__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

CHICO’S FREE NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY VOLUME 42, ISSUE 8 THURSDAY, OCTOBER 18, 2018 WWW.NEWSREVIEW.COM

On the BALLOT SPECIAL ISSUE: 2018 election primer

4 ENDORSEMENTS! 27 BLOOD ON HER HANDS 24 ZOMBIELAND


FREE Annual Lyme Education Seminar THURSDAY OCTOBER 25, 2018 6:00-8:00pm www.thelymecenter.org

DONATE • SHOP • VOLUNTEER

Save 50-75% off building materials

OPEN TO ALL

Enloe Conference Center 528 Esplanade Chico

Diagnosis & Treatment of

• Windows

• Doors

• Paint

• Building Supplies • So much more!

LYME DISEASE

SUNJYA SCHWEIG MD

• Appliances

Dr. Schweig is Co-Director of the California Center for Functional Medicine, a member of the Scientific Advisory Board for the Bay Area Lyme Foundation and has received a grant from Johns Hopkins University for Lyme research. He has been a speaker at Lyme conferences nationally and is a proponent of the functional medicine approach to treat Lyme and chronic illness. Dr.Schweig will be joined by health coach Danielle Cook from CCFMED who will be talking about how lifestyle and emotional health affect the Lyme patient.

Afternoon Session 12:30-2:00pm | Limited to Medical Professionals This is an event offering CME’s. Light lunch provided Please RSVP with the CME office to reserve your seat (530)332-7586

FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL (530)877-6666

FIRST PLACE 1994-2018  5 Acre Mediterranean Fitness Resort  Running Track & Outdoor Fitness Park  500 Free Classes Every Month!  Boutique Functional Fitness Studios - Sky Room, Southside, Stretching, Outside Fitness  7 Mind/Body Studios - Yoga, Gold, Silver, Women’s Only, Personal Training, etc.  Kids Play Structure & Kids In Motion

220 Meyers St Chico (530) 895–1271

 29 New Cardio/Fitness Machines this Month!  5 Pools, Splash Park, Jacuzzis, Steam Room, Sauna, Spa  Luxurious Locker Rooms with Private Showers, Towel Service, 5 Diamond Cleanliness  Executive Locker Rooms - Opulent, Quiet, Ultra Private  More Free Weights, Weight Machines, & Cardio Than Anywhere Else!  Senior Wellness Classes, Aquatics & Specific Equipment

Voted #1 for 25 Consecutive Years & Running!

Our Facilities, Our Service, Our Staff All Strive To Over-Deliver Where Fitness Is a Resort  open 24 hrs 2 

CN&R 

october 18, 2018


CN&R

INSIDE

Vol. 42, Issue 8 • October 18, 2018 OPINION

4

Editorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Second & Flume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . This Modern World . . . . . . . . . . . . . Streetalk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4 4 5 5 7

NEWSLINES

8

Downstroke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Sifter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

HEALTHLINES

12

Appointment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Weekly Dose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

GREENWAYS

16

Eco Event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS

VOTE ★ 2018 ★

17

15 Minutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 The Goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

25

COVER STORY

18

ARTS & CULTURE

24

Arts Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 This Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Fine arts listings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Scene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Nightlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Reel World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Chow. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Arts DEVO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Brezsny’s Astrology . . . . . . . . . . . . 36

CLASSIFIEDS

36

REAL ESTATE

38

ON THE COVER: DESIGN BY TINA FLYNN

Our Mission: To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. Editor Melissa Daugherty Managing Editor Meredith J. Cooper Arts Editor Jason Cassidy Contributing Editor Evan Tuchinsky Staff Writer Ashiah Scharaga Calendar Editor Nate Daly Contributors Robin Bacior, Alastair Bland, Michelle Camy, Vic Cantu, Bob Grimm, Howard Hardee, Miles Jordan, Mark Lore, Landon Moblad, Brie Oviedo, Ryan J. Prado, Juan-Carlos Selznick, Ken Smith, Robert Speer, Cathy Wagner, Carey Wilson Managing Art Director Tina Flynn Creative Services Manager Christopher Terrazas Web Design & Strategist Elisabeth Bayard Arthur Ad Designer Naisi Thomas Custom Publications Designer Katelynn Mitrano Director of Sales and Advertising Jamie DeGarmo Advertising Services Coordinator Ruth Alderson Senior Advertising Consultants Alec Binyon, Brian Corbit, Laura Golino Advertising Consultant Autumn Slone Office Assistant Jennifer Osa Distribution Director Greg Erwin Distribution Manager Mark Schuttenberg Distribution Staff Ken Gates, Bob Meads, Pat Rogers, Sara Shaughnessy, Larry Smith, Placido Torres, Jeff Traficante, Bill Unger, Lisa Van Der Maelen, David Wyles

President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Director of Nuts & Bolts Deborah Redmond Director of People & Culture David Stogner Director of Dollars & Sense Debbie Mantoan Nuts & Bolts Ninja Norma Huerta Project Coordinator Natasha vonKaenel Payroll/AP Wizard Miranda Hansen Accounts Receivable Specialist Analie Foland Developer John Bisignano System Support Specialist Kalin Jenkins N&R Publications Editor Michelle Carl N&R Publications Associate Editor Laura Hillen N&R Publications Writers Anne Stokes, Rodney Orosco Marketing & Publications Consultants Steve Caruso, Joseph Engle, Elizabeth Morabito, Traci Hukill, Celeste Worden 353 E. Second Street, Chico, CA 95928 Phone (530) 894-2300 Fax (530) 892-1111 Website www.newsreview.com Got a News Tip? (530) 894-2300, ext 2224 or chiconewstips@newsreview.com Calendar Events cnrcalendar@newsreview.com Calendar Questions (530) 894-2300, ext. 2243 Want to Advertise? Fax (530) 892-1111 or cnradinfo@newsreview.com Classifieds (530) 894-2300, press 2 or classifieds@newsreview.com Job Opportunities jobs@newsreview.com Want to Subscribe to CN&R? chisubs@newsreview.com Editorial Policies: Opinions expressed in CN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons, or other portions of the paper. CN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or review materials. Email letters to cnrletters@newsreview.com. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form and to edit them for libel. Advertising Policies: All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes the responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. CN&R is printed at PressWorks Ink on recycled newsprint. Circulation of CN&R is verified by the Circulation Verification Council. CN&R is a member of Chico Chamber of Commerce, Oroville Chamber of Commerce, Downtown Chico Business Association, CNPA, AAN and AWN. Circulation 38,650 copies distributed free weekly.

OCTOBER 18, 2018

CN&R

3


OPINION

Send guest comments, 340 words maximum, to gc@newsreview.com or to 353 E. Second St., Chico, CA 95928. Please include photo & short bio.

EDITORIAL

The CN&R recommends … The Nov. 6 ballot is packed with important contests, from

the local to the federal level. The CN&R editorial board has done its homework to make the following endorsements. Note: We are not weighing in on every race. As always, we urge voters to research candidates and issues and come to their own conclusions.

Local

Chico City Council: Rich Ober, Scott Huber and Alex Brown This election is a pivotal one for Chico. Will the progressives take control of the council and return civil discourse to the level that existed prior to the conservative takeover four years ago? Will they mandate police officers receive additional training to peacefully interact with people with mental health issues? Will they be given a chance to install policies that address the root causes of homelessness? Each of the candidates listed above is committed to those efforts and has the right skillset to carry them out. Huber and Ober, for example, have experience in the public sphere—on the Chico Unified School District board of trustees and Bidwell Park and Playground Commission, respectively. Huber has immersed himself in the homelessness debate and Ober brings to the table years of experience as a member of the Torres Community Shelter’s board of directors. Meanwhile, Brown, who holds a master’s degree in social work, has a background in crisis counseling. Her relative youth and connections with the LGBTQ community will bring much-needed diversity to the panel. All are smart, articulate and open-minded. They have the temperament and willingness to serve all constituents—regardless of politics or economic status—and seek out best practices and data-driven approaches rather than the knee-jerk ideological reactions that have divided the community of late. Measure S (term limits): No It would mandate a two-year hiatus for Chico City Council members elected to three consecutive terms. The idea is that it will bring “fresh blood” to the council. Our question: at what cost? Historical knowledge and wisdom gained from experience are key to effective government. Moreover, taking away voters’ choice is fundamentally anti-democratic. The conservatives wasted taxpayer money putting this on the ballot.

State offices

Governor: Gavin Newsom Our choice is less an endorsement of the current lieutenant governor and more a rejection of his challenger. Republican John Cox has spent nearly two decades in the Midwest waging failed efforts to become a high-ranking public official. The change of scenery doesn’t change the fact that he’s not qualified for the job.

State measures

Prop. 1 ($4 billion affordable housing bond): Yes. We need additional housing now, especially for low-income residents. This is one tool to get us there, and a quarter of the funding is earmarked for veterans. Prop. 2 (mental health money for housing): Yes. Allows $2 billion to be borrowed for use on supportive

4

CN&R

OCTOBER 18, 2018

VOTE ★ 2018 ★

housing for mentally ill individuals with repayment from revenues collected via the voter-approved Mental Health Services Act. Prop. 3 ($8.9 billion water bond): No. We approved a water bond during the June primary that pays for water systems, state parks and conservation. This one, however, calls on taxpayers to pay for regional water conveyance systems used by big ag. Our take: Private industry is benefiting and should foot the bill. Prop. 4 ($1.5 billion for children’s hospitals): Yes. Funds upgrades at public and private nonprofit hospitals that treat children—most of them run through the University of California campuses. These facilities provide a critical service to ailing kids, especially those with special needs who are enrolled in state programs, such as Medi-Cal, which provides abysmal reimbursement rates. Prop. 5 (portable Prop. 13): No. Allows older and disabled homeowners to keep their lower property tax rate no matter how many times and where they move in the state. Championed as a way to address the housing crisis, what it really does is serve its backing group, the California Association of Realtors, whose members stand to make beaucoup bucks in commissions. Prop. 6 (gas and vehicle tax repeal): No. Repealing the lawmaker-enacted fuel tax and vehicle fees means California’s crumbling transportation infrastructure—from highways to bridges to local streets—would not get the maintenance it desperately needs. Prop. 7 (daylight saving time): Yes. Puts Californians closer to getting rid of that antiquated time tradition. The goal is to switch to daylight saving time year-round. However, that effort hinges on congressional approval, so this is just the first step. Prop. 8 (dialysis clinic profit pruning): Yes. This one pits unions against two major dialysis companies raking in enormous profits from private insurers. There’s a complex gambit at play here, and the end result is increased insurance rates and insurers pulling out of health care exchanges. The measure would cap the companies’ revenues. Prop. 10 (expanded rent control): Yes. We’re in a housing crisis that has resulted in tens of thousands of Californians living on the streets. This measure would repeal a law that widely prohibited rent control. It allows cities to take up the issue, but does not mandate policies. Prop. 11 (paramedic break time): Yes. Makes a special exception in the labor code for private company EMTs and paramedics that requires them to remain on call during paid breaks, as a matter of public safety. This has long been the case, but a recent state Supreme Court ruling put companies at risk of lawsuits. Prop. 12 (farm animal welfare): Yes. Mandates that eggs sold in the state are produced by cage-free hens, starting in 2022. Additionally, mandates sales of veal and pork products are from animals that were not confined.

Federal office

Congressional District 1: Audrey Denney. Smart, capable, resilient. Denney is true blue, and we don’t mean she’s a Democrat. We mean she has the best interests of the North State’s residents at heart and is not under the thumb of corporate interests. That cannot be said of the incumbent. Ω

SECOND & FLUME by Melissa Daugherty m e l i s s a d @ n e w s r e v i e w. c o m

Sticking point Ah, election time. It’s one of the more stressful periods for newspaper editors—at least in my experience. Figuring out our endorsements gives me fits. I take them very seriously. When it comes to the ballot measures, for example, I read virtually anything I can get my hands on for research purposes. As for the candidates for local office, we go a step further. In addition to attending the candidate forums and reading campaign literature, we invite them to sit down with us for a chat. (In this case, the “us” is yours truly and Managing Editor Meredith J. Cooper.) Unlike during the Butte County League of Women Voters (LWV) forums, we can ask as many questions and follow-ups as time allows and push back on nebulous answers. That’s the best way to gauge how would-be politicos will handle themselves at the dais, where they will interact with strangers. Overall, I enjoy the process. It gives me a sense of the person behind the political mailers and soundbites. Meanwhile, it gives the candidates a sense for the people behind these ink-soaked pages. One of the keys for us is to keep an open mind. That was our mantra going into each of the interviews we conducted over the past month with the candidates for Chico City Council. Irrespective of whom we endorsed for the three open seats, we liked all of the candidates. I mean that. Indeed, it made our job tougher when it came to making a final call. We found a lot of common ground on issues the council should better address, such as economic development, maintenance of city parks and recreation spaces, and the polarization that has crippled thoughtful discussion that leads to solutions. In our early conversations about the candidates, the outcome varied from what you’ll read in our endorsements. The sticking point? Our No. 1 concern: homelessness. In the end, we chose the candidates we believe are best equipped to reject the course the current council majority has chosen over the last four years to address this crisis. Our hope is that they will move forward with careful consideration of the potential policies and collaborations with stakeholders that will reduce the rate of chronic homelessness and the associated problems that the community is so up in arms about. Of course, voters should do their own homework. In addition to watching the aforementioned LWV forums (available on BCAC.tv’s YouTube channel), we urge everyone to read a variety of local news coverage, including this paper’s special election coverage (pages 10 and 18-22). In it, you’ll see what the council candidates had to say in their own words.

SPEAKING OF ENDORSEMENTS We may weigh in on a few more contests over the coming weeks. This year’s ballot is hefty, and there are a couple we’re continuing to research. We’ll also be reprinting our endorsements in a condensed form as we get closer to Election Day. Speaking of which, Monday (Oct. 22), is the last day to register to vote. You can’t complain if you don’t participate. Melissa Daugherty is editor of the CN&R


LETTERS

ATTENTION BOOMERS

Send email to cnrletters@newsreview.com

Imbecilic empire  Watching Trump’s imbecilic interview on 60 Minutes telling us that only material wealth is important and all other human values are trivial, I slipped into a reverie of my freshman days in college and my world history course. Trump is obviously setting himself up to “Cross the Rubicon” just as Caesar did when he established himself as dictator of Rome for life. But is this really the history we are seeing repeated, or is it Nero fiddling while Rome burned? In his penthouse lounges, Trump fiddles his own off-key compositions as his eunuchs, McConnell and Graham, lounging at his side, tell him how beautiful his music is and feed him gold coins. Statistics suggest that 24 years from now none of the three will be around to hike up their togas as the seawater—fetid with the remains of our once-productive oceans—swirls around the table legs of the ocean-view restaurant at Mar-a-Lago.

But our grandchildren will and they will undoubtedly wonder why in hell those of us educated citizens allowed such an imbecile to run this civilization into the dirt. Our social problems do not lie with the “Me Too” movement, they lie in our promoting a “Me First” rationale to life. Dean Carrier Paradise

Readers’ endorsements I have Republican, Democrat and independent friends and none of them will vote for Doug LaMalfa. They all know that LaMalfa only cares about enriching himself. How can LaMalfa and the Republican Congress be against the reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act, which protects all women from domestic violence, stalking and date rape. What makes him just not care about women’s safety? Also, he actually does not care about veterans either, except for a photo opportunity, because he voted to reduce the benefits that are due to

our veterans. Congressional District 1, including Butte County, has a very significant population of poor families with children, and LaMalfa has voted to also cut their benefits. Please vote for Audrey Denney, who will actually work for the people in our area. John Scott Butte Valley

It’s a very sad thing to see someone as hard-working and genuinely interested in civic service as Ms. Audrey Denney being bushwhacked in her run for Congress by none other than her own party. Today’s Democratic party has devolved into a screaming, hatefilled, chaos-loving mob, which few if any rational voters want to see in power. The disgusting tactics used by the Democrats in the attempted [character] assassination of our new Supreme Court justice made it clear that the Democrats care absolutely nothing about due LETTERS c o n t i n u e d

o n pa g e 6

New to Medicare? Turning 65? Leaving an employer plan? Looking for a competitive quote?

I can help with your medicare options. With over 400 customers served, I can help you to: Save money on Healthcare expenses WE S MA HOP Reduce your prescription drug costs CARRJOR IERS Call today for your free consultation. All agent fees & commissions paid by insurance companies.

Bruce A. Jenkins | CA License #0B86680 530.781.3592 | www.BruceJenkinsInsurance.com

SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY & SSI “We help YOU through the System” We assist with paperwork! Attorney at Law

LAw OffIC ES Of BETSY H. A LBERTS Over 35 years of experience.

976 Mangrove, Chico • 530.893.8387

public notice

leaf pickup

STaRTS novembeR 1, 2018 anD enDS JanuaRY 1, 2019

ciTY of chico ReSiDenTS ShoulD noT... BLOCK bicycle lanes, driveways, or storm drains. DEPOSIT branches, limbs, trees, or other debris for pickup (LEAVES ONLY). This program is not available to residents living on privately-owned streets or in unincorporated areas.

Property owners and landscape companies who service commercial and multifamily properties are NOT ALLOWED to place leaves in city streets. PLEASE CONTACT THE CITY FOR OTHER LEAF DISPOSAL OPTIONS. City of Chico: 894-4205 Monday - Friday, 8am-5pm RightofWayMaintenance@chicoca.gov www.ci.chico.ca.us october 18, 2018

  CN&R 

5


LETTERS

c o n t i n u e d f r o m pa g e 5

process nor the rule of law, only obstruction and vitriolic nasty politics. Editors and staff of the CN&R have also thrown their lot in with the mob, further strengthening and energizing local Republican voters, who, at any rate, have a substantial majority in District 1. While I admire Ms. Denney’s efforts and grit, I, like most others in the district, will be voting for Doug LaMalfa. Nobody wants the House in the hands of radicals like Maxine Waters and Nancy Pelosi, of which Ms. Denney, if elected, would most certainly be forced to swear allegiance to this wild-eyed Democrat mob. It’s simply too dangerous for the republic, or this district, to take the chance. Mike Birch Chico

I am a proud fourth-generation farm owner in the North State. My great-grandfather, a 21-yearold German immigrant, started our family farm in 1854 next to the Sacramento River in Glenn County. Our family has farmed it for the past 164 years and plans to continue that for at least four more generations. A recent scientific report by UC researchers titled “Climate Change Trends and Impacts on California Agriculture: A Detailed Review” was published on Feb. 26, 2018. This detailed report describes how our warming temperatures will significantly decrease crop yields in the future, including Butte County’s top two agricultural crops, walnuts and almonds. Doug LaMalfa denies that the climate is warming due largely to our burning of fossil fuels. His denials are a danger to finding effective solutions to crop yield challenges for future generational farmers and their ability to have successful agricultural businesses. Audrey Denney is the congressperson we need to represent the North State. She has the vision, ideas and courage to address the serious issues affecting farms today and to keep them sustainable for the future. Support our farms and vote for Audrey Denney for Congress. Roger Steel Chico

U.S. Rep. Doug LaMalfa’s latest political ad on local radio makes it a point to say he’s working hard for veterans. As a 26-year veteran, I’ve 6

CN&R

october 18, 2018

The right to vote is something that people in our country put their lives on the line for. There are people who got killed for that right, and this happened in my lifetime. —Walter ballin

got good reason to take exception to this false claim. For the past several years, I’ve tracked LaMalfa’s co-sponsorship of legislation intended to benefit our military. His performance has been dismal at best. The latest report from the independent Military Officers Association of America (moaa.com) reveals LaMalfa is currently (as of Oct. 15) co-sponsoring only two of 10 key bills affecting our military. LaMalfa has signed his name to co-sponsor only HR 299 and 3897. He has failed to get behind HRs 303, 333, 1384, 92, 93, 102, 846 and 5125. Of course, it takes real guts to step out ahead of most others and show your early support of these bills. Unless a bill garners enough co-sponsors, it is unlikely to get out of committee and reach the House floor for a full vote by all members. When you vote in November’s election, keep in mind that not every claim heard in campaign ads is truthful. Check out the facts and get informed. Dare I say, hypocrisy abounds during a political campaign. Peter Stiglich Cottonwood

Don’t sit this one out! Discouraged by mean-spirited politics, locally and nationwide? This crucial election could turn it around! Deadline to register to vote: Monday, Oct. 22. Get voter registration cards at DMV or Democratic Headquarters: 455 E. 20th St. (20th and Fair). Are you concerned for the people who are just trying to get by—priced out of renting a home, immigrant deportations, family separations, struggling students, racist policies, affordable health care, a living wage? Are you concerned about climate change, about protecting North State water,

about the health of our planet Earth home? I urge you to support these candidates: Audrey Denney for Congress—replace Doug LaMalfa, rice-farmer millionaire, rich on government subsidies to wealthy farmers while voting against food stamps for the hungry. Sonia Aery opposing Jim Gallagher for state Assembly. For a compassionate, open-minded, competent Chico City Council— Alex Brown, Rich Ober, Scott Huber. Don’t be confused by big shiny mailers and confusing TV ads! Mostly, those are paid for by big-money interests. Vote the opposite: no on 6, yes on 8, yes on 10. Help Nov. 6 become the day it all begins to turn around! Emily Alma Chico

Let’s cut to the chase. Congressman Doug LaMalfa is cheap: He uses taxpayers’ money for a campaign mailer; PAC money financed a TV attack ad against his congressional campaign opponent, Audrey Denney. He votes to cut funding for SNAP while he has a mouthful of taxpayer money; $5.2 million in government subsidies for his family farm. LaMalfa’s TV attack ad is narrated by a one-term, incompetent, deceitful and partisan Chico city council member, Reanette Fillmer, who besmirches one of her own constituents with a sneering attitude; it’s ironic that she accuses Audrey Denney of supporting a $1.5 trillion tax hike when it’s Congressman LaMalfa that voted to add $1.5 trillion to the deficit. Audrey Denney does not believe in irresponsible tax legislation; she does believe it is wrong that the Republican House, including LaMalfa, has voted numerous times to repeal the Affordable Care Act. She believes that people have a right to feel that we are a

compassionate country that looks out for one another, helping make sure that people have health care, shelter, food an education and a living wage. It’s what America is. LaMalfa has other priorities. Vote for American values. Vote for Audrey Denney on Nov. 6. Roger S. Beadle Chico

Voters in our area are blessed with several attractive candidates running for public office on Nov. 6. First and foremost is Audrey Denney, who’s seeking a seat in Congress. Articulate, smart, refreshing and personable, she will superbly represent the diversity of interests found in our sprawling 11-county district. Closer to home, three candidates for the Chico City Council stand head and shoulders above the rest: Andrew Coolidge, Matt Gallaway and Kasey Reynolds. Representing a wealth of practical business experiences and a demonstrated love of Chico, their election to our City Council will assure fiscal prudence and a sensibly balanced approach to resolving the gnarly problems facing our community. Thus, send Denney to Washington and elect Coolidge, Gallaway and Reynolds to City Hall. We will be superbly represented both near and far. Charles Geshekter Chico

The purpose of my letter is not to be nonpartisan. For Congress, I ask people to vote for Audrey Denney, as, among other things, she supports free college tuition and improved Medicare for All. For Chico City Council, I recommend Scott Huber, Rich Ober and Alex Brown. These candidates are dedicated to ending homelessness in Chico and helping people with housing and getting mental health care for those who need it. A progressive City Council will allow for regulated dispensaries in Chico in order that people can buy marijuana for medicinal or recreational purposes. None of these candidates, including Audrey Denney, take corporate money and so they are not beholden to corporations. The right to vote is something that people in our country put their lives on the line for. There are people who got killed for that right, and this happened in my lifetime. I was so inspired by the outpouring of young people marching for

gun controls after the shootings at Parkland High School in Florida. Now let’s take this to the polls. Walter Ballin Chico

In the 1970s, I moved into the foothills. All these years, when there is an election, conservative candidates have large campaign signs along both sides of Highway 99 between Chico and the Butte College exit. This year, four conservative candidates—Doug LaMalfa, Kasey Reynolds, Matt Gallaway and Andrew Coolidge—not only have their signs for miles along the highway but each has also up put a sign right by the Welcome to Chico structure. I guess it is legal, but it demeans our city and seems overkill of the great advantage they already have. Marvin Wiseley Chico

As we approach the winter season, I become more and more concerned about our vulnerable citizens. We do have local agencies, the Jesus Center, the Torres Community Shelter and several other organizations who attempt to help these folks. We also have what I call local heroes like Bob Trausch and Patrick Newman, who do their best to help this portion of our community. Something I rarely hear about because of limited media coverage is the group Youth 4 Change, which is based in Paradise, and our Chico affiliate 6th Street Center for Youth. What these people attempt to do, without much help, is to provide services for homeless young people ages 14 to 24. They are in constant need of everything from personal care items to tarps and sleeping bags for this segment of our population. The majority of these kids have aged out of the foster care system and now have nothing to fall back on for support. The goal here is that they are not on the streets for decades to come. If you believe this is a worthwhile goal, you can help. You can find out more by visiting the 6th Street center at 130 W. Sixth St. or calling 894-8008. Ed Pitman Chico

More letters online:

We’ve got too many letters for this space. please go to www.newsreview.com/chico for additional readers’ comments on past cn&r articles.


