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CHICO’S FREE NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY VOLUME 41, ISSUE 41 THURSDAY, JUNE 7, 2018 WWW.NEWSREVIEW.COM

GREEN FIGHT The Golden State takes on Washington in battle over land, sea and air PAGE

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8 DRIVE-BY EVANGELISM 10 ELECTION RESULTS 27 EAT THE BONES


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CN&R

INSIDE

Vol. 41, Issue 41 • June 7, 2018 OPINION

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Editorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Guest Comment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Second & Flume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Streetalk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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NEWSLINES

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Downstroke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Sifter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

HEALTHLINES

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Eco Event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS

R A N C H

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Appointment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Weekly Dose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

GREENWAYS

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* e e F l a r r fe e R r e k o r B Meadow Brook 2.5%

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15 Minutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 The Goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

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COVER STORY

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ARTS & CULTURE

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Arts feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 This Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Fine arts listings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Nightlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Reel World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Chow. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Arts DEVO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Brezsny’s Astrology . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31

CLASSIFIEDS

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REAL ESTATE

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ON THE COVER: ILLUSTRATION OF SCOTT PRUITT BY DONKEYHOTEY DESIGN BY TINA FLYNN

Our Mission: To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. Editor Melissa Daugherty Managing Editor Meredith J. Cooper Arts Editor Jason Cassidy Staff Writer Ashiah Scharaga Calendar Editor Nate Daly Contributors Robin Bacior, Alastair Bland, Michelle Camy, Vic Cantu, Josh Cozine, Bob Grimm, Howard Hardee, Miles Jordan, Mark Lore, Landon Moblad, Ryan J. Prado, Juan-Carlos Selznick, Ken Smith, Robert Speer, Evan Tuchinsky, Cathy Wagner, Carey Wilson Managing Art Director Tina Flynn Creative Services Manager Christopher Terrazas Creative Director Serene Lusano Web Design & Strategist Elisabeth Bayard Arthur Ad Designer Catalina Munevar Director of Sales and Advertising Jamie DeGarmo Advertising Services Coordinator Ruth Alderson Senior Advertising Consultants Brian Corbit, Laura Golino Advertising Consultants Chris Pollok, Autumn Slone Office Assistant Amanda Geahry Distribution Director Greg Erwin Distribution Manager Mark Schuttenberg Distribution Staff Ken Gates, Bob Meads, Pat Rogers, Mara Schultz, Larry Smith, Lisa Torres, Placido Torres, Jeff Traficante, Bill Unger, Lisa Van Der Maelen

President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Director of Nuts & Bolts Deborah Redmond Director of People & Culture David Stogner Director of Dollars & Sense Debbie Mantoan Nuts & Bolts Ninja Norma Huerta Project Coordinator Natasha vonKaenel Payroll/AP Wizard Miranda Hansen Accounts Receivable Specialist Analie Foland Developer John Bisignano System Support Specialist Kalin Jenkins N&R Publications Editor Michelle Carl N&R Publications Associate Editor Laura Hillen N&R Publications Writers Anne Stokes, Rodney Orosco Marketing & Publications Consultants Steve Caruso, Joseph Engle, Elizabeth Morabito, Traci Hukill, Celeste Worden 353 E. Second Street, Chico, CA 95928 Phone (530) 894-2300 Fax (530) 892-1111 Website www.newsreview.com Got a News Tip? (530) 894-2300, ext 2224 or chiconewstips@newsreview.com Calendar Events cnrcalendar@newsreview.com Calendar Questions (530) 894-2300, ext. 2243 Want to Advertise? Fax (530) 892-1111 or cnradinfo@newsreview.com Classifieds (530) 894-2300, press 2 or classifieds@newsreview.com Job Opportunities jobs@newsreview.com Want to Subscribe to CN&R? chisubs@newsreview.com Editorial Policies: Opinions expressed in CN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons, or other portions of the paper. CN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or review materials. Email letters to cnrletters@newsreview.com. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form and to edit them for libel. Advertising Policies: All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes the responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. CN&R is printed at Bay Area News Group on recycled newsprint. Circulation of CN&R is verified by the Circulation Verification Council. CN&R is a member of Chico Chamber of Commerce, Oroville Chamber of Commerce, Downtown Chico Business Association, CNPA, AAN and AWN. Circulation 38,650 copies distributed free weekly.

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OPINION

Send guest comments, 340 words maximum, to gc@newsreview.com or to 353 E. Second St., Chico, CA 95928. Please include photo & short bio.

SECOND & FLUME

EDITORIAL

A divisive message The Rev. Billy Graham was a leader. Whether or not you

believe in his charismatic brand of evangelism, he was largely viewed as a good man for many reasons, including his push for racial equality. Among those efforts: inviting The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. to join him on one of his “crusades.” Religious tolerance was also important to Graham, who worked alongside Catholics, much to the dismay of his fundamentalist followers. But Franklin Graham is very much not his father’s son. And Chico got to see that first hand on Sunday (June 3), when he appeared in front of some 3,000 to 4,000 people at the Silver Dollar Fairgrounds for what he dubbed his “Decision America California Tour.” The goal? To appeal to rural Republican Christians and encourage them to vote. That’s something we can get behind: Vote. We believe the late Billy Graham would have agreed with that message as well. But what would the elder Graham have thought about his son’s bigotry and partisanship? After all, Franklin has called Islam a “very wicked and evil religion” (and he once suggested President Obama might be a “secret Muslim”). It should come as no surprise that he supported President Trump’s “Muslim ban.” Apparently, Franklin believes—and preaches—a

by Melissa Daugherty m e l i s s a d @ n e w s r e v i e w. c o m

similar thing about progressives. Specifically, he calls them “godless.” In a tweet in April, he said, “Christians should be aware of candidates who call themselves progressive. Progressive is generally just a code word for someone who leans toward socialism, who does not believe in God, & who will likely vote against Godly principles that are so important to our nation.” That’s certainly painting with a broad brush. We wouldn’t label all conservatives Bible-thumping greed-mongers. Local Christian churches that agree with Graham’s rhetoric ought to do some serious soul-searching—and biblical research, particularly with regard to the New Testament. His offensive and divisive comments underscore how far the modern evangelical movement has strayed from its core principles: things like “Love thy neighbor as thyself.” While the crowd cheered, it was clear that not all in attendance were prepared to heed the call (see “Church, meet state,” page 8). Indeed, several folks countered his message. That includes a local believer who went out of his way to point out Graham’s decidedly anti-Christian rhetoric. Another man who spoke to the CN&R expressed wishes that the reverend stay out of politics altogether. We concur. Ω

GUEST COMMENT

Why I risk arrest LCampaign, in Sacramento with the nationwide Poor People’s commemorating the 50 years since the ast Tuesday, May 29, I was at the state Capitol

historic PPC in Washington, D.C., during the summer of 1968. I was arrested, along with 19 others, and spent the night in Sacramento County Jail. I say “risk arrest” because one never knows if those who are the targets of a protest will be inclined to retaliate, or whether the police at the current location will be inclined to “keep [their] order.” Nevertheless, I by am appalled at the state of our Cathy Webster economy in the face of increasing joblessness, rising housing costs, The author is homelessness and despairing a longtime peace social relationships. I am appalled advocate/activist, at the callousness of our politicurrently associated cians who are supposed to keep with the Chico Peace and Justice Center, the general welfare of the citiand its program zenry as a top priority, but who Confronting too often cave to the interests of Endless War. those who profit from the war/

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military necessity illusion. The facts are readily available if you look for them (see beyondwar.org or poorpeoplescampaigncalifornia.org). What else is a citizen in the United States—which brags about free speech and the right to freely redress government—to do but protest where it may make the most impact? For speaking out against the violence of the war economy, I was arrested and subsequently jailed. Experiencing the county jail in Sacramento gives me the opportunity to report to officials and taxpayers alike about the deplorable conditions of the place. When if ever did a callous disrespect for humanity improve behavior? I was there for 18 hours; the poor, even if criminal—and so many are not—remain, often indefinitely, in filth, noise, confusion and frustration. When there are enough bodies on the side of justice clamoring to be heeded, those not in that crowd will be compelled to change the dynamic because the dynamic threatens their power. Interrupting business as usual is just one of many diverse ways of effecting change. And, if it is intelligently and nonviolently successful the change is more permanent, lessening the chances of re-emergence of the power-hungry and wealth-driven interests. Ω

Primary grumblings People treat elections like team sports. I’ve seen that a bit over the past couple of weeks, especially since this newspaper made its endorsements. Mostly, I’ve heard grumblings behind the scenes— particularly on social media, where people tend to lose their filter. One person called the CN&R an “establishment paper,” which really gave me a chuckle. Another sent a letter to the editor that begins with—I kid you not—“Shame on you.” Evidently, because Chico nativism didn’t factor into our decision—that is, we didn’t endorse the hometown congressional candidate—we are The Man. In reality, we picked the person we believe to be the best person for the job—taking into account education, background, positions on the issues and viability in the general election. Over many months, we wrote several stories about the upcoming election, attended candidate forums and did our research. Voters didn’t agree with us—and that’s called democracy. Fortunately for the local favorite, Audrey Denney, who ended up as one of the top two vote-getters, we won’t hold her responsible for the delusional narrative of her fervid supporters. We can all agree on at least one thing: Rep. Doug LaMalfa is in Washington to enrich himself and his kind, not to serve the interests of his lowly constituents. Denney will have to step things up to dethrone LaMalfa in what is largely considered one of the safest seats in California. Still, GOP support is eroding at quite a clip in the Golden State—in fact, according to just-released statistics, there are now more voters identified as “no party preference” (NPP) than registered Republicans. However, in District 1, at least for now, LaMalfa enjoys an advantage—there are about 44,000 more registered Republicans than Democrats. One indication that he’s not sweating things is the fact that he didn’t file a paid candidate statement—at least not with the Butte County Elections Office. The big question: How will the 79,000 NPPs in this district vote in November? Speaking of endorsements, it’s only in hindsight we realized all of them were for women. Granted, we didn’t make picks for everything on the ballot. Had we done so, there likely would have been men on our list, too. Thing is, there’s a lot of catching up to do, especially at the federal level. As of the last election cycle, women accounted for 21 percent and 19 percent of the Senate and House, respectively, according to the Pew Research Center. Here in District 1, it was heartening to see three women among the cast of seven candidates.

IN NONPOLITICAL NEWS I’m now counting down the days till fall. You sun worshipers may be happy that summer arrived early, but I’m in a funk. Indeed, I recently returned from an amazing coastal getaway. For a few days thereafter, I fantasized about picking up and moving there. I doubled down on that idea when my air-conditioner went on the fritz last weekend—the first triple-digit days of the year. It’s fixed now, so don’t get too excited. I’m here to stay.

Melissa Daugherty is editor of the CN&R


LETTERS

Send email to cnrletters@newsreview.com

Tsk-tsk, CN&R  Re “Endorsements” (Editorial, May 31): Shame on you for not endorsing Audrey Denney for Congress! Growing up in agriculture, she truly represents the values of our Chico community as endorsed by the California Teachers Association and Chico State. I thought the CN&R represented these values as well, but I guess this publication would rather support an attorney not from our city. Disappointed.

disastrous to men? What he probably thinks is we cannot have old religious men deciding women’s issues? Then the system of people elected to represent us falls apart. This could have been said under Obama and the left. If people are unhappy with this government, change it. But don’t cry and moan like little kids. The left does their thing and then the right does their thing. Half the country is upset every eight years. It is not the end of the world. Allen Clark Paradise

Bill Matthews Chico

Quit your crying Re “High stakes for women’s health” (Guest comment, by Roger S. Beadle, May 31): If Mr. Beadle thinks a Congress that’s 80 percent white male and Christian is so bad, what would be his opinion on an 80 percent black and Christian, or Hindu, Congress? Surely then, one composed of 80 percent women would be

‘Rip-off’ Re “Fair way” (Newslines, May 31): Just when I thought I had seen most every kind of rip-off out there in my 77 years on this earth, wouldn’t you know it, the Silver Dollar Fair board manages to provide a new one. I’m talking about the parking situation at the fair. Bad enough the fair board set the fee at $7

per car for the average citizen. They even decided to extend this disgusting fee to disabled veterans. The fact that they managed to do this on Memorial Day weekend no less is a real slap in the face to our veterans. The fair wouldn’t even exist without their sacrifices. Most veterans are pretty much low-income or on a fixed income, so $7 is a lot of money. To add a little more insult, the California Highway Patrol involved themselves by having kids in their Explorer group out taking the money—not a good public image for them. Yes, sir, future fair boards are going to have to search pretty far out to find a way to beat the money grab they laid on the public this year. Maybe next year they can charge disabled veterans $10 a car to park—out in a field to ensure a good walk. Classy job, fair board. W.M. Gunter Hamilton City

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Re “More on mass shootings” (Letters, by Loretta Ann Torres, May 31): Ms. Torres: You have freedom of religion; atheists have freedom from religion. However, neither atheists nor secularists, who want religion out of government and vice versa, discard sound values and reason from their lives or the lives of their children. Traditional values may have their base in religious morals, but you don’t need a supernatural deity to understand their worth and to behave in a socially conscious manner. Atheism is not your problem. Try directing your frustration to the extreme anti-American liberalism on university campuses preparing our new generations of teachers. Along with principles of classroom management, teaching-credential candidates are indoctrinated with their professors’ ideas that America was stolen, its heritage slavery, its culture exclusionary, the white race bigots, males are misogynists, and conservatives are evil. If you’re a young American white male with behavioral issues, and feel isolated, and you’re standing at the edge of sanity, and one push, one little slight, sends you over the edge, what pulls you back when you’re taught you embody everything that is wrong with the world? School shooters are young white males not because we let them, but because we make them. Our children, after all, become what we tell them they are.

Re “The doctor is in” (The Goods, by Meredith J. Cooper, May 24): Meredith Cooper’s comment suggested karma had bitten Acapillow and they went out of business because they caused 1078 Gallery’s eviction. My business, All Fired Up Ceramic Art Center, shared a common wall with 1078 for eight years. We enjoyed many shared art events and, usually, being neighbors was a win-win. Sometimes 1078 were bad neighbors. Loud, blaring music and theater groups screaming obscenities were clearly heard during business hours. Sometimes customers walked in, heard the

racket, and abruptly left. After late-night concerts, large piles of ice were dumped by my back door in the path of my customers coming in from the parking lot. I know Acapillow dealt with the same issues. I feel these problems were due to the volunteer board not being able to properly oversee events, and I really hope things go better in their new location. For the record, property owner Dorna Andersen always went out of her way to be generous and accommodate her tenants. Yes, she is a businesswoman, but more importantly, she is a passionate supporter of the arts. She charged myself and 1078 low rent for years in an effort to help us succeed. Janice Hofmann Chico

Remembering Bobby Fifty years ago on June 4, 1968, Robert Kennedy won the California presidential primary by 5 points over Eugene McCarthy. Both Kennedy and McCarthy were running against the war in Vietnam. Vice President Hubert Humphrey was not on the California ballot. Tragically, late that night, after Kennedy was declared the winner, he was shot. He died in the early morning on June 6. Humphrey became the Democratic nominee for president and Nixon won by just 7 percent. About 40 percent of the 58,300 Americans who died in Vietnam were killed while Nixon was president—so much for Nixon’s “secret plan” to end the war. I believe that Bobby Kennedy would have won the nomination and the presidency, and I think of that often. I was in Vietnam (101st Airborne) that June, and by the time I heard [the news he’d been shot]—it was Bobby Kennedy assassinated, after winning California primary. Bob Mulholland Chico

Write a letter Tell us what you think in a letter to the editor. Send submissions of 200 or fewer words to cnrletters@ newsreview.com. Deadline for publication is noon on the Tuesday prior to publication.


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NEWSLINES DOWNSTROKE COUNCIL WRAP-UP

The City Council meeting agenda for Tuesday (June 5) was packed, with the issues taking discussion past midnight. Here are highlights: • The panel approved the 2018-19 budget unanimously. • After more than 2 1/2 years and at least $550,000 spent a consultant, the city approved the update of the Development Impact Fee program, which sets fees for builders to account for impacts on public infrastructure. Street facilities fees, which were previously more than $11,000 per single-family unit, were reduced to about $9,300. Councilman Andrew Coolidge was the only “no” vote. • Four parcels (about 13 acres) of former Redevelopment Agency land near the airport valued at $764,000 were sold to Kevin Avila for commercial and industrial development. • Federal funds via the Community Development Block Grant and Home Investment Partnerships Program will go to the following organizations: Community Action Agency ($26,000), Chico Housing Action Team ($24,000), Meals on Wheels ($17,000), Peg Taylor Center ($19,208), Jesus Center ($19,208) and Catalyst Domestic Violence Services ($19,208).

