrote. “With the new policy, social media posts criticizing GlaxoSmithKline’s habit of making false and misleading claims about its products, inflating prices and withholding crucial drug safety information from the government will no longer be made by Post employees.” Beyond that, Webb suggested it could protect the CIA, which has $600 million contract with Amazon Web Services. Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos purchased The Post four months after that contract was signed. “While criticism of the CIA is not technically prohibited by the new policy, former Post reporters have suggested that making such criticisms could endanger one’s career,” Webb noted. He added that in 2013, former Post writer John Hanrahan told Alternet, “Post reporters and editors are aware that Bezos, as majority owner of Amazon, has a financial stake in maintaining good relations with the CIA—and this sends a clear message to even the hardest-nosed journalist that making the CIA look bad might not be a good career move.” “Corporate news coverage of The Washington Post’s social media policy has been extremely limited,” Project Censored noted. It’s part of a much broader problem, identified in Jeremy Iggers’ 1998 book, Good News, Bad News: Journalism Ethics and the Public Interest. Iggers argued that journalism ethics focused on individual reporters completely missed the larger issue of corporate conflicts whose systemic effects fundamentally undermined journalism’s role in a democracy.

among progressive-minded viewers toward Russia’s ‘attack on our democracy’ that is somehow deemed more sinister and newsworthy than corporate dominance of American politics (including Democrats), racist voter suppression, gerrymandering and many other U.S. electoral defects all put together.” Also true. But not so much propaganda as Project Censored’s broader category of “news abuse,” which includes propaganda and spin, among other forms of “distraction to direct our attention away from what we really need to know.” To fully grasp what’s involved requires a more complex analysis. On the other hand, the censorship of alternative journalistic voices is far more clear-cut and straightforward. In a report for Fairness and Accuracy in Reporting, Robin Andersen examined Russiagate-inspired censorship moves by Twitter, Google and others. A key initial target was RT (the television network formerly known as Russia Today). “RT’s reporting bears striking similarities to alternative and independent media content, and that is why letting the charges against RT stand unexamined is so dangerous,” Andersen noted. In fact, the government’s intelligence report on RT included its reporting on the dangers of fracking as part of its suspect activity. Beyond that, the spill-over suppression was dramatic: “Yet in the battle against fake news, much of the best, most accurate independent reporting is disappearing from Google searches,” Anderson said. “The World Socialist Web Site (8/2/17) reported that Google’s new search protocol is restricting access to leading independent, left-wing, progressive, anti-war and democratic rights websites. The estimated declines in traffic generated by Google searches for news sites are striking.” There were declines for AlterNet.org (63 percent), DemocracyNow.org (36 percent), CounterPunch.org (21 percent), ConsortiumNews.com (47 percent), MediaMatters.org (42 percent), and TheIntercept.com (19 percent), among others.

7

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Regenerative griculture

he world’s agricultural and degraded soils the capacity to recover 50 percent to 66 nt of the historic carbon loss to the atmore, according to a 2004 paper in Science, tually reversing the processes driving lobal warming. A set of practices known as “regenerative agriculture” could play a major role in accomplishing that, while substantially increasing crop yields as well, according to information compiled and ublished by Ronnie Cummins, founder d director of the Organic Consumers ciation, in May 2017. or thousands of years we grew food by ting soil carbon and, in the last hundred or e carbon in fossil fuel as well,” food and ng writer Michael Pollan wrote. “But now now how to grow even more food while at me time returning carbon and fertility and to the soil” ummins, who’s also a founding member generation International, wrote that regene agriculture offers a “world-changing igm” that can help solve many of today’s onmental and public health problems. As Guardian explained: Regenerative agriculture comprises an array hniques that rebuild soil and, in the prosequester carbon. Typically, it uses cover and perennials so that bare soil is never ed, and grazes animals in ways that mimic als in nature. It also offers ecological benar beyond carbon storage: it stops soil on, re-mineralizes soil, protects the purity oundwater and reduces damaging pesticide ertilizer runoff.” We can’t really solve the climate crisis (and lated soil, environmental, and public health without simultaneously solving the food arming crisis,” Cummins wrote. “We need p putting greenhouse gas pollution into mosphere (by moving to 100% renewable y), but we also need to move away from ical-intensive, energy-intensive food, factory ng and land use, as soon as possible.” addition to global warming, there are und economic and social justice concerns ved. Out-of-touch and out-of-control governments world now take our tax money and spend billion ... a year mainly subsidizing 50 million rial farmers to do the wrong thing,” Cummins . “Meanwhile, 700 million small family farms erders, comprising the 3 billion people who ce 70% of the world’s food on just 25% of orld’s acreage, struggle to make ends meet.” you’ve never heard of it before, don’t be sed. Regenerative agriculture has received limttention in the establishment press, highd by only two recent, substantive reports e New York Times Magazine and Salon,” ct Censored wrote.

8

Congress passes data-sharing law

On March 21, House Republicans released a 2,232-page omnibus spending bill. It passed both houses and was signed into law in two days. Attached to the spending provisions that made it urgent “mustpass” legislation was the completely unrelated Clarifying Lawful Overseas Use of Data Act of 2018, also known as the CLOUD Act. “The CLOUD Act enables the U.S. government to acquire data across international borders regardless of other nations’ data privacy laws and without the need for warrants,” Project Censored summarized. It also significantly weakens protections against foreign government actions. “It was never reviewed or marked up by any committee in either the House or the Senate,” the Electronic Frontier Foundation’s David Ruiz wrote. “It never received a hearing. ...It was robbed of a stand-alone floor vote because Congressional leadership decided, behind closed doors, to attach this unvetted, unrelated data bill to the $1.3 trillion government spending bill.” Congressional leadership failed to listen to citizen concerns, Ruiz wrote, with devastating consequences: “Because of this failure, U.S. and foreign police will have

9

Legal rights for nature

In March 2017, the government of New Zealand ended a 140-year dispute with an indigenous Maori tribe by enacting a law that officially recognized the Whanganui River, which the tribe considers its ancestor, as a living entity with rights. The tribe’s perspective was explained to The Guardian by its lead negotiator, Gerrard Albert. “We consider the river an ancestor and always have,” Albert said. “We have fought to find an approximation in law so that all others can understand that from our perspective treating the river as a living entity is the correct way to approach it, as in indivisible whole, instead of the traditional model for the last 100 years of treating it from a perspective of ownership and management.” But that could be just the beginning. “It is a critical precedent for acknowledging the Rights of Nature in legal systems around the world,” Kayla DeVault reported for YES! Magazine. Others are advancing this perspective, DeVault wrote: “In response to the Standing Rock Sioux battle against the Dakota Access Pipeline, the Ho-Chunk Nation of Wisconsin amended its constitution to include the Rights of Nature. This is the first time a North American tribe has used a Western legal framework to adopt such laws. Some American municipalities have protected

new mechanisms to seize data across the globe. Because of this failure, your private emails, your online chats, your Facebook, Google, Flickr photos, your Snapchat videos, your private lives online, your moments shared digitally between only those you trust, will be open to foreign law enforcement without a warrant and with few restrictions on using and sharing your information, privacy and human rights,” concluded Robyn Greene, who reported for Just Security. “The little corporate news coverage that the CLOUD Act received tended to put a positive spin on it,” Project Censored noted. Because of this failure, U.S. laws will be bypassed on U.S. soil. Greene noted that the CLOUD Act negates protections of two interrelated existing laws. It creates an exception to the Stored Communications Act that allows certified foreign governments to request personal data directly from U.S. companies. “This exception enables those countries to bypass the Mutual Legal Assistance Treaty process, which protects human rights by requiring foreign governments to work with the Department of Justice to obtain warrants from U.S. judges before they can access that data for their criminal investigations,” Greene explained.

their watersheds against fracking by invoking Rights of Nature.” “[If the New Zealand Whanganui River settlement] was able to correct the gap in Western and indigenous paradigms in New Zealand, surely a similar effort to protect the Missouri River could be produced for the Standing Rock and Cheyenne River nations by the American government,” DeVault wrote. The same could be done with a wide range of other environmental justice disputes involving Native American tribes. Mihnea Tanasescu, writing for The Conversation, described the broader sweep of recent developments in the “rights of nature,” noting that significant problems have resulted from the lack of specific guardianship provisions, which are integral to the Whanganui River law. “By granting natural entities personhood one by one and assigning them specific guardians, over time New Zealand could drastically change an ossified legal system that still sees oceans, mountains and forests primarily as property, guaranteeing nature its day in court,” Tanasescu concluded. “A few corporate media outlets have covered the New Zealand case and subsequent decisions in India,” Project Censored noted. “However, these reports have not provided the depth of coverage found in the independent press or addressed how legal decisions in other countries might provide models for the United States.”

10

FBI’s racial profiling

At the same time that white supremacists were preparing for the “Unite the Right” demonstration in Charlottesville, Va., which resulted in the murder of Heather Heyer in August 2017, the FBI Counterterrorism Division produced an intelligence assessment warning of a very different, though actually nonexistent, threat: “Black Identity Extremists.” The report appeared to be the first time the term had been used to identify a movement, according to Foreign Policy magazine, which broke the story. “But former government officials and legal experts said no such movement exists, and some expressed concern that the term is part of a politically motivated effort to find an equivalent threat to white supremacists,” Foreign Policy reported. “The use of terms like ‘black identity extremists’ is part of a long-standing FBI attempt to define a movement where none exists,” said former FBI agent Mike German, who now works for the Brennan Center for Justice. “Basically, it’s black people who scare them.” “It’s classic Hoover-style labeling with a little bit of maliciousness and euphemism wrapped up together,” said William Maxwell, a Washington University professor working on a book about FBI monitoring of black writers. “The language—black identity extremist—strikes me as weird and really a continuation of the worst of Hoover’s past.” “There is a long tradition of the FBI targeting black activists and this is not surprising,” Black Lives Matter activist DeRay McKesson told Foreign Policy. A former homeland security official told them that carelessly connecting unrelated groups will make it harder for law enforcement to identify real threats. “It’s so convoluted—it’s compromising officer safety,” the former official said. “The corporate media [has] covered the FBI report on ‘black identity extremists’ in narrow or misleading ways,” Project Censored noted, citing examples from The New York Times, Fox News and NBC News. “Coverage like this both draws focus away from the active white supremacist movement and feeds the hate and fear on which such a movement thrives.” Ω

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Arts &Culture Bonnie Bloomgarden is still front-and-center with L.A.’s Death Valley Girls. PHOTO BY MICHAEL HAIGHT

THIS WEEK

Failed utopia

1

THU

Special Events LYNN FREED: Award-winning author author discusses her recent book, The Romance of Elsewhere, a collection of essays reflecting on travel, identity, language and literature. Thu, 11/1, 7:30pm. Free. Zingg Recital Hall, Chico State, ARTS 279.

NOVEMBEARD KICKOFF: The Chico Beard Collective hosts its annual competition to raise funds for music and arts programs at local high schools. Show up clean-shaven, pledge your $25 and enjoy an imperial stout to kick those follicles into overdrive. Thu, 11/1, 6pm. Secret Trail Brewing Co., 132 Meyers St., Ste. 120.