STREETALK VOTE ★ 2018 ★

Motivated to vote? Asked at Butte College main campus

Kristen Worrell student

Actually, I’m going to [register] to vote today. I want to make a difference. Obviously, I know it’s just one vote, but I want to make a difference in this election because a lot of people don’t.

Robin McCall LVN

I’m excited to vote because the propositions that are on the ballot right now have a huge benefit towards California. I believe that the health care system in California can benefit [from] some of the propositions.

Taran Booker

15th Street

Café

liquidation Sale continueS We’ve LoWered Prices!! authentic Slim aqua reg $54.99

now ow $29.99

Starting at

19 9

$

99

freight worker

Yes, I am. I like to be not only educated about what’s going on, but also to form my own opinion about what is going on in the community around me.

Lorenzo Landeros order filler

I have never really voted before, but I’ve actually considered it this time since I am old enough to vote now. And I’ve been paying more attention to politics.

take advantage of diScountS in every area of the Store!!

hiking Special

29

$

99

Selected StyleS

20% oFF all kidS uggS

Selected StyleS

Your Neighborhood Place for Coffee, Food & More

30 to 50% oFF

40% oFF Selected StyleS

~

Featuring Specialty Coffees Pastries Breakfast & Lunch Local Wines and Craft Beers 7am to 3pm Monday through Saturday 8am to 2pm Sunday 1414 Park Ave, Ste 120 Chico 530-809-1087 ~

Selected StyleS

30 to 50%

Heel & Sole SHoeS

708 Mangrove Ave. (in the Safeway Shopping Center) Chico 899-0780 Open 7 Days Mon-Sat 10am-8pm Sun 11am-6pm • We carry nArrOWS & WiDeS Prices good thru 10.31.18, while supplies last OCTOBER 18, 2018

CN&R

7


NEWSLINES DOWNSTROKE DA REBUKES OROVILLE COUNCIL

Butte County District Attorney Mike Ramsey told the Oroville City Council Tuesday night (Oct. 16) that five members had violated the Brown Act a second time, and while he wouldn’t prosecute them, he’d consider charges for a third violation. Ramsey said he’d heard from ClerkRecorder Candace Grubbs that the five had come together to her office to file a complaint about a voter registration matter. They were Vice Mayor Janet Goodson and council members Jack Berry, Marlene del Rosario, Linda Draper and Art Hatley. Ramsey said he could charge each with a misdemeanor. The Brown Act, California’s openmeetings law, prohibits a quorum from gathering to take action or make a decision without public notice. In July, those same council members drew a Brown Act complaint for their hasty censuring of Mayor Linda Dahlmeier, prompting another meeting on that vote. (See “Mayor censured … again,” Downstroke, July 26.)

CHICO MAN SUES CITY, MAYOR

Former Bidwell Park and Playground Commissioner Mark Herrera (pictured) is suing the city of Chico, Mayor Sean Morgan, Deputy Chico Police Chief Matt Madden and Officer Marcelo Escobedo for violating his rights protected by the First and Fourth amendments. On May 15, Herrera addressed the City Council during a public comment period, offering a satirical speech directed at local community group Chico First and policies often criticized for criminalizing homelessness. (See “Heat from the dais,” Newslines, May 17.) In a civil complaint filed last Thursday (Oct. 11) in the U.S. Eastern District Court, Herrera argues Morgan “unlawfully imposed a content-based restriction to silence” him. He maintains that he was unlawfully detained and arrested “without probable cause.” Herrera, who’d taken a break during the council meeting at a local tavern, was held overnight at the Butte County Jail after submitting to a breathalyzer test. He was not charged. Herrera is demanding a jury trial, damages and attorney’s fees, arguing that he has suffered emotional distress, anxiety, depression and damage to his reputation. Additionally, he wants an order prohibiting those named from curtailing speech from members of the public during dedicated public comment periods without “content-neutral, narrowly tailored procedures which further a significant governmental interest.”

8

CN&R

OCTOBER 18, 2018

Arresting development Sit/lie vote sparks another contentious council meeting hen the handcuffs locked into place W around Patrick Newman’s wrists Tuesday (Oct. 16), it marked the second

time police escorted a person out of the Chico City Council Chambers in six months. story and photo by That scene was one Ashiah Scharaga of several protests that night. Lately, civil unrest as h i a h s @ has been growing from a n ew srev i ew. c o m populace divided along ideological lines but united in their discontent with the state of the city. The meeting began with a discussion on the reinstatement of the sit/lie law, which was in place from Nov. 19, 2013, to Jan. 1, 2016. The vote fell predictably along conservative-liberal lines, with the council deciding to prohibit people from obstructing sidewalks or doorways in commercial districts throughout the city from 7 a.m. to 11 p.m. (Councilmembers Karl Ory, Ann Schwab and Randall Stone were opposed.) Prior to his arrest, Newman—an advocate for the homeless and founder of Chico Friends on the Street—criticized sit/lie, as

well as the conservative-majority council’s approach to homelessness. “People on the streets are the losers in the housing game. They’re losers for reasons that have to do with disability, mostly,” he said. “Instead of co-exiting in public space, which would be the honorable and humane approach to all this, we are trying to squeeze them out of town.” Near the end of his speaking limit, he began to read an excerpt from Martin v. City of Boise, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals decision that has come to define the legality of sit/lie laws, acknowledging that he would continue “until this meeting is adjourned or I am removed from this building.” After a calm exchange between Newman and Mayor Sean Morgan, both choosing not to budge, Morgan called for a five-minute recess and Newman’s removal. He was released outside the chambers because he was being cooperative and was not intoxicated, Police Chief Mike O’Brien later told the CN&R. Newman’s circumstances contrast with the May removal and arrest of Mark Herrera, who is now suing the city (see Downstroke, this page).

The meeting started out differently than

expected—the chambers weren’t overflowing, and there were two police officers situated along the aisles, not six, as there have been for the past several meetings. Morgan commented upon the start of the meeting, “OK, it’s eerily quiet in here.” It didn’t take long for tensions to escalate. Newman was the 14th of 24 speakers, about half for and half against sit/ lie, the first topic of the meeting’s regular agenda. After Councilman Andrew Coolidge made the motion to approve sit/lie, more than 20 attendees—in the second protest of the night—stood and turned their backs to the council. Dan Everhart had announced the action during his public comment: “Some of us, in protest of the injustice of this law, when the mayor calls the vote, we’re going to quietly turn our backs on the right wing of the City Council, as they have consistently done to the people in our community who need their help the most.” Those in support of the law included business owners, Downtown Chico Business Association board President


Patrick Newman is escorted in handcuffs from the council chambers.

A Californian in the White House?

David Halimi and members of the community group Chico First. Teri DuBose, a downtown business owner, said she is trying to make a living and it is “reasonable to expect clear sidewalks and doorways in the downtown area.” It is not the kind-hearted people who are down-and-out whom she has a hard time asking to relocate, she added, “it is the registered sex offenders, violent criminals and drug addicts that threaten my business and personal safety.” Ory criticized the move to discuss sit/lie now as a political stunt— Coolidge brought it up and is the only conservative incumbent running for reelection (the ordinance’s second reading will fall on election night). “What we have is a feel-good proposal, window dressing, weeks before the election, that has the effect of making us more of an us-and-them community,” Ory said. He added that the ordinance “dances around” the Ninth Circuit decision and “just looks and smells” like criminalization, because the $100 fines issued for violations will not be paid. Coolidge responded by saying that if it were political, he would not have pushed for the shelter crisis declaration as well. He reiterated public statements he has made, that he is looking for “all solutions” to the city’s problems with homelessness. Councilman Mark Sorensen countered that the purpose of Martin v. City of Boise was “not to relinquish public areas to uncivil behavior.” Vice Mayor Reanette Fillmer said “there are two sides to this story” and that the people in favor of the ordinance are “not speaking as loudly” but “speaking in abundance” via calls and emails. In the last protest of the night, a small group chose to eat food in the chambers during a typical recess. When asked to obey the water-only rule by police and city staff members, the group shot back by calling out council members and a police officer who had eaten in the chambers that night. Among other actions taken, the council voted unanimously (with Stone recused) to have a discussion about the retroactive taxation of AirBnB owners. (See “Blindsided,” Newslines, Oct. 4.) Also, the council voted to reduce development impact fees for small units. Ω

Insiders’ predictions on who might be on the presidential ballot in 2020 The latest conventional wisdom among state political

insiders: There’s a good chance a Californian will be on the presidential ticket in 2020, and that Californian is likely to be Democratic U.S. Sen. Kamala Harris. Among participants in a new Target Book Insider Track survey, 55 percent say it is somewhat or very likely that a Californian makes the 2020 ticket, either for president or vice president. The survey—our attempt to put some real data behind the anecdotal estimations of conventional About this story: wisdom—is based on 34 responFormer CN&R dents who are Target Book subintern Elizabeth Castillo originally produced this scribers, an assortment of politicos, for CALMatters.org, a lobbyists and consultants. nonprofit, nonpartisan When asked whom they had in media venture explaining mind, the overwhelming favorite California policies and politics. was Harris, with Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti a distant second. Garcetti has already made several trips to South Carolina, an important state in the primaries behind Iowa and New Hampshire. But Harris is visiting the state this week. The rookie senator also has made stops in Ohio, where she was greeted earlier this month by fellow Democrats as a rock star. Although she has been consistent in saying she’s focused on the midterms as she campaigns for Democratic candidates across the country, she also went further than before in acknowledging her interest in 2020. “I’m thinking about ’18 and what we need to do around these races, and then I’ll seriously take a look at

SIFT ER Safe passage Butte County Public Health just received a one-year $40,000 California Office of Traffic Safety grant, which will fund activities promoting bike and pedestrian safety. That’s a good thing, considering statistics showing that bicyclist and pedestrian injuries and deaths often occur here at a higher rate than the national average. At the same time, the city of Chico is updating its bicycle plan. Those hoping to weigh in should attend the final public info session today (Oct. 18), 5-6:30 p.m., in the

things after that. But right now I’m focused on this,” she told reporters. Harris, a former prosecutor and California attorney general, is the first Indian American senator and California’s first black senator. She firmly stood behind Christine Blasey Ford, Justice Brett Kavanaugh’s first public accuser, and drew headlines for her tough questioning of him during the confirmation hearing that addressed alleged sexual assault. There hasn’t been a sitting mayor

who transitioned straight to the White House, but Garcetti, who like Harris has been glowingly profiled in Vogue, has been quietly working the national circuit with visits to Iowa and New Hampshire. During these trips he would frequently introduce himself with the line: “I come from Los Angeles, and we have a few more

Sen. Kamala Harris at the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing for the confirmation of Brett Kavanaugh to the U.S. Supreme Court, in September. PHOTO COURTESY OF CALMATTERS.ORG

Kardashians than you do, but we are mostly not Kardashians,” according to a GQ profile. For now, many national experts place Harris among the wide top tier of potential Democratic presidential contenders, behind Elizabeth Warren and Joe Biden. But she hasn’t given sufficient clues to determine her aim in the view of FiveThirtyEight.com, which places Harris behind Garcetti in a rubric of actions made by past candidates that signaled their intent to run.

second floor conference room at the Old Municipal Building. Check out these stats: • From 2015 to 2016, the percentage of bicycle collisions that injured a child in Butte County more than doubled, from 8 percent to 20 percent, according to Public Health data. • Nationally, 4 percent of pedestrians injured in a crash in 2015 were younger than 15 years old, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. In Butte County, that rate was 13 percent. • The National Highway Traffic

—ELIZABETH CASTILLO

NEWSLINES C O N T I N U E D

O N PA G E 1 0

Safety Administration reports 13 percent of pedestrians injured and 19 percent of pedestrians killed nationally in 2015 were elderly. In Butte County, elderly folks accounted for 27 percent of bike-related injuries and 56 percent of deaths. A contributing factor to the problem is a low rate of helmet use: Only 28 percent of those 18 or younger, and 20 percent of adults 19 and older, used head protection, according to 2016 county data and the California Highway Patrols Statewide Integrated Traffic Reporting System.

OCTOBER 18, 2018

CN&R

9


Assisted Living On your Property* Quaint, Park Model Homes Full size Kitchens-Bathrooms Multiple Floor Plans Handicap Plans Available 400 sq ft or smaller *Chico Municipal Code 19.22.040. Restrictions Apply. Contact us for details

Canterbury Cabins Inc.

530.899.8297 | canterburycabins.com

Vote

Ken Rensink

NEWSLINES

C O N T I N U E D F R O M PA G E 9

VOTE ★ 2018 ★

Taxes on the brain Paradise and Oroville residents asked to tax themselves to bolster services Despite being nestled in the same

region of Northern California, Paradise and Oroville are quite different. Life on the Ridge has unique challenges, as does residing in the city dominated by a dam and a reservoir that provides water for many of California’s communities to the south. But one thing they do share is a severe lack of funding for everything from public safety to road improvements. Enter Measure V in Paradise and Measure U in Oroville, a half-cent and 1 cent sales tax, respectively, to bolster their general funds. Paradise’s proposed sales tax is actually an extension of a half-cent tax approved by voters in 2014. That one sunsets in 2021 after six years, but has a proven track record. Measure V is expected to generate about $1.4 million a year. “As general fund revenues, the tax revenues may be used to pay for various Town services, including, but not limited to, the funding of public services such as fire protection and emergency response services, police protection, animal control services, and street maintenance,” according to the impartial analysis prepared

by Paradise Town Attorney Dwight Moore. The tax would be extended for an additional 10 years, sunsetting in 2031. It maintains a requirement of a nine-member citizens’ oversight committee charged with providing direction for funding and preparing regular updates for the Town Council. “Basic necessities like groceries and prescription medications are NOT taxed,” say Mayor Jody Jones and Vice Mayor Greg Bolin in a letter arguing in favor of Measure V. “A retail sales tax is considered to be more ‘fair’ because visitors help pay a share of the cost for roads and emergency services on retail purchases.” Nobody submitted an argument against Measure V, but one of the main talking points of those who oppose temporary taxes is that they tend not to remain temporary because stopping them means stopping services. “Our primary goal and reason [to extend the tax] is to maintain services in the town of Paradise—mainly public safety services, police and fire, but with dedicated funding for

roads and animal control,” acknowledged Gina Will, finance director for the town of Paradise. That’s not the whole story, however. “We chose 10 years this time because we have a pension obligation bond that will be paid off in 10 years,” she continued. “That’s kind of where we came up with 10 years. Payments will be about $1 million a year, so we’re thinking we’ll be in better financial shape once that bond is paid off.” Oroville’s Measure U is different

from Paradise’s tax measure in a couple of key ways. First, it’s a full 1 cent; second, it has no sunset clause. It’s essentially the same as Measure R, which was brought before voters in 2016 and failed, with just 47 percent voting for it. Measure R was set to expire after six years. “The tax would remain in place until repealed by the voters,” City Attorney Scott E. Huber explains in his impartial analysis of Measure U. “[A]ll revenue collected from the measure would be used by the city to pay for general city operations and services, including police

for

ChiCo City CounCil An Experienced Independent Free from Partisan Influence.

www.KenForChico.com

Paid for by Ken Rensink for City Council 2018

FPPC # 1402910

n o s n i b en Ro t

Re-Elec

Eile

rd of SD Boa

for CU

Continuing Support for Quality Education

ion

Educat

Endorsements:

Claudia Anderson Susan J. Bruce Connie Chrysler Carolyn Neves Janean Regas Leslie Howard Dr. David Brown, D.D.S. Terra Ayers

Autumn Brock Leslie Johnson Alan & Stevi Mittman Angela McLaughlin Billie Kanter Richard Ober Tim VanderHeiden

Paid for by The Committee to Elect Eileen Robinson to Board of Education, 2018 #1328942 | Paid Political Advertisement 10

CN&R

OCTOBER 18, 2018

WATER WORKS

The volunteers at Chico Heritage Association advocated for the preservation of the historic, decommissioned water towers on East Third and Orient streets after Cal Water announced last year that they would be torn down for safety concerns. On Monday (Oct. 15), the CHA folks and Cal Water reps joined community members to celebrate the permanent residency of the century-old water tanks at Cal Water’s “An Evening Under the Towers.” PHOTO BY ASHIAH SCHARAGA


Italian Cottage Restaurants

MEET TEAK

Lunch or Dinner Special

An Amazing Snugglebug

protection, fire suppression, vehicle repair and maintenance, finance department analyst and human resources services,” he continues. “The city finance director estimates that, if passed, the measure would generate approximately $3.7 million per year.” Half a dozen calls to Oroville City Hall, to half a dozen different people, were unanswered and were not returned—a tangible reminder that the city is understaffed. “Yes on U ensures Oroville will add more police officers on neighborhood patrols and strengthen crime prevention and gang suppression programs,” write proponents of Measure U, which include Bill LaGrone, the city’s chief of fire and police; Ruth Wright, the city’s finance director; and Robert Wentz, CEO of Oroville Hospital. “The city of Oroville has a backlog of million dollars’ worth of street maintenance and road repair projects,” their letter continues. “Measure U is a small price to pay to maintain essential services like police, fire, emergency response, street repairs, libraries, and youth and senior programs.” The argument against the 1 cent tax, penned by local business owner Steve Christensen, points to actions by the City Council that indicate the funds would not be used as promised. “California requires voter approval for raising existing taxes or imposing new taxes,” he writes. “Ask yourself, ‘Should I trust these people with more of my dollars?’” Mayor Linda Dahlmeier countered that argument, saying the budget constraints the city has felt—in particular the recession and loss of redevelopment agency funds—have been beyond the council’s control. “There isn’t any more cutting to be done,” she told the CN&R. “We are down to the bare minimum.” She also pointed to safeguards included in the measure, such as the requirement of a citizens’ oversight committee and annual audits. “You can look at this as a costof-living increase to the city of Oroville, which hasn’t had one in years,” Dahlmeier said. “When you look at all of the positive things that have happened in Paradise with the additional sales tax, that is exactly what any city would want to see.” —Meredith J. Cooper mere d i thc @ n ewsr ev i ew. com

FREE

BUY ONE GET ONE 1/2 OFF

Buy any lunch or dinner, get the 2nd of equal or lesser value 1/2 off!

TO A GOOD HOME

Offer good Mon-Thurs.11am – close. Not valid with any other discounts. Up to 4 guests per coupon. Expires 10.25.18.

1 yr old stray, up to date on vax, requires wet food.

“A Chico Tradition Since 1965” Come find out why we’re Chico’s best spot for great sandwiches, fresh salads, pizzas, pasta and breakfast too!

Please call or email for more details: AdoptTeak@gmail.com or 530-206-9300

2002–2017

2234 Esplanade, 343-7000 • Open 7 days, 6am–10pm • 2525 Dominic Dr., 342-7771 • Open 7 days , 6am–9pm

PIZZA, PASTA, SAL ADS & MORE · BREAKFAST SERVED EVERYDAY · CHAMPAGNE SUNDAY BRUNCH 6AM - 1PM · COCKTAILS · BEER · WINE

RETIRE IN THE

$289,90

0

FOOTHILLS

12 Acres 3 Bed / 3 Bath 1,700 sqft Beautiful Views Room To Build Shop David Black (530) 370-3360 Lic #01715554 Owner, Robert Moore (530) 514-2463

Let’s Plant! Maple Trees Renowned for their brilliant fall foliage. Vibrant hues of fiery red, electric orange and calming yellow deepen with warm sunny days and cool nights. Planting a Maple such as Autumn Blaze or October Glory will make you the envy of the neighborhood.

