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CHICO’S FREE NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY VOLUME 41, ISSUE 40 THURSDAY, MAY 31, 2018 WWW.NEWSREVIEW.COM

Hot r e m m Su n o i t c A A guide to the season’s potential best and worst films

12 POWER OF PILLS 29 PIZZA IN THE BEER AISLE 26 SO-SO SOLO

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CN&R

INSIDE

Vol. 41, Issue 40 • May 31, 2018 OPINION

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Editorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Guest Comment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Second & Flume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Streetalk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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NEWSLINES

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Downstroke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Sifter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

HEALTHLINES

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Appointment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Weekly Dose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

GREENWAYS

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Eco Event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS

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15 Minutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 The Goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

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COVER STORY

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ARTS & CULTURE

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Music feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 This Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Fine arts listings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Nightlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Reel World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Chow. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Arts DEVO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Brezsny’s Astrology . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31

CLASSIFIEDS

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REAL ESTATE

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ON THE COVER: DESIGN BY TINA FLYNN

Our Mission: To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. Editor Melissa Daugherty Managing Editor Meredith J. Cooper Arts Editor Jason Cassidy Staff Writer Ashiah Scharaga Calendar Editor Nate Daly Contributors Robin Bacior, Alastair Bland, Michelle Camy, Vic Cantu, Josh Cozine, Bob Grimm, Howard Hardee, Miles Jordan, Mark Lore, Landon Moblad, Ryan J. Prado, Juan-Carlos Selznick, Ken Smith, Robert Speer, Evan Tuchinsky, Cathy Wagner, Carey Wilson Managing Art Director Tina Flynn Creative Services Manager Christopher Terrazas Creative Director Serene Lusano Publications Designer Mike Bravo Web Design & Strategist Elisabeth Bayard Arthur Ad Designer Catalina Munevar Director of Sales and Advertising Jamie DeGarmo Advertising Services Coordinator Ruth Alderson Senior Advertising Consultants Brian Corbit, Laura Golino Advertising Consultants Chris Pollok, Autumn Slone Office Assistant Amanda Geahry Distribution Director Greg Erwin Distribution Manager Mark Schuttenberg Distribution Staff Ken Gates, Bob Meads, Pat Rogers, Mara Schultz, Larry Smith, Lisa Torres, Placido Torres, Jeff Traficante, Bill Unger, Lisa Van Der Maelen

President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Director of Nuts & Bolts Deborah Redmond Director of People & Culture David Stogner Director of Dollars & Sense Debbie Mantoan Nuts & Bolts Ninja Norma Huerta Project Coordinator Natasha vonKaenel Payroll/AP Wizard Miranda Hansen Accounts Receivable Specialist Analie Foland Developer John Bisignano System Support Specialist Kalin Jenkins N&R Publications Editor Michelle Carl N&R Publications Associate Editor Laura Hillen N&R Publications Writers Anne Stokes, Rodney Orosco Marketing & Publications Consultants Steve Caruso, Joseph Engle, Elizabeth Morabito, Traci Hukill, Celeste Worden 353 E. Second Street, Chico, CA 95928 Phone (530) 894-2300 Fax (530) 892-1111 Website www.newsreview.com Got a News Tip? (530) 894-2300, ext 2224 or chiconewstips@newsreview.com Calendar Events cnrcalendar@newsreview.com Calendar Questions (530) 894-2300, ext. 2243 Want to Advertise? Fax (530) 892-1111 or cnradinfo@newsreview.com Classifieds (530) 894-2300, press 2 or classifieds@newsreview.com Job Opportunities jobs@newsreview.com Want to Subscribe to CN&R? chisubs@newsreview.com Editorial Policies: Opinions expressed in CN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons, or other portions of the paper. CN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or review materials. Email letters to cnrletters@newsreview.com. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form and to edit them for libel. Advertising Policies: All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes the responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. CN&R is printed at Bay Area News Group on recycled newsprint. Circulation of CN&R is verified by the Circulation Verification Council. CN&R is a member of Chico Chamber of Commerce, Oroville Chamber of Commerce, Downtown Chico Business Association, CNPA, AAN and AWN. Circulation 38,650 copies distributed free weekly.

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OPINION

Send guest comments, 340 words maximum, to gc@newsreview.com or to 353 E. Second St., Chico, Ca 95928. Please include photo & short bio.

SECOND & FLUME

EDITORIAL

Endorsements We want to remind readers that the CN&R isn’t

making endorsements for everything on the June 5 primary ballot. Once again, we encourage you to read the sample ballot and recent newspaper coverage (our May 24 issue). We also recommend checking out the local League of Women Voters’ recent forums (go to lwvbuttecounty.org). Governor: Former State Superintendent of Public Instruction Delaine Eastin knows the value of education, has an environmentally sound platform, and supports health care for all. If elected, she’d be the first woman to hold the post. Congress: Jessica Holcombe’s education, experience on Capitol Hill and fundraising ability make her the most viable challenger to the incumbent, Republican Doug LaMalfa. She’s remarkable for many reasons, so don’t balk at the fact she’s based in Auburn. County assessor: Diane Brown has three decades of experience in the department she was first elected to lead four years ago. Brown’s in the midst of completing several major projects in the Assessor’s Office, and we think she deserves to see them through. County auditor-controller: Assistant AuditorController Graciela Gutierrez is highly regarded by her administrative colleagues at the county, as well as staff. She also has the advanced degree and experience

by Melissa Daugherty m e l i s s a d @ n e w s r e v i e w. c o m

necessary for this management position. District 3 supervisor: Tami Ritter wants to protect North State water, implement “housing first” policies and ensure the county is prepared for emergencies. Those priorities will serve her constituents well. District 2 supervisor: Debra Lucero will bring a much-needed dose of creativity to a panel composed mainly of doctrinaire conservatives—we trust her on the issues, including righting the budget. Proposition 68: Yes. This $4.1 billion bond measure would fund improvements for long-neglected state parks and water systems, as well as a host of other conservation efforts. Proposition 69: Yes. Essentially, it’s a legally binding way to ensure “gas tax” revenues are spent only on transportation projects, as the Legislature promised. Proposition 70: No. The short version is this would require a supermajority vote in only a single year, 2024, on how to spend cap-and-trade funds. Proposition 71: Yes. Makes ballot initiatives go into effect five days after election results are certified— rather than the day after an election, which is the case now for initiatives that don’t specify another start date. Proposition 72: Yes. Another no-brainer, it would exclude rainwater-capture systems from property tax assessments, beginning Jan. 1. Ω

GUEST COMMENT

High stakes for women’s health Christian men with an average age of over T60.white Through their collective ignorance and unfettered

he Republican-controlled U.S. Senate is 88 percent

arrogance, they have been hell-bent on passing legislation that controls women’s personal health issues, using morality to ignore the risks associated with subpar medical treatment. An anti-abortion tool of the far right is faith-based crisis pregnancy centers (CPCs), a fast-growing industry that relies heavily on misleading or outright lying to women about by reproductive health care in order to Roger S. Beadle dissuade them from having abortions. The author, There are more than 3,000 CPCs a Chico resident, is around the country. They sometimes a Chico State alum offer ultrasounds, pregnancy tests and former small-business and free diapers, often masqueradowner. ing as abortion clinics or licensed medical facilities. It is quite common that there are no doctors or licensed medical professionals on the premises. Funded mostly by the anti-abortion movement, many CPCs also receive taxpayer money from state governments.

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Highway billboards lure women in with messages such as: “Pregnant? Scared? We offer confidential counseling.” However, these centers don’t offer anything of the kind. Rather than counseling on the full range of reproductive options, they push the myths that abortion leads to suicide and drug addiction; that condoms don’t work because they’re “naturally porous”; and that birth control causes hair loss, memory loss, headaches, weight gain and even breast cancer. California’s 2015 Reproductive FACT Act compels CPCs to post a notice that the state has programs to subsidize comprehensive family planning services. CPCs without medical licenses are also required to disclose the fact that there are no medical professionals on the premises. This law has been challenged by anti-abortion groups and oral arguments were heard by the Supreme Court on March 20. A decision is expected by the end of June. The stakes are high because it’s the first test on abortion rights with Trump appointee Neil Gorsuch on the bench. Once again, women’s self-determination is threatened by an all-white male conservative majority. I fear they will follow in the footsteps of federal- and state-led Republican majorities and ignore the rights of women in favor of a misguided religious doctrine. Ω

Bass-ackwards I briefly mentioned last week in this space City Councilman Andrew Coolidge’s effort to agendize discussion on recodifying an ordinance that the federal government deemed antithetical to addressing homelessness. I’m talking about the so-called sit/lie law that the council adopted back in the fall of 2013. It had a sunset date: Jan. 1, 2016, roughly two years after it went into effect. That ordinance is one of two local laws that prompted the Department of Housing and Urban Development to cut $50,000 from its allocation to the Butte Countywide Continuum of Care, the local agency that administers the funds to area service providers, such as the Torres Community Shelter. That’s because, based on federal law—specifically the Homeless Emergency Assistance and Rapid Transition to Housing Act—laws like sit/lie are discriminatory. Moreover, they don’t work. Accordingly, as one agency administrator put it during an interview with CN&R last year, “we’re going backwards.” Coolidge evidently wants to dig a deeper hole. Additional potential action he’s proposing includes a shopping cart ordinance (i.e., making it harder for homeless folks to transport their belongings); discussion on park closure times (i.e., making sure homeless people can’t sleep there); discussion on areas and parks that “should have added protection from crime, violence, drugs, illegal behavior, etc.” Seems to me like Coolidge is trying to curry favor with a certain segment of constituents—namely, those affiliated with Chico First, a local group whose motto is “Unity, Action, Vigilance.” It’s an election year, after all, and he’s trying to retain his seat. Why not go for the low-hanging fruit? You see, Chico First had already suggested three of Coolidge’s five proposals (sit/lie, shopping carts, park closures). That’s according to one of the group’s founders, who sent the City Council an email this week expounding on those and other measures it’s recommending. The memo is making the rounds, and should be part of the official record when the council takes up Coolidge’s items next Tuesday, June 5. Here’s just a sampling: “Dumpster security,” “property and material distribution in parks or public spaces requiring permits,” prohibition of “exchange of any item to/from a vehicle on public streets,” “no loitering near children’s playgrounds unless supervising a child,” and prohibition of “camping in vehicles on public streets.” Meanwhile, as if to avoid alienating the folks attempting to establish a tiny house village, Coolidge has also agendized discussion on declaring a housing crisis, which would aid that effort. Seems to me like the council’s next meeting has the potential to define Chico’s path forward on addressing the issues stemming from homelessness. There are two options: we can either tackle the root causes of this crisis or we can legislate ourselves into some backwater police state.

In rElaTEd nEwS Belated thank you to the folks who came into the CN&R over the winter to drop off supplies for our annual toiletries drive—everything from toothbrushes and lotion to feminine products and socks. The items filled not only the entire trunk of my hatchback but also the backseats and floorboards. Everything is now in the hands of the folks at the Torres Community Shelter and Chico Friends on the Street, where they will be put to good use.


LETTERS

ATTENTION BOOMERS

Send email to cnrletters@newsreview.com

Four on the cover Re “Voting time” (Cover story, by CN&R staff, May 24): CalPERS/STRS is unfunded by an estimated $335 billion and the state’s budget plan only pays it down over 30 years. That’s if everything goes perfect. Our governor says, “Good news, we have a $6.8 billion surplus. I’ll save a little and spend the rest.” I’ve got news for you too, Scary Clown; you don’t have a surplus when you owe your retiring workers $335 billion you don’t have. You worked and saved your entire adult life so you wouldn’t be a burden to your children in your old age. Now it looks like you’ll be a burden after all, because they are going to tax the hell out of your kids and grandkids, as they spent, and continue to spend, government retirement funds. Delaine Eastin might sink the bullet train’s Titanic-like costs, but she’s only rearranging

the deck chairs with promises to sink the same money into other projects. Companies and middle-class taxpayers that can are abandoning California’s sinking ship. The state is becoming three-tier: the rich, the poor and a dwindling middle-class squeezed for every penny. Consider voting for John Cox, not because he inspires you, but because he’s a Republican check and balance against the otherwise unstoppable Democrat-controlled legislative spending. Peter Bridge Ord Bend

I have worked in the Butte County Auditor-Controller’s Office for the past five years. I have been directly supervised by both of the candidates running for the auditor-controller position. Graciela Gutierrez believed in and challenged me to accomplish more than I ever dreamed possible. Her encouragement, open-door policy

and readiness to answer questions boosted my confidence to accomplish the tasks set before me. We are incredibly blessed to work in an office with such a positive atmosphere. I love going to work because I get to make a difference with a group of amazing people I call my county family. Graciela leads by example and her genuinely happy attitude is contagious. The office is almost unanimous in sharing the desire for Graciela to be elected the next auditor-controller. Her experience and education is impressive, but what makes her an amazing leader is her relational personality. She gets on your page for a better understanding of the issues. She has a great team that is built on a strong foundation based on building relationships. In her time at the auditor’s office, Graciela’s opponent did not. Vote on or before June 5. (VoteGraciela.com for more info.) Rebecca Mittag Paradise

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Chico News & Review’s recent endorsement of Graciela Gutierrez for auditor is questionable at best. A state audit revealed a multimillion-dollar missallocation of funds. The county has a budget of about $550 million. I doubt there are many organizations responsible for that kind of money without a CPA on staff. A CPA does not earn just a certificate, they are licensed after passing a national four-day exam, and demonstrating their education and training to the state. The CN&R needs to rethink the use of the word “many” when referring to the number of counties in the state that do not have a CPA as auditor. The word should be “few,” not “many.” Small rural counties with limited budgets are more likely to be lacking a CPA than larger counties like Butte with half-a-billion-dollar budgets. Kathryn Mathes has worked in the auditor’s office and has experienced the deficiencies first hand. Butte County needs good financial leadership in the auditor’s office. Let’s not shortchange this county with someone who lacks proper financial training. David Johnson Chico

Editor’s note: According to the state Office of the Controller, of California’s 58 county auditorcontroller offices, 27 (less than half) are led by a CPA. The Treasurer-Tax Collector’s Office works closely with the Auditor-Controller’s Office every day in the performance of our duties and, as the treasurer for the county, I have also served on numerous committees and projects with Graciela Gutierrez over the years. I have found her to be intelligent, determined to achieve positive outcomes, and thorough in her analysis and implementation of new systems and procedures. Graciela recognizes the importance of collaboration and innovation, and has brought a fresh perspective on business practices from her private-industry background in corporate financial management. During her seven years as assistant auditor-controller, Graciela has worked tirelessly to achieve improved efficiencies, has a solid understanding of governmental accounting and, importantly, is familiar with all

of the widely varying accounting functions of the many departments and entities served by her office. Transparency, accountability, continuity of management and a keen desire to serve the public well are important. Graciela has proven leadership abilities, a master’s in public administration, and has effectively demonstrated her commitment to the duties of the auditor-controller to protect the interests of the public in overseeing, auditing and reporting the expenditure of public funds. I hope you will join me in voting for Graciela Gutierrez for Butte County auditor-controller. Peggy Moak Oroville

‘Laugh of the week’ Re “Giving the lie to two big lies” (Guest comment, by Jaime O’Neill, May 17): The laugh of the week has to be Jaime O’Neill claiming Stormy Daniels’ lawyer is better educated than Donald Trump or Rudy Giuliani. If that were the case, one wonders why he chases ambulances or why a court just ordered him to pay millions to another? One might wonder why he has not built a multibillion-dollar empire as well? Sadly, Jaime has no talent at picking people, that’s why he voted for Hillary Clinton. Michael Avenatti’s only card is to hope for a settlement to go away. True to form, he has been on CNN and other leftist-commie news shows more than the nuclear deal or the school shootings. Again, no law was broken, just the mindless left hoping for a ding on Trump. Allen Clark Paradise

Something to ponder Re “Heck of a meeting” (Letters, by Patrick Newman, May 24): My friend Patrick Newman’s point—that an unsaid narrative among well-intentioned thinking by city authorities supported by local churches is the removal of homeless people from downtown Chico—carries a bluntness that would impress Balaam’s donkey, which God used to speak wisdom to the obstinate prophet in the Jewish scriptures. Jesus himself was suitably impressed by a donkey. He rode it

to mark his entry into Jerusalem in the Christian gospels. In the case of the prophet Balaam, the donkey’s purpose was to bring him to his senses. In Jesus’ case, it was to announce not the pomp of a triumphant monarch—to do that he would enter on a war horse—rather that his mission, which was shortly to be accomplished, was to bring good news for the poor (Luke 4:18). Perhaps in Patrick’s case, it is a word from God to remind Christians who their God is: Jesus, the crucified God, is the homeless God put to death outside the city (Heb 13:12)—something all of us should ponder. I’ve learned from my children that speaking of someone as a “badass” is a huge compliment. Bill Such Chico

Editor’s note: The author is the former executive director of the Jesus Center.

Proactive, not reactive Please stop the insanity! Protests, boycotts, calls for gun control, reactive measures—like cameras, barring doors, shotdetectors, arming teachers—does nothing to prevent the shooter from entering the campus. The answer is incredibly simple: Install a campus perimeter fence with a single entrance/exit sally-port through which all persons entering the campus must pass through. Plug in a walk-through metal/ shape detector(s) and have the school resource officer (SRO) on task at opening and closing. Vendor/emergency gates can be wired for access/send text/pictures to front desk, SRO, etc. All other vehicles—including buses—remain outside the fence. Security is achieved through rings of defense, starting at the perimeter and working in. Isn’t that why the White House, airports, elites, athletic fields, military bases, etcetera, have perimeter fences? And yet our K-12 schools do not? Every community—this summer!—needs to raise funds, supply labor, and get it done. Now! We can no longer afford to wait for the decision-makers to form committees, debate and maybe, just maybe, agree to anything. And then ultimately waste valuable resources on reactive measures without ever considering the proactive measure which

discourages shooters from ever entering the campus in the first place. John J. Blenkush Forest Ranch

More on mass shootings Anyone interested in the mindset of our so-called representative, Doug LaMalfa, should note his explanation for doing nothing on our proliferation of violence. Mr. LaMalfa’s response for a lack of effort to stop these events is basically that new gun laws won’t work because criminals do not buy legal weapons. How clueless or dishonest is this guy? All of the recent mass shootings were done with legally bought weapons—the school shootings as well as the Las Vegas shooting were with legal guns. LaMalfa is inherently dishonest. Marc Deveraux Chico

In light of the recent school shootings, it’s time we stop wringing our hands and look at the culture of violence in our country. What can we do about it? Well, we used to allow children in grade school (with their parents’ permission) to attend surrounding churches for Sunday school. Each week we were released early, for one hour, and allowed to experience different religions. I was Catholic but got to visit other religions, singing their songs and learning. The Ten Commandments were taught in these churches. You know: thou shall not kill, or steal, etc. Atheists have cowed our schools into no longer doing this. Schools have stopped saying the Pledge of Allegiance every day (even omitting “under God”) in some instances. When children have no respect for God, authority, parents or humanity in general, our American culture suffers. When students who bully or are cruel to one another: you have the perfect storm! Guns don’t kill people. The violent culture of our country kills people. Take guns away, it’ll be knives or clubs. Loretta Ann Torres Chico More letters online:

We’ve got too many letters for this space. please go to www.newsreview.com/chico for additional readers’ comments on past cn&r articles.