The cult of Death Valley Girls

Tyears, be coming more frequently in recent from music writers as well as he cries of “rock is dead” seem to

from the dinosaurs who got rich off of it decades ago. That senby timent is as lazy as it is Mark untrue. However, there Lore is a simple element of rock that seems to Preview: have been lost through Death Valley Girls the ages. perform Sunday, The art of entertainNov. 11, 8:30 p.m.. ing and putting on a Gymshorts open. show—once a pillar Tickets: $10 (at the door and of rock ’n’ roll—has brownpapertickets. gone the way of the com) drum solo (OK, drum Duffy’s Tavern solos can go). Well, 337 Main St. Death Valley Girls’ 343-7718 Bonnie Bloomgarden facebook.com/ isn’t having it. Her duffschico Los Angeles band takes a very egalitarian approach to rock ’n’ roll, while also trying to keep a certain mystique—even in a time when you can see once unapproachable rock stars posting dinner selfies on Instagram. “Our policy was to be mysterious,” Bloomgarden said. “We just wanted to create a special night for people. Rock ’n’ roll should bring people together. We believe that we’re entertainers, so 24

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NOVEMBER 1, 2018

we don’t get political … unless it’s people treating people poorly.” Death Valley Girls’ live performances recall the “satanic panic” of the 1980s, with members clad in black capes, with “666” and pentagrams scrawled on their foreheads, like runaways who found refuge in a satanic cult (you could say it’s all been done before, but it’s not done nearly enough). The band’s just-released third record, Darkness Rains, its first on Suicide Squeeze, continues the lipstick-andeyeliner glam, punk sneer and B-movie sleaze of the previous records, and adds a few more layers of unsettling noise. It’s the soundtrack for what Bloomgarden calls the essence of Death Valley Girls: “The idea of a failed utopia.” Actually, the members mostly get their kicks from the paranormal, as well as ’60s and ’70s horror flicks, themes that go back to the band’s 2014 debut for Burger Records, Street Venom. Bloomgarden doesn’t shy away from telling stories of the band’s run-in with a mummy, or even the origins of their own songs. She says she often “writes” lyrics in the studio, right before they record. Or rather … “These ideas don’t come from any of us,” said Bloomgarden, without a trace of irony. “They come from outer space. The studio is a super psychic experience.”

Whether they’re beamed from space, or conjured from the subconscious, songs like “TV in Jail on Mars” and “Born Again and Again” sound otherworldly, with Bloomgarden’s wail piercing through droning desert riffs. The band is exactly what its name implies. Although Bloomgarden studied jazz and owns quite a jazz collection, it was the debut from Black Sabbath that set her on her path. She formed Death Valley Girls with current guitarist Larry Schemel and former drummer Patty Schemel (yes, that Patty Schemel, previously of Hole), and has since brought in new disciples for this gang, including bassist Pickle, drummer The Kid and a rotation of other guest players. Death Valley Girls continue to invade cities, spreading the powers of rock ’n’ roll, and forever in search of the paranormal. The band recently opened for L7 and the video for the new single “Disaster (Is What We’re After)” features Iggy Pop eating a hamburger in a loving nod to an Andy Warhol film short. It seems the cult is only growing. Get on board, or, as Bloomgarden jokingly puts it, get lost. “It’s our religion,” she said. “It’s just as hokey as any other religion. We believe in rock ’n’ roll and cool stuff. If people think we’re dumb then they’re stupid.” Ω

Theater HIGH NOON ON WALL STREET: Written and directed by TOTR’s own Jerry Miller, this rock ’n’ roll musical takes the Academy Award-winning film High Noon and gives it a modern twist. Hero Frank Miller is getting out of prison for insider trading and he’s out for revenge as faces down a pack of corporate raiders. Thu, 11/1, 7:30pm. $12-$22. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Road, Paradise. 877-5760. totr.org

OEDIPUS: PV High School students perform the classic Greek tragedy on the king’s fall from grace. Thu, 11/1, 7pm. $6-$8. Pleasant Valley High School, 1475 East Ave. 891-3050.

THE WALWORTH FARCE: Laughs and mayhem abound in this disturbing, moving and hysterical play by Enda Walsh. A misfit family of Irish expats confine themselves to their London apartment, reenacting a bizarre domestic drama, but when a stranger enters the scene, things spin wildly out of control. Thu, 11/1, 7:30pm. $15. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St.

THE WALWORTH FARCE

Shows Thursday-Saturday, Nov. 1-17 Blue Room Theatre SEE THURSDAY-SATURDAY, THEATER


FINE ARTS ON NEXT PAGE

RONN MCFARLAND

Saturday, Nov. 3 Museum of Northern California Art SEE SATURDAY, MUSIC

THE WALWORTH FARCE: See Thursday. Fri, 11/2, 7:30pm. $15. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St.

3

SAT

NOR CAL ROLLER GIRLS: Local roller derby queens take on SINtral on the flat track. Sat 11/3, 7pm. Cal Skate, 2465 Carmichael Drive.

Special Events

PAULOWEEN: Insane pedal-powered Halloween

ALL CHURCH FALL BAZAAR: Massive arts and crafts sales with homemade quilts, baked goods, holiday decorations, jams and jellies, and tons of other stuff. Lunch available for $5 from 11am-1:30pm. Sat 11/3. First Baptist Church, 903 First St., Orland.

COWBOY FOLKLORE & MUSIC: Rustle up a dinner

2

FRI

Special Events BIKE CHECK, FIT AND MAINTENANCE CLINIC: North State Composite Mountain Bike Team and local mechanics host a free clinic reviewing trail-side repairs and basic bike information every cyclist should know. Fri, 11/2, 3:30pm. Hooker Oak Park, 1928 Manzanita Ave.

DINNER WITH A SCIENTIST: Enjoy a catered dinner with a scientist of your choice to help support the Chico Science Fair. Science exhibit, dessert auction, music from Knight & Thorne, and a talk from Chico State biology professor David Stachura. Fri, 11/2, 5pm. $30-$50. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St. 828-1129. chicosciencefair.org

SHOR FUNDRAISING DINNER: SHOR homeless support center hosts its annual dinner and auction. Fri, 11/2, 5:30pm. $30. Paradise Alliance Church, 6491 Clark Road, Paradise. shorparadise.org

HIGH NOON ON WALL STREET

Thursday-Sunday, Nov. 1-18 Theatre on the Ridge SEE THURSDAY-SUNDAY, THEATER

Music JOAN BAEZ: Legendary singer, songwriter, activist and Rock & Roll Hall of Fame inductee Joan Baez takes the stage on her farewell tour. SOLD OUT. Fri, 11/2, 7:30pm. $15-$80. Laxson Auditorium, Chico State.

MISCAST CABARET: Singing, dancing and more in this Theatre Arts Club variety show. Fri, 11/2, 6:30pm. Rowland-Taylor Recital Hall, Chico State, Performing Arts Center 134.

Theater HIGH NOON ON WALL STREET: See Thursday. Fri, 11/2, 7:30pm. $12-$22. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Road, Paradise. 877-5760. totr.org

OEDIPUS: See Thursday. Fri, 11/2, 7pm. $6-$8. Pleasant Valley High School, 1475 East Ave. 891 3050.

SIDE SHOW: Based on a remarkable true story, this one-of-a-kind tale follows the legendary Hilton twins, as they rise from conjoined side-show attractions to Hollywood celebrities. Performed by talented students from the Butte College theater department. Fri, 11/2, 7:30pm. $10-$18. Butte College Black Box Theatre, 3536 Campus Drive, ARTS Building, Oroville. 893-7444.

organizations have experienced as both have worked to bring positive change to our community. Sat, 11/3, 10am. $5. Chico History Museum, 141 Salem St. chicohistorymuseum. org

of tri-tip, cowboy beans, salad and bread served family style, then sit back and enjoy an evening of entertainment with Edson Gamersall, poetic essays by Rae Turnbull and Dave Stamey, acclaimed cowboy entertainer. Proceeds benefit the Knights of Columbus’ charitable giving fund. Sat 11/3, 5:30pm. $45. Our Divine Savior Social Hall, 556 E. Lassen Ave. 864-7088. cowboyfolkloreandmusic.org

DUELING PIANOS, DINNER & DESSERT: Killer Keyz perform during this annual Soroptimist International fundraiser, plus dinner and a dessert auction. Sat 11/3, 5pm. $75. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St. 514-3352. SoroptimistChico.org

FARM CITY CELEBRATION HARVEST FESTIVAL: Free event celebrates Chico’s first farmer, John Bidwell, with kids arts and crafts, interactive animal displays, a bounce house, calf roping, farm equipment on display, Bidwell Mansion tours and more. Sat 11/3, 10am. Bidwell Mansion State Historic Park, 525 Esplanade.

HOLIDAY CRAFT & GIFT FAIRE: Community artisans and vendors sell their goods to support county veterans. Sat 11/3, 10am. Veterans Memorial Hall, 2374 Montgomery St., Oroville.

INSPIRED GIFTS & GOODS: The Inspire Foundation hosts a craft fair featuring local vendors, handmade gifts, food trucks and more. The Foundation helps raise money to support Inspire School students in need, teacher requests and scholarships. Sat 11/3, 11am. Chico Country Day School, 1054 Broadway St.

JOSH FOX – THE TRUTH HAS CHANGED: Director and playwright Josh Fox discusses his experiences as a 911 first responder to his current environmental activism work. Fox is the director of Gasland & Gasland 2, and was instrumental in helping to get fracking banned in Butte County through Measure E. Sat 11/3, 2pm. $10-$20. El Rey Theater, 230 W. Second St.

LOCAL VOLUNTEER ORGS: Debbie Meline from Respect the Walls and Daniel Bringoff of Chico Community Watch speak about the challenges, successes and rewards their

FREE LISTINGS! Post your event for free online at www.newsreview.com/calendar, or email the CN&R calendar editor at cnrcalendar@newsreview.com. Deadline for print listings is Wednesday, 5 p.m., one week prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

race hosted by Chico’s own Paul Component Engineering. Sat 11/3, 6pm. Paul Component Engineering, 11204 Midway. paulcomp.com

SOGGY DOG DAY: Pups take over the pool for water play while you find great information at a pet health fair. Ticket includes 30 minutes in the pool, a goody bag and a photo opportunity with your dog. Proceeds go toward CARD’s fund for a new dog park. Sat 11/3, 11am. $10. Shapiro Pool, Chico Junior High, 280 Memorial Way. 560-895-4711. chicorec.com

THAT’S AMORE!: Organic, locally sourced Italian dinner, drinks, live music from Soul Posse, vintage Italian music, auctions and raffles to support the Arc of Butte County. Sat 11/3, 6pm. $50. Arc Pavilion, 2040 Park Ave. arcbutte.org

TIMSHEL VINEYARDS HARVEST PARTY: Celebrate a great vintage with appetizers, wine for sale and beer from British Bulldog. Sat 11/3, 2pm. Timshel Nursery & Vineyard, Inc., 5438 Cana Highway.