Together We’re Chico Rich

OBER Chico City Council My Priorities: • Collaborative leadership and a Council that listens • Affordable housing • Good, sustainable jobs • Protecting the Greenline and investing in our parks

oberforchico.com Mon- Sat 8aM-4pM | 2270 fair Street | 343-7615

Paid forfor bybyOber Council2018 2018FPPC FPPC #1399070 Paid Oberfor forChico Chico City City Council #1399070 OctOber 18, 2018

CN&R

11


HEALTHLINES

VOTE ★ 2018 ★ Assemblyman James Gallagher, center left, introduces himself as “the elephant in the room” at the health care forum including his challenger, Sonia Aery, left, and congressional candidate Audrey Denney, far right. Moderator Mike Wiltermood sits center stage.

who pay escalating prices for health coverage. “As a business owner in a rural area, I can say, ‘Yeah, it’s way too expensive,’” said Aery, who runs an insurance agency. “I’m not my employees’ mother. It took me 2 1/2 years in business to be able to contribute to their health care cost…. “We’re [both] paying and still not everything is covered.” That the forum became a referendum on

Double take on single-payer Forum discussion bifurcates with surprise GOP participant story and photo by

Evan Tuchinsky

evantuc hin sk y @ n ewsrev i ew. com

W Guild Hall last Wednesday evening (Oct. 10), moments before the scheduled start of a hen James Gallagher walked into the Chico

candidate forum on health care, heads turned. The North State assemblyman didn’t draw notice for his manner of arrival. Rather, the fact he’d come at all is what proved a surprise to event organizers and attendees. This forum—sponsored by a collection of progressive groups, moderated by Enloe Medical Center CEO Mike Wiltermood— focused on big-picture questions surrounding health care, directed at candidates for U.S. Congress and the California Legislature. Democrats accepted the invitation to appear; Republicans either declined or didn’t respond. So Gallagher, a GOP incumbent, approached a dais with seats set for his challenger, Sonia Aery of Chico; Caleen Sisk, running for Assembly in the Redding area against Brian Dahle (in a district that also covers part of the Ridge); Phillip Kim, vying to unseat state Sen. Jim Nielsen; and Audrey

12

CN&R

OCTOBER 18 2018

Denney, the Chicoan battling Rep. Doug LaMalfa. During his introductory comments, Gallagher addressed “the elephant in the room” by quipping, “I’m the elephant in the room.” His views mostly contrasted with those of the Democrats, who all favor some version of single-payer insurance—universal coverage, “Medicare for All”—and he drew a few boos with talking points against these health programs overseas. Gallagher, and Wiltermood afterward, joined the chorus in identifying fundamental problems with the current system and an urgent need to address them. “I think it’s an important discussion to have,” Gallagher told the CN&R. “I disagree that single-payer is the way to go to bring about better outcomes and lower costs, but the goals that we’re trying to reach are similar: How do we provide more access [and] how do we ensure that health care is truly affordable? “I think everybody in this room agreed that, ‘Hey, the current system is a disaster.’ It really is. My argument is it’s been made more of a disaster by government interference over time.” Aery and Denney both stressed singlepayer health care is neither a government takeover nor socialized medicine. Singlepayer encompasses “who pays for health

care,” Denney said, “not who delivers health care.” The same providers—hospitals, clinics, doctors’ offices—would operate under a single-payer system; what it would eliminate would be private insurance companies. Removing that stratum of administrative cost and corporate profit would yield savings for businesses, employees and individuals

single-payer stemmed from planners as well as participants. The lead sponsor, Butte County Health Care Coalition, is a chapter of Health Care for All – California—a single-payer advocate. So, too, are co-sponsors Physicians for a National Health Program and California Health Professional Student Alliance. (Chico Housing Action Team and Chico Peace and Justice Center also cosponsored.) The groups’ leftward leanings may have telegraphed a tone, but Gallagher told the CN&R that a schedule conflict was the reason he had not planned to attend. When he found he’d become available, he came. The hosts prepared a handwritten placard for him and made space between Aery and Wiltermood. The event starting with a screening of the 2015 documentary Fix It: Health Care at the Tipping Point, which makes a HEALTHLINES C O N T I N U E D

O N PA G E 1 5

APPOINTMENT flu vaccinations. If you miss them, many pharmacies in the county offer inexpensive shots with no reservation required.

Tuesday (Oct. 23)

Free flu shots Who wants to use up sick days actually being sick? Go get a flu shot—or, if you can, nasal mist—and save time off for something fun. Both Enloe Medical Center and Chico State have upcoming events where they’ll offer free, walk-up

Chico State Flu Clinic Meriam Library Breezeway 1-5 p.m. Students free ($15 for staff and faculty)

Next Saturday (Oct. 27) Enloe Community Wellness Expo 175 W. 5th Ave. (corner of W. 5th and Magnolia Ave.) 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. Ages 3 and older


FOR DENTURES WITH EXTRACTIONS ONLY october 18, 2018

CN&R 

13


© ANAND VARMA

JOIN THE AS WE PRESENT

Anand Varma BEAUTY AND THE BIZARRE WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 7 | 7:30 PM LAXSON AUDITORIUM

© MARK THIESSEN

W

hen Anand Varma takes a photograph of a parasitic wasp consuming a caterpillar from the inside, he doesn’t want to you to be disgusted—he wants you to be amazed! He’s devoted years of his life to perfecting his techniques to create dramatic, bizarre—and beautiful—images of the miniature world around us. In these unique images, he reveals the secret life cycle of the honeybee and captures the lightning-fast behaviors of hummingbirds.

3 PHOTOS © ANAND VARMA

TICKETS: $32 Premium | $25 Adult | $23 Senior | $15 Youth & Chico State Student Available at the University Box Office • Corner of 3rd & Chestnut Streets | 530.898.6333 Sponsored by Presented by Supported by Gwen Quail

MORE INFORMATION:

WWW.CHICOPERFORMANCES.COM | 898-6333 14 

CN&R 

october 18, 2018


HEALTHLINES case for single-payer. Gallagher felt that may have “pigeon-holed us” in exploring that option, as opposed to looking at the issue without a preconception. Overall, following the event, he said, “I’m glad I was here. I enjoyed it; I enjoy a healthy discussion and debate.” During the discussion, Gallagher proposed a “social safety net”—government-funded coverage for people who cannot afford it, with protections for people with pre-exising conditions— “then a free market for everyone else.” He posed the question, Why should the public pay for a billionaire? (Gallagher named Tesla CEO Elon Musk.) Aery stressed a key component of single-payer: taking health insurance out of the workplace. Denney—noting “we need to be thoughtful, we need to be careful, when we structure one-fifth of our [national] economy”—expanded on that idea; she extolled job mobility, free from concerns of

C O N T I N U E D F R O M PA G E 1 2

See for yourself:

BCAC TV, which broadcasted the forum, has posted a video online (visit tinyurl.com/ BCACForum).

employer health plans, as a way to “unleash human capital.” After his 70-minute Q&A, Wiltermood told the CN&R that he was pleased with the outcome. “The issues of health care are pretty complex,” he said, “and I have to give the candidates a lot of credit. It seemed like a frank and pretty open dialogue. “The takeaway that we’re in crisis is important for the public to understand,” he added. “It’s also important for the public to understand that it is a complex issue, there’s a diversity of opinions here, and it’s going to take a country that’s willing to set aside partisan differences in order for us to come together and create a system that actually works the way our country deserves it to work.” Ω

National Mammography Day National Mammography Day is observed annually on the third Friday in October as part of National Breast Cancer Awareness Month. The best protection is early detection.

Laura’s Wig Be au t y Supply & S a l o n

ALL THE BRANDS YOU LOVE! Pamper yourself with the largest selection of extensions, wigs & beauty supplies in the North Valley.

530.342.1200 | 872 East avE, ChiCo |

It might sound like a kitschy dance, but the Dutch Reach is a common sense technique for preventing bicycle injuries that we all can use. If you’ve ever been “doored” while biking, or witnessed such an accident, you know the reason for this measure. When exiting a vehicle, both drivers and passengers should use the far hand to open the door, reaching across your body to grab the door handle. This forces you to slightly swivel and look over your shoulder to check for bikes and traffic. Dutch kids learn this in school, and it’s a necessary skill for passing a driving test in the Netherlands. The Reach also has been incorporated into the Massachusetts driver’s manual and is being advocated for in Berlin, Dublin, Toronto and Washington, D.C. If Chico wants to truly embrace its bike city status, we should do it here, too. Learn more at dutchreach.org.

Cnrsweetdeals.newsreview.Com

Do the Dutch Reach

Fall into Fitness

$50 Off Your First Month Unlimited Classes

Schedule a free class on our free Kaia Fit app, choose Chico as your location, book your first class, and select introductory rate at checkout!

Locally owned and operated sine 1964

WEEKLY DOSE

Love. Laughter. Support. Hope. Cheer

2700 Hegan Lane Suite 108 (530) 570-6342 www.kaiafitchico.com Find us on Facebook

3D MAMMOGRAPHY eV erY W oma N e VerY Yea r beGiNNiNG at 40

This guy saves you money. A Division of North State Radiology

chicobreastcare.com | 530.898.0502 oOcCtToObBeErR 1 188, 2 0 1 8

CN&R 

15


GREENWAYS Pete Calarco, assistant director of Butte County Development Services, says the oak ordinance headed to county supervisors could apply to a parcel with even one tree. PhOtO cOurtesy Of butte cOunty DevelOPment services

Woodlands watchdogging Oak ordinance raises questions about mitigation, lack of codes for preservation by

Evan Tuchinsky evantuc hin sk y @ n ewsrev i ew. com

Tof vineyard in the Central Coast community Paso Robles grew alarmed when they wo summers ago, neighbors of a large

realized earth movers had cleared hundreds of oak trees on the property. San Luis Obispo County officials issued a stop-work order to prevent further grading. By spring—specifically, April 2017—public concern had grown wide enough that the county adopted a preservation ordinance to prohibit clear-cutting oaks. Napa and Sonoma counties have similar laws. Butte County does not, though an oak tree ordinance is working its way through government channels. This statute—the Oak Woodlands Mitigation Ordinance, approved by the county Planning Commission at its Sept. 27 meeting—would streamline environmental reviews for developers and landowners who want to remove trees and set out means to offset the losses. That may sound ecological in nature. However, Woody Elliott, conservation chair for the Mount Lassen chapter of the California Native Plant Society, wants to disabuse everyone of that notion. While emphasizing he doesn’t support or oppose the proposal per se, he says it’s important to know its limits. “It’s not really a preservation ordinance. It’s an ordinance to facilitate the removal of oaks,” he told the CN&R by phone. “It will, at best, result in a minimal loss of oak woodlands.” The Board of Supervisors will take up the ordinance Nov. 6, according to Pete Calarco, assistant director of the county’s Development Services Department. It stems from the county’s general plan, which

16

CN&R

OctOber 18, 2018

includes policies “that support an oak mitigation program”; he said it’s “a priority of the board to complete this [process] by the end of the year.” Currently, Calarco explained, officials evaluate oak removals on a case-by-case basis. Options to offset the loss of trees comprise replanting, establishing conservation easements or making in-lieu payment to the state oak conservation fund. If adopted, the ordinance would establish a code for most development projects in unincorporated areas, such as small subdivisions, that in most cases would preclude the need for a specific environmental impact review for removing oak trees. “Part of the discussion has been the concern that this ordinance isn’t a preservation ordinance, or a protection or permitting ordinance—and that’s correct,” Calarco said. “It’s an ordinance that sets a threshold of significance under [state environmental law] for development projects. “It also helps prospective applicants

Ordinance drafts:

visit tinyurl.com/butteOakOrd for more information on the oak mitigation ordinance, including revised versions.

understand what’s expected for analyzing oak woodlands when they’re doing their project design, in advance of submitting an application; and also have a general idea of what to expect from mitigation, so they can begin making some decisions about whether they are interested in [pursuing a project].”

grasses that support 60 percent of California rangelands” and “acorns [that] are a highly nutritious food source for livestock.” Calarco said his department and the commission took public feedback into consideration and made several changes accordingly. Those include qualifications of experts authorized to assess mitigation and a rule prohibiting an arborist from both recommending and performing work on the same project. Perhaps most significantly, the county changed the size of the grove to which the ordinance would apply. Rather than calculate the percent oaks represent in a site’s tree canopy, applicants and county planners could look at the mitigation rules for “essentially any canopy area for an oak tree,” Calarco said—using the rules for even a single tree. Elliott’s issue with the ordinance is “it creates the illusion you’re doing a lot of good things for oaks.” That would come from a preservation ordinance. He hopes the current discussions and deliberation winds up leading Butte County to follow Sonoma and Napa—and forestall an imbroglio like San Luis Obispo County’s. “I see this [mitigation ordinance] as a process, as I told the Planning Commission, of becoming informed about the importance of preserving oaks,” Elliott said. “Hopefully, before it’s too late, they’ll get around to that.” Ω

ECO EVENT

Elliott views mitigation of oak woodlands as

a “problematic” proposition. During the two public workshops and comment periods for drafting the ordinance, he offered some of the most pointed critiques—as did members of California Oaks, an Oakland-based project of the California Wildlife Foundation. The ordinance, Elliott told the CN&R, “calls for replanting oaks to replace those that are taken, and there really is no place to replant oaks that they aren’t already growing in naturally. The other provisions are for purchasing mitigation credits or outright oak woodlands of a certain value—that does not create new oaks. “So, you result in a net loss.” Oaks have environmental significance. In response to a draft of the ordinance, Angela Moskow of Cal Oaks wrote that “standing trees and associated soils sequester carbon while providing habitat, watershed, and other ecosystem benefits” such as “a productive understory of

T&T birds Local birder, zoologist and author Ted Beedy has studied birds and other wildlife throughout California for more than 60 years. He’s co-authored a new book with Ed Pandolfino, titled Birds of the Sierra Nevada. But his presentation Monday (Oct. 22) at 6:30 p.m. at the Chico Creek Nature Center focuses on more tropical locales. Beedy recently returned from a bird photography tour of Trinidad & Tobago, led by wildlife artist Keith Hansen, and will discuss what he saw, talk conservation and share photographs and sound recordings of these tropical treasures.


EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS PHOTO BY CATHY WAGNER

15 MINUTES

THE GOODS

Bringing food to you

Exploring, giving

FoodJets, a new service that delivers your favorite restaurant food in Chico right to your door, is a brand new venture for owners Andrea and Chris Duffey. Andrea, who is originally from Maryland, and Chris, who grew up locally by the Sutter Buttes in the small town of Meridian, met in Gridley while they were both living there in 2000. Together, they moved to Virginia, then back to California, to Auburn, and finally settled on Chico as the place they wanted to live. Andrea had worked for 12 years as a physical therapy assistant, later to become a stay-at-home mom to 5-yearold Reagan (pictured), and Chris is an engineer who earned his degree at Chico State. As luck would have it, one of their neighbors in Auburn is the CEO of FoodJets—he started the company 25 years ago as Food to You in Sacramento, but changed the name and business model in the last couple of years. He suggested the Duffeys open up a franchise when he learned they were moving to Chico. The couple are enjoying the new challenges and the freedom of running their own business. There is a $4.99 delivery charge, and restaurant partners include Inday’s Filipino Restaurant, the Foodie Cafe and LemonShark Poké. Check them

out at FoodJets.com, or download their smartphone app.

What’s the best part about your new business? Andrea: I like to be busy, and it’s keeping me busy, so that’s good. I was busy in health care and I was busy as a stay-at-home mom, but now that Reagan’s in kindergarten, I just really wanted to get back into doing something while she’s at school. Chris: I’m still an engineer; I work full-time and then help Andrea out with FoodJets. FoodJets is mostly her, she’s handled all of it, or most of it, and I help out wherever she needs me to. Andrea: I do everything until I can’t and then I say, “Hey, can you do this?”

How does your “Give $5, get $5” promotion work? Andrea: When you create an

account with FoodJets, you get your own promo code to give your friends. So, [for example], if I give you my promo code, you can save $5 the first time you use FoodJets, and I get a $5 credit into my account for a future food order. We’ve had a few people use it, but a lot of people don’t know about it yet.

Are you involved in the community? Chris: We partnered with the Chico Children’s Museum to do a donation for the museum. Any time anybody uses the promo code “museum” [when placing their order], we’ll donate out of our proceeds $1 for every order. So if we can get 100 people to do it, we’ll donate $100 to the museum this month. Andrea: That’s another good thing about the locally owned FoodJets franchises; we give back to the community. —CATHY WAGNER

by

Meredith J. Cooper meredithc@newsreview.com

One of the projects I oversee here at the CN&R is Discover Butte County. It’s a little daunting because there’s so much to do in this region and things change constantly, so keeping up on it all and not leaving important things out is always a challenge. This local visitor guide is also one of my favorite projects to work on, as it affords me plenty of reasons to get out of the Chico bubble and experience cool new things. Our region has its own travel initiative, Explore Butte County, which has a hefty budget (over $1 million), as it’s funded through the tourism business improvement district (TBID) that launched in December 2015. I recently took a survey it’s sponsoring online that’s geared toward those in the hospitality industry but is applicable to anyone who interacts with visitors to our county. I urge others to take it, too (incentive: a $100 Visa card to one lucky winner), and to leave comments about what you think should be highlighted in our area. The purpose of the survey (you can find it at tinyurl.com/ButteCountyCTA) is to inform Explore Butte County’s new certified tourism ambassador program. It seems like a step in the right direction, as I have been underwhelmed with the group’s progress thus far. Its website (explorebuttecounty.com) is beautiful, but lacking in substance. Examples: It offers one itinerary that sends people to three different pumpkin patches in one day and a map of places to shop in Chico has just two options. Its list of Butte County communities includes Clipper Mills (population 142) but not Gridley (pop. 6,704), as Gridley hotels didn’t sign on to the TBID. The good news is, Explore Butte County knows this—a website analysis was offered at last week’s board meeting and an upgrade will soon commence. (Personal suggestion: Add links to local news sources on the site!)

CARS FOR A CURE Are you in the market for a new vehicle? If so, you could get a little more for your buck with Oroville Auto Center’s Think Pink event running through the month of October. For every car and truck sold this month, the center will donate $100 to cancer research and treatment. Last year, the first year of the Think Pink event, that equaled $11,000. Not too shabby! In similar car-cure news, there will be a car show/fire-truck pull on Saturday (Oct. 20) in the Chico Mall parking lot to benefit the American Cancer Society’s breast cancer initiatives. Teams of 10 pullers as well as people wanting to participate in the car show can register online (go to chicomall.com and click on “events”). The event is 9 a.m.-1 p.m. and also will feature food trucks and ice cream. MORE DOGOODERY In addition to being Breast Cancer Awareness Month, October

is also Domestic Violence Awareness Month. In honor of the latter, 12 local Allstate agents recently held a donation drive to gather toys and kitchen items for Catalyst Domestic Violence Services. An added value: Because of the drive, they also were able to secure $10,000 for the nonprofit through the Allstate Foundation Helping Hands Grant program.

OCTOBER 18, 2018

CN&R

17


TIME TO VOTE

I

n this special Election Issue, the CN&R focuses on a few of the races closest to home, including the hotly contested council races in Chico and Oroville. A lot is at stake locally this election cycle—those seeking office have widely divergent takes on how to move their communities forward on issues ranging from homelessness to cannabis. In addition, we take a look at how Prop. 6—aka the gas-tax repeal—would affect our region. The Nov. 6 ballot includes a bevy of other statewide initiatives—11 in all—and numerous open seats ranging from the U.S. Senate and Congress down to school boards. We’ve made recommendations only for the races and ballot initiatives we’ve studied sufficiently to feel confident about our endorsements (see Editorial, page 4). That includes local Measure S— a term-limits initiative backed by an outgoing Chico council member. And finally, the deadline to register to vote is Monday, Oct. 22. The easiest route: go to registertovote.ca.gov. See you at the polls!

Eight is enough A Q&A WITH THE FOLKS WHO ARE SEEKING THREE OPEN CHICO CITY COUNCIL SEATS THE QUESTIONS: 1. Chico’s Chamber of Commerce would like the City Council to explore new taxes, such as a sales tax increase or bond measure that voters would take up at the ballot box. Should the council do so? Why or why not? If so, what should the money be spent on? 2. Would you support expanding crisis intervention training for Chico police officers? Why or why not? 3. The state recently earmarked $4.9 million for Butte County service providers to address homelessness. The allocation hinged on the declaration of a shelter crisis. Do you support the Chico City Council’s recent decision to approve that declaration? Why or why not? 4. Should the City Council establish policy that allows for cannabis dispensaries in Chico? Why or why not? 5. From a policy perspective, what would you do as a City Council member to increase Chico’s housing stock, especially for the average Chico family (i.e., those About the this story: In addition to the candidates featured, making the median household income of you’ll find the name James Aguirre on $43,000 a year) and the workforce (i.e., the ballot for Chico City Council. However, millennials)? because Aguirre has been a no-show at each of this year’s council forums, the 6. Overall, the City Council has become CN&R does not consider him an active increasingly polarized during the past candidate and did not include him in this report. The other candidates’ answers couple of years. What would you do to have been minimally edited, mainly for foster better relationships with members grammar and punctuation. The newspaper of the panel and the public who have didn’t have room for all of the questions we asked of the group. To read the Q&A in divergent ideological perspectives? its entirety, go to newsreview.com/chico.

18

CN&R

OCTOBER 18, 2018

Alex Brown

Andrew Coolidge

Matt Gallaway

1. Taxation is a tool that can be used strategi-

1. I am currently in support of exploring a

1. If proponents believe that enough public

cally to move our city forward. It should be built into cannabis commerce in Chico so we can benefit from revenue through cannabis dispensary sales, allowing us to address other issues impacting our city. If the city were to implement additional taxes, my priorities would be in addressing homelessness, Chico’s pavement conditions and the CalPERS crisis.

2. Yes. Responding to a crisis requires a dif-

ferent set of skills than responding to a general safety concern. People in crisis cannot respond to intervention as well as people who are not in crisis can respond. This training supports our police force in developing an essential set of skills to manage crises effectively. An investment in CIT training is an investment in public safety.

3. I support the city declaring a shelter crisis.

The city should avail itself to any funds that can be used to address the issue of homelessness in the most effective ways possible. Research indicates that housing and service-delivery models are the best and most cost-effective approaches for addressing homelessness, and the shelter crisis declaration opens the door for solutions to be brought to the table.

4. I am supportive of a smart, strategic and

sustainable policy regulating cannabis in Chico. Some benefits of cannabis commerce in Chico include reducing the power of the black market, and the potential for revenue that can be utilized to address other concerns impacting our city. We can learn from the successes and errors of surrounding areas to adopt a policy that works for our community.

5. I would incentivize development of affordable

housing through waiving and/or deferring development fees for developers who include affordable units in their proposed projects. I would prioritize development of smaller units that are better suited for our workforce, including single room occupancy (SRO) units, accessory dwelling units (ADUs), and other small units that are developed densely and can therefore house a larger number of Chico residents.

6. I have worked in settings that require

thoughtful collaboration with individuals and organizations with differing perspectives and goals. I understand the value of meeting people where they are. I am confident in my ability to communicate effectively with my colleagues, even those who have divergent ideological perspectives. I will maintain respectful, productive dialogue and make data-driven decisions that consider the needs of all constituents.

bond measure for road repairs, which would free up a substantial amount of funds to not only improve roads, but also to benefit various other aspects of city services. I believe all fee or tax increases should be decided by the citizens of Chico.

2. Chico Police Department officers have the

support for these proposals exist, they should collect signatures. I am focused on other, more sustainable ways of funding our basic services. With that said, the city’s finance committee has already agreed to survey the community about these proposals and I’m committed to serving the needs and desires of the public.

proper training, according to state and local standards. I was pleased to support the implementation and use of body cameras for our officers and also to work toward the department increasing from just 65 officers to now 95 under my first term on the council. I also agendized and support the year-round operation of the Street Crimes Unit.