STREETALK

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Nina Dobrev, as she acted in Flatliners. She’s a gorgeous actress, and who wouldn’t want to come back to life?

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Danny DeVito. We’re both about the same height with the same facial features, and we’re both crazy.

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NEWSLINES DOWNSTROKE WEEKEND MAYHEM

Chico Police were busy over the Memorial Day weekend, with a shooting and a high-profile arrest. On Sunday (May 27) around 3:40 a.m., a fight erupted on the 1200 block of North Cedar Street, ending with a shooting in which no wounded victims were found, according to a press release. Police arrested suspects Shevvy Franklin, 19; William Stewart, 18; and Ryan Brown, 19, all from Benicia. About 6:30 p.m. the night before, officers received a noise complaint about a party on the 600 block of West Eighth Street. As the crowd dispersed, Shawntre Tillis, 23, of Antioch, was arrested for possessing a concealed, loaded revolver in public, and outstanding warrants. Tillis appears to be the same person implicated in a drunken-driving collision on Interstate 5 last March that killed two others, according to the Butte County District Attorney’s Office.

OROVILLE DAM REGULATIONS

More requirements for Lake Oroville’s facilities, including the dam, could be in store. Congress will consider the Energy and Water Development Appropriations Bill, which was developed and approved by a subcommittee of the Senate on May 24. It would require the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) to brief congressional committees on its response to the independent study done of the Oroville Dam’s spillways. Also, the California Department of Water Resources would have to ask the U.S. Society on Dams to nominate independent consultants to prepare a risk analysis during the dam’s safety review next year. The bill also encourages prioritizing “meaningful opportunities for public engagement” with state and local governments during the relicensing process, which should “remain transparent and consistent, and ensure the health, safety, and security of the environment and each affected community.”

SCHOOL LOCKDOWN

Chico Junior High was placed on lockdown for about five minutes around 1:45 p.m. Tuesday (May 29) while Chico Police chased a burglary suspect, Steven McFarland, 26, of Sacramento, as he ran from Mangrove Avenue through Chico Cemetery and onto the school grounds, according to a press release. Originally, an AT&T employee attempted to detain McFarland (pictured) after he was allegedly observed stealing thousands of dollars’ worth of cellphones from the store in the Safeway shopping center. McFarland was arrested in the area of East Lincoln and Oleander avenues, after he was seen exiting the backyard of a residence, and the stolen items were returned. 8

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Fighting to be heard Environmental interests say they don’t have enough input on local groundwater

Ano one last meeting, Susan Strachan surprised who knows her when she declared

t the Butte County Board of Supervisors’

that the interests of domestic well users and the environment need story and ample representation photo by in groundwater goverEvan Tuchinsky nance. She surprised eva nt u c h i ns k y @ n ew srev i ew. c o m everyone, friends and strangers alike, when she suddenly announced Next venue: her resignation from the The Butte County Groundwater Pumpers Water Commission will consider the resolution Advisory Committee—a recognizing BEC as a board created expressly groundwater represen- to accord citizen input to tative Wednesday (June policymakers. 6) at 1:30 p.m. in the The supervisors’ Board of Supervisors chambers. meeting May 22 came a day after the GPAC convened at Chico State’s University Farm. To her consternation, Strachan’s colleagues had declined to consider a resolution put forth by the Butte Environmental Council for the county to recognize BEC as a representative of groundwater interests. Supervisors previously passed a comparable resolution for

an agricultural group. The resolution was just the latest issue in which Strachan found herself a lone voice. Her frustration compounded when a committee member made a comment she took as discounting the importance of environmental protection. Strachan, project manager for the Chico State Geographical Information Center, served on the county water commission from 2007 to 2010. At the GPAC meeting, she recounted to the CN&R, “I said I didn’t see what my role on the committee was. I had not decided at that point [to quit], but I don’t see it being useful to be 8-to-1, 7-to-1 or 6-to-1 on everything.” Paul Gosselin, county director of water resources, says her contributions have been valuable. As water commissioner, she helped author the water resource element of the county general plan, “which became one of the best water elements of any general plan in the state,” he said. “She has an outstanding, creative policy mind.” GPAC member Les Heringer expressed a similar sentiment. He’d made the comment that provoked Strachan: “I don’t know how much the environment needs protecting in Butte County.” Heringer told

the CN&R he “did probably misspeak” and explained he inferred that protection measures for the environment in state law apply, by definition, locally. The state law encompassing all this— governance, planning, GPAC—is the Sustainable Groundwater Management Act, or SGMA. This legislation grants local authority over underground water supplies, divided by “sub-basins” (geological caches). Local agencies have until 2022 to form plans to, as the law title says, manage groundwater sustainably. At the GPAC meeting, Heringer said, he meant to express that in “implementing SGMA, I felt through the original 2014 legislation that the environment and domestic well users are fully protected. “For the life of me, I don’t know why it would appear we are pitting one user against another, because it’s not that way with this legislation—everyone is protected—and if [a plan proves] not sustainable, ag is going to have to make some changes, not necessarily domestic well users, or the environment.” Butte County overlaps four groundwater

sub-basins: Vina (Chico area), Wyandotte


Susan Strachan says she worries domestic well users will get eclipsed by farmers in governing groundwater. That’s the way she felt on the county pumpers advisory board.

(Oroville area), West Butte (southwest county) and East Butte (southeast county). Each will have a separate governance structure under SGMA, decided upon by agencies involved: the county, cities and water districts. The working proposals for Vina and Wyandotte both delineate a five-member governing board with an advisory committee to ensure various groups’ inclusion. Each governing board would comprise five representatives: the county, the respective city, special district, an ag user and a domestic user. East Butte and West Butte face complicated agreements because, instead of three entities apiece, those sub-basins encompass 13 and eight, respectively. County supervisors at the last meeting voted to recommend representation of two ag users and one domestic user. That balance—or imbalance—spurred Strachan to address the board. “The agricultural wells tend to be much deeper, so the domestic well owners are kind of like the canary in the coal mine,” Strachan told the CN&R—not only for drops in groundwater levels, but also danger to flora and fauna. Moreover, “some of the neighborhoods that are served by domestic wells are very low-income, and they don’t have resources to deepen their wells should there be issues.” Natalie Carter, BEC’s executive director, echoed Strachan’s perspective on equal representation. “Farmers say, ‘We represent domestic users—we have domestic wells,’ and they do, and they absolutely have a shared perspective in that,” Carter said. “They don’t want their domestic wells to go dry. “That’s not to say we shouldn’t have a voice for someone who is only a domestic well user and doesn’t have ties to the agricultural interests in this community, which are so valuable, but shouldn’t be the only voice at the table.” In seeking recognition from the county, BEC wants to become a—not the— representative for users of groundwater from shallow depths. That’s the connection BEC sees between advocacy for groundwater-dependent ecosystems and homeowners who depend on wells—and why Carter says it’s important for the county to recognize multiple constituencies. “[SGMA conveys] a 50-year horizon to sustainability,” she added. “The whole design is local control, and our local voices include a wide variety.” Ω

Considering cannabis Informational sessions open discussion on legal businesses in Oroville Last Thursday, Oroville residents got the first

taste of what life with commercial marijuana might look like in their community. At least, that was the idea behind two information sessions— one in the morning, one in the evening—run by SCI Consulting Group, which was hired in March by the city to study the matter. The sessions, held in the Oroville Municipal Auditorium, focused on community research and outreach—the first of six key elements to implementing commercial cannabis, explained consultant Neil Hall, who led the morning session. The goal of the sessions was to provide an overview of what legalizing commercial activities would look like, including physical representations of businesses as well as things like zoning, application processes, fees and taxation. “We’re looking at five main activities: retail, manufacturing, cultivation, testing and distribution,” Hall said. He explained those main activities and showed photographs of businesses in other communities to illustrate that the industry tends to be low-key. “The only activity that is open to the public is retail,” he said. Manufacturers, for example, aren’t plastering signs on the sides of their buildings advertising what sort of business is taking place inside, he explained. And, as a regular inspector of cannabis businesses in California, he said the ability to control odor—a main concern for most

communities considering legalization—has improved to the point that the smell can be nearly entirely contained within a building. Hall said this is an opportunity for Oroville to take control of an industry that likely will grow in the region one way or another. Some communities have passed ballot initiatives, for example. “They are typically not as well-written as those written by a city attorney who is looking out for the city’s interests,” he said. He also pointed to the likelihood that the state will begin to take control from local governments if so many maintain bans on commercial cannabis. “The state is gradually going to start saying, ‘If you don’t allow it, we’re going to,’” Hall said. “The state wants their money. There’s a bill going through [the state Legislature] that would allow deliveries in places where bans are in place. They say it’s about access. Sure, maybe it’s about access. But it’s really about money.” Speaking of money, taxation is a key element that must be acted on sooner than later, Hall said. In order for a local tax initiative to

SIFT ER Two-term Trump? Voters fearful that President Trump could get a second term will not like the results of a recent Gallup poll. That’s because, while up to 59 percent of those registered to vote think he does not deserve to be re-elected, the percentage of those who say he does deserve to spend another four years in the White House (37 percent) is “essentially identical to that of Bill Clinton and Barack Obama at the time of the 1994 and 2010 midterm elections, respectively.” And, of course, those two former presidents are two-termers. Here are the results of the survey, broken down by party, of those expressing support for the incumbent:

Democrats 2018 Donald Trump 2010 Barack Obama 2002 George W. Bush 1994 Bill Clinton

6% 79% 32% 71%

Independents

Republicans

32% 34% 60% 32%

78% 5% 93% 8%

This is one example of a cannabis dispensary presented during last Thursday’s information sessions on legalizing commercial activities in Oroville. PHOTO COURTESY OF SCI CONSULTING

qualify for the November ballot, the process must begin no later than July. A special election would be costly, he warned. He broke down how some nearby communities have handled the matter. Shasta Lake, for instance, has a fairly complicated system that taxes retail stores at 6 percent, nurseries and distribution facilities at 3 percent and cultivation facilities per square foot. Davis, on the other hand, taxes all cannabis businesses at 10 percent. The second half of the information session

was opened up for citizen input. Tom Lando, interim city administrator, prefaced this portion by alerting the 35 or so in attendance that “this is an informational meeting, not a public hearing.” Most of those who spoke, however, treated it as the latter, providing reasons why they were for or against cannabis itself and allowing related businesses in Oroville. Some valid questions were raised, however, such as how businesses will be able to operate without the ability to bank (banks that are federally regulated cannot accept money from businesses that are not federally recognized). “Commercial real estate is going up,” one man said. “What’s the impact that this is going to have on our community?” The next step in the process, Hall said, will be putting together a stakeholders group to draft an ordinance. There also will be a public hearing on June 19, Lando added. In all, Hall told the CN&R this week, attendance at both sessions was less than expected, though he felt they went well. “We were surprised, because we expected a larger turnout in the evening,” he said. “The evening’s discussion was more animated than the morning session, but everyone was polite, and we had a civil discussion.” —MEREDITH J. COOPER me r e d i th c @ newsr ev iew.c o m

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C O N T I N U E D F R O M PA G E 9

On the brink California’s high rent leaves many one crisis away from financial ruin Charlene Holkenbrink-Monk tracks

her family’s monthly budget on an Excel spreadsheet. Panic usually sets in by the end of the month. “Because oftentimes we are negative by about $10,” HolkenbrinkMonk said. “If we had some unexpected expense, we wouldn’t know how to figure it out. We wouldn’t know how to pay for it. We literally have zero dollars in our savings account right now.” Her situation is hardly a rarity. More than a third of California families don’t have enough money to pay for basic living expenses for three months without an income, according to Washington, D.C.-

FAIR WAY

based Prosperity Now. Although California ranks only slightly higher than the rest of the country, on average, experts believe the state’s residents face a bigger barrier to socking money away into a rainy day fund. “Clearly, California has a housing problem and a housing affordability problem that’s sucking out income,” said Erik Bruvold, chief executive officer at the San Diego North Economic Development Council. “We have these escalating housing prices and these really low personal savings rates.” For Holkenbrink-Monk, it is the escalation of housing costs that, she said, have drained her of

More than 62,000 people passed through the gates of the Silver Dollar Fair this year, according to Scott Stoller, fair manager. He has run the fair for the past nine years, but says he’s soon leaving Chico to manage the Colorado State Fair. He told the CN&R it has been a privilege to be at the helm of “one of the best fairs in the state.” Just over 500 animals were sold this year, for a total of $1.2 million that went directly to kids involved in agriculture. PHOTO COURTESY OF SILVER DOLLAR FAIR

any hope of building a savings for emergencies. She moved her family into a two-bedroom apartment in San Diego in 2014 for $1,525 a month. Since then, her rent has gone up more than $400. It is about to increase again in July by another $110. “It’s pretty infuriating and pretty heartbreaking,” she said. “Especially since part of that increase was they tacked on pet rent, a maintenance fee, administrative fees and they increased our water.” She is employed part-time as a community college sociology professor and is working on a Ph.D. in education. Her husband works full time in culinary services at UC San Diego. He is also in school. Their combined monthly takehome pay is $4,200, which has to cover expenses for the family of four, which includes two young children. The couple has not started paying down their $160,000 student loan debt. And she said even with better jobs and a little more pay, she and her husband continue to pay half of their income on rent and utilities because of increases. Since 2013, the average monthly rent on a three-bedroom apartment has jumped 19 percent in California, according to Irvinebased ATTOM Data Solutions. Home prices are up nearly 40 percent. “Roughly since that time period, we’ve seen average wages go up 9 percent,” said Daren Blomquist, ATTOM’s senior vice president of communications. “It’s not sustainable at all.” More than half of the state’s renters and more than a third of its homeowners are considered housing burdened, according to the California Budget & Policy Center. That means they are paying over a third of their income on housing. And a third of renters in the state and 16 percent of homeowners are paying more than half of their paycheck to cover housing. The trend is shifting elsewhere


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in the United States. Homeowners have been spending an increasingly smaller share of their household income on housing in recent years, according to Next 10, a nonpartisan data collection group that focuses on quality-of-life issues in California. Meanwhile, the gap between what California homeowners pay for housing compared to the rest of the nation grew 3.8 percent from 2014 to 2016. University of San Diego economics professor Alan Gin said there is a practical reason the federal government recommends that people not spend more than 30 percent of their income on housing. “Somebody gets ill,” Gin said. “Your car breaks down. There’s damage to your house or something like that where you’re going to need money, if people don’t have any savings at all, they’re going to be in serious financial difficulties.” Holkenbrink-Monk knows this scenario well. “We had one car break down on us and we didn’t have the money to fix it,” she said. “So, it’s gotten to the point where we just don’t use it. We can’t use it. We’re going to end up getting rid of it.” She said she cannot borrow from friends and family because they are also struggling. Holkenbrink-Monk believes California’s housing affordability problem won’t change until renters speak up. “They don’t want to get kicked out because it’s too expensive to move anywhere else,” she said. She argued, however, that fear can be overcome. “I think we need to stop being afraid of talking about money too because it is such a stigma to not have enough money to pay for things,” Holkenbrink-Monk said. “I think if we break through that it would be easier to be like, ‘Hey, I don’t have any money and neither do you,’ and we should be really angry about this and start telling people, ‘No, I don’t want to pay this anymore.’”

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HEALTHLINES

Heart of the matter

Austin Eubanks shared his experience, both onstage and off, during the California Opioid Summit last week at Chico State.

Opioid summit brings statistics to life through stories of death

story and photo by

Evan Tuchinsky

evantuc hin sk y @ n ewsrev i ew. com

Acould, April 20, 1999. Even if he he wouldn’t—he relives that ustin Eubanks will never forget

day frequently, recounting its most terrifying moments, in front of rapt audiences around the country. That morning, per usual on a weekday at 11:19 a.m., Eubanks sat with his best friend, Corey, in the library, eating lunch. As the 17-year-olds bandied their afterschool options—fishing or golf— Corey interjected, “Sounds like gunshots.” They dismissed the notion, immediately returning to conversation. The thought of a school shooting was “unfathomable,” Eubanks explained last Tuesday (May 22) at Chico State; there was no point of reference. Until that day. Until that school: Columbine High.

12

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Five minutes later, teacher Patti Nielson rushed in and told everybody to get under the tables, “someone has a gun.” She chronicled the unfolding tragedy on a 911 call (which Eubanks played). Within another five minutes, Corey would be the last of 10 students killed in the library. Eubanks— among the 12 injured, shot in the hand and knee—scrambled out the back door, only then realizing how badly he was hurt. Receiving medical treatment in a triage area, he “couldn’t feel anything” emotionally. Only after a half-hour, when his father scrambled over a fence to reach his son, did Eubanks experience a catharsis. He went limp from screaming in his father’s arms. Comfort came at the hospital, medicinally, with morphine and sedatives. “I remember it felt like someone put a warm blanket over me,” he said. “And I was drawn to that feeling.” In retrospect, he said, within a week of leaving the hospital, he probably didn’t need narcotics for pain relief. Yet, he went home with

a 30-day supply of hydrocodone— aka Norco—and was prescribed more three days later, giving him two months’ worth. Eubanks soon fell into an “addiction spiral” of prescription drugs, recreational drugs, alcohol—“anything that would let me detach and not be present,” he said. “I was not willing to experience the stages of grief.” It took him until April 2011 to find lasting sobriety. Now, he’s chief operating officer for Foundry Treatment Center in Steamboat Springs, Colo., a three-hour drive from Columbine. Eubanks came to Chico for the California Opioid Summit, co-sponsored by Butte County’s Behavioral Health and Public Health departments as well as the Butte-Glenn Medical Society. The two-day event addressed the nationwide epidemic of opiate abuse, which has resulted in escalating overdoses and deaths (see infobox); Eubanks contributed not only his story, but also a thoughtprovoking premise echoed by others.