PD LAUNCHES STREET CRIMES UNIT

Chico PD is focusing on quality-of-life crimes (e.g., car burglaries, drug-dealing, bike and retail theft) with a temporary Street Crimes Unit that launched last Thursday (May 31). The team—composed of a sergeant, six officers and a community service officer— will operate through mid-August, at which time it will resume its typical patrols in the south campus neighborhood. In its first week, the unit made 24 arrests (about half were for narcotics violations) and seized more than 2 ounces of methamphetamine.

SHAKEUP AT STONEWALL

Putting the organization in a state of flux heading into Pride Month, Chico’s Stonewell Alliance Center parted ways with longtime Executive Director Thomas Kelem (pictured). The board let Kelem go May 25. Hired in July 2009, he’d planned to leave this fall. Last week, the center closed for renovations. Board Chair T.R. Billiet said in a news release that “the overlap of these events was purely coincidental,” declining to explain the “confidential personnel matter.” The LGBTQ support and advocacy group will hold a public forum Wednesday (June 13) at 6 p.m. at the North Valley Community Foundation (240 Main St.). Eirin Auld stepped down as board chair to serve as interim executive director while the board hires Kelem’s successor. 8

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Church, meet state Celebrity evangelist Franklin Graham encourages local Christians to get political

O

n Sunday, June 3, Kyle Walling was

sitting with some friends at a table facing the hot afternoon sun and watching as a river of people carrying lawn chairs streamed into Chico’s Silver by Dollar Fairgrounds. Robert Speer This was a gatherr ob e r t s pe e r@ ing of Christians come n ew srev i ew. c o m from far and wide to see the Rev. Franklin Graham, son of the late Billy Graham, and listen to his fiery call for salvation politics. It was the penultimate stop on his 10-city tour of California, during which he would combine a call to political action—with a conservative twist—with a sermon leading to a mass confession of sins. Walling had a different confession in mind. Taped to his table was a handmade sign that read: “Will you hear our confessions?” I stepped forward to volunteer. I said I was a reporter and might like to include his confession in my story. That was fine by him. He drew close and said softly, “I live in a neighborhood in Chico where there are lots of homeless people. They

walk past my house every day. I know they’re hungry, but I don’t feed them. I feel guilty about that.” Walling is a devout Christian, but his Jesus is not the same as Graham’s. He gave me a copy of an open letter he’d written to “the Christian Church in Chico.” In it he writes that Jesus’ “politics was to feed the hungry, clothe the naked, welcome the stranger/foreigner, care for the sick, and visit the imprisoned, regretfully we (especially of the Evangelical tradition) are now known for pledging our allegiance to idols such as political parties, flags, countries, and ideologies that, in effect, are anti-Christ.” He was speaking, of course, of Graham, who he points out has made public statements calling for “banning Muslims from the country, disallowing LGBTQ+ people in our churches and homes, [regarding] our President’s election (and God’s role in it) [and] whether or not Jesus would use nuclear weapons on terrorists.” The event itself was a lot like a rock con-

cert—vast stage, huge sound and light systems, large twin projection screens. A

crowd of somewhere between 3,000 and 4,000 people filled the lawn area in the center of the fairgrounds. For them it was a fun—and free—event. Two opening music acts, including a performance by Christian music star Jeremy Camp and his band, were part of the draw. Jimmy Giombetti, who sported a Maoristyle tattoo that ran up his neck and onto his cheek, and his wife, Tarrah, said they’d driven from Reno mostly to see Camp perform, but also to see Graham preach. They were soft-spoken and amiable, gentle people despite the dramatic tattoo. Bob Wenzinger, a 78-year-old retired insurance agent from Gridley, said he was there because his wife wanted to come and his church had asked parishioners to attend. He said that he’d never had a chance to see “the dad,” so he was determined to see his son instead. I asked him whether he agreed with Graham’s widely publicized statement that progressives—that is, Democrats—are “godless.” “No, no, absolutely not,” he replied. “We need to keep politics separate from religious belief.” He added that he was deeply concerned


Thousands of people gathered from as far away as Reno to see The Rev. Franklin Graham (inset) and Christian rock star Jeremy Camp at the Silver Dollar Fairgrounds in Chico. PHOTOS BY CHARLES FINLAY

about the partisanship and tribalism that afflicted the body politic. A number of Christian motorcycle clubs were in attendance. One biker, a burly black man with the unusual name of Choir (surname Tennin), explained that the event’s organizers had invited them to attend because their very presence and visibility—all wore biker vests—helped keep order. He’d been a little reluctant, Tennin said, because he’s a big sports fan and the Chico Heat and Golden State Warriors were both playing that evening. But as a member of the Lord’s Prospects club, he felt called to take part in the Rev. Graham’s ministry. Tennin said he knew a number of men who once had been outlaw bikers. Somewhere along the way—often in prison—they discovered Jesus and abandoned their outlaw ways. Franklin Graham’s sermon began as a

call to spiritual and political arms and ended with a mass absolution of sins. Graham was ostensibly nonpartisan, saying that our country was a mess and “the Democrats are not going to fix it, the Republicans are not going to fix it. Only God can fix it.” But the politicians who needed Christians’ prayers most, he said, were Democrats such as Jerry Brown and Nancy Pelosi. “It doesn’t mean you vote for them; you pray for them. But wouldn’t it be good if prayer changed them?” He encouraged the audience to get involved in politics—to run for the city council, the school board or mayor. He urged them to “saturate the ballot and get a majority of born-again Christians in office.” But he warned any potential candidates that they would need thick skins. “Progressives,” he said, “are going to attack you with their evil ways.” Be not afraid, he said. “Church, take your state back!” he exhorted. Then it was on to sin. “We’re all sinners, and God knows it,” Graham said. But just like a computer, God has a delete button that can wipe away a believer’s sins. Graham asked those who wanted to be absolved to stand, but less than half did so. Undeterred, he said, “I want you to know God has forgiven you. God has hit the delete.” Ω

Public discord About 50 people speak up on proposed laws addressing ‘quality-of-life’ issues

Chico City Councilman Karl Ory asked Police

Chief Mike O’Brien a pointed question during the panel’s regular meeting Tuesday evening (June 5), during which the council discussed a raft of controversial potential ordinances related to homelessness, including reintroduction of one that prohibited sitting or lying on public property. If the sit/lie law was so effective and necessary, why is it just now resurfacing for the council’s consideration? After all, it expired more than two years ago. In front of an overflowing City Council chambers, O’Brien replied that the department had been implementing other tactics of which he wanted to judge the efficacy. He offered his opinion—that reinstating the law could be helpful when it comes to qualityof-life issues in commercial districts downtown—because he was asked by the mayor. The law was one of five discussion items on the agenda under the banner of “Chico Safe Now” proposals. Brought forward by Councilman Andrew Coolidge, the list drew comments from roughly 50 Chicoans, who squeezed as much as they could into a oneminute speaking limit during a meeting that adjourned past midnight after closed session. Overwhelmingly, speakers were against reinstating the sit/lie law or creating any other regulations that could further criminalize homelessness, whether they were related to shopping carts or changing city

park closure times (also among the proposals). Many of them wore T-shirts or emblems with the slogan “housing not handcuffs.” Coolidge kicked off the conversation by asking speakers to “toss away” prepared speeches and provide solutions to the city’s issues with homelessness and crime. The crowd’s energy was tense from the get-go. After only two speakers, the mayor ordered a recess once loud cheers and clapping erupted, warning against future “outbursts.” Among the many solutions presented after the meeting progressed were: paving the way for more housing by supporting legal camping and Chico Housing Action Team’s Simplicity Village; forming a committee to examine services and close gaps; and creating a detox center funded by private and public resources. Multiple speakers suggested legalizing cannabis businesses and using the revenue to help fund affordable housing. Homeless man Richard Muenzer said the city needs a needle exchange program and rehab “something fierce.” Chico State political science professor

SIFT ER Facebook outpaced Facebook may have a shelf life, if results from a new Pew Research Center survey of teens and their use of technology and social media hold true. The survey, when compared with results from a similar one conducted in 2014-15, shows that teens are shifting away from Facebook and toward YouTube and Snapchat. In 2014-15, 71 percent used Facebook, versus 51 percent today. Here are some other notable findings from the 2018 report:

• Just 10 percent of teens name Facebook as their most-used social media platform, compared with Instagram (15 percent), YouTube (32 percent) and Snapchat (35 percent). • 95 percent of teens have access to a smartphone today, versus 73 percent in 2014-15. • 45 percent say they use the internet “almost constantly,” up from 24 percent. • More girls (50 percent) than boys (39 percent) report being online almost constantly. • 31 percent say social media has a mostly positive effect on their lives, including connecting with friends and having access to news. • 24 percent say it has a mostly negative effect, citing bullying and lack of in-person contact.

Lisa Miller grabs a free slice of pizza outside the City Council chambers, handed to her by volunteer Daniel Cavanaugh. Miller, who has been homeless and is working on her recovery from opioid addiction, said she thinks Chico Friends on the Streets efforts to provide food to homeless people is “awesome.” Tensions have been escalating between Chico First and CFOTS, with the former advocating for a policy that regulates public distribution of food. PHOTO BY ASHIAH SCHARAGA

Jennifer Wilking suggested the city partner with students to work on researching these issues; she teaches a course that focuses on how research can be used to set policy, and published a study that analyzed the sit/lie ordinance with her colleagues last year. (See “Costs of criminalization,” Newslines, Sept. 7, 2017.) A few speakers pointed out that the municipal code already has laws on the books to prohibit being drunk or under the influence in public, loitering and camping; yet, they haven’t done anything to curb homelessness. “If you don’t want people to be outdoors, you need to give them a place to be,” said Joey Haney. Eventually, the council circled back around

to approving all of O’Brien’s recommendations, which he offered at the beginning of the conversation. Here’s what happened: • O’Brien will bring back an analysis of the sit/lie ordinance, along with citation and prosecution information. (Noes: Ory, Councilwoman Ann Schwab and Councilman Randall Stone.) • Shopping cart discussions will happen at retail watch meetings, a partnership between Chico PD and the Chico Chamber of Commerce. • What could it mean if Chico declares a shelter crisis? City Attorney Vince Ewing will return with that information. • The Bidwell Park and Playground Commission will discuss closure times for city parks, as well as requiring perNEWSLINES C O N T I N U E D J U N E 7, 2 0 1 8

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mits for the use of Bidwell Bowl Amphitheater. • Can the city add cameras or other forms of security in certain public spaces? City staff will examine possible locations. In Mayor Sean Morgan’s perspective, “illegal activity is illegal activity.” “When we’re talking about sit and lie, I don’t think officers are out there to criminalize homelessness,” he said, adding that he has been supportive of wraparound, nonfragmented services, namely the Jesus Center’s consolidation of services and relocation. Schwab said the city really needs to “put our money where our mouth is” and make affordable housing a priority. The best way to create social change is to fund the agencies providing services to homeless people, like the city was doing when it had a community grant program, which was redirected to the general fund at the council’s last meeting. “We just sold a piece of property for $700,000 tonight,” she said. “Can we reinvest that money into our community, into our citizens?” Coolidge said installing security cameras in places like Depot Park is probably a good idea, citing the usefulness of the cameras installed on the bike path near Chico State. “If someone gets beaten or stabbed, I’d love to catch the person and throw them in jail who did that.” “I’m not proposing these ordinances to harm people. I’m proposing these ordinances to hear from the people I represent and work for and see what we can do to make things make a little more sense,” he said. “I just got tired of waiting to have this discussion because it seemed my community was going to explode over it.” Ory noted that no beds were created as a result of the council’s discussion and expressed hope that there would be a serious look taken at housing when the topic comes back around. “We’re not talking about coddling anyone, we’re talking about creating another 100 shelter beds,” he said. “That’s a first step towards doing the right thing with this issue.” —AshiAh schArAgA ash ia h s@ newsr ev iew.c o m


Close of the polls

VOTE

★ 2018 ★

Tuesday’s primary election yields women as supervisors, congressional hopeful When Larry Wahl won the seat of

longtime Butte County Supervisor Jane Dolan, Supervisor Maureen Kirk became the lone woman on the five-member panel. That was eight years ago. When voters headed to the polls on Tuesday (June 5), that changed. Not only was the retiring Kirk, of District 3, replaced by a woman, Tami Ritter, a former member of the Chico City Council, but District 2 Supervisor Wahl also fell to his challenger, longtime economic development, tourism and arts impresario Debra Lucero. Reached for comment Wednesday morning, Lucero, who took 54.6 percent of the vote, told the CN&R it was a long road to victory. She realized early on that unseating the established Wahl—a two-term supervisor and former member of the Chico City Council—would take name recognition and a good campaign. Lucero said she stepped up when she realized nobody else was going to do so. “In terms of a female voice, we’re going to get two female voices,” she said excitedly. Looking forward, she’s eager to work with the other members of the panel—she knows them and believes they, too, are committed to serving their constituents in a nonpartisan way. One of her first priorities: developing more cooperation between the county and its municipalities on major issues, including homelessness and public safety. In District 3, Ritter ran against Bob Evans, who serves on the Chico Planning Commission, and Norm Rosene, a local dentist and winery owner. As of Wednesday morning, she had 53.3 percent of the vote, enough to secure the seat. “I was not looking forward to a runoff election in November, so I’m happy we finished it in June,” she said. As for adding two women to the panel, “The more diversity we can get, the better,” she said. “We still have a long way to go in Chico and Butte County in terms of diversity—we have no people of

color [on the Board of Supervisors]. This is definitely a step in the right direction.” Ritter’s priorities are addressing homelessness, regulating cannabis, ensuring emergency preparedness and protecting North State water.

Congress To challenge entrenched Republican Congressman Doug LaMalfa, North State voters chose Chico’s Audrey Denney by a decisive margin. Denney, an agricultural instructor, got 17.5 percent of the vote in a field of seven, including four Democrats. Auburn attorney Jessica Holcombe finished almost 6 points behind. LaMalfa, a rice farmer from Richvale seeking his fourth term, took 51.7 percent. Denney awaited results on the patio of B Street Public House with Lucero, Ritter and Sonia Aery, who will face District 3 Assemblyman James Gallagher in November. She told the CN&R Wednesday morning that she sensed a positive outcome upon seeing the first returns from Shasta County showing her in the lead. “Since the beginning of this race in January, I’ve had in the pit of my stomach the feeling that I could win in June and November,” Denney said. “That didn’t prepare me for what happened last night. “Initially it was a moment of sheer joy—then, reflection. There’s a lot of work till November.” Denney attributes her success in the primary to a broad base of support and “very professional campaign” operation. Her staff includes five full-timers and numerous volunteers; between them and her, she estimates knocking on 18,000 doors. (She received 18,840 votes.) She also said she did not campaign specifically toward fellow Democrats. While she was one of just six California congressional candidates endorsed by the progressive group Our Revolution, she drew “farmers and ranchers who feel left behind by our representative.”

Added Denney: “The reason I’m going to win in November is I fit the district. I’ve been myself and trying to show the district—not [just] Democrats—the way I’m like them.”

County auditor-controller While most of the local races had margins defined by electionday results, one remained too close to call definitively. Just 467 votes separated the candidates for Butte County auditor-controller as mail-in and provisional ballots remained uncounted. Kathryn Mathes, accounting manager for the city of Chico, held the edge over Assistant AuditorController Graciela Gutierrez. County Clerk-Recorder Candace Grubbs told the CN&R that the Elections Office received a halfdozen trays of ballots from the post office Wednesday morning, on top of the mail-in ballots delivered Tuesday. She was unable to estimate how many ballots election officials had yet to count, though she confirmed the auditor-controller race was close enough to potentially be affected. “It’s happening more now that people are hanging on to their ballot,” she said. Grubbs has three days to finalize the count. She expects 70 percent of the ballots will have been by mail. Mathes had 16,805 votes, or 50.6 percent, as of election night.

A certified public accountant who made that credential the centerpiece of her campaign, Mathes previously worked in the auditor-controller’s office. Gutierrez, who cited her master’s degree in public administration, was at 49.2 percent.

Assessor In the race for county assessor, which grew chippy due to the politicking of challenger Randall Stone, incumbent Diane Brown handily retained her job. Brown got 63 percent of the vote to 36 for Stone, a Chico city councilman who serves on an assessment appeals board. In mailers, on social media and at candidate forums, Stone blasted Brown for alleged campaign violations, an irregular assessment that went to appeal and as mundane a matter as calling a refrigerator a technological upgrade. He took a conciliatory tone on Facebook early Wednesday, offering congratulations.