2. I look to the chief for answers to these dif-

3. I agendized the shelter crisis discussion that came before the council and approved it because it will help provide actual solutions to the homeless problems facing Chico. While I believe in tougher enforcement on crime issues, I also believe in a helping hand for those in need. According to the city attorney, the approval does not void current laws restricting illegal camping and would not allow it.

3. I’ve been consistent in saying that I support brick-and-mortar solutions. At the very root of homelessness is the fact that people lack a roof over their heads. The council decision is done; if elected, I have to deal with the ramifications. From what I’ve seen in the Continuum of Care applications, there are not many options for brick-and-mortar requests—rendering the declaration disappointing.

4. While state laws made recreational

4. No. My research on the subject shows that

marijuana legal in the state of California, many citizens have concerns about the location of and problems associated with dispensaries and possible places throughout the city. I do not support a policy for dispensaries in Chico. I believe the council established a clear and fair set of guidelines for growing marijuana for medical or personal use in Chico.

5. The best way to work toward more housing

in Chico would be to reduce the tens of thousands of dollars in fees the city adds on to the price of a home. Over the last four years, the council has worked to streamline the development process in Chico so new homes and apartments can move forward with proper and thorough approvals.

6. I have set myself apart on the council as someone who is willing to work across the aisle and move forward on important policies for the city. From tree-planting programs in Lower Park to support of the arts in our community to efforts to save The Esplanade, I have taken the lead on many issues that seek to strengthen our community rather than separate us.

ficult questions. The statistics I’ve seen from Chico PD indicate that incidents in which use of force is necessary amounts to a miniscule amount of the total number of calls to which they respond. I’m in favor of a safe Chico and will support our police with the tools they need to accomplish that goal.

the associated risks and costs outweigh the benefits of doing so. Other municipalities have seen an increase in crime, heavy drug usage, hospitalizations, traffic deaths related to cannabis, incidents of minority youth arrested for drug crimes, and an increase in their transient population requesting services. Considering our current situation, the costs will outweigh the benefits.

5. The biggest housing problem we face is a

shortage in supply. We must reform our landuse regulations and fees in order to allow for innovation and encourage builders to invest in more units, and more importantly in different types of units. Right now, we don’t have enough low-income product. We must change that. Due to my experience, I’m uniquely qualified to do so.

6. In my profession for the past 25 years, I have served as liaison, generally between two opposing parties. Success in my world has been measured by maintaining positive results with smiles on both sides of the issue. This requires listening respectfully to others and spending valuable time on solutions rather than focusing on blame.


Scott Huber

Rich Ober

Ken Rensink

Kasey Reynolds

Jon Scott

1. It is irresponsible to not look at every

1. Taxes, bonds and other revenue-generating

1. Yes, a ballot measure increasing city rev-

1. According to the Public Policy Institute of

1. Until exploding unfunded pension costs are

2. I support providing Chico Police officers

2. I support and have faith in our police chief

option for solving our severely underfunded safety issues, such as road repairs, fire and police staffing. In addition to seeking out grant funding wherever available, taxes and bonds must be part of a comprehensive revenuegeneration discussion. Not doing so handicaps our ability to keep citizens safe.

2. Expanded CIT and other training not only

makes our community safer, it also helps assure that lives are not being lost needlessly. The more that we invest in training of our safety personnel, the lower the cost in human suffering and lawsuits.

3. I first asked the council to declare a shelter crisis nearly a year ago; my experience at Safe Space made it clear that more resources were needed. The HEAP allocation will allow us to entertain proposals for such items as structural shelter, a day center, mental health and addiction services, 24-hour restrooms and jobs, taking pressure off of our downtown and parks. 4. A citizens’ advisory panel tasked with

creating a workable regulation plan should be assembled, made up of representatives from organizations including: schools, safety personnel, business organizations, common citizens and cannabis advocates. Based on the recommendations of this group, the council should take action to allow well-regulated commercial sales on an initially limited basis. Allowing medical deliveries to patients should be approved immediately.

5. Citizens worked diligently with staff on our

general plan—a consensus on how Chico should grow. That plan focused on higher-density infill units mixed with neighborhood commercial as a way to avoid sprawl. The city hasn’t taken the lead on assuring that we follow that plan. We need to give preference to plans that comply with the general plan goals and incentivize smart growth.

6. Lead by example, by treating both community members and my fellow council members the way I want to be treated, with respect.

measures are simply tools in our toolbox. It is smart fiscal management to bring all of these tools to the job of balancing our city’s needs against budgetary restraint. The chamber offered one option and the City Council should now do its job and lead an open discussion. Any revenues generated through these means should be applied to infrastructure and pension liability reduction.

2. Absolutely. I believe that critical incident

training, de-escalation training and implicit bias training should all be standard protocol for every police force. In addition to facilitating best policing practices, the adoption of mandatory training programs would send a clear message from the CPD to the community that we’re entering a new period of transparency, accountability and partnership.

enue should go before the voters. Take Chico’s roads; to maintain them at a PCI (pavement condition index) of 60 out of 100 will require spending $3 million to $4 million more per year. Potholes, slowed traffic, increased air pollution, auto repairs (tires, alignments) are costs too. We will all pay one way or another. The voters should decide.

with 40 hours of critical incident training, including de-escalation strategies, conflict resolution techniques and practice role playing. This will enable our local police officers to have greater choices with skills and techniques and the confidence to apply them on the job. Increased training can also help improve police-public interactions and create a greater sense of community.

3. Yes, absolutely. Many of us in the community have been advocating for this for many months, even before this funding became available. My work with [the] Torres [Shelter] has helped me understand this issue deeply. I am eager to work with the Continuum of Care to identify service providers and programs that will benefit greatly from these funds to continue to do the amazing work they are doing every day.

3. I absolutely support the declaration of a shelter crisis, which is a legal requirement for the city of Chico to access the $4.9 million earmarked for Butte County. I understand the concerns about “strings attached.” However, I would rather have money with strings than no money with no strings, if that is what is required to obtain more financial support and services for our community.

4. The voters of Chico have already settled

a Schedule 1 drug and placed more appropriately on Schedule 3 or Schedule 4. Cities will then be able to craft public policy and ordinances that allow for marijuana dispensaries without placing the city, the police or funding opportunities in jeopardy with the federal government.

this matter by voting overwhelmingly in favor of legalization. Chico should be leading on this, applying smart management and safe regulation while also providing mechanisms for both recreational users and medical patients for safe, regulated access. It’s time for us to bring this industry out of the shadows and realize the revenues that other communities are already reaping.

5. Just like the rest of the state, we are facing

a housing crisis in Chico, particularly for hardworking modest- and low-income families. Our development community needs to continue to be steered toward multifamily and smaller singleoccupancy units. The city needs to incentivize this type of development by lowering or waiving certain fees, clearing red tape, and putting this type of development at the head of the line.

6. Working collaboratively across lines of difference is a skill I have honed in my many community service roles and in my work as a communications manager for an international software company. I have taken a deep dive into understanding polarization and how to fix it. By applying communication models built on open dialogue and mutual respect, we can rebuild trust on the council and throughout the community.

4. Yes, as soon as marijuana is reclassified from

5. I would pursue development agreements

with developers to construct high-density, affordable housing near public transportation in SPAs (special planning areas) where it might be possible to reduce some fees and costs. The city could encourage building smaller homes under 1,000 square feet for first-time buyers. The general plan also emphasizes infill development and mixed-use buildings concepts, which may also help make housing more affordable.

6. The principles of open communication, collaboration, respect for all, encouraging participation, seeking solutions through constructive dialogue, not divisive rhetoric; these are the principles I applied while serving two terms on the Chico Planning Commission and will apply if elected to the City Council. To foster a better atmosphere, I suggest council members host or go out to dinner together to build relationships and mutual respect.

California, about 4 in 10 Californians are living in, or near poverty. Increasing gas, housing, electricity and food prices are making it more and more unaffordable to live here. With that being said, I believe that the decision to increase taxes should be left up to the voters of Chico, not the seven members of the City Council.

to make these types of decisions. Politicians and activists should not be micromanaging industries and services they know very little about. Let’s leave it up to the professionals, who, in my opinion, are doing a great job in Chico.

3. I’m looking forward, not backwards. The question to the candidates seeking to serve in the future should be: What is the best way to use this funding with the goal of reducing and preventing homelessness? For me, I’d like to see this funding used to create a coordinated entry system so that we have rapid response services that are streamlined for those in need. 4. I support the current ordinance. 5. The reality is that builders will build houses if there is profit to be made. Therefore, we need to ensure that our local government is not imposing unreasonable fees and rules that scare away potential investors looking to build additional housing stock.

6. I think people should look at my long history of involvement in our community and the broad base of support for my campaign. On my website, there is a very long list of Republicans, Democrats and independents who have all endorsed my campaign. I think that is a testament to how I will bridge this divide.

addressed, no new taxes should be discussed. In a time not that long ago, tax rates were far below what they are today, and yet we found money for libraries, police, fire, etc. Currently, unfunded pension liability costs to the city of Chico are $500,000 per month. That money could fund additional police and road repairs.

2. Absolutely! Police officers have a difficult

job. Officers are constantly in situations in which life-and-death split-second decisions must be made. Providing additional training to our police officers is a win for the police, a win for the city, and a win for the individuals with whom the police interact. I am also a proponent of body and vehicle cameras at all times.

3. I do not agree with the declaration. We do

not have a shelter crisis. We have a transient behavior crisis. If you observe the transients that are congregating in every public location, you will note they are not emaciated like the pictures we often see of starving people in locations experiencing extreme famine (usually in Africa). They eat plenty and behave poorly. Enough is enough.

4. This is a silly issue. Cannabis is legal. It

should be treated like whiskey. For sale anywhere you can buy whiskey and controlled the same way. If treated that way, there will be no “marijuana only” shops. It will become a non-issue.

5. Streamline the permit process and stop the group insanity of thinking city fees do not get passed on to homebuyers. When it often costs near $100,000 to have a lot ready to build before “pounding the first nail,” something is drastically wrong. Often those calling the loudest for “affordable housing” are the same people calling for every fee imaginable.

6. Respect that we are all on the same team. No one on the council (nor anyone running for council) has anything but the best of intentions for the city. As a candidate, my proposed solutions are the near opposite of some other candidates’ solutions. Regardless, I have deep respect for those candidates’ viewpoints and their loving commitment to the city. None are the “enemy.”

MORE

ELECTION C O N T I N U E D

OCTOBER 18, 2018

O N PA G E 2 0

CN&R

19


VOTE ★ 2018 ★

Three seats, four candidates

T

his year’s Chico Unified School District board of trustees race is made up of mostly familiar faces, with three incumbents hoping to keep their seats. The longest-serving, Kathy Kaiser, who’s been on the panel for the past dozen years, is seeking a fourth term. Meanwhile, Eileen Robinson, first elected in 2010, has served two four-year terms, and Gary Loustale is wrapping up his first term. Their lone challenger? Tom M. Lando, the son of former Chico City Manager Tom Lando, but “my last name is not junior,” he’s quick to point out. CUSD has a five-member board, rounded out by Elizabeth Griffin and Linda Hovey, whose terms end in 2020. Here’s a little on each candidate on the November ballot. • Kathy Kaiser is a retired Chico State sociology professor. She lives in Chico with her partner and can often be found cheering for her grandchildren at school sports games. Kaiser has worked in a local and state capacity (on the Chico State and CSU system academic senates) to connect the educational experience provided in kindergarten through 12th grades to college. Kaiser was first elected as a trustee in 2006. Among her accomplishments, she noted having supported the upgrading of middle school science labs and technology districtwide, with students and computers on a 1:1 ratio. Parents stressed safety as being a No. 1 concern, so the school board took a “really important step” and put up fencing around all schools, she added. Looking forward, CUSD is expecting to see student growth—its recently expanded middle schools are already full, and the school

ONE CHALLENGER JOINS THREE INCUMBENTS IN SCHOOL BOARD RACE board is trying to address crowded elementary campuses. The board has to “really keep focused” on providing its incoming students with classrooms that allow them to learn in a hands-on capacity, she said. • Tom M. Lando, a teacher at Pivot Charter School North Valley, became motivated to run to repair what he sees as an underutilized, unhealthy relationship between the district and charter schools. “We need a board that understands that [charter] process better and is willing to see charter school teachers ... as advocates for their students,” he told the CN&R. He would like to see the district encourage teachers, whether at charter- or district-run campuses, to share best practices and provide more opportunities for professional development and transfer student success. He’d also like to explore a full-service community school model, in which campuses become a community hub, with health and social services. Lando’s greatest concern is the performance disparity across CUSD elementary schools—test scores for English and math are low and decreasing, he said. “I’m kind of worried that it’s turning into a have-and-havenot situation,” he added. Lando, a longtime Chicoan, graduated from Chico State in 2009 with a degree in political science and his teaching credential. He’s been teaching for five years, is married and has two kids.

• Gary Loustale grew up in Tracy and has been the career tech educator and adviser for the Butte County Office of Education’s Computer Technology and Small Business Administration for 12 years. He is married and has three adult children. If re-elected, Loustale said he’d focus on getting all kindergarten schools on a full-day schedule, so CUSD students can all start first grade on equal footing. The state is pushing for schools to become college- and career-ready, so he wants to make sure CUSD is “providing many career pathways for students to experiment with” before graduating. During his time as a trustee, Loustale supported making room in the budget to retain district elementary school counselors after a grant expired. He stressed that the board saw that as a critical service for young students. The board also has supported charter schools by making sure they were eligible to receive Measure K bond funding for facilities, security, transportation and athletic equipment. “That’s kind of rare for the state,” he said. “I was proud we did that, because their parents pay taxes, too.” • Eileen Robinson grew up on a small dairy west of Hamilton City, and has seven daughters (three of whom are step-daughters) and seven grandkids. For nearly 30 years, she was

School board candidates prepare for a League of Women Voters forum. From left to right: Kathy Kaiser, Tom M. Lando, Gary Loustale and Eileen Robinson. PHOTO BY MELISSA DAUGHERTY

an attendance clerk at Pleasant Valley High School. After she retired in 2002, she had a hard time staying away from education, and was first elected to the school board in 2010. During her tenure, Robinson has advocated for interest-based bargaining, a style of negotiations that looks at “solving a problem rather than winning a battle.” That process, recently used by the district and its employee and teachers’ unions, has led to “such a positive change.” She’s been proud to support getting preschool started in the district, adding that she “can see already with our preschool programs how much more prepared our kiddos are as they get to kindergarten.” If re-elected, Robinson said she will push for more educational flexibility (i.e., high school schedules and career-readiness), more training for teachers (to improve the learning experience for special education students in integrated classrooms), and more opportunities for parent involvement. Robinson is also a Torres Community Shelter board member.

DONATE YOUR CAR Cars For A Cause

helps support Arc’s Family Support Programs for individuals with developmental disabilities and their families when you donate your car. * 100% Tax Dexuctible * We accept Vehicles Running or Not

—ASHIAH SCHARAGA ash ia h s@ newsr ev iew.c o m

1 tacos

$

every Tuesday

* Free Vehicle Pickup * We take care of all paperwork and DMV

Make a difference in your community, call TODAY!

Call 343-3666 20

CN&R

OCTOBER 18, 2018

530-566-7745 • 1002 W 5th St., Chico


A house divided

Your plumbing

VOTE ★ 2018 ★

OROVILLE MAYOR, COUNCIL RACES SPUR SUPPORTERS TO ‘MALICIOUS’ LEVELS

Fixed Right, Right Now!

J

anet Goodson is no stranger to Oroville politics. After moving from Sacramento in 2009, she worked to improve Southside, culminating in the community’s annexation into the city in 2015. The next year, she ran for City Council; Goodson finished second of 11 in the race for three seats. Now she’s Oroville’s vice mayor, seeking to become mayor—an elected office. Incumbent Linda Dahlmeier opted not to seek a third term; instead, Goodson faces newcomer Chuck Reynolds, a business owner whose family has lived in town for generations. This campaign, and the challenges to three incumbent council members, has grown particularly pitched. The mayoral race featured dueling charges of sign-stealing and revelations of decades-old criminal records … in September alone. Goodson, who’s black, says she’s endured racial denigration. Council candidate Bobby O’Reiley, who had criminal charges unearthed in the same media reports as Reynolds, told the CN&R he’s received death threats—some posted on social media. “Today’s social climate and political climate is very contentious,” Goodson said, “to the point of being mean-spirited … I ran two years ago, and never would I have imagined the atmosphere would be[come] so volatile, extremely malicious.” She and her opponent apparently don’t harbor animosity. Reynolds, after a candidates forum Oct. 4, and Goodson, by phone Oct. 9, both said they get along personally despite differences idealogically. Should Reynolds win, he’ll have to work with Goodson, as her council term runs through 2020. “I think what’s going on is there’s some overzealous supporters on both sides that are trying to show their support, and sometimes it gets a little out of hand,” Reynolds said. “I don’t know [that] she personally knows her overzealous supporters; I know I don’t personally know all of mine. But there’s momentum in this campaign.” Goodson said Reynolds “is absolutely correct” that she has not sanctioned dirty-trick politicking. Noting that she “can only be responsible for the actions of Janet Goodson,” she added that “we cannot dictate what someone else is going to do.” Goodson called for unity in her closing statement at the forum: “It does not matter whether you are Democrat or Republican or decline-tostate, or whether you’re black, brown, white or Asian, rich or poor—what matters is we all work together, for the common good of all.”

The precise nature and cause of Orovillians’

divide is complicated. Like many California cities, Oroville has battled budget problems throughout the decade, exacerbated by escalating pension liabilities and

Perfect Eyebrows don ’t happen by accident... They happen by appointment. Call, Text, or Email the loss of redevelopment funding. The fiscal picture turned so bleak that City Hall no longer opens on Fridays and staff shrank by a third following layoffs and a hiring freeze instituted four years ago. Insolvency looms. Enter cannabis. State legislation legalizing marijuana for recreational use and in commerce created an opportunity for municipalities to regulate cannabis and reap tax benefits. Oroville began exploring this option last year. Dahlmeier and Councilman Scott Thomson, a pastor, oppose legalizing cannabis. The other five council members consistently voted to advance legalization proposals. Those include Goodson and three up for re-election: Jack Berry, Marlene del Rosario and Art Hatley. Their challengers, along with O’Reiley, are former council members Cheri Bunker and David Pittmann, Oroville Chamber of Commerce CEO Eric Smith and energy specialist Ricky Gabriel; the latter didn’t attend the forum. The process has created a rift on the dais (see “Council vs. mayor,” Newslines, July 19). Dahlmeier and Thomson—plus like-minded citizens, including candidates—have accused the majority of railroading cannabis. The five chose to decide the matter via council vote rather than ballot measure, and they’ve raised eyebrows by seeming to accelerate their Planning Commission’s review of ordinances (see “Stutter step,” Newslines, Aug. 9). Reynolds said his stance isn’t simply about cannabis. He claims the incumbents have eroded trust in city government. Meanwhile, O’Reiley and other challengers charge a lack of transparency.

Janet Goodson and Chuck Reynolds, apparently friendlier than some of their supporters, await the Oroville city candidates forum Oct. 4 at the State Theatre.

415.994.7014 ca rri e@ wa x ed b out i q ue. com Locat ed in t he Garden Walk Mall

PHOTO BY EVAN TUCHINSKY

“I’m not anti-anything other than against the law,” Reynolds said, noting that the federal government considers cannabis an illegal drug, contrary to state law. “A contributing factor for me getting involved in this race was when they took the vote away from the people. They had the opportunity to go back to the ballot, where marijuana had been voted down in this town seven times. I think that’s a pretty good indication of how people want to live.” A majority of city voters, 55.7 percent, did reject Measure L, the failed Butte County initiative on medical marijuana cultivation and commerce, in November 2016—but, in the same election, 51.7 percent supported Proposition 64, the state initiative legalizing cannabis. Goodson says her role on the council transcends individual beliefs. Hatley and Berry said likewise at the forum. None stated a position about cannabis itself. “I do not have the luxury of weighing in on my own personal opinions,” Goodson said emphatically. “We were asked to explore all viable opportunities to generate employment opportunities, explore economic expansion, increase our tax base and generate revenue—period.” —EVAN TUCHINSKY eva n tu c h insk y @ newsr ev iew.c o m

MORE

ELECTION C O N T I N U E D

O N PA G E 2 2

NOW OFFERING

SWIMWEAR YEAR ROUND! SWIM * YOGA * DANCE

177 E 3RD ST, CHICO • (530) 891-0672 TUE-FRI 10AM-6PM • SAT 10AM-5PM One of a Kind Affordable Luxury Charter Service Faster Service available 24 Hours $134 Flat Rate Airport Service to Sacramento Discounts for Round Trip Service to SanFran Coming Soon Call or text 530-893-2221 to book your next trip

www.affordalux.us Lic# TCP37883-P

OCTOBER 18, 2018

CN&R

21


Whistle stops Senate, governor hopefuls swing through Chico

Limited time CONSERVATIVES PROPOSE TERM LIMITS FOR CHICO CITY COUNCIL

S

hall Section 401 of the Chico City Charter be amended to limit the members of the Chico City Council to no more than three (3) consecutive terms? That is the question posed by Measure S, which will go before voters in the city of Chico Nov. 6. The measure was proposed by Councilman Mark Sorensen, who, along with his conservative council colleagues, voted in July to place it on the ballot. He, Mayor Sean Morgan and Councilman Andrew Coolidge, who is up for re-election for his second term, signed the official argument in favor of the measure submitted to the city (the arguments are available on the city website). Their letter begins: “12 consecutive years as a Council Member is long enough! “Term Limits encourage greater citizen participation in government, ensuring regular turnover in Council Member seats,” it continues. “Citizens of all professions and backgrounds can and will run for office.” By way of rebuttal, longtime Councilwoman Ann Schwab and retiring Butte County Supervisor Maureen Kirk, who previously served two terms on the Chico City Council, argue that term limits remove voters’ ability to choose the most qualified candidates. “Sometimes, the incumbent is the best choice available to voters,” they write. Schwab is currently serving her fourth consecutive four-year term on the council (she was originally elected to the panel in 2004). Measure S, which would take effect this November if approved, is not retroactive. It would require a two-year hiatus from the panel after three terms before a candidate can run again. “We already have term limits. They’re called elections,” Schwab and Kirk write in their argument against Measure S. “… Council’s job is to direct staff. Inexperienced leaders defer more frequently to staff and special interests. Term limits ensure lobbyists have more experience than the people you elect.” The Measure S proponents suggest term limits should apply to all political offices, from the president to Congress to state legislatures right on down to city councils. “Elected positions should be temporary service to the PUBLIC interest, not a long career spanning decades,” they write. Term limits do apply to the president, California governor as well as state Assembly and Senate (but not Congress). —MEREDITH J. COOPER m er ed i t hc@ n ew sr ev i ew. com

22

CN&R

OCTOBER 18, 2018

U.S. Senate candidate Kevin de León huddles with students during his Sept. 27 campaign stop at Chico State.