Music NORTH STATE SYMPHONY REHEARSAL: Join Scott Seaton and talented symphony musicians for an open rehearsal, a lecture on Mozart, a Q&A and a chance to mingle with the NSS crew. Sat, 11/3, 2pm. $20-$25. Museum of Northern California Art, 900 Esplanade. monca.org

unfamiliar with the instrument, this virtuoso is the guy to see. Sat, 11/3, 7:30pm. $20. Museum of Northern California Art, 900 Esplanade. monca.org

STEVE JOHNSON: Fingerstyle guitarist plays light rock, country and more for brunch. Sat, 11/3, 11am. La Salles, 229 Broadway St. 3454128. lasalleschico.com

SYMPHONIC WINDS ALL MUSIC WAS ONCE NEW: Many styles and colors of music will be the emphasis of this band concert, including several 21st century compositions. Sat, 11/3, 7:30pm. $6-$18. Harlen Adams Theatre, Chico State, PAC 144. 898-5152.

Theater HIGH NOON ON WALL STREET: See Thursday. Sat, 11/3, 7:30pm. $12-$22. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Road, Paradise. 877-5760. totr.org

SIDE SHOW: See Friday. Sat, 11/3, 7:30pm. $10$18. Butte College Black Box Theatre, 3536 Campus Drive, ARTS Building, Oroville. 8937444. butte.edu

THE WALWORTH FARCE: See Thursday. Sat, 11/3, 7:30pm. $15. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St.

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SUN

Special Events HEALTH ARTS FESTIVAL & PSYCHIC FAIR: Crystals, tarot readings, astrology, chiropractors and psychic readings. Sun, 11/4, 10am. Manzanita Place, 1705 Manzanita Ave. healingartsday. com

RONN MACFARLANE: Perhaps the world’s finest lutenist performs Renaissance and Baroque masterworks in addition to boundarypushing original compositions. For those

THIS WEEK CONTINUED ON PAGE 26

EDITOR’S PICK

PEDAL PARTY PAULoween is a bike race like no other. Paul Component Engineering’s annual cyclocross event is pure mayhem, adrenaline and fun with a course that takes you through the machine shop (11204 Midway), around the property and over obstacles while you struggle to keep upright. On Saturday, Nov. 3, bring your bike, a costume, helmet and headlight, plus one carved jack-o’-lantern for your entry fee. There will be a taco truck, drinks and live music from Smokey the Groove, Wolfthump and MADD, and the mystical creepoids from 24/7 DJ “Services” will be on the decks spinning records all night while you spin cranks. Truly the most fun you can have on two wheels.

NOVEMBER 1, 2018

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1 tacos

$

THIS WEEK continued from page 25

every Tuesday

FINE ARTS

Theater

NO. It Is A Complete sentenCe Serving Butte, Glenn & Tehama Counties

342-RAPE

530-566-7745 • 1002 W 5th St., Chico

24 hr. hotline (Collect Calls Accepted) www.rapecrisis.org

HIGH NOON ON WALL STREET: See Thursday. Sun, 11/4, 2pm. $12-$22. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Road, Paradise. 877-5760. totr.org

DIa De Los mUerTos

NORMA – SF GRAND OPERA CINEMA SERIES: Set during the Gallic-Roman wars, Vincenzo Bellini’s masterpiece focuses on an aweinspiring druid high priestess, whose role demands a strict vow of celibacy. But she’s violated that code by falling in love with the leader of the occupying army, and leads a double life to conceal her secret. Watch a battle full of fury and anguish in the SF Opera’s 2014 production, screened here in HD. Sun, 11/4, 2pm. $10-$18. Zingg Recital Hall, Chico State, ARTS 279. 898-6333.

Shows through Nov. 23 Chico Art Center see arT

SIDE SHOW: See Friday. Sun, 11/4, 2pm. $10-

DONATE YOUR CAR Cars For A Cause

helps support Arc’s Family Support Programs for individuals with developmental disabilities and their families when you donate your car. * 100% Tax Dexuctible * We accept Vehicles Running or Not

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$18. Butte College Black Box Theatre, 3536 Campus Drive, ARTS Building, Oroville. 8937444. butte.edu

Music quintet performing a repertoire rooted in classical music, venturing into American jazz, South American Latin styles and European folk music. Mon, 11/5, 7:30pm. $25. Oroville State Theatre, 1489 Myers St., Oroville. orovillestatetheatre.com

6

TUe

Special Events CHICO HOME BREW: Do you like beer?!? (sorry … that’s never going to get old.) Chico Home Brew gives a demonstration on brewing your own. Enjoy a potluck at 5:45 p.m. Tue, 11/6, 6:30pm. Free. Chico Guild Hall, 2775 Nord Ave. 321-4662.

THROUGH THE RED DOOR: Carson Medley and Coach Greg Clink discuss Medley’s book following the Chico State men’s basketball team’s remarkable 2015-2016 season. Tue, 11/6, 6:30pm. The Bookstore, 118 Main St.

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WeD

Special Events ANAND VARMA BEAUTY & THE BIZARRE: National Geographic photographer, Anand Varma takes you on an oddly enough enlightening world of parasites, bugs, birds and bees, with a multi-media, stop-motion photo presentation. Wed, 11/7, 7:30pm. $15-$32. Laxson Auditorium, Chico State. 898-6333.

CANDLELIGHT VIGIL FOR HOMELESS YOUTH: Vigil to bring awareness to the crisis of youth homelessness. Event features short speeches by youth, advocates and community leaders. Wed, 11/7, 6pm. Chico Municipal Building, 421 Main St. 879-3780.

Music INSPIRE FALL CONCERT: Seasonal showcase featuring Inspire’s varied musical acts. Wed, 11/7, 7pm. $5-$8. Inspire School of Arts & Sciences, 335 W. Sacramento Ave.

JAZZ II & CONCERT BAND: Double Your Pleasure features Chico State’s Concert Band and Jazz II performing everything from overtures to big band swing, with a guest soloist or two. Wed, 11/7, 7:30pm. Free. Harlen Adams Theatre, Chico State, PAC 144. 898-5152.

for more MUSIC, see NIGHTLIFE oN page 30

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November 1, 2018

are an art form made with sand colored with watercolor paint to produce intricate and intriguing sacred designs. Through 11/10. 900 Esplanade. nvcss. org

FIVE SAX: Innovative and daring saxophone

Art B-SO GALLERY: Marie Fox, BFA culminating exhibition. Through 11/2. Chico State, Ayres Hall, Room 105.

BMU THIRD FLOOR GALLERY: Voices What’s Going on in Our World?, pop art exhibit from the Art Education Student’s club DaDa and AE401: Manga and Beyond. Through 11/13. Chico State, 400 W. First St.

CHICO ART CENTER: Dia de los Muertos, exhibit features works of momento mori, vanitas, totems, relics, portraiture and a community altar. Opening reception on Friday, Nov. 2 at 5pm includes a pinata for kids. Through 11/23. 450 Orange St. chicoartcenter.com

CHICO CITY HALL: Breaking the Cycle of Youth Homelessness, art and writing created by homeless youth made during MONCA workshops. Through 11/2. Free. 411 Main St.

JACKI HEADLEY UNIVERSITY ART GALLERY: Legal Gender, featuring the work of the politically-engaged artist Anita Steckel (American, 1930-2012), the show focuses on her innovative use of collage and appropriation as a feminist strategy to counter the dominant male narratives endemic to art history and American society. Through 12/14. Free. Chico State, ARTS 121, 898-5864. headleygallerycsuchico.com

JANET TURNER PRINT MUSEUM: Deep Etch, exhibition features print work by Chico State art faculty, including the late artists Richard Hornaday, James Kuiper, Ann Pierce and Claudia Steel. Through 12/8. 400 W. First St. janetturner.org

MUSEUM OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA ART: Diverse Minds, program promoting mental wellness through the creative arts in Northern California. Opening gala on Thursday, Nov. 1 at 6pm and a journal book release event on Friday, Nov. 2 at 4pm. Through 11/4. Also: Mandala of the Lotus, Lama Losang Samten has returned to create a stunning mandala sand painting in the MONCA library. Mandalas

ORLAND ART CENTER: A Handsome Harvest, ceramicist Michelle Turner and watercolor painter Marilyn Walsh display a beautiful bounty of skill and talent. Through 11/24. 732 Fourth St., Orland. PARADISE ART CENTER: Teachers & Facilitators, works on display feature a range of media and artistic styles by Paradise Art Center’s talented instructors and staff. Reception on Saturday, Nov. 3 from 1-4pm. Through 11/30. 5564 Almond St., Paradise. paradise-art-center.com

SALLY DIMAS ART GALLERY: Ann Pierce & Betty Polivka, estate sale, plus new works by by C. Preble Miles and Sally Dimas. Reception on Friday, Nov. 9, from 4-7pm. Through 12/31. 493 East Ave., Suite 1. sallydimasartgallery.com

Museums GATEWAY SCIENCE MUSEUM: Zoom Into Nano, hands-on exhibition demonstrates how scientists observe and make things that are too small to see. Through 1/6. $5-$7. 625 Esplanade.

GOLD NUGGET MUSEUM: A Stitch in Time, quilts from the museum’s collection, along with the handiwork of people in our community and stunning works from the Ridge Quilters Guild. Through 11/4. 502 Pearson Road, Paradise.

PATRICK RANCH MUSEUM: Working farm and museum with rotating exhibits open every Saturday and Sunday from 11am to 3pm. Through 12/30. 10381 Midway, Durham. patrickranchmuseum.org

VALENE L. SMITH MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY: Reimagining Chico, find out what Chico looked like 100 years ago with this exhibit exploring the archaeology of our neighborhoods. Two excavations have yielded historic artifacts from boarding houses located on campus and the long abandoned historic Chinatown. Special presentation on Chico’s Historic Chinese Temple on Saturday, Nov. 3, at 11am, followed by a walk to the temple. Through 12/8. Free. Chico State, 400 W. First St., 898-5397.


r A F

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Harvest Festival

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saturday, nov. 3, 10:00am–2:00pm Free daytime event for the Whole Family! Bidwell mansion state historic park, 525 esplanade, chico

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SCENE

Your plumbing

Sami Birtola (left) and Kaila Davidson as the conjoined Hilton sisters. Photo by jesse merz

Perfect Eyebrows don ’t happen by accident... They happen by appointment.

We’re all freaks

Fixed Right, Right Now!