“Pain isn’t always tissue damage,” he said, “and when [medical practitioners only] treat it as such, you’ll see what we see today.” Indeed, by declaring that “opioids

reduce symptoms of emotional pain better than symptoms of physical pain,” Eubanks intersected the message of another keynote speaker, John Underwood, who addressed a half-full Bell Memorial Union for a community forum last Monday evening and a full BMU the next afternoon. The symposium drew professionals from across California to hear from nationally prominent experts such as Eubanks and Underwood. As director of the Human Performance Project, an organization that develops science-based training regimens, Underwood has coached Olympians and advised sports federations as well as the U.S. military. His campaign for drugfree athletics, Life of an Athlete, includes Butte County’s Athlete Committed program. “People can probably stand a

lot more pain than they think they can stand,” he told the community forum, after detailing Navy SEAL training sessions he’s witnessed. SEALs call pain “weakness leaving the body,” he said; for athletes, “pain is a regular and often daily part of life.” Everyone has a pain threshold and develops tolerance to a level of pain over time. “The legitimate intent for the administration of opioids is extreme pain,” he continued. But people self-report pain, with no external objective measure for comparison or confirmation; “sometimes they’re not in as much pain as they’d lead you to believe.” The pain level may get distorted subconsciously or—as with addicts seeking pills—intentionally. Like Eubanks, Underwood zeroed in on emotional ache, such as the pain of social exclusion. More broadly even, “pain is an emotion—an emotional response.” He also noted that studies have shown “pain is often increased by attending to it.” Underwood, whose wife is a physician assistant, presented medical information on the impacts of opioid use, including brain scans, neurochemical data and research. His refrain on the epidemic was more visceral than factual: “People should be pissed this ever got going where it’s going.” April Rovero, like Eubanks, draws

deeply from a well of personal pain that most would choose to leave untapped. She speaks to audiences nationwide, twice before at Enloe Medical Center. She lives in San Ramon but flew in from Connecticut, where she was vacationing with her husband, expressly to share her story at the


university. Rovero’s day of tragedy was Dec. 18, 2009—a week before her son, Joey, was to come home for Christmas from Arizona State. That Thanksgiving, she and her husband learned Joey’s roommates had stopped paying their share of the rent for their apartment; what they didn’t know was his friends’ addictions to narcotics would lead their son to a doctor and pharmacy in Southern California, where he’d obtain prescription pills to resell to pay the bills. She described Joey as a “popular kid” who was “living the life” at ASU. He belonged to a fraternity and enjoyed the party scene, yet had a five-year relationship with the girlfriend he’d dated since senior year of high school. Having just finished finals, he found the presence of pills tempting. Sampling opioids with alcohol proved a lethal combination: Joey died in his apartment at age 21. “I miss him every single day,” Rovero said, “because I talk about him every single day.” Until losing him, she added, “I

Sobering statistics:

Information presented at the California Opioid Summit included: Opioids are the third most prescribed medication in the U.S. americans get 289 million opioid prescriptions annually; the total population is 326 million. The U.S., with 4.6 percent of the world’s people, takes 80 percent of all opioids. americans use 99 percent of the world’s oxycodone. In the U.S., 68,000 people died from drug overdoses last year (up 12 percent from 2017).

· · · · ·

never would have believed my son would have died of an overdose.” It wasn’t just what she calls “the denial factor”; she and other parents simply weren’t educated on the dangers. In response, she established the National Coalition Against Prescription Drug Abuse, and for the past eight years has been a public speaker, educator and advocate for safety reforms. “I know I can’t save the world,” Rovero said, “but I can save some people; some people listen.” Ω

   WEEKLY DOSE   

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Protect horses from West Nile

Butte County officials urge horse owners to vaccinate their animals for West Nile virus, an illness transmitted to animals and people through infected mosquitoes. The vaccination is an inexpensive and effective way to prevent the disease. Last year, 21 horses in California tested positive for the disease, and eight of those animals died or were euthanized. Horses spend most of their time outdoors, of course, so they have a greater risk than humans and other animals of coming into contact with infected mosquitoes, especially during dusk or dawn. You can help make your horse’s home safer by draining standing water, cleaning holding containers and stocking ponds and tanks with mosquito-eating fish. West Nile virus can cause a variety of symptoms in horses, similar to rabies and equine herpes. Call your vet if your horse is stumbling or seems generally weak, exhibits drooping lips or teeth grinding, becomes sensitive to touch or sounds, or has difficulty rising. Find more information at buttewnv.com. Source: Butte County Public Health

 

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Investment and Insurance Products: X NOT FDIC Insured X NO Bank Guarantee X MAY Lose Value  Wells Fargo Advisors is a trade name used by Wells Fargo Clearing Services, LLC, Member SIPC, a registered broker-dealer and non-bank affiliate of Wells Fargo & Company. © 2012 Wells Fargo Clearing Services, LLC. All rights reserved. 1116-00738 [79510-v4BDC] A1255  CN&R 13  M ay 3 1 , 2 0 1 8


GREENWAYS Master gardener Kay Perkins showcases the woolly bluecurls thriving at Demonstration Garden established at Patrick Ranch in 2013.

Splendor versus grass Patrick Ranch Demonstration Garden exhibits sustainable landscapes story and photo by

Ashiah Scharaga ashiahs@ n ewsrev i ew. com

OrockRanch, a bird perched on the edge of a fountain, dipping its beak into fresh n a warm May afternoon at Patrick

water. Bees the size of grapes buzzed about nearby, dancing on cloud-like bunches of yarrow flowers; and a lizard, startled by sudden human presence, scurried to the safety of its garden home under the Seussian poufs of a woolly bluecurls shrub. Kay Perkins was guiding a personalized tour around the Demonstration Garden, a 1-acre spot that has grown over the past five years from a patch of weeds and Johnson grass to a lush area with several plots, potting sheds and an outdoor classroom. It has been a labor of love for Perkins and her fellow volunteers with the UC Master Gardeners of Butte County, about 120 members strong. Their mission is straightforward, but far from simple: teaching homeowners and small farmers how to garden sustainably, protecting wildlife and the environment, and conserving vital resources like water. “There’s nothing like having a garden to teach in,” Perkins said. “We let people put their hands on the plants and in the dirt.” Last week, the same day as the tour, a class of elementary-school children visited the garden for a field trip, and adults learned how to prune fruit trees during a workshop. From the cauliflower-like swells of milkweed to the wayward tufts of deer grass to the popular hummingbird treat of the purple penstemon, there’s a lot to take in at the garden. And it isn’t even finished yet. Perkins gazed at bare expanses the way an artist looks at a canvas she’s eager to paint, masterpiece already in mind. A succulent garden is still to come, and lavender

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will be planted near the pathway, kissing people’s heels. In one section, she told the CN&R, there will be an entirely edible and ornamental food garden, and in another, a plot dedicated to noninvasive, climate-compatible Australian plants. The plan is to have this all in place by the end of the year, with a final project taking a bit longer due to funding constraints: a garden for youth geared toward fostering an interest in botany by providing hands-on experience. “We’re going to make it look like somebody’s real backyard,” Perkins said. There’s a misconception that sustainable

gardening means no variety, texture or color when, in fact, it’s the opposite, Perkins said. “Most people think if they have to take out their lawn and go low-water or native, it’ll be just rock or cactus.” Another counterintuitive notion is that every grass yard is bad. “If you have five kids who play on the lawn, keep it. If you don’t, think about something else,” she said. Jennifer Jewell, host of the gardening program “Cultivating Place” on North State Public Radio, shares a similar perspective. She grew up in the mountains of Colorado, where her passion for gardening was Get growing:

Butte County has more than 100 master gardeners actively hosting workshops and providing advice. For more information, visit ucanr.edu/sites/bcmg/ or call 538-7201.

instilled by her mother, an avid gardener and florist, and father, a wildlife biologist. Her family used resources judiciously out of necessity, cultivating a thriving sustainable garden. For this reason, Jewell said, she cringes when she looks down a street and sees 90 percent of homes maintaining lawns— “There’s no habitat there, and there’s a huge amount of resources [being used] in the way of water, the people who come to mow and blow it, and the fertilizer that goes to that color green.” And, when she sees people replacing their lawns, it’s often with a “strange conglomeration of plants that look good” at big-box retail stores but will struggle in the Butte County climate. Perkins said those interested in redesigning or starting their own sustainable gardens need to start by recognizing what is important to them: namely, how they plan to use their outdoor space and how much maintenance they can manage. “There are so many more wonderful things that can be done with [grass yards] that are better for the environment,” she added, “and that’s what we try to teach.” When it comes to keeping a beautiful, sus-

tainable garden, Perkins offers some key steps: build and maintain healthy soil with compost and mulch (avoiding over-fertilizing); choose plants that are well-adapted to the climate, noninvasive and attract wildlife like birds and butterflies; use proper irrigation to conserve water and maintain its quali-

ty; and practice integrated pest management, avoiding pesticides as much as possible. The Demonstration Garden is a prime example of these techniques in action, and Jewell encourages people to visit. “It’s a wonderful resource in our area, and it’s free,” she said. “Go ask questions, look, see what you like.” Congruently, Jewell suggests finding homes with admirable gardens, knocking on the door and asking about them; additionally, gathering advice at independent local nurseries and on garden tours. Gardening societies and clubs are inexpensive to join and “full of amazing, intelligent people.” In fact, that’s how Perkins and Jewell met. The master gardeners are busy doing their part to teach as many people as possible. Perkins said the workshops they host—about 16 to 18 per year, on subjects from seed-starting and propagation to compost-building and drip irrigation—are so much fun because she can see the revelations people experience. “If you want to be inspired, you can be,” she said. “We get ourselves in these cycles of ruining nature and putting in store-bought things. “It’s a discipline. You have to learn to be patient because nature is slower than the chemical solutions, but it’s sustainable longterm, and the other solutions are not.” Ω

ECO EVENT

COUNT THEM FLUTTER BY The North American Butterfly Association’s annual count gives you a chance to chase butterflies for science! Organized by Don Miller of Chico State’s Department of Biological Sciences, our local count takes place on Friday, June 1, 7 a.m.-4 p.m., at the Big Chico Creek Ecological Reserve. Volunteers will gather data by counting the number of butterflies and species within the reserve. Those numbers get added to a database that scientists use to track butterfly populations and biology in North America. You can contact Miller at dgmiller@csuchico.edu to offer to help; there is a $3 participant fee.


EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS PHOTO BY CATHY WAGNER

15 MINUTES

Pizza for the people Rob and Sarah McKay are creating the life of their dreams with their mobile wood-fire pizza business, Drifter Pizza Co. They’ve been together their whole lives; they grew up in Santa Cruz and met in third grade, they started “going together” in eighth grade and have been married now for 20 years. Soon after they got married, the McKays moved to Sebastopol, where Rob spent 17 years as a paramedic and Sarah was a manager and then owner of a climbing gym. They realized, with the birth of their daughter, Tallulah, now 4, that they would have to restructure their lives if they were going to be the kind of dedicated and focused parents they had always wanted to be. And so Drifter Pizza Co. was born. The McKays started the business in 2016 and enjoyed a lot of success with private events in the wine country, but with a second child on the way, they decided to move closer to family, many of whom were in Butte County. Earlier this month, they brought their brand of “farmto-fire,” Neapolitan-inspired, wood-fired pizza to Chico. They use a sourdough starter for their crust, so it’s a naturally leavened dough, and they source everything as locally and as organically as possible. Give them a try at the Tuesday farmers’ market in Paradise, the Wednesday market in Chico or the Saturday Market in Chico. Visit drifterpizza.com for more information or to

THE GOODS

Mom tribe

arrange your own private event.

Why pizza? Rob: I love the social aspect of pizza. You can go into any pizzeria and … a tech person will be sitting right next to a blue-collar, dig-in-the-dirt construction worker or landscape artist. It puts everyone on an even playing field and people identify with that. I love how it can really bring a community together, socially.

Sarah, do you share Rob’s love of pizza? Sarah: Before we started Drifter, his uncle used to call me Pizza McKay because I just love pizza—but this is Rob’s brainchild and passion.

Why did you leave Sebastopol? Sarah: We really felt like we were in a lot of transition in our lives, with career stuff for both of us and of course our expanding

family, and so we just felt like in Sebastopol we were totally on our own, no family support, and you have to have two full-time incomes to survive. It just got to the point where we were like, “We can do this, but we’re just strung out!”

What do you like about Chico? Rob: One of the things we intended for Drifter Pizza Co. in the first place was the community aspect of it, the social aspect of pizza that I talked so strongly about. We were a part of the community in Sebastopol for 20 years and as soon as we started the pizza thing, it just seemed like we got swallowed up by the private event monster that’s there. We never got a chance to do much public stuff, which is what we get a chance to do up here. —CATHY WAGNER

by

Meredith J. Cooper meredithc@newsreview.com

Back in January, the CN&R interviewed sisters Kelley Sexton and Shannon Rowley, who’d recently moved here from San Diego and opened their own business geared toward children: Chico Princess Parties. Well, I checked in with them last week and it turns out their once-small venture has already grown, so much so that they had to move out of their quaint cottage on Williamsburg Lane and into the hustle and bustle of downtown. Now, you can find Sexton and Rowley in a sweet suite above Naked Lounge. And they have some pretty cool plans for the summer. First, they’ll be holding summer camps, some of which are offered through the Chico Area Parks and Recreation District. One week will be Jungle Camp, the next Pirate Camp …. Sounds pretty fun! My favorite new offering, though, is the Kids Club they’re planning to start up in the next couple of weeks. For $10 an hour, parents will be able to drop their children off and then go have dinner downtown—no need for a babysitter, plus the kids get social interaction. One room in the suite will be a dance party; the other will be a movie room. “The idea is that you pick up your kids and they’re ready for bed,” Sexton said. What’s more, Sexton and Rowley didn’t move in above Naked Lounge alone; they brought friends with them. Ruth Wagner, owner of SpOiled Shoppe; and Krystle Stetson, who has a photography studio, are neighbors. The women met through the Chico Mothers Club (Rowley is the only one without kids of her own) and all happened to be looking for commercial space at the same time. “I love being able to support and collaborate with other business mamas,” Wagner told me. Her shop is stocked with essential oils and she also hosts oil workshops. Stetson agreed. When she moved with her fiancé to Chico from the Bay Area three years ago, she said she didn’t know a soul, so she joined the Chico Mothers Club, which she said has been a fantastic resource. “The idea behind moving into the same space was to mom tribe it a little bit,” she said. “It’s been really great. We all understand the craziness that happens when you have kids. And it’s just awesome to have these moms in your corner.” All three have Facebook pages. Search Chico Princess Parties, SpOiled Shoppe or Krystle Stetson Photography to learn more.

WATCH OUT When one door closes, another opens, right? Downtown clothing store Kreations recently shut its doors—but do not fear; owner AnneMarie Peters assures her loyal customers that she’s not quitting, but merely getting out of the brick-and-mortar game. On the store’s Facbook page, she says she’s keeping her brand—watch out for pop-ups and other events on the horizon. As Kreations leaves 130 W. Third St., a new tenant prepares to move in. The Watchman, a longtime fixture in the Chico Mall, will be taking over the space in July. The 15th is the store’s last day at the mall, and they hope to open up downtown by the end of the month.

NO.

It Is A Complete sentenCe

Serving Butte, Glenn & Tehama Counties

342-RAPE

24 hr. hotline (Collect Calls Accepted) www.rapecrisis.org M AY 3 1 , 2 0 1 8

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r t e o H summ

n o i t c a A guide to the season’s potential best and worst films

by Bob Grimm bobg @new srev i ew. c o m

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L

ook, folks, I know Netflix, Apple TV and Hulu are all great ways watch movies (see sidebar for advice on some great selections) rather than going out to a theater. But big screens in stinky multiplexes are still the best. A trip to the theater comes with the added value of $197 popcorn and drinks, and the opportunity to catch bedbugs, head lice and strep throat while somebody threatens to beat you up for texting during the flick or mug you in the parking lot afterward. Hmm … not making a good argument for going out to the movies, am I? Maybe this will help. Here’s a rundown of what’s coming this summer movie season. Well, not every movie, but a choice selection. Lots of superheroes, sharks, The Rock, animation and dinosaurs, along with some Chekhov thrown in for good measure. I give you this, my summer movie preview!

Now playing

Deadpool 2: On the encouraging side, the guy who directed John Wick was at the helm of this sequel. On the not-so-encouraging side, Ryan Reynolds’ shtick as the smartass antihero is getting a little tired in all of the previews. Deadpool is getting to be like a movie reviewer who is a little too impressed with his own not-so-clever clever jokes. How to Talk to Girls at Parties: In preparing for this article, I watched the preview for this. It’s an early contender for one of the year’s weirdest movies. Elle Fanning stars as an alien living in London, and it’s written and directed by John Cameron Mitchell (Hedwig and the Angry Inch). It co-stars Nicole Kidman in full punk regalia. Solo: A Star Wars Story: Ron Howard stepped in to take over directing chores after the guys who directed The Lego Movie got kicked off the set for being jerks to famed producer Kathleen Kennedy. Alden Ehrenreich, a name I will never spell correctly without triple-checking, steps into the role of Han Solo—a Han Solo long before he got all regrettably huggy with his lightsaber-wielding son. Why didn’t they release this on May 4?


June

Action Point (June 1): When I was a teen, I used to spend parts of my summers at a crazy amusement park called Action Park in New Jersey. The notorious park had a death toll from people cashing out violently on their water slides and their jacked-up rides, and drowning in their Tidal Wave pool. (I almost died in that sucker.) How appropriate that Johnny Knoxville and parts of his Jackass crew mount a movie loosely based on Action Park. I’m thinking this thing will bring back pleasant memories of second-degree sunburns, sprained ankles and water in my lungs.

Ocean’s 8 (June 8): Sandra Bullock stars as Debbie Ocean, sister to George Clooney’s Danny, and equally big-minded when it comes to pulling a heist. Anne Hathaway and Cate Blanchett co-star, with an appearance by Matt Damon. I couldn’t be less excited about this particular thing.

Adrift (June 1): Shailene Woodley stars as a woman who, along with her boyfriend, winds up adrift at sea after boating through a hurricane. Whenever I see a movie like this or Cast Away, I can’t help but think about how bad everybody must smell due to the lack of showering and deodorant. Like that show Survivor … that set must stink!

