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CHICO’S FREE NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY VOLUME 41, ISSUE 37 THURSDAY, MAY 10, 2018 WWW.NEWSREVIEW.COM

Chico’s homeless out of luck as city stalls on 24-hour restrooms

24 EARWORMED

BY

ASHIAH SCHARAGA PAGE

18

OVERNIGHT

12 BIRTHING BABIES 31 BUFFET THROWDOWN


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INSIDE

Vol. 41, Issue 37 • May 10, 2018 OPINION

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Editorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Guest Comment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Second & Flume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Streetalk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4 4 4 5 7

NEWSLINES

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Downstroke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Sifter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

HEALTHLINES Appointment . Weekly Dose .

12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

GREENWAYS

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Eco Event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS

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15 Minutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 The Goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

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COVER STORY

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ARTS & CULTURE

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Music feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 This Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Fine arts listings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Scene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Nightlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Reel World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Chow. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Arts DEVO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Brezsny’s Astrology . . . . . . . . . . . . 35

CLASSIFIEDS

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REAL ESTATE

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ON THE COVER: DESIGN BY TINA FLYNN

Our Mission: To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. Editor Melissa Daugherty Managing Editor Meredith J. Cooper Arts Editor Jason Cassidy Staff Writer Ashiah Scharaga Calendar Editor Nate Daly Contributors Robin Bacior, Alastair Bland, Michelle Camy, Vic Cantu, Josh Cozine, Bob Grimm, Howard Hardee, Miles Jordan, Mark Lore, Landon Moblad, Conrad Nystrom, Ryan J. Prado, Juan-Carlos Selznick, Ken Smith, Robert Speer, Brian Taylor, Evan Tuchinsky, Cathy Wagner, Carey Wilson Managing Art Director Tina Flynn Creative Services Manager Christopher Terrazas Creative Director Serene Lusano Publications Designer Mike Bravo Web Design & Strategist Elisabeth Bayard Arthur Ad Designer Catalina Munevar Director of Sales and Advertising Jamie DeGarmo Advertising Services Coordinator Ruth Alderson Senior Advertising Consultants Brian Corbit, Laura Golino Advertising Consultants Chris Pollok, Autumn Slone

President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Director of Nuts & Bolts Deborah Redmond Director of People & Culture David Stogner Director of Dollars & Sense Debbie Mantoan Project Coordinator Natasha vonKaenel Payroll/AP Wizard Miranda Hansen Accounts Receivable Specialist Analie Foland Developer John Bisignano System Support Specialist Kalin Jenkins N&R Publications Editor Michelle Carl N&R Publications Associate Editor Laura Hillen N&R Publications Writers Anne Stokes, Rodney Orosco Marketing & Publications Consultants Steve Caruso, Joseph Engle, Elizabeth Morabito, Traci Hukill, Celeste Worden 353 E. Second Street, Chico, CA 95928 Phone (530) 894-2300 Fax (530) 892-1111 Website www.newsreview.com Got a News Tip? (530) 894-2300, ext 2224 or chiconewstips@newsreview.com Calendar Events cnrcalendar@newsreview.com Calendar Questions (530) 894-2300, ext. 2243 Want to Advertise? Fax (530) 892-1111 or cnradinfo@newsreview.com Classifieds (530) 894-2300, press 2 or classifieds@newsreview.com Job Opportunities jobs@newsreview.com Want to Subscribe to CN&R? chisubs@newsreview.com Editorial Policies: Opinions expressed in CN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons, or other portions of the paper. CN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or review materials. Email letters to cnrletters@newsreview.com. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form and to edit them for libel.

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CN&R is printed at Bay Area News Group on recycled newsprint. Circulation of CN&R is verified by the Circulation Verification Council. CN&R is a member of Chico Chamber of Commerce, Oroville Chamber of Commerce, Downtown Chico Business Association, CNPA, AAN and AWN. Circulation 38,650 copies distributed free weekly.

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OPINION

Send guest comments, 340 words maximum, to gc@newsreview.com or to 353 E. Second St., Chico, CA 95928. Please include photo & short bio.

SECOND & FLUME

EDITORIAL

Inaccessibility a lawsuit in the making when we wrote about a deadly outbreak of hepatitis A spreading through San Diego’s homeless population out in an editorial that the city of Chico was invitdue to a lack of sanitation—20 people died as a ing a lawsuit related to its Offenses Against Public result—and how the city of Chico should take note Property Ordinance. We opined on the subject the and immediately open overnight restrooms to mitigate same week that the City Council, on a 5-to-2 vote, a potential local outbreak (see “Inhumane threat to expanded citywide that local law, which, among other health, commerce,” Sept. 21, 2017). Should something things, prohibits camping, storage of personal items, similar happen locally, lawsuits will follow, and it will and urination and defecation on public property (see be easy see that city administrators, staff and elected “Shameful and dehumanizing,” March 3, 2016). officials were warned repeatedly of such a scenario. Thing is, according to the U.S. The city’s move to temporarily Department of Justice, government The city’s open City Plaza’s restrooms overnight entities cannot lawfully criminalwon’t cut it as a legal defense. First ize behaviors required for basic move to off, that effort took place prior to the survival without providing alternatemporarily outbreak. In addition, we’re far from tives. Doing so violates Eighth open City Plaza’s convinced that the preparations were Amendment protections against sufficient for a successful outcome— cruel and unusual punishment. In restrooms overwe’ve seen better vandalism-proofing other words, the council’s policy night won’t at downtown watering holes. Most made the city vulnerable to legal cut it as a legal telling, perhaps, is that the City challenges based on civil rights Council’s majority refuses to return to defense. violations. the subject to brainstorm a permanent It remains so today. solution despite calls to do so from their colleagues For starters, the city lacks 24/7 public toilets. and the public over the past year. Additionally, as we noted in March 2016, there aren’t Chico can come up with creative ways to address enough shelter beds to accommodate Chico’s homeless this issue, but we first have to move beyond this stalepopulation, which, these days, is estimated at about mate. Indeed, the inaction and deflection needs to end. 1,100 individuals, including 433 people who live in It serves only to further expose the city to a public our parks, riparian areas and other outdoor locales. health crisis and litigation. Ω Fast-forward to September of last year. That’s

by Melissa Daugherty m e l i s s a d @ n e w s r e v i e w. c o m

More than two years ago, this newspaper pointed

GUEST COMMENT

A walk in the park O

n my birthday I take my 4-year-old grandson,

Elliott, for a walk to the cork forest, next to Parkview Elementary School. Of course, our dog Livingstone (I presume) believes he is the point of the walk. As we cross East Eighth Street, I consider that in my hand lies this little boy’s well-being and his parents’ dreams. Set loose in Bidwell Park, Elliott manages to fall once. He does not cry, but he keeps bending over to check if his owie will last until we get home and his mother can kiss it. My kisses last only two blocks. Mothers’ are forever. by Donald Heinz As I look down at curly blond hair, I realize I am holding hands The author is a professor emeritus with my youth. My father took me of religious studies at for a walk every night after supper, Chico State. back in Dubuque, Iowa, holding my hand tight. If we greeted a neighbor

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on hard times, he would say to me, “poor fella.” I was to hold my head high, because I was a Heinz. In a seminary class on preaching, though, the professor thought I held my head a little too high. At Bidwell Park, the highlight of our walk is the creek. Elliott immediately begins to squeal and toss sticks and stones. Livingstone is beside himself with all the commotion. Of course, I walk along the creek every day, sometimes calculating the effect of recent rains. But I never throw stones and squeal. Perhaps I could learn Elliott’s capacity for delight. As we’re walking home we pass by several people having loud fun on their front porch. A man into what’s probably his third beer shouts, “I know what kind of dog you have, it’s an English sheep dog.” “No, it’s not,” the woman says. “It’s a springer spaniel.” “Right,” I say. The man hoots. Then he spies Elliott and shouts, “God bless you, little boy.” Elliott looks up at me beaming: “He knows me, Grandpa. He knows me.” Is this how people feel when they hear God calling to them? Ω

Battle-ax As the editor of the local alternative newsweekly, it’s probably no surprise that, among the hundreds (no exaggeration) of emails that pour into my inbox each day, some are written in high dudgeon. Often, they are triggered by what’s in the CN&R’s current issue. Of course, there are also the predictable messages calling me a pinko, commie or Marxist—or a combination of those words—and the fill-in-the-pejorative-term variety. Fortunately, I also get my fair share of “good on ya” notes to balance it all out. When it comes to discussion about homelessness, however, there’s a common thread. I find it in my inbox, I see it all over social media, and it even made it into a letter to the editor in our last issue. The target is basically anyone who dares to stand up for folks who live on the streets. It goes something like this: “If you care so much about bums, why don’t you invite one to live with you?” I cannot recall how many times I’ve seen or heard some form of this trite argument. Last week, a letter writer suggested that we “liberal elitists” at the CN&R open our office’s restrooms to the “unfortunate.” The letter was in response to an editorial criticizing an elected official—Chico Mayor Sean Morgan—not only for his record of partisanship and nepotism but also for refusing to agendize discussion on public restrooms. Its author evidently believes that this newspaper should not advocate for the city to provide public restrooms unless we do something similar. Never mind that we’re talking about a taxpayer-funded agency versus a private business. Thing is, coming up with solutions is going to take actual critical thinking from members of our community. Sadly, a lot of folks aren’t interested in that kind of discussion. Thus far, that includes the members of the City Council’s majority. We hope that changes during upcoming budget discussions. It’s hard for us to believe that the city can’t figure out how to make a facility that’s literally yards from a police substation safe and accessible round-the-clock. As we spelled out in this week’s editorial, there are practical reasons to make sure homeless people have access to restrooms at all hours. Another that seems to get overlooked is that withholding it strips people of their dignity. Indeed, that’s a central theme reporter Ashiah Scharaga came upon while talking to local homeless individuals, many of whom didn’t make it into her piece, this week’s cover story exploring the holdup. We elitists at Second and Flume streets don’t have all the answers, but we do know this: Restroom access has long been a civil rights issue, and it remains one today. Once upon a (shameful) time, “white-only” facilities existed and it was unheard of to have accommodations for those with disabilities. Withholding access is just another form of discrimination—and it’s not going to make homelessness go away.