Call, Text, or Email 41 5 . 9 9 4 . 7 0 1 4 c arri e @w a x ed b out i q ue. com Lo c a ted i n t he Garden Walk Mall

Butte College stages elaborate musical with a message

Jmusicals arts instructor, seems to like big about unlikely subjects.

esse Merz, Butte College’s theater

Last year at this time he directed a Butte College Drama Department staging of Urinetown: The Musical, a politically charged satire filled with dancing and song. Merz and his student crew are are back this year with a similarly ambitious and unlikely musical, the 1997 Broadway extravaganza Side Show, with book and lyrics by by Robert Speer Bill Russell, and music by Henry r ober ts peer@ Krieger. newsrev i ew.c om This elaborate production, with its cast of more Review: than 30, is loosely side show shows based on the true Friday-saturday, story of the Hilton 7:30 p.m. & sunday, sisters, conjoined 2 p.m., Nov. 2-4. tickets: $10-$18 twins—attached at the hip and butButte College Black tocks—who in the Box Theatre 1930s became a main campus, Arts building, 3536 butte hugely successful Campus Drive, song-and-dance oroville act on the vaudebuttedrama.com ville circuit. That success, however, came only after years of performing in circus sideshows, along with various other “freaks,” as they were then called. At the center of everything are the twins, Violet and Daisy Hilton (Sami Birtola and Kaila Davidson, respectively), two distinct women who, because of a biological quirk,

are forced to share every moment of their lives together. Where Violet is shy and introspective and wants nothing more than to have a husband and children and a home, Daisy is adventurous and wants a Hollywood career. This difference in their natures is compounded by outside forces— various managers and would-be lovers—who attempt to manipulate the twins for financial gain. The sisters ultimately prevail, in large part because of their sheer talent. And here Birtola and Davidson shine brightly. Both women have wonderful voices and a delightful stage presence. They excel not only as vocalists, but also in their roles as sisters whose lives are inextricably knotted together. The women are like mirrors for each other and the audience, revealing both the joy of their intimacy and the frustrations it causes. Two songs in particular speak to this deeply felt emotional conflict, the anthemic “Who Will Love Me as I Am?” and “I Will Never Leave You.” It’s impossible to hear these beautifully rendered songs and not feel compassion for the women they describe. The rest of the cast is fairly typical of student productions, long on enthusiasm but a mixed bag when it comes to vocalization skills. Some of the strongest performances are

given by the ensemble, beginning with the electrifying “Come Look at the Freaks,” which sets the tone of the entire production. The man making that exhortation, the slimy sideshow boss Sir, is nicely played by Jarrod Jackson. Kudos also to Matthew Stone, who plays the talent scout Terry Connor, who falls in love with Daisy. His signature song, “Private Conversation,” about the frustration he feels because of the inability to be alone with her, is a highlight. Side Show is being performed in the Butte College Arts building’s spacious black-box theater. It uses a minimalist but effective tiered set (designed by Robert Pickering) that allows the many actors to move freely about the stage. Complex but unobtrusive lighting (designed by Michael Johnson) adds to the effectiveness of the stage set. There’s also an excellent sixmember backstage band, directed by Christine Buckstead. In many ways Side Show is a story about community. As different as the “freaks” are, they offer love and a sense of belonging to Violet and Daisy that isn’t available from the rest of society. The same might be said of the community of actors, technicians, directors, musicians, dancers and choreographers who are presenting this delightful musical. Ω

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29


NIGHTLIFE

THURSDAY 11/1—WEDNESDAY 11/7 HOWLIN’ RAIN, MAPACHE & PAT HULL Wednesday, Nov. 7 Argus Bar + Patio SEE Wednesday

SACRAMENTO BLUES

Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfallscasino. com

SPAZMATICS: Eighties cover nerds

geek out in the brewery. Fri, 11/2, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino

& Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfallscasino.com

TYLER DEVOLL: Happy hour tunes. Fri, Arts Club variety show. Fri, 11/2, 6:30pm. Rowland-Taylor Recital Hall, Chico State, Performing Arts Center 134.

MIXTAPE: Fun dance plans plays your Edlow join local favorites Jordan Antuan Riggins and Sam Miller with live music by StoicB4Dark. Fri, 11/2, 8:30pm. $7. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave. maltesebarchico.com

1THURSDAY

OPEN MIC/JAM: Bring your songs and your instrument for this weekly open mic and jam session. Thu, 11/1, 7:30pm. Woodstock’s Pizza, 166 E. Second St.

2FRIDAY

COMEDY NIGHT: Sydney Hupp, plus featured comics Don Ashby, Dillon Collins and Benny Villa, hosted by Mitch Valentine. Fri, 11/2, 8pm. $5. The Spirit, 2360 Oro Quincy Highway, Oroville.

HILLCREST AVENUE: Cover band plays Sublime, Johnny Cash, Green Day and more. Fri, 11/2, 6pm. Free. Shakey’s Pizza, 2890 Olive Hwy, Oroville., 775-771-4116.

AUDIOBOXX: Top 40 hits and dancing in the lounge. Fri, 11/2, 8:30pm. Gold Country Casino & Hotel, 4020 Olive Highway, Oroville.

BOB’S COMEDY COMEDY NIGHT: Comics

MISCAST CABARET: Singing, danc-

Dejan Tyler, Chadd Beals and Zach

ing and more in this Theatre

favorite cover tunes. Fri, 11/2, 9pm. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave.

tackleboxchico.com

MUSIC FOR MILITARY: Two Men and a Truck and Ike’s host live bands to help raise money for the Movers for Military campaign for veterans. Fri, 11/2, 5pm. Ike’s Place, 648 W. Fifth St.

NORTHERN TRADITIONZ: Country, rock, country-rock and rockin’ country. Fri, 11/2, 9pm. White Water Saloon, 5571 Clark Road, Paradise.

OPEN MIC: Tito hosts this regular

event. Backline available. Fri, 11/2, 7:30pm. $1. Down Lo, 319 Main St., 513-4707.

SOUNDWAVE: Classic rock, dance tunes and modern favorites in the lounge. Fri, 11/2, 8:30pm. Feather

11/2, 4pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St. lasalleschico.com

YUNG PINCH: Huntington Beach rapper making waves with his catchy hooks and melodic songs about coastal living. DBRO$ and Real Friends & Co. open the show. Fri, 11/2, 9pm. $18. Senator Theatre, 517 Main St. jmaxproductions.net

3SATURDAY

Dubbed a rising star of the West Coast jazz scene, Delta blues-inspired guitarist Ross Hammond brings a bucketful of innovation and musicianship to the 1078 Gallery. The Sacramento musician bridges gospel tunes and old-time music with groundbreaking technique, resulting in a remarkable and unique style. Hammond has performed for Hillary Clinton and worked with Kevin Seconds, Lizz Wright, Nels Cline and Scott Amendola. See him live Monday, Nov. 5, with pedalboard master Cat Depot and singer/songwriter Donald Beaman.

AUDIOBOXX: See Friday. Sat, 11/3,

8:30pm. Gold Country Casino & Hotel, 4020 Olive Highway, Oroville.

AXON: Singer-songwriter in the confessional cowboy tradition celebrates his 65th birthday. Sat, 11/3, 6:30pm. Farm Star Pizza, 2359 Esplanade.

JOY & MADNESS AND SKIP CULTON PROJECT: Eight-piece groove machine from Sacramento plays high-powered pop, laced with funk, soul and R&B. The Skip Culton

Project opens the gig. Sat, 11/3, 9pm. $10. Lost on Main, 319 Main St., 892-2445. lostonmainchico.com

LOCKED IN A CAGE WITH MONSTERS: Rock ’n’ roll in three flavors: classic, hard and alternative! Sat, 11/3, 9pm. White Water Saloon, 5571 Clark Road, Paradise.

LONG TIME: Boston tribute band features layered guitar harmonies and powerful vocal harmonies that’ll

give you “More Than a Feeling.” Sat, 11/3, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfallscasino.com

MOSSY CREEK: Roots, American

and bluegrass tunes. Sat, 11/3, 8pm. Unwined Kitchen & Bar, 980 Mangrove Ave.

REDDING-CHICO ROCK CONNECTION: Quirky noise pop band Viking Skate Country and early-Dischord-era

Shop Local

Holiday Guides CN&R’s holiday guides hit stands on November 15 and December 13. Don’t miss your chance to be included in these essential holiday shopping guides! Contact your advertising representative for more information today. (530) 894-2300

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NOVEMBER 1, 2018

310346_4.9_x_5.4.indd 1

10/25/18 8:41 AM


THIS WEEK: FIND MORE ENTERTAINMENT AND SPECIAL EVENTS ON PAGE 24

OF MONTREAL

Tuesday, Nov. 6 Sierra Nevada Big Room SEE TUESDAY

WITHIN SIGHT & SEPARATING THE SEAS: Progressive metal and metalcore, plus local acts the Anima Effect and Shadow of Crows. Sat, 11/3, 7:30pm. $8. The Spirit, 2360 Oro Quincy Highway, Oroville.

for your dancing pleasure. Sat, 11/3, 7pm. Free. Smokie Mountain Steakhouse, 7039 Skyway, Paradise, 894-3463.

heavy hitters West By Swan host Redding rockers Belda Beast. (The same lineup plays Friday, Nov. 2 at The Dip in Redding if you want to follow the bands on this grueling two-day tour.) Sat, 11/3, 8pm. $7. Naked Lounge, 118 W. Second St.

5MONDAY

GEETARS: Ross Hammond performs virtuosic takes on jazz, folk, blues, spiritual and world guitar styles, plus noodle king Cat Depot and singer/guitarist/songwriter Donald Beaman. Mon, 11/5, 7pm. $7. 1078 Gallery, 1710 Park Ave. 1078gallery. org

SOUNDWAVE: See Friday. Sat, 11/3,

8:30pm. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfallscasino.com

RYAN RAYNAL BAND: Chico State alum and former lead singer of Branded, Raynal kicks up the dirt in his new country project. Sat, 11/3, 9pm. $5. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave. tackleboxchico.com

SOC HOP DANCE PARTY: Lisha and

TENDER LOVING COFFEE GRAND OPENING: Outpatient Records on the decks throughout the day and a performance by Bogg at 7:30pm. Sat, 11/3. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

MARIO KART MONDAY: Nobody wants to race as Toad anymore. Eight-person tournament with a small entry fee and prizes. Mon, 11/5, 6pm. Chico Taproom, 2201 Pillsbury Road, Ste. 114.

Friends dust off some golden oldies

6TUESDAY

11/7, 7pm. $2. Norton Buffalo Hall,

OF MONTREAL: Shape-shifting musician and foppish savant Kevin Barnes explores paranoia, identity and doubt on his new record. Reptaliens open the gig. Tue, 11/6, 8pm. $15. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St. sierranevada.com

7WEDNESDAY

5704 Chapel Drive, Paradise., 877-4995.

TWIDDLE: Jam band known for extended instrumental interludes blending rock, bluegrass, reggae and funk. Wed, 11/7, 8pm. $15-$18. Lost on Main, 319 Main St., 892-2445. lostonmainchico.com

POETRY SLAM: Open mic poetry. Wed,

11/7, 7pm. Sutter Courtyard, Chico State.