Hereditary (June 8): Brace yourselves, folks. This horror movie, the directorial debut of a dude named Ari Aster, is getting some major buzz as a film that will chill your bones so much that the muscles around them will get pissed off and expel themselves out your backside. Toni Collette stars in what looks to be this year’s scary classic.

Ocean’s 8

Won’t You Be My Neighbor? (June 8): A documentary on Fred Rogers. I know Mr. Rogers was a beloved children’s TV figure and a good man, but his show gave my young self the willies. I was always put off by his sanguine tones, and those puppets freaked me out. The Lady Elaine Fairchilde puppet looked like a red-nosed alcoholic demon, the sort that would perhaps hide under my bed and steal my underwear off my butt while I was sleeping. Don’t get me started on Captain Kangaroo.

d: Fallen

Worl Jurassic

Kingtdom

Hotel Artemis (June 8): A futuristic crime drama with Jodie Foster playing a nurse running a hospital for criminals in her hotel. Foster hasn’t really been doing much as an actress lately, but this one looks like a true departure for her. It also has Jeff Goldblum and Dave Bautista, so maybe it will be an under-the-radar surprise. Incredibles 2 (June 15): The original Incredibles was my favorite Pixar movie until Up came along and made me cry. This one looks like it will be well worth the long wait. (The original came out 14 years ago.) Elastigirl (Holly Hunter) gets a new gig with the government while Mr. Incredible (Craig T. Nelson) has to stay home with the kids, one of them being an infant with budding, mysterious powers. Tag (June 15): A lifelong, cross-country game of tag played by the likes of Jeremy Renner and Jon Hamm. This reminds me of that Monty Python “Olympic Hide and Seek” sketch. You’ve never seen that? Oh, my. Well, check it out on YouTube. You’ll laugh. It’s a regular riot. SuperFly (June 15): A remake of the ’70s blaxploitation classic starring Trevor Jackson and Jason Mitchell. If they jettison the original theme song by Curtis Mayfield, I will throw my unwrapped Starburst Minis at the screen as a show of extreme protest. Gotti (June 15): Somebody who recently met me said he could tell I grew up in New York, which I did, because my hair makes me look like mobster John Gotti. Seriously considering a new stylist. John Travolta plays the dapper prick in this long-delayed look at the life of a total bastard. Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom (June 22): I was having doubts about this one based on the first trailer, but the second has me happy. The movie’s first half deals with Chris Pratt trying to get dinosaurs off an island that’s about to erupt. That part looks a little goofy, but the second part deals with dinosaurs invading residential homes. That’s

Incredibles 2

following the basic blueprint of Spielberg’s The Lost World: Jurassic Park, and that’s fine by me. Movie dinosaurs belong in living rooms scaring the hell out of people. Under the Silver Lake (June 22): From David Robert Mitchell, the writer/director of the very original and terrifying It Follows … that’s all you have to say to get my curiosity up for this one starring Andrew Garfield and Riley Keough. Damsel (June 22): Robert Pattinson has been picking them well in his post-Twilight career. This period comedy-Western is from the Zellner brothers directing team. Sicario: Day of the Saldado (June 29): Josh Brolin and Benicio del Toro are back for this sequel, but Emily Blunt is not because she’s off piloting her umbrella for the new Mary Poppins movie. My first thought was this would be lame, like when Harrison Ford didn’t show up for The Fugitive sequel. But, I have to admit, that scene where del Toro goes apeshit on a drug cartel guy with that nasty little herky-jerky gun has me thinking it might deliver the goods. The Hustle (June 29): This is actually a remake of Dirty Rotten Scoundrels—which, in turn was a remake of the film Bedtime Story—starring Anne Hathaway in the role previously inhabited by the late Glenne Headly. (It’s weird to type the words “the late Glenne Headly.”) Uncle Drew (June 29): This is based on a series of Pepsi ads starring the likes of Kyrie Irving and Shaquille O’Neal playing tournament basketball in old-age makeup. Seriously, what the hell is this?

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July

The First Purge (July 4): Marisa Tomei is in the latest installment of this garbage franchise. The Marisa Tomei! This is disheartening news. Ant-Man and the Wasp (July 6): In case you haven’t figured it out yet, the Marvel Cinematic Universe is still in full effect. Sorry to Bother You (July 6): This is in my Top 10 movies I’m looking forward to. Starring Lakeith Stanfield—the party screamer in last year’s Get Out—and directed by Boots Riley. (You just have to root for a guy with the name Boots Riley.) Stanfield stars as a guy who employs a “white voice” (the voice of David Cross) to make it big as a telemarketer. This looks like fantasy satire to be reckoned with. Hotel Transylvania 3: Summer Vacation (July 13): I’ll say this in advance: you should feel just a little guilty for dumping your kids off for this animated kiddie crap while you go have your margaritas on a Saturday. My dad used to drop me off for movies like Star Wars and the Indiana Jones films. There was an attention to quality even when he was blowing me off. Skyscraper (July 13): While it’s not called The Towering Inferno, this looks a lot like Irwin Allen could sue, even though Irwin Allen is so, so dead. The Rock stars as a security guy who must rescue his family from a skyscraper that’s on fire, while also being besieged by bad guys. This is the 589th movie The Rock has headlined in the last year. Don’t Worry, He Won’t Get Far On Foot (July 13): Joaquin Phoenix and Jonah Hill star for Gus Van Sant in the true story of irreverent cartoonist John Callahan. I have nothing clever or snarky to say about this.

Mamma Mia! H

ere We Go Agai n 

Mission: Impossible – 

Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again (July 20): Is Meryl Streep really in this, or are they just using her in flashbacks? Look, I love ABBA, but the first movie kind of sucked, and … Pierce Brosnan is back and singing again. There are a lot of horror movies coming out this summer, but there are no cinematic prospects as scary as the possibility of Brosnan warbling “Super Trouper.” The Equalizer 2 (July 20): Retired CIA black-ops badass Robert McCall (Denzel Washington) is back and on a revenge spree after his friend is murdered. He’s gonna kill ya. Doesn’t matter if you have a bazooka in his face, explosives set to go off in his pants, and a nuclear bomb ready to kill him and everybody around him if he moves. He’s gonna kill ya. Don’t even try to protect yourself. He’s … gonna … kill … ya. Mission: Impossible – Fallout (July 27): Tom Cruise, who notoriously does many of his own stunts, broke parts of his body filming a scene for this, and I think that footage makes it into the movie. I’m buying a ticket just for that. Tom Cruise is a freaking nut, but he’s still a badass.

August

Christopher Robin (Aug. 3): Christopher Robin (Ewan McGregor) grows up to work a regular Joe job and gets visited by old pal Winnie the Pooh. Could be cute. Could also be Hook revisited. The Spy Who Dumped Me (Aug. 3): Mila Kunis, Kate McKinnon and Justin Theroux star in a spy comedy that has to be good because of those three names I just typed. BlacKkKlansman (Aug. 10): Spike Lee is back telling the story of real-life Colorado police detective Ron Stallworth (played by John David Washington), who in 1979, with the reluctant help of

one of his white colleagues (Adam Driver), infiltrates the KKK. Of course, the film draws a direct line to the white supremacism that persists today, even including footage of the Charlottesville protests. The Meg (Aug. 10): A big shark movie. A really big shark movie. A really, really, really, god damned, holy crap big shark movie. Oh, yeah! Starring Jason Statham. Oh, well. The Happytime Murders (Aug. 17): Humans and puppets share the screen in this Jim Henson Company production. No “Muppets” are in the cast, but Elizabeth Banks, Joel McHale and Melissa McCarthy show up. Dog Days (Aug. 24): A drama about people in Los Angeles meeting via their dogs. I wasn’t excited about this until I noticed it’s directed by Ken Marino (Victor in Wet Hot American Summer), and I saw a Boston terrier in one of the publicity stills. Boston terrier sighting! Replicas (Aug. 24): Keanu Reeves stars as a scientist who doesn’t know how to say goodbye to his wife (Alice Eve) and kids after they die in an auto accident. Prepare yourselves in advance for somber, brainy Keanu as opposed to vapid, joyous Keanu. It’s a very different strain of Keanu. Psychological adjustments and preparations are required. This is a PSA brought to you by the fans of vapid, joyous Keanu. Papillon (Aug. 24): One of my all-time favorites is the original starring Steve McQueen as an escape artist trying to get off a prison island with Dustin Hoffman in tow. Charlie Hunnam steps into the McQueen role and Rami Malek (Mr. Robot) steps in for Hoffman. I don’t know about this.

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Fallout

September

Alpha (Sept. 14): I love my dog. This one is about a cave kid lost in the wilderness becoming the world’s first dog owner. I’m hoping it plays at a drive-in nearby so I can take my dog with me, and we can experience it together. I’ll shed some tears and feel uncompromising love for my furry companion. She’ll probably just fart a lot. The Predator (Sept. 14): As the summer winds down, someone takes another shot at making a worthwhile Predator movie, something that hasn’t happened since the original Arnie installment over 30 years ago. So, they’ve cooked up a new story for you, and they are dropping you into a rebooted meat grind-uh! By the time you’ve watched the

Schwarzenegger-less Predator, it will be three months until Christmas. That’s messed up. So, if you read these capsules in chronological order as you were seeing the movies in real time—sort of like a cinematic Advent calendar—and you are reading this part in late September, Santa is coming soon! Hooray! □ The Predator


n i y a t s Or, t h g i n to

CN&R film critic’s recommendations for summer streaming

A

few mid-year notes on intriguing new (and/or recent) releases that have missed local theaters, but are available for spring/summer streaming. As usual, a good many foreign language films of special note have arrived locally solely via these electronic and digital routes (I count at least eight so far); as have three distinctively artful documentaries and three (or maybe four) offbeat variations on movie westerns. Plus, a characteristically uncategorizable film by a major writer-director of the 1980s/90s (Alan Rudolph) is currently hiding in plain sight on demand. Ray Meets Helen The new film by Alan Rudolph (Choose Me, Trouble in Mind, The Moderns, etc.), is a pleasingly eccentric and ramshackle comedydrama with two septuagenarian stars (Keith Carradine and Sondra Locke) in the title roles. It’s a very Rudolphian mixture of romantic comedy, quasi-existentialist bull session and old-fashioned romantic rapture. Mistaken identities, love triangles, lost dreams, a suicide, gang violence and quite a lot of stolen money are also in the mix, as are piquantly paradoxical characters played by Keith David and Jennifer Tilly. It’s a thoroughly uncommercial endeavor, and that’s part of its special charm. (Xfinity, DirecTV) Les Cowboys A 2015 French production in which the daughter of a cowboy-hatted family of country music enthusiasts disappears at a Wild West fair in Eastern France. The setting is contemporary, but writer-director Thomas Bidegain works a variation on the plot of John Ford’s classic The Searchers—as the young

woman’s father (an intense François Damiens) and, subsequently, her younger brother “Kid” (Finnegan Oldfield) launch a years-long quest to find her. The cultural and political conflicts of present-day Europe figure crucially in the search as well as in the quietly radical personal dramas that play out among the family members. A character known only as “The American” (John C. Reilley) plays a prominent role in the second half of the film. (Netflix, Amazon Video)

of dime-novel heroics (Diego Josef) have variously conflicting claims on what Lefty can or cannot do. (Amazon Video, DirecTV) Paradox Though it’s amusing enough as a half-comic western with music, it wouldn’t be entirely accurate, or fair, to call Paradox nothing more than a 70-minute music video in western dress. As a movie, western or not, it is rambunctiously slapdash. Neil Young, guitar in hand, plays The Man in the Black Hat. He has a showdown with “Red”(Willie Nelson) on Main Street and instead of shooting it out, they rob a bank—a seed bank. Nelson’s sons, Lukas and Micah, both members of Young’s current band, are on hand as characters named Jailbait and The Particle Kid, respectively. Daryl Hannah, who appears briefly in a particularly romantic segment, is credited as writer and director. Be that as it may, Paradox rides high on much the same quality of homemade exultancy that marks films that Young has made under his “Bernard Shakey” aegis. (Netflix)

Les Cowboys

Just for the record: the foreign

The Ballad of Lefty Brown A flavorsome but not always coherent blend of “revisionist westerns” and old-fashioned “cowboy movies.” In director Jared Moshe’s scenario, the hero figure (Peter Fonda) is shot down early on and it falls to his grufty and somewhat ineffectual sidekick (Bill Pullman, shaggy and uproarious in the title role) to bring the bad guys to justice. And there’s nothing simple about any of that: The dead man’s widow (Kathy Baker), an alcoholic lawman (Tommy Flanagan), a politician and fledgling megalomaniac (Jim Caviezel), and a teenage admirer

films alluded to in the intro are Aki Kaurismäki’s The Other Side of Hope (Finland), Jaco Van Dormael’s The Brand New Testament (Belgium/ France), Albert Serra’s The Death of Louis XIV (France/Spain/Portugal), Claire Denis’ Let the Sun Shine In (France) and Hong Sang-Soo’s Right Now, Wrong Then (South Korea). The documentaries include Bertrand Tavernier’s My Journey Through French Cinema (France), Agnés Varda’s Faces/Places, and Ross Lipman’s Notfilm (U.S.), on the subject of Samuel Beckett and Buster Keaton. All are available to stream via one or more online or cable/satellite services. —JUAN-CARLOS SELZNICK

Nancy Bultema Joins Bidwell Presbyterian Church as Director of Children’s Ministry Beginning June 4, 2018, Nancy Bultema will become Director of Children’s Ministry at Bidwell Presbyterian Church. She brings with her a depth and breadth of experience ranging from classroom teaching to coordinating events, organizing volunteers and leading Bible studies. She is also gifted musically, having years of experience teaching music to children and leading children as part of Kidspraise band. Nancy has deep roots in our community. She grew up in Chico, is raising her family here and has worked with Chico Unified School District, Nord Elementary as well as the Chico Christian School. Nancy has also been an active volunteer, giving back to the community that she loves. Bidwell Presbyterian Church feels very strongly that Nancy is called to ministry with children, and that her unique gifts, education, leadership and experience will serve the church well, as she equips families and helps to raise children in faith. Speaking about her philosophy on faith and working with children, Nancy said, “I have a heart to see children and families invested in their relationship with the Lord and desire to give them the tools to discover their unique gifts and the opportunity to use them.” paid advertisement M AY 3 1 , 2 0 1 8

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Arts &Culture Hannah Jane Kile PHOTO COURTESY BY EMILY O’NEILL

Grown-woman anthems

THIS WEEK 31

THU

Special Events PHIL ELKINS: The KZFR DJ, musician and instructor is also an author. Elkins has written three books about his experiences in the military and civilian life. Expect an illuminating evening. Thu, 5/31, 6pm. Free. Butte County Library, Chico Branch, 1108 Sherman Ave.

SUMMER BASH: Celebrate 80 years of Shubert’s Ice Cream &

Hannah Jane Kile goes big with two new albums

SsheHannah Jane Kile is 23 years old, and has already written and recorded acramento-based singer-songwriter

four albums. Two of those recordings are actually dropping this weekend, and by Kile says that listenHoward ing back to the earlier Hardee albums—Becoming Someone and Little Blue Heron—today is Preview: like reading snippets of Hannah Jane Kile her teenage diary. They CD-release, Friday, June 1, 6:30 p.m. A also mark how much benefit for KZFR. she’s grown as a musiTickets: $15 (available cian. at KZFR, Chico Paper “Some of the lyriCo. & brownpaper tickets.com) cal choices were funny and random,” she said, Chico Women’s Club “and I do like to listen 592 E. Third St. back to how much my 895-0706 voice has changed. kzfr.org I’ve moved forward, especially with these new albums. I feel like I really found my voice this time. Basically, it feels like I have the same voice, but there are more tools in my tool box now. … I have a lot more ways to make myself emotional.” Arranging and recording two collections of music was a huge undertaking that 20

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consumed most of Kile’s spare time for the past two years, and it was also a valuable learning process. “I better understand how to serve a song not just as a vocalist, but as a guitarist,” she said. “A lot of what I learned is about staying out of the way of a really good song. You don’t have to put a bunch of stuff on top of it.” Kile is celebrating with a doublealbum release on Friday, June 1, at Chico Women’s Club. She’ll be backed by a nine-piece band. Originally from Auburn, Kile is a familiar face in Chico’s music scene. She’s performed extensively throughout Northern California and now lives in Sacramento with her boyfriend and drummer, Corey Morgan Strange. Much of Kile’s music is classified as Americana, but she also touches on jazz, blues and more theatrical styles of singing. The first of two new albums is They Almost Got Away, a relatively loose collection of songs Kile wrote as a teenager that don’t share a common thread. The other, Broken Girls Anthem, is more of a concept album, exploring themes of family, growth and practicing self-love. “We didn’t sit down and say, ‘This is going to be a concept album,’ but I wrote all of these songs at a similar place in my life—getting out of an abusive

relationship, finding myself again, falling in love, being with my family, realizing how lucky I am to have the family I do,” she said. “The whole album is about self-acceptance and forgiveness, joy and sadness, and it’s all centered around love.” Kile wrote the album’s title track on a keyboard she’d received as a Christmas present. She’s struggled with anxiety for most of her life, and recalls feeling particularly low at the time. One source of insecurity is working in an industry that tends to reward artists based on fitting a cookie-cutter standard for physical appearance. “I just cried and cried because I felt so awful about myself,” she said. “Then I heard from my friend, and she said, ‘If you could see you the way I see you …’ and that kind of flipped the switch for me. I started thinking about all of the women in my life and my best friends growing up—who I think are some of the most beautiful human beings on this planet, inside and out—and watching them pick themselves apart. “It was damaging for them and also for me,” she continued. “I want to set an example for other young women, and especially young artists who don’t fit the mold.” Ω

Candy with food, drink, entertainment and a best booth contest. Hosted by Chico Chamber. Thu, 5/31, 5:30pm. $30-$40. Patrick Ranch Museum, 10381 Midway, Durham. chicochamber.com

Music KEITH GREENINGER: Soulful Americana and folk tunes with longtime collaborator Dayan Kai. Fearless songwriting and down-home flavor. Thu, 5/31, 7:30pm. $15. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St. kzfr.org

Theater FRESH INK: New works brought to life for the first time during this short-play festival. Thu, 5/31, 7:30pm. $10. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. blueroomtheatre.com

1

FRI

Special Events AMAIN HOBBIES’ MANUFACTURERS CUP: Professional RC car races bring

CHICO HEAT HOME OPENER Friday, June 1 Nettleton Stadium

SEE FRIDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS


FINE ARTS ON NEXT PAGE

embroidery or whatever project you’re working on and share skills, pass advice and get crafty. Kid-friendly event. Sat 6/2, 12pm. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

HOOKED ON FISHING, NOT DRUGS: Free pancake breakfast and fishing derby for kids age 12 and younger, sponsored by the Kiwanis Club of Oroville. Sat 6/2, 7pm. Bedrock Park, 1101 Fifth Ave., Oroville. 530-533-6680.