Governor Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom (33.3 percent) will face Republican John Cox (26.2 percent) in the highly contested race to replace Jerry Brown as California’s governor. A former San Francisco mayor, Newsom ran on a platform based on education, starting with prenatal care and including free tuition two-year community colleges and the addition of apprenticeship pro-

Debra Lucero, Audrey Denney and Tami Ritter celebrate victories Tuesday night. PHOTO COURTESY OF DEBRA LUCERO

grams. He has promised to protect immigrants and the LGBTQ community and support the #MeToo movement by fighting for women’s empowerment and workplace equality. He supports health care for all, prison reform and affordable housing. Cox, backed by President Trump as well as the California Pro-Life Council, is a businessman and CPA from San Diego. He has vowed to “take back California” by repealing the gas tax and “ending the sanctuary state.” Cox also supports creating business-friendly policies. Trump took to Twitter following the election to take credit for his part in Cox’s turnout: “Even Fake News CNN said the Trump impact was really big, much bigger than they ever thought possible.”

Propositions Prop. 68 (Natural Resources Bond): Yes Prop. 69 (Transportation Revenue: Restrictions and Limits): Yes Prop. 70 (Greenhouse Gas Reduction Reserve Fund): No Prop. 71 (Ballot Measures: Effective Date): Yes Prop. 72 (Property Tax: New Construction: Rain-Capture): Yes —MEREDITH J. COOPER, MELISSA DAUGHERTY AND EVAN TUCHINSKY

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HEALTHLINES Chico is home to three DaVita-affiliated clinics, including this one on East Avenue. PHOTO BY MEREDITH J. COOPER

Treatment battle Dialysis clinics and union square off over care for kidney patients

by

David Gorn and Elizabeth Aguilera

ACalifornia, industry and an influential union in with allegations on one side of battle is escalating between the dialysis

shoddy practices in the treatment of kidney patients and accusations of political bullying on the other. With a growing number of Californians on dialysis, the union has teed up an initiative for the November ballot that would rein in profits at 555 privately owned clinics where patients receive life-sustaining treatment. The measure would cap profits at 15 percent after most clinical costs. And in Sacramento, legislators have been considering measures to regulate staffing, inspections and other elements of the dialysis industry. Proponents say such moves could reduce infections and deaths for fragile kidney

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patients, partly by encouraging more investment in equipment and training. Their opponents argue that the initiative has nothing to do with improving patient care and could have the opposite effect—financially squeezing dialysis companies to the point where many would close, making it harder for patients to get the blood-cleansing treatment they need. “The goal of this ballot initiative is to hold the dialysis industry accountable and improve life for patients and for the people who care for them every day,” said Sean Wherley, spokesman for the Service Employees International Union-United Healthcare Workers West union. His labor group has ponied up $6 million so far to gather petition signatures and promote the initiative, according to campaign filings with the Secretary of State’s Office. The measure wouldn’t require improvements in patient care. But Wherley said the profit limit, as well as allowing facility improvements and staff training to be incorporated into clinical costs, would give dialysis centers an incentive to invest in new equipment and improve hygiene practices.

Dialysis is prescribed for kidney failure.

Machines do the kidneys’ work by purging toxins from patients’ blood over the course of several hours. Nearly 140,000 people received dialysis in California in 2016, according to the Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development, a 26 percent increase since 2011. More than 10,000 dialysis patients died in California in 2016, a 2.5 percent rise from the previous year, according to an Assembly analysis. Infection and cardiac problems are the leading causes of death in kidney-failure patients. Critics of dialysis centers say they’re money machines that often cut corners, putting patients at greater risk. What those cen-

ters need, proponents of the ballot measure say, is a swift kick in the wallet. Union member Tangi Foster is a 60-year-old dialysis patient in Northridge, a Los Angeles suburb. She has received treatment three times a week for the past 10 years at various clinics. “I started to notice unsanitary conditions,” said Foster, who has advocated for the November initiative. “Sometimes there were dirty floors. I’ve seen roaches. I’ve seen blood on the chairs.” The state Department of Public Health received 577 complaints and found 370 deficiencies during a 2 1/2-year period between 2014 and 2017—roughly 18 complaints and 12 deficiencies per month. Those included complaints that patients’ vital signs weren’t checked by staff every 30 minutes as required by law and that translation services were not provided to non-English-speaking patients. One grievance accused staff members of failing to check the connection between a patient and machine, even though blood was inappropriately oozing from the patient’s medical port. The depiction of dirty, unhygienic clinics as

being commonplace is one Miguel Estrada takes personally. “No, no, no, that’s not right at all,” he said. Estrada hooks patients to machines and monitors them at a dialysis center in the Bay Area. He’s seen or worked at dozens of centers, he said, and cleanliness is a constant among them: “That’s the most basic thing everyone knows, and that’s what we spend our lives doing—making the dialysis process as clean and safe as possible.” Estrada said he’s pro-union, but he called the ballot measure a “political tactic” by union officials.

APPOINTMENT CPR is A-OK! You’re going to be spending a lot of time in creeks, lakes and pools as temperatures climb higher, and if you have cardiopulmonary resuscitation training, you may be able to save a life in a drowning emergency. If you haven’t been trained, what are you waiting for? In addition to online training through the Red Cross, several local organizations offer in-person lessons.

Basic Emergency Safety Training: 228-2911 Lifeline Training Center: 893-5254, lifelinechico.com

Mobile First Response: 636-2654, mobilefirstresponse.com Paradise Instructional Nursing Group: 5207948, pingeducation.net

If you’re not trained and encounter a heart attack or near-drowning victim, it’s always better to do something rather than nothing. That means uninterrupted chest compressions until paramedics arrive.


About this story:

It was produced by Cal Matters, an independent public journalism venture covering California state politics and government. Learn more at calmatters.org.

The centers are worried because the “direct patient care services costs” listed in the ballot measure do not include administrative costs such as payroll, human resources and legal expenses, nor payment for medical directors to oversee the clinics. All of those costs would have to come out of the 15 percent, translating into minuscule profit or none at all, Estrada said. About 70 percent of the centers in California are owned by two large companies: DaVita Kidney Care and Fresenius Medical Care. They operate most of the dialysis clinics in the nation, and both turn healthy profits. DaVita, for example, recorded net income of $1 billion last year. Those two companies are the money behind the organized opposition to the initiative, donating slightly more than $2.3 million so far. Kathy Fairbanks, the opponents’ representative, said the coalition against the measure also includes the California Medical Association and many patient-

advocacy groups. The measure “will harm patients,” she said. “If clinics close down, where will patients go?” They’ll end up in emergency rooms that aren’t equipped to handle a swell of people needing hours-long treatment, she said. The union’s initiative is no more than a way to organize dialysis workers, Fairbanks said. “Unionization is what they want, pure and simple,” she said. “They want to bring the dialysis community to the table and unionize it. This is just leverage.” In the Legislature, only one proposal to change how dialysis centers are run is currently active, but it might not clear all legislative steps for passage this year. Democratic state Sen. Connie Leyva of Chino wants to limit “third-party” payments for treatment. Dialysis companies sometimes pay a patient’s insurance premiums to make treatment possible, then collect payment for it from the insurers. Leyva wants to allow that arrangement only for patients not eligible for Medicare, Medi-Cal (aka Medicaid) or subsidies through Covered California. Those government options are less expensive. A union-backed bill by state Sen.

Ricardo Lara, a Bell Gardens Democrat, is currently inactive but could be revived. It has cleared every hurdle except a vote of the full Assembly. It would set staffing ratios at dialysis centers and a minimum transition time between patients. Annual

clinic inspections would replace the current regimen of every five or six years. Legislation that essentially would have capped profits was introduced last year and later withdrawn. It also had union backing. Ω

WEEKLY DOSE Be safe on the water Getting out on the water is a welcome retreat from our scorching heat, but don’t be a Gilligan this summer when you set sail on your SS Minnow, whether it’s a boat, canoe or jetski. The Butte County Sheriff’s Marine Unit tells us that the four leading causes of boat accidents are operator inexperience, inattention, recklessness and speeding, while the leading cause of death while boating is drowning. Follow these tips when enjoying our beautiful lakes and rivers:

• Wear a life jacket. Children younger than 13 are required by law to wear life jackets, and you should have one on board for every person. This goes for canoes, kayaks and standup paddleboards, too.

• Alcohol and boating do not mix. Drunken sailors are the leading cause of boating deaths.

• Take a boating safety course. Many online courses teach safety basics and navigational rules.

• Obey the captain. He or she is responsible for your safety onboard.

• Prepare in advance. Make sure your boat runs and operates safely before leaving home.

Source: Butte County Sheriff’s Office

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GREENWAYS During a visit to Bidwell Park, CivicSpark fellow Molly Marcussen explains that cities have to address how to better protect natural spaces and neighboring urban centers, which will be more prone to wildfires due to climate change.

Sobering reality Climate change projections for Chico not rosy; planning underway

story and photo by

Ashiah Scharaga ashiahs@ n ewsrev iew.c om

Sdaysmemories from her childhood on a dairy farm in Petaluma

ome of Molly Marcussen’s fondest

are of warm summers spent swimming in a nearby creek, tadpoles at her toes. When she went off to Chico State, she intended to study agricultural business, but her first summer back home stopped her in her tracks. The frogs—where did they go? Her mother’s rosebushes usually were crowded with croaking amphibians. That year, there was silence. What could have caused the frogs’ disappearance? Marcussen did some digging (academically speaking). The answer had to do with something she did not expect: climate change. The waters of the creek had been getting warmer and more shallow. The frogs couldn’t survive there anymore. “I was kind of scared,”

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Marcussen said. If the creek had become unsuitable for frogs, might it become unsuitable for her? When Marcussen returned to college, she shifted her studies to environmental planning. Postgraduation, Marcussen, 24, has become an expert in Cal-Adapt, climate-modeling software developed by the California Energy Commission and the UC Berkeley Geospatial Innovation Facility. It forecasts what Butte County will be experiencing by 2050 and 2100 based on projections of high and low greenhouse gas emissions. Using Cal-Adapt in conjunction with data from local agencies, Marcussen has created climate change vulnerability assessments for Chico and Butte County. The reports—mandated by Senate Bill 379—aim to answer essential questions about the future of California communities: namely, how will the changing climate

Get the details:

To view the Chico Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment, visit tinyurl.com/ChicoCCVA.

impact the people, natural environment and infrastructure, and what strategies can be used to adapt to those changes that are already cemented, while preventing even harsher ones from coming? The assessments represent the bulk of her work as an AmeriCorps CivicSpark fellow— her one-year assignment ends in August. Last Thursday (May 31), Marcussen presented a draft of the Chico report to the city’s Sustainability Task Force. She is working on the strategies portion; once complete, the assessment will make its way to the Planning Commission for review and eventual integration into the general plan. The report describes a Chico many people wouldn’t recognize. This includes hotter temperatures in general, with more frequent scorching heat waves and wildfires. Average annual rainfall will increase, but in the form of brief, intense storms causing massive flooding; coupled with a melting snow pack, this will mean less water storage and recharging of

groundwater. “You look at it and go, Oh my god, everything is a problem,” Mark Stemen, task force chairman, told the CN&R. “If it doesn’t get really bad, we’re going to be OK—we have the capacity to deal with the [Cal-Adapt] low-emissions scenario.” Health impacts are one reason

these climate changes are so troubling. The increase in extreme heat days alone is projected to increase cases of nausea, dizziness, stroke, dehydration and heat exhaustion, according to the assessment. Sherry Morgado, Butte County Public Health assistant director, told the task force her department is very concerned about the impact on vulnerable populations, such as the elderly, children, people with chronic illnesses (e.g., diabetes), those who work outdoors, homeless individuals and low-income families. Morgado is already on board to help create an extreme-heat preparedness plan for Chico next year with the next CivicSpark fellow. Another major health concern is wildfires, which release harmful pollutants; increased exposure will lead to more cases of asthma, cardiovascular disease, bronchitis and congestive heart failure. Reduced staffing of the county and city fire departments only adds to the growing concern about fire safety, Stemen said. Of course, the impacts of climate change are also felt by other living beings. Plants are expected to become prone to disease and overwhelmed by invasive species. Woodlands and animals in the foothills will be at extreme risk of catastrophic wildfires as well. Flooding can distribute hazardous pollutants, degrading ecosystems. Reduced water flows, diversion for agriculture and warmer water temperatures can cause stress on fish, insects, crustaceans and other animals. Species such as chinook salmon eventually may no longer be able to mate and spawn. Chico’s vernal pools may never recover. “The seasons are getting longer

and the resources are getting fewer. It makes planning all the more important and valuable,” Stemen said. “All of these [projections] are not an ‘if’ but a ‘when’ kind of thing.” After Marcussen’s fellowship ends, a new CivicSpark fellow will continue the momentum. In fact, that’s similar to how Marcussen got the ball rolling: She built off of research from a Chico State community service geography course, taught by Stemen, which dove into the same climate projections. (See “Beyond the grade,” Greenways, Dec. 17.) Marcussen is aware that her incomplete assessment is quite bleak, but she’s confident that “we’re going to be able to get through this.” The city already has some plans underway, ahead of her full report. A good example is the urban forester’s mission of planting 700 trees citywide in the next three years. (See “Power Planting,” Greenways, May 17.) “It is an investment, but it’s an investment for our lives and our infrastructure,” Marcussen said, “to keep people in Chico.” Ω

ECO EVENT

BIKES AND BANDS! Two of our favorite things converge during the annual Chico Bicycle Music Festival. The Saturday, June 9, event kicks off with Wolfthump at the downtown farmers’ market at 11 a.m. before a critical mass of cyclists heads to Bidwell Park, with on-bike performances from Scout and Cameron Ford. Later, ride to The End of Normal (2500 Estes Road) at 2 p.m. to enjoy food trucks, games and more bands, including Severance Package, XDS and Black Fong. For more info, go to becnet.org.


EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS PHOTO BY CATHY WAGNER

15 MINUTES

THE GOODS

Hemp is here

Pho Le’s crab boil Ta Le and Anh Tran have been serving authentic Vietnamese food in Chico since August 2016, when they opened Pho Le. Just last month, they partnered with close family friend Tony Le (pictured— no relation) from Sacramento to expand, opening Wild Casian Crawfish and Seafood. “Casian” is a play on words combining Cajun and Asian, and the food is a similar combination of flavors. The cuisines may at first seem divergent, but Le and Tran’s 21-year-old daughter, Laura Le (also pictured), says they are not as unrelated as one might think; Casian, she says, is like American Vietnamese. Indeed, it grew out of the kitchens of Vietnamese refugees in Texas and Louisiana. Both Laura and her older brother James work at the restaurant with their parents, which adds to the family feel of the place. Don’t let the new signage fool you—it’s all under one roof and all the food is being cooked in one kitchen by Ta and Tran. Wild Casian isn’t the only thing new at Pho Le; they also knocked down a wall and built a bar in the back, where they now serve beer and wine. Laura recently sat down with the CN&R to explain the concept. For more, find Pho Le on Facebook or visit 2201 Pillsbury Road in the Almond Orchard shopping center.

What sets Vietnamese food apart from other Asian cuisines? You know how Chinese food is like a lot of things that are fried in oil—we have a lot of veggies that are incorporated. There are a lot of greens and a lot of color in Vietnamese food, as opposed to Chinese food.

How did you decide to add Casian food? I think [my parents] wanted to add on something else, something more to it so we could have more options. Also, Tony has family with a Casian restaurant in Texas.

So, Casian is a fusion of Cajun and Asian flavors? [It] comes from Vietnamese people in Louisiana, and it kind of fuses those things together. We incorporate our Asian flavors into the Cajun-style seafood. Have you ever seen a seafood [boil] that’s just dumped on the table and eaten? Basically it’s that, but we incorporate our Asian flavors into it.

So, you dump the seafood on the table? It will come in either a bowl or a bag, depending on how much you get, and then our table will be covered with paper and some people just dump the whole thing on the table and start eating it.