FRANKENBABS

BARBRA & FRANK: Tribute act portrays Barbra Streisand and Frank Sinatra, in the concert that never was. Wed, 11/7, 6:30pm. $40. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfallscasino.com

HOWLIN’ RAIN: Second chance for those who missed the band in August. Ethan Miller (Comets on Fire) adds a touch of soul to his mega-psych outfit on the band’s latest record, The Alligator Bride. They play with Los Angeles duo Mapache and Pat Hull. Highly recommended! Wed, 11/7, 8pm. $10-$15. Argus Bar + Patio, 212 W. Second St. bit.ly

OPEN MIC: Mr. Bang hosts this monthly

event. Signups start at 5:30pm. Wed, 11/7, 6pm. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

OPEN MIKEFULL: At Paradise’s only

In an alternate musical universe, Mary Shelley’s demented doctor stitches together Sinatra’s decaying corpse with Barbra Streisand and the horrifying monster torments souvenir cup-toting tourists on the Las Vegas Strip. (We’ll option that to you, Hollywood.) This tribute concert probably won’t rise to that level of awesomeness, but it’ll still be pretty fun. Barbra & Frank: The Concert That Never Was comes to Feather Falls Casino & Lodge on Wednesday, Nov. 7.

open mic, all musicians get two songs or 10 minutes onstage. Wed,

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supp rt

NOVEMBER 2 - 8

REEL WORLD The Old Man and the Gun

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Biopic picks

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Notorious bank robber and literary giant get film treatments The Old IRedford Man and the Gun, you already know it stars Robert as the real-life serial bank robber Forrest f you’ve heard or read anything at all about

Buy online anytime with a credit card or in person with cash, check or credit card M-F 9am – 5pm at 353 E. Second Street, Downtown Chico.

Tucker, and that it’s reportedly Redford’s farewell to movie acting. But you should also know, going by in, that it has Sissy Spacek playing Juan-Carlos Jewel, a widowed Texas rancher Selznick who takes a liking to Forrest without really knowing what it is that he does when he’s “at work,” and it has Casey Affleck as a moody police detective whose personal investment in Forrest’s case keeps expanding in The Old Man and unexpected ways. the Gun Redford’s character is the heart Cinemark 14, Feather of the matter, of course, but Old River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Man at its best is also the story of Rated PG-13. the Spacek and Affleck characters, as reflected through their respective encounters with Forrest. To a lesser extent, that applies as well to the other guys in Forrest’s “gang,” Teddy (Danny Glover) and Waller The Happy Prince (Tom Waits). Opens Friday, Nov. 2. Even with its many bank robberPageant Theatre. Rated R. ies and occasional chase sequences, the film runs counter to conventional crime-film action, and while it breezes through Tucker’s story in a brisk 93 minutes, it’s got time to hang out with Forrest and Jewel during their curiously witty flirtations, and room for John Hunt (Affleck) to spend time with his wife (Tika Sumpter) and kids even while he’s rethinking his professional goals or trying to out-guess Forrest. All in all, The Old Man and the Gun shapes up as a genial kind of outlaw ballad. Forrest Tucker, the “gentleman bandit” with a friendly smile, is quoted as saying that robbing banks is not a way of “making a liv-

3 3

32

CN&R

NOVEMBER 1, 2018

ing,” but rather a way of living. John and Jewel come to understand and respect that in contrasting ways, but the film as a whole clearly shares the sentiment. The film is written and directed by David Lowery (Ain’t Them Bodies Saints, Pete’s Dragon, A Ghost Story). Here again he’s proving his worth as a distinctly contemporary version of the shrewd auteur/ entertainers of Old Hollywood. Rupert Everett’s The Happy Prince is a stormy, semi-

expressionist account of Oscar Wilde’s final years, with Everett himself playing Wilde. Everett the actor is an extraordinary incarnation of the author and public performer in all the pathos, grotesquerie and flamboyancy of the days following his release from prison (after a “sodomite” conviction) and preceding his subsequent death. Everett the filmmaker conjures up a good deal of quasi-Victorian phantasmagoria, some of which is darkly rich in period atmosphere and some of which is thick with ornate confusions. Emily Watson is strong and steady in the perhaps thankless role of Constance Wilde, the writer’s wife and mother of his two sons. Colin Firth, Colin Morgan and Edwin Thomas are diversely incisive as the writer’s most devoted friends and lovers. Morgan is especially sharp as Wilde’s beloved “Bosie,” Alfred Douglas, whose paradoxical passions seem the obverse reflections of Wilde’s own selfcontradicting genius. Tom Wilkinson, Béatrice Dalle, Anna Chancellor and Antonio Spagnuolo are also noteworthy in key smaller roles. Along the way, Everett’s film takes notice of the history of Britain’s laws against homosexual conduct, and provides multiple glimpses of solidarity among gay men in moments and periods of social duress. And Everett’s Wilde, both shabby and brilliant, gradually emerges as a great messy, large-spirited icon for, perhaps, several kinds of liberation. Ω


FILM SHORTS

Bohemian Rhapsody

Hunter Killer

Reviewers: Bob Grimm and Juan-Carlos Selznick.

Gerard Butler and Gary Oldman star in this thriller about a submarine full of Navy SEALS on a mission to rescue the kidnapped Russian president and prevent World War III. Cinemark 14, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated R.

Opening this week Bohemian Rhapsody

X-Men film franchise mainstay Bryan Singer directs this biopic on the legendary rock band Queen. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

3The Happy Prince

See review this issue. Pageant Theatre. Rated R —J.C.S.

The Nutcracker and the Four Realms

Lasse Hallstrom (The Cider House Rules, Chocolat) and Joe Johnston (Jumanji) direct this fantasy-adventure retelling of the classic Christmas story/ballet. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG.

Nobody’s Fool

The latest Tyler Perry comedy follows a woman who, after being released from prison, reunites with her sister who might be the victim of a catfishing scam. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas7. Rated R.

Nowp laying First Man

Goosebumps 2: Haunted Halloween

The second film in the most recent series of adaptations of R.L. Stine’s classic youthhorror fiction series follows a group of kids living out one of the author’s stories as they try to save the world from a Halloween apocalypse. Starring Jack Black, Wendi McLendon-Covey and Ken Jeong. Cinemark 14. Rated PG.

Halloween

This direct sequel to the first film in the franchise picks up 40 years after the events of the 1978 original and features Laurie (Jamie Lee Curtis) squaring off against her old murderous nemesis, Michael, who has escaped from captivity and is apparently bent on taking care of unfinished business. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated R.

Poor

Film No. 3 in the James Bond parody series, with Rowan Atkinson reprising his role as the bumbling secret agent who comes out of retirement to track down those responsible for a cyber attack. Cinemark 14. Rated PG.

Mid90s

Jonah Hill wrote and makes his directorial debut with this coming-of-age story set against the backdrop of the mid-1990s skate culture of Los Angeles. Cinemark 14, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated R.

3The Old Man & the Gun

See review this issue. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13 —J.C.S.

Smallfoot

In this 3D animated feature, the Bigfoots (i.e., Yeti) are astonished to discover that the Smallfoots (humans) are real. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

3A Star Is Born

Damien Chazelle (La La Land, Whiplash) directs this biopic about Neil Armstrong (Ryan Gosling) and the events leading up to and including the first mission to the moon. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13.

1

Johnny English Strikes Again

The familiar story is still there (a turbulent show-biz romance between a rising star and one who’s about to fall), but there’s very little about this latest A Star Is Born that feels seriously outdated. This time, a gifted and very alcoholic country music star named Jackson Main (Bradley Cooper) takes an aspiring young singer (Lady Gaga) under his wing professionally and into his days and nights romantically. Cooper, who is also making his directorial debut, gives a powerfully modulated performance, with reckless extremes and soulful reversals balanced in a kind of perilous harmony. But Ally (Lady Gaga) is the star being born here—a singer getting her big break within the story, but also a movie star emerging, in the movie and with it. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated R —J.C.S.

Venom

Tom Hardy stars as the title character, the conflicted Marvel Comics superhero whose powers come via the alien that’s taken over his body. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

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CHOW

“It’s all about the Dirty Sauce”

Follow the recipes

Vegan options aVailable

hat is the one food that says “home” or “family”

floor and step over her to fight for that last bite? In my family there are many by such dishes, usually trotted out Jason Cassidy with much anticipation for special occasions and so treasured that a j aso nc @ newsrev i ew.c om holiday can be ruined if the culinary tradition is broken. No Casey’s Famous Potato Salad at the annual Easter family reunion? Kill all the bunnies! As the holidays approach, and grandma’s old recipe box is dusted off, I’ve been thinking that maybe it’s time to start preserving some of these traditions before the handwriting fades. It’s still early enough in the year to gather your family’s greatest hits and preserve them in cookbook form for this giving season, and there are a handful of online printing companies—shutterstock. com, mixbook.com (my favorite)—as well as more cookbook-centric ones—heritagecookbook.com and createmycookbook.com—that feature easy-to-navigate design programs and quick turnaround times. The hard part, of course, is tracking down all the recipes. Inevitably, some are already tragically lost to time. My personal favorite, Grandma’s Cherry Pie (with cans of sour cherries and sweet pie crust rolled between sheets of wax paper), went to to the grave with her. And of course, there’s that dirty secret of most families, the fact that many of the personal classics are just bastardizations of cookbook staples, and only the chef knows the secret (for Mom’s Coffee Cake, it turns out, you have to just double the topping and leave out the nuts from the Betty Crocker recipe). The rest are just a matter of thumbing through recipe cards and typing ’em out for posterity. The Clogger—aka the Butter Experiment, aka DoubleButter Butter Cookies—is now in the books. So is The Clogger 2—aka Cheesy Potatoes—with cheese, potatoes, butter, sour cream, cream of chicken soup and potato chips. And I’ve just put the finishing touches on the recipe my wife, Connie, and I are forever duty-bound to bring to the Christmas buffet, Cassidys’ Holiday Mac-n-Cheese. Feel free to add it to your repertoire.