LOCAL HERB FAIRE: Learn about local plants from

KEITH GREENINGER Thursday, May 31 Chico Women’s Club SEE THURSDAY, MUSIC

manufacturers together to compete against each other during this fun weekendlong event. Classes, demonstrations and more. Fri, 6/1. AMain RC Tracks, 101 Silver Dollar Way.

ANNUAL BUTTERFLY COUNT: Help the North American Butterfly Association for the annual butterfly count. Contact Jon Aull at jaull@csuchico.edu to reserve a spot. $3 participation fee. Fri, 6/1, 8:30am-4:30pm. Big Chico Creek Ecological Reserve. csuchico. edu/bccer

BARRELS, BITES & BOUNTY: Explore the shops and storefronts of downtown Oroville while sampling local beer, wine and food. Participating businesses will be offering specials and there will be a raffle. The event supports the Boys and Girls Clubs of the North Valley. Fri, 6/1, 5pm. $20-$30. Downtown Oroville, 1789 Montgomery St. 530-899-0335. bgcnv.org

BIKE RODEO & FAMILY PICNIC: Youth for Change and the Salvation Army sponsor this free event promoting bike safety with tune-ups, helmet fittings, games and bike giveaways. Sack dinner provided by Adventist Health Feather River. Fri, 6/1. Beyond Fitness, 7224 Skyway, Paradise.

FOOTLOOSE

Runs through June 24 Chico Theater Company SEE FRIDAY-SUNDAY, THEATER

herbalists and community organizations. Features workshops, education and herbal products, plus live music and food. Sat 6/2, 10am. Free. Bidwell Park, Oak Grove A (between Sycamore Pool and Caper Acres). 320-9658. theelderberryapothecary.org

LOVE OF DANCE: Dance Revolution’s spring student performance showcases the hard work and dedication of these talented young dancers. Sat 6/2, 1pm & 6pm. $8-$15. Paradise Performing Arts Center, 777 Nunneley Road, Paradise. 530-520-9449. revolution.dance

MICROBREW FESTIVAL: Soroptimist International’s CHICO HEAT HOME OPENER: The Heat begin their quest for the Great West League championship with a game against the Klamath Falls Gems. Downtown Dance performs between innings and there will be fireworks after the game. Fri, 6/1, 6:35pm. $7-$14. Nettleton Stadium, Chico State, 800 College Drive. chicoheat.com

NORTH STATE KIWI FEST: An inaugural three-day festival celebrating Gridley’s kiwi-growing history with carnival rides, rodeos, live music food and all kinds of kiwi-themed fun. Search “North State Kiwi Fest” on Facebook or call the fair office for more info. Fri, 6/1. Free admission and parking. Butte County Fairgrounds, 199 E. Hazel St., Gridley. 846-2636.

Music FRIDAY NIGHT CONCERT: Classic rock in the plaza with The Retrotones. Fri, 6/1, 7pm. Free. City Plaza, downtown Chico.

HANNAH JANE KILE: Singer, multi-instrumentalist and composer frequently compared to Bonnie Raitt and Norah Jones. She’ll be backed by her amazing band for this album release party. Sunday Iris opens. Fri, 6/1, 8pm. $15. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St. kzfr.org

KAWIKA KAHIAPO & NATHAN AWEAU: A night of contemporary Hawaiian music from Kahiapo, a slack-key guitar player, and Aweau, a virtuosic musician and island favorite. Fri, 6/1, 7:30pm. $20. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St. sierranevada.com

Theater FOOTLOOSE: Let’s hear it for the boy! Of all the great ’80s dance movies, only one starred the late Chris Penn as a country boy who learned to shake a tail feather. We’re not sure how that role translates in this musical adaptation, but we’re excited to find out. Kick off your Sunday shoes for this high-energy theatrical production from Chico Theater Company. Fri, 6/1, 7:30pm. $16-$22. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. 530-894-3282. chicotheatercompany.com

FRESH INK: See Thursday. Fri, 6/1, 7:30pm. $10. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. blueroomtheatre.com

2

SAT

Special Events AMAIN HOBBIES’ MANUFACTURERS CUP: See Friday. Sat 6/2. AMain RC Tracks, 101 Silver

23rd annual Microbrew Fest brings more than 50 breweries together of a day of tasting, live music and more. Learn about home brewing, sample ciders and honey wine, and help support women and girls in the community through Soroptimist’s programs. Sat 6/2, 2pm. $50. Manzanita Place, 1705 Manzanita Ave. sibidwellrancho.org/ microbrew-festival

NORTH STATE KIWI FEST: See Friday. Sat, 6/2. Free admission and parking. Butte County Fairgrounds, 199 E. Hazel St., Gridley. 846-2636.

ORO-CON: Oroville’s own comic convention is free and open to everyone. Meet comic book artists and local creators, take part in costume contests, shop from tons of vendors and see celebrity cosplayers. Sat 6/2, 10am. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfallscasino.com

PARADISE GARDEN TOUR: Six inspirational gardens to view, plus a plant sale, benefit drawing, refreshments, compost demo, a Master Gardener booth and more. Sat 6/2, 10am. $20. Norton Buffalo Hall, 5704 Chapel

Drive, Paradise. 530-877-4242. paradise gardenclub.org

STRIVE DANCE & PERFORMING ARTS: Oroville’s family-oriented dance company puts on their spring showcase. Sat 6/2, 6pm. Oroville State Theatre, 1489 Myers St., Oroville. orovillestatetheatre.com

TRACK & SIGN: Did you know that animals have their own social media? Learn how to tell the differences between a dog track and a mountain lion track, and what that coyote had for dinner last night. Led by members of the Chico Tracking Club and Earthbound Skills, this free outdoor class teaches valuable wildlife skills. Contact Anasuya Basil for details. Sat 6/2, 8:30am. Free. Indian Fishery, 12105 River Road. 510-848-8439.

Music MOOD SWING: Brunch and tunes. Sat, 6/2. La Salles, 229 Broadway St. lasalleschico.com

Theater FOOTLOOSE: See Friday. Sat, 6/2, 7:30pm. $16-$22. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Rd., Suite F. 530-894-3282. chicotheater company.com

FRESH INK: See Thursday. Sat, 6/2, 7:30pm. $10. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. blueroomtheatre.com

3

SUN

Special Events AMAIN HOBBIES’ MANUFACTURERS CUP: See Friday. Sun, 6/3. AMain RC Tracks, 101 Silver Dollar Way.

BAGEL BRUNCH: Enjoy traditional Jewish foods including bagels, lox, creamed herring and a cornucopia of homemade desserts. Proceeds will benefit Congregation

THIS WEEK CONTINUED ON PAGE 22

Dollar Way.

ARROYO SESSIONS: Billy Sky, KZFR and the Design Renegade host a fashion show featuring threads from Ruby’s Boutique, music by Pat Hull and Luke Sweeney, and a mini artist fair with local art, jewelry and clothing. Sat 6/2. $10. Magnolia Gift & Garden, 1367 East Ave.

BANDIT CHASE: Saddle up the posse for this 61st annual event, a full weekend of horseback riding, games food and fun honoring our Western heritage. Sat 6/2. $70-$80. Butte Meadows. 530-990-3151.

BIKES & BEERS SIERRA NEVADA: 15- and 30-mile rides followed by a party at the hop yard. A portion of proceeds will go to Chico Velo to help improve the cycling conditions in our city. Sat 6/2, 9am. $50. Sierra Nevada Brewing Co., 1075 E. 20th St. bikesandbeers.com

CRAFTWERK: Get your craft on! Bring your sewing, drawing, knitting, crochet,

FREE LISTINGS! Post your event for free online at www. newsreview.com/calendar, or email the CN&R calendar editor at cnrcalendar@newsreview.com. Deadline for print listings is Wednesday, 5 p.m., one week prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

EDITOR’S PICK

A BIT ON THE NOSE They’ve got us pegged, you guys. The organizers of Bikes & Beers have combined two of Chico’s biggest loves for this can’t-fail event. First, take part in a 15- or 30-mile ride, then enjoy some suds in the Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. hop yard, where there will be games, live music, food and fun. Your $50 entry fee covers the ride, two beers, a pint glass and a koozie, and a portion of the proceeds will benefit Chico Velo Cycling Club, advocates for bike safety and improved bike infrastructure in town. Both courses are flat and the pace is leisurely, so you can leave your lycra at home and dress fun and funky with your friends. Advanced registration for the Saturday, June 2, event is required at bikesandbeers.com. M AY 3 1 , 2 0 1 8

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buckle up! A

FINE ARTS

Beth Israel’s religious school, the Torres Community Shelter and Catalyst Domestic Violence Services. Sun, 6/3, 10am. $7-$12. Congregation Beth Israel, 1336 Hemlock Street. 530-342-6146. cbichico.org

e k r's

BOUTIQUE AR

THIS WEEK CONTINUED FROM PAGE 21

T STUDI

BANDIT CHASE: See Saturday. Sun, 6/3. $70-

for the best ride in chico!

Fun Workshops Affordable Fashion Clothing Vintage Furniture Home Decor & Unique Gifts Chalk Paint® by Annie Sloan

STAR

TAXI

466-8899

We are there for you!

$80. Butte Meadows, Butte Meadows, Butte Meadows. 530-990-3151.

BUTTE CREEK CANYON DAY: A full day of activities in the canyon starting off with a pancake breakfast in the covered bridge and followed by a fair at the Colman Museum. Live music, arts and crafts, plant sale, BBQ, drinks and much more. Drive carefully, watch for cyclists and respect the residents. Sun, 6/3. Colman Museum, 13548 Centerville Road. buttecreekcanyon.com

FRANKLIN GRAHAM: Evangelical pastor and anti-

on b table mountain golf clu $30 Value, You pay $15

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Buy online anytime with a credit card or in person with cash, check or credit card M-F 9am – 5pm at 353 E. Second Street, Downtown Chico.

Let’s Plant! Herbs

Muslim, anti-gay-rights heir to his daddy’s fortune comes to town to teach us about bootstraps and how to pull ’em up. Sun, 6/3, 7:30pm. Silver Dollar Fairgrounds, 2357 Fair St.

FREE CLOTHES FOR KIDS: The M.A.D.I.A. Project hosts a clothing giveaway for low-income families. Newborn to size 12 children’s clothes available to EBT card holders. Sun, 6/3. Free. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St.

NORTH STATE KIWI FEST: See Friday. Sun, 6/3. Free admission and parking. Butte County Fairgrounds, 199 E. Hazel St., Gridley. 846-2636.

Shows through June 3 Upper Crust

Drive, Paradise. 530-877-4242. paradisegardenclub.org

SEE ART

WOMAN VETERANS RESOURCE DAY: Resources for woman veterans and a screening of Served Like a Girl, a candid look at the rising numbers of homeless women vets suffering from PTSD, sexual abuse and other trauma. Sun, 6/3, 10am. Free. Chico Memorial Veterans Hall, 554 Rio Lindo Ave. 530-899-6300.

Music DOIN’ IT JUSTICE COMMUNITY CHORUS: Featuring guest performers from Inspire School of Arts & Sciences and Wildflower Open Classroom, this vocal concert is a benefit for water defenders AquAlliance. The uplifting event promotes peace, justice and equality. Sun, 6/3, 4pm. $15-$20. El Rey Theater, 230 W. Second St. 530-713-6061. dijchorus.org

Theater FOOTLOOSE:See Friday. Sun, 6/3, 2pm. $16-$22. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Rd., Suite F. 530-894-3282. chicotheatercompany.com

FRESH INK: See Thursday. Sun, 6/3, 2pm. $10. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. blueroomtheatre.com

Spice up your life, Grow your own Herbs! Oregano, Parsley, Thyme, Rosemary, Mint, Lemon Verbena and more! Herbs thrive in pots, planted in the ground or build a herb spiral or knot garden.

MICHELLE CAMY

PARADISE GARDEN TOUR: See Saturday. Sun, 6/3, 12pm. $20. Norton Buffalo Hall, 5704 Chapel

5

TUE

Special Events PERMACULTURE & REGENERATIVE AGRICULTURE: Rosa Macias gives an insightful presentation on permaculture, preceded by a potluck. She teaches at Butte College and works with Chico State Agriculture students, and is the founder of Permafunk. Tue, 6/5, 6pm. Chico Guild Hall, 2775 Nord Ave.

Art CENTER FOR SPIRITUAL LIVING, PARADISE: Jim Lawrence, abstract art on display in the Social Hall. Exhibit covers more than 20 years of Lawrence’s work. Through 5/31. Free. 789 Bille Road, Paradise, 530-877-5673.

HEALING ART GALLERY, ENLOE CANCER CENTER: Ernest King, mixed media paintings by Northern California artist. Through 7/20. Free. 265 Cohasset Road, 530-332-3856.

JAMES SNIDLE FINE ARTS GALLERY: Clowns & Portraits, Lynn Criswell’s multiple medium art works. Through 6/30. Free. 254 E. Fourth Street, 530-343-2930. jwamessnidlefinearts.com

MUSEUM OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA ART: Persistence, featuring the works of 60 female artists from Northern California including the late Claudia Steel and Dr. Anne Pierce. Opening night reception on Thursday, May 31, from 6-8pm. Through 7/15. 900 Esplanade.

ORLAND ART CENTER: The American West: A Way of Life, Oregon photographer Tracy Libby tells the story of the American West through her sepia tones, stark blackand-white images and brilliant color work. Through 7/21. 732 Fourth St., Orland. orlandartcenter.com

PARADISE ART CENTER: Water Media, watercolor, acrylics and mixed water media in a variety of styles including abstract and realistic, colorful and monochromatic. Reception on Saturday, June 2, 4pm-7pm. Through 6/30. Free. 5564 Almond St., Paradise. paradise-art-center.com

SATORI HAIR SALON: Faded Glory—

Mon-SAT 8AM-4pM | 2270 fAir STreeT | 343-7615 22

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FOR MORE MUSIC, SEE NIGHTLIFE ON PAGE 24

Photographs of Havana, Michael Goloff’s photographs of Cuban buildings and street scenes. Through 5/31. Free. 627 Broadway St., Suite 120, 530-514-6264. michaelgoloffphotography.com

UPPER CRUST: Michelle Camy, known for her excellent photography, she is also a fantastic painter. Check out her original paintings, prints and silkscreens at the downtown eatery. Through 6/3. 130 Main St.

Museums BOLT’S ANTIQUE TOOL MUSEUM: Hand Tools, rotating displays of more than 12,000 kinds of tools. Through 6/2. $3. 1650 Broderick St., Oroville, 530-538-2528. boltsantiquetools.com

BUTTE COUNTY HISTORICAL MUSEUM: WWI Exhibition, recently renovated exhibits demonstrating the profound changes in American society caused by The Great War. Through 7/29. 1749 Spencer Ave.

CHICO CREEK NATURE CENTER: Permanent Exhibits, including the The Janeece Webb Living Animal Museum and the Nature Play Room. Through 12/15. 1968 E. Eighth St. ccnaturecenter.org

GATEWAY SCIENCE MUSEUM: Summer Exhibits, learn how our climate catastrophe is affecting the acidification of the oceans and changing California’s wildflower blooms, plus life beneath the sea with coral reefs and hammerhead sharks. Through 9/8. $5-$7. 625 Esplanade. csuchico.edu

GOLD NUGGET MUSEUM: The Lord of the Plains, members of the Stirling City Historical Society return to the museum for a presentation on the American buffalo and the hide hunters who slaughtered them. Firearms used for hunting buffalo will be shown. Through 5/31. Free. 502 Pearson Road, Paradise, 530-872-8722. goldnuggetmuseum.com


MUSIC

NICKI BLuHM

fest fatigue

WITH MAPACHE LIVE AT

THE BIG ROOM

TuESDAy, juNE 12, 2018 SIERRA NEVADA BREWING CO. 1075 E. 20TH ST., CHICO. TICKETS ON SALE NOW! $30 AVAILABLE IN THE GIFT SHOP OR ONLINE AT WWW.SIERRANEVADA.COM/BIGROOM

Muse’s explosive finale at BottleRock. Photo courtesy of Bottlerock NaPa Valley

Good music, soul-crushing lines at BottleRock

Pstadium-worthy music festival. There are fewer acts being born erhaps we’ve reached peak

these days, and there’s a shrinking number of bands that would by typically get top Howard billing at major Hardee festivals. Case in point: One of last year’s Review: headliners at Bottlerock Napa BottleRock Napa Valley, May 25-27 Valley—Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers—isn’t around anymore. (And good luck filling those shoes.) The closed circuit can leave seasoned festival-goers with a sense of having seen it all. Two of this year’s headliners at BottleRock— The Killers and Muse—have been playing prominent slots at festivals all over the world for well over a decade. If not for BottleRock’s closing-night headliner, Bruno Mars, this might as well have been a lineup from 2008. But those world-beating bands still have a massive draw, as my girlfriend, Abby, and I discovered over Memorial Day weekend (May 25-27) at the music, wine and food festival in Napa. She was most excited for The Killers; I was there for Muse. Friday’s chilly weather must have suppressed the traffic and

crowds, because we easily entered the festival and made a bee-line for the Midway Stage—one of the smaller-scale venues scattered around the grounds—where we caught Shakey Graves, a totally bitchin’ guitar-picker from Austin, Texas. (Check out his new album, Can’t Wake Up.) Then we drank wildy expensive beer and watched performances by ’70s R&B/soul legends Earth, Wind & Fire and alt-rock heavyweights Incubus, both solid. The main attraction on the first night was Muse, the long-running British rock band known for its over-the-top stage shows. And it was on a warpath, pairing heavymetal songs such as “The Handler” and “Stockholm Syndrome” with brain-frying sci-fi visuals. Frontman Matt Bellamy coaxed all sorts of absurd sounds out of his space-age guitar while simultaneously pushing his falsetto voice into operatic territory, and the show culminated with a sky-high explosion of confetti and streamers. We were blown away. The second day of the festival was more of a pain. The sunshine came out, and so did every 19-yearold within a 250-mile radius; the demographic skewed younger, louder and drunker, the crowds swelled and the lines became soul-crushingly long. It took an hour and a half just to clear security and enter the festival grounds. It was the worst.