ANNIVERSARY This month marks my fifth year in the chief’s chair at the CN&R. Over the years, writing in this space and the one on the opposite page, I’ve made it a priority to speak truth to power. In doing so, I’ve developed a reputation as something of a battle-ax. I don’t see myself that way, but then again, somebody’s gotta do it. Melissa Daugherty is editor of the CN&R


LETTERS

Grand Opening

Send email to cnrletters@newsreview.com

Hypocrites all around Re “Off the market” (Newslines, by Ashiah Scharaga, May 3): All seven on the Chico City Council unequivocally support decommissioning the Jesus Center on Park Avenue, as was obvious at the meeting on May 1. Providing food and clothing in our downtown was never popular. When Bill Such was cut loose, the writing was on the wall; the new business-oriented director was hired to end the madness. The sort of madness prescribed by Jesus: feeding and clothing the poor, right here, in our midst. (Matthew 25: 34-36). The purpose of closing the Jesus Center, rather than improving and expanding it, is to get the homeless out of downtown. To deny them the public space, especially City Plaza. With any other class of people—people of color or you-name-it—our three “liberal” council members would have stood on principle, or postured as such. But, the homeless are unworthy of inclusion. So, we can try to hide the

motive, but the motive is to exclude people. Chico is a wannabe-affluent enclave, with a mean streak. Complicit or complacent are the frauds associated with “social justice” and “diversity”: liberal Christian churches, Quakers, the Peace and Justice Center, the Chico State Department of Social Work, etc. Hypocrites, one and all. Patrick Newman Chico

‘Shed-plicity Village’ Re “Support for tiny houses” (Letters, by Laurel Heath, May 3): The Yahi chapter of the Sierra Club has financially endorsed Simplicity Village. Let’s correct Yahi’s depiction that Simplicity Village is “tiny houses.” A bed-in-a-shed does not make a tiny house any more than two-beds-in-a-shed make a tiny duplex. They are sheds: “Shedplicity Village.” Describing them as tiny houses is misleading. To gain community support, progenitors of Simplicity Village stated they will help only “local

homeless”—decent people that for lack of a better term, fell one paycheck out of their home. They were outspokenly adamant that this project would not attract more transient homeless to Chico: those who leave garbage and a festival of toilet paper on our creeks and waterways. Yet Yahi’s rationale is that Simplicity will somehow help our creeks and waterways, which suggests they believe it will indeed serve transients that trash our waterways. Yet since services attract people, Simplicity will attract more transient homeless, which will further impact our waterways. Yahi is endorsing Simplicity, which suggests Simplicity isn’t what it purports to be. Yet if Simplicity does what it promises, it makes Yahi’s financial endorsement a questionable use of funds. Or is it simply friends funneling club money to friends? Nothing ironic there.

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LETTERS c o n t i n u e d f r o m pa g e 5

Housing first works For those seeking a cleaner, safer Chico, “housing first” (HF) has repeatedly produced positive results. HF is a recovery-oriented approach to ending homelessness, based on quickly moving unhoused people into independent/permanent housing and then providing additional supports and services as needed. Peer-reviewed studies of housing first cite: • Greatly reduced returns to the street and greater gains in quality of life. • Substantial and rapid improvement in housing stability and selected health and justice outcomes. • Significant reductions in probability of hospitalization, community functioning and number of days experiencing alcohol-related problems. Viewed in terms of costeffectiveness: In a study in central Florida, the savings in public costs for shelter, criminal justice, health care, emergency room and behavioral health were $20,000 per person. In a Denver study, the total costs for providing an individual with housing was $13,400. The costs for all services used by a person living outside was assessed to be $15,733. While a punitive approach to dealing with the homeless is the same tired response to symptoms, housing first is a plan with demonstrable results that actually seeks to help people regain control of their lives, making Chico a cleaner, safer place. Scott Huber Chico

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When the Don “Corleone” Trump crime family arrived in Washington, their sights were not set on providing leadership that would benefit America. They were fixated on expanding the financial influence of the Trump Organization. Donald Trump has kept total control of the Trump Organization but ceded day-to-day management to two of his sons, Donald Jr. and Eric, who started peddling their father’s power to effect international real estate deals. Daughter Ivanka Trump and son-in-law Jared Kushner were appointed to highly classified

“We have a crime family running the presidency; the absence of accountability and oversight by the Republicanheld Congress is criminal.” —roger S. Beadle

positions within the Oval Office. They exploited their connection to the U.S. presidency, hyping the Visa EB-5 program to Chinese investors; a $500,000 investment in the U.S., in particular Kushnerrelated real estate, in return for a permanent United States residency card. Ivanka secured three trademark deals with the Chinese for her jewelry and spa businesses, and has deals pending in other countries. The Trump Organization has raked in $15.1 million in revenue from political groups and federal agencies. Another $2.4 million went to Trump Tower Commercial LLC, and hundreds of thousands more to the president’s various hotels and corporate holdings. We have a crime family running the presidency; the absence of accountability and oversight by the Republican-held Congress is criminal. Roger S. Beadle Chico

Election shout-outs Voters will choose a new auditorcontroller for Butte County on June 5. My choice is Kathryn Mathes. Kathryn brings 35 years of experience as a certified public accountant having worked in both the private and public sectors in that capacity as well as an entrepreneur. Her government experience includes positions in both the Butte County Assessor’s Office and the Butte County Auditor’s Office, which she left to sharpen her skills in her current position as accounting manager for the city of Chico. The Butte County auditorcontroller is responsible for accurate handling of both expenditures

and receipts of funds for an annual budget exceeding $550 million. Kathryn is the only candidate that has worked as both an auditor and a controller and is the only CPA in the race. Because of Kathryn’s professional and personal qualifications, I believe she will provide the best professional leadership for that important office. The auditor-controller answers only to the voters, so it is incumbent upon us to choose the best qualified candidate for this important position. Please join me in voting for Kathryn Mathes for Butte County auditor-controller. Kim Morris Paradise

Jessica Holcombe has my vote as the Democrat with the strongest voice to challenge—and defeat— Doug LaMalfa. Her educational and legal background, coupled with her life experiences and charisma, make her a formidable candidate. I respect Holcombe for her intelligence, depth, grit and personal attributes of kindness and compassion. She was not born into wealth and privilege and is grateful for the financial aid she received in order to go to college and law school. Jessica is passionate about widening the social safety net for others. As a former congressional intern, she will enter Congress with insight on how legislation is accomplished, making her a strong and effective advocate. Her website, holcombeforcongress.com, highlights her specific proposals for legislation, including health care for all and other vital issues. I encourage readers to vote for this capable and dynamic woman to be our U.S. representative in District I. Silona Reyman Chico

Correction In last week’s Newsline “Half a dozen hopefuls,” by Meredith J. Cooper, a reference to the Rebuild America Act was misattributed to Marty Walters. It is, in fact, part of Jessica Holcombe’s platform. We regret this error, which has been corrected online. —ed. More letters online:

We’ve got too many letters for this space. please go to www.newsreview.com/chico for additional readers’ comments on past cn&r articles.


STREETALK

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Should the city provide 24-hour restrooms?

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They should, but only from dawn to dusk, like in parks. I work downtown, and it’s really frustrating when a homeless person locks themselves in one of our bathrooms.

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Yes, because if it weren’t for those bathrooms, then they’d be forced to resort to the bathrooms of other businesses in the area that can’t accommodate the homeless.

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Absolutely. Everybody should be entitled to a place to use the restroom, 24 hours a day—there should be no question as to when people should be allowed to use the restroom.

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NEWSLINES DOWNSTROKE CINCO DE MAYO VIOLENCE

The Cinco de Mayo weekend proved to be a violent one, with reports of a stabbing at a party and a shooting at a trailer park, according to the Chico Police Department. Just after 2 a.m. on May 5, police discovered a man who had been stabbed several times near West Fourth and Ash streets. Two other victims, one stabbed and one bruised, were already at Enloe Medical Center. All of them had attended a party on the 400 block of Oak Street. After getting into an argument, they were stabbed and beat up. All are expected to survive. Suspects are described as Hispanic men, one with brown, medium-length hair and the other shorter and heavyset. In an unrelated incident around 12:50 a.m. the next morning, several handgun-caliber bullets were fired into a mobile home on East Lassen Avenue. Nobody was hurt. The shooting is still under investigation. Anybody with information should call the Chico PD at 897-4900.

KNOW BEFORE YOU GO

Butte County this week launched an interactive road conditions map, highlighting closures as well as time estimates for when a road will be reopened. The map is available on the county website as well as the Butte County Connect app. For those unfamiliar with the app, it’s available through Google Play and the Apple Store and includes links to supervisor agendas, parcel maps, local libraries and a B-Line bus locator. The map, which includes only countymaintained roads, is its newest addition. “The interactive map provides a much better overview of local road closures and will help our department keep first responders and residents informed of rapidly evolving conditions, especially during winter flooding events, heavy snowstorms, and other dynamic weather events,” Dennis Schmidt, director of county’s Public Works Department, said in a press release.

PRINCIPAL RESIGNS

Chico High Principal Mark Beebe announced his resignation in a letter to parents last week (May 2). Beebe (pictured) wrote that his departure “is in the best interests of CHS and myself.” Though he is unsure of his plans, he said he will remain in education. Beebe, who has served as the school’s principal for three years, will finish out this school year. He has worked in education for more than 25 years, including 16 as an English teacher, and nearly 20 as a basketball coach. “I have tremendous and unwavering confidence in this amazing staff and student body that CHS will continue to thrive and flourish,” he wrote. 8

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Equipped for success Laptop donation supports more than 70 local foster youth

W laptop, she marveled at how much easier it would be to work on her homework, hen Georgia flipped open her new sleek

and envisioned her grades improving. Georgia (whose story and last name is withheld photo by because she’s a foster Ashiah care dependent) has Scharaga been living on her own as h i a h s @ since January, shortly n ew srev i ew. c o m after she turned 18. Currently, she’s saving More info: up for a car and searchMay is National Foster ing for summer work Care Awareness Month. For more information before attending Butte about local programs, College in the fall. visit Youth & Family She considers a lapPrograms at ncyfp. top necessary for her org/index.php or the Department of success, but acknowlEmployment and Social edged it was not at the Services website: top of her list of financial tinyurl.com/buttedess. priorities, and it would have taken a while to purchase one on her limited income. “Having the resources at your fingertips is very healthy and important,” she said. “When you’re sitting in your college class and you see everyone pull out their com-

puters, you’re like, ‘Oh, I have one, too!’ versus that shameful feeling of, ‘Oh, I don’t have one.’” The free computer wasn’t just a thoughtful graduation surprise for Georgia. It was one of about 1,200 laptops that will be donated to transition-age youth (16 to 21 years old) in the foster care system across 35 California counties this year, funded by $400,000 from Rural County Representatives of California and National Homebuyers Fund in partnership with iFoster, a nonprofit child advocacy organization. About 75 youth in Butte County will benefit. Nationwide, there are more than 430,000 children in foster care, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and California is home to about 60,000. Like Georgia, iFoster’s co-founder Serita

Cox grew up in foster care, which is what motivated her to advocate for foster children and fill gaps in their care. Since its laptop program launched in 2012, the nonprofit has donated more than 9,000 computers to foster youth. The organization, now in its eighth year,

has always had a goal of providing “the resources and opportunities that children and youth growing up outside their biological home … need to become successful and independent adults,” Cox said from her office in Truckee. Though the nonprofit supports youth in many ways—through scholarships, stipends for sports and arts activities, tutoring and job skills training—laptops have remained the No. 1 request. Indeed, while 90 percent of middle- and upper-class youth and 79 percent of lowincome youth in the U.S. have access to a computer at home, that number is significantly lower for foster youth in urban and rural counties, at 21 percent and 5 percent, respectively, according to an evaluation of iFoster’s laptop program by the University of California. Donating the computers has resulted in significant improvements for youth on many levels: academics, relationships with friends and families (foster and biological), self-esteem and overall satisfaction with life. Christina Porter, coordinator for the federal Independent Living Program, appeared delighted to present Georgia’s laptop on


Christina Porter, Butte County Independent Living Program coordinator, smiles at Georgia, a foster care dependent, as she opens her iFoster laptop for the first time. The nonprofit partnered with Rural County Representatives of California and National Homebuyers Fund to bring 1,200 laptops to foster youth in California.