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Preserve your tribe’s culinary history with a family cookbook to you? That favorite dish that will turn siblings W against one another as they knock mom to the kitchen

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Cassidys’ Holiday Mac-n-Cheese

e’s paradisw n Hometot! hangou

(adapted from Favorite Comfort Food by Martha Stewart)

Ingredients: 6 slices sourdough bread (preferably Tin Roof Chico sourdough) Roughly two sticks of butter, unsalted, softened 5 cups whole milk 1/2 cup all-purpose flour 1 tablespoon salt 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg 1/4 teaspoon black pepper 4 1/2 cups grated sharp cheddar 1 1/2 cups grated Pecorino Romano cheese 1 pound cavatappi (or spiral) noodles

In a saucepan, heat milk over medium heat. Cut up bread slices into half-inch squares and put in a bowl. Melt 4 tablespoons (1/2 a stick) of butter and toss with bread chunks, set aside. Grease a 3-quart casserole dish with butter, set aside. Fill large pot with water and bring to boil. Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Once milk is hot, turn off heat and make the cheese sauce. In a large, high-sided skillet, melt 6 tablespoons of butter over medium heat until bubbly, then add flour and stir until it pastes up a bit (don’t brown)—a minute or less. Increase the heat slightly and, a little bit at a time, whisk hot milk into the roux. After each pour, whisk and let it thicken a bit. Continue pouring and whisking until milk is gone and sauce is bubbly and fairly thick. Remove from heat and stir in salt, nutmeg, pepper, 3 cups of the cheddar and 1 cup of the Pecorino Romano. Set aside. Cook pasta until it’s super al dente. Drain pasta in colander and rinse with cold water until it’s cool. Drain completely, then stir pasta into cheese sauce. Pour pasta/cheese mixture into the casserole dish. Sprinkle remaining cheese on top. Spread bread chunks over that. Bake uncovered for 30 minutes or until bread starts to brown. Let set for 5-10 minutes before serving, then get out of the way lest you get trampled in the buffet line. Ω

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CCPRA FINALS

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ARTS DEVO by Jason Cassidy • jasonc@newsreview.com

saves you money!

oNe good burN deserves aNother Longtime Chico tattoo artist david

singletary has taken a mean-spirited act of vandalism and turned it into a lighthearted act of charity … with a tiny amount of sweet revenge thrown in. Singletary recently reopened his sacred art Tattoo Parlor—in the same 804 Broadway spot where he’d been working at the now-closed Amber Rose Tattoo—and last month someone made a giant sticker featuring an image of him wearing a T-shirt with “Straight Outta Neckroom” on it and stuck it to a vintage “Tattoo” sign in front of his shop. To his credit, Singletary is taking the body-shaming slam in stride. He’s not pressing charges (even though he says he has surveillance footage); instead, he’s made a T-shirt featuring an image of the sticker and David Singletary and his new shirt. is selling them to pay for repair of the sign. Any extra proceeds will be donated to charity. Swing by the shop and get yours for only $20. Just don’t ask for a turtleneck.

housebouNd souNd If, like arts dEVo, you’re

House Parts

always on the lookout for something different in your art, you’ll likewise be interested in the new album by addi d., aka local musician-ofmany-hats addison desantis. The publicity-shy player says that the thread running through House Parts is, well, the parts of the house, as seen through the fog of being sick and stuck inside. His “Porch,” “Cupboard,” “Pillow,” etc., all make appearances on this trippy, all-overthe-musical-map bedroom recording. My jam right now is the Pinback-esque “Front Door,” with oddly timed acoustic riffs and cool vocal interplay between DeSantis and guest Melanie Treuhaft. Get it now at addid.bandcamp.com.

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show, a group showcase of its members’ art, Nov. 1-4, at the Museum of Northern California Art. The opening reception is tonight, Nov. 1, 6-8 p.m., and will be followed by a release party for the Diverse Minds journal, Friday, Nov. 2, 4-6 p.m.

• Whistling competion: To get inspired for your whistling tryout—this Friday, Nov. 2, 6-9 p.m., at Purple Line Urban Winery (760 Safford St., Oroville)—search for footage of “Whistling Caruso” from The Muppets movie (2011). It’s Andrew Bird—a bona fide master whistler—doing the “Dare to Hope,” by Angela  Armijo (Diverse Minds exhibit) behind-the-scenes whistling for the Walter character, and it’s thrilling. The qualifiers will get to perform during intermission of Bridge Over the River Kwai—a film with maybe the most famous whistling scene of all time—at Oroville’s State Theatre on Nov. 9.

• Through the Red door: This Tuesday, Nov. 6, 6:30-8 p.m., author Carson Medley will be holding a book signing at The Bookstore (118 Main St.) for Through the Red Door, his book chronicling the 2015-16 season of the Chico State’s men’s basketball team that went 22-7 overall, won its conference and made it to the NCAA Division II tournament for the fifth season in a row. Joining Medley for the signing will be Greg Clink, men’s basketball coach.

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November 1, 2018

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Karen James is a noted journalist who specializes in relationships, romance, and sex.

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man his secret. The nutritionist smiled, introduced himself as Vito, and told my husband he was 78 years old, his wife 65, and that after 32 years of marriage, their sex life was better than ever. Then he took a small pack from his satchel, gave it to my husband, and said “These tablets come from a small village where they’re cultivated organically from the most potent sexual extracts on earth. Believe me, they will give you a strong desire for sex, powerful erections, and a climax like you’ve never felt before! Then he laughed and said, “You’ll become an Italian Stallion, like me!” Italian Stallion is right! These past several weeks have been a dream. My husband’s desire for me is through the roof. He takes me whenever he wants, and he even wakes up most days with a ‘morning salute!’ like he did years ago. I love it! He’s a sexual powerhouse, beaming with confidence, and our marriage is stronger than ever. Karen, here’s why I’m writing you. The pack of tablets is about to run out and we both desperately want more. I’ve looked everywhere but can’t find them. Do you know anything about these “super-sex tablets” from Europe and how to get some here in the States? Sincerely, Tina C., Fort Worth, TX Tina, you and the rest of my readers are in luck because I do know about these secret European sex tablets. Ever wonder why older men from Italy and all over Europe have the lowest use of ED drugs, but are known worldwide for staying energized, sexually passionate well into their 80’s? Well, for years, these men have relied on a unique blossom seed extract called Provarin to enhance their sexual power and performance. Milled on the fertile plains of northern Europe, Provarin’s extracts are harvested along the Baltic Sea where pure seeds, nutrient-rich soil, and perfect weather conditions combine to deliver maximum sexual potency. As Giovanni from Milan put it, “It’s like

Famous for fueling extremely hard erections and a long, intense climax, Provarin has a legendary reputation throughout the European sexual underground. sexual rocket fuel - especially for us older guys!” The best part from a woman’s perspective, as you well know, is the extreme hardness and ongoing power is enough to send us over the blissful edge! I found out about Provarin a few years ago when I was dating a cowboy from Wyoming. He took Provarin every morning - and oh my, that good ol’ boy sure rocked my nights! All-natural and safe to take, Provarin is still a wellkept secret for those in the know - and they like to keep it that way. An old-school, family business, they don’t have a website and do very little advertising. They don’t need to. Long-time customers and word of mouth ensures their limited stock is sold out every year. They do have a distributer in the States and when I reached out for this article, a spokesman told me that if any of my readers call today and mention this article, they’ll be offered a one-time 50% discount, PLUS 30 TABLETS ABSOLUTELY FREE while supplies last. He went on to say their telephone hotline guarantees you can place an order in under 4 minutes - and it will be shipped the very same day. So there you go, Tina - and the rest of you readers! Just give them a call today at 1-800-385-0970. Aren’t you glad you asked?

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38312022_10_x_10.5.indd   CN&R  n o1v e m b e r 1 , 2 0 1 8

10/25/18 12:13 PM


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY For the week oF November 1, 2018 ARIES (March 21-April 19): You have

officially arrived at the heart of the most therapeutic phase of your cycle. Congratulations! It’s an excellent time to fix what’s wrong, hurt or distorted. You will attract more help than you can imagine if you summon an aggressive approach toward finding antidotes and cures. A good way to set the tone for your aggressive determination to feel better is to heed this advice from poet Maya Angelou: “Take a day to heal from the lies you’ve told yourself and the ones that have been told to you.”

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): U2’s

singer, Bono, born under the sign of Taurus, says that all of us suffer from the sense that something’s missing from our lives. We imagine that we lack an essential quality or experience, and its absence makes us feel sad and insufficient. French philosopher Blaise Pascal referred to this emptiness as “a God-shaped hole.” Bono adds that “you can never completely fill that hole,” but you may find partial fixes through love and sex, creative expression, family, meaningful work, parenting, activism and spiritual devotion. I bring this to your attention, Taurus, because I have a strong suspicion that in the coming weeks you will have more power to fill your Godshaped hole than you’ve had in a long time.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “Most of

our desires are clichés, right? Readyto-wear, one-size-fits-all. I doubt if it’s even possible to have an original desire anymore.” So says a character in Gemini author Tobias Wolff’s short story, Sanity. Your assignment in the coming weeks, Gemini, is to refute and rebel against this notion. The cosmic rhythms will work in your favor to the degree that you cultivate innovative yearnings and unique urges. I hope you’ll make it your goal to have the experiences necessary to stir up an outbreak of original desires.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): If you’re

a typical member of the Cancerian tribe, you’re skilled at responding constructively when things go wrong. Your intelligence rises up hot and strong when you get sick or rejected or burned. But if you’re a classic Crab, you have less savvy in dealing with triumphs. You may sputter when faced with splashy joy, smart praise or lucky breaks. But everything I just said is meant to be a challenge, not a curse. One of the best reasons to study astrology is to be aware of the potential shortcomings of your sign so you can outwit and overcome them. That’s why I think that eventually you’ll evolve to the point where you won’t be a bit flustered when blessings arrive. And the immediate future will bring you excellent opportunities to upgrade your response to good fortune.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “Each of us needs

something of an island in her life,” said poet John Keats. “If not an actual island, at least some place, or space in time, in which to be herself, free to cultivate her differences from others.” According to my reading of the astrological omens, Leo, you’ll be wise to spend extra time on your own island in the next two weeks. Solitude is unlikely to breed unpleasant loneliness but will instead inspire creative power and evoke inner strength. If you don’t have an island yet, go in search! (P.S. I translated Keats’ pronouns into the feminine gender.)

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): I’m rooting

for you to engage in experimental intimacy, Virgo. I hope you’ll have an affinity for sweet blends and incandescent mixtures and arousing juxtapositions. To get in the right mood for this playful work, you could read love poetry and listen to uplifting songs that potentize your urge to merge. Here are a few lyrical passages to get you warmed up. 1. “Your flesh quivers against mine like moonlight on the sea.” —Julio Cortázar. 2. “When she smiles like that she is as beautiful as all my secrets.” —Anne Carson. 3. “My soul is alight with your infinitude of stars … The flowers of your garden blossom in my body.” —Rabindranath Tagore. 4. “I can only find you by looking deeper, that’s how love leads us into the world.” —Anne Michaels.

by rob brezsNy LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Of course I

want you to have more money. I’d love for you to buy experiences that expand your mind, deepen your emotional intelligence and foster your ability to create inspiring forms of togetherness. My soul would celebrate if you got access to new wealth that enabled you to go in quest of spiritual fun and educational adventures. On the other hand, I wouldn’t be thrilled about you spending extra cash on trivial desires or fancy junk you don’t really need. Here’s why I feel this way: To the extent that you seek more money to pursue your most righteous cravings, you’re likely to get more money.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “Penetra-

lia” is a word that means the innermost or most private parts, the most secret and mysterious places. It’s derived from the same Latin term that evolved into the word “penetrate.” You Scorpios are of course the zodiac’s masters of penetralia. More than any other sign, you’re likely to know where the penetralia are, as well as how to get to them and what to do when you get to them. I suspect that this tricky skill will come in extra handy during the coming weeks. I bet your intimate adeptness with penetralia will bring you power, fun and knowledge.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec.