We overhead several people speculating that BottleRock’s organizers must have oversold the festival, and we could only agree. It was so difficult to navigate the crowds that we decided to post up in front of the main stage for Billy Idol and The Head and the Heart to ensure we’d be in a better position for The Killers. When the headliners started, frontman Brandon Flowers appeared in a slick pinstripe suit, flashing a pearly white smile, striking grand poses and generally hamming it up. He’s a captivating, Vegas-style showman, but it was sometimes difficult to hear his voice over the legions of screaming girls on hits like “Mr. Brightside” and “All These Things That I’ve Done.” As The Killers took their encore, Flowers reappeared in a gold suit covered in sequins and brought the house down with “When We Were Young.” But the most poignant moment of the evening came when the band played a spot-on cover of Tom Petty’s “American Girl.” Not only was Flowers emotional about Petty’s death, but it was a reminder that, as the dinosaurs of classicrock go extinct, festival organizers are running out of bands that will keep us in line for $12 Coronas. Given our aggravating experience on Saturday—we ended up skipping the final day of the festival— maybe that’s OK. Ω

SierraNevadaBeer

@SierraNevada

M ay 3 1 , 2 0 1 8

@SierraNevada

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NIGHTLIFE

THURSDAY 5/31—WEDNESDAY 6/6 SINGER-SONGWRITER SHOWCASE: Performances by John Michael Sun and Susan Dobra, Samaria Grace and Paul Mozzini, Alan Chamberlain, Dallas Darnell and Mercedes Macias, and Mark Zempel. Thu, 5/31, 6:30pm. Free. Farm Star Pizza, 2359 Esplanade, 530-521-6473.

1FRIDAY

AEROMYTH: Dude... Chris Van Dahl

BALKAN CHILI TRIO

31THURSDAY

CHUCK EPPERSON BAND: Rock ’n’ roll

on the patio after the market, plus excellent beer on tap and house cocktails. Thu, 5/31, 8pm. Free. Argus Bar + Patio, 212 W. Second St., 530-895-8257.

KEITH GREENINGER: Soulful Americana and folk tunes with longtime collaborator Dayan Kai. Fearless songwriting and down-home flavor. Thu, 5/31, 7:30pm. $15. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St. kzfr.org

KELLY TWINS ACOUSTIC: Jon and Chris

Friday, June 1 Duffy’s SEE FRIDAY

dust off some old favorites with an acoustic evening of “living room” music. Thu, 5/31, 6pm. Two Twenty Restaurant, 220 W. Fourth St.

MCBRIDE BAND: Music on the

patio during the market. Thu, 5/31. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

lasalleschico.com

NASTY BASS: Sab3rt00th headlines, plus heavy bass sets from Dub Heezy, Soliloquy and Shiner. Thu, 5/31. $5. Panama Bar Café, 177 E. Second St.

really looks and sings like Steven Tyler. Experience some uncanny mugging and scarf dancing with this tribute act. Fri, 6/1, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfallscasino.com

BALKAN CHILI TRIO: Bulgarian trio performs on gaida (a regional bagpipe), tupan drum and accordion. They’ll teach you some sweet dance moves from their homeland so you can get down Balkan style. Fri, 6/1, 5pm. $2. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St.

BREWERS GRADE BAND: Dance country in the lounge. Fri, 6/1, 8:30pm. Gold Country Casino & Hotel, 4020 Olive Highway, Oroville.

BROTHER & THE DAMAGED GOODS: Rock at the Box with two fun local acts. Fri, 6/1, 9pm. $5. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave.

FRIDAY NIGHT CONCERT: Classic rock in

0+2=1

Incalculably poppy and a little bit goofy, nunofyrbeeswax (pictured) is a duo with reams of charm. It’s downright impossible to stand still for their jangly, energetic songs and bouncy hooks. Their 2016 album On Everything knocked our socks off. The Berlin band is on tour with melodic minimalist Business of Dreams (Corey Cunningham of Terry Malts and Magic Bullets) and D.A. Stern, a power-pop wizard with a thing for Albert Brooks and a knack for ’80s alt rock—we’re thinking Stone Roses here. The stacked lineup performs at Naked Lounge on Wednesday, June 6.

the plaza with The Retrotones. Fri, 6/1, 7pm. Free. City Plaza, downtown Chico.

HANNAH JANE KILE: Singer, multiinstrumentalist and composer frequently compared to Bonnie Raitt and Norah Jones. She’ll be backed by her amazing band for this album release party. Sunday Iris opens. Fri, 6/1, 8pm. $15. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St. kzfr.org

JOE MARCINEK ALL-STAR JAM BAND: The keyboardist from Fresh Hops jumps to guitar to lead his own band featuring Alan Evans of Soulive, Tony Hall of Dumpstaphunk and Todd Stoops of Electric Beethoven. The Jeff Pershing Band opens the show. Fri, 6/1, 9pm. $12-$15. Lost On Main, 319 Main St.

KAWIKA KAHIAPO & NATHAN AWEAU: A night of contemporary Hawaiian music from Kahiapo, a slack-key guitarist, and Aweau, a virtuosic musician and island favorite. Fri, 6/1, 7:30pm. $20. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St. sierranevada.com

Bart Budwig and Max Minardi. Fri, 6/1, 8pm. $8. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave. maltesebarchico.com

RECKLESS ENVY: Reno trio covers a wide range from Journey and ZZ Top to George Strait and Keith Urban, plus modern pop favorites in the lounge. Fri, 6/1, 8:30pm. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfallscasino.com

ROCK ’N’ BLUES: Mo’ bands, mo’ fun, with Big Mo Quartet, Caitlin Jemma,

2SATURDAY

BREWERS GRADE BAND: See Friday. Sat, 6/2, 8:30pm. Gold Country Casino & Hotel, 4020 Olive Highway, Oroville.

CRY ME A RIVER: An all male lineup of

comics share heavy break-up stories and ex-girlfriend drama while a female host drinks their sad, salty man tears. Plus, music from Legit Supreme. Sat, 6/2, 7pm. $5-$10. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave. maltesebar chico.com

FLOATER: Hard rock trio returns to

town touring their latest album, The Thief. The Pacific Northwest band emerged during the grunge era and still keeps one foot firmly planted

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CRY ME A RIVER Saturday, June 2 The Maltese

THIS WEEK: FIND MORE ENTERTAINMENT AND SPECIAL EVENTS ON PAGE 20 Box, 379 E. Park Ave.

THE STUFF THAT LEAKS OUT: Psychedelic sounds and weird songs (in a good way), plus the Time Beings. Sat, 6/2, 8pm. Naked Lounge, 118 W. Second St.

5TUESDAY

HE IS WE: Indie pop band from Tacoma, Wash., hits town on their Let’s Talk About Us tour. Tue, 6/5, 8pm. Naked Lounge, 118 W. Second St.

6WEDNESDAY

UP TO 11: ’80s and ’90s hard rock and

head banging. Sat, 6/2, 9pm. Free. White Water Saloon, 5571 Clark Road, Paradise., 530-877-7100.

UPTOWN FUNK: The ultimate Bruno Mars tribute featuring high-stepping dance moves and a ripping band. Sat, 6/2, 8:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfallscasino.com

in the ’90s. Sat, 6/2, 8:30pm. $15. Lost On Main, 319 Main St. lostonmainchico.com

LO & BEHOLD: Fun dance grooves

and on-your-feet funk. Sat, 6/2, 9pm. Unwined Kitchen & Bar, 980 Mangrove Ave. unwinedchico.com

MYTHICAL CREATURES BURLESQUE: The Malteazers get cryptozoological for this magical show exploring otherworldly beauty. Sat, 6/2, 10pm. $7. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

OVERDRIVE: Classic rock ’n’ roll

covers from the ’70s and ’80s. Sat,

6/2, 9pm. Studio Inn Lounge, 2582 Esplanade.

RECKLESS ENVY: See Friday. Sat, 6/2, 8:30pm. Feather Falls Casino &

Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfallscasino.com

THE RUGS: Final show! Send off Katrina in style during the band’s last hurrah, plus Lisa Valentine. Sat, 6/2, 9pm. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St.

RUNNING IN THE SHADOWS: One set paying tribute to Fleetwood Mac, followed by a set of classic rock covers. Sat, 6/2, 9pm. $7. Tackle

3SUNDAY

MUD CREEK MISFITS: Afternoon

Americana and rockabilly. Sun, 6/3, 3pm. Secret Trail Brewing Company, 132 Meyers St., Suite 120.

SLOW SEASON: Heavy riffage from Visalia psych rockers will transport you back to the ’70s, plus sets from Black Magnet and West by Swan. Early start time so you can get home to watch Matlock re-runs! Sun, 6/3, 7:30pm. $7. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave. maltesebarchico.com

open mic, all musicians get two

songs or 10 minutes onstage. Wed, 6/6, 7pm. $1-$2. Norton Buffalo Hall, 5704 Chapel Drive, Paradise., (530)877-4995.

STANDARDS: L.A.-based math rock duo sound like a slow-motion Hella. Battery opens the show. Wed, 6/6, 10pm. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave.

TV MIKE & THE SCARECROWS: Comsic folk/country rock from this Oakland outfit featuring anthemic melodies, wicked twang and TV Mike’s singular lead vocals, plus sets Eyes Like Lanterns and Royal Oaks. Wed, 6/6, 8pm. $5. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave. maltesebarchico.com

DEAN MARTIN & FRIENDS DINNER SHOW: Las Vegas impressionist Tom

Slow Season

Stevens performs Deano’s hits and bits, plus a delicious meal. Wed, 6/6, 6:30pm. $10-$40. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfallscasino.com

DUFFY’S DANCE NIGHT: DJ Lois and Amburgers spin funk, pop and hiphop. Wed, 6/6, 10pm. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St.

NUNOFYRBEESWAX, BUSINESS OF DREAMS & D.A. STERN: Super awesome lineup from three perfect pop purveyors. Wed, 6/6, 8pm. Naked Lounge, 118 W. Second St.

OPEN MIC: Mr. Bang hosts this monthly

event. Signups start at 5:30pm. Wed, 6/6, 6pm. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

OPEN MIC COMEDY: Tell jokes on stage. Not intimidating at all! Signups start at 8pm. Wed, 6/6, 9pm. Free. Studio Inn Lounge, 2582 Esplanade.

OPEN MIKEFULL: At Paradise’s only

PHYSICAL GRAFFITI

It’s all there from the buttery Bonham shuffles to Jimmy Page’s trademark spontaneity. Where so many heavy bands are taking the Sabbath route or blasting out recycled Motörhead riffs, Slow Season’s 2016 album, Westing, recalls late-era Led Zeppelin in the best possible way, cutting out the histrionics and delivering the goods. Ripping solos and monster bass will take you back to when rock was rolling. Fuzzed-out psych warlords Black Magnet and riff pummelers West by Swan also perform at the Maltese, Sunday, June 3.

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a scoundrel story Solo’s charms outweigh its weaknesses, barely Solo: A Star Wars Story Ator makes it to screens, completed by a different directhan the ones who started the gig. fter a tumultuous production,

About a year ago, director Ron Howard took over for Phil Lord and Christopher Miller (The Lego Movie, 21 Jump Street) by after executive producer Kathleen Bob Grimm Kennedy showed them the door. Howard came on when principal bg ri m m @ new srev i ew. c o m photography was near completion, but wound up reshooting 70 percent of the movie. The finished film definitely feels like more than one director had his hands in the pot. It’s sloppy, tonally challenged, and scenes crash into Solo: A Star each other at times, as if moments Wars Story were shoehorned into the plot to fix Cinemark 14, Feather a story problem, killing an otherwise River Cinemas, brisk and fun pace. Paradise Cinema 7. So, there are some definite negaRated PG-13. tives at play here, but there are also plenty of positives, though not enough to keep Solo from being one of the weaker Star Wars films. In the end, Solo will probably fall in the middle of the favorite Star Wars film scale—with the Star Wars Holiday Special on one end and Revenge of the Sith on the other. Stepping into the iconic role of Han Solo is Alden Ehrenreich (hilarious in the Coen Brothers’ Hail, Caesar!), a guy who has very little in common with Harrison Ford. He doesn’t look like him, he doesn’t sound like him, and he lacks that bemused Ford swagger. He does have his own charms, however, and is a likeable actor, and he puts his own spin on the character. While he didn’t feel like the Han Solo to me, he gets by as an enjoyable variation. (Hey, not all of the

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guys who played James Bond were very much alike, but there’s more than one good Bond in film history, right?) The film is an origin story of the scoundrel with a heart of gold, willing to shoot first and ask questions later and also put his life on the line to save the universe. I had no need to see Han’s past romantic relationships, but it is undeniably enjoyable when he meets Chewbacca (Joonas Suotamo) and Lando Calrissian (Donald Glover) for the first time. The budding bond with Chewbacca made me smile, and Glover does Billy Dee Williams proud as the young Lando. In my opinion, he is the film’s shining star. Not so much Emilia Clarke as Qi’ra, an early Han love interest who just doesn’t catch fire as a worthy character. She seems a bit lost here, perhaps one of the fatalities of switching directors midstream. Playing an early associate in Han’s young gangster days, Woody Harrelson has a little more luck as the crusty Beckett. And Paul Bettany as Dryden Vos, the film’s central villain, just might be the dullest Star Wars bad guy yet. This film needed Jabba the Hut, but instead gets someone who sits around in a dark room sniveling. There are a couple of fantastic action set pieces, including the Millennium Falcon’s infamous “Kessel Run” and a terrific train heist. When the film is in action mode, when the Falcon takes flight, and when Glover occupies the screen, Solo: A Star Wars Story soars. When Han pauses to chat or make out, it stops in its tracks. I enjoyed it ... barely. Ω

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MeMbership special

FILM SHORTS Due to Memorial Day holiday schedule, film listings might not be current. Please check with theaters for up-to-date information.

Reviewers: Bob Grimm and Juan-Carlos Selznick.

Opening this week Action Point

A couple of Jackasses—Johnny Knoxville and Chris Pontius—star in this physical comedy about a crew of misfits and their wild-anddangerous amusement park. Cinemark 14. Rated R.

Adrift

A young couple’s romantic sailing adventure in the Pacific turns into a survival story after they get caught in a hurricane. Based on a true story. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

How to Talk to Girls at Parties

Adapted from a Neil Gaiman short story, John Cameron Mitchell (Hedwig and the Angry Inch) directs this film about an alien being (Elle Fanning) hanging out with punk kids in 1970s London. Pageant Theatre. Rated R.

The Rider

A young cowboy must redefine himself after a riding accident keeps him off horses, robbing him of his identity. Pageant Theatre. Rated R.

Upgrade

In a tech-controlled near future, a man agrees to a have a chip implanted on his spine, giving him superhuman fighting ability and the means to exact revenge on those who murdered his wife. Cinemark 14. Rated R.

Nowp laying The Avengers, the Guardians of the Galaxy, and Black Panther and his Wakandan army join forces to try and defeat Thanos before he destroys the universe. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

Book Club

After reading Fifty Shades of Grey in their book club, four single, professional older women (played by Jane Fonda, Diane Keaton, Candice Bergen and Mary Steenburgen) restart their stalled sex lives in what looks to a much more lively film than the one adapted from the source book. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

Breaking In

When bad guys take her kids hostage, a grieving daughter (Gabrielle Union) takes the fight to them as she battles to save her

How to Talk to Girls at Parties

Deadpool 2

3

The happily profane superhero party continues with Deadpool 2, a sequel that brings the anarchistic spirit of the original without necessarily blazing any new trails. Ryan Reynolds’ Deadpool/Wade Wilson character continues the break-thefourth-wall schtick here—Ferris Buellerstyle—and while the gimmick definitely leads to some good laughs, it does start to feel a little too cute and repetitive. Much of the movie involves Deadpool forming the mutant supercrew X-Force while also becoming a trainee of the much more conservative X-Men team. Deadpool’s first mission with his crew is a screamer, especially due to the participation of Peter (Rob Delaney), a normal, khakis-wearing guy with no powers and a killer mustache who joins the force because he saw an ad and thought it might be cool. Deadpool gets a worthy adversary in the time-traveling Cable (Josh Brolin), a half-cyborg mound of angst with a human side. The sequel earns its hard-R rating much as its predecessor did: thanks to a steady stream of intermittently hilarious profanity and constant gore. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated R —B.G.

I Feel Pretty

Amy Schumer plays a young woman struggling with insecurity who, after hitting her head, starts believing she’s extremely capable and beautiful. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13.

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Show Dogs

Real dogs get human voices (Ludacris, RuPaul, Shaq!) in this comedy about a crimefighting Rottweiler who goes undercover at a dog show to stop an animal-smuggling ring. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

Solo: A Star Wars Story

3

See review this issue. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13 —B.G.

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Melissa McCarthy stars in this comedy about a divorcée who returns to college, joining her college-aged daughter in class and the party scene. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

The male and female roles that Goldie Hawn and Kurt Russell made famous in the 1987 version of this comedy are flipped with Eugenio Derbez playing the rich jerk with amnesia and Anna Faris as the blue-collar worker with life lessons to impart. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13.