Who is your clientele? We get people of all kinds. I feel like we have almost the entire Vietnamese community in Chico, which is not that big but there is one, and you can see them in Pho Le. They come out and support us a lot. A lot of college kids come in. There’s actually a lot of regulars that come in, too, people who come in on a daily basis. —CATHY WAGNER

by

Meredith J. Cooper meredithc@newsreview.com

Some people may not realize that, aside from providing a framework for legalizing the sale, etc., of cannabis for adult use, Proposition 64 also opened the door for hemp products, formerly forbidden for sale in California. Know what that also means? Oils, tinctures, capsules and all manner of other hemp and CBD products—which do not contain THC, meaning they won’t get you high—are now free to be sold here. The first company to fully jump into the Chico market (there are a few other places that sell hemp products) is Hempful Farms. Based in Phoenix, the business sells its products in stores across the country. The Chico shop—on Cohasset Road, next to Sushi Burrito King—was opened by the owners of the Phoenix store, Chris and Andi Martin, and is managed by Andi’s cousin Chelsea Smith, a yoga instructor in town, and her uncle Rick Killingsworth. The grand opening was last week (June 1), and I popped in to check it out. There are a few display cases filled with products, a shelf with some samplers and racks with a selection of hempwear like purses and T-shirts. Smith was super friendly and happy to explain the concept. First and foremost, they offer natural treatments for ailments such as pain, anxiety and inflammation. Also for sale: products for pets, under the moniker Paw Puddy. Smith also hopes to become an information center for people to learn more about hemp. The store is celebrating Hemp Awareness Week this week (June 4-10) with product giveaways and speakers.

ANOTHER FAREWELL May 31 marked the end for Enjoy Teriyaki, Chico’s only Korean restaurant. I got a tip about the closure and was able to swing by for one final bowl of bibimbap, and I chatted briefly with owner John Chuen, quite possibly the smiliest, sweetest shop owner in town. He informed me that he’s ready to retire. He plans to move back to Chicago, which he called home before moving to Yuba City decades ago. He opened Enjoy Teriyaki in 2013. Anyone ready to fill the Korean cuisine void? Bring it! CARE TO GAMBLE? I stopped in to Quackers Fire Grill and Bar last week after seeing

a new sign added to the street marquee advertising Casino Chico “coming soon.” Sure enough, the place is in the full swing of construction. A sign warns patrons that Crystal Billiards—the pool bar that shares Quackers’ building—will be closed on Sundays and Mondays while they finish the work. They’re hoping to open Casino Chico this month.

KUDOS Apollo Olive Oil, out of Oregon House, wins awards frequently for its variety of oils and vinegars. Well, 2018 has been a good year for them. Their oils have won four gold medals so far, for its Sierra and Gold series oils in competitions ranging from the California State Fair to the New York International Olive Oil Competition, the most recent. Nice job, Apollo. Keep up the good work.

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CN&R

15


Golden State v. Trump

Much at stake in California’s battle against administration efforts to weaken land, sea and air protections by

Julie Cart

T

he punch-counterpunch sparring between the Trump administration and the state of California over rollbacks of federal environmental regulations is often described as a war of words, with neither the president nor Gov. Jerry Brown giving an inch. Some of the disputes are largely symbolic—foot-stamping gestures from Washington designed to resonate with the president’s core supporters rather than to hold up in court. But the latest skirmish is serious.

About this story:

It was produced by Cal Matters, an independent public journalism venture covering California state politics and government. Learn more at calmatters.org.

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The federal Environmental Protection Agency’s decision to unravel fuel-efficiency standards for cars and light trucks not only threatens California’s autonomy in setting its own emissions limits but also could derail the state’s ability to reach its future greenhousegas-reduction goals. “This is a politically motivated effort to weaken clean-vehicle standards with no documentation, evidence or law to back up that decision,” Mary Nichols, chairwoman of the state Air Resources Board, said in a statement. “This is not a technical assessment; it is a move to demolish the nation’s clean-car program. EPA’s action, if implemented, will

worsen people’s health with degraded air quality and undermine regulatory certainty for automakers.” The gauntlet was thrown down by EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt, a darling of the Trump administration for his zeal in dismantling Obama-era environmental regulations. Even though Pruitt is the target of multiple investigations for alleged ethical transgressions and has found his job security in question, the effect of his current decisions can resonate far beyond his or his boss’ terms in office. “There have been some


troubling developments,” said Deborah Sivas, director of the Environmental Law Clinic at Stanford Law School. “But I think a lot of this is ultimately not going to happen.”

Putting the brakes on fuel efficiency Sivas said an attack on the fuel-efficiency standard is one of the critical fights for California, which must drastically reduce emissions from the state’s enormous transportation sector to stay on track in cutting carbon. At issue are miles-per-gallon standards set near the end of the Obama administration. They require an average 45.4 miles per gallon by 2022 and more than 50 miles per gallon by 2025. Standards differ by vehicle type and are stricter for cars than for SUVs and light trucks. Chester France, the former EPA senior

executive who directed the office that crafted the regulations, termed the fuel-standard rule solid. France, who retired in 2012, said the benchmarks were the product of rigorous technical research and vetting with federal agencies, the California air board and car manufacturers. The rule was reviewed again during the last days of the Obama administration and determined to be reasonable. “The mid-term review was thorough and found that advances in auto-industry technology meant that meeting the standards was easier and cheaper than EPA had predicted,” France said. “It concluded that the standards were attainable, and, if anything, they could have gone further.” Pruitt called the current regulations inappropriate, saying they “set the standards too high.” He said his agency and

the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration would revisit them, but he has not yet announced any proposed changes. Some insiders say a draft document has been submitted that calls for scrapping the next adjustment, scheduled to take effect after 2022. In explaining its rationale, the EPA has dusted off a decades-old analysis that suggests lighter, more fuel-efficient cars are not substantial enough to withstand crashes and thus pose a danger to drivers. Federal and state crash tests disprove that, but Sivas said she anticipates similar arguments. The state is pushing back hard. Brown, during a recent visit to Washington, told reporters that the rollback is “not going to happen, and the attempts to do this are going to be bogged down in litigation long after we have a new president.” Last month, California filed its 32nd lawsuit against the Trump administration, asserting that in preparing to change the

A dozen other states have adopted California’s [emissions] standards; together, that coalition represents more than a third of the national auto market. emission standards, the EPA is violating the Clean Air Act and failing to follow its own regulations. In announcing the suit, which 16 other states and the District of Columbia have joined, Brown conjured images of floods and wildfires ravaging the state as greenhouse gases warm the planet. “This is real stuff,” he said. “I intend to fight this as hard as I can.” In addition to rolling back mileage requirements, Pruitt has signaled that he PROTECTIONS C O N T I N U E D

O N PA G E 1 8

Flanked by EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt (center) and Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke, President Trump in March 2017 signed an executive order that, among other things, intructs the EPA to roll back many Obama-era climate change policies. PHOTO COURTESY OF U.S. DEPT. OF INTERIOR

J U N E 7, 2 0 1 8

CN&R

17


PROTECTIONS C O N T I N U E D

F R O M PA G E 1 7

Deborah Sivas, director of Stanford University’s Environmental Law Clinic, says California’s battle with the EPA over the fuel-efficiency standard is critical. PHOTO COURTESY OF STANFORD LAW SCHOOL

may revoke California’s legal authority to establish its own emissions standards, independent of federal benchmarks. A dozen other states have adopted California’s standards; together, that coalition represents more than a third of the national auto market. “California is not the arbiter of these issues,” Pruitt said in a television interview in March. While the state may set its own limits on greenhouse-gas emissions, he said, it “shouldn’t and can’t dictate to the rest of the country.” California’s right to request a waiver from federal clean-air laws is well established and, legal experts say, the burden would be high for the administration to convince a court that there is a compelling reason to change the longstanding policy. Pruitt recently told lawmakers in Washington that his agency was engaged in talks with California officials regarding proposed changes. California air board spokesman Stanley Young said the state has had three meetings with the EPA since December, adding: “Nothing substantive was discussed, so I wouldn’t characterize them as negotiations.” He said the board had not seen a final proposal, and no future meetings were scheduled. On Friday, Nichols tweeted to Pruitt: “Call me.”

Opening the coast to drilling Perhaps the most consequential of the administration’s many moves to expand domestic energy production

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is the Interior Department’s five-year plan to offer lease sales in federal waters off the outer continental shelf, including parcels where drilling has been banned for decades. That includes the California coast. The plan, announced by Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke, envisions drilling in the Arctic, off the Hawaiian coast and in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, as well as expanding existing exploration into the eastern Gulf of Mexico. The leasing is scheduled to begin in 2019 off the north coast of Alaska, then move to the lower 48 states, the agency said. Zinke said the leasing plans would expand the country’s energy independence. “This is the beginning of an opening up,” he said, promising that the months-long public comment period before enactment would include all stakeholders. “The states will have a voice.” Whose voice will be heeded may be another matter. Florida’s governor has already negotiated directly with President Trump to exempt his state from leasing. Even though Brown had a conversation with administration officials relaying California’s wish to be included in a similar exemption, no announcement has been made that would prevent drilling in federal waters off the coast. But this is one issue where the state may get its way, thanks to current market forces and a stubborn regulatory blockade. The oil and gas industries have shown little interest in exploring off the California coast, and the State Lands Commission has resolved to make it much more difficult and expensive for companies to get crude oil to land and into pipelines. The commission’s policy to prevent construction of onshore infrastructure does nothing to stop drilling but could

“This is real stuff. I intend to fight this as hard as I can.” —Gov. Jerry Brown

limit the volume of oil shipped at a time when the low price per barrel is already discouraging new exploration. Given those financial and logistical headaches, companies may take a pass. “A state like California is going to put its full force and resources on the line,” said Timothy O’Connor, a California-based attorney for the Environmental Defense Fund. “There’s still an element of local and state control, and we are going to defend our values to their very core. That’s certainly one of them.”

Rolling back air rules California has notched two victories over the Trump administration’s effort to undo a methane regulation instituted during Obama’s term. The Waste Prevention Rule was to have gone into effect in January 2017, regulating emissions of natural gas leaking from more than 100,000 oil and gas wells on public lands across the country. The federal Interior Department delayed enactment of the rule and was sued by California and New Mexico. The states prevailed. The agency then suspended part of the new rule and the two states sued again, winning in court once more. The victory has significant impact in California, home to vast, aging oil fields and energy infrastructure. Methane’s potent heat-trapping capacity makes it many times more damaging to the atmosphere than carbon dioxide. The state Air Resources Board recently limited methane coming from both new and existing oil and gas sources. Another win came in a suit the state joined after the EPA postponed implementation of yet another Obamaera rule aimed at combating smog. The “Ozone Rule” reduced allowable concentrations of ozone, a main component of smog. Pruitt ordered the EPA to extend the deadline to comply with the new standards by at least a year. Two days after California and 15 other states filed suit, Pruitt reversed his decision. The state also won a suit calling for federal transportation officials to monitor greenhouse-gas emissions along national highways, but the government is considering repealing the regulations. In another pending case, California and other states are suing the EPA to identify areas of the country with the most polluted air. In April, Trump weighed in, directing the EPA to relax restrictions on state governments and


ATTENTION LOCAL BUSINESS OWNERS: businesses that have been key to cutting smog. In a memo, the president instructed Pruitt to expedite review of state smog-reduction plans and streamline the process for businesses to get airquality-related permits. In addition, Trump ordered a review of other airquality regulations related to public health to determine whether they “should be revised or rescinded.” The agency said the directive was aimed at trimming costs and maximizing efficiency.

Dropping protection for water In an effort to more precisely define which bodies of water are covered under federal law, the Obama administration adopted a rule in 2015 that effectively expanded the number of protected waterways, including springs and floodplains that appear for only part of the year. The idea was to safeguard both water quality and water quantity, and to put an end to the time-consuming practice of determining status on a case-by-case basis. The U.S. Supreme Court had already weighed in, but the high court’s definitions of the “waters of the United States” failed to provide adequate clarification. The Obama definition-stretching rules were strenuously opposed by developers, who said they swept up much of the undeveloped land in California, including wetlands. Soon after Trump came into office, the EPA launched a review of the rule, and then got rid of it. In February, California sued the EPA and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, which signs off on development permits in protected wetlands. The legal case is still pending, but Sivas said the Trump administration is doing an end-run by requiring the Army Corps to run all permit requests through Washington, rather than making those determinations in regional offices. By centralizing the decisionmaking, Sivas said, political appointees can circumvent scientific and legal analysis performed by field offices and determine the outcome based on other factors. “My guess is they are going to say [to developers], ‘You don’t need a permit,’” she said. Ω

Best of

Chico

VOTING IS COMING! The CN&R is designing Best of Chico Posters with a QR code that links directly to the Official Best of Chico 2018 online ballot. It’s the perfect way to remind your customers that it’s time to vote for you, their favorite! This 11x17 poster will be available at no cost to you. (Limit 2 per business)

DON’T MISS YOUR ONLY OPPORTUNITY TO RECEIVE POSTERS FOR THIS YEAR’S BEST OF CHICO CONTEST Mark your calendar to pick up your FREE posters at the CN&R office July 30–August 3, 9am-5pm BEST OF CHICO VOTING BEGINS THURSDAY, AUGUST 9 ONLINE

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CN&R

19


Arts &Culture Lynn Criswell’s “Clown Wall.” PHoTo by Jason Cassidy

THIS WEEK

e m i t n Clow is here

7

THu

Special Events MASTER GARDENER TOUR: Tour the Patrick Ranch Demonstration

A juxtaposition of dark and whimsical at new Snidle exhibit from the surprise at so much Tbeingcomescontained in such small quarters,

he power of the classic clown-car gag

and this is something that can also be said of the living-roomsize exhibit space at by James Snidle Fine Arts Carey Gallery. Wilson It’s basically Review: the front room of a Clowns & Portraits, Victorianesque house by Lynn Criswell, with a picture window shows through June 30 facing the street and Hours: Wed.-Fri., French doors providing 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; sat., ingress from an art9 a.m.-2:30 p.m. filled foyer. Currently, James Snidle the intimate space is Fine Arts overflowing with an 254 e. Fourth st. impressive collection 343-2930 from multimedia artist jamessnidle finearts.com Lynn Criswell—works explode across the walls, dangle from the ceiling and stand firmly in the middle of the floor. And there are also clowns. Declaring a whimsical, surreal and enigmatic power that a genuine artist can wring from such mundane sources as old grade-school photos, vintage plastic bird cages and images from old Saturday morning cartoons and ran-

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dom Americana, Criswell’s Clowns & Portraits exhibit superimposes and juxtaposes in ways that skillfully evoke a compendium of contradictory emotional and intellectual reactions. Opposite the foyer are those clowns, on the “Clown Wall.” Consisting of an array of layered ink-jet-printed images on Turkish felt, the clowns are placed in seemingly random, multi-angled discontinuity across the wall, evoking both the goofiness and scariness of clowns and welcoming you in to a circus of fascinatingly odd imagery. In front of the picture window, “Jack Robin,” the 3-D, cast-aluminum ringmaster of the exhibit, stands on one end of a narrow table laughing and facing a rustic birdhouse perched on a tree stump. He looks a lot like fiendishly cackling trickster Woody Woodpecker, but balancing his cartoon persona is a silhouette of a very realistic woodpecker cut from sheet lead and applied to the base of the sculpture. The “Portraits” of the exhibition are hung in simple, unglazed wooden frames. To create them, Criswell took photos from a set of 1965 fifth-grade school photos, enlarged them and printed them on Turkish felt, trimmed out the

silhouettes and then hand-stitched and superimposed assorted images over or onto the faces of the children. The results are both beautiful pieces of craftwork and imagination, and somewhat disconcerting reinterpretations of what were originally rather innocuous images. “The Boy With Fried Egg Eyes” stares blankly, the left quadrant of his torso spotted with craters, his irises formed from circles of the artist’s hair surrounded by crudely sketched yellow crayon to finish the fried egg look. Providing subtext to the clowns and portraits is the unstated but primary value of birds in Criswell’s work. Adding a surreal 3-D quality to the show are four Lucite 1950s birdcages—much like those featured in her “As the Crow Flies” installation in the Sacramento International Airport. Suspended on translucent thread from the gallery ceiling, the unoccupied clear plastic cages comment on the ways in which we imprison that which is beautiful, harmless and vulnerable, much like her alterations of the children’s photos force us to speculate on what actually became of those seemingly blameless, innocent children who sat in front of a camera 50 years ago. In other words, it’s a great show. Ω

Garden with founder Kay Perkins. Learn about sustainable garden practices, drought tolerant plants, hardscape installation, and how you can recreate the same functional beauty in your backyard. Advance registration required. Thu, 6/7, 10am & 1:30pm. Free. Patrick Ranch Museum, 10381 Midway, Durham. 530-538-7201.

PURPLE RIBBON PROJECT: You’re invited to write the name of someone you know affected by Alzheimer’s on a purple ribbon, then tie it to the Purple Ribbon Project exhibit presented by the Alzheimer’s Association. Thu, 6/7, 5pm. Free. 150 Amber Grove Drive, Ste. 154, 530-895-9661.