Candidates on the statewide ballot don’t often come to Chico, which made Bernie Sanders’ 2016 rally at Chico State all the more remarkable. This cycle, three stumped in Chico: Democratic gubernatorial candidate Delaine Eastin, who spoke at the library ahead of June’s primary; Republican gubernatorial finalist John Cox, trying to score points against the gas tax at a gas station Sept. 29; and U.S. Senate challenger Kevin de León, who got personal with small groups at Chico State and a recent backyard fundraiser. De León aims to unseat Sen. Dianne Feinstein, in office since 1992. A former president pro tem of the California Senate, from a district in Los Angeles, de León is terming out of office. He’s endorsed by the state Democratic Party and touts progressive policies such as single-payer health coverage and tuitionfree public colleges. “Every vote counts,” de León told the CN&R, “and I wanted to give folks in a rural county like Butte County the respect that they deserve.” —EVAN TUCHINSKY eva ntu c h insk y @ newsr ev iew.c o m

PHOTO BY EVAN TUCHINSKY

Rocky roads LOCAL IMPACTS OF THE GAS TAX REPEAL Who doesn’t love lower gas prices? This election year, there’s a proposition on the ballot to roll back California’s latest gas and diesel fuel tax hikes, 12 cents per gallon and 20 cents per gallon, respectively. But if Proposition 6 passes, Butte County and its municipalities stand to lose more than $120 million in revenue that would be earmarked for repairing failing roadways and bridges through 2027. Prop. 6 is a Republican-led initiative aiming to repeal Senate Bill 1, which also increased vehicle registration fees. In addition, it would require voter approval for fuel tax and vehicle fee hikes in the future. Proponents—including Republican gubernatorial candidate John Cox, whose campaign committee has contributed $250,000 to the Yes on Prop. 6 effort—have argued that SB 1 regressively taxes people, unfairly burdening Californians already grappling with a rising cost of living. Prop. 6 supporters say SB 1 costs drivers $600 to $800 per year, but opponents and independent analysts say that price tag is inflated. According to The Sacramento Bee, the average California family consumes a little over 600 gallons of gas per year (the average per registered car), so the gas tax increase ranges between $153 and $215 See “Bracing for annually and will grow with inflation. the ballot,” Aug. 2, Opposition of Prop. 6 has come from for a comprehenassociations of firefighters, civil engineers sive look at the 11 propositions on the and highway patrol workers, who have argued that repealing the gas tax will halt ballot.

PROP. 6

critical transportation projects and jeopardize the safety of the state’s bridges and roads. In Chico, SB 1 dollars have gone to rehabilitating Cohasset Road from East Avenue to Eaton Road. Other improvements across the county have been planned for the Skyway and Oro-Quincy Highway. The following breakdown of how much Butte County and its cities stand to lose if the gas tax is repealed—provided by Butte County Public Works Director Dennis Schmidt—was originally compiled by Michael Cohen, the principal fiscal policy adviser to the League of California Cities. (Go to CaliforniaCityFinance.com for more info.)

Jurisdiction

2019-20

Projected loss (2019-27) Biggs........................$48,000 ....................$504,000 Chico........................$2.3 million ...............$24.7 million Gridley .....................$168,000 ...................$1.8 million Oroville.....................$453,000...................$4.8 million Paradise...................$659,000...................$6.9 million Butte County ............$8.5 million ..............$87.6 million TOTAL ......................$12.2 million ..............$126.3 million —ASHIAH SCHARAGA ash ia h s@ newsr ev iew.c o m


october 18, 2018

CN&R 

23


Arts &Culture In the face! Another zombie decimated by Day-Glo.

Undead county

mbie The Zo Crew Wrecking comes to Chico

THIS WEEK 18

THU

Special Events AFRICAN DIASPORA: Nefertiti’s Dozen Dance Company specializes in dances of the Caribbean. First they perform, then they’ll teach. No experience is necessary and all ages are welcome. Thu, 10/18, 6:15pm & 7:30pm. $3-$5. Museum of Northern California Art, 900 Esplanade.

POETRY READING: Poetry and refreshments every third Thursday. Thu, 10/18, 6:30pm. Free. The Bookstore, 118 Main St. POETRY READING: Marianne Werner reads new works and selections from Moments and Findings. Thu, 10/18, 7pm. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St.

Aterrorized combat, the zombie hordes that have Oroville each October have fter four years of heated seasonal

finally been cleared. But alas, the undead have once again risen, this time in south Chico, and it looks like stopping them will require more advanced weaponry than ever before. Bring out the lasers! story and This is a new photo by chapter in the ongoing Ken Smith storyline of the Zombie Wrecking Crew, an Zombie Wrecking interactive annual Crew haunt—and hunt—in Friday-Sunday, which participants ride through Oct. 28. Gates open at 5 p.m., a bus and pelt the walkrides start at dark ing dead with glow-inand run until the-dark paintballs. For everyone’s done. its fifth season, the crew Book times online at zombiewreck has moved its operaingcrew.com. tion from the southern Tickets: bus ride: $15 outskirts of Oroville to plus cost for Chico’s Silver Dollar paintballs. On-foot zombie hunt: Fairgrounds. This $15; family fun zone: year’s attraction (which $8/kids . runs every weekend in October) has also Silver Dollar Fairgrounds added new features to (Costco entrance) the Halloween fun: a 2357 Fair St. walk-through zombie hunt that combines elements of laser tag; Call of Duty-like first-person shooter video games; and a haunted house. Zombie Wrecking Crew honcho Thomas Taylor said transforming the fairgrounds into a zombie-infested postapocalyptic wasteland was a “huge undertaking.” Taylor is a former professional 24

CN&R

OCTOBER 18, 2018

paint-baller and co-owner of Oroville’s Combat Zone Paintball Park (where previous hunts took place). “When I’m in my own field, I have all year to move things around and test out new ideas,” he said during a recent Saturday night visit to the new Chico locale. “But here, we basically had one day from when the races ended to get everything set up. We started first thing in the morning and worked through the night.” That set-up included building makeshift structures to resemble bombed-out buildings and placing wrecked cars— which Thomas acquired from Chico’s Pick-n-Pull—along the path the bus travels, and from which the zombies lurch forward to attack. Then there’s the bus itself—a murdered out (black primered) converted school bus with a front-mounted zombie scoop and guns bristling from its side windows. As a veteran visitor (see “Possessed by the Spirit,” Oct, 27, 2016), I can attest the ride holds up in its new location. The outskirts of Oroville had their own creepy appeal, but the headlights of unwitting motorists and darkened backsides of vaguely familiar buildings along Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway provide a different and surreal backdrop to the apocalypse. Then again, it’s hard to pay that much attention to such details when one is splattering zombies (or, rather, people getting paid to get shot for pretending to be zombies). It’s a joy sure to bring an ear-to-ear smile to the face of even the most determined pacifist. (And, I don’t now what it says about my own nature or that of my fellow bus-riders,

but the face and groin areas of each attacking zombie are, infallibly, the first to drip with Day-Glo paint.) The Zombie Wrecking Crew is largely a family affair. During the CN&R’s visit, we were greeted by Taylor’s wife at the ticket booth, his sister led us to the bus and led the safety briefing, and he and his 8-year-old son, Keith, served as two of the three anti-zombie militiamen whipping bus-riders into a faux killing frenzy. Afterward, we passed a snack table run by his mother en route to the laser zombie maze, where we were greeted by his brother and father-in-law. After a quick briefing about how the system works—there was a lot of talk about weapon upgrades and calling in airstrikes that flew straight over my head—our squad of five entered the course and proceeded to make our way through, activating a series of five beacons while being sporadically interrupted by charging zombies with collars that lit up as we opened up on them. Having not played a first-person shooter since, I dunno, Doom, some of the laser course’s nuances were lost on me. One of my companions phrased it well, saying it felt like the more experienced players were playing a video game that we weren’t a part of, but that same guy also took points as our group rushed through the course and giggled along as we all pelted spasming zombies with invisible laser beams. All in all, we agreed on two things: It was an entertaining, strange and even cathartic October outing, and Keith Taylor is about the luckiest kid ever. Ω

UNSOLVED HATE: On April 15, 2017, Humboldt State sophomore David Lawson was stabbed to death at a house party. There are no suspects in custody and students have responded to the investigation with a clear message: Arcata does not feel safe for students of color. Documentary explores how racism is embedded in the town’s culture and what they’re doing to resolve it. Thu, 10/18, 5pm. Free. Chico State, Arts & Humanities Building 112.

WAGS & WHISKERS CARNIVAL: Fun carnival to help raise money for pet rescue. Thu, 10/18, 10am. Wags & Whiskers Pet Rescue, 2156 Pillsbury Road, Ste. 155. 895-8888.

Theater LORD OF THE FLIES: Play finds a group of schoolgirls—the only survivors of a plane crash on a remote island—splitting into two factions in a fight for control that rapidly descends into madness. A ferocious and savage take on William Golding’s brilliant book. Thu, 10/18, 7:30pm. $15. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. blueroomtheatre.com

MAKING GOD LAUGH: The holidays can be brutal. Ruthie and Bill’s children—a priest, an aspiring actress and a former football star—all return home as family rituals and old tensions flare up in both humorous and touching ways. Thu, 10/18, 7:30pm. $14-$65. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. 894-3282. chicotheatercompany.com

OUR HOUSE

Thursday-Sunday, Oct. 18-Oct. 21 Wismer Theatre SEE THURSDAYSUNDAY, THEATER


FINE ARTS ON NeXT PAGe

cHIKOKO: eVOKe Saturday, Oct. 20 Silver Dollar Fairgrounds

See SATURDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS

STORIES IN STONE: Author and photographer

DEPARTMENT OF FORESTRY: Enjoy a fascinating presentation on maintaining the health of our woodlands. Sat 10/20, 10am. Bolt’s Antique Tool Museum, 1650 Broderick St, Oroville. boltsantiquetools.com

HOP HARVEST FESTIVAL: Sierra Nevada Brewing

OUR HOUSE: Extremely dark comedy dissects our media-obsessed culture and its compulsion to turn even the most sobering crisis into sexy entertainment, blurring the lines between reality television and reality. Thu, 10/18, 7:30pm. $8-$20. Wismer Theatre, Performing Arts Center, Chico State. 898-5152.

19

FRI

Special Events COMPLEXIONS CONTEMPORARY BALLET: Genrebending dance company puts on a spectacular show, featuring excerpts from their tribute to David Bowie. Fri, 10/19, 7:30pm. $15-$42. Laxson Auditorium, Chico State. 898-6333. csuchico.edu

DRIVE-THRU DINNER: Whole tri-tip roast, beans, salad, rolls and cookies included in this drive-thru fundraiser for teen sisters Mia and Nyah Herndon of Paradise. Friends and family are helping to pay for medical expenses. Fri, 10/19, 4pm. Achieve Charter School, 771 Elliott Road, Paradise.

HOCUS POCUS: Come dressed in your favorite costume, meet the three witches and enjoy popcorn from the Boy Scouts while enjoying this classic kids film. Fri, 10/19, 7pm. Free. Chico Mall, 1950 E 20th St. 570-5509. shopchicomall.com

WAGS & WHISKERS CARNIVAL: See Thursday. Fri, 10/19, 10am. Wags & Whiskers Pet Rescue, 2156 Pillsbury #155.

ZOMBIE WRECKING CREW: Blast zombies with paintballs from an armored bus, escape on foot through a laser tag maze, and have fun in the kid zone. Fri, 10/19, 5pm. $8-$50. Silver Dollar Fairgrounds, 2357 Fair St. zombiewreckingcrew.com

Music PETER TURNER COFFEEHOUSE: Music, readings and poetry for the whole family in honor of the late local talent. Beer, wine and snacks available for purchase and donations accepted. Fri, 10/19, 6:30pm. Free. Center for Spiritual Living, 789 Bille Road, Paradise. 8775673. cslchico.org

Theater DISNEY’S NEWSIES: Inspired by the real-life newsboy strike of 1899, this high-energy musical is set to soar with rousing dance numbers and non-stop thrills. This Tony Award-winning musical, based on the timeless Disney film, is toe-tapping fun for the entire family. Fri, 10/19, 7:30pm. $15-$30. CUSD Center for the Arts, 1475 East Ave. 800722-4522. crtshows.com

LORD OF THE FLIES: See Thursday. Fri, 10/19, 7:30pm. $15. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. blueroomtheatre.com

MAKING GOD LAUGH: See Thursday. Fri, 10/19, 7:30pm. $14-$65. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. 894-3282. chicotheater company.com

OUR HOUSE: See Thursday. Fri, 10/19, 7pm. $8-$20. Wismer Theatre, Performing Arts Center, Chico State. 898-5152.

20

SAT

Special Events BBQ SPOOKTACULAR: Show your support and love for wildlife during this afternoon of music, food and fun. Your ticket purchase helps to provide medication, physical therapy and care for animals with special needs. Sat 10/20, 1pm. $10-$50. Barry R. Kirshner Wildlife Sanctuary & Educational Center, 4995 Durham Pentz Road, Oroville. 533-1000. kirshner.org

BUTTE ENVIRONMENTAL COUNCIL GALA: Celebrate 43 years of advocacy with BEC during their annual awards dinner. Enjoy a sustainable and local meal prepared by Chico Natural Foods Co-op, plus music and good cheer. Sat 10/20, 5pm. $50. Arc Pavilion, 2040 Park Ave. becnet.org

CANDIDATES RALLY & GET OUT THE VOTE WEEKEND: Audrey Denney, Sonia Aery, Alex Brown and other local, progressive candidates speak at the Women’s Club before volunteers take to the streets to rally voters. Sat 10/20, 10am. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St.

CHIKOKO EVOKE: The fashion wizards of Chikoko

HOP HARVeST FeSTIVAL Saturday, Oct. 20 Sierra Nevada Brewing Co.

See SATURDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS

put on their big annual show featuring experimental, abstract and phantasmagoric wearable art. The extravagant show explores the nature of perception with a melange of breathtaking and gleefully confounding fashion. Sat 10/20, 6pm. $28$35. Silver Dollar Fairgrounds, 2357 Fair St. chikoko.com

Co. and the California Craft Brewers Association host a celebration of adventurous brewing. More than 50 breweries, including Odell, Ninkasi, Karl Strauss, Firestone and more. Sat 10/20, 1pm. $25$75. Sierra Nevada Brewing Co., 1075 E. 20th St. sierranevada.com

KIDS’ FARM DAY: Family event where kids can learn about life on the farm, animals and the hard work of growing our food. Fun activities and demonstrations all day long. Sat 10/20, 10am. $2-$5. Patrick Ranch Museum, 10381 Midway, Durham. patrickranchmuseum.org

KISS OF THE ART GODS BOOK SIGNING: In conjunction with his show at Butte College (see Fine Arts, page 26), Dan Corbin will be signing his new book, and several sculptures will be on display. Sat 10/20, 10am. Barnes & Noble, 2031 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Pkwy.

MOON NIGHT HIKE: The Chico Creek Nature Center hosts four hikes to correspond with the moon’s phases. Explore which animals are more active during the full moon versus a new moon, how the night sky is different and how moon cycles affect plant growth. Sat 10/20, 8pm. Free. Chico Creek Nature Center, 1968 E. Eighth St.

PERSONAL PREPAREDNESS FOR NATURAL DISASTERS: The planet is scary and it’s going to get worse. Be ready to face a future filled with more wildfires, floods, hurricanes and earthquakes. Sat 10/20, 6pm. Free. Paradise Performing Arts Center, 777 Nunneley Road, Paradise.

POPOVICH COMEDY PET THEATER: As seen on

Douglas Kiester discusses the symbols and headstone markings in Chico Cemetery, which he has concluded contains more secret society symbols in a small area than any other cemetery in the world. Sat 10/20, 10am. $5. Chico Museum, 141 Salem St. chicohistorymuseum.org

TINY HOME BUILD-OFF: Four teams face off to build tiny houses in just 13 hours. The structures will then be used by the Chico Housing Action Team for demonstrations around town. Sat 10/20, 8am. Creative Composition, 396 E. Park Ave. chicohousingactionteam.org

WAGS & WHISKERS CARNIVAL: See Thursday Sat 10/20, 10am. $0-$30. Wags & Whiskers Pet Rescue, 2156 Pillsbury #155.

WOMEN VETERANS BENEFITS & EMPLOYMENT RESOURCES WORKSHOP: Women veterans will get an opportunity to learn about employment tools and career resources during this informative workship. Sat 10/20, 10am2pm. Free. Oroville Branch LIbrary, 1820 Mitchell Ave. 916-503-8334. calvet.ca.gov

YOU KNOW YOU’RE FROM CHICO FESTIVAL: Familyfriendly Chico reunion with live music, a craft fair and food vendors. Sat 10/20, 12pm. Scotty’s Landing, 12609 River Road.

YOUTH LEADERSHIP SUMMIT: High school students take part in an empowering day of fun and inspiration, partnered with Chico State students. Plan community service projects, gain skills and experiences for college applications and learn how to advocate for change in your community. Sat 10/20, 10am. Free. Chico State, Colusa Hall, room 100. csuchico.edu

ZOMBIE WRECKING CREW: See Friday. Sat 10/20, 5pm. $8-$50. Silver Dollar Fairgrounds, 2357 Fair St. zombiewreckingcrew.com

Music ERIC PETERS: Brunch tunes. Sat, 10/20, 11am. La

friends and attempt to pull a firetruck across the parking lot to help fund breast cancer research, programs and services. Sat 10/20, 9am. Chico Mall, 1950 E. 20th St. 343-0706. shopchicomall.com

PUMPKINHEAD BREWFEST: Enjoy a time-honored tradition of ding dongs standing on milk crates with pumpkins on their heads, while you drink beer. In additional to the endurance challenge, enjoy live music, sample food trucks and drinks from Almendra Winery, British Bulldog Brewery, Lagunitas, Monkey Face Spirits and a lot more. Sat 10/20. $30$40. Manzanita Place, 1705 Manzanita Ave.

FRee LISTINGS! Post your event for free online at www.newsreview.com/calendar, or email the CN&R calendar editor at cnrcalendar@newsreview.com. Deadline for print listings is Wednesday, 5 p.m., one week prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

DISNEY’S NEWSIES: See Friday. Sat, 10/20, 2pm & 7:30pm. $15-$30. CUSD Center for the Arts, 1475 East Ave. 1-800-722-4522. crtshows.com

LORD OF THE FLIES: See Thursday. Sat, 10/20, 2pm & 7:30pm. $15. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. blueroomtheatre.com

MAKING GOD LAUGH: See Thursday. Sat, 10/20, 7:30pm. $14-$65. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. 894-3282. chicotheater company.com

OUR HOUSE: See Thursday. Sat, 10/20, 2pm & 7:30pm. $8-$20. Wismer Theatre, Performing Arts Center, Chico State. 898-5152.

21

SUN

Special Events BIRTHDAY PARTY FOR THE BIRTH DAY PLACE: Celebrate 50 years of babies born at Adventist Health Feather River with dinner from Bacio’s, live music from Decades, dancing and more. Sun, 10/21, 5pm. $150. Manzanita Place, 1705 Manzanita Ave.

DRAG STORYBOOK HOUR: Stonewall Alliance hosts this family event featuring drag performers reading stories about self expression, diversity and being yourself. Most books will have a focus on LGBTQ characters. Free, all ages and kids are invited to bring pillows and stuffed animals. Sun, 10/21, 10:30am. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

TINY HOME BUILD-OFF: See Saturday. Sun, 10/21, 9am. Creative Composition, 396 E. Park Ave. chicohousingactionteam.org

WAGS & WHISKERS CARNIVAL: See Thursday Sun, 10/21, 10am. $0-$30. Wags & Whiskers Pet Rescue, 2156 Pillsbury #155.

Salles, 229 Broadway St.

David Letterman and America’s Got Talent, this super fun family show features cats, dogs, parrots and even a miniature horse, adorably named Mr. Diamond. All animals were rescued from shelters and now enjoy life in the limelight with co-star Gregory Popovich. Sat 10/20, 4pm. $15-$25. El Rey Theater, 230 W. Second St. 702-527-7987. comedypet.com

PULL FOR A CURE: Get nine of your most burly

Theater

THIS WEEK cONTINUeD ON PAGe 26

EDITOR’S PICK

bATTeRIe POWeR Nothing short of groundbreaking, Complexions Contemporary Ballet has wowed critics and audiences alike with its boundary-breaking version of the style. The sensational company was founded by Alvin Ailey dancers Desmond Richardson and Dwight Rhoden, frequent contributors to the hit TV show So You Think You Can Dance and known for their creative choreography blending classical movements with modern flair. In the past, they’ve set pieces to Metallica and J.S. Bach, and their Friday, Oct. 19, show at Laxson Auditorium will feature excerpts from StarDust,a tribute to David Bowie, in addition to repertory favorites and exciting new work. OcTObeR 18, 2018

CN&R

25


THIS WEEK continued from page 25

on

sweet meals! $10 Value, You pay $6.50

45% off

FINE ARTS

ZOMBIE WRECKING CREW: See Friday. Sun, 10/21, 5pm. $8-$50. Silver Dollar Fairgrounds, 2357 Fair St. zombiewreckingcrew.com

10

ant tauR 93 ’s Res 520.25 for Inday h st | 530. redeemable . 45-1749.6. Not est 8t Sections 1749. will be given as store credit 43-B W e nia Civil Code

Chang 10 Califor for gratuity. according to does not expire and offers. Cannot be used nts certificate and This is a gift be used with other discou cash. Can

Buy online anytime with a credit card or in person with cash, check or credit card M-F 9am – 5pm at 353 E. Second Street, Downtown Chico.

Music RYAN HEIMLICH & CLARINET FRIENDS: A mix of old and new music for the clarinet in multiple configurations, including clarinet solos, duos, trios, quartets and ensembles. Music from Bach to Earth, Wind & Fire on the program. Sun, 10/21, 2pm. Free. Zingg Recital Hall, Chico State, ARTS 279.

SAZIL: Ten-piece Latin jazz band performs on the river. Sun, 10/21, 2:30pm. $10. Scotty’s Landing, 12609 River Road.

Theater DISNEY’S NEWSIES: See Friday. Sun, 10/21, 2pm. $15-$30. CUSD Center for the Arts, 1475 East Ave. 800-722-4522. crtshows.com

THE MAD MAIDEN: The Malteazers present another interactive Killer Cabaret. When you arrive you’ll be assigned a character for this fun murder mystery theater production. Sun, 10/21, 7pm. $20. Birdcage Theatre, 1740 Bird St., Oroville. birdcagetheatre.org

MAKING GOD LAUGH: See Thursday. Sun, 10/21, 7:30pm. $14-$65. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. 894-3282. chicotheater company.com

A BEAUTIFUL LIFE FURNISHINGS: Birds & Barns,

Arts Center, Chico State. 898-5152.