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a pizza bar, eating, drinking and getting loud and happy. That was not what I expected to see walking into New Earth Market story and to pick up a brew for band practice photo by one evening. It turns out that, during Jason Cassidy the store’s regular beer- and winej ason c @ tasting events at its Rolling Stone newsrev iew.c om Pizza Co.—a little cafe nestled in the inviting beer-and-wine corner of Rolling Stone the store—New Earth is a pretty fun Pizza Co. place to hang. Inside New Earth When I finally got around to Market returning and joining the fun a few 864 East ave. 636-4447 weeks ago, there weren’t any tastnewearth ings on the immediate schedule, so market.com/chico I tested the scene with a Saturday Pizza counter open lunch date with my wife, Connie. daily 11 a.m.-3 p.m. No beverage rep, no problem, and 4-8 p.m. because one of Rolling Stone’s biggest selling points is that you can choose what you want from the New Earth stash and drink your purchase with your meal right there in the store. And with bottles of wine stacked to the ceiling and an entire aisle of coolers filled with one of the most interesting collections of beer in Chico, the selection is impressive. Connie grabbed a bottle of rosé, I got a tall can of IPA that was on sale, and before our pizzas went in the oven, we were already partying on our bar stools. There are two sections to the Rolling Stone menu: the build-your-own pizzas and the house pizzas (split between “classic” and “specialty” varieties). Prices range from $12.99 for a personal and $22.99 for a large for both the build-your-own (up to three toppings) and classic pies. Add a buck or two for each size on the specialty list, and certain crusts—Udi’s gluten-free and the local Cali’flour—cost a little bit more as well. Connie built her own, staying true to her

traditionalist nature and getting pepperoni and black olive with mozzarella and the Northern California red sauce on a personal-size lavash (thin, crispy) crust. Initially, I had my eye on the intriguing-looking Indie Go-Go, a specialty Indian-inspired pie with butter curry sauce, mushrooms, red onions, grilled chicken, black olives, jalapeños, garlic and cilantro. But I decided to put my fate in the hands of the cook, and asked him to split a medium in half with the two most popular choices. Naturally, I ended up with the Stoner 420 on one side, and Grilled Chicken Feta Spinach (also a “stoner favorite”—no, really, it says so right on the menu) on the other. My crust was “The Longboard,” Rolling Stone’s rectangular-shaped standard thin (but not crispy) crust that’s used on most of the pizza sizes. (The lavash, Cali’flour and tandori flatbread are available in the personal size only.) The crusts come lightly prebaked, and once topped are finished in Rolling Stone’s 650-degree oven, then served on a cutting board. The skinny personal pizza came out first, and it was very good—a nicely composed version of a classic tied together with a basic red sauce (tasted mostly of just tomatoes—my preference over a heavy hand with herbs and spices) and nice, crispy crust. My stoner pie was two very different experiences. The 420 side was very similar to the personal pizza— with the red sauce, mozzarella and pepperoni, plus fresh garlic and a dried herb blend. The sweet zing of chopped garlic was a nice addition. The other half—with chicken, red onions, tomatoes, feta cheese, spinach and garlic-Parmesan sauce—was my favorite combo of flavors. All the strong elements— onion, garlic, feta—were well-measured and very complementary to the chicken and tomatoes. The crust was fairly light and airy, and probably would’ve been moreso had it been tossed fresh to order. I suppose the common element between the two—the stoner connection—was the fresh garlic. I wasn’t stoned, but we were both pretty happy, and the garlic, which was never overpowering, was a fine pairing with the IPA. Ω

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Heavy business Chico loved KaRP. Formed in 1990 by three high-school

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social outcasts in tiny Tumwater, Wash., KARP (aka Kill all Redneck Pricks) was part of a wave of great indie bands—playing a wide range of pop, punk, rock, math, metal and experimental styles—that regularly stopped in Chico during the mid- to late-’90s. KARP was one the faves for its devil-may-care live shows, great sense of humor and an unrelenting visceral heaviness. KARP bassist/vocalist Jared Warren went on to co-found some other amazing noisy bands—The Whip, Tight Bros From Way Back When and, starting in 2004, the one that’s enjoyed the most success, the duo Big Business. Warren and his bandmate, drummer Coady Willis (of Murder City devils), also have played in legendary sludge outfit The Melvins, touring and recording with them off and on through 2016. Big Business is coming to Chico next week (Thursday, June 7, 7 p.m., at Chico Women’s Club—$15 tickets available at Duffy’s Tavern), and in anticipation of the show, arts dEVo talked to Warren about his current band as well as the good old days, including the last time he played Chico, in 2003, Big Business: Jared Warren (left) and Coady Willis. when The Whip was kicked out of one-time downtown Chico punk-rock bar The Riff Raff.

Remember Chico?

I do. I remember the Superwinners festival [in 1995]. We came down with our friends [in one-time Olympia, Wash., noisemakers] Raisler. I remember being so tired … and I remember it being hot. There was nowhere to rest, and I remember taking a nap in the auditorium where bands were blasting and I somehow managed to fall asleep.

What happened at The Riff Raff?

I remember it was a weird-shaped room, and you played in the front, on the side, like, on the wall. And then the other thing I remember is the owner. He came in the through the door, “You better turn down!” In front of everybody. “Turn down, or I’m not paying you!” And we were like, “All right. Well then, fuck you.” We kept playing and he looked so mad. And everybody was, like, “Yeah!” It was worth it. We probably would’ve only got $50 anyway. It’s at least a $50 story.

you’re releasing a tour EP with a couple of suicide covers—which songs?

We are doing “Cheree” and “Ghost Rider”—“Ghost Rider” was also covered by the Rollins Band, so you’ll be sure to check that out.

do you have other recording plans?

We do. We’re almost done writing a record. We just gotta finish up this summer and record it this summer. Hopefully by the end of the year or the first of next year we will have a new full-length. I think you can expect it to be a little weirder, maybe a little more psychedelic—in the most stereotypical sense possible. By psychedelic, I mean [with] reverb and delay. … I think we’re trying to capitalize off of the fun we had goofing around on the last record with some of the more experimental stuff. We’re trying to flex our weird muscles a little more on this one.

Back in the day, your bands would be described as metal plus punk, rock, indie, etc. These days, a lot of people just say metal, even though you’re still all over the heavy-music map ...

I don’t think of us as a metal band necessarily, but I understand that’s how we get pigeonholed. … I will say this, metal, as a genre, kind of has its shit together. I can’t think of another scene that’s really like it—in terms of fan devotion, camaraderie. If you go through a list of the top 30 metal bands you can think of in America, they all know each other. … There is a real brotherand sisterhood that comes with that scene that is unique. We are always flattered and appreciative when other metal bands either invite us on tour, or give us props, or whatever. We love our metal family, for sure.


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY For the week oF May 31, 2018 ARIES (March 21-April 19): A critic

described Leonardo da Vinci’s painting the “Mona Lisa” as “the most visited, most written about, most sung about, most parodied work of art in the world.” It hasn’t been sold recently, but is estimated to be worth hundreds of millions of dollars. Today it’s kept in the world-renowned Louvre museum in Paris, where it’s viewed by millions of art-lovers. But for years after its creator’s death, it enjoyed little fanfare while hanging in the bathroom of the French King Francois. I’d love to see a similar evolution in your own efforts, Aries: a rise from humble placement and modest appreciation to a more interesting fate and greater approval. The astrological omens suggest that you have more power than usual to make this happen in the coming weeks and months.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): These

days, many films use CGI, computer generated imagery. The technology is sophisticated and efficient. But in the early days of its use, producing such realistic fantasies was painstaking and time-intensive. For example, Steven Spielberg’s 1993 film Jurassic Park featured four minutes of CGI that required a year to create. I hope that in the coming weeks, you will summon equivalent levels of old-school tenacity and persistence and attention to detail as you devote yourself to a valuable task that you love. Your passion needs an infusion of discipline. Don’t be shy about grunting.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): On

February 17, 1869, Russian chemist Dmitri Mendeleyev had an appointment with a local cheese-making company to provide his expert consultation. But he never made it. A blast of inspiration overtook him soon after he awoke, and he stayed home to tend to the blessed intrusion. He spent that day as well as the next two perfecting his vision of the periodic table of the elements, which he had researched and thought about for a long time. Science was forever transformed by Mendeleyev’s breakthrough. I doubt your epiphanies in the coming weeks will have a similar power to remake the whole world, Gemini. But they could very well remake your world. When they arrive, honor them. Feed them. Give them enough room to show you everything they’ve got.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Ninety-five

percent of your fears have little or no objective validity. Some are delusions generated by the neurotic parts of your imagination. Others are delusions you’ve absorbed from the neurotic spew of other people’s imaginations. What I’ve just told you is both bad news and good news. On the one hand, it’s a damn shame you feel so much irrational and unfounded anxiety. On the other hand, hearing my assertion that so much of it is irrational and unfounded might mobilize you to free yourself from its grip. I’m pleased to inform you that the coming weeks will be an excellent time to wage a campaign to do just that. June can and should be Fighting for Your Freedom from Fear Month.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): During the next

four weeks, I’ll celebrate if you search for and locate experiences that will heal the part of your heart that’s still a bit broken. My sleep at night will be extra deep and my dreams extra sweet if I know you’re drumming up practical support for your feisty ideals. I’ll literally jump for joy if you hunt down new teachings that will ultimately ensure you start making a daring dream come true in 2019. And my soul will soar if you gravitate toward the mind-expanding kind of hedonism rather than the mind-shrinking variety.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Everyone has a unique fate that’s interesting enough to write a book about. Each of us has at least one epic story to tell that would make people cry and laugh and adjust their thoughts about the meaning of life. What would your saga be like? Think about what’s unfolding right now, because I bet that would be a ripe place to start your meditations. The core themes of your

by rob brezsny destiny are currently on vivid display, with new plot twists taking your drama in novel directions. Want to get started? Compose the first two sentences of your memoir.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “Dear Oracle:

I find myself in the weird position of trying to decide between doing the good thing and doing the right thing. If I opt to emphasize sympathy and kindness, I may look like an eager-to-please wimp with shaky principles. But if I push hard for justice and truth, I may seem rude and insensitive. Why is it so challenging to have integrity?— Vexed Libra.” Dear Libra: My advice is to avoid the all-or-nothing approach. Be willing to be half-good and half-right. Sometimes the highest forms of integrity require you to accept imperfect solutions.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): You have

waited long enough to retaliate against your adversaries. It’s high time to stop simmering with frustration and resentment. Take direct action! I suggest you arrange to have a box of elephant poop shipped to their addresses. You can order it here: tinyurl.com/ElephantManure. JUST KIDDING! I misled you with the preceding statements. It would in fact be a mistake for you to express such vulgar revenge. Here’s the truth: Now is an excellent time to seek retribution against those who have opposed you, but the best ways to do that would be by proving them wrong, surpassing their accomplishments, and totally forgiving them.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

Marketing experts say that motivating a person to say yes to a big question is more likely if you first build momentum by asking them smaller questions to which it’s easy to say yes. I encourage you to adopt this slant for your own purposes in the coming weeks. It’s prime time to extend invitations and make requests that you’ve been waiting for the right moment to risk. People whom you need on your side will, I suspect, be more receptive than usual—and with good reasons—but you may still have to be smoothly strategic in your approach.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): I

bet you’ll be offered at least one valuable gift, and possibly more. But I’m concerned that you may not recognize them for their true nature. So I’ve created an exercise to enhance your ability to identify and claim these gifts-in-disguise. Please ruminate on the following concepts: 1. a pain that can heal; 2. a shadow that illuminates; 3. an unknown or anonymous ally; 4. a secret that nurtures intimacy; 5. a power akin to underground lightning; 6. an invigorating boost disguised as tough love.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): When

I was a kid attending elementary schools in the American Midwest, recess was a core part of my educational experience. For 45 minutes each day, we were excused from our studies so we could indulge in free-form play—outdoors, if the weather was nice, or else in the gymnasium. But in recent years, schools in the U.S. have shrunk the time allotted for recess. Many schools have eliminated it altogether. Don’t they understand this is harmful to the social, emotional, and physical health of their students? In any case, Aquarius, I hope you move in the opposite direction during the coming weeks. You need more than your usual quota of time away from the grind. More fun and games, please! More messing around and merriment! More recess!

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): For many

years, actor Mel Blanc provided the voice for Bugs Bunny, a cartoon character who regularly chowed down on raw carrots. But Blanc himself did not like raw carrots. In a related matter, actor John Wayne, who pretended to be a cowboy and horseman in many movies, did not like horses. And according to his leading ladies, charismatic macho film hunk Harrison Ford is not even close to being an expert kisser. What about you, Pisces? Is your public image in alignment with your true self? If there are discrepancies, the coming weeks will be an excellent time to make corrections.

www.RealAstrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888.

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BUTTE MOBILE VETERINARY PRACTICE at 5610 Feather River Place Paradise, CA 95969. MICHAEL LANE SEELY 5610 Feather River Place Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: MICHAEL L. SEELY Dated: April 10. 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000502 Published: May 10,17,24,31, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as LOCALE COMMERCIAL, LOCALE MANAGEMENT, LOCALE RESIDENTIAL at 242 Broadway Ste 12 Chico, CA 95928. VAUGHT, INC 242 Broadway Ste 12 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: RYAN VAUGHT, VAUGHT INC PRESIDENT Dated: April 20, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000552 Published: May 10,17,24,31, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as INTERNATIONAL FARM MANAGEMENT at 2233 Nord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. JOE T CAMARENA JR. 25725 Moller Ave. Orland, CA 95963. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JOE CAMARENA Dated: May 1, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000602 Published: May 10,17,24,31, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as HEARTSONG WELLNESS STUDIO AND BOUTIQUE at 6311 Skyway Paradise, CA 95969. CARMI ELISSA HOOKS

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759 Red Hill Way Paradise, CA 95969. KRISTEN NICOLE HORST 701 Kinsey Way Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: KRISTEN HORST Dated: April 26, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000587 Published: May 10,17,24,31, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CHICO COMMUNITY ACUPUNCTURE at 1815 Mangrove Ave Chico, CA 95926. OLIVIA STARR PETERS-LAZARO 11802 Meridian Road Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: OLIVIA PETERS-LAZARO Dated: April 4, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000463 Published: May 10,17,24,31, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as SISTERS EVENTZ at 6904 Dean Place Paradise, CA 95969. AMY BLAIR 553 Barbara Paradise, CA 95969. MEGAN LATTA 6904 Dean Place Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: AMY BLAIR Dated: April 26, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000584 Published: May 10,17,24,31, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as NORTHERN BITES at 185 Cohasset Lane Apt F Chico, CA 95926. RACHEL BALMER 185 Cohasset Lane Apt F Chico, CA 95926. DYLAN ROWE 185 Cohasset Lane Apt F Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: DYLAN ROWE Dated: April 17, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000532 Published: May 10,17,24,31, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as THE BAHAMA HUT at 1008 W Sacramento Ave Suite I Chico, CA 95926. MATTHEW DAVE VERESCHAGIN 6798 State Hwy 32 Orland, CA 95963. DONNA LYNN WETZEL 6798 State Highway 32 Orland, CA 95963. This business is conducted by a Joint Venture. Signed: DONNA WETZEL Dated: May 4, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000619 Published: May 10,17,24,31, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CHICO ART GALLERY, CHICO ART SCHOOL, CHICO ART SCHOOL AND GALLERY, LOMBARDI BLIXT DESIGN at 261 E. 3rd Street Chico, CA 95926. JANET LOMBARDI BLIXT 290 E. Sacramento Avenue Chico, CA 95926. THOMAS BLIXT 290 E. Sacramento Avenue Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by A Married Couple. Signed: JANET LOMBARDI BLIXT Dated: May 3, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000607 Published: May 10,17,24,31, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BEAUTY ETERNAL at 1260 East Avenue, Suite 130 Chico, CA 95926. NORTHSTATE PLASTIC SURGERY ASSOCIATES INC 1260 East Avenue, Suite 100 Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: EMILY HARTMANN, VICE PRESIDENT Dated: April 13, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000519 Published: May 17,24,31, June 7, 2018

ClaSSIFIEdS

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as LATIMER AND KENKEL at 330 Wall Street Chico, CA 95928. DENNIS M LATIMER 320 West Legion Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: DENNIS M. LATIMER Dated: April 25, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000577 Published: May 17,24,31, June 7, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as STICKY ICKY INDUSTRIES at 1518 Broadway Street Basement Chico, CA 95928. PRANA VAJRA JOHNSTON 702 Mangrove Ave #287 Chico, CA 95926. RYAN MCDOUGAL 1474 Hawthorne Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: PRANA JOHNSTON Dated: May 8, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000636 Published: May 17,24,31, June 7, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PIPEVINE PLAYHOUSE at 1051 Eaton Rd Chico, CA 95973. KATHLEEN LEE MACHEK 1051 Eaton Rd Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: KATHLEEN L. MACHEK Dated: May 9, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000640 Published: May 17,24,31, June 7, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BIDWELL H2O, BIDWELL WATER, SACRAMENTO VALLEY BOTTLED WATER at 2704 Hegan Ln Chico, CA 95928. ROBERT LEE SMITH 1256 Vallombrosa Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ROBERT SMITH Dated: May 9, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000644 Published: May 17,24,31, June 7, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as LARABEE ENTERPRISES, MAC TOOLS at 81 Hollis Lane Gridley, CA 95948. DAVID LARABEE 81 Hollis Lane Gridley, CA 95948. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: DAVID LARABEE Dated: May 9, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000645 Published: May 17,24,31, June 7, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as GOOD EARTH COFFEE AND TEA HOUSE at 980 Oro Dam Blvd E Oroville, CA 95965. RAI TAJ FAMILY LLC 19 Marci Way Chico, CA 95973.