Theater ENCHANTED APRIL: Set on a remote Italian island, this romantic musical comedy follows four Englishwomen looking for an escape from their monotonous lives. During their Mediterranean adventure, the ladies fall under the spell of their sun-drenched surroundings as they struggle to reconcile their normal lives and relationships with the beauty around them. TOTR’s production will transport you to a far off land. A little change could do you good. Thu, 6/7, 7:30pm. $16-$20. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Road, Paradise. totr.org

enCHanTed aPRiL Through June 24 Theatre on the Ridge

see THuRsday-sunday, THEATER


JUNGLE BOOK

FINE ARTS ON NEXT PAGE

Friday, June 8-Sunday, June 10 CUSD Center for the Arts SEE FRIDAY-SUNDAY, THEATER

Patrick Ranch Museum, 10381 Midway, Durham. patrickranchmuseum.org

Music CELEBRATION GOSPEL CHOIR CONCERT: The Celebration Gospel Choir of Chico invites the public to attend its “Community Celebration of Love” concert, directed by Dr. Pedro Douglas and Robert Morton. The choir will present a variety of gospel songs, both traditional spirituals and more modern choral works. Donations welcome. Sat, 6/9, 3pm. Free. Bethel AME Church, 821 Linden Ave. 530-513-1565.

CHICO BICYCLE MUSIC FESTIVAL: The completely

FOOTLOOSE: Let’s hear it for the boy! Of all the great ’80s dance movies, only one featured the late Chris Penn as a country boy who learned to shake a tail feather. We’re not sure how that role translates in the musical version of Footloose, but we’re excited to find out. Kick off your Sunday shoes for this high-energy theatrical production from the Chico Theater Company. Thu, 6/7, 7:30pm. $16-$22. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. (530) 894-3282. chico theatercompany.com

8

FRI

Special Events CHICO ELKS YARD SALE: The Chico Elks Ladies hold their annual community yard sale. Tons of stuff for sale, plus coffee, donuts, hotdogs and lemonade in the Elks backyard under the shade trees. Fri, 6/8, 4pm. Free. Chico Elks Lodge, 1705 Manzanita Ave. 530-519-3366. chicoelks.com

FRUGAL HOUSE: A showcase for local decorators and artists, this stylish event features loads of DIY inspiration with individually designed rooms to peruse. Friday night’s preview party ($40) includes live music, hors d’oeuvres and your first chance for shopping. Saturday’s open house ($15) provides more opportunities to tour the rooms and shop. Frugal House is a fundraiser for the North State Symphony in partnership with Epick Homes. Fri, 6/8, 6pm. $15-$40. 2855 Silkwood Way. 530-898-6692. northstate symphony.org

TRI-TIP DRIVE-THRU: Smoked meats to help fight smoked trees during this Butte County Fire Safe Council fundraiser. Fri, 6/8. $20. Atria Paradise, 1007 Buschmann Road, Paradise.

Music TIM FLANNERY & THE LUNATIC FRINGE: Former San Diego Padres player and S.F. Giants coach, Flannery has always been an avid musician. Now retired from the MLB, he spends his days writing tunes and touring with his acoustic band. A benefit for KZFR and Love Harder Project. Fri, 6/8, 6:30pm. $25. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St. 530-895-0706. kzfr.org

Theater ENCHANTED APRIL: See Thursday. Fri, 6/8, 7:30pm. $16-$20. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Rd., Paradise. totr.org

FOOTLOOSE: See Thursday. Fri, 6/8, 7:30pm. $16$22. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. 530-894-3282. chicotheatercompany. com

THE JUNGLE BOOK: Interpretive dance adaptation of Rudyard Kiplings’s classic story, created by Mandie Burson of Kinetics Academy of Dance. Fri, 6/8, 5:30pm. $14-$18. CUSD Center for the Arts, 1475 East Ave. kineticsacademyofdance.com

9

SAT

Special Events BLOCK PARTY WITH A PURPOSE: A community cleanup designed to bring neighbors together and make a positive difference in the community and our waterways. You bring boots and gloves, Butte Environmental Council provides the tools and knowhow. Sat 6/9, 9am. Teichert Ponds; meet Behind Kohl’s. 530-891-6424. becnet.org

CHICO ELKS YARD SALE: See Friday. Sat 6/9, 7am. Free. Chico Elks Lodge, 1705 Manzanita Ave. 530-519-3366. chicoelks.com

FRUGAL HOUSE: See Friday. Sat 6/9, 10am. $15$40. 2855 Silkwood Way. 530-898-6692. northstatesymphony.org

JOHN DOYLE Thursday, June 7

SEE THURSDAY, MUSIC

Theater ENCHANTED APRIL: See Thursday. Sat, 6/9, 7:30pm. $16-$20. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Rd., Paradise. totr.org

FOOTLOOSE: See Thursday. Sat, 6/9, 7:30pm. $16$22. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. 530-894-3282. chicotheatercompany. com

Theater ENCHANTED APRIL: See Thursday. Sun, 6/10, 2pm. $16-$20. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Rd., Paradise. totr.org

FOOTLOOSE: See Thursday. Sun, 6/10, 2pm. $16$22. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. 530-894-3282. chicotheatercompany. com

THE JUNGLE BOOK: See Friday. Sun, 6/10, 2pm. $14-$18. CUSD Center for the Arts, 1475 East Ave. kineticsacademyofdance.com

THE SANDLOT: See Friday. Sun, 6/10, 2pm. $6. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. bgcnv.org

12

TUE

Music NICKI BLUHM: Ex-Grambler’s solo career takes flight with a new album reflecting on a turbulent time in her personal life. It’s poppier and funkier thaN her previous work, with her stellar vocals shining through on every track. Mapache open the show with country-tinged tunes à la Gene Clark or The Byrds. Tue, 6/12, 8pm. $30. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St. sierranevada.com

THE JUNGLE BOOK: See Friday. Sat 6/9, 5:30pm. $14-$18. CUSD Center for the Arts, 1475 East Ave. kineticsacademyofdance.com

THE SANDLOT: See Friday. Sat, 6/9, 7:30pm. $6. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. bgcnv.org

FOR MORE MUSIC, SEE NIGHTLIFE ON PAGE 24

GRAND GLAM GARDEN PARTY: Chico History Museum’s big fundraiser features a delicious buffet dinner, barbecue tri-tip and chicken, tasty side dishes and salads, watermelon and a no-host bar. Attend historical lectures, take a tour of the mansion and enjoy live music. Dress it up for this glamorous event. Sat 6/9. $55. Little Chapman Mansion, 256 E. 12th St. chicohistory museum.org

MOVIES IN THE PARK: Enjoy a family movie under the stars when CARD screens Sing in Bidwell Park. Bring a blanket and lowback chairs and picnic stuff. Free popcorn and hot dogs available while supplies last. Film starts at dusk. Sat, 6/9, 8:30pm. Free. Sycamore Field, Lower Bidwell Park., 530895-4711. chicorec.com

OLD FASHIONED COUNTRY FAIRE: All kinds of farm and ranch activities and demonstrations including a tractor and draft horse parade, wheat harvest, tram rides, farmhouse tours, blacksmithing and more. Sat 6/9. $2-$5.

THE SANDLOT: The Boys & Girls Clubs of the North Valley’s Triple Threats program presents a theatrical adaptation of the classic coming-of-age story. Can a team of rag-tag baseball players come together to defeat a beast in order to get back a signed Babe Ruth baseball? Fri, 6/8, 7:30pm. $6. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. bgcnv.org

pedal-powered event kicks off at 11am at Third St. & Flume St. with Wolfthump, followed by a bike parade to Cedar Grove (noon) in Bidwell Park and finally to The End of Normal (2pm) where you’ll find games, food trucks and more live music from Severance Package, Black Fong and More. Sat, 6/9, 11am. Free. The End of Normal, 2500 Estes Road. becnet.org

10

SUN

FREE LISTINGS! Post your event for free online at www. newsreview.com/calendar, or email the CN&R calendar editor at cnrcalendar@newsreview.com. Deadline for print listings is Wednesday, 5 p.m., one week prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

EDITOR’S PICK

BLOOMING Nicki Bluhm’s connection to Chico is partly through her ex-husband and former bandmate Tim Bluhm (Mother Hips), so perhaps it’s fitting to play the Sierra Nevada Big Room immediately after the release of her cathartic solo debut To Rise You Gotta Fall. A deeply personal recording, there are plenty of lows, but it’s the soaring peaks that convey her resolve and rebirth. Recorded in Memphis at the legendary Sam Phillips Recording studio, the record shimmers with strings and a ’70s palette, occupying the same sonic space as Dusty Springfield’s masterpiece Dusty in Memphis. Los Angeles duo Mapache open the show on Tuesday, June 12, with a sunny, psych-pop vibe reminiscent of The Flying Burrito Bros. J U N E 7, 2 0 1 8

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Art

Museums

HEALING ART GALLERY, ENLOE CANCER CENTER:

BUTTE COUNTY HISTORICAL MUSEUM: WWI

Ernest King, mixed media paintings by Northern California artist. Through 7/20. Free. 265 Cohasset Road, 530-332-3856.

JAMES SNIDLE FINE ARTS GALLERY: Clowns & Portraits, Lynn Criswell’s multiple-medium art works. Through 6/30. Free. 254 E. Fourth St., 530-343-2930. jamessnidlefinearts.com

MUSEUM OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA ART: Persistence, featuring impressive works by 60 female artists from Northern California including Ann Pierce and the late Claudia Steel. Through 7/15. 900 Esplanade.

ORLAND ART CENTER: The American West: A Way of Life, Oregon photographer Tracy Libby tells the story of the American West through her sepia tones, stark black-and-white images and brilliant color work. Through 7/21. 732 Fourth St., Orland. orlandartcenter.com

PARADISE ART CENTER: Water Media, watercolor,

220 Meyers St Chico (530) 895–1271 22

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J u n e 7, 2 0 1 8

acrylics and mixed water media in a variety of styles including abstract and realistic, colorful and monochromatic. Through 6/30. Free. 5564 Almond St., Paradise. paradiseart-center.com

Exhibition, recently renovated exhibits demonstrating the profound changes in American society caused by The Great War. Through 7/29. 1749 Spencer Ave., Oroville.

CHICO CREEK NATURE CENTER: Permanent Exhibits, including the The Janeece Webb Living Animal Museum and the Nature Play Room. Through 12/15. 1968 E. Eighth St. ccnaturecenter.org

GATEWAY SCIENCE MUSEUM: Summer Exhibits, learn how our climate catastrophe is affecting the acidification of the oceans and changing California’s wildflower blooms, plus life beneath the sea with coral reefs and hammerhead sharks. Through 9/8. $5-$7. 625 Esplanade. csuchico.edu


MUSIC

Summer special

Lone Knight

41music Any kids meal Chico-to-Seattle transplant seeks enlighten-

Lone Knight $5.00

ment on debut solo album.

Chico-to-Seattle transplant seeks enon debut solo album expireslightenment 6/30/18 image in production 2365 Esplanade, Chico / 530-895-9607 Sunday & Monday 11–8 / tuesday - Saturday 11-9

Former Mondegreens singer/ guitarist Jack Knight. PHOTO BY NATHAN MCKEEVER

Chico-to-Seattle transplant seeks enlightenment on debut solo album who made their mark locally before relocating to TSeattle in May 2015. But while co-founder Jack Knight he Mondegreens were Chico-bred indie-folk rockers

said he enjoyed gigging in Seattle and recording music, his bandmates preferred the road life. Knight left The Mondegreens on amiby Howard Hardee cable terms in late 2016. Suddenly, the singer/songwriter/ guitarist was a solo artist. He built Preview: a mini-studio in his bedroom and Jack Knight album- spent months writing, engineering, release on Friday, recording and mixing new songs June 8, 8:30 p.m. that would become Some for Jack, Solar Estates opens. $8 cover Some for Jesus, his debut solo album released on April 26. Though the DIY The Maltese approach was a valuable lesson in all 1600 Park Ave. facets of the music-making process, 343-4915 maltesebarchico.com Knight discovered some drawbacks as well. “When you’re focusing on the engineering and production, those technical aspects of album-making, you have less bandwidth for the musical aspects,” he said. “I definitely struggled with that, giving a good musical performance but also deciding which microphone I was going to use and all of the other 10,000 little decisions that are made by an engineer. I took those on, too. I’m proud of what I accomplished by myself, but moving forward I’d rather hire and work with really good people that I trust.” During the recording process, Knight didn’t hold back in terms of auxiliary instrumentation; layers of keyboard and strings add color and texture throughout the album. But the record’s strength is in the backbone of bass, drums and guitar, which contribute to a sound

that’s an extension of the folk-rock/California-soul approach of Knight’s former band. He eventually recruited a drummer and bass player to fill out the sound and added overdubs at MRX Studio in Seattle. “I knew I wanted a pretty lean live band; I wanted a trio,” he said. “I tried to emphasize that throughout the process so it could be replicated live in an exciting way. Those guys help on vocals and I used guitar effects to kind of flesh out each song.” Lyrically, the album references Knight’s Catholic upbringing and the contradictions he’s encountered while striving for a moral ideal in the modern world. “I’m kind of grappling between these two disparate entities,” he said. “The Catholic church is a far cry from the lives we lead in America today, it seems like. So that cropped up in the lyrics a lot, this question of, ‘What does it mean to be good today? What does that look like in action? What does it look like to be bad?’” Following the Some for Jack, Some for Jesus tour, Knight intends to build on the connections he’s made since moving to Seattle. His vision involves recording and mixing albums and working as a session musician for other artists. He’ll keep working on solo material, but expects to take his time creating his next album. “I really want to nail something down I think that’s better than what I’ve done before,” he said. And as long as he’s in Seattle, he plans to keep his eye on what he considers the big prize—airplay on Seattle’s powerhouse public radio station, KEXP, which highlights rising and established indie-rock acts. “I’m going to pester them as much as I can,” he said. “That’s kind of my big plan. If you get airplay, you get offered a lot of new gigs. … You do what you can to get noticed.” □

Email marEnwisE@gmail.com or call 530.570-4313 300 Broadway Suite A4 · Chico · Tue – SAT 11 – 8 or Sold ouT

DINNER IN THE GARDEN

SATuRDAy, juNE 16, 2018 SIERRA NEVADA BREWING CO. 1075 E. 20TH ST., CHICO. TICKETS ON SALE NOW! $75 AVAILABLE IN THE GIFT SHOP OR ONLINE AT WWW.SIERRANEVADA.COM/BIGROOM MuST BE 21+ TO ATTEND THE EVENT

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NIGHTLIFE

THuRSDAY 6/7—WeDneSDAY 6/13

BIG BuSIneSS, ARMeD FOR APOCALYPSe & PInS OF LIGHT Tonight, June 7 Chico Women’s Club

L.A. hip-hop crew are storming the gates with their debut mixtape, the oh-so cleverly titled “ShorelineDoThatShit.” Opening sets by Salah and Yoseb Starz. Thu, 6/7, 9pm. $20-$50. El Rey Theater, 230 W. Second St.

SOUL POSSE: Fun dance music on the

BIG BUSINESS: Monster duo featuring drummer Coady Willis (Murder City Devils) and bassist Jared Warren (Karp). Super rad pummeling stuff. S.F.’s Pins of Light and Chico’s Armed for Apocalypse open. Thu, 6/7, 7pm. $15. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St.

JOHN DOYLE: Traditional Irish musician and a fabulous guitarist, Doyle makes a special stop in Chico for

KELLY TWINS ACOUSTIC: Jon and Chris dust off some old favorites with an acoustic evening of “living room” music. Thu, 6/7, 6pm. Two Twenty Restaurant, 220 W. Fourth St.

JOHN SEID, LARRY PETERSON & STEVE COOK: An eclectic mix of dinner

LAMBSTOCK KICKOFF PARTY: Local

SHORELINE MAFIA: Brash, young

7THuRSDAY

Jesus. Solar Estates opens the show. Fri, 6/8, 9pm. $8. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

music. Fri, 6/8, 6:30pm. Two Twenty Restaurant, 220 W. Fourth St.

See THuRSDAY

this backyard show. He formed the supergroup Solas in the ’90s and has had a storied solo career, working with a who’s-who list of Irish performers, touring with Joan Baez and performing for President Obama on St. Patrick’s Day in 2009. Thu, 6/7, 7pm. $20. Call Pullins Cyclery for details and tickets: 530-342-1055.

47-STRInG SORCeReSS

patio, plus yummy burgers and Mexican food. Thu, 6/7, 6pm. Free. Mike’s Grande Burger, 2896 Olive Highway, Oroville., 530-828-8040.