22

MON

Special Events BIRDS OF TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO: Ted Beedy presents bird photography from his trip to Trinidad & Tobago. Mon, 10/22, 6:30pm. Free. Chico Creek Nature Center, 1968 E. Eigth St. altacal.org

23

tUe

Special Events CHICO SPEAKS: Mark Herrera, Sue Hilderbrand, Rich Ober, Robert Speer and Peter Washington discuss free speech, its role in our society and attacks on the First Amendment, from all sides of the political spectrum. Tue, 10/23, 6pm. Free. 1078 Gallery, 820 Broadway St.

24

WeD

Special Events CCSA HAPPY HOUR: Fundraiser for the Chico Community Scholarship Association, benefiting graduating seniors of the Chico Unified School District area. Passed appetizers, wine and beer and a raffle. Wed, 10/24, 5pm. $35. Beatniks Coffee House & Breakfast Joint, 1387 E. Eighth St. 520-2347. chicoscholarships.org

OPEN POETRY READING: Poetry and spoken word hosted by Bob the Poet and Travis Rowdy. Wed, 10/24, 5:30pm. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

fOr MOre MUSIC, See NIGHTLIFE ON PAge 28

CN&R

OctOber 18, 2018

1078 GALLERY: Just Lying in the Grass, illustrations and paintings by Wyatt Hersey inspired by unity with our landscape. Through 10/28. 1710 Park Ave. 1078gallery.org

OUR HOUSE: See Thursday. Sun, 10/21, 2pm. $8-$20. Wismer Theatre, Performing

26

Art

show from local teachers Reta Rickmers and Caitlin Schwerin. Through 10/31. Free. 250 East First St., 487-7229.

BELL MEMORIAL UNION AUDITORIUM: What’s Going on in our World?, pop art exhibit from the Art Education Student’s club DaDa and AE401: Manga and Beyond. Reception on Monday, Oct. 22 at 5pm. Through 11/13. Chico State, 400 W. First St.

BLACKBIRD: Group Show, works by Robin Indar, Sienna Orlando, Tiera May, Ben Schiff, Sesar Sanchez, Heather Kelly, Brandon McKie, Raymi Ray and Tiffani Myers. Reception on Friday, Oct. 19 from 5-7pm Through 10/31. 1431 Park Ave.

CHICO ART CENTER: Open Studios Art Tour, two weekends of fun and inspiration when local artists open their work spaces to art tour ticket holders. Buy your map/ticket ($12) and discover studios throughout Butte County. Kick-off reception Friday, 10/19, 5-7pm, at CAC. An exciting way to meet artists, purchase local art and learn about the creative process. Through 10/28. $12. 450 Orange St., 895-8726. chicoartcenter.com

CHICO CITY HALL: Breaking the Cycle of Youth Homelessness, art and writing created by homeless youth made during MONCA workshops. Through 11/2. 411 Main St.

FEATHER RIVER SENIOR CENTER: Nostalgic Collection, works on display from Artists of River Town. Through 10/31. 1335 Myers Street, Oroville. artistsofrivertown.org

JAMES SNIDLE FINE ARTS GALLERY: Ann Pierce & Lois Cohen, works from the estates of two of Chico’s most honored artists, plus art by Pierce’s parents, Frederick Trucksess and Ann Hoar. Through 10/27. Free. 254 E. Fourth St., 343-2930.

JANET TURNER PRINT MUSEUM: Deep Etch, exhibition features print work by Chico State art faculty, including the late artists Richard Hornaday, James Kuiper, Ann Pierce and Claudia Steel. Dolores Mitchell, professor emerita, will discuss the show on Thursday, Oct. 18 at 5:30pm in Zingg Recital Hall, followed by a reception. Through 12/8. Arts & Humanities Building, Chico State. janetturner.org

OPeN StUDIOS Art tOUr Oct. 20-21 & 27-28 See cHIcO Art ceNter

MUSEUM OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA ART: Black & White in Black & White, exhibit examines the optimistic era of “The New Negro Movement” through the photographs of African American photographer John Johnson. In conjunction, MONCA presents Silence Out Loud, exploring nontraditional presentations of the black image featuring members of the 3.9 Art Collective. Through 10/28. Also: Mandala of the Lotus: Lama Losang Samten creates a stunning mandala sand painting in the library. Through 10/25. $5. 900 Esplanade. monca.org

PARADISE ART CENTER: Around Butte County, art for this show will depict some aspect of Butte County, whether in realism, sculpture, or abstract renderings. Through 10/27. 5564 Almond St., Paradise.

SALLY DIMAS ART GALLERY: Susan Proctor, works in watercolors, acrylics and pen and ink contain hidden images incised into the medium. Through 10/27. 493 East Ave., Ste. 1. sallydimasartgallery.com

UPPER CRUST: Artober, works by Cathy Eide. Through 10/31. 130 Main St. uppercrustchico.com

Museums GATEWAY SCIENCE MUSEUM: Zoom Into Nano, hands-on exhibition demonstrates how scientists observe and make things that are too small to see. Find out how nanotechnology affects our lives through a number of awesome interactive exhibits. Through 1/6. $5-$7. 625 Esplanade.

GOLD NUGGET MUSEUM: A Stitch In Time, quilts from the museum’s collection, along with the handiwork of people in our community and stunning works from the Ridge Quilters Guild. Through 11/4. 502 Pearson Road, Paradise.

VALENE L. SMITH MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY: Reimagining Chico, find out what Chico looked like 100 years ago with this exhibit exploring the archaeology of our neighborhoods. Two excavations have yielded historic artifacts from boarding houses located on campus and the long abandoned historic Chinatown. Through 12/8. Free. Chico State, 400 W. First St., 898-5397.


SCENE

e’s paradisw n Hometot! hangou

Lady of the flies

6007 Clark Rd | (530) 877-9973 Mon-Sun 10:00 AM-10:00 PM

Soul Shake ecStatic Dance Music • Movement • Community 10/21 - DJ Jacia 10/28 - DJ Medicine Heart 11/4 - DJ Neptune 11/11 - DJ Medicine Heart

EVERY Sunday 10am-Noon | Find us on 775 E 16th st.Chico | www.edance.org/chico

Rose and Piggy (from left: Sam Lucas and Rosemary Richardson) on the deserted island. PHOTO BY JOE HILSEE

An all-female cast flips the script of classic story famous novel Lord Oof theGolding’s Flies is, among other things, riginally published in 1954, William

a dark fable about human nature. The allegory about the by Carey breakdown of Wilson society plays out among warring factions Review: that form when Lord of the Flies a plane carshows Thursdayrying English Saturday, 7:30 p.m. schoolboys (with 2 p.m. matinee on Saturday) through crashes, strandOct. 20. ing the kids on Tickets: $15 a remote tropical island. Blue Room Theatre 139 W. First St. For its 895-3749 adaptation blueroomtheatre.com of the Nigel Williams stage version of the novel, co-directors Erika Soerensen and Martin Chavira have made the bold move of flipping the script by switching out boys for girls and using an allfemale cast, raising the question in the minds of theater-goers of how a different gender might result in a different outcome. Golding himself, in a recorded introduction to his novel (viewable on YouTube), stated that, “I think women are foolish to pretend they are equal to men, they are far superior and always have been. But one thing you can’t do with them is take a bunch of them and boil them down, so to speak, into

a set of little girls who would then become a kind of image of civilization, of society.” But, despite Golding’s perhaps sentimental misgivings, and thanks to excellent performances by the actors, Soerensen and Chavira’s vision of human frailty and fallibility—set against Amber Miller’s gorgeously painted, dark and lush jungle backdrop—does prove universal. We first meet Rose (Sam Lucas) and Piggy (Rosemary Richardson) scrambling around on the beach after the plane crash. Rose, like her male counterpart Ralph in the novel, is the model of reasonableness and decorum, her school uniform immaculate, hair brushed, and shoes polished. Piggy, as in the novel, is the embodiment of the goodness of the common man (or, in this case, girl), slightly disheveled, full of emotion and sentiment, but pragmatic and reasonable regarding the necessity of working together to achieve social harmony. Joining the initial duo comes choir leader Jane (Mia Corrina), with her cadre of singers who make up the rest of the cast. Like her parallel character, Jack, Jane is a domineering but charismatic leader, who, freed from the constraints of adult supervision, is determined to shape her crew with violent retribution for anyone who contradicts her desires. Initially, Rose’s very reasonable arguments for order and coopera-

tion win her the title of “Chief,” but Jane counters that authority by creating her own faction of hunters whom she controls. Among her followers are the well-meaning but easily manipulated twins, Sam (Lila Chavira) and Erika (Lola Parks), and the visionary schizomystic Sara (Morgan Allen), whose hallucination/vision in the forest upon encountering the flycovered head of a slaughtered pig leads to the story’s title. Those familiar with the novel will have no problem matching the parallel characters on stage, and the action touches most of the novel’s crucial scenes, from the butchering of a pig and subsequent bonfire and primeval feast, to the much more dark and blood-soaked trials born of the escalating conflict. I went in thinking and still believe, apparently like Golding himself, that populating the island with girls in real life would flip not just the gender and actions of the characters but also the outcome of their dilemma. But to those who might so quickly dismiss the female capacity for both good and evil, Chavira responded, “These people must never have heard of Margaret Thatcher [or] Sarah Palin … nor watched Mean Girls.” And this well-played production’s dark vision of humanity’s universal tendency toward self-destruction does provide some powerful food for thought and debate on the issue. Ω

OF MONTREAL W/ REPTALIENS LIVE AT

THE BIG ROOM

TuESDAy, NOVEMBER 6, 2018 SIERRA NEVADA BREWING CO.

1075 E. 20TH ST., CHICO. TICKETS ON SALE NOW! $20 AVAILABLE IN THE GIFT SHOP OR ONLINE AT WWW.SIERRANEVADA.COM/BIGROOM

SierraNevadaBeer

@SierraNevada OCTOBER 18, 2018

@SierraNevadaChico

CN&R

27


NIGHTLIFE

THURSDAY 10/18—WEDNESDAY 10/24 NEKROGOBLIKON, THE DEPRIVED & ABERRANCE Tonight, Oct. 18 Tackle Box

19FRIDAY

AL’S PALS: Live music in the

10/18, 9pm. $5. Tackle Box, 379 E.

18THURSDAY

OPEN MIC/JAM: Bring your songs and

plus Spun, Thin Air and Helicopter Kids. Thu, 10/18, 7:30pm. $5. Ike’s Place, 648 W. Fifth St.

your instrument for this weekly open mic and jam session. Thu, 10/18, 7:30pm. Woodstock’s Pizza, 166 E. Second St.

AWAKEBUTSTILLINBED: So emo it hurts,

CALIFORNIA MEN: Abs and pecs for

your eyeballs. Thu, 10/18, 8pm. $10. The Beach, 191 E. Second St.

Park Ave. tackleboxchico.com

SÓL & NECRODANCER: Grab a fistful of metal and punk with French melodic crustys Necrodancer and sludge-y atmospheric metal band Sól from Portland. They lay waste with local rippers Shadow Limb and Voyeur. Rad show! Thu, 10/18, 8pm. $7. Naked Lounge, 118 W. Second St.

KINSKI: Seattle superstars, plus XDS

and Cat Depot rock out. Thu, 10/18, 9pm. $10. Argus Bar + Patio, 212 W. Second St.

NEKROGOBLIKON: Melodic death metal fronted by ... you guessed it: a goblin! Totally silly, totally rad. The Deprived and Aberrance open. Thu,

WAVELENGTH: Van Morrison tribute from Belfast featuring Keven Brennan. Thu, 10/18, 6pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

originals and cover tunes. Fri, 10/19, 9pm. White Water Saloon, 5571 Clark Road, Paradise.

DUFFY’S HALLOWEEN: Yeah, it’s almost

SEE THURSDAY

Nekrogoblikon

DRIVER: Classic rock trio plays

gazebo. Fri, 10/19, 6pm. Purple Line Urban Winery, 760 Safford St., Oroville.

BARREL AGED: Classic rock ’n’ blues,

plus two other bands. Fri, 10/19, 8pm. $7. Unwined Kitchen & Bar, 980 Mangrove Ave. unwinedchico.com

BORGORE: Mad beats, plus GG Magree and Benda. Fri, 10/19. $25. El Rey Theater, 230 W. Second St. d

CATFISH HUNTER BAND: Party band plays blues, rock and Motown hits. Fri, 10/19, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

DECADES IN: San Jose melodic metalcore band, plus Chico’s Gigantes, Central Coast hardcore act Bears Amongst Men and proggy metalcore trio Constructs. Big show! Fri, 10/19, 7:30pm. $8. The Spirit, 2360 OroQuincy Highway, Oroville.

two weeks early. So what!? Pinhead plays the Ramones, Black Magnet does Nirvana and the Don Parrish Extreme Mt. Dew Trio does The Beatles. Fri, 10/19, 9:30pm. $5. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St.

HILLCREST AVENUE: Popular favorites from Johnny Cash, Green Day, the Beatles and more. Fri, 10/19, 7pm. Shakey’s Pizza, 2829 Olive Highway, Oroville.

LIFE & SONGS OF HAGGARD & JONES: Tribute act to country legends Merle Haggard and George Jones. Fri, 10/19, 9:30pm. $7-$15. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave. tackleboxchico.com

MOTORCOAT: Portland band plays grooved-up indie with Sunny Acres and Bungo. Fri, 10/19, 8:30pm. $7. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

ROCKOLOGY: Cover band will school you on the finer points of classic rock. Fri, 10/19, 8:30pm. Gold Country Casino & Hotel, 4020 Olive Highway, Oroville.

TYLER DEVOLL: Singer/songwriter plays two shows: Fri, 10/19, 4pm at La Salles (229 Broadway St.) and 7pm at The Exchange (1975 Montgomery St., Oroville).

POST-FUZZ

Kinski sure likes to switch it up, but you can always count on crunchy, fuzzed-out riffs. The mostly instrumental Seattle outfit has been destroying eardrums for 20 years, and the post-rock originator is still going strong and changing musical directions at the players’ whim. The band’s latest album, Accustomed to Your Face, is equal parts grungy punk and pummeling noise rock, with a track titled “Kinski 101,” in case you need a refresher on what they do best. The band plays Argus Bar + Patio with Cat Depot and XDS tonight (Thursday, Oct. 18).

20SATURDAY

ALEX VINCENT: Live music. Sat,

10/20, 6pm. The Exchange, 1975 Montgomery St., Oroville.

ALL IN THE FAMILY: Get funky during this Souled-Out Benefit for the families of the Carr Fire with music from Bay Area bands Afrolicious and Smoked Out Soul, plus DJ Amburgers. Sat, 10/20. $20-$25. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St. shastarcf.org

style. Sat, 10/20, 10pm. $7. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave. maltesebar chico.com

JEFF AUSTIN BAND: Ex-Yonder Mountain String Band mandolinist brings his jammy bluegrass outfit to Chico. With Low Flying Birds. Sat, 10/20, 9pm. $17-$20. Lost on Main, 319 Main St., 892-2445.

MOMMA T & THE SHAKY GROUND BAND: Feel-good hits, rock, pop and a bit of country in the lounge. Sat, 10/20, 8:30pm. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

CANDY’S HAUNTED HOUSE: Drinks, dancing and drag, Halloween

Shop Local

Holiday Guides CN&R’s holiday guides hit stands on November 15 and December 13. Don’t miss your chance to be included in these essential holiday shopping guides! Contact your advertising representative for more information today. (530) 894-2300

28

CN&R

OCTOBER 18, 2018

310346_4.9_x_5.4.indd 1

10/11/18 10:44 AM


THIS WEEK: FIND MORE ENTERTAINMENT AND SPECIAL EVENTS ON PAGE 24 ALL IN THE FAMILY: A SOULEDOUT CARR FIRE BENEFIT Saturday, Oct. 20 Chico Women’s Club SEE SATURDAY

21SUNDAY

IMPROVFEST: Short form improv

Afrolicious

Yes, there’s an accordion! Sat, 10/20, 6:30pm. Farm Star Pizza, 2359 Esplanade.

RAGEMODE: Halloween EDM dance party with Sab3rtooth, 9lives, Shiner, Dub Heezy and Proto:Che. Arrive in costume and get $5 off. Sat, 10/20, 9pm. $10-$15. The Spirit, 2360 Oro-Quincy Highway, Oroville.

980 Mangrove Ave.

JONATHAN BROWN: New Orleans hip-

ROCKOLOGY: Classic rock. Sat, 10/20,

hop and spoken word artist joined by Cory Himp Hunt, Fox E. Jeff and Travis + Glisel. Sun, 10/21, 6pm. $5. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

8:30pm. Gold Country Casino & Hotel, 4020 Olive Highway, Oroville.

SOUL POSSE: Romantic R&B and

soul. Sat, 10/20, 7pm. Free. Wine Time, 26 Lost Dutchman Dr., 530-828-8040.

PARADISE BIG BAND: Cut a rug with live music from a 17-piece big band playing all the classics. Sun, 10/21, 7pm. $8. Studio One Ballroom, 707 Wall St.

ZEPPARELLA: These four women bring an entirely different energy to the stage as they roar through the legendary band’s repertoire. Sat, 10/20, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

SUNDAY IRIS: Acoustic tunes, craft beer and a food truck. Sun, 10/21, 6pm. Secret Trail Brewing

Company, 132 Meyers St., Suite 120. secrettrailbrewing.com

JAZZ JAM: Improv session curated by Uncle Dad’s Art Collective opens with a set from the house band paying tribute to a featured artist, followed by an open jam. Mon, 10/22, 7:30pm. Naked Lounge, 118 W. 2nd St. uncledad.co

THE STEEL WHEELS: Hailing from the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia, the acoustic quintet weaves through Americana and bluegrass, folk and old-time music. Mon, 10/22, 7:30pm. $20. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St. sierranevada.com

23TUESDAY

TECH N9NE: Rapper brings his blazingfast rhymes to Chico, along with Krizz Kaliko, Futuristic and Dizzy Wright. Tue, 10/23, 9pm. $32.50. Senator Theatre, 517 Main St. jmax productions.net

24WEDNESDAY EXPAIN: Canadian prog-thrash

masters, plus Yolo County speed thrashers DoomToker and local grind lords Splitjaw. Wed, 10/24, 8pm. $10-$12. The Spirit, 2360

boys get rowdy with Nate Curry, Abstract Ninjaa and Similar Alien and the Lizard Brains, plus comedy sets from Becky Lynn and Shahera Hyatt. Wed, 10/24, 8pm. $5. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave. maltesebar chico.com

KENNETH HOWELL: Singer and guitar-

ist. Wed, 10/24, 6:30pm. Red Tavern, 1250 Esplanade.

OPEN MIKEFULL: At Paradise’s only open mic, all musicians get two songs or 10 minutes onstage. Wed, 10/24, 7pm. $1-$2. Norton Buffalo Hall, 5704 Chapel Drive, Paradise, 877-4995.

STEVE COOK & FRIENDS: An eclectic mix of music. Wed, 10/24, 6pm. Izakaya Ichiban, 2000 Notre Dame Blvd.

MANDOLICIOUS

A founding member of the Yonder Mountain String Band, Jeff Austin shocked the jamgrass scene when he up and quit the band in 2014, leaving behind a group he had led for 16 years. He’s since built a solid reputation as a solo act, with a rotating cast of talented musicians equal to his own blazing mandolin skills. Catch him live when he comes to Lost on Main on Saturday, Oct. 20, and performs with Low Flying Birds.

Public Notice

Glass–Free Zone Declared Oct. 25 - Oct. 28, 2018

PUBLIC NOTICE – NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that pursuant to Chapter 9.32., GlassFree Zone of the Chico Municipal Code, the City Manager has declared the Glass-Free Zone ordinance operative from 6:00 P.M. Thursday, October 25, 2018 through 6:00 P.M. Sunday, October 28, 2018. Generally, the possession of glass containers on city owned property is prohibited within the Glass Free Zone during this time period.

A map of the Glass-Free Zone is set forth below.

C.S.U.C. IG B

C ED A R

O IC H C

K EE R T C 1S

FL U M E M

ST A IN R ST EE B R R T O E A ET D W A Y

IV Y

ST R EE T

ODE TO MUIR

FEATURING TETON GRAVITy RESEARCH ATHLETES

LIVE AT

THE BIG ROOM

SATURDAy, OCTOBER 13, 2018 SIERRA NEVADA BREWING CO. 1075 E. 20TH ST., CHICO. TICKETS ON SALE NOW! TICKETS AVAILABLE IN THE GIFT SHOP OR ONLINE AT WWW.SIERRANEVADA.COM/BIGROOM

S T R E E T

PAISANI: Italian, French and Latin jazz.

8pm. $5. Unwined Kitchen & Bar,

PERVERT: Back from tour, the pervy

Oro-Quincy Hwy, Oroville., 712-4050. decayproductions.ticketleap.com

7T H

and alternative bluegrass with multi-vocal harmonies. Sat, 10/20, 9pm. $5. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave. tackleboxchico.com

ROCKHOUNDS: Party covers. Sat, 10/20,

W .

MOSSY CREEK BAND: Roots, Americana

games, beer and pretzels and then a set of long form improv. BYOB event. Sun, 10/21, 7pm. $8. Kingmaker Studios, 561 E. Lindo Ave., 408-509-3981.

22MONDAY

Zone Glass Free

SierraNevadaBeer

@SierraNevada OCTOBER 18, 2018

@SierraNevadaChico

CN&R

29


REEL WORLD

NO.