Monday (May 7). She said, “having something tangible that’s theirs is very important.” Porter oversees an office in Chico that provides life-skills coaching, job and college application assistance and case management for transition-age youth in foster care. Every year, her program purchases laptops for graduating students. The iFoster donation will save her office about $7,000, which will go to a fund for schooling and housing for emancipated youth. The iFoster laptops have all the bells and

whistles—the Intel computers operate on Microsoft Windows, and come with Microsoft Office, live tech support and a web portal with access to resources like health care and job opportunities, and a digital locker in which youth can save personal documents. “It’s incredibly helpful for these young people and for our program,” Porter said. “I had a youth tell me once she wrote a paper on her iPhone because it was the only computer she had.” That’s something Georgia is thankful she won’t be doing in college—she’s already looking forward to finding her own patch of sunshine in which to study on campus. Georgia entered the foster care system when she was 10, and has a lot of what she calls “system siblings,” fellow young people who have been part of the system, too, and are connected by a “very strong and powerful” bond. “They generally understand what it’s like to have to leave everything and move over and over again,” she said. A reliable laptop can become a source of stability. It’s a way to help foster kids stay organized and remember what they’ve learned, Georgia said, despite moving from school to school. It allows kids to stay connected with their “system siblings,” and provides a way to de-stress. Cox shared several stories of youth who have stayed in touch with the iFoster team: one young lady was a grocery store bagger without a high school degree, and is now a floral department manager attending college. “I’m proud of them and their successes and just feel privileged that we get to invest in them,” Cox said, choking up. “These kids are worth investing in. If we collectively as a society don’t invest in them, then it’s our fault when they fail.” Ω

Another party ordinance? Advisory board discusses violent crimes, shoplifting and registering parties The most unexpected news to come out of the

Police Community Advisory Board meeting on Monday (May 7) came after the regular agenda had concluded and Mike Campos, owner of Campos Properties, approached the lectern to address the panel. His concern was with crime in the south campus neighborhood. It needs to be addressed with real solutions, he said, such as the cameras on the bike path, which had an immediate effect on safety. He referenced the two stabbings that occurred just last weekend in the south campus area as evidence that something more needs to be done. That’s when Police Chief Mike O’Brien made what he called a premature announcement: He’s working on a partyregistration ordinance, which would require organizers of any gathering over a certain size (there are no specifics yet) to register with the city ahead of time to avoid penalties. In O’Brien’s mind, Chicoans aren’t the problem—it’s out-of-towners. When Chico State changed its spring break schedule to coincide with St. Patrick’s Day; when law enforcement agencies allied to ban booze on the Sacramento River over Labor Day weekend; when police cracked down on Halloween festivities—all those efforts helped make Chico less attractive to out-of-town revelers, O’Brien said. “The last dinosaur,” he said, borrowing a phrase from Campos, “is the open party.” This wouldn’t be the first time Chico PD has tried to crack down on house parties. Over a decade ago, the city attempted to pass a simi-

lar ordinance—then dubbed the “safety plan ordinance,” requiring gatherings of more than 100 people, or those that would impact traffic, to register a safety plan with the city ahead of time. That didn’t come to fruition and instead morphed into the controversial Disorderly Events Ordinance. Since then, the city amended that law, dubbed it the Unruly Gatherings Ordinance, and added language to better hold party organizers and landlords accountable. In the past year, Chico police have issued 15 citations for unruly gatherings. The board will take up the issue again at its next meeting in September, chair Jovanni Tricerri told the CN&R. That meeting will be held on campus. The main topic on the agenda Monday night was

the Reducing Crime and Keeping California Safe Act, which is currently in the signaturegathering stage in order to qualify for the November ballot. O’Brien characterized it as closing loopholes opened by recent prison realignment legislation—Assembly Bill 109 and Propositions 47 and 57. For example, he said, that legislation narrowly defines “violent crimes” and has allowed for the early release of prisoners convicted of things like felony domestic violence, rape by intoxication and felony assault with a deadly weapon. “Are we at least in agreement that those really are bad, bad offenses?” O’Brien asked the room. Everyone seemed to agree. He added that the City Council had supported the

SIFT ER Millennial moms Millennials are increasingly making up the majority of new mothers each year, according to Pew Research Center data. With Mother’s Day this Sunday (May 13), the “nonpartisan fact tank” compiled some interesting facts about millennial moms. For instance, they’re following the trend of having children later than was previously popular, which has been attributed to more women having careers, increased emphasis on education, and getting married later or not at all. Here are some other highlights: • In 2016, 48 percent of millennial women age 20-35 were mothers, compared with 57 percent of Gen-Xers in the same age group in 2000. • 60 percent of millennials say parenthood is central to their identity.

• 58 percent of millennial moms say parenting is rewarding (versus 51 percent of Gen-Xers and 46 percent of baby boomers). • 52 percent of millennial moms say it’s also enjoyable (versus 39 percent of both previous generations).

Chico Police Chief Mike O’Brien told the Police Community Advisory Board Monday that he’s working on a partyregistration ordinance. CN&R FILE PHOTO

initiative by unanimous vote. According to Ballotpedia, law enforcement is largely in favor of the initiative, while the American Civil Liberties Union, which backed Prop. 47, is listed in opposition. Katie Simmons, president and CEO of the Chico Chamber of Commerce, said her organization is backing the initiative and is an official signature-gatherer. That made for a good segue into the evening’s second topic of discussion, the Retail Watch program launched earlier this year and spearheaded by the chamber. It aims to empower local retailers to report and prosecute shoplifters. The discussion came up during regular chamber business walks, Simmons explained, when it became apparent that shoplifting was a growing problem—one that affected one major retailer, she said, by $250,000 a year. But many stores weren’t reporting the crimes, either because they felt the Chico Police Department wouldn’t respond or because of policies that prevented employees from stopping suspected shoplifters. “That $20 bottle of vitamins may not be worth chasing a person down for, but it is ... because that person may have felony warrants, or may be in a stolen vehicle,” said O’Brien. Simmons said retailers are working together to alert each other of potential issues. They are also working to better quantify losses due to theft. That’s encouraging, she said. Any shops interested in learning more about Retail Watch should call the chamber—membership is not required to participate. —MEREDITH J. COOPER me r e d i th c @ newsr ev iew.c o m

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Marijuana businesses join ranks of lobbyists in California politics

Larmsandcrowded burly veterans with tattooed into a Capitol hearobbyists in slick pinstriped suits

ing room last week as lawmakers considered a bill to make it easier for Californians to buy legal marijuana. One supporter said people need more access to the “beautiful sacred plant.” But at its core, this was a business dispute—a question of whether legislators would allow cannabis companies to reach more customers, and make more money. The committee passed the bill—to stop cities from banning delivery services that sell pot to customers at their doorsteps—despite objections from cities and counties that favor local control. And the standing-room-only crowd that showed up to push for it revealed the new reality in California, where cannabis interests have become a formidable lobbying force. As marijuana companies seek laws more favorable to their industry, they are using the traditional tools of politics: hiring well-heeled lobbyists and donating money to politicians. Cannabis is big business in California, with sales expected to hit $3.7 billion by the end of the

year, according to BDS Analytics. The industry’s spending on California politics soared in 2016, when voters made it legal for adults to use the drug. “They want to be treated like every other business, and part of that is making campaign contributions so they can get access to politicians and have their voice heard,” said Jim Sutton, an attorney who represents cannabis businesses organizing political campaigns. Cannabis companies, entrepreneurs and advocates spent at least $1.8 million to help pass the legalization measure in 2016. Since then, the industry has donated more than $600,000 to California political campaigns—more than four times as much as it spent on politics in the state during the 2013-14 election campaigns. Cannabis money is flowing to Democrats and Republicans running for re-election to the Legislature, as well as to Democratic candidates hoping to be elected governor and attorney general. With the money comes a mainstream political presence for an industry quickly shedding its coun-

terculture image. At the California Democratic Party convention in February, the roster of receptions for delegates included one sponsored by Eaze, a company whose website allows people to order home delivery of marijuana. It was one of three marijuana companies that donated to the state party for the first time this year, for a total of $45,000. “I’m sure we will [continue] soliciting from the cannabis industry,” said party chairman Eric Bauman. “It’s a legal industry in California. It’s not one that hurts the environment, it’s not undermining our society. So we welcome their dollars.” The party prohibits donations from tobacco and oil companies. Democratic Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom, the frontrunner in the race for governor, has raised more money from cannabis interests than any other California politician: at least $495,000 as of April. Newsom championed the legalization ballot measure and now talks about California rejecting the “war on marijuana” as part of his gubernatorial campaign. One of his opponents, state

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FOOD - MUSIC - ACTIVITIES Stop by your nearest Butte County Library: Saturday May 5th - 11am-2pm Paradise Masonic Hall - (next to the Paradise Branch library) Saturday May 12th - 11am-2pm Chico Branch Library Saturday May 19th - 11am-2pm Oroville Branch Library For More Information Contact: Oliver Allen, oallen@buttecounty.net 530.891.2726 This project was supported in whole or in part by the U.S. Institute of Museum and Library Services under the provisions of the Library Services and Technology Act, administered in California by the State Librarian.

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Fee frustration Chico State students chant, “We cannot afford the fees; this is not democracy,” outside of Kendall Hall on Monday (May 7) in protest of three fees (student health services, “student learning” and athletics) that collectively will amount to an increase of $190 per semester by spring 2019. More than 60 percent of students voted against each fee

increase in a recent advisory measure. “[President] Gayle Hutchinson is making the sole decisions on this campus for the students, without any care for what we have to say, and that’s just an injustice,” said sophomore Brigitte Dahrouj (center, with “Greedy Gayle” sign). “Especially when she gets to make $300,000 a year and we all have to take out several thousands of dollars of student loan debt.” PHOTO BY ASHIAH SCHARAGA


about this story:

It was produced by Cal Matters, an independent public journalism venture covering California state politics and government. Learn more at calmatters.org.