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This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: RAY TARIQ SAEED AHMAD, MANAGER Dated: May 8, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000632 Published: May 17,24,31, June 7, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as THE MEADOWS MHP at 3541 Calle Principal Chico, CA 95973. RANCHO CHICO MHP, LP 3050 Fite Circle, Suite 210 Sacramento, CA 95827. This business is conducted by a Limited Partnership. Signed: ANDY CAREY Dated: April 24, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000567 Published: May 17,24,31, June 7, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BIDWELL LOCK AND KEY at 559 Crestwood Drive Paradise, CA 95969. JAMES JOSEPH HAFER 559 Crestwood Drive Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JIM HAFER Dated: April 13, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000516 Published: May 17,24,31, June 7, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as 99BATS, ADAMAS SPORTS at 3030 Thorntree Dr. Suite 12 Chico, CA 95973. INFINITE HORIZONS, LLC 3030 Thorntree Dr. Suite 12 Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: NATHAN KANEMOTO, CO-OWNER Dated: May 15, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000667 Published: May 24,31, June 7,14, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as WILD MAMA BREWS at 6281 Woodbury Drive Magalia, CA 95954. CINDY PAULINE JONES 6281 Woodbury Drive Magalia, CA 95954. MARK ALAN JONES 6281 Woodbury Drive Magalia, CA 95954. This business is conducted by A Married Couple. Signed: CINDY PAULINE JONES Dated: May 15, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000668 Published: May 24,31, June 7,14, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CASEY AND AUTUMN STUDIOS at 498 E 8th Avenue Chico, CA 95926. SEAN CASEY APLANALP 498 E 8th Avenue Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: S. CASEY APLANALP Dated: May 16, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000672 Published: May 24,31, June 7,14, 2018

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as SHOSHONE FURNITURE COMPANY at 3216 Godman Ave 1 Chico, CA 95973. THOMAS CANADA MOLESWORTH 13193 Orchard Blossom Lane Nord, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: THOMAS C MOLESWORTH Dated: May 16, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000676 Published: May 24,31, June 7,14, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as ROOM FOR BEAUTY at 2241 St George Lane #3 Chico, CA 95926. DORHANDA MARIE SOULLIERE 2505 Navarro Dr. Chico, CA 95973. WOODROW WAYNE SOULLIERE 2505 Navarro Dr. Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by A Married Couple. Signed: DORHANDA M SOULLIERE Dated: May 3, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000616 Published: May 24,31, June 7,14, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PARK AVE AUTOMOTIVE MACHINE at 1814 A Park Ave Chico, CA 95928. MIKE PELAK 3083 Bay Ave Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: MIKE PELAK Dated: April 23, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000564 Published: May 24,31, June 7,14, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as RW ENTERPRISES at 188 Valley View Drive Paradise, CA 95969. BRIAN D. WHITE 188 Valley View Drive Paradise, CA 95969. SUZANNE M. WHITE 188 Valley View Drive Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by A Married Couple. Signed: SUZANNE WHITE Dated: May 11, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000658 Published: May 24,31, June 7,14, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as GREEN CLEAN NATURAL CARPET CLEANING at 3549 Esplanade Space 251 Chico, CA 95973. MARITZA ALVAREZ 3549 Esplanade Space 251 Chico, CA 95973. JUAN CARLOS HUERTA 3549 Esplanade Space 251 Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by A Married Couple. Signed: MARITZA ALVAREZ Dated: April 13, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000521 Published: May 24,31, June 7,14, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as AMB WOOD AND STEEL DESIGN at 2368 Brown Street Durham, CA 95938. AARON BARR 2368 Brown Street Durham, CA 95938. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: AARON BARR Dated: May 14, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000662 Published: May 31, June 7,14,21, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as RAWMAZING at 132 W 2nd Ave. Chico, CA 95926. JOSHUA JAMES HERNANDEZ 132 W 2nd Ave. Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JOSHUA HERNANDEZ Dated: May 22, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000707 Published: May 31, June 7,14,21, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as DROP IN THE BUCKET at 1938 Oak Park Avenue Chico, CA 95928. ROSEANNE LUCY NELSON 1938 Oak Park Avenue Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ROSEANNE LUCY NELSON Dated: May 23, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000712 Published: May 31, June 7,14,21, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as H AND M HIGHWAY SUPPLIES at 1521 Warren Rd Paradise, CA 95969. KAYLA HAMPTON 1135 1st Ave Oroville, CA 95965. FRANK ANTHONY MEDINA JR 1521 Warren Rd Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: KAYLA HAMPTON Dated: May 18, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000689 Published: May 31, June 7,14,21, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as T L C PATIENT ASSOCIATIONS at 6219 McReynolds Ct Magalia, CA 95954. T L C PATIENT ASSOCIATIONS 5327 Edgewood Lane Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: MICHELLE LAFOND, SECRETARY/VICE PRESIDENT Dated: May 18, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000692 Published: May 31, June 7,14,21, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as COCO’S at 1008 W Sacramento Ave Ste 1A Chico, CA 95926. YANSUN ZOU 100 Sterling Oaks Dr #237 Chico, CA 95928.

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This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: YANSUN ZOU Dated: April 30, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000596 Published: May 31, June 7,14,21, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business asa SUBWAY 4149 at 1947 E 20th Street Suite A Chico, CA 95928. ADVALI GROUP INC 1325 Turker Way Chico, CA 95973. RAVI GUNDIMEDA 2485 Notre Dame Blvd Suite 380-269 Chico, CA 95928. CRUEITA MENA 2485 Notre Dame Blvd Suite 380-269 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: RAVI GUNDIMEDA, PRESIDENT Dated: May 10, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000654 Published: May 31, June 7,14,21, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as SUBWAY # 44154 at 2485 Notre Dame Blvd Suite 380 Chico, CA 95928. ADVALI GROUP INC 3251 Tinker Creek Way Chico, CA 95973. RAVI GUNDIMEDA 2485 Notre Dame Blvd Suite 370 #269 Chico, CA 95928. CRUCITA MENA 2485 Notre Dame Blvd Suite 370 #269 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: RAVI GUNDIMEDA, PRESIDENT Dated: May 10, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000653 Published: May 31, June 7,14,21, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as SUBWAY 1561 at 1000 W Sacramento Avenue Chico, CA 95926. ADVALI VENTRUES INC 2485 Norte Dame Blvd Chico, CA 95926. RAVI GUNDIMEDA 2485 Notre Dame Blvd Suite 380-269 Chico, CA 95926. CRUCIT MENA 2485 Notre Dame Blvd Suite 380-269 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: RAVI GUNDIMEDA, PRESIDENT Dated: May 10, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000655 Published: May 31, June 7,14,21, 2018

NOTICES NOTICE OF BID Notice is hereby given that by the Chico Unified School District (CUSD), will rebid Subcontractor proposals for Glazing and Framing & Rough Carpentry for the Marigold Elementary School New Construction and Modernization Project, via email mcampos@chicousd.org and ktiner@chicousd.org until 2:00p.m., on Friday, June 1, 2018. Trade contractors will be in contract with UBC/CS Builders, the Lease-Leaseback Entity selected for this project. In accordance with the provisions of Section 1773 of the Labor Code, the Director of Industrial Relations has determined the general prevailing rate of wages

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applicable to the work to be done. These rates are set forth in a schedule located at the State Department of Industrial Relations, Director of Industrial Relations, (415) 703-5070, Website: www.dir.ca.gov. All Bidding Contractors are required to be familiar with the hiring requirements set forth in Education Code section 17407.5, and as a condition of entering into this Facilities Lease, Contractor understands and agrees that Contractor and its Subcontractors at every tier will use a skilled and trained workforce, as defined in Education Code section 17407.5, to perform all Work on the Project that falls within an apprenticeable occupation in the building and construction trades. Attention is directed to the provisions of Section 1777.5 and 1777.6 of the Labor Code of the State of California concerning employment of apprentices by the contractor or any subcontractor under him. The prime contractor is responsible for compliance with the requirements of Section 1777.5 and the prime contractor and any subcontractor under him shall comply with the requirements of Section 1777.6. No Bid Bond required, however a Performance Bond may be required at Lease-Leaseback Entity’s discretion. Each bid must conform to the requirements of the Drawings and other documents comprising the Contract Documents. Interested parties may obtain copies of the complete bid package by emailing ktiner@chicousd.org or 530-891-3215. After the scheduled closing time set for receipt of bids, bids may not then be withdrawn for a period of 90 days from and after said closing time, except as otherwise provided for in the California Public Contract Code. Published: May 24,31, 2018

NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS Notice is hereby given that BCM Construction (BCM), hereinafter referred to as the Lease Leaseback Entity selected by the Chico Unified School District (CUSD), will receive Subcontractor proposals for the Neal Dow Elementary New Construction and Modernization Project Phase 1 “Underground Site Utilities and Site Work”, at the offices of BCM via fax (530) 342-1768 or email at matt@bcmconstruction.com until 4:00p.m., on Friday, June 15, 2018. A Bid Walk will be on June 8, 2018 at 11:00 a.m. at Neal Dow Elementary School. In accordance with the provisions of Section 1773 of the Labor Code, the Director of Industrial Relations has determined the general prevailing rate of wages applicable to the work to be done. These rates are set forth in a schedule located at the State Department of Industrial Relations, Director of Industrial Relations, (415) 703-5070, Website: www.dir.ca.gov. Attention is directed to the provisions of Section 1777.5 and 1777.6 of the labor Code of the State of California concerning employment of apprentices by the contractor or any subcontractor under him. The prime contractor is responsible for compliance with the requirements of Section 1777.5 and the prime contractor and any subcontractor under him shall comply with the requirements of Section 1777.6. Attention is directed to the

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provision of Section 20111.6 of the Public Contract Code, regarding the requirement for successful Prequalification with the Chico Unified School District of Electrical, Mechanical or Plumbing Components, specifically A, B, C-4, C-7, C-10, C-16, C-20, C-34, C-36, C-38, C-42, C-43, C-46, 10 days prior to the bid date. Each bid must conform to the requirements of the Drawings and other documents comprising the Contract Documents. Interested parties may obtain copies of the complete bid package by emailing matt@bcmconstruction.com. After the scheduled closing time set for receipt of bids, bids may not then be withdrawn for a period of 90 days from and after said closing time, except as otherwise provided for in the California Public Contract Code. Published: May 31, June 7, 2018

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: DAVID MICHAEL KIEL Proposed name: MICHAEL DAVID CHRISTIAN THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: July 13, 2018 Time: 9:00am Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: MICHAEL P. CANDELA Dated: May 14, 2018 Case Number: 18CV01533 Published: May 24,31, June 7,14, 2018

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner JESSICA SOCORRO BAZURTO-BERLANGA filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: JESSICA SOCORRO BAZURTO-BERLANGA Proposed name: JESSY SOCORRO BERLANGA THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing.

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NOTICE OF HEARING Date: June 15, 2018 Time: 9:00am Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: MICHAEL P. CANDELA Dated: May 3, 2018 Case Number: 18CV01266 Published: May 24,31, June 7,14, 2018

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner ANGELICA IVET BAZURTO-BERLANGA filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: ANGELICA IVET BAZURTO-BERLANGA Proposed name: ANGELICA IVET BERLANGA THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: June 29, 2018 Time: 9:00am Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: MICHAEL P. CANDELA Dated: May 3, 2018 Case Number: 18CV01265 Published: May 24,31, June 7,14, 2018

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: ETHEL ELEANOR HARRIS Proposed name: CHRIS ELEANOR JACKSON THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: July 6, 2018 Time: 0900 Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: MICHAEL P. CANDELA Dated: May 17, 2018 Case Number: 18CV01453 Published: May 24,31, June 7,14, 2018


ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner ISRAEL LEON JUNIOR filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: ISRAEL LEON JUNIOR Proposed name: ISRAEL LEON THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: July 6, 2018 Time: 9:00a.m. Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: MICHAEL P. CANDELA Dated: May 8, 2018 Case Number: 18CV01239 Published: May 24,31, June 7,14, 2018

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner MEGAN COOPER filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: KADE DALE SHELTON Proposed name: KADE ALLEN COOPER THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: June 22, 2018 Time: 9:00a.m. Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: MICHAEL P. CANDELA Dated: May 3, 2018 Case Number: 18CV01235 Published: May 24,31, June 7,14, 2018

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner ANGELO GONZALO TABIOS filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: ANGELO GONZALO TABIOS Proposed name: ANGELO GONZALO CARTOSCELLI THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to

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show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: July 13, 2018 Time: 9:00a.m. Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: MICHAEL P. CANDELA Dated: May 18, 2018 Case Number: 18CV00692 Published: May 24,31, June 7,14, 2018

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner KYLE GERARD FERGUSON filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: KYLE GERARD FERGUSON Proposed name: KYLE WILLIAM NABORS THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: June 29, 2018 Time: 9:00a.m. Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: MICHAEL P. CANDELA Dated: May 8, 2018 Case Number: 18CV01418 Published: May 31, June 7,14,21, 2018

SUMMONS SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: DOMINIQUE N PEOPLES YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: BUTTE COUNTY CREDIT BUREAU A CORP NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you

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cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The Court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Avenue Chico, CA 95928 LIMITED CIVIL CASE The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney is: JOSEPH L SELBY (#249546) Law Office of Ferris & Selby 2607 Forest Avenue Ste 130 Chico, CA 95928. (530) 366-4290 Dated: November 3, 2017 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Case Number: 17CV03274 Published: May 24,31, June 7,14, 2018

SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: REBECCA S OSBORNE AKA REBECCA S EGGLESTON AKA BECKI S EGGLESTON YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: BUTTE COUNTY CREDIT BUREAU A CORP NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp),

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or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The Court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Avenue Chico, CA 95928 LIMITED CIVIL CASE The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney is: JOSEPH L SELBY (#249546) Law Office of Ferris & Selby 2607 Forest Avenue Ste 130 Chico, CA 95928. (530) 366-4290 Dated: July 10, 2017 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Case Number: 17CV02044 Published: May 24,31, June 7,14, 2018

PETITION NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE CINDTHIA LEE CHELLSON, AKA CINDTHIA L. CHELLSON, AKA CINDTHIA CHELLSON To all heirs and beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: CINDTHIA LEE CHELLSON, AKA CINDTHIA L. CHELLSON, AKA CINDTHIA CHELLSON A Petition for Probate has been filed by: SAMUEL W. BRINLEY in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: SAMUEL W. BRINLEY be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or conseted to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: June 5, 2018 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: TBA Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of

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the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: REBECCA YUHASZ McKernan, Lanam, Bakke & Williams LLP 732 Fir Street Paradise, CA 95969 (530) 877-4961 Case Number: 18PR00207 Dated: May 10, 2018 Published: May 17,24,31, 2018

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE GEORGE T. DAVIS, AKA GEORGE TAYLOR DAVIS To all heirs and beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: GEORGE T. DAVIS, AKA GEORGE TAYLOR DAVIS A Petition for Probate has been filed by: SUSAN DAVIS in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: SUSAN DAVIS be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or conseted to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: June 5, 2018 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: 8 Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California

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Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: FRAYDA L. BRUTON, ATTORNEY AT LAW 3638 American River Drive Sacramento, CA 95864 (916) 444-8826 Case Number: 18PR00203 Published: May 17,24,31, 2018

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE IRENE ELIZABETH DEEKEN To all heirs and beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: IRENE ELIZABETH DEEKEN, AKA IRENE ELIZABETH MCGRANE AND IRENE ELIZABETH HAYS A Petition for Probate has been filed by: COLLEEN KIRCHEM, AKA COLLEEN MCGRANE in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate

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requests that: COLLEEN KIRCHEM be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or conseted to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: June 19, 2018 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: TBA Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the

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decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: CHERYL A. FORBES PO Box 1009 Red Bluff, CA 96080 (530) 527-7500 Case Number: 18PR00221 Dated: May 18, 2018 Published: May 24,31, June 7, 2018

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REAL ESTATE

FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT ADVERTISING IN OUR REAL ESTATE SECTION, CALL 530-894-2300

Love’s Real estate

Nuisance

You may be able to ignore the knee-high grass in your neighbor’s yard, but a home appraiser probably won’t. When calculating the value of a property, an appraiser factors in surrounding neighborhood conditions. “Neighborhood nuisances like an overgrown yard or a persistent odor could in some cases bring down the value of adjacent homes by 5 to 10 percent,” said Richard L. Borges II, the president of the Appraisal Institute.

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Of course, the perception of what’s a nuisance varies by neighborhood. Junked cars are more likely to be considered a problem in residential neighborhoods than out in the country where we consider rusty cars part of the landscape. “It’s very much case by case,” said Borges. “This is why the appraiser should be geographically competent, with knowledge of how significant the external factors are in that particular market segment and on that particular property.”

Not all nuisances noticed by an appraiser are measurable, either. “I’ve never seen a location adjustment because of barking dogs or loud teenagers,” said one certified appraiser. The appraiser has to be able to provide some sort of evidence for that adjustment.” If you have a nuisance in your neighborhood it might be solved with help from the local authorities. If those rusty cars aren’t registered, or if chickens and horses are a zoning violation, a phone call might end the problem. But turning your neighbor in to the authorities might cause a neighbor war. A code enforcement officer gives this advice: “Some people aren’t worth starting a fight with. If you start it, they’ll never let it die. On the other hand, we usually do a pretty good job of mediating a situation when it’s needed. We are happy to discuss a situation privately before making it official.” My grandmother would say, “Make ‘em a pie, and go visit ‘em. That’s how you get a good neighbor.”

Doug Love is Sales Manager at Century 21 Jeffries Lydon. Email escrowgo@aol.com, or call 530-680-0817. See an archive of columns at douglovesrealestate.com.

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$590,000 $561,000 $505,000 $445,000 $410,000 $402,000 $400,000 $389,000 $379,000 $375,500 $370,000

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SQ. FT. 2676 2447 1808 1904 1884 1925 1548 1250 1718 1606 1874

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chiconativ@aol.co

26.6 ac walnuts with 5800 sq ft home $1,549,000 6ac Creekside on Butte Creek $249,000 3.4 ac, well, septic and power in place $115,000 5 ac lot. Owner carry $29,500 2 bed 1 bath downtown, $209,000 Campus close, newer 4/2 $369,000

mark reaman 530-228-2229

www.ChicoListings.com • chiconativ@aol.com Mark.Reaman@c21jeffrieslydon.com www.ChicoListings.com • chiconativ@aol.com

The following houses were sold in Butte County by real estate agents or private parties during the week of May 14, 2018 – May 18, 2018 The housing prices are based on the stated documentary transfer tax of the parcel and may not necessarily reflect the actual sale price of the home. ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

2733 Ceanothus Ave

Chico

$288,000

3/2

SQ. FT. 1196

1125 Sheridan Ave #30

Chico

$180,000

2/2

SQ. FT.

7 Mckinley Ln

Chico

$285,000

3/2

1170

1110 W 8th Ave #3

Chico

$145,000

3/2

988

2763 Lowell Dr

Chico

$270,000

3/2

1194

123 Zonalea Ln

Oroville

$549,000

6/3

3767

270 Pinedale Ave

Oroville

$323,500

3/2

1854

3109 Claremont Dr

Oroville

$285,000

3/2

2069

1150

11 Rainier Ln

Chico

$270,000

3/2

1119

63 Mill St

Chico

$267,000

2/1

812

1142 Broadway St

Chico

$266,000

2/2

1073

1300 Laurel Ave

Oroville

$266,500

4/3

2002

1220 Stewart Ave

Chico

$266,000

2/1

780

6439 N Point Dr

Paradise

$600,000

2/3

2812

73 Skymountain Cir

Chico

$260,000

3/2

1312

5410 Hickory Way

Paradise

$455,000

3/3

2279

1258 Normal Ave

Chico

$254,500

3/1

980

520 Fir St

Paradise

$415,000

4/4

2259

2473 England St

Chico

$253,000

3/3

1197

5220 Country Club Dr

Paradise

$388,000

4/3

2500

555 Vallombrosa Ave #20

Chico

$188,500

2/1

902

737 Roe Rd

Paradise

$322,000

3/2

1853

M ay 3 1 , 2 0 1 8

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345 West FiFth street ChiCo, CA 95928 (530) 891–6328 Please call for reservations Open Fridays for Lunch 11:30am to 2:30pm Join us for Happy Hour 7 days a week 4:30 to 6:00pm

Profile for News & Review

c-2018-05-31  

c-2018-05-31  

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