It Is A Complete sentenCe

Serving Butte, Glenn & Tehama Counties

342-RAPE

24 hr. hotline (Collect Calls Accepted) www.rapecrisis.org

C H I CO P E R F O R M A N C E S

Upcoming Events

OCTOBER 19 26 28

COMPLEXIONS CONTEMPORARY BALLET CIRQUE MECHANICS: 42FT MARIACHI HERENCIA DE MÉXICO

born this way

NOVEMBER 2

JOAN BAEZ LD OUT SO

4

NORMA

7

Lady Gaga shines in well-worn rags-to-riches story

Fare Thee Well . . . Tour 2018 SF Opera Grand Cinema Series

COMPLEXIONS

ANAND VARMA “BEAUTY AND THE BIZARRE” National Geographic Live

17 24-25 30

CINDERELLA A Magical Ballet CINDERELLA A Magical Ballet LYLE LOVETT & ROBERT EARL KEEN

13 19

BELIEVE

Inspired By the Polar Express

CELTIC WOMAN

CIRQUE MECHANICS

The Best of Christmas

LEANN RIMES

You and Me and Christmas

JANUARY 13 14 24-26

SUSANNAH

SF Opera Grand Cinema Series

DAVID SEDARIS MADONNA

Uncle Dad’s Art Collective

MARIACHI HERENCIA DE MÉXICO

TICKETS NOW ON SALE

MORE INFO AT: WWW.CHICOPERFORMANCES.COM 898-6333

30

CN&R

OctOber 18, 2018

e’ve already had three movie versions of

cession). My personal favorite is William Wellman’s 1937 version, by with Janet Gaynor and Fredric Juan-Carlos March. George Cukor’s 1954 verSelznick sion, with Judy Garland and James Mason, was the first to make songs a major part of the action, and it’s probably the best known and most widely admired version, and the most impressive and accomplished A Star Is Born as well. Starring Lady Gaga The 1976 version, with Barbra and bradley cooper. Streisand and Kris Kristofferson, Directed by bradley cooper. cinemark 14, had its stars and musical attractions, Feather river cinemas but seemed to run its much-told and Paradise cinema tale, once and for all, into some 7. rated r. very soggy ground. So it wasn’t exactly a happy surprise to learn that, after a four-decade hiatus, the old chestnut was getting dragged out for yet another run. Nevertheless, I couldn’t help but wonder what a 21st century version of the old tale would look like, and can now report that there are multiple signs of life in the new Bradley Cooper-directed version, with Cooper and Lady Gaga in the key roles. The old story is still there (a turbulent show biz romance between a rising star and one who’s about to fall), but there’s very little about this A Star Is Born that feels seri-

3

DECEMBER 7-9

A Star Is W Born (four if you’re one of those who includes 1932’s What Price Hollywood? in the line of suc-

ously outdated. This time, a gifted and very alcoholic country music star named Jackson Main (Cooper) takes an aspiring young singer (Gaga) under his wing professionally and into his days and nights romantically. Cooper, who is also making his directorial debut, gives a powerfully modulated performance, with reckless extremes and soulful reversals balanced in a kind of perilous harmony. But Ally (Lady Gaga) is the star being born here— a singer getting her big break within the story, but also a movie star emerging, in the movie and with it. Lady Gaga is the stage name of Stefani Germanotta, and she plays a star singer whose greatest success and fulfillment comes by shedding the gaudy Gaga-like wigs, makeup and costumes and presenting herself and her talent in the relatively unadorned guise of Germanotta herself. Sam Elliott plays Jackson’s older brother (who claims the younger man has “stolen my voice”—which may be true in more ways than one). Andrew Dice Clay is nicely effective as Ally’s father, a celebrityworshipping limo driver, who insists on comparing himself with Frank Sinatra and Paul Anka). Dave Chappelle is very fine as an old music-biz friend of Jack’s and a rare source of calm and compassion in his life. Those three characters, along with the Gaga/ Germanotta transformations and Cooper’s deft mixtures of fury and reticence, are more than enough to make me glad for yet another Star Is Born among us. Ω


FILM SHORTS Reviewers: Bob Grimm and Juan-Carlos Selznick.

Opening this week Halloween

This direct sequel to the first film in the franchise picks up 40 years after the events of the 1978 original and features Laurie (Jamie Lee Curtis) squaring off against her old murderous nemesis, Michael, who has escaped from prison and is apparently bent on taking care of unfinished business. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated R.

The Hate U Give

An adaptation of the bestselling 2017 youngadult novel by Angie Thomas about a young black girl straddling two worlds—the poor, mostly black neighborhood in which she lives and the mostly white affluent prep school she attends—who is faced with a crisis of conscious after witnessing the murder of her friend at the hands of police. Cinemark 14. Rated R.

The Little Stranger

A gothic horror about a country doctor (Domhnall Gleeson) who visits an 18th century English estate only to find the old house has some terrifying secrets. Also starring Ruth Wilson and Charlotte Rampling. Pageant Theatre. Rated R.

The Old Man & the Gun

David Lowery (A Ghost Story) directs Robert Redford as Forrest Tucker, a real-life bank robber who escaped from San Quentin at the age of 70 and went on a crime spree. Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

Hamm, Cynthia Erivo, Dakota Johnson, Chris Hemsworth and Nick Offerman. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated R.

Joaquin Phoenix and John C. Reilly star as a couple of Gold Rush-era assassin brothers on the trail of a prospector. Directed by Jacques Audiard (Dheepan). Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

Nowp laying

Goosebumps 2: Haunted Halloween

The second film in the most recent series of adaptations of R.L. Stine’s classic youthhorror fiction series follows a group of kids living out one of the author’s stories as they try to save the world from a Halloween apocalypse. Starring Jack Black, Wendi McLendon-Covey and Ken Jeong. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG.

The House With a Clock in Its Walls

Eli Roth (Hostel, Cabin Fever) takes a break from the horror genre to direct Jack Black, Cate Blanchett and Owen Vaccaro in this adaptation of the 1973 young-adult mystery by John Bellairs (illustrated by Edward Gorey) that unveils a magical world of witches and warlocks hiding in a sleepy town. Cinemark 14. Rated PG.

Night School

Kevin Hart stars as a screw-up who joins a crew of troublemakers attending a night school class taught by a no-nonsense instructor (Tiffany Haddish) who uses unconventional methods to get through to her students. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13.

In this 3D animated feature, the Bigfoots (i.e., Yeti) are astonished to discover that the Smallfoots (humans) are real. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

3

A Star Is Born

Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated R —J.C.S.

Bad Times at the El Royale

Writer (Cloverfield, The Martian) and director (The Cabin in the Woods) Drew Goddard wears both hats for his new film about a group of seven strangers staying at a hotel with dark secrets on the California/ Nevada border. Featuring an impressive ensemble that includes Jeff Bridges, Jon

WE OFFER

Vegan options aVailable

• 4000 sq.ft of theatrical quality costumes (no cheap bagged costumes) • 10 day rental special for early halloween reservations • personalized customer service

First Man

Damien Chazelle (La La Land, Whiplash) directs this biopic about Neil Armstrong (Ryan Gosling) and the events leading up to and including the first mission to the moon. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

Smallfoot

The Sisters Brothers

THEATRICAL QUALITY COSTUMES

“It’s all about the Dirty Sauce”

530-894-1346 ALTER EGO

648 West 5th St. | Chico 530.924.3171 ILikeIkesPlace.com

2260 A PARK AVE.

C O S T U M E S

CHICO PERFORMANCES PRESENTS

COMPLEXIONS STARDUST CONTEMPORARY BALLET

a

t r i b u t e

t o

DAVID BOWIE

“A NEW AESTHETIC IN MOVEMENT” — DANCE MAGAZINE

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 19 | 7:30 PM | LAXSON AUDITORIUM

Venom

Tom Hardy stars as the title character, the conflicted Marvel Comics superhero whose powers come via the alien that’s taken over his body. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

The Hate U Give

1 Poor

2

3

4

5

Fair

Good

Very Good

Excellent

FOR MORE INFO AND TICKETS WWW.CHICOPERFORMANCES.COM OCTOBER 18, 2018

898-6333 CN&R

31


CHOW

evil brewing

saves you money! 50%

Great Northern Coffee

The dark art of imperial stouts

off

928 ico, CA 95 Street | Ch 9.6. Not redeemable 434 Orange Sections 1749.45-174 be given as store California Civil Code will

e expire according to Cannot be used for gratuity. Chang amount used. cate and does not and offers. consumer minus any This is a gift certifi with other discounts amount paid by the for cash. Can be used for this certificate is equal to the credit. Cash value

$5 Value

You pay $2.50

TEngland overseas transactions between and Russia more than two he imperial stout was born of

Gift Ce50% off rtificate

centuries ago, when extra alcohol fermented into the beer provided the anti-freeze measures needed $ to get the beer across the Baltic Sea without turning to slush or ice and, in doing so, bursting from its Dream $10 Value Catche 580 Ca r Tradbarrels. nal St H ing Po amilto st n City, Those first imperial stouts were You pay $5 CA 95 961 probably something by along the lines of Alastair what we still see off Bland from the UK’s Samuel Smith Old Brewery, whose toasty and rich imperial stout runs 7 percent alcohol by volume and is $10 Value smooth and creamy on the tongue. 15TH STREET CAFE 120 | 530.809.1087 1414 PARK AVE SUITE It remains a popular beer (and is You pay $5 one of my favorites). That classic beer also comes off as something of a dwarf in the spectrum of modern versions of the style. There may be no other imperial stout on the market with YOU such a modest ABV as Samuel R LOG Smith’s. Indeed, the style—along O HER $ $10 Value E with its close cousin the imperial porter—has become a playground You pay $5 Russ and laboratory for almost maniacal, ell’s Sunr 185 C ise C evil-scientist brewing experiments ohas a fe set R d, Ch that test the limits of alcoholico off making yeasts and the palates of beer drinkers. Many super-stouts are aged in bourbon barrels, a once-innovative practice (that can add vanilla and coconut flavors to the mix) that has, by now, become almost standard treatment for the strongest beers. The strength of some imperial stouts and porters is unnerving. One of the strongest fermented beers Buy online anytime with a credit card or in person with (as opposed to those enhanced via cash, check or credit card M-F 9am – 5pm at 353 E. distillation) is the World Wide Stout, Second Street, Downtown Chico. an oak-aged vanilla-bean-infused

Dream Catcher Trading Post

Dark Lord Russian Style Imperial Stout from 3 Floyds Brewing Co.

10

This is a gift

50%

15th Street Cafe

certificate and doe cash. Can be used with s not expire according to California other discoun Civil Code Sec ts and offe rs. Cannot be used for tions 1749.45-1749.6. gratuity. Cha Not redeem nge will be able for given as stor e credit.

GIFT CERTIFICATE

10

redeemable for cash. Code Sections 1749.45-1749.6. Not expire according to California Civil This is a gift certificate and does not Change will be given as store credit. offers. Cannot be used for gratuity. Can be used with other discounts and

Russell’s Sunrise Cafe

Gift C ertifi cate

10

As a Ca liforni Gift certi a corporation , ficates do no Chico Comm discoun t expire in ac unity Publishin ts and offers, cordance with g dba News & but cann Ca ot be us lifornia Civil CoReview is req uir ed for gratuityde Sections 17 ed to abide by . Any ch 49 ange rem.45-1749.6. all California Civ il Co aining fro This certi m purch ficate ma des and reg ulations y be ase will . be given used with oth as store er credit.

50%

32

CN&R

OctOber 18, 2018

offering from Dogfish Head Brewery. The beer runs 16 percent to 20 percent ABV, depending on the year (the yeast isn’t always in the mood to take it to the max), and is generally served and consumed with a level of caution and respect, rather like brandy. Many breweries promote their imperial stouts as some sort of expression of evil. I get it—the beers are dark in color, and you can follow the metaphors forward from there. In Munster, Ind., 3 Floyds Brewing Co. calls its Dark Lord Russian Style Imperial Stout “demonic,” and the label features a hellish-looking warrior. This 15 percent ABV beer has drawn a dedicated cult following. The pitch-black brew is apparently named after the devil and it’s super strong—so, there you have it. Fans clamor for tickets to the annual Dark Lord Day, a beer fest where attendees listen to heavy metal music and enjoy the worshiped stout as well as sought-after brews from other craft brewers. It would

not surprise me if bottles of this imperial stout are treated by especially devout followers as a sort of pagan idol. Avery Brewing Co., in Colorado, bills its Mephistopheles Stout with similar themes and shadows. The immensely strong beer— it has been taken as high as nearly 17 percent—is tar black, fruity and sweet, and, though flavorful, not super easy to drink. (I’ve tried it.) It is part of the brewery’s Demons of Ale series. Go figure. In Chico, Sierra Nevada’s seasonal rendition of the style (on shelves now) plays off a different dark metaphor. The brewery’s excellent yet comparatively “tame” 10.2 percent ABV version is still an impressive beast—specifically a Narwhal, “the mysterious creature that thrives in the deepest fathoms of the frigid Arctic Ocean.” Christian Kazakoff, brewer at Iron Springs Pub & Brewery in Fairfax, says the strongest beer he’s made is his Compulsory triple IPA. “I hit 12.5 percent a couple years back.” In the realm of imperial stouts, however, Kazakoff says he has made a few stronger than 10 percent—“but not in years.” However, Kazakoff says he enjoys the wildly strong imperial stouts—a very worthy opinion from a man who is also outspokenly fond of low-alcohol craft lagers. Recently, he says, he drank a bottle of Firestone Walker Brewing Co.’s Coconut Rye Parabola. The 12 percent ABV beer is aged in rye whiskey barrels with coconut, and he said it’s “scary drinkable delicious. “Thank god it was only 12 ounces,” he added. Ω


Families, tourists, and art enthusiasts will all enjoy exploring unique studios, seeing how artists work, and buying local art on the Tour. Â Buy tickets with guides and maps at Chico Art Center, Chico Paper Co., Ellis Art, Made in Chico, Art Etc., Sally Dimas Gallery, and Broken Color Gallery in Oroville.

october 18, 2018

CN&R 

33


on

coffee! Naked Lounge

$5 Value, You pay $2.50

$

5

ARTS DEVO by JASON CASSIDY • jasonc@newsreview.com

ounge Naked L

50% off

Buy online anytime with a credit card or in person with cash, check or credit card M-F 9am – 5pm at 353 E. Second Street, Downtown Chico.

ico.com ungech . Gift certificates do nakedlo ulations d for Street | abide by all California Civil Codestsandandregoffers, but cannot be usee cred d n it. 2 t to r discoun n as stor 118 Wes ng dba News & Review is required used with othe from purchase will be give g ificate may be ainin

ity Publishi 9.6. This cert tuity. Any change rem Chico Commun e Sections 1749.45-174 gra Cod a corporation, As a Californi ance with California Civil accord not expire in

RETURN TO DANNYLAND Last week, Arts DEVO received an out-of-the-blue

email from Danny Cohen, one of Butte County’s most enigmatic performers, to let me know that he had quietly released a new album—Cabaret Forest Lawn—this past summer. Even though the longstanding local musician is one of my all-time favorite songwriters, I feel I’ve never been able to satisfyingly describe his music. Tom Waits is the most obvious touchstone, but Cohen’s sideshow character is much weirder, and the latest album bears this out. It’s a home-recorded collection of typically twisted lounge tunes filled with gnarled guitar sounds, creepy organ, a variety of musical and other samples and Cohen’s distinct warped vocal delivery. It gets perhaps the best compliment I can give a piece of art: It’s truly unique, and if you’re already a Cohen fan like me—or if all of those descriptors add up to something intriguing—Cabaret Forest Lawn will not disappoint in offering an oddly tuneful escape. So far, it’s an online-only release (iTunes, CD Baby, Spotify), and for a more detailed and more interesting explanation of the recording, I turn it over to the artist himself (from the album notes): It was done in a month during the opening of a creative portal (like that Twilight Zone where the child entered another dimension under the bed), which subsequently closed. … The theme of death pervades as [I] almost died during recording. My stomach bloated, hair and nails grew rapidly and [I] was basically a zombie for 7 years after surgery from a bike wreck. Crank it!

HOW ’BOUT DAH? If you want to make an adult flip their shit and blame all

the problems of the world on the kids these days, search YouTube and play them a video of the Cash Me Outside girl (aka Danielle Bregoli). It doesn’t matter which video—it can be the Dr. Phil segment where her mom throws then “out-of-control” 13-year-old Danielle to the wolves in the studio audience. It can be DJ Suede the Remix God’s “Cash Me Outside,” which samples the Florida teen’s best one-liners from that Dr. Phil battle—“Cash me outside! How ’bout dah?”—and the millions upon millions of listens/views it and various remixes garnered in the months that followed. Or it can be the videos for the solo songs she released over the next couple of years under her new rap moniker, Bhad Bhabie—“These Heaux,” “Hi Bich” or “Gucci Flip Flops” (with Lil Yachty)—all of which charted on the Billboard 100. That’s right, a girl with no performing experience steals her mom’s car, then thanks to one salty Dr. Phil exchange, goes from poor-whitetrash petty criminal to internet star to charting recording artist in less than two years. How ’bout dah? Indeed. Don’t get me wrong, even though she’s still only 15, Bhad Bhabie seems like kind of an asshole, but it’s likely mostly an act, and the parts that aren’t were born of a broken home. It is hilarious that in taking on youth culture, the massive tool Dr. Phil got spanked hard while tryBhad Bhabie ing to exploit it. And, actually, her music is pretty fun—dumb, but still fun. To mark her latest birthday, she released her debut album/mixtape, 15, last month, and JMax Productions just announced that it is bringing her to Chico on Nov. 17. Say it with me: “Cash me outside” the Senator Theatre before the show.

SELL YOUR ART Inspire School of Arts & Sciences is hosting a pop-up market on Nov. 3, at Chico Country Day School, and it’s still looking for a few craft, art and food vendors. Visit bit.ly/InspiredShopping for more info on how to take part. 34

CN&R

OCTOBER 18, 2018


october 18, 2018

CN&R 

35


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY For the week oF october 18, 2018 ARIES (March 21-April 19): Humraaz

is a word in the Urdu language. Its literal meaning is “secret sharer.” It refers to a confidante, a person in whom you have full trust and to whom you can confess your core feelings. Is there such a character in your life? If so, seek him or her out for assistance in probing into the educational mysteries you have waded into. If there is no such helper you can call on, I advise you to do whatever’s necessary to attract him or her into your sphere. A collaborative quest may be the key to activating sleeping reserves of your soul wisdom.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Taurus

author Roberto Bolaño suggests that the world contains more beauty than many people realize. The full scope and intensity of this nourishing beauty “is only visible to those who love.” When he speaks of “those who love,” I suspect he means deep-feeling devotees of kindness and compassion, hard-working servants of the greater good, and free-thinking practitioners of the Golden Rule. In any case, Taurus, I believe you’re in a phase when you have the potential to see far more of the world’s beauty. For best results, supercharge your capacity to give and receive love.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Once upon a time you were walking along a sidewalk when a fairy floated by and whispered, “I’m willing to grant you three wishywashy wishes for free. You don’t have to do any favors for me in return. But I will grant you three wonderfully wise wishes if you perform three tasks for me.” You asked the fairy, “What would those three tasks be?” She replied, “The second task is that you must hoodwink the devil into allowing you to shave his hairy legs. The third task is that you must bamboozle God into allowing you to shave his bushy beard.” You laughed and said, “What’s the first task?” The fairy touched you on the nose with her tiny wand and said, “You must believe that the best way to achieve the impossible is to attempt the absurd.”

CANCER (June 21-July 22): You Crabs

tend to be the stockpilers and hoarders of the zodiac. The world’s largest collections of antique door knobs and Chinese restaurant menus and beer cans from the 1960s belong to Cancerian accumulators. But in alignment with possibilities hinted at by current astrological omens, I recommend that you redirect this inclination so it serves you better. How? One way would be to gather supplies of precious stuff that’s really useful to you. Another way would be to assemble a batch of blessings to bestow on people and animals who provide you with support.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Chinese mythology

tells us there used to be ten suns, all born from the mother goddess Xi He. Every 24 hours, she bathed her brood in the lake and placed them in a giant mulberry tree. From there, one sun glided out into the sky to begin the day while the other nine remained behind. It was a good arrangement. The week had ten days back then, and each sun got its turn to shine. But the siblings eventually grew restless with the staid rhythm. On one fateful morning, with a playful flourish, they all soared into the heavens at once. It was fun for them, but the earth grew so hot that nothing would grow. To the rescue came the archer Hou Yi. With his flawless aim, he used his arrows to shoot down nine of the suns, leaving one to provide just the right amount of light and warmth. The old tales don’t tell us, but I speculate that Hou Yi was a Leo.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): You now have

maximum command of a capacity that’s a great strength but also a potential liability: your piercing brainpower. To help ensure that you wield this asset in ways that empower you and don’t sabotage you, here’s advice from four wise Virgos. 1: “Thought can organize the world so well that you are no longer able to see it.” —psychotherapist Anthony de Mello. 2: “Keep some room in your heart for the unimaginable.” — poet Mary Oliver. 3: “I like to wake up each morning and not know what I think, that I may reinvent myself in some way.” —actor

by rob brezsny and writer Stephen Fry. 4: “I wanted space to watch things grow.” —singer Florence Welch.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “There are

works which wait, and which one does not understand for a long time,” wrote Libran author Oscar Wilde. “The reason is that they bring answers to questions which have not yet been raised; for the question often arrives a long time after the answer.” That’s the weird news, Libra. You have been waiting and waiting to understand a project that you set in motion many moons ago. It has been frustrating to give so much energy to a goal that has sometimes confused you. But here’s the good news: Soon you will finally formulate the question your project has been the answer to. And so at last you will understand it. You’ll feel vindicated, illuminated and resolved.

CN&R

october 18, 2018

Call for a quote. (530) 894-2300 ext. 2

seekers who read horoscope columns want common-sense advice about love, career, money and power. So I hope I don’t disappoint you by predicting that you will soon have a mystical experience or spiritual epiphany. Let me add, however, that this delightful surprise won’t merely be an entertaining diversion with no useful application. In fact, I suspect it will have the potential of inspiring good ideas about love, career, money or power. If I had to give the next chapter of your life story a title, it might be “A Thousand Dollars’ Worth of Practical Magic.”

All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. Further, the News & Review specifically reserves the right to edit, decline or properly classify any ad. Errors will be rectified by re-publication upon notification. The N&R is not responsible for error after the first publication. The N&R assumes no financial liability for errors or omission of copy. In any event, liability shall not exceed the cost of the space occupied by such an error or omission. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes full responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. *Nominal fee for some upgrades. 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ROBERT GARNER Dated: August 30, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001121 Published: September 27, October 4,11,18, 2018 HIRING AUTO GLASS INSTALLER. Must have 3-5yrs experience. $12-14/hr. Call or come by Safety Auto Glass (530) 891-8988

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

In 1962, when she was 31 years old, Sagittarian actress Rita Moreno won an Academy Award for her role in the film West Side Story. In 2018, she attended the Oscars again, sporting the same dress she’d worn for the ceremony 56 years before. I think the coming weeks will be a great time for you, too, to reprise a splashy event or two from the past. You’ll generate soul power by reconnecting with your roots. You’ll tonify and harmonize your mental health by establishing a symbolic link with your earlier self.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): The

Committee to Reward Unsung Good Deeds hereby acknowledges your meritorious service in the trenches of the daily routine. We praise your tireless efforts to make life less chaotic and more coherent for everyone around you. We’re grateful for the patience and poise you demonstrate as you babysit adults who act like children. And we are gratified by your capacity to keep long-term projects on track in the face of trivial diversions and petty complaints. I know it’s a lot to ask, but could you please intensify your vigilance in the next three weeks? We need your steadiness more than ever.