Treasurer John Chiang, is also touting his cannabis cred. A Democrat who has received at least $10,100 from marijuana interests, Chiang has highlighted his interest in creating a state bank that could serve cannabis businesses. Attorney General Xavier Becerra has taken at least $21,000 from cannabis interests in his re-election campaign. It’s a marked difference from the last election for that office—in 2014, then-Attorney General Kamala Harris reported no donations from marijuana businesses. Cannabis businesses in California now

have several trade associations and a political action committee for raising money to dole out to politicians. “It’s just one tool folks in cannabis policy reform are using to move the conversation in a positive direction,” said Lindsay Robinson, executive director of the California Cannabis Industry Association, referring to campaign contributions. That PAC has raised more than $290,000 since launching in 2014. “The goal we’re striving for is for cannabis businesses to be regulated and treated like any other business, taxed fairly and able to thrive in the market….The political giving piece is important,” she said. That point was illustrated back in the hearing room, where lawmakers were considering the bill to expand marijuana delivery services, authored by Sen. Ricardo Lara, a Democrat from Bell Gardens who has taken at least $18,900 from cannabis interests and is now running for insurance commissioner. Not every legislator who accepted marijuana contributions voted for the bill. Sen. Mike McGuire, a Healdsburg Democrat, took a $4,000 check from a marijuana delivery company last year but sided with the local governments that opposed limits on their power to ban delivery services. Still, marijuana businesses that want to get ahead have to play politics, said Hilary Bricken, an L.A. attorney who specializes in cannabis law—and that generally means throwing some money around. “Cannabis has learned from Big Pharma, Big Alcohol and Big Tobacco that they have to step up in this way,” she said. “They would be stupid to not do what’s worked for the industries that came before them.” —LaureL rosenhaLL

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HEALTHLINES Cheryl Struve, nurse-midwife at Adventist Health Feather River, tends to a couple and their newborn in The Birth Day Place. PHOTO COURTESY OF ADVENTIST HEALTH FEATHER RIVER

to just 7 percent under the supervision of their midwives. Trained in all elements of women’s health, nurse-midwifes attend to a variety of women’s issues, from cancer screenings and breast exams to pregnancy, delivery and postpartum care. Struve believes this comprehensive approach contributes greatly to the success of the pregnancy, and can help minimize the use of medical interventions, such as C-sections, during labor. “We see the woman as a whole,” Struve said. “It’s not just about the medical components of the pregnancy. We work with her on her nutrition, mental health, everything. There are lots of things we can talk about, from as early as four or five weeks into the pregnancy. And it’s not just about the facts like ‘you need to lose or gain weight.’ We want to help them figure out their triggers as to why they’re gaining weight, so they can be more successful in making changes during the pregnancy.” There are a variety of reasons for the nation’s increase in C-sections, Yocum and Struve say. Some women have elected for planned C-sections to gain more control over the scheduling of the birth; knowing when and how they’ll deliver provides a sense of peace. And for doctors, a fear of litigation sometimes leads to a C-section delivery. As Struve explained, a provider can be put into a precarious position if there are any signs of complications during labor. Performing a C-section during labor distress avoids the potential for litigation, even if the surgery is not always necessary.

Back to basics

Most studies and health care professionals agree that there is

a time and place for C-sections. According to a current analysis of childbirth in The Journal of the American Medical

As nation grapples with high rate of C-sections, local hospital promotes natural birth

by

Rachel Bush

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t Paradise’s Adventist Health Feather River Hospital, the

comforts of home birth can be found in The Birth Day Place. Recently celebrating 20 years as the hospital’s designated birthing unit, The Birth Day Place encourages the labor, delivery, recovery and postpartum processes to remain in a single room, to keep everything as smooth and natural as possible. Women often make the space their own, bringing in music and choosing what kind of support system they want present. “It’s all about creating an environment the mom wants. And we promote nonmedical intervention whenever possible,” said Teresa Yocum, the hospital’s obstetrics director. Those intentions are reflected in Feather River’s low rates of cesarean sections, a procedure that requires incisions in the stomach and uterus to extract the baby. Out of the 783 births at Feather River in 2017, only 96—just 12 percent—were primary C-sections (the first C-section performed on a woman).

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Those numbers are significantly lower than the national average. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1 in 3 pregnant women in the U.S. gives birth by C-section. Those rates are indicative of a significant increase in the procedure over the past several decades; only 5 percent of women delivered by C-section in 1970. By 1996, the rate had skyrocketed to 20 percent. In an attempt to decrease the rate of unnecessary C-section births, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services created a goal of reducing its use nationwide for low-risk first births to 23.9 percent, under the Healthy People 2020 initiative. To bolster achieving that target rate, Smart Care California, a public-private partnership that promotes affordable state health care, honored hospitals this past January that met or surpassed that goal. Of the 111 hospitals recognized, both Feather River and Enloe Medical Center in Chico made the cut. Much of Feather River’s success can be attributed to the

midwife services available at the hospital. According to Cheryl Struve, nurse-midwife at Feather River for the past 28 years, the likelihood of needing a C-section goes down

HEALTHLINES C O N T I N U E D

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APPOINTMENT Growing Healthy Children It’s important to help children develop healthy habits early in life, encouraging them to make smart food choices and promoting regular physical activity. The 12th annual Growing Healthy Children Walk & Run on Saturday, May 12, is a great place to start. The free event kicks off with a 1-mile loop, a 5K run and sprints for kids. Then enjoy refreshments, prizes, music and dancing, plus a bicycle giveaway for four lucky winners. Find all the information and register at growinghealthychildrenchico.com. The the first 300 preregistered children to pick up their packets on race day will get a free T-shirt.


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• Never leave children unattended in or near water, even when lifeguards are present.

The Department of Commerce has assessed preliminary newsprint tariffs, which range as high as 32%.

It’s heating up and many of us are heading to the water to cool down. As we spend more time in pools, rivers, creeks and lakes, May has been designated as National Drowning Prevention Awareness Month to help us mentally prepare for a fun summer. Ten drownings occur every day in the U.S., according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and drowning is the leading cause of unintentional death for children ages 1-4, most of them occurring in home pools. Here are some water-safety tips:

Trump’s Tariffs

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medical intervention, from pain medication to C-sections, Struve says there are a variety of things the birthing team can do to help move things along naturally. “There are exercises to ripen the cervix. And we encourage mothers to move around a lot,” she said. “There are breathing techniques and different ball-shaped cushions that provide some comfort when a woman is laying on her side.” Sometimes, however, a C-section will become a necessary means for delivery. Regardless of the method of birth, Struve stresses the importance of supporting the mother. “Sometimes C-section moms wonder if they didn’t work hard enough during delivery. But they often worked very hard! In those situations, there wasn’t an appropriate way for the baby to come out vaginally. … The ultimate goal is to have a healthy baby and mom, both physically and emotionally.” Ω

tell congress that news matters. ask them to end the newsprint tariff.

Association, a C-section rate of 19 percent is warranted. That statistic accounts for obstructed labor scenarios, multiple gestations, and emergency conditions, in which C-sections are most beneficial. But as the surgery rates increase beyond 19 percent, necessity decreases while the likelihood of complications during surgery goes up. “There’s a greater chance that amniotic fluid can enter the maternal bloodstream [with a C-section],” Yocum said. “There’s an increased chance of blood clotting. The maternal mortality rate goes up. And once the surgery’s done, you’ve got six weeks of recovery time to heal from the incision.” For all these reasons, Struve says patience is a crucial component of the birthing process. “Labor goes so much better when we don’t have to force it.” While the pain of delivery often leads expecting mothers to ask for

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• Don’t trust water wings, noodles or pool toys to stay afloat. These are not approved safety devices. • Learn CPR. Several organizations in the county offer low-cost programs. You can find more information on Butte County’s website: buttecounty.net/publichealth/Programs/InjuryPrevention/Drowning

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GREENWAYS About this story:

‘Abnormal responses’ Fracking chemicals’ effects on mice underscore dangers to people, study reveals by

Brian Bienkowski

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Cto impair near fracked oil and gas wells appear the proper functioning of the

hemicals commonly found in groundwater

immune system, according to a lab study released last week. The study, published May 1 in the journal Toxicological Sciences, is the first to find a link between fracking chemicals and immune system problems and suggests that baby girls born to mothers near fracking wells may not fight diseases later in life as well as they could have with a pollution-free pregnancy. “This is a really important study, especially since the work started with the idea of identifying what’s out there in the environment, how much people are exposed to,” said Andrea Gore, a professor of pharmacology and toxicology in the College of Pharmacy at the University of Texas at Austin. “So it’s all based on this model that has been determined by a real-world situation,” said Gore, who was not involved in the study. The implications are far-reaching: More

than 17 million people in the U.S. live within a mile of an oil or gas well. Hydraulic fractured wells now account for about half of U.S. oil and two-thirds of the nation’s natural gas, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Fracking, short for hydraulic fracturing, is a method of drilling where millions of gallons of water and chemicals are pumped underground at high pressures to fracture shale or coal bed layers to release otherwise unreachable oil and gas deposits. The chemicals used in the process remain proprietary. However, the industry has reported more than 1,000 chemicals are used in fracked oil and gas wells—and researchers have found more than 200 of these compounds in wastewater near extraction. The researchers tested 23 chemicals commonly found in groundwater near fracking operations. The chemicals chosen were recently associated with reproductive and development impacts on mice. The researchers exposed mostly female mice in their mothers’ womb to the chemical mixture at levels commonly found near fracking sites. Exposed mice had “abnormal responses” to diseases when they were older—specifically an allergic disease, a certain type of flu, and a disease similar to multiple sclerosis. “The mice whose moms drank water containing the mixture had faster disease onset and more severe disease,” lead author Paige Lawrence said in a phone interview. Lawrence is a researcher and chair of Environmental Medicine at the University of Rochester Medical Center. Some of the observed changes were subtle, “such as alterations in the number or percentage of certain cell types, whereas other changes were more manifest, such as advancement in the onset and severity of disease,” the authors wrote. Lawrence said human and mice immune systems are “more similar than they are different.” “This provides information as to what to look for in people,” she said. It’s not entirely clear how the mixture altered the mouse immune system, but Lawrence said the chemicals may be altering pathways that control the immune cells that would fight off diseases. Some of the compounds in the mixture—benzene and styrene—are considered toxic to mammals’ immune system. Susan Nagel, a researcher and associate professor of obstetrics, gynecology and women’s health at the University of Missouri School of Medicine and study co-author, said the 23 chemicals they use are known endocrine disruptors, meaning they interfere with

It was originally published online by Environmental Health News at www.environmentalhealthnews.org.

the proper functioning of hormones. Properly functioning hormones are crucial for immune system development. There’s probably “some overlap of chemicals that perturb the endocrine system, some that perturb the immune system and probably some that do both,” Gore said. Female mice had more severe changes to their immune systems and abilities to fight off disease. “Immune responses of males and females are inherently different, and ... sex affects the timing, magnitude or penetrance of many diseases,” the authors wrote, but cautioned that this study alone doesn’t conclude that females are more sensitive to fracking chemicals than males. The study is just the latest to underscore concern for people near fracking sites. Previous studies have found associations between living near fracking sites and birth defects, prostate and breast cancer, asthma and acute lymphocytic leukemia. Over the past decade, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has identified dozens of chemicals used in fracking as health hazards, according to a report from the Partnership for Policy Integrity and Earthworks. However, the report found the agency allowed the chemicals to be made and used, and hasn’t disclosed the chemicals to the public. The EPA would not comment on the new study—a spokesperson said the agency is reviewing it. Ω

ECO EVENT

LITTLE CHICO CREEK CLEANUP Our urban waterways are choked with invasive plants and trash from illegal dumping. It’s a big problem that threatens the natural spaces that make our city great. The good news is that you you can help! Pitch in for this weekend’s Block Party With a Purpose, which targets Little Chico Creek. Butte Environmental Council provides the tools, dumpsters and know-how while you contribute to a healthy urban wildlife habitat and keep the creek looking great. Meet up at Ninth and Hazel streets on Saturday, May 12, at 9 a.m. Find out more information and register at becnet.org


EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS Photo by Cathy wagNer

15 MINUTES

THE GOODS

Social climbing

New studio, Indian food

Terrain Park Climbing Center, co-owned by Paul Hendricks and Mitch Robison, is not only a public climbing gym, it’s also a new kind of community and social gathering place. Born and raised in Red Bluff, Hendricks (pictured) and Robison have known each other all their lives. They both attended Long Beach State, where Hendricks got a degree in marketing and Robison studied accounting. After graduation, they had a shared goal and the skills they needed to launch Terrain Park, which opened last month. In addition to features like a large and colorful climbing area with lots of mats, there’s a full weight room as well as a lounge. Terrain Park also plans to offer activities like workshops, camps, movie nights and more. Hendricks recently took the time to sit down and answer a few questions for the CN&R. Drop by 931 W. Fifth St. 8 a.m.10 p.m. Monday-Friday or 9 a.m.-9 p.m. Saturday and Sunday or visit their website at terrainparkclimbingcenter.com.