8FRIDAY

THE CRIPPLE CREEK BAND: Southern

rock and country in the plaza. Fri, 6/8, 7pm. Free. Chico Downtown Plaza, 132 W. Fourth St.

JACK KNIGHT BAND: Chico dude returns home, touring on his debut solo album, Some for Jack, Some for

music fest opens downtown this year with Birds Of Fortune (Derek Brooker & Sean Lehe), plus Jon Trafton (Strangefolk) and friends. Fri, 6/8, 9pm. $7. Lost on Main, 319 Main St. lostonmainchico.com

LOOKING 4 ELEVEN: Classic rock tribute act plays Aerosmith, Skynyrd, Floyd, Stones and more. Fri, 6/8, 9pm. Free. White Water Saloon, 5571 Clark Road, Paradise, 530-877-7100.

All harpists are wizards. Not just because the instrument found popularity in medieval times when Merlin was running around doing spells, but due to the level of musicianship it takes to make one sound good. Mary Lattimore’s redolent new record is at once ethereal and grounded, conjuring ancient emotions and bringing them into the present day. The exquisite harpist has worked with Thurston Moore, Sharon Van Etten, Jarvis Cocker and Nick Cave, and we get to see her this Sunday, June 10, at Tender Loving Coffee with Donald Beaman and Scott Elder.

OVERDRIVE: Classic rock tribute

act. Fri, 6/8, 8pm. Unwined Kitchen & Bar, 980 Mangrove Ave.

TIM FLANNERY & THE LUNATIC FRINGE:

PURPLE XPERIENCE: Prince tribute act checks all the right boxes: from Minneapolis, frontman bears an uncanny likeness and two musicians played with the Purple One (guitarist Tracey Blake and keyboardist Cory Eischen were both with the New Power Generation). Fri, 6/8, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfallscasino.com

Former San Diego Padres player and S.F. Giants coach, Flannery has always been an avid musician. Now retired from the MLB, he spends his days writing tunes and touring with his acoustic band. Benefit for KZFR and Love Harder Project. Fri, 6/8, 6:30pm. $25. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St., 530-895-0706. kzfr.org

9SATuRDAY

BUCK FORD: Nashville recording

artist and young country sensa-

tion returns to the Box. Sat, 6/9, 9pm. $6-$12. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave.

COMEDY NIGHY: Rachel Myles and Becky Lynn host a lineup of comics from San Francisco, Sacramento

? t e P e t u C

Prove it!

Visit Chico News & Review’s Facebook page and reply to the pet-contest post with a photo of Scrappy, Silly or Sam— and get your friends to “Like” your pic!

DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSION: JUNE 27, 9 A.M.

facebook.com/ChicoNewsandReview 24

CN&R

J u n e 7, 2 0 1 8


THIS WEEK: FIND MORE ENTERTAINMENT AND SPECIAL EVENTS ON PAGE 20 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfallscasino.com

RADIO RELAPSE RAGES: Yeah, it’s just another bombtrack... The band performs a full Rage Against the Machine set, plus opening act Shadow of Crows. Sat, 6/9, 8:30pm. $7. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave. maltesebarchico.com

10SUNDAY

BRYCE! SCOUT! FOX!: Solo performers

shake things up. Sun, 6/10, 6pm. $3. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

JOHN SEID & LARRY PETERSON:

and around town. Sat, 6/9, 8pm. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St.

DRIVER: Rock ’n’ roll trio from

TIM FLANNERY & THE LUNATIC FRINGE Friday, June 8 Chico Women’s Club SEE FRIDAY

Paradise plays the lounge. Sat, 6/9, 8:30pm. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfallscasino.com

JOHN SEID, LARRY PETERSON & STEVE COOK: An eclectic mix of dinner

music. Sat, 6/9, 6:30pm. Two Twenty Restaurant, 220 W. Fourth St.

LOOKING 4 ELEVEN: See Friday. Sat, 6/9,

An eclectic mix of music for dinner. Sun, 6/10. 5th Street Steakhouse, 345 W. Fifth St.

MARY LATTIMORE: Magical harpist uses loop pedal to create otherworldly tunes, plus sets from Donald Beaman and Scott Elder. Sun, 6/10, 7pm. $8. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

funkier that her previous work, with her stellar vocals shining through on every track. Mapache open the show with country-tinged tunes Ă la Gene Clark or The Byrds. Tue, 6/12, 8pm. $30. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St. sierranevada.com

13WEDNESDAY

BASS HEAVY WEDNESDAY: Trap, dubstep and EDM with AZ RedSmoke, Weezy, Shiner, Trippy Mayne and more DJs. Wed, 6/13, 9pm. $5-$7. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave. maltesebarchico.com

BLUES JAM: Upper River Blues Society performs by the river to help raise money for Inspire School of Arts & Sciences. Wed, 6/13, 6pm. Scotty’s Landing, 12609 River Road.

DUFFY’S DANCE NIGHT: DJ Lois and Amburgers spin funk, pop and hip-hop. Wed, 6/13, 10pm. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St.

OPEN MIKEFULL: At Paradise’s only 9pm. Free. White Water Saloon, 5571 Clark Road, Paradise, 530-877-7100.

PYROMANIA: Let’s get rocked! Def Leppard tribute act pours out all the sugar. Sat, 6/9, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3

12TUESDAY

NICKI BLUHM: Ex-Grambler’s solo

open mic, all musicians get two songs or 10 minutes onstage. Wed, 6/13, 7pm. $1-$2. Norton Buffalo

KILLIN’ IT IN THE NAME OF

Radio Relapse is restless. Not content with playing the same mix-tape sets on repeat, the Chico cover band mixes things up by tackling classic albums and artists for one-off theme nights. Past special tributes have included re-creating Nirvana’s Nevermind and Blink 182’s Enema of the State, and this summer the band takes a swing at the bomb tracks of Rage Against the Machine for a string of dates across Nor Cal. First up is this Saturday, June 9, at The Maltese. Here’s hoping frontman Matt “The Coach� Sutter has been practicing his “Unh!�

Hall, 5704 Chapel Drive, Paradise, 530-877-4995.

career takes flight with a new album reflecting on a turbulent time in her personal life. It’s poppier and

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CN&R

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REEL WORLD FILM SHORTS Reviewers: Bob Grimm and Juan-Carlos Selznick.

Opening this week Hereditary

Toni Collette stars in this much-anticipated horror flick about a family uncovering disturbing family secrets upon the death of the matriarch. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated R.

Hotel Artemis

Drew Pierce, creator of the British superhero comedy series No Heroes, directs Jodi Foster as a nurse presiding over a members-only hospital for criminals in a dystopian near-future Los Angeles. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated R.

Ocean’s 8

This time, an all-female crew of specialist thieves teams up for a big heist. Starring Sandra Bullock, Rihanna, Cate Blanchett, Anne Hathaway, Mindy Kaling, Helena Bonham Carter, Sarah Paulson and Awkwafina. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

Cowboy up Cast of non-actors shines in intimate and ‘distinctively revelatory’ western

T

he Rider, the much-acclaimed film by Chloé Zhao, is both a wrenching experience and a heartening one. Key parts of its low-key brilliance come from mixtures of honesty, directness and intimacy that provide a plain-spoken sort of by emotional depth. Juan-Carlos The title character is Brady Selznick Blackburn, a young rodeo rider struggling to recover, physically and emotionally, from a severe and partially disabling injury suffered in rodeo action. Rodeo competition and horse training The Rider are at the core of his being, but Ends tonight, June 7. the injury curtails his involveStarring Brady, Tim and Lilly Jandreau. ment in those activities, at least Directed by Chloé in part, and so he is faced with Zhao. challenges to his own sense of Pageant Theatre. purpose and self-worth. Rated R. What results, in the hands of Zhao and her nonprofessional cast, is rewarding and complex in a number of quietly surprising ways. Brady’s thorny personal questing and his attachment to a couple of aging horses are central elements of the story, but his relationships with his family and with various pals in rodeo and ranching frequently drift back into the heart of the action as well. Zhao’s script is based on events in the life of Brady Jandreau, the real-life rodeo rider and horse trainer who plays “Brady Blackburn” in the film. Jandreau’s father, Tim, plays Blackburn’s dad (“Wayne” in the film), and his younger sister Lilly is sweetly unconventional as the title char-

5

26

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J U N E 7, 2 0 1 8

Pope Francis: A Man of His Word

acter’s sister. A number of Jandreau’s friends and colleagues (Cat Clifford, Tanner Langdeau, James Calhoon, Terri Dawn Pourier, etc.) appear as themselves, as does Lane Scott, a fearsomely disabled rodeo rider whom Brady views as a “big brother” and role model. Scott’s scenes with Brady are right at the heart of the film’s clashes of spiritual heroism and physical tragedy. Damaged bodies and resurgent souls seem to recur, but mainly in offhanded ways. Whatever its epiphanies, The Rider never preaches, never insists on big conclusions, foregone or otherwise. Zhao’s latter-day neo-realism (nonprofessional actors, use of actual locations, focus on everyday life, etc.) is very much in keeping with an approach to spiritual matters that values discovery over declamation. In that spirit, The Rider might also be viewed as a distinctively revelatory kind of western movie. It’s set and filmed in Pine Ridge territory in South Dakota, and the Jandreau family and many of their rodeo friends have Oglala Sioux lineage. Plus the exhortation to “Cowboy up!” clearly means a lot to Brady and others close to him. Of course, the phrase has a special sting for him and his variously stricken friends, but it also continues to be a genuine rallying call, even if requiring constant reinterpretation. Ω

1 2 3 4 Poor

Fair

Good

Very Good

5 Excellent

Director Wim Wenders (Wings of Desire) had total access to the leader of the Catholic church in this series of personal interviews on the church and the Pope’s thoughts on and involvement with social-justice issues. Pageant Theatre. Rated PG.

Now playing Action Point

A couple of Jackasses—Johnny Knoxville and Chris Pontius—star in this physical comedy about a crew of misfits and their wild-and-dangerous amusement park. Cinemark 14. Rated R.

Adrift

A young couple’s romantic sailing adventure in the Pacific turns into a survival story after they get caught in a hurricane. Based on a true story. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

Avengers: Infinity War

The Avengers, the Guardians of the Galaxy, and Black Panther and his Wakandan army join forces to try and defeat Thanos before he destroys the universe. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

Book Club

After reading Fifty Shades of Grey in their book club, four single, professional older women (played by Jane Fonda, Diane Keaton, Candice Bergen and Mary Steenburgen) restart their stalled sex lives in what looks to a much more lively film than the one adapted from the source book. Cinemark 14, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

Deadpool 2

3

The happily profane superhero party continues with Deadpool 2, a sequel that brings the anarchistic spirit of the original without necessarily blazing any new trails. Ryan Reynolds’ Deadpool/ Wade Wilson character continues the break-the-fourth-wall schtick here—Ferris Bueller-style—and while the gimmick definitely leads to some good laughs, it does start to feel a little too cute and repetitive. Much of the movie involves Deadpool

forming the mutant supercrew X-Force while also becoming a trainee of the much more conservative X-Men team. Deadpool’s first mission with his crew is a screamer, especially due to the participation of Peter (Rob Delaney), a normal, khakis-wearing guy with no powers and a killer mustache who joins the force because he saw an ad and thought it might be cool. Deadpool gets a worthy adversary in the time-traveling Cable (Josh Brolin), a half-cyborg mound of angst with a human side. The sequel earns its hard-R rating much as its predecessor did: thanks to a steady stream of intermittently hilarious profanity and constant gore. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated R —B.G.

Life of the Party

Melissa McCarthy stars in this comedy about a divorcée who returns to college, joining her college-aged daughter in class and the party scene. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

Overboard

The male and female roles that Goldie Hawn and Kurt Russell made famous in the 1987 version of this comedy are flipped with Eugenio Derbez playing the rich jerk with amnesia and Anna Faris as the blue-collar worker with life lessons to impart. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13.

The Rider

5

Ends tonight, June 7. See review this issue. Pageant Theatre. Rated R—J.C.S.

Show Dogs

Real dogs get human voices (Ludacris, RuPaul, Shaq!) in this comedy about a crimefighting Rottweiler who goes undercover at a dog show to stop an animal-smuggling ring. Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

Solo: A Star Wars Story

3

After a tumultuous production, Solo: A Star Wars Story makes it to screens, completed by a different director (Ron Howard) than the ones who started the gig. The finished film definitely feels like more than one director had his hands in the pot. It’s sloppy, tonally challenged, and scenes crash into each other at times. There are also plenty of positives, though not enough to keep Solo from being one of the weaker Star Wars films. Stepping into the iconic role of Han Solo is Alden Ehrenreich, a guy who has very little in common with Harrison Ford. He doesn’t look like him, he doesn’t sound like him, and he lacks that bemused Ford swagger. He does have his own charms, however, and is a likeable actor, and he puts his own spin on the character. The film is an origin story of the scoundrel with a heart of gold, willing to shoot first and ask questions later and also put his life on the line to save the universe. I had no need to see Han’s past romantic relationships, but it is undeniably enjoyable when he meets Chewbacca (Joonas Suotamo) and Lando Calrissian (Donald Glover) for the first time. The budding bond with Chewbacca made me smile, and Glover does Billy Dee Williams proud as the young Lando. In my opinion, he is the film’s shining star. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13 —B.G.

Upgrade

In a tech-controlled near future, a man agrees to a have a chip implanted on his spine, giving him superhuman fighting ability and the means to exact revenge on those who murdered his wife. Cinemark 14. Rated R.


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23RD ANNUAL

Bone marrow and parsley salad on toast.

The simple pleasure of bone marrow I wanted to live deep and suck out all the marrow of life ... —Henry David Thoreau, Walden

Tbeans, at Walden Pond; he actually preferred his homegrown trading some for a little rice when he could. Any horeau wasn’t eating much meat during his time

marrow he was sucking was of the metaphorical variety— jamming his straw past the distractions story and and into the elemental core to drink photo by from the source. Jason Cassidy Of course, anyone who has sucked out the primordial goop from a roasted j asonc @ newsrev iew.c om cow femur knows that the eating of actual marrow is no mere metaphorical pleasure. The enjoyment provided by that most simple dish might be the epitome of good living. “Simple” is one of the core tenets of farm-to-table/ nose-to-tail/slow food philosophy, and an argument can be made that humble bone marrow is one of the movement’s seminal dishes. English chef Fergus Henderson is considered by many to be the godfather of nose-to-tail cooking (he wrote the key book—The Whole Beast: Nose to Tail Eating), and the roasted bone marrow with parsley salad recipe that he’s been serving for 24 years at his St. John restaurant in London is iconic in the culinary world. Anthony Bourdain has said it’s what he wants for his last meal, and hip restaurants around the world have followed St. John’s lead. Before revisiting it for this story, I’d only tried roasted bone marrow once, five years ago at Restaurant 1833 in Monterey. It was a revelatory experience. The marrow had a mildly unctuous, meaty flavor, almost like a well-marbled rib-eye steak, but spreadable. It was one of the best things I’d ever eaten. And despite its emergence as a foodie trend, bone marrow is an inexpensive dish to prepare at home. It’s also very simple. Bones are only $2.69 a pound at The Butcher Shop at S&S Produce (ask for 3- to 4-inch-long beef marrow bones), and you need only one per person if serving as an appetizer.