21): Sagittarian poet Rainer Maria Rilke suggested that we cultivate an alertness for the ever-present possibility of germination and gestation. On a regular basis, he advised, we should send probes down into the darkness, into our unconscious minds, to explore for early signs of awakening. And when we discover the forces of renewal stirring there in the depths, we should be humble and reverent toward them, understanding that they are as-yet beyond the reach of our ability to understand. We shouldn’t seek to explain and define them at first, but simply devote ourselves to nurturing them. Everything I just said is your top assignment in the coming weeks.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

You’re in a phase of your cycle when your influence is at a peak. People are more receptive than usual to your ideas and more likely to want the same things you do. Given these conditions, I think the best information I can offer you is the following meditation by Capricorn activist Martin Luther King Jr. “Power without love is reckless and abusive, and love without power is sentimental and anemic. Power at its best is love implementing the demands of justice, and justice at its best is power correcting everything that stands against love.”

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Aquar-

ian environmentalist Edward Abbey spent much of his life rambling around in the great outdoors. He was an emancipated spirit who regarded the natural world as the only church he needed. In an eruption of ecstatic appreciation, he once testified, “Life is a joyous dance through daffodils beneath cerulean blue skies and then, then what? I forget what happens next.” And yet the truth is, Abbey was more than a wild-hearted Dionysian explorer in the wilderness. He found the discipline and diligence to write 23 books! I mention this, Aquarius, because now is a perfect time for you to be like the disciplined and diligent and productive version of Abbey.

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PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): For

renowned Piscean visual artist Anne Truitt (1921-2004), creating her work was high adventure. She testified that artists like her had to “catapult themselves wholly, without holding back one bit, into a course of action without having any idea where they will end up. They are like riders who gallop into the night, eagerly leaning on their horse’s neck, peering into a blinding rain.” Whether or not you’re an artist, Pisces, I suspect your life in the coming weeks may feel like the process she described. And that’s a good thing! A fun thing! Enjoy your ride.

BUTTE COUNTY GIGANTIC SURPLUS SALE!!! Fri, Nov. 2nd, 9am1:30pm 14 County Center Dr. Oroville, CA Monitors $10-$15, Desks $5 Chairs $10, $5, $1 File Cabinets & Bookcases ($5 per drawer or shelf) Phones, Speakers, Office/Desk Supplies Tons of $1 items! Don’t Miss This Sale!

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CHICO SEASONS at 1260 Vallombrosa Ave Chico, CA 95926. EMILY MARIE AUVINEN 1260 Vallombrosa Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: EMILY AUVINEN Dated: Otober 4, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001269 Published: October 11,18,25, November 1, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ASIAN MASSAGE at 2070 E. 20th Street #140 Chico, CA 95928. LINDA LIU 1842 Bedford Dr. Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed; LINDA LIU Dated: September 20, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001208 Published: October 11,18,25, November 1, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as TURNKEY CLEANING SERVICES at 1530 Sheridan Ave Chico, CA 95926. KAYLA CASTILLO 1530 Sheridan Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: KAYLA CASTILLO Dated: September 28, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001242 Published: October 11,18,25, November 1, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as FOOTHILL PROPERTIES at 1834 Mangrove Ave Chico, CA 95926. BLAKE ANDERSON 695 E 4th St Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: BLAKE ANDERSON Dated: October 1, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001249 Published: October 11,18,25, November 1, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as IMMIGRATION ADVERSITY DOCUMENTATION at 1721 Dayton Road Chico, CA 95928. NANCY A BRYANT 1721 Dayton Road Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: NANCY A. BRYANT Dated: August 27, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001111 Published: October 11,18,25, November 1, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following persons have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name TEB PANTRY at 1982 Modoc Drive Chico, CA 95928. ALI EMDADIAN 1982 Modoc Drive Chico, CA 95928. MOHAMMADREZA SOLEYMANI 1982 Modoc Drive Chico, CA 95928. This business was conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: ALI EMDADIAN Dated: August 16, 2018 FBN Number: 2017-0001106 Published: October 11,18,25, November 1, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CENTURY 21 SELECT COMMERCIAL GROUP,

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CENTURY 21 SELECT REAL ESTATE INC at 1101 El Monte Avenue Chico, CA 95928. JACUZZI LYDON LTD 1101 El Monte Avenue Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed; DANIEL C. JACUZZI, PRESIDENT Dated: September 27, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001239 Published: October 11,18,25, November 1, 2018

SCHNEBERGER 1842 Cummings Ln Durham, CA 95938. NICHOLAS ANDREW SCHNEBERGER 157 Picholine Way Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: DONALD SCHNEBERGER Dated: October 4, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001273 Published: October 18,25, November 1,8, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as FULL CIRCLE LANDSCAPING at 1241 Honey Run Road Chico, CA 95928. ANNA ISAACS 1241 Honey Run Road Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ANNA ISAACS Dated: October 10, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001287 Published: October 18,25, November 1,8, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as MOUNTAIN TRAFFIC SERVICES at 5521 Paloma Ave Paradise, CA 95969. KEVIN JAMES SCOTT JR 5521 Paloma Ave Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: KEVIN JAMES SCOTT Dated: September 19, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001200 Published: October 18,25, November 1,8, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as TWO LOVES THRIFT at 6171 Skyway Paradise, CA 95969. KAYLA RENEE DURAN 5429 Foster Rd Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: KAYLA DURAN Dated: October 8, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001280 Published: October 18,25, November 1,8, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CALICONCEPT KITCHEN at 864 East Ave Chico, CA 95926. CALIFLOUR FOODS, LLC 1057 Village Ln Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: JAMES P. LACEY, CFO Dated: October 17, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001322 Published: October 25, November 1,8,15, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as MOPHEAD at 5585 Scottwood Rd Paradise, CA 95969. THERESA KEREAZIS-PAGE 5585 Scottwood Rd Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: THERESA KEREAZIS-PAGE Dated: September 14, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001184 Published: October 18,25, November 1,8, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as DAYCAMP COFFEE, DAYCAMP COFFEE COMPANY at 1925 Market Place Ste 150 Chico, CA 95928. DAYCAMP COFFEE, LLC 30 Aroyo Vista Ln Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed; MARK ROZELL, MEMBER Dated: October 9, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001284 Published: October 18,25, November 1,8, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CLASSIC CABINETRY at 3178 Hwy 32 Chico, CA 95973. ADAM DONALD SCHNEBERGER 1842 Cummings Lane Durham, CA 95938. DONALD GEORGE

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as HAPPY HONEST HOME REPAIR at 1056 Eaton Rd Chico, CA 95973. SCOTT CHESTER OGBORN 1056 Eaton Rd Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: SCOTT OGBORN Dated: October 15, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001304 Published: October 25, November 1,8,15, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ARCANELY MADE at 1174 1/2 Palm Ave Chico, CA 95926. LUCEY RAINS 1174 1/2 Palm Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: LUCEY RAINS Dated: October 15, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001314 Published: October 25, November 1,8,15, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The folling persons are doing business as PARTNERS IN REAL ESTATE at 702 Mangrove Ave #263 Chico, CA 95926. DAVID A LANDECK 3355 Shallow Springs Ter

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Chico, CA 95928. PARTNERS IN REAL ESTATE 702 Mangrove Ave #263 Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: DAVID A LANDECK, VICE PRESIDENT Dated: October 18, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001327 Published: October 25, November 1,8,15, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as JR FLAGGING SERVICES at 2928 Elm St Live Oak, CA 95953. BALDO BOTELLO JR 2928 Elm St Live Oak, CA 95953. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: BALDO BOTELLO JR Dated: October 22, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001337 Published: October 25, November 1,8,15, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as NOR CAL FLAGGERS at 622 Richards Ave Gridley, CA 95948. MARIANO MONTENEGRO VALLEJO 9625 Cannon Way Live Oak, CA 95953. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: MARIANO VALLEJO Dated: October 23, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001342 Published: November 1,8,15,21, 2018

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as B AND R FOODS at 6000 Maxwell Dr Apt F Paradise, CA 95969. GARY ALAN BATES 14833 Magalia Dr Magalia, CA 95954. BRADEN CHARLES SHAW 6000 Maxwell Dr Apt F Paradise, CA 95969. ROBERT BLAINE SHAW 6000 Maxwell Dr Apt F Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: ROBERT B. SHAW Dated: October 23, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001343 Published: November 1,8,15,21, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as UNITED IRONWORKS at 2944 Heritage Road Oroville, CA 95966. MARK ALLEN GODFREY 2944 Heritage Road Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: MARK A. GODFREY Dated: October 10, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001290 Published: November 1,8,15,21, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as LOUNGE A-GO-GO at 1541 Palm Avenue Chico, CA 95926. CAROLYN S ENGSTROM 1541 Palm Avenue Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: CAROLYN S. ENGSTROM Dated: October 15, 2018

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FBN Number: 2018-0001309 Published: November 1,8,15,21, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as GO GO LOCAL at 243 W 9th Street Chico, CA 95928. VERONICA VANCLEAVE-HUNT 20 Green Acres Crt 1 Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: VERONICA VANCLEAVE-HUNT Dated: October 25, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001353 Published: November 1,8,15,21, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as NORTH VALLEY FARMS at 2862 Bancroft Dr Chico, CA 95928. IMRAN BABU 3072 Rae Creek Dr Chico, CA 95973. MOHAMMAD FAROOQ NAMIT 2862 Bancroft Dr Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: IMRAN BABU Dated: October 26, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001356 Published: November 1,8,15,21, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PRETTY NAILS AND SPA at 555 Flying V Street #3 Chico, CA 95928. NGUYEN THI THU HONG 1419 Ridgebrook Way Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: HONG THI THU NGUYEN Dated: October 24, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001349 Published: November 1,8,15,21, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as LUNATIC FRINGE BOHEMIAN BOUTIQUE at 1462 Myers Street Suite A Oroville, CA 95965. MICHELLE PALOMA-HUDKINS 309 Bonite Street Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: MICHELLE PALOMA HUDKINS Dated: October 2, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001260 Published: November 1,8,15,21, 2018

NOTICES NOTICE OF LIEN SALE Pursuant to CA Business Code 21700, in lieu of rents due, the following units contain clothes, furniture, boxes, etc. JOSE ARTEAGA 238ss 6x10 (Furniture, Boxes) JAMES BUI 502cc 6x7 (Furniture, Boxes) MICHAEL DONAGHUE 507Ac 6x12 (Boxes, Misc) ANTOINETTE GRIFFITH 332cc 6x12 (Furniture, Appliance, Misc) REBECCA LAAKSO 533cc 5x7 MARK PIXLEY 364cc1 6x12 (Furniture, Boxes) CARSON REEK 494cc 6x12 (Boxes, Misc) CHRISTIAN SHEAFFER 259ss

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5x6 DARRELL SHEALY 229ss 5x12 THOMAS VANERT 446cc (Misc.) 5x5 DAVE WAITE 427Ac (boxes, Misc.) 6x10 Contents to be sold to the highest bidder on: November 17, 2018 Beginning at 1:00pm Sale to be held at: Bidwell Self Storage, 65 Heritage Lane, Chico, CA 95926. (530) 893-2109 Published: November 1,8, 2018