Are you the only climbing gym in town? We have the only public [climbing] gym in Chico. There’s the Chico State WREC Center; they have a [climbing] gym in there that’s open for students. It has bouldering and rope climbing. We’re strictly bouldering here ….

What do you offer besides bouldering? We have not only the climbing wall, but also the slackline area and then a whole upstairs lounge area with board games, TV, couches, ping-pong, foosball. We see people coming in, trying out the climbing and having a ball with that, and then their fingers and muscles get sore—it’s a new thing, you’re working new muscles. They’ll take a break, hop on the slackline, have some fun with that, go upstairs, play Uno with their parents or we have a Wii.

Do you get a lot of college students? Yeah, we’ve been getting a lot of students. I would say, surprisingly, we’ve been getting tons of families. It seems like there was a demand

by

Meredith J. Cooper meredithc@newsreview.com

Mother’s Day is nearly upon us, and that means it’s prime season for gift shops and florists. And it just so happens I have news related to both. How’s that for an introduction? First, the new news: Alex Marshall Studios is opening a retail showroom and manufacturing facility just south of downtown Chico. The studio, which produces ceramics such as dinnerware, accessories and lighting, is relocating from Corning, where it’s been since 2000. Now, it’s time to expand, according to a press release, and the 4,200-square-foot warehouse at 1095 Nelson St. that used to house AT&T offices was a good fit. The coolest thing about this studio, in my mind, is the care taken to really connect customers with the art. First, each piece is handmade, meaning each one is slightly different from the next. Plus, while browsing the showroom, visitors can watch the process unfold through large picture windows. A grand opening celebration is planned for May 18, 5-8 p.m. (OK, that’s after Mother’s Day, but it’s neat anyway!)

Slow MovINg A few weeks ago, I caught wind that Christian & Johnson, practically for something more family-oriented that had an inexpensive price point—our day pass is $10 for unlimited use.

So, parents can send their kids here? We’ve actually had a ton of that. Been getting the high school crowd in here—they come in with their parents for the first time and get their membership taken care of and, as long as they’re 14 and older, they can ride their bike here after school and do their climbing and then come up here and do their homework.

What kind of community are you building? The clientele that we get in here, you couldn’t pick better people. They’re outdoor-oriented and very friendly. It’s really cool to be able to have these role-model-type people walking around as our members, like they’re an extension of us, so when we have guests and families come in and they get to see these successful, fit, friendly, nice, welcoming people. It just adds to the whole experience of the gym. —CATHy WAgneR

a landmark perched on the bank of Big Chico Creek, was experiencing delays and financial setbacks regarding city permits in its efforts to move to a house on East First Avenue. I reached out to owner Melissa Heringer for details, but got no callback. She told others inquiring similarly online that she was holding her breath that she and the city could come to an agreement. Well, they did! Last Thursday (May 3), a Facebook announcement said the project is back on track, though still behind schedule. As a fundraiser to help pay for the move, C&J will be selling bulbs removed from the house’s landscape to make way for construction. Go to christianandjohnson.com or find the business on Facebook for details.

Curry tIMe When I walked into Taj Indian Restaurant, I wasn’t particularly in the mood for Indian food. But I wasn’t prepared to be hit with such a sweet curry aroma. Walking into the space, it’s easy to forget it was previously occupied by Bulldog Taqueria, and if it weren’t for the Pizza Factory logo painted on the floor in front of the counter, that might’ve been ancient history as well. Now, colorful tapestries hang from the rafters and Indian music videos play on the TV. This was their soft opening, and they were offering free samples of several of their preprepared dishes. I chatted it up with the owner, Lally Mahindru, while his niece, Simi Kaur, made my bowl. His family hails from Magalia, he told me, and they own another restaurant in Yuba City. My favorite dish was the shahi paneer—Indian cheese in a creamy, buttery sauce. Prices are very reasonable, too—expect to grab lunch for less than $10. I look forward to checking out the full menu, which should be up now, sometime soon. See for yourself at 995 Nord Ave.

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t’s not a memory Carrington Forbes enjoys recalling: a tension in his midsection just above his empty pockets, tears cascading down his cheeks as he frantically searched Chico for a place to go—to relieve himself. Forbes, who suffers from Crohn’s disease and irritable bowel syndrome, was homeless at the time. “I [would] be literally crying, a full-grown man crying, just running down the streets looking for a bathroom,” recalled Forbes. “If you don’t have your own bathroom and you don’t have the money to pay for something at a store and all the bathrooms are locked down, you have no option other than to just literally crap your pants.”

LOCKED OUT Chico’s lack of 24/7 restrooms is inhumane, a health hazard and a disruption to commerce. So why isn’t the city doing something? story and photos by

Ashiah Scharaga as h i a h s @new srev i ew. c o m

Formerly homeless Chicoan Carrington Forbes says the lack of 24-hour restroom access in Chico makes people who live unsheltered feel like they’re “not even worthy of being able to go to the bathroom.”

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Forbes, 25, now lives with his girlfriend and tends her family’s orchard, but he spent six years living on Chico’s streets, working multiple jobs while going to community college and trying to stay sober. During that time, he, like many others in similar circumstances, had no access to restrooms at night. That’s because all the city’s public restrooms are closed overnight. For the roughly 430 unsheltered people living here, it often comes down to a choice between finding a bush or a tree, or, as one homeless man told the CN&R, trying to alter his biological rhythm so the urge to go doesn’t happen when restroom doors are locked. Opening a round-the-clock facility has been discussed in some fashion by City Council members for more than two years, and even included an 80-day trial of leaving the restrooms at City Plaza open 24/7. However, the panel has yet to land on a permanent solution, despite the human toll, threat to public health and repeated lobbying by local homeless advocacy groups, merchants and other citizens fed up with the inaction. The city’s Greater Chico Homeless Task Force is one such group. In February, its members sent a memo to the council and city manager, asking that a 24-hour restroom be included in the 2018-19 budget, and calling for portable toilets to be installed in the meantime. Councilman Randall Stone, chairman of the task force, said the city has plenty of money to install a 24-hour restroom, and is frustrated that the issue hasn’t been high on the its list of priorities. “It’s not a priority because we haven’t made it a priority,”


Stone said. “The thought of trying to fix people’s bathroom needs, especially a population that is already marginalized and dismissed by the larger community—it’s not a sexy thing to solve that bathroom problem.” For those on the streets, it’s dehumanizing, said fellow task force member Jennifer Barzey. Performing bodily functions in a safe, clean manner is a basic, everyday need, like food and shelter, that “certainly shouldn’t be on the back burner.” “Nobody wants to use the sidewalk or street corner,” said Barzey, program manager for Sixth Street Center for Youth. “We have had youth show up that have defecated on themselves or had to use dumpsters. It’s very embarrassing to them. … The youth want people to realize that, when that happens, there’s no other option.”

Trial, error and success Before City Plaza’s restrooms were temporarily opened 24/7, downtown business owners had grown weary of finding urine and human excrement near their storefronts regularly. Some reported that their private restrooms were being misused as well. People would line up to get into the downtown Starbucks’ restrooms in the morning, and then use them as a place to clean up, recalled Melanie Bassett, Downtown Chico Business Association executive director. As a result, the coffee shop installed locking keypads. Something needed to be done, business owners told the DCBA. In November 2015, then-Councilwoman Tami Ritter requested the city address the issue and associated health and safety concerns. Eventually, after some back and forth at council and Internal Affairs Committee meetings, the city embarked upon an experiment in January 2017. The City Plaza restrooms were renovated and the doors were secured open 24/7 for a planned 90-day trial. Costs climbed quickly—two months in, maintenance workers from the city and DCBA were overwhelmed by the trash and personal belongings left behind by people who sought shelter within the restrooms. They spent three hours per day cleaning the facilities, Public Works Facilities Manager Jason Bougie told the committee, and also dealt with vandalism—walls were scratched, written on and burned. Staff abandoned the trial a week early, on April 17—and a year later, access to public restrooms has changed only slightly: City Plaza’s restrooms now open at 5 a.m. instead of 7 a.m. That facility closes at 9 p.m. All other public restrooms in the city, located downtown or in Bidwell Park, either open later or close earlier. Ultimately, city staff concluded that the rigid design of the plaza restrooms made the location less than ideal for 24-hour access,

despite a $19,000-renovation project that included stainless steel stalls, walls with graffiti-resistant coating and LED lighting. Maintenance for the trial ended up costing more than $15,000—$2,500 went to the DCBA’s now-defunct Clean Up Brigade for additional cleanings, while vandalism repairs and additional city staff time racked up $13,000. (According to a public works official, $3,000 went to repairs made by city contractors, while $10,000 covered the average “fully burdened” pay and benefits costs for more than 200 hours of city staff time.) Chico’s best bet, according to city staff, was to install a Portland Loo restroom, a stainless steel facility with a compact design to deter vandalism and camping, or something similar elsewhere in the city. But, given a lack of funding for the structure, the idea was shelved. Despite the costs, however, the experiment was considered a success on the commercial front: during that time, businesses reported experiencing less wear and tear on their restrooms and saw less urine and feces outside their shops, according to Bassett, who accompanied Team Chico, the Chamber of Commerce’s outreach group, during business walks to assess the effectiveness of the trial. Mona Hymel, manager of Gabrielle Ferrar Diamonds & Exceptional Jewelry (on Main Street near West Second Street), told the CN&R that the trial made a difference at her store, where they didn’t have to spend as much time cleaning up urine. She added that she was dismayed to see how the plaza restrooms were treated. “[People] need access to public restrooms that are clean and sanitary that they’re not afraid to use,” she said. “I don’t know how to teach these people that, ‘Hey, you should clean up,’ or ‘Hey, if you vandalize, you’re going to have to do community service.’” Though Steve O’Bryan says the trial didn’t seem to make a difference for Pullins

Councilman Randall Stone says the city has plenty of money to install a 24-hour restroom, but has not made it a priority.

Cyclery, his bike shop located three blocks from the plaza, the longtime downtown business owner believes better access to public restrooms is needed. He deals with urine, feces and litter cleanup, as well as folks who are passed out, outside of his store several times a month. “I’ve found piles of poo in the doorway. One of my employees goes, ‘How do you know it wasn’t a dog?’ and I go, ‘Dogs don’t have an opposable thumb to use toilet paper,” he said. “If you don’t provide the facilities, then you’re going to have people peeing and defecating all over the place.”