You could skip all pretense and just throw the bones in a 450-degree oven for 15-20 minutes and dig in. It really is that simple. But a little complementary acidic/ crunchy/spicy/fresh-green accompaniment will really send it over the top. I went straight to the source and found Henderson’s recipe, and just made some minor changes (no capers and more oil in the parsley salad). It was surprising how well it came out. And eating marrow again was just as invigorating as the first time. As I crunched on slathered toast with wild-eyed enjoyment, I imagined it being akin to how our scavenging ancestors felt when they first busted open the bones of picked-over carcasses and discovered the brain-building manna within and perhaps thought, Life is good. Roasted bone marrow with parsley salad (adapted from Fergus Henderson)

6 4-inch-long sections of beef marrow bones 1 cup fresh flat-leaf parsley, roughly chopped 1/3 cup shallots, thinly chopped 4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil (plus more for toasting bread) 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice sea salt, to taste freshly ground black pepper, to taste 8 slices sourdough, or French, or rustic white bread, cut into 2-inch pieces

Heat oven to 425. Brush bread pieces with a little olive oil, place on baking sheet and into oven. Bake seven minutes or so, turning pieces as needed until crisp. Remove from oven. Set oven to 450, line a rimmed baking sheet or roasting pan with aluminum foil, and place bones on it, wideside down. Roast for 15-20 minutes, or until marrow gets “wobbly” and starts to pull away from sides. (Note: It’s normal for a little marrow to melt out the bottom of the bones, but don’t cook too long or you’ll have nothing but liquid.) While things are roasting, toss parsley, shallots, oil, lemon juice, salt and pepper. Plate bones. Using skinny spoon, scoop marrow and spread on toasted bread, top with a little parsley salad, moan with pleasure. Ω

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summer’s here; let’s rock So many amazing, fun and weird shows are on the schedule over the next few months. Tonight (June 7) is Big Business at Chico Women’s Club, and then ... • The Hawk and the Hacksaw, June 15, argus Bar + Patio: Neutral Milk Hotel drummer Jeremy Barnes is on accordion in this violin/accordion act playing Eastern European-influenced folk. • a Band Called Love (ABC Love), June 17, duffy’s Tavern: From Sao Paolo, Brazil, comes some mesmerizing, deeply confusing, psych-lounge weirdness. • Harmed Brothers and in/PLanEs, June 23, The Maltese: Americana in the Whiskeytown/Uncle Tupolo/Avett Brothers tradition, plus vintage-pop/ Americana husband-wife duo. • Playboy Manbaby, June 22, naked Lounge: Phoenix’s messiest punk-rock dance party returns. • Koi division, June 30, The Maltese: Joy Division as performed by fish. Seriously. • Kuinka, July 29, Chico Women’s Club: KZFR presents this super-sweet acoustic (and a little electronic) Americana-pop quartet. • Here Lies Man, July 1, Naked Lounge: What if Black Sabbath played Afrobeat? That’s the question a couple of members of world-renowned Afrobeat collective Antibalas asked and answered with this side project. • Killer Whale, July 6, The Maltese: Psychedelic, surfy, electro-poppy yacht rock from S.F. via New Orleans. • Joan of arc, July 14, Duffy’s Tavern: The Chicago-bred indie-experimental innovators are back with a new album. • slow Poisoner, July 21, Blackbird: “One-man surrealistic rock band” from S.F. A Band Called Love • Howlin’ Rain, Aug. 1, Naked Lounge: Throwback bong-rock from the dude who used to front Comets on Fire. Also: I am often floored by how admirably our local noisemakers keep up with those who come to town and share bills with them. In the last couple of weeks, powerhouse sets by local noise-rock pioneers West by swan and dark-noise pedal-mashers Black Magnet (together at The Maltese) and a gorgeous solo set by donald Beaman (at Tender Loving Coffee) were as effective and memorable as the great performances by out-of-towners (slow season and Richard Buckner, respectively). And an impressive list of locals—armed for apocalypse, Beaman, Michelin Embers, Bran Crown, Los new Huevos, Black Magnet, surrogate, solar Estates, The americas, Xds—brings powerful support to many of the bills above.

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Autumn is coming … eventuAlly We are just getting started with the summer fun, and arts dEVo wants you all present and sweating along with him to a summer of great shows coming to Chico (see below). So, let your mind wander ahead to the cool winds of fall only long enough to update your calendar with two super-big-show announcements: One: neko Case is coming! The indie/ Americana/country singer/songwriter who sings and writes songs better than almost anyone will bring her powerhouse pipes and evocative, amazing lyrics to the sierra nevada Big Room Dec. 4, as she tours in support of her justreleased album, Hell-On. Tickets go on Neko Case sale Friday, June 8, online (eventbrite. com) and at the brewery’s gift shop. Oh, and if Case wasn’t enough, destroyer (aka Dan Bejan) will open with a solo set. Two: Folk icon and recent Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee Joan Baez is coming to Laxson auditorium Nov. 2, during what’s being billed as her last tour. Tickets for the Fare Thee Well show go on sale Aug. 11 (series tickets) and Aug. 20 (single tickets). Visit chicoperformances.com for info.

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY For the week oF June 7, 2018 ARIES (March 21-April 19): According

to my analysis of the astrological omens, you would be wise to ruffle and revise your relationship with time. It would be healthy for you to gain more freedom from its relentless demands; to declare at least some independence from its oppressive hold on you; to elude its push to impinge on every move you make. Here’s a ritual you could do to spur your imagination: Smash a timepiece. I mean that literally. Go to the store and invest $20 in a hammer and alarm clock. Take them home and vociferously apply the hammer to the clock in a holy gesture of pure, righteous chastisement. Who knows? This bold protest might trigger some novel ideas about how to slip free from the imperatives of time for a few stolen hours each week.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Promise

me that you won’t disrespect, demean, or neglect your precious body in the coming weeks. Promise me that you will treat it with tender compassion and thoughtful nurturing. Give it deep breaths, pure water, healthy and delicious food, sweet sleep, enjoyable exercise, and reverential sex. Such veneration is always recommended, of course—but it’s especially crucial for you to attend to this noble work during the next four weeks. It’s time to renew and revitalize your commitment to your soft warm animal self.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Between

1967 and 1973, NASA used a series of Saturn V rockets to deliver six groups of American astronauts to the moon. Each massive vehicle weighed about 6.5-million pounds. The initial thrust required to launch it was tremendous. Gas mileage was seven inches per gallon. Only later, after the rocket flew farther from the grip of Earth’s gravity, did the fuel economy improve. I’m guessing that in your own life, you may be experiencing something like that seveninches-per-gallon feeling right now. But I guarantee you won’t have to push this hard for long.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Mars,

the planet that rules animal vitality and instinctual enthusiasm, will cruise through your astrological House of Synergy for much of the next five months. That’s why I’ve concluded that between now and mid-November, your experience of togetherness can and should reach peak expression. Do you want intimacy to be robust and intense, sometimes bordering on rambunctious? It will be if you want it to be. Adventures in collaboration will invite you to wander out to the frontiers of your understanding about how relationships work best.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Which astrological

sign laughs hardest and longest and most frequently? I’m inclined to speculate that Sagittarius deserves the crown, with Leo and Gemini fighting it out for second place. But having said that, I suspect that in the coming weeks you Leos could rocket to the top of the chart, vaulting past Sagittarians. Not only are you likely to find everything funnier than usual; I bet you will also encounter more than the usual number of authentically humorous and amusing experiences. (P.S.: I hope you won’t cling too fiercely to your dignity, because that would interfere with your full enjoyment of the cathartic cosmic gift.)

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): According to

my analysis of the astrological omens, a little extra egotism might be healthy for you right now. A surge of super-confidence would boost your competence; it would also fine-tune your physical well-being and attract an opportunity that might not otherwise find its way to you. So, for example, consider the possibility of renting a billboard on which you put a giant photo of yourself with a tally of your accomplishments and a list of your demands. The cosmos and I won’t have any problem with you bragging more than usual or asking for more goodies than you’re usually content with.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The coming

weeks will be a favorable time for happy

by rob brezsny endings to sad stories, and for the emergence of efficient solutions to convoluted riddles. I bet it will also be a phase when you can perform some seemingly clumsy magic that dispatches a batch of awkward karma. Hooray! Hallelujah! Praise Goo! But now listen to my admonition, Libra: The coming weeks won’t be a good time to toss and turn in your bed all night long thinking about what you might have done differently in the month of May. Honor the past by letting it go.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “Dear Dr.

Astrology: In the past four weeks, I have washed all 18 of my underpants four times. Without exception, every single time, each item has been inside-out at the end of the wash cycle. This is despite the fact that most of them were not inside-out when I threw them in the machine. Does this weird anomaly have some astrological explanation?—Upside-Down Scorpio.” Dear Scorpio: Yes. Lately your planetary omens have been rife with reversals, inversions, flip-flops, and switchovers. Your underpants situation is a symptom of the bigger forces at work. Don’t worry about those bigger forces, though. Ultimately, I think you’ll be glad for the renewal that will emerge from the various turnabouts.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec.

21): As I sat down to meditate on your horoscope, a hummingbird flew in my open window. Scrambling to herd it safely back outside, I knocked my iPad on the floor, which somehow caused it to open a link to a Youtube video of an episode of the TV game show Wheel of Fortune, where the hostess Vanna White, garbed in a long red gown, revealed that the word puzzle solution was USE IT OR LOSE IT. So what does this omen mean? Maybe this: You’ll be surprised by a more-or-less delightful interruption that compels you to realize that you had better start taking greater advantage of a gift or blessing that you’ve been lazy or slow to capitalize on.

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CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

You’re in a phase when you’ll be smart to bring more light and liveliness into the work you do. To spur your efforts, I offer the following provocations. 1. “When I work, I relax. Doing nothing makes me tired.”— Pablo Picasso. 2. “Opportunities are usually disguised as hard work, so most people don’t recognize them.”—Ann Landers. 3. “Pleasure in the job puts perfection in the work.”—Aristotle. 4. “Creativity is allowing yourself to make mistakes. Art is knowing which ones to keep.”—Scott Adams. 5. “Working hard and working smart can sometimes be two different things.”—Byron Dorgan. 6. “Don’t stay in bed unless you can make money in bed.”—George Burns. 7. “Thunder is good, thunder is impressive; but it is lightning that does the work.”— Mark Twain.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “There

isn’t enough of anything as long as we live,” said poet and short-story writer Raymond Carver. “But at intervals a sweetness appears and, given a chance, prevails.” My reading of the astrological omens suggests that the current phase of your cycle is one of those intervals, Aquarius. In light of this grace period, I have some advice for you, courtesy of author Anne Lamott: “You weren’t born a person of cringe and contraction. You were born as energy, as life, made of the same stuff as stars, blossoms, breezes. You learned contraction to survive, but that was then.” Surrender to the sweetness, dear Aquarius.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Between

you and your potential new power spot is an imaginary ten-foot-high, electrified fence. It’s composed of your least charitable thoughts about yourself and your rigid beliefs about what’s impossible for you to accomplish. Is there anything you can do to deal with this inconvenient illusion? I recommend that you call on Mickey Rat, the cartoon superhero in your dreams who knows the difference between destructive destruction and creative destruction. Maybe as he demonstrates how enjoyable it could be to tear down the fence, you’ll be inspired to join in the fun.

www.RealAstrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888.

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BEAUTY ETERNAL at 1260 East Avenue, Suite 130 Chico, CA 95926. NORTHSTATE PLASTIC SURGERY ASSOCIATES INC 1260 East Avenue, Suite 100 Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: EMILY HARTMANN, VICE PRESIDENT Dated: April 13, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000519 Published: May 17,24,31, June 7, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as LATIMER AND KENKEL at 330 Wall Street Chico, CA 95928. DENNIS M LATIMER 320 West Legion Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: DENNIS M. LATIMER Dated: April 25, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000577 Published: May 17,24,31, June 7, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as STICKY ICKY INDUSTRIES at 1518 Broadway Street Basement Chico, CA 95928. PRANA VAJRA JOHNSTON 702 Mangrove Ave #287 Chico, CA 95926. RYAN MCDOUGAL 1474 Hawthorne Ave Chico, CA 95926.

this legal Notice continues

This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: PRANA JOHNSTON Dated: May 8, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000636 Published: May 17,24,31, June 7, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PIPEVINE PLAYHOUSE at 1051 Eaton Rd Chico, CA 95973. KATHLEEN LEE MACHEK 1051 Eaton Rd Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: KATHLEEN L. MACHEK Dated: May 9, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000640 Published: May 17,24,31, June 7, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BIDWELL H2O, BIDWELL WATER, SACRAMENTO VALLEY BOTTLED WATER at 2704 Hegan Ln Chico, CA 95928. ROBERT LEE SMITH 1256 Vallombrosa Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ROBERT SMITH Dated: May 9, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000644 Published: May 17,24,31, June 7, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as LARABEE ENTERPRISES, MAC TOOLS at 81 Hollis Lane Gridley, CA 95948. DAVID LARABEE 81 Hollis Lane Gridley, CA 95948. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: DAVID LARABEE Dated: May 9, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000645 Published: May 17,24,31, June 7, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as GOOD EARTH COFFEE AND TEA HOUSE at 980 Oro Dam Blvd E Oroville, CA 95965. RAI TAJ FAMILY LLC 19 Marci Way Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: RAY TARIQ SAEED AHMAD, MANAGER Dated: May 8, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000632 Published: May 17,24,31, June 7, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as THE MEADOWS MHP at 3541 Calle Principal Chico, CA 95973. RANCHO CHICO MHP, LP 3050 Fite Circle, Suite 210 Sacramento, CA 95827. This business is conducted by a Limited Partnership. Signed: ANDY CAREY Dated: April 24, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000567 Published: May 17,24,31, June 7, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BIDWELL LOCK AND KEY at 559 Crestwood Drive Paradise, CA 95969. JAMES JOSEPH HAFER 559 Crestwood Drive Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JIM HAFER Dated: April 13, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000516 Published: May 17,24,31, June 7, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as 99BATS, ADAMAS SPORTS at 3030 Thorntree Dr. Suite 12 Chico, CA 95973. INFINITE HORIZONS, LLC 3030 Thorntree Dr. Suite 12 Chico, CA 95973.

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State and Local Cannabis Licensing and Compliance Conversion of your nonprofit entity now available for more information, call the aBDallah laW GroUP, P.c. at (916) 446-1974. mitchell l. aBDallah, esq. J u n e 7, 2 0 1 8

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This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: NATHAN KANEMOTO, CO-OWNER Dated: May 15, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000667 Published: May 24,31, June 7,14, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as WILD MAMA BREWS at 6281 Woodbury Drive Magalia, CA 95954. CINDY PAULINE JONES 6281 Woodbury Drive Magalia, CA 95954. MARK ALAN JONES 6281 Woodbury Drive Magalia, CA 95954. This business is conducted by A Married Couple. Signed: CINDY PAULINE JONES Dated: May 15, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000668 Published: May 24,31, June 7,14, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CASEY AND AUTUMN STUDIOS at 498 E 8th Avenue Chico, CA 95926. SEAN CASEY APLANALP 498 E 8th Avenue Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: S. CASEY APLANALP Dated: May 16, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000672 Published: May 24,31, June 7,14, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as SHOSHONE FURNITURE COMPANY at 3216 Godman Ave 1 Chico, CA 95973. THOMAS CANADA MOLESWORTH 13193 Orchard Blossom Lane Nord, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: THOMAS C MOLESWORTH Dated: May 16, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000676 Published: May 24,31, June 7,14, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as ROOM FOR BEAUTY at 2241 St George Lane #3 Chico, CA 95926. DORHANDA MARIE SOULLIERE 2505 Navarro Dr. Chico, CA 95973. WOODROW WAYNE SOULLIERE 2505 Navarro Dr. Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by A Married Couple. Signed: DORHANDA M SOULLIERE Dated: May 3, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000616 Published: May 24,31, June 7,14, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PARK AVE AUTOMOTIVE MACHINE at 1814 A Park Ave Chico, CA 95928. MIKE PELAK 3083 Bay Ave Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual.