Ultimate Soothing Massage Call Michelle (530) 566-6477 A Unique Touch by Deja. Full-Body Shower and Massage. $140 per 1hr & 20min session (530) 321-0664 Claudia’s Relaxing Massage. Back working. Hours are 7AM-7PM. Thank you for being patient. 530-8930263 No texting. OR Google me. A Relaxing Massage In a cool, tranquil studio. $40 special. By appointment only. 10:30am - 7pm. 530893-0263. No texting.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): You

need a special pep talk that’s best provided by Aquarian poet Audre Lorde. Please meditate on these four quotes by her. 1: “Caring for myself is not self-indulgence, it is selfpreservation.” 2: “We have been raised to fear the yes within ourselves, our deepest cravings.” 3: “You cannot use someone else’s fire. You can only use your own. To do that, you must first be willing to believe you have it.” 4: “Nothing I accept about myself can be used against me to diminish me.” 5: “The learning process is something you can literally incite, like a riot.”

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Warning:

My horoscopes may interfere with your ability to rationalize your delusions; they could extinguish your enthusiasm for clichés; they might cause you to stop repressing urges that you really should express; and they may influence you to cultivate the state of awareness known as “playful wisdom.” Do you really want to risk being exposed to such lavish amounts of inner freedom? If not, you should stop reading now. But if you’re as ripe for emancipating adventures as I think you are, then get started on shedding any attitudes and influences that might dampen your urge to romp and cavort and carouse.

This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: SHAHID IQBAL, SECRETARY Dated: September 13, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001181 Published: September 27, October 4,11,18, 2018

Phone hours: M-F 9am-5pm. Deadlines for print: Line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Display ad deadline: Friday 2pm

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Many

www.RealAstrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888.

36

CLASSIFIEDS

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BLAST OFF at 1 London Ct Chico, CA 95973. PANCO ENTERPRISES, INC. 1 London Ct Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: DAVE PANZER, SECRETARY Dated: September 12, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001177 Published: September 27, October 4,11,18, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as DIAMOND STEAKHOUSE at 220 West 4th Street Chico, CA 95928. ALISA VIRGINIA COOK-SCOTT 690 Esplanade Chico, CA 95928. DENNIS GREGORY SCOTT 690 Esplanade Chico, CA 95928. TWO TWENTY RESTAURANT GROUP, LLC 220 West 4th Street Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: ALISA COOK-SCOTT, MANAGING MEMBER Dated: September 21, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001213 Published: September 27, October 4,11,18, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as YOUR MODERN HOME at 1453 Saratoga Drive Chico, CA 95973. DANIELLE ALBINI 1453 Saratoga Drive Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Indivdual. Signed: DANIELLE ALBINI Dated: August 22, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001086 Published: September 27, October 4,11,18, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as LIGHTTHOUGHTS at 6 Verde Ct Chico, CA 95973. KATHLEEN SCHULZ 6 Verde Ct Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: KATHLEEN SCHULZ Dated; August 15, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001061 Published: September 27, October 4,11,18,2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as WHIPSNAP MUSIC at 1620 Hemlock St Chico, CA 95928. ROBERT ARNOLD GARNER 1620 Hemlock St Chico, CA

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as COMPUTERS PLUS at 2477 Forest Avenue Suite 150 Chico, CA 95928. INTELLIMICRO INC 2477 Forest Avenue Suite 150 Chico, CA 95928.

this Legal Notice continues

this Legal Notice continues

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as JAMIE C PHOTOGRAPHY at 1910 W Sacramento Ave Chico, CA 95926. JAMIE CHRISTY LEONARD 1910 W Sacramento Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JAMIE LEONARD Dated: August 31, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001126 Published: September 27, October 4,11,18

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as DREAMERS AUTO SALES at 2961 Hwy 32 Ste 18 Chico, CA 95973. DREAMERS AUTO SALES LLC 2961 Hwy 32 Ste 18 Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: ERIKA FINK, MEMBER MANAGER Dated: September 20, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001205 Published: September 27, October 4,11,18, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as HEAVY METAL BULLION, HEAVY METAL COINAGE, HEAVYMETALBULLION.COM, HEAVYMETALCOINAGE.COM at 5517 Paloma Ave Unit B Paradise, CA 95969. ROBERT GREER DAVIS 5517 Paloma Ave Unit B Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ROBERT G. DAVIS Dated: September 25, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001226 Published: October 4,11,18,25, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as ARWEN ENTERPRISES at 2550 Lakewest Dr Suite 50 Chico, CA 95928. ARWEN TRACY FUNK 1125 Sheridan Avenue #22 Chico, CA 95926. HERBERT WALTER FUNK 1125 Sheridan Avenue #22 Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: ARWEN TRACY FUNK Dated: August 27, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001110 Published: October 4,11,18,25, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as YOUR HOME HELPER HANDYMAN at 1380 East Ave Ste 124-196 Chico, CA 95926. YOUR HOME HELPER HANDYMAN LLC 1380 East Ave Ste 124-196 Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company.

this Legal Notice continues

Signed: DANIEL BOTSFORD, OWNER/MANAGER Dated: September 24, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001217 Published: October 4,11,18,25, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as OLDE TYME REALTY at 6200 Clark Road Ste B Paradise, CA 95969. LISA EGLESON DIEGO 5699 Cherry Lane Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: LISA EGLESON DIEGO Dated: September 27, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001238 Published: October 4,11,18,25, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following person has abandoned the use of the fictitious business name OLDE TYME REALTY at 6200 Clark Road #B Paradise, CA 95969. TAMMY SPIRLOCK 13589 Miwok Court Magalia, CA 95954. This business was conducted by an Individual. Signed: TAMMY SPIRLOCK Dated: September 27,2018 FBN Number: 2017-0001373 Published: October 4,11,18,25, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as VANDERHALL OF CHICO at 590 East 5th Ave Chico, CA 95926. SSA III VENTURES, LLC 590 East 5th Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: STEPHEN S. ADAMS, III, MANAGER Dated: September 19, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001202 Published: October 4,11,18,25, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as HAZEL STREET VINTAGE AND COMPANY at 901 Hazel Street Gridley, CA 95948. NELDA ZOE ANDES 542 B Street Biggs, CA 95917. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: NELDA Z. ANDES Dated: September 13, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001179 Published: October 4,11,18,25, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as DPG ENTERPRISES LLC at 1385 E. LINDO AVE #11 Chico, CA 95926. DPG ENTERPRISES LLC 1385 E. Lindo Ave #11 Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: BRUNO A. BICOCCA JR, PRESIDENT Dated: September 25, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001224 Published: October 4,11,18,25, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CHICO SEASONS at 1260 Vallombrosa Ave Chico, CA 95926. EMILY MARIE AUVINEN 1260 Vallombrosa Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: EMILY AUVINEN Dated: Otober 4, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001269 Published: October 11,18,25, November 1, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ASIAN MASSAGE at 2070 E. 20th Street #140 Chico, CA 95928. LINDA LIU 1842 Bedford Dr. Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed; LINDA LIU Dated: September 20, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001208 Published: October 11,18,25, November 1, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as TURNKEY CLEANING SERVICES at 1530 Sheridan Ave Chico, CA 95926. KAYLA CASTILLO 1530 Sheridan Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: KAYLA CASTILLO Dated: September 28, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001242 Published: October 11,18,25, November 1, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as FOOTHILL PROPERTIES at 1834 Mangrove Ave Chico, CA 95926. BLAKE ANDERSON 695 E 4th St Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: BLAKE ANDERSON Dated: October 1, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001249 Published: October 11,18,25, November 1, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as IMMIGRATION ADVERSITY DOCUMENTATION at 1721 Dayton Road Chico, CA 95928. NANCY A BRYANT 1721 Dayton Road Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: NANCY A. BRYANT Dated: August 27, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001111 Published: October 11,18,25, November 1, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following persons have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name TEB PANTRY at 1982 Modoc Drive Chico, CA 95928. ALI EMDADIAN 1982 Modoc Drive Chico, CA 95928.

this Legal Notice continues


MOHAMMADREZA SOLEYMANI 1982 Modoc Drive Chico, CA 95928. This business was conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: ALI EMDADIAN Dated: August 16, 2018 FBN Number: 2017-0001106 Published: October 11,18,25, November 1, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CENTURY 21 SELECT COMMERCIAL GROUP, CENTURY 21 SELECT REAL ESTATE INC at 1101 El Monte Avenue Chico, CA 95928. JACUZZI LYDON LTD 1101 El Monte Avenue Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed; DANIEL C. JACUZZI, PRESIDENT Dated: September 27, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001239 Published: October 11,18,25, November 1, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as FULL CIRCLE LANDSCAPING at 1241 Honey Run Road Chico, CA 95928. ANNA ISAACS 1241 Honey Run Road Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ANNA ISAACS Dated: October 10, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001287 Published: October 18,25, November 1,8, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as TWO LOVES THRIFT at 6171 Skyway Paradise, CA 95969. KAYLA RENEE DURAN 5429 Foster Rd Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: KAYLA DURAN Dated: October 8, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001280 Published: October 18,25, November 1,8, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as MOPHEAD at 5585 Scottwood Rd Paradise, CA 95969. THERESA KEREAZIS-PAGE 5585 Scottwood Rd Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: THERESA KEREAZIS-PAGE Dated: September 14, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001184 Published: October 18,25, November 1,8, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as DAYCAMP COFFEE, DAYCAMP COFFEE COMPANY at 1925 Market Place Ste 150 Chico, CA 95928. DAYCAMP COFFEE, LLC 30 Aroyo Vista Ln Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed; MARK ROZELL, MEMBER Dated: October 9, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001284 Published: October 18,25, November 1,8, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CLASSIC CABINETRY at 3178 Hwy 32 Chico, CA 95973. ADAM DONALD SCHNEBERGER 1842 Cummings Lane Durham, CA 95938. DONALD GEORGE SCHNEBERGER 1842 Cummings Ln Durham, CA 95938. NICHOLAS ANDREW SCHNEBERGER 157 Picholine Way Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: DONALD SCHNEBERGER Dated: October 4, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001273 Published: October 18,25, November 1,8, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as MOUNTAIN TRAFFIC SERVICES at 5521 Paloma Ave Paradise, CA 95969. KEVIN JAMES SCOTT JR 5521 Paloma Ave Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: KEVIN JAMES SCOTT Dated: September 19, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001200 Published: October 18,25, November 1,8, 2018

NOTICES ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner JUAN CARLO DELPORTILLO filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: JUAN CARLO DELPORTILLO Proposed name: CARLO KNIGHT WOLF THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: November 30, 2018 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: MICHAEL P. CANDELA Dated: September 24, 2018 Case Number: 18CV03089 Published: October 4,11,18,25, 2018

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner JASON PAUL NELSON filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: JASON PAUL NELSON Proposed name: JAYSON PAUL NELSON THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the

this Legal Notice continues

hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: November 30, 2018 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: MICHAEL P. CANDELA Dated: September 28, 2018 Case Number: 18CV03177 Published: October 11,18,25, November 1, 2018

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner HARRY VAUGHN BOATRIGHT filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: HARRY VAUGHN BOATRIGHT Proposed name: VAUGHN BOATRIGHT THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: November 30, 2018 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: MICHAEL P. CANDELA Dated: September 28, 2018 Case Number: 18CV03171 Published: October 11,18,25, November 1, 2018

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner EMILEE STILTNER filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: EMILEE STILTNER Proposed name: EMILEE RAY ARKOSE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: November 16, 2018 Time: 9:00 AM

this Legal Notice continues

Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: September 17, 2018 Case Number: 18CV02999 Published: October 18,25, November 1,8, 2018

PETITION NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE THELMA WARREN To all heirs and beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: THELMA WARREN aka THELMA A. WARREN aka THELMA ARVESTA WARREN A Petition for Probate has been filed by: LESLEY MARCH in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: LESLEY MARCH be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decendent’s will and codicls, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: October 30, 2018 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: TBD Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Petitioner: LESLEY MARCH 4325 Caballo Way Chico, CA 95973 Case Number: 18PR00278 Dated: September 25, 2018 Published: October 4,11,18, 2018

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE DEN CONG HA To all heirs and beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors,

this Legal Notice continues

and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: DEN CONG HA A Petition for Probate has been filed by: XA THI LE in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: XA THI LE be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: October 30, 2018 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: 8 Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: RAOUL J. LECLERC P.O. Drawer 111 Oroville, CA 95965. (530) 533-5661 Case Number: 18PR00434 Dated: October 1, 2018 Published: October 11,18,25, 2018

will or estate, or both, of: VINCENT S. ANZALONE, VINCENT ANZALONE A Petition for Probate has been filed by: VINCENT J. ANZALONE in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: VINCENT J. ANZALONE be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: November 6, 2018 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: NICOLE R. PLOTTEL 466 Vallombrosa Ave. Chico, CA 95926. (530) 893-2882 Case Number: 18PR00456 Dated: October 10, 2018 Published: October 18,25, November 1, 2018

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE VINCENT S. ANZALONE, also known as VINCENT ANZALONE To all heirs and beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE CHARLES A. MCCAULEY, also known as CHARLES ANTHONY MCCAULEY, IV To all heirs and beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors,

this Legal Notice continues

this Legal Notice continues

and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: CHARLES A. MCCAULEY, also known as CHARLES ANTHONY MCCAULEY, IV A Petition for Probate has been filed by: PAMELA K. CLOW in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: PAMELA K. CLOW be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: November 13, 2018 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: TBA Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: KELLY ALBRECHT, ESQ 1440 Lincoln Street Oroville, CA 95965. (530) 534-9900 Case Number: 18PR00447 Dated: October 9, 2018 Published: October 18,25, November 1, 2018

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE LINDA SELINE SWIHART, also known as LINDA S. SWIHART, also known as LINDA SWIHART

this Legal Notice continues

To all heirs and beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: LINDA SELINE SWIHART, also known as LINDA S. SWIHART, also known as LINDA SWIHART A Petition for Probate has been filed by: RONDA BRUNSON and CYNTHIA HARVEY in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: RONDA BRUNSON and CYNTHIA HARVEY be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: November 13, 2018 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: C-18 Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: JANE E. STANSELL 103 South Plumas Street Willows, CA 95988. (530) 342-4524 Case Number: 18PR00450 Dated: October 9, 2018 Published: October 18,25, November 1, 2018

october 18, 2018

  CN&R 

37


REAL ESTATE

For More INForMAtIoN AboUt ADVertISING IN oUr reAL eStAte SectIoN, cALL 530-894-2300

Our goal is your satisfaction McEckron Real Estate Team

Need a hand with your home purchase?

Tracey McEckron

530-228-3118 TeeMac060@gmail.com

Bill McEckron

530-228-3006 BillyMac058@gmail.com

bidwell TiTle & esCrOw

With locations in:

3609 Bridle lane, ChiCo | $444,500 CLOSE TO TOWN, but with the feel of living in the Country! This house sits on a corner lot on over half an acre (0.57 acres). It is a gorgeous home that has a bright and open floor plan. The bedrooms are spacious and the family room has a beautiful brick fireplace with a nice wood mantel. It is a gorgeous house! Brand new carpet! There is beautiful and lush landscaping all around the house. There is even a large separate fenced off area for a garden where you can plant anything! There is also a separate 1 car garage/shop. There is leased solar that can be transferred to the new owner. Make sure to scroll through all of the pictures online at GarrettFrenchHomes.com to get an idea of everything that this house has to offer and then hurry up and make an appointment for your private tour! You’re going to love it!

www.BillyMac058.net

CalDRE# 02039754 • CalDRE#01930785

Chico: 894-2612 • Oroville: 533-2414 Paradise: 877-6262 • Gridley: 846-4005 www.BidwellTitle.com

Sign up for our newSletter. get 10% off

garrett french

realtor associate century 21 select real estate, inc. Dre #01402010 garrett.french@century21.com 530.228.1305

your firSt purchaSe Cnrsweetdeals.newsreview.Com

Homes are Selling in Your Neighborhood Shop every home for sale at www.C21SelectGroup.com

530.345.6618

recent listings sold By

New 2100+ home, 3 car garage $479,000 Lot in Butte Meadows $76,900 20 acres with views $145,000

-sold in 1 week

EmmEtt Jacobi (530)519–6333 calbRE#01896904

Lic# 01318330

Homes Sold Last Week ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

448 Paseo Companeros St 50 Caruthers Ln 4189 Spyglass Rd 200 White Cedar Ln 1250 Hobart St 550 Stilson Canyon Rd 229 Speedway Ave 31 Baltar Loop 1668 Arizona Way 1474 Vallombrosa Ave 26 Redding Ct

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico

$648,000 $615,000 $610,000 $566,000 $560,000 $479,000 $465,000 $395,000 $373,000 $370,000 $364,000

3/3 4/3 3/3 4/2 6/4 3/2 4/2 3/2 3/2 2/1 3/1

october 18, 2018

787 Sierra View Way chic

Century 21 Quality Service Award Recipient 2017

Kim Jacobi (530)518–8453 calbRE#01963545

Jennifer Parks | 530.864.0336

-sold in 2 days

Alice Zeissler | 530.518.1872

CN&R 

“Call me anytime for straightforward advice in real estate.”

-sold in 1 day! avante Way chico

Asking Price: $449,500

CalBRE #01312354

38  

2606 Waverly ct chico

BRE# 01269667

Sponsored by Century 21 Select Real Estate, Inc. SQ. FT. 3201 2560 2421 2881 3280 2077 1908 2523 1767 1610 1050

ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

2891 Bancroft Dr 2832 Beachcomber Cv 392 E 8th Ave 7 Hemming Ln 1575 La Linda Ln 828 Bryant Ave 186 E 12th St 30 Plaza Way #4 1420 Sherman Ave #25 1837 Roth St 234 Maine St

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Gridley

$352,500 $352,000 $350,000 $305,000 $292,500 $250,000 $228,000 $175,000 $140,000 $96,000 $235,409

3/2 3/2 2/2 3/3 4/2 2/3 2/1 2/2 2/2 3/3 3/3

SQ. FT. 1641 1580 2176 1286 1590 1665 983 1050 920 1472 1799


Donate to ’s Independent Journalism Fund

Show your support at www.independentjournalismfund.org

Protect your goodies. Insurance & Risk Management Services for: • Farm • Business • Life • Health • Home • Auto

High ceilings, open retail space of almost 3,000 SF, 1.5 bathrooms, LRG display windows w/ display lighting $249,000 Ad# 61

PRICE REDUCED! Remodeled Mobile Home, new. Vinyl floors & bathroom sinks, toilets, kitchen, refrigerator, dishwasher, stove, exterior and interior paint. $114,995 Ad#114

Mike Metz l 530-520-5858

Mike Richards l 530-864-9192

2BD/2BA 1031 SF w/vaulted ceilings, Updated laminate flooring, brand new roof, Nearly new barn style shed that adds to the décor. $269,000 Ad#121

This custom home has 3BD/3BA, 2 car garage & over 22OO SF of living space, kitchen Has granite counter tops, stainless appliances $311,000 Ad#119

Nancy Jacobson l 530-864-6944

Learn more at Dahlmeier.com Oroville Chico 530.533.3424

John Hosford l 530-520-3542

License #0680951

530.342.6421

How Much is Your Home Worth Today? Ask the Professionals at Century 21 Select

530.345.6618 | www.C21SelectGroup.com

teresa Larson (530) 899-5925 DRE #01177950 chiconativ@aol.com

Walnuts! 2.56 acs, + newer manufactured 3 bed/2 bth, 1,716 sq foot nice home!...................... $385,000 Brand neW exterior Paint! 4 bed, 2.5 bth, 2,070 sq ft., Park location! .................................... $425,000 oPen Floor Plan! 4 bed/3 bth, 1,767 sq ft. Nice touches! .............................................................$329,900 Butte valley 2 custom homes, private setting on 235 acs, horse or cattle ...............................$1,899,000 durham 3 bed/2 bth, 1,600 sq ft in town, easy care lot, home has upgrades! ................................ $278,500 Cal Park,, gorgeous kitchen, lot’s of extras, 3 bed/2 bth, 1,713 sq ft. ..............................................$369,900 ING PEN D BeautiFul updated home offering 3 bed 2 bth, 1,126 sq ft with lots of nice touches!..................... $297,500 G 1,874 sq ft PARK, .53 ac with horse area .....................$525,000 DIN Park loCation! Wonderful P 3 EN bed/2.5 bth, G kitchen + bath, large yard...................................... $469,900 BeautiFul 4 bed/2.5 bth, 2,457 updated PENsqDftIN

Buy OR SeLL a HOMe witH Me

6ac Creekside on Butte Creek $249,000 3.4 ac, well, septic and power in place $115,000 5 ac lot. Owner carry $29,500 Campus condo tastefully remodeled $159,000 SO LD 26.6 ac walnuts with 5800 sq ft home D $1,455,000 SO L

and get a MOving tRuck fOR fRee! CalDRE #02056059

Olivia Larrabee l (530) 520-3169 Olivia.Larrabee@c21selectgroup.com

Mark Reaman l (530) 228-2229 Lic# 01265853

Mark.Reaman@c21jeffrieslydon.com

The following houses were sold in Butte County by real estate agents or private parties during the week of October 1- October 5, 2018 The housing prices are based on the stated documentary transfer tax of the parcel and may not necessarily reflect the actual sale price of the home. ADDRESS 6192 Kilgord Ct 13891 S Park Dr 6465 Shaw Cir 15111 Jack Pine Way 1548 Lone Tree Rd 688 Mount Ida Rd 87 Skyline Way 116 Flying Cloud Dr 3371 Hildale Ave 2766 Mitchell Ave 3 Westwood Way

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

Magalia Magalia Magalia Magalia Oroville Oroville Oroville Oroville Oroville Oroville Oroville

$280,000 $260,000 $230,000 $210,000 $525,000 $385,000 $255,000 $220,000 $195,000 $173,455 $160,000

3/2 2/2 2/2 1/2 3/2 4/3 3/2 3/2 3/2 2/1 3/1

SQ. FT. 1728 2111 1700 899 1689 2159 1488 1175 1383 1016 1012

ADDRESS 25 Carter Rd 2327 Wyandotte Ave 2445 Las Plumas Ave 1626 Elgin St 221 Sky Oaks Dr 2020 Picnic Ln 4511 Sandpiper Ln 1800 Apple View Way 790 Highland Ln 5729 Jewell Rd 6773 Moore Rd

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

SQ. FT.

Oroville Oroville Oroville Oroville Paradise Paradise Paradise Paradise Paradise Paradise Paradise

$150,000 $130,000 $125,000 $86,000 $750,000 $642,000 $635,000 $342,500 $235,000 $188,000 $95,000

2/1 2/1 2/1 2/1 5/6 4/4 3/3 3/2 2/2 3/2 4/3

1190 1131 821 736 5653 5433 2284 1950 2016 1083 2668

october 18, 2018

  CN&R 

39


r o f s u n joi

h c n u l y a

d i r f 13

16

16

13

15

17

18

17

18

345 West FiFth street ChiCo, CA 95928 (530) 891–6328 Please call for reservations Open Fridays for Lunch 11:30am to 2:30pm Join us for Happy Hour 7 days a week 4:30 to 6:00pm

15

Profile for News & Review

c-2018-10-18  

c-2018-10-18