An epidemic Public health officials know that the matter has much more serious implications than just the cleanup. Last fall, San Diego County health professionals flooded the streets, attempting to

City Plaza restrooms were open 24 hours a day for a trial period last year, during which time they were vandalized and used for shelter.

vaccinate the region’s homeless population during an outbreak of hepatitis A. Portable toilets and hand-washing stations were erected, and the sidewalks were pressure-washed with bleach three days a week. Typically, hepatitis A spreads when small, undetected amounts of fecal matter from an infected person are ingested by another from contact with contaminated objects, food or drinks, but it can also spread from close personal contact with an infected person, such as through intercourse or through caring for someone who is ill. In San Diego, most folks who contracted the virus were homeless and/ or illicit drug users exposed to “fecally contaminated environments,” according to the San Diego Public Health Department. Since then, Los Angeles, Santa Cruz and Monterey have also reported outbreaks of the highly contagious liver disease, and scrambled to address emergency health crises as they unfolded. So far, hepatitis A infections have killed 20, infected 588 and hospitalized 403 people in San Diego. Nationwide, the epidemic is considered the “largest person-to-person hepatitis A outbreak” since the vaccine became available in 1996, according to the California Department of Public Health, and prompted Gov. Jerry Brown to declare a state of emergency. It took more than a year to get the situation under control, with the state agency demobilizing its response as of April 11—the first patient was reportedly cared for in San Diego in November 2016. While the North State hasn’t seen an outbreak, Cassie Miracle, a senior health education specialist in Butte County, told the CN&R that diseases have no boundaries. With a homeless population of nearly 2,000, according to the Continuum of Care’s 2017 point-in-time census, the county is home to cities that lack what Public Health RESTROOMS c o n t i n u e d M ay 1 0 , 2 0 1 8

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RESTROOMS C O N T I N U E D

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considers important preventative measures: public restrooms, running water and soap that is accessible 24 hours a day. Contamination of food or water is more likely to occur in areas where there are poor sanitary conditions or poor personal hygiene, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. As part of its prevention efforts, Butte County Public Health started offering free vaccines to the homeless communityin January. So far, 58 people have been inoculated across the county, Miracle said, with clinics held at the Hope Center in Oroville and Torres Community Shelter and Jesus Center in Chico. Public Health representatives also have provided educational resources, including basic information about the virus, its symptoms and how to prevent it, to Oroville and Chico city governments and their parks and recreation districts, as well as sober living communities and homeless service providers. “We’re telling these [homeless] folks, ‘Wash your hands, wash your hands, wash your hands.’ It’d be great if they could do that 24/7,” Miracle said. “They may have access during the day, but in the evenings, you still need to wash your hands, too.” As evidenced through the experiences of communities in Southern California, once an outbreak reaches a certain size, it’s all reactionary, Miracle said. The cost for San Diego County ended up surpassing $10 million, according to The San Diego Union-Tribune. “We’re trying really hard to not put ourselves in that [position],” she said. “We are making sure the folks that may be the most affected know what the resources are and know what the risks are. We want to make sure we have everything in place to protect us.”

The human toll Siana Sonoquie has advocated for homeless individuals in Chico for the past couple of years, serving as a volunteer, housing consultant and now the outreach director for North Valley Housing Trust. A few weeks ago, she gave a spare pair of pants to a homeless woman who was on her period and had soiled the jeans she was wearing. “Imagine waking up in the morning and your nearest bathroom is 10 blocks away and you don’t have any transportation,” Sonoquie said. “It’s a human rights issue. It’s a health issue. People need access to a place to go to the bathroom.” Sonoquie said she expected the city to keep coming back to the drawing board with new ideas after learning from the trial, getting creative and exploring other options, whether it be installing a Portland Loo or gathering input from neighborhoods about multiple new restroom sites. One of the factors she believes is a road22

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Richard Muenzer, who is currently homeless, is frustrated over the city’s lack of 24-hour restrooms. He told the CN&R he doesn’t want people causing a mess or monopolizing them, either. “It’s not a place for shooting up, for rolling a bowl,” he says. “It’s a place to do personal things and leave.”

anything to use to keep clean, and just has to “sit there” or wait until morning, when she can get some toilet paper to place in her underwear or a change of clothes. Henson said she’s miserable, and she knows nobody cares. She’s tired of getting in trouble for camping, for having no place to go. She’s lost any hope that things will change in Chico. “I know it’s because some homeless people do drugs and drink and are filthy, but not all of us are like that,” she said. “The cops say we’re just an eyesore … the only thing that’s different is that we don’t have a house or place to lay our head.” From where she sat on the curb near Henson, Mona Basinger, 68, remarked that she has a hard time getting around because she suffers from many health issues, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and a prolapsed bladder, and wears adult diapers because it’s difficult to get to an open

block to action is a perception among some that extending restroom hours invites folks to congregate and enables them to stay on the streets. At its core, she said, the real problem is a lack of housing, low-barrier shelter beds, a day center and mental health and substance abuse services. “These arguments, if we are providing too much food in one space, if we build a bathroom they will come … it’s just such a limited view of what the real problem is,” she said. “Imagine if you did this at a college, if your grades weren’t Mona Basinger, 68, says she good enough and you often can’t physically get weren’t progressing … herself to an open restroom because she suffers from they stopped feeding you many health issues. She and you wouldn’t get to wears adult diapers to help use a bathroom. … That’s her feel more confident. not a way to move people forward. That’s a way to put more stress into their lives.” Indeed, this was evident in the CN&R’s many interviews with members of the homeless community. On the sidewalk outside the Jesus Center, Ashley Henson, 22, popped open a can of food for her pup, Turbo. She’s been on the streets off and on since she was 18, following the death of her grandmother and her father’s arrest and imprisonment. “I’ve held it so long that it hurts so bad. I’ve held it over 24 hours,” she said. Menstruation is especially problematic. Henson said she often doesn’t have

restroom. She has been homeless for nearly four years, she said, ever since her husband died and she was evicted from their home. Chico is going through a transition, added homeless artist Lee Wright—homelessness isn’t going to go away, and people need to work together and understand each others’ perspectives. “There’s a problem with elitistmindedness here,” he said. Wright, 48, left his most recent home after experiencing what he described as emotional heartache. Living on the streets holds a comfortable familiarity for the former foster youth, who struggles with anxiety and has lapsed in and out of homelessness for 20 years. It’s smart to consider a restroom like the Portland Loo, he said, which should be monitored so it isn’t abused. “When perfectly sophisticated people who happen to be homeless need to hide behind two dumpsters and cardboard walls and go into a plastic bag or go between bushes … that’s a big flaw.”

Still unfunded Since the City Plaza trial ended last year, a 24-hour restroom has been added to what’s essentially a wish-list of unfunded city projects within the Public Works Department. Erik Gustafson, Chico director of public works-operations and maintenance, said there are multiple high priorities for the general fund, like public safety, streets and building


“People look down at us so much that we can be crying in pain and they won’t even show us sympathy.” a financial reserve. chambers on —Carrington Forbes City staff are working May 1, however, on other projects until the panel did not they get direction from the include restrooms in council to shift gears. the discussion. “We understand the need is Angela McLaughlin, a there,” he said. “However, providhomeless advocate who voluning 24-hour restrooms is a very costly teers with Chico Friends on the endeavor.” Street and Safe Space, said she is City staff and the Greater Chico especially concerned with the panel’s Homeless Task Force seem to agree upon inaction because of the hepatitis A outa Portland Loo-style facility as a favorable break in Southern California. “They’re not option. The structure runs about $100,000, showing any concern about public health,” with an additional $20,000-$30,000 cost to she said. “If they were, I think they would hook up to utilities and at least $10,000 per be frantic at this point.” year for maintenance, Gustafson said. McLaughlin has started rallying supThe restroom, first installed in Portland port through a Change.org petition, which in 2008, is exposed at the top and bottom, demands that the council take immediate making a person’s feet visible while in use. action for the health and well-being of This helps law enforcement monitor the all Chicoans. More than 100 people have facility and prevent crime. Because it is signed so far. made of stainless steel, it’s easy to clean, “I was just incredibly frustrated that and hand-washing stations are placed on they wouldn’t even have a discussion of the outside. the bathroom issue or the possibility of free bathrooms … it just seemed so outrageous But the City Council has thus far balked to me,” she said. “Whatever this shapes up at the suggestion. At its March 20 meeting, the panel considered what to do with $40,000 to be, it’s going to have to be citizen-led if we want any changes.” from the Chico Community Grant Program. One idea was to create a community-wide capital benefit project—City Manager Mark Orme used a 24/7 restroom as an example of what could be funded. That Though he’s no longer on the streets, proposal went nowhere—instead, the panel Forbes told the CN&R it took him about voted to delay a decision until the budget is seven years to break the cycle of homelessfinalized in June. ness. He’s not exactly where he wants to At yet another meeting, on April 17, be, but he’s getting there, he said, and he Councilwoman Ann Schwab requested that has many reasons to offer a quick smile. Orme be directed to explore a partnership Chief among them: He has paid off $7,000 with another public agency that could fund in debt that accumulated while he was public restrooms. It was pitched as having homeless, related to citations for camping, the potential to be cost-neutral, but explotrespassing, loitering and other offenses. ration of the concept was shot down along During a recent interview, he recalled party lines. (Orme declined to discuss any the trauma of life on the streets, includdetails when contacted by this newspaper.) ing being physically attacked. Being “We’ve been down this road before, we denied access to a restroom leaves a did it right across the street, and it was an psychological impact that is “heartbreakunmitigated disaster,” Mayor Sean Morgan ing,” Forbes said. said at the meeting. “While I am not at all “It damages our psyche,” he said. “It opposed to public restrooms if we could makes us think that we’re not even worthy find a place and area they worked and they of being able to go to the bathroom. People weren’t abused by drug addicts and others, look down at us so much that we can be I would rather see that be part of the larger crying in pain and they won’t even show discussion with the consolidated services us sympathy.” center … ’cause otherwise, to me it’s anothHomeless people aren’t all addicted er Band-Aid.” to drugs, he added. Many lost their jobs, When the Jesus Center consolidation lived through a family tragedy or are just a plan came back around to the City Council victim of poor circumstances. When some

The Portland Loo, a stainless steel public toilet manufactured by Madden Fabrication, was installed in 2008 by the city of Portland, Ore. The Greater Chico Homeless Task Force has recommended installing one, or something with a similar design, in Chico. PHOTO COURTESY OF EVAN MADDEN/MADDEN FABRICATION