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Signed: MIKE PELAK Dated: April 23, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000564 Published: May 24,31, June 7,14, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as RW ENTERPRISES at 188 Valley View Drive Paradise, CA 95969. BRIAN D. WHITE 188 Valley View Drive Paradise, CA 95969. SUZANNE M. WHITE 188 Valley View Drive Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by A Married Couple. Signed: SUZANNE WHITE Dated: May 11, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000658 Published: May 24,31, June 7,14, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as GREEN CLEAN NATURAL CARPET CLEANING at 3549 Esplanade Space 251 Chico, CA 95973. MARITZA ALVAREZ 3549 Esplanade Space 251 Chico, CA 95973. JUAN CARLOS HUERTA 3549 Esplanade Space 251 Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by A Married Couple. Signed: MARITZA ALVAREZ Dated: April 13, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000521 Published: May 24,31, June 7,14, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as AMB WOOD AND STEEL DESIGN at 2368 Brown Street Durham, CA 95938. AARON BARR 2368 Brown Street Durham, CA 95938. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: AARON BARR Dated: May 14, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000662 Published: May 31, June 7,14,21, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as RAWMAZING at 132 W 2nd Ave. Chico, CA 95926. JOSHUA JAMES HERNANDEZ 132 W 2nd Ave. Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JOSHUA HERNANDEZ Dated: May 22, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000707 Published: May 31, June 7,14,21, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as DROP IN THE BUCKET at 1938 Oak Park Avenue Chico, CA 95928. ROSEANNE LUCY NELSON 1938 Oak Park Avenue Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ROSEANNE LUCY NELSON Dated: May 23, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000712 Published: May 31, June 7,14,21, 2018

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as H AND M HIGHWAY SUPPLIES at 1521 Warren Rd Paradise, CA 95969. KAYLA HAMPTON 1135 1st Ave Oroville, CA 95965. FRANK ANTHONY MEDINA JR 1521 Warren Rd Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: KAYLA HAMPTON Dated: May 18, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000689 Published: May 31, June 7,14,21, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as T L C PATIENT ASSOCIATIONS at 6219 McReynolds Ct Magalia, CA 95954. T L C PATIENT ASSOCIATIONS 5327 Edgewood Lane Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: MICHELLE LAFOND, SECRETARY/VICE PRESIDENT Dated: May 18, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000692 Published: May 31, June 7,14,21, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as COCO’S at 1008 W Sacramento Ave Ste 1A Chico, CA 95926. YANSUN ZOU 100 Sterling Oaks Dr #237 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: YANSUN ZOU Dated: April 30, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000596 Published: May 31, June 7,14,21, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as SUBWAY 4149 at 1947 E 20th Street Suite A Chico, CA 95928. ADVALI GROUP INC 1325 Turker Way Chico, CA 95973. RAVI GUNDIMEDA 2485 Notre Dame Blvd Suite 380-269 Chico, CA 95928. CRUEITA MENA 2485 Notre Dame Blvd Suite 380-269 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: RAVI GUNDIMEDA, PRESIDENT Dated: May 10, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000654 Published: May 31, June 7,14,21, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as SUBWAY # 44154 at 2485 Notre Dame Blvd Suite 380 Chico, CA 95928. ADVALI GROUP INC 3251 Tinker Creek Way Chico, CA 95973. RAVI GUNDIMEDA 2485 Notre Dame Blvd Suite 370 #269 Chico, CA 95928. CRUCITA MENA 2485 Notre Dame Blvd Suite 370 #269 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: RAVI GUNDIMEDA, PRESIDENT Dated: May 10, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000653 Published: May 31, June 7,14,21, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as SUBWAY 1561 at 1000 W Sacramento Avenue Chico, CA 95926. ADVALI VENTRUES INC 2485 Notre Dame Blvd Chico, CA 95926. RAVI GUNDIMEDA 2485 Notre Dame Blvd Suite 380-269 Chico, CA 95926. CRUCIT MENA 2485 Notre Dame Blvd Suite 380-269 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: RAVI GUNDIMEDA, PRESIDENT Dated: May 10, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000655 Published: May 31, June 7,14,21, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as COSMETIC TATTOOING BY STEPHANIE at 142 W. 2nd Street Chico, CA 95928. STEPHANIE POTTS 420 Oakvale Ave. Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: STEPHANIE POTTS Dated: May 17, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000687 Published: June 7,14,21,28, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as LAW OFFICE OF HARLEY MERRITT at 1280 E. 9th St, Suite D Chico, CA 95928. HARLEY E MERRITT 2 Lacewing Ct Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: HARLEY E. MERRITT Dated: May 17, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000686 Published: June 7,14,21,28, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as FULL SUN ORGANICS at 1161 Palmetto Ave Chico, CA 95926. QUINTIN LOWELL TROESTER 1161 Palmetto Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: QUINTIN TROESTER Dated: May 29, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000722 Published: June 7,14,21,28, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as DESIGN BY HUMANS at 1262 Humboldt Ave Chico, CA 95928. DBH WORLDWIDE LLC 1262 Humboldt Ave Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: JEFF SIERRA CO-OWNER Dated: May 25, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000717 Published: June 7,14,21,28, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as D2A NETWORKS, SHOE TEMPTATIONS at 1197 Ravenshoe Way Chico, CA 95973.

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WIRELESS WIZARD SOLUTIONS, LLC 1197 Ravenshoe Way Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: DAVID GUADRON, MANAGER Dated: May 30, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000726 Published: June 7,14,21,28, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as ART ETC at 256 East First Street Chico, CA 95926. CALEB PAUL KLUNGTVET 609 Victorian Park Drive Chico, CA 95926. LARRY DALE KLUNGTVET 5732 Shady Lane Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: CALEB P. KLUNGTVET Dated: June 1, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000747 Published: June 7,14,21,28, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as HEAVEN TO EARTH NATURAL SOLUTIONS at 100 Sterling Oaks Dr Apt # 173 Chico, CA 95928. MICHAEL KEIICHI MCNEAL 100 Sterling Oaks Dr Apt # 173 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: MICHAEL K. MCNEAL Dated: May 18, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000688 Published: June 7,14,21,28, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as TINY HINIES at 3456 Fletcher Rd Oroville, CA 95966. GRACIE ANGELICA STEWART 3456 Fletcher R Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: GRACIE STEWART Dated: May 18, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000693 Published: June 7,14,21,28, 2018

NOTICES NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS Notice is hereby given that BCM Construction (BCM), hereinafter referred to as the Lease Leaseback Entity selected by the Chico Unified School District (CUSD), will receive Subcontractor proposals for the Neal Dow Elementary New Construction and Modernization Project Phase 1 “Underground Site Utilities and Site Work”, at the offices of BCM via fax (530) 342-1768 or email at matt@bcmconstruction.com until 4:00p.m., on Friday, June 15, 2018. A Bid Walk will be on June 8, 2018 at 11:00 a.m. at Neal Dow Elementary School. In accordance with the provisions of Section 1773 of the Labor Code, the Director of Industrial Relations has determined the general prevailing rate of wages applicable to the work to be done. These rates are set forth in a schedule located at the State Department of Industrial Relations, Director of Industrial Relations, (415) 703-5070,

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Website: www.dir.ca.gov. Attention is directed to the provisions of Section 1777.5 and 1777.6 of the labor Code of the State of California concerning employment of apprentices by the contractor or any subcontractor under him. The prime contractor is responsible for compliance with the requirements of Section 1777.5 and the prime contractor and any subcontractor under him shall comply with the requirements of Section 1777.6. Attention is directed to the provision of Section 20111.6 of the Public Contract Code, regarding the requirement for successful Prequalification with the Chico Unified School District of Electrical, Mechanical or Plumbing Components, specifically A, B, C-4, C-7, C-10, C-16, C-20, C-34, C-36, C-38, C-42, C-43, C-46, 10 days prior to the bid date. Each bid must conform to the requirements of the Drawings and other documents comprising the Contract Documents. Interested parties may obtain copies of the complete bid package by emailing matt@bcmconstruction.com. After the scheduled closing time set for receipt of bids, bids may not then be withdrawn for a period of 90 days from and after said closing time, except as otherwise provided for in the California Public Contract Code. Published: May 31, June 7, 2018 NOTICE OF LIEN SALE Pursuant to CA Business Code 21700, in lieu of rents due, the following units contain clothes, furniture, boxes, etc. HURSHELL BOLMANSKI #232ss (Bikes, tools, misc. items) CANDACE CARBY #219ss (clothes, tools) KENNETH MASSINGALE #086ac (dvds, clothes, furniture) Contents to be sold to the highest bidder on: June 23, 2018 Beginning at 12:00pm Sale to be held at: Bidwell Self Storage, 65 Heritage Lane, Chico, CA 95926. (530) 893-2109 Published: June 7,14, 2018

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: DAVID MICHAEL KIEL Proposed name: MICHAEL DAVID CHRISTIAN THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: July 13, 2018 Time: 9:00am Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave

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Chico, CA 95928 Signed: MICHAEL P. CANDELA Dated: May 14, 2018 Case Number: 18CV01533 Published: May 24,31, June 7,14, 2018

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner JESSICA SOCORRO BAZURTO-BERLANGA filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: JESSICA SOCORRO BAZURTO-BERLANGA Proposed name: JESSY SOCORRO BERLANGA THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: June 15, 2018 Time: 9:00am Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: MICHAEL P. CANDELA Dated: May 3, 2018 Case Number: 18CV01266 Published: May 24,31, June 7,14, 2018

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner ANGELICA IVET BAZURTO-BERLANGA filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: ANGELICA IVET BAZURTO-BERLANGA Proposed name: ANGELICA IVET BERLANGA THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: June 29, 2018 Time: 9:00am Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: MICHAEL P. CANDELA Dated: May 3, 2018 Case Number: 18CV01265 Published: May 24,31, June 7,14, 2018

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner filed a petition with this

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court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: ETHEL ELEANOR HARRIS Proposed name: CHRIS ELEANOR JACKSON THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: July 6, 2018 Time: 0900 Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: MICHAEL P. CANDELA Dated: May 17, 2018 Case Number: 18CV01453 Published: May 24,31, June 7,14, 2018

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner ISRAEL LEON JUNIOR filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: ISRAEL LEON JUNIOR Proposed name: ISRAEL LEON THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: July 6, 2018 Time: 9:00a.m. Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: MICHAEL P. CANDELA Dated: May 8, 2018 Case Number: 18CV01239 Published: May 24,31, June 7,14, 2018

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner MEGAN COOPER filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: KADE DALE SHELTON Proposed name: KADE ALLEN COOPER THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the

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reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: June 22, 2018 Time: 9:00a.m. Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: MICHAEL P. CANDELA Dated: May 3, 2018 Case Number: 18CV01235 Published: May 24,31, June 7,14, 2018

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner ANGELO GONZALO TABIOS filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: ANGELO GONZALO TABIOS Proposed name: ANGELO GONZALO CARTOSCELLI THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: July 13, 2018 Time: 9:00a.m. Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: MICHAEL P. CANDELA Dated: May 18, 2018 Case Number: 18CV00692 Published: May 24,31, June 7,14, 2018

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner KYLE GERARD FERGUSON filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: KYLE GERARD FERGUSON Proposed name: KYLE WILLIAM NABORS THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: June 29, 2018 Time: 9:00a.m. Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court

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1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: MICHAEL P. CANDELA Dated: May 8, 2018 Case Number: 18CV01418 Published: May 31, June 7,14,21, 2018

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner DIANE ELIZABETH SMITH filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: DIANE ELIZABETH SMITH Proposed name: DIANE ELIZABETH PRINCE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: July 13, 2018 Time: 9:00a.m. Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: May 22, 2018 Case Number: 18CV01624 Published: June 7,14,21,28, 2018

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner PATRICIA ELAINE PETROPOULOS filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: RENAE JANE LEFLORE Proposed name: RENAE JANE PETROPOULOS-LEFLORE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: July 6, 2018 Time: 9:00a.m. Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: MICHAEL P. CANDELA Dated: May 11, 2018 Case Number: 18CV01532 Published: June 7,14,21,28, 2018

SUMMONS SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: DOMINIQUE N PEOPLES YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: BUTTE COUNTY CREDIT BUREAU A CORP NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The Court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Avenue Chico, CA 95928 LIMITED CIVIL CASE The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney is: JOSEPH L SELBY (#249546) Law Office of Ferris & Selby 2607 Forest Avenue Ste 130 Chico, CA 95928. (530) 366-4290 Dated: November 3, 2017 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Case Number: 17CV03274 Published: May 24,31, June 7,14, 2018

SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: REBECCA S OSBORNE AKA REBECCA S EGGLESTON AKA BECKI S EGGLESTON YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: BUTTE COUNTY CREDIT BUREAU A CORP NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court

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to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The Court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Avenue Chico, CA 95928 LIMITED CIVIL CASE The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney is: JOSEPH L SELBY (#249546) Law Office of Ferris & Selby 2607 Forest Avenue Ste 130 Chico, CA 95928. (530) 366-4290 Dated: July 10, 2017 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Case Number: 17CV02044 Published: May 24,31, June 7,14, 2018

PETITION NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE IRENE ELIZABETH DEEKEN To all heirs and beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: IRENE ELIZABETH DEEKEN, AKA IRENE ELIZABETH MCGRANE AND IRENE ELIZABETH HAYS A Petition for Probate has been filed by: COLLEEN KIRCHEM, AKA COLLEEN MCGRANE in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: COLLEEN KIRCHEM be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or conseted to the proposed action.) The

this Legal Notice continues

independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: June 19, 2018 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: TBA Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: CHERYL A. FORBES PO Box 1009 Red Bluff, CA 96080 (530) 527-7500 Case Number: 18PR00221 Dated: May 18, 2018 Published: May 24,31, June 7, 2018

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Homes Sold Last Week ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

337 Stonebridge Dr 6 Via Flora Ct 8948 Aguas Frias Rd 228 Estates Dr 4342 Kathy Ln 757 Hillgrove Ct 44 Moraga Dr 332 Denali Dr 1821 Roth St 1478 Vallombrosa Ave 25 Moraga Dr

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico

$600,000 $575,000 $565,000 $510,000 $505,000 $484,818 $440,000 $420,000 $407,000 $404,000 $374,000

3/3 4/2 3/2 3/2 4/3 4/3 4/2 3/2 3/4 3/2 3/2

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SQ. FT. 2527 2749 2079 2037 2317 2144 2659 1784 1472 1951 2019

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TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

524 W 2nd Ave 1966 Vallombrosa Ave 120 Wine Blossom Dr 129 Delaney Dr 230 Legacy Ln 557 Grand Smokey Ct 1668 Hooker Oak Ave 2090 Robailey Dr 2814 North Ave 588 Waterford Dr 2733 Madera Ln

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico

$373,000 $367,000 $365,000 $365,000 $340,000 $340,000 $338,500 $337,000 $325,000 $318,000 $300,000

4/3 3/2 3/2 3/2 3/2 3/2 3/2 3/2 3/2 3/2 3/3

SQ. FT. 1720 1698 1543 1565 1441 1473 1461 1683 1254 1470 1900


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outstanding 3 bed/2bth , 2411 sq ft on 1.01 acres, pool, lush grounds, RV parking, updated home.........................................................................................................$599,000 butte Valley 2-custom homes, private setting on 235 acs, horse or cattle ..............$1,999,000 stunning custom home, 3 bed/ 2.5 bth, 2,102 sq ft, hardwood floors, Carrera Marble + more!. Teresa Larson ................................................................................................................................$475,000 (530)899-5925 open floor plan,, 3 bed/2 bth, 1,653 sq ft, lovely backyard with pond ......................$365,000 pending BRE #01177950 huge family room! Plus living room, 3/bed/1.5 bath, 1,861 sq ft on a cul de sac! ...$325,000 g lot .20 of an ac adjoining lot. ..................$575,000 chiconativ@aol.com bigger and better! 2 homes in town pendin on .77

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GRacIOus 1980 BLT wITh hOME with parklike setting, 3 bed, 2 bath, 2 car garage $310,000 hOME, OME, located on a lovely REMOdELEdd 1966 BLT hOME, ding pen cul-de-sac, 3 bed, 2 bath plus bonus room, lovely gardens and large lot, $310,000 sTuNNING aMBERGROvE aMBER aMBERG GRO ROv vEE hOME, blt 2004, 3 bed, 2 d sol bath 1784 sq ft. $410,000 ch sTYLE hOME NEwER RaNch hOME,, blt 2007, 1471 sq ft, ld shopping close to schoolsso and shopping$316,500

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The following houses were sold in Butte County by real estate agents or private parties during the week of May 21, 2018 – May 25, 2018 The housing prices are based on the stated documentary transfer tax of the parcel and may not necessarily reflect the actual sale price of the home. ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

132 Benson Ter

Chico

$293,000

2/2

SQ. FT. 1451

135 Valley View Dr

ADDRESS

Oroville

$535,000

5/3

3895

1041 Windsor Way

Chico

$289,000

3/2

1357

3897 Doubletree Rd

Oroville

$260,000

3/2

1742

203 Mission Serra Ter

Chico

$275,000

3/2

1317

5175 Miners Ranch Rd

Oroville

$235,000

2/2

1380

2650 Cactus Ave

Chico

$255,000

3/2

1379

3 Brentwood Way

Oroville

$220,000

3/2

1034

2570 E 20th St

Chico

$214,000

1/1

801

183 Valley Ridge Dr

Paradise

$380,000

2/1

1802

108 Aurora Glen Dr

Chico

$190,000

4/4

2802

5214 Trafalgar Sq

Paradise

$325,000

3/2

1962

685 Mann And Nolta Ridge Rd

Chico

$155,000

2/1

1300

6286 Lucky John Rd

Paradise

$259,000

2/2

1121

1248 Bruce St

Chico

$114,500

2/1

804

814 Natures Way

Paradise

$258,000

2/3

1200

1500 Gilbert Ln

Chico

$82,000

4/2

1803

8409 Montna Dr

Paradise

$254,500

2/2

1228

295 Shippee Rd

Oroville

$750,000

3/3

2075

1857 Salida Way

Paradise

$228,000

3/2

1286

142 Pinedale Ave

Oroville

$537,000

5/3

3251

6161 Oliver Rd

Paradise

$218,000

2/2

1210

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SQ. FT.

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345 West FiFth street ChiCo, CA 95928 (530) 891–6328 Please call for reservations Open Fridays for Lunch 11:30am to 2:30pm Join us for Happy Hour 7 days a week 4:30 to 6:00pm

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