ORDER ON REQUEST TO CONTINUE HEARING Petitioner/CARISSA MORRIS, through her attorney of record RODNEY E. BENSON of MCGLYNN & CLARK, 737 Washington Street, Red Bluff, CA 96080 (530) 527-1117, has filed a Request for Order re Modification of Visitation with the Tehama County Superior Court located at 1740 Walnut Street, Red Bluff, CA 96080, Civil Division, (530) 527-3484 in the matter of CARISSA MORRIS, Petitioner vs. ERIC CARLSON, Respondent, Case No. FL63165. There will be a court date of Monday, December 17, 2018 at 1:30 p.m. in Dept. 5 of the Tehama County Superior Court. This document was filed with Tehama County Superior Court on October 9, 2018. This is for notice to ERIC CARLSON, Respondent in the matter. Published: October 25, November 1,8,15, 2018

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner JASON PAUL NELSON filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: JASON PAUL NELSON Proposed name: JAYSON PAUL NELSON THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: November 30, 2018 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: MICHAEL P. CANDELA Dated: September 28, 2018 Case Number: 18CV03177 Published: October 11,18,25, November 1, 2018

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner HARRY VAUGHN BOATRIGHT filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: HARRY VAUGHN BOATRIGHT Proposed name: VAUGHN BOATRIGHT THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the

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hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: November 30, 2018 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: MICHAEL P. CANDELA Dated: September 28, 2018 Case Number: 18CV03171 Published: October 11,18,25, November 1, 2018

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner EMILEE STILTNER filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: EMILEE STILTNER Proposed name: EMILEE RAY ARKOSE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: November 16, 2018 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: September 17, 2018 Case Number: 18CV02999 Published: October 18,25, November 1,8, 2018

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner NASSIM LEBNAN MAJED AAD filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: NASSIM LEBNAN MAJED AAD Proposed name: ALEK LUCIANO BEY HAWCK THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition

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without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: December 14, 2018 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: October 18, 2018 Case Number: 18CV03287 Published: October 25, November 1,8,15 2018

PETITION NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE VINCENT S. ANZALONE, also known as VINCENT ANZALONE To all heirs and beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: VINCENT S. ANZALONE, VINCENT ANZALONE A Petition for Probate has been filed by: VINCENT J. ANZALONE in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: VINCENT J. ANZALONE be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: November 6, 2018 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California

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law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: NICOLE R. PLOTTEL 466 Vallombrosa Ave. Chico, CA 95926. (530) 893-2882 Case Number: 18PR00456 Dated: October 10, 2018 Published: October 18,25, November 1, 2018

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NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE HELEN MARIE CITRANO To all heirs and beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: HELEN MARIE CITRANO A Petition for Probate has been filed by: DAWN MARIE POWELL in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: DAWN MARIE POWELL be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: November 20, 2018 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by

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the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Petitioner: DAWN MARIE POWELL 9414 PUTNEY DRIVE, DURHAM CA, 95938-0771 Case Number: 18PR00483 Published: November 1,8,15, 2018

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NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE EMMA TOKIKO ROGERS aka EMMA T. ROGERS To all heirs and beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: EMMA TOKIKO ROGERS aka EMMA T. ROGERS A Petition for Probate has been filed by: CAROLYN M. PADILLA and KATHERINE A. ROGERS in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: CAROLYN M. PADILLA and KATHERINE A. ROGERS be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: November 13, 2018 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: 8 Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the

decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: RAOUL J. LECLERC P.O. Drawer 111 Oroville, CA 95965. (530) 533-5661 Case Number: 18PR00461 Dated: October 15, 2018 Published: October 25, November 1,8, 2018

Donate to

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NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE LINDA SELINE SWIHART, also known as LINDA S. SWIHART, also known as LINDA SWIHART To all heirs and beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: LINDA SELINE SWIHART, also known as LINDA S. SWIHART, also known as LINDA SWIHART A Petition for Probate has been filed by: RONDA BRUNSON and CYNTHIA HARVEY in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: RONDA BRUNSON and CYNTHIA HARVEY be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: November 13, 2018 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: C-18 Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the

date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: JANE E. STANSELL 103 South Plumas Street Willows, CA 95988. (530) 342-4524 Case Number: 18PR00450 Dated: October 9, 2018 Published: October 18,25, November 1, 2018

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NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE CHARLES A. MCCAULEY, also known as CHARLES ANTHONY MCCAULEY, IV To all heirs and beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: CHARLES A. MCCAULEY, also known as CHARLES ANTHONY MCCAULEY, IV A Petition for Probate has been filed by: PAMELA K. CLOW in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: PAMELA K. CLOW be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: November 13, 2018 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: TBA Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of

the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: KELLY ALBRECHT, ESQ 1440 Lincoln Street Oroville, CA 95965. (530) 534-9900 Case Number: 18PR00447 Dated: October 9, 2018 Published: October 18,25, November 1, 2018

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SABRINA CHEVALLIER

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When you’re trying to get a good reading on the real estate market, find a good Realtor, and more than likely, they’ll whip out the stats. “Let’s see,” they say, “the average days on market stat is extremely low compared to a normal market. The average list price is up; the list price to sale price ratio is tight; the number of pending sales is up; the number of listed properties is down; the average sales price is up. In short, a fast market.” You nod. It’s hard to argue with the stats. “It’s been this way for several years now,” says the Realtor. “With interest rates as low as they are, even after a few interest rate hikes, the supply can’t keep up with the demand. The number of buyers making all-cash offers are a constant surprise, and the number of buyers in general is unbelievable.” But wait. The conversation described above is from a month or two ago. The conversation is changing.

Here’s another good Realtor from a meeting I attended last week: “Statistics from all around the state are showing a growing inventory of housing supply and a slowdown in sales. Houses are lingering on the market longer before getting offers.” “Are you trying to warn us of a stall in the housing market?” somebody asked. “No, not at all,” said the Realtor. “No stalling. Check the real estate speedometer. We’ve been in an 80 mile per hour market and now we’re cruising into maybe a 55 mile per hour market.” Another Realtor stood up and said, “Hey, don’t forget, this is good news for our buyers. If houses stay on the market a little longer, buyers can shop around before they make a decision.” If you’re trying to get a handle on the real estate market, find a good Realtor and ask them to bring the stats. And ask them to check the real estate speedometer.

Doug Love is Sales Manager at C-21 in Chico. Got comments or suggestions? Call or text 530-680-0817, or email Doug.love@gmail.com. License #950289

Homes are Selling in Your Neighborhood Shop every home for sale at www.C21SelectGroup.com

530.345.6618 Over a half acre in Chico!

New 2100+ home, 3 car garage $479,000 Lot in Butte Meadows $76,900 20 acres with views $145,000

RECENT LISTINGS SOLD BY

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EMMETT JACOBI (530)519–6333 CalBRE#01896904

Lic# 01318330

Homes Sold Last Week ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

2328 Alamo Ave 66 Chicory Rd 1426 Lazy Trail Dr 620 Vallombrosa Ln 13536 Autumn Ln 2973 Gallatin Gtwy 3207 Mystery Run 18 Nicole Ln 1578 Borman Way 5 Veneto Cir 2880 Bancroft Dr

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico

$762,500 $615,000 $532,500 $499,000 $495,000 $465,000 $435,000 $435,000 $433,182 $409,000 $399,000

3/3 3/3 4/3 3/3 1/1 4/3 4/3 3/2 3/2 3/3 3/2

november 1, 2018

787 Sierra View Way Chic

Century 21 Quality Service Award Recipient 2017

KIM JACOBI (530)518–8453 CalBRE#01963545

Jennifer Parks | 530.864.0336

-sold in 2 days

CalBRE #01312354

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-sold in 1 day! Avante Way Chico

Asking Price: $444,500

Alice Zeissler | 530.518.1872

42  

2606 Waverly Ct Chico

BRE# 01269667

Sponsored by Century 21 Select Real Estate, Inc. SQ. FT. 2880 2433 2649 1694 1626 2195 2725 1540 2124 2063 1765

ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

65 Temperance Way 1218 Dog Leg Dr 14 N Valley Ct 618 W 12th Ave 9 Roberto Ct 807 Sequoyah Ave 2736 Swallowtail Way 1164 Lupin Ave 2524 White Ave 1379 Ringtail Way 1604 E Lassen Ave

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico

$380,000 $364,000 $330,000 $320,000 $319,000 $304,000 $292,500 $290,000 $287,500 $279,000 $275,000

3/2 3/2 4/2 4/2 3/3 3/2 3/2 3/2 4/2 3/2 2/2

SQ. FT. 1605 1653 1603 1527 2102 1334 1136 1378 1616 1471 1305


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Teresa Larson (530) 514-5925 DRE #01177950 chiconativ@aol.com

BEAUTIFUL updated home offering 3 bed 2 bth, 1,126 sq ft with lots of nice touches!.....................$289,900 CUL DE SAC, RV PARKING, 3 bed 2 bth, 1,776 sq ft ........................................................................... $360,000

Olivia Larrabee l (530) 520-3169 Olivia.Larrabee@c21selectgroup.com

6ac Creekside on Butte Creek $249,000 3.4 ac, well, septic and power in place $115,000 5 ac lot. Owner carry $29,500 LD LD SOremodeled SO Campus condo tastefully $159,000 26.6 ac walnuts with 5800 sq ft home $1,455,000 SOLD

Mark Reaman l (530) 228-2229 Lic# 01265853

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The following houses were sold in Butte County by real estate agents or private parties during the week of October 15- October 19, 2018 The housing prices are based on the stated documentary transfer tax of the parcel and may not necessarily reflect the actual sale price of the home. ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

1013 Lupin Ave 2600 Cohasset Rd 951 Walnut St 2150 Bar Triangle St 3106 Calistoga Dr 1026 Bryant Ave 278 E 9th St 136 W 19th St 3955 Ord Ferry Rd 1944 Arcadian Ave 1444 Fetter St

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico

$269,000 $258,000 $255,000 $247,500 $233,182 $220,000 $205,500 $170,000 $165,000 $160,000 $160,000

2/2 2/1 3/1 3/2 4/2 3/2 3/1 2/1 3/2 3/2 2/1

SQ. FT. 1031 780 1089 1102 1683 2080 1137 728 1345 1044 960

ADDRESS 1114 Nord Ave #30 1420 Sherman Ave #3 1225 Ivy St 746 Brookwood Way 7195 Springtime Trl 1200 Washington Ave 5810 Acorn Ridge Dr 6085 Cliff Dr 5071 Malibu Dr 733 Bille Rd 5903 Debbie Ln

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

SQ. FT.

Chico Chico Chico Chico Oroville Oroville Paradise Paradise Paradise Paradise Paradise

$143,000 $130,000 $100,000 $65,000 $440,000 $250,000 $540,000 $399,000 $395,000 $325,000 $275,000

3/2 2/2 2/1 3/2 2/2 7/7 3/3 3/3 3/3 3/2 3/2

960 915 668 1677 2136 4715 2930 2405 2317 1570 1712

november 1, 2018

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