‘A hardship’

people fail, they get second chances, or they have a safety net on which they can rely. But others aren’t so lucky. “The public doesn’t really understand the issues, or they just see the results,” he said. “They see the homeless leaving their trash, they see them crapping in front of businesses and things like that, but they don’t understand the whys.” And everybody’s “why” is different. All that John Shaw has left of his material possessions are contained in two briefcases. On a recent afternoon at City Plaza, the 78-year-old unclasped one with his cigarettestained fingers, revealing charcoal and pencil drawings he drew more than 50 years ago, along with a few old photographs—in one, he’s a blond 20-something in a burgundy suit. Another is a fading snapshot of One-Mile’s Sycamore Pool. Shaw used to work at a nonprofit that provided services to homeless people. Now he knows what it’s like to be the one in need, finding himself homeless last summer after a living situation became unstable. When nature calls and the plaza restrooms are closed, he

goes to the downtown Jack in the Box if he has enough change to buy a coffee. If he doesn’t, he tries to hold it. “I try not to drink liquids in the evenings,” he said. Shaw recalled a time when he had diarrhea and couldn’t make it to a restroom in time. He had no choice—though he was afraid of getting in trouble, he had to squat behind a tree. Richard Muenzer, listening to Shaw’s accounts, chimed in that he relates: He’s attempted to train his biological rhythm to feel the urge to go only when restrooms are available. He expressed frustration over the city’s lack of 24-hour restrooms, adding that he doesn’t want people causing a mess and monopolizing them either. “It’s not a place for shooting up, for rolling a bowl,” he said. “It’s a place to do personal things and leave.” Shaw said that, to him, the city doesn’t seem to care. The restrooms aren’t available 24/7 because “they want to kick the homeless people out of town.” But “when Mother Nature calls, she calls,” and when those doors are locked, it can really cause “a hardship on the homeless people.” Ω M AY 1 0 , 2 0 1 8

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Arts &Culture Earworm engineers New York’s Cults uses new tools to build vintage pop songs

Sdespite minute pop song since it emerged in the 1950s. Even today, the boundless possibilities of electronic music producurprisingly little has changed about the three- to five-

tion, much of the sound palette has remained more or less the same and many songwriters still rely on the verse-chorus format. It’s a proven formula. The New York-based indie-rock duo by Howard Cults works under those same parameters Hardee and, in fact, sound a whole lot like the pop that played through tube radios back in the ’50s. But it took a unique route to get there, says guitarist, keyboardist and back-up Preview: vocalist Brian Oblivion. Cults perform Sunday, May 20, 8:30 p.m. “A lot of people are surprised that ‘Go (doors 7:30 p.m.) Outside’—our first big song and the first Tickets: $20 song we wrote—hardly has any live instruments,” he said. “There’s some guitar Sierra Nevada Big strumming over the second verse, but you Room 1075 E. 20th St. hardly hear it. It’s almost all electronic 899-6138 plug-ins and samples. In a way, this has sierranevada.com always been an electronic band.” The CN&R caught up with Oblivion and lead singer Madeline Follin ahead of Cults’ performance at Sierra Nevada Big Room on May 20. The show is a bellwether for the venue’s new direction under Manager Mahina Gannet, who took over booking in March. In the CN&R’s recent Local Music Issue, Gannet observed that Cults plays “100 percent different music than has ever been seen in this room.” For its part, Cults is stoked to play the Big Room—maybe too stoked. “We’re more excited than you probably think, because Brian is a Sierra Nevada, um, lover,” Follin said. Leading up to the release of Cults’ self-titled debut record in 2011, Oblivion and Follin approached their music as an art project, combining modern electronic elements with the sugary-sweet melodies of The ShangriLas and other mid-century girl groups. The follow-up, 2013’s Static, took that formula and flipped it, adding darkness, tension, and standouts like the brilliant “Always Forever.” With the release of the band’s most recent record, last year’s Offering, Cults has produced three albums’ worth of sweet and insidious melodies, the sort of hooks that bury themselves in one’s mind and stay there for weeks. Oblivion and Follin haven’t agreed on where to take the band’s sound from 24

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here, though, and Oblivion was reluctant to give any hints. “It’s always a lie, whatever we say, because we end up actually recording and it’s like, ‘Oh, yeah, we didn’t do any of that,’” Oblivion said. “For me personally, I feel like our whole catalog has been go-go-go. I want to do a really chill album where nothing is over like, 80 [beats per minute]. But she wants to make our ultimate party record.” The tug-of-war will probably result in their fourth album falling somewhere in the middle, and sounding just like Cults. “That’s usually how we get there,” Follin said. “We have totally opposite ideas of what we want, and then we compromise.” The band has expanded its sound beyond its original retro influences, however. Since they’ve gotten tighter in the studio and have access to better equipment, the lo-fi haze of Oblivion and Follin’s first record is long gone. And they’re excited to push Cults into new territory. “Computers are getting so advanced, we might be able to step beyond what we think is the palette for music,” Oblivion said. “I feel like someone is going to come along and blow this whole thing wide open.” Ω

THIS WEEK 10

THU

Special Events ERASE THE STIGMA OF MENTAL ILLNESS: Public forum to discuss mental health issues and support. Panelists will share tips for being present, balancing life and work, and coping with mental illness. Thu, 5/10, 6:30pm. Free. Manzanita Place, 1705 Manzanita Ave. sichico.com

SMOKE-VAPE-DRUG-FREE NIGHT: Community organizations provide resources and information about smoking, vaping and drugs, plus music by Fox E. Jeff, Dopus Locus and Sons of Jefferson. Thu, 5/10, 6-9pm. City Plaza, 132 W. Fourth St.

Music INSPIRE SPRING CONCERT: Inspire School of Arts & Sciences performance featuring the Inspire Orchestra, pop bands, solos and small ensembles. Thu, 5/10, 7pm. $5-$8. CUSD Center for the Arts, 1475 East Ave. inspirecusd.org

Theater GLENGARRY GLEN ROSS: A group of cutthroat real estate salesmen will go to any lengths to unload parcels of land on unsuspecting buyers in David Mamet’s crackling satire. The top salesman wins a new Cadillac. The loser cleans out his desk. Director Amber Miller leads an excellent cast through this brutal laceration of the American Dream, which won the 1984 Pulitzer Prize for drama. Thu, 5/10, 7:30pm. $15. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. blueroomtheatre.com

JOSEPH & THE AMAZING TECHNICOLOR DREAMCOAT: Chico High students perform Andrew Lloyd Webber’s highenergy Biblical musical set to a cornucopia of musical styles. Thu, 5/10, 7pm. Williams Theatre, Chico High, 901 Esplanade.

FREE LISTINGS! Madeline Follin and Brian Oblivian of Cults. PHOTO BY SHAWN BRACKBILL

Post your event for free online at www. newsreview.com/calendar, or email the CN&R calendar editor at cnrcalendar@newsreview.com. Deadline for print listings is Wednesday, 5 p.m., one week prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.


FINE ARTS ON NEXT PAGE

PIRATE PALOOZA

530-518-3452. fixchicoskatepark.com

Friday, May 11 Sierra Nevada Big Room

CHICO WALKING TOUR: Take a tour of the south of campus neighborhood and visit early and historic homes with your guide John Gallardo. Donations are gladly accepted. Sat 5/12, 10am. Fifth and Salem streets.

SEE FRIDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS

FEATHER FIESTA DAYS: The culmination of Oroville’s big hometown celebration with a parade, arts and crafts, car show, chili cook-off and lots of fun, family activities. Sat 5/12. Downtown Oroville. orovillechamber.com

FEATHER FIESTA DAYS KIDDIES’ PARADE: Fun parade with decorated floats and bikes. This year’s theme is “Under the Sea.” Fri, 5/11, 4pm. Free. Downtown Oroville, Bird and Pine streets.

GROWING GREAT FUTURES DINNER: Boys & Girls Clubs of the North Valley fundraising dinner. Sat 5/12, 6pm. $100. Capay Farms, 7929 County Road 9, Orland. 530-899-0335. bgcnv.org

PARADISE CHOCOLATE FEST KICK-OFF: Chocolate and wine pairings, beer tasting, live jazz, guest chefs with delectable samples, a chocolate fountain, chocolate cocktails and lots of things covered in chocolate. Fri, 5/11, 7pm. $50. Paradise Community Park, Black Olive Drive and Pearson Road. chocolatefest.us

PIRATEPALOOZA: Avast

11

FRI

Special Events AN EVENING WITH CATALYST: Help provide services to victims of domestic violence and their children during this fundraising event featuring a dinner catered by Mom’s Restaurant, auctions and live music from the Miami Rogue Roosters. Fri, 5/11, 6pm. $50. The Palms, 2947 Nord Ave. catalystdvservices.org

ART AT THE MATADOR: Local artists transform rooms of the iconic motel into imaginative galleries for this fun block party. The family-friendly event features live music, art demos, activities for kids, a pennystamping machine, fire dancing, augmented reality glasses, a Fairy Doors tour, food and a cantina. Fri, 5/11. Matador Motel, 1934 Esplanade. chivaa.org

ye! This funky fundraiser for the Disability Action Center merges the flashier side of piracy (poofy breeches, gold jewelry and booty) with the disco era (tight breeches, gold jewelry and booty). The fun event features dancing, music, a tasty meal, a costume contest and a jaw-dropping performance from the Singing Disco Pirate. Fri, 5/11, 5:30pm. $55. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St. actionctr.org

SOURDOUGH CLARITY WORKSHOP: When does sourdough bread rise? When you yeast expect it. It’s true. Sourdough can be fickle, but taming your starter and developing your DIY loaf is a thing of beauty. Learn tips from a baker and rise above the learning curve. Fri, 5/11, 6pm. $40. Untamed Bakeshop, 6208 Fern Lane, Paradise. 530520-5339. untamedbakeshop.com

SPORK: Mini Fork in the Road event with seven food trucks and music. Fri, 5/11, 5:30pm. Orchard Supply Hardware, 231 W. East Ave.

STREET MEET: Cool, classic cars and other awesome automobiles. Fri, 5/11. Wittmeier Auto Center, 2288 Forest Ave.

CAPSTONE DESIGN EXPO: Really cool science stuff on display when College of Engineering, Computer Science and Construction Management students showcase 90 projects designed to solve problems devised by industry sponsors. Fri, 5/11. Free. O’Connell south veranda, Chico State.

FASHIONABLY LATE: Butte College Fashion Department’s annual spring event showcases designs from students and local retailers. The show takes place in the ARTS Theater. Fri, 5/11, 7pm. $5-$15. Butte College, 3536 Butte Campus Drive, Oroville. butte.edu

TAIMANE

Tuesday, May 15 Big Room SEE TUESDAY, MUSIC

PARADISE CHOCOLATE FEST: An all-day “choco-

ART AT THE MATADOR Music CHICO STATE GUITAR ENSEMBLE: Guitar quartet takes center stage for a program featuring the music of Federico Moreno Torroba. To complement the Spanish theme, a full guitar ensemble will also perform an arrangement by Isaac Albéniz. Fri, 5/11, 7:30pm. $6-$15. Zingg Recital Hall, Chico State, ARTS 279. 8986333. chicostatetickets.com

FRIDAY NIGHT CONCERT: Blues and funk in the

plaza with Big Mo & The Full Moon Band. Fri, 5/11, 7pm. Free. City Plaza.

HELLO SUMMER: KZFR’s second annual summercelebration concert features music from party band Mumbo Gumbo, plus opening sets by Nina Gerber and Chris Webster, eats from Gnarly Deli and suds from Sierra Nevada. Bring a lawn chair and leave your pets at home. Fri, 5/11, 5:45pm. $25. The End of

Friday & Saturday, May 11 & 12 Matador Motel

SEE FRIDAY & SATURDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS

Normal, 2500 Estes Road. kzfr.org

late extravaganza!” Chocolate samples, pie- and ice-cream-eating contests, kids activities, music and chocolate demos. Sat, 5/12, 9am-5pm. $5 (kids 4-under free). Terry Ashe Park & Recreation Center, 6626 Skyway, Paradise. chocolatefest.us

SIERRA NEVADA BEER CAMP: Adult day camp in the hop field with games, a zip line, an obstacle course, keg bowling, hammerschlogan and more fun stuff. Lotsa beer and tasty grub, and costumes are encouraged! Sold out. Sat 5/12, 12pm. $25. Sierra Nevada Brewing Co., 1075 E. 20th St.

NEW WORLD STRING PROJECT: Quartet performs Celtic, Nordic and unconventional folk music on the Swedish nyckelharpa, fiddle, guizouki (a guitar/bouzouki hybrid), cittern and more. A fascinating, uplifting evening of music. Fri, 5/11, 7:30pm. $10-$20. Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 1289 Filbert Ave. uuchico.org

THIS WEEK CONTINUED ON PAGE 26

EDITOR’S PICK

Theater GLENGARRY GLEN ROSS: See Thursday. Fri, 5/11, 7:30pm. $15. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. blueroomtheatre.com

12

SAT

Special Events ART AT THE MATADOR: Se Friday. Sat 5/12. Matador Motel, 1934 Esplanade. chivaa.org

BLOCK PARTY WITH A PURPOSE: Communitysupported cleanup designed to bring neighbors together and make a positive difference in the community and our waterways. Sat 5/12, 9am. Free. Ninth and Hazel streets, Chico. 530-891-6424. becnet. org

CHICO ANTIQUES & DESIGN FAIRE WITH FULL THROTTLE CAR SHOW: Eighth & Main’s annual event includes 50 vendors from Northern California offering unique treasures and vintage scores. There will also be a classic car show, food vendors and homemade ice cream available. Sat 5/12. $5. Patrick Ranch Museum, 10381 Midway, Durham.

CHICO SKATE PARK GRAND OPENING: The ambitious project by Chico Skatepark Solutions comes to fruition with this grand opening celebration featuring live bands, skate clinics, demos and competitions. Hats off to the local thrashers who helped make this happen! Sat 5/12, 9am. Free. Humboldt Avenue Skate Park, 286 Humboldt Ave.

POETRY OF MOTION Chico celebrates its new and improved skate park with a full day of demonstrations, live music, competitions and more. Years of effort from the community group Chico Skatepark Solutions has paid off with a complete renovation of the once underbuilt park, with new bowls and street features that draw skaters from the throughout the county. The Humboldt Avenue Skate Park Grand Re-Opening Celebration on May 12 kicks off at 10 a.m. with a clinic for skaters of all ages, followed by demos and riding competition. There will be live music coordinated by Heartburn Records, booths, prizes and more. It’s been a long time coming, now go skate. M AY 1 0 , 2 0 1 8

CN&R

25


Student Discount

THIS WEEK CONTINUED FROM PAGE 25

Half Price Green Fees With Purchase of Cart*

FINE ARTS

Music NORTH STATE SYMPHONY: Join Scott Seaton and the North State Symphony for As Fate Would Have It, featuring Tchaikovsky’s searing Fifth, plus cellist Evan Kahn solos on Elgar’s Cello Concerto, one of the most beautifully heart-wrenching concerti ever written. Sat, 5/12, 7:30pm. $10-$39. Laxson Auditorium, Chico State. 530 898-5984. northstatesymphony.org

Table Mountain Golf Club

Theater

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GLENGARRY GLEN ROSS: See Thursday. Sat, 5/12, 7:30pm. $15. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. blueroomtheatre.com

2700 ORO DAM BLVD WEST OROVILLE, CA 95965 530.533.3922

JOSEPH & THE AMAZING TECHNICOLOR DREAMCOAT: See Thursday. Sat, 5/12, 7pm. Williams Theatre, Chico High, 901 Esplanade.

13

C r av i n g s o m e t h i n g m o r e ?

SUN

Special Events MOTHER’S DAY TEA IN THE ROSE GARDEN: Celebrate

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all the special ladies in your life with tea or lemonade, cute tea sandwiches and other treats. If you have a special tea cup, bring it along. Advanced registration required. Sun, 5/13, 2pm. $25-$30. CARD Center, 545 Vallombrosa Ave. 530-895-4711. chicorec.com

SOARING DREAMS: Dance troupe gets high showcasing aerial feats and stunning acrobatics. Sun, 5/13, 2pm & 6pm. $12. Positive I Dance & Circus Center, 8935 Skyway, Paradise. positiveiparadise.com

Theater JOSEPH & THE AMAZING TECHNICOLOR DREAMCOAT: See Thursday. Sun, 5/13, 2pm. Williams

If you can’t recycle, repurpose. Feel good Recycling.

Theatre, Chico High, 901 Esplanade.

15

TUE

Special Events ADVENTURES BEHIND A CAMERA: Acclaimed local photographer Douglas Keister talks about his life in photography and the amazing places his work has taken him. He’s published over 40 books on architecture, novels, a memoir, children’s books and more. Tue, 5/15, 7pm. Free. Butte County Library, Chico Branch, 1108 Sherman Ave. 530-521-4402.

BUTTE COUNTY POLICE OFFICER MEMORIAL: Pay tribute to public servants who died during duty and honor active-duty officers. Tue, 5/15, 7pm. Neighborhood Church of Chico, 2801 Notre Dame Blvd.

Music TAIMANE: We’re all suffering ukulele fatigue, but still have to admit that this young performer shreds, playing music from Bach to Dick Dale. Tue, 5/15, 7:30pm. $25. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St. sierranevada.com

Theater SHAKESPEARE MIX TAPE: Local actors read some of their favorite monologues, scenes, sonnets and songs from the Bard. Tue, 5/15, 7pm. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

INK & CLAY Art B-SO GALLERY: Tatiana Stevens, BFA student’s

CENTER FOR SPIRITUAL LIVING, PARADISE: Jim Lawrence, abstract art on display in the Social Hall. Exhibit covers over 20 years of Lawrence’s work. Through 5/31. Free. 789 Bille Rd, Paradise, 530-877-5673.

CHICO ART CENTER: Bodies In Motion, juried exhibition challenges the way we look at dance traditions by highlighting diverse forms of movement, cultural fusion and trends around the world. Through 5/25. 450 Orange St. chicoartcenter.com

CHICO PAPER COMPANY: Jesse Smith, artist reception featuring drawings of Chico buildings and landscapes as well as some from outside of the area. Through 5/12. 345 Broadway St.

JACKI HEADLEY UNIVERSITY ART GALLERY: Juried Student Exhibition, the 63rd annual exhibit features a diverse group of artwork. Through 5/12. Free. 400 W. First St., 530-898-5864.

JANET TURNER PRINT MUSEUM: Ink & Clay, juried student print exhibition showcases outstanding student work in printmaking, complemented by corresponding works of excellence in ceramics. Through 5/19. Free. 400 W. First St., 530-898-4476.

MATADOR MOTEL: Art at the Matador, local artists transform rooms of the iconic motel into imaginative galleries for this fun block party featuring art demos, children’s activities and a whole lot more. Fri-Sat, 5/11-12. 1934 Esplanade. chivaa.org

MUSEUM OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA ART: MONCA Honors Our Veterans, the museum welcomes 25+ vets to share paintings, ceramics, drawings, sculpture and more. Check the MONCA website for special events including films, panels and workshops. Through 5/27. $5. 900 Esplanade. monca.org

ORLAND ART CENTER: Dancing to Different

OROVILLE INN: Feather Fiesta Days Art Show,

26

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M AY 1 0 , 2 0 1 8

FOR MORE MUSIC, SEE NIGHTLIFE ON PAGE 28

SEE ART

culminating exhibition. Through 5/11. Chico State, Ayres Hall, Room 105.

Tunes, mother and daughter Pat Vought and Alyson Mucci display their diverse works. Through 5/19. 732 Fourth St., Orland.

Chico: 2300 Fair St. • 343-8641 • Hours: Monday-Saturday 8am–3:45pm

Shows through May 19 Janet Turner Print Museum

community art show, plus wine and olive oil tasting. 5/12. $10. 2066 Bird St., Oroville.

PAC 134: Trimpin, German-born composer and artist presents sound sculptures and installations that explore acoustics through kinetic objects. Trimpin has worked with Samuel Beckett and the Kronos Quartet, and his work has appeared throughout the Pacific Northwest. Through 5/10. Free. Chico State.

PARADISE ART CENTER: Wild. Wildfire. Wilderness. Wild nights. Getting wild in the streets. Multi-format show brings wild perspectives into the gallery. Through 5/26. 5564 Almond St., Paradise.

SATORI HAIR SALON: Faded Glory Photographs of Havana, Michael Goloff’s photographs of Cuban buildings and street scenes. Through 5/31. Free. 627 Broadway, Suite 120, 530-514-6264. michaelgoloff photography.com

Museums BOLT’S ANTIQUE TOOL MUSEUM: Hand Tools, rotating displays of more than 12,000 kinds of tools. Through 6/2. $3. 1650 Broderick St., Oroville, 530-538-2528. bolts antiquetools.com

BUTTE COUNTY HISTORICAL MUSEUM: WWI Exhibition, recently renovated exhibits demonstrating the profound changes in American society caused by The Great War. Through 7/29. 1749 Spencer Ave.

CHICO CREEK NATURE CENTER: Permanent Exhibits, including the The Janeece Webb Living Animal Museum and the Nature Play Room. Through 12/15. 1968 E. Eighth St. ccnaturecenter.org

VALENE L. SMITH MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY: Imprisoned at Home, excellent and enlightening exhibit on Japanese Americans held at the Tule Lake Incarceration Camp during WWII. Through 5/18. Plus, Sacred Splendor, exhibit chronicles the history and influence of Christian colonization, underscoring the faith’s movement across the globe from Indo-Portuguese carvings to a William Morris cartoon. From the collection of Judith E. Hilburg. Through 5/11. Chico State. csuchico.edu


SCENE SPRING 2018 STRAWBERRY MUSIC FESTIVAL May 24th - 28th | Nevada CouNty FairgrouNds, grass valley Ca

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A cast of ringers sinks its teeth into Mamet’s masterpiece

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Sersworthless properties to suckwho can’t really afford to buy hady brokers get rich selling

them in the first place. Wait, that sounds really by Jason Cassidy familiar … There’s a j ason c @ newsrev iew.c om reason the Blue Room Theatre chose to revive Review: Glengarry Glen Glengarry Glen Ross shows Thursday- Ross, David Saturday, 7:30 p.m., Mamet’s 1984 through May 19. Pulitzer PrizeTickets: $15 winning drama (Thursdays: pay-what-you-can) about real estate agents who will Blue Room Theatre do anything it 139 W. First St. takes to out895-3749 www.blueroom maneuver their theatre.com cohorts for commissions as they manipulate unwitting clients into buying shaky Florida real estate. Despite the play’s age, one of its underlying concerns—the corruption of unchecked capitalism destroying the imagined American Dream—is still depressingly relevant. The story concerns a group of real estate brokers who are in the midst of a sales promotion in which the top man will win a Cadillac. The classic character Alec Baldwin played in the 1992 film version isn’t present here (Mamet wrote that part especially for the movie), but the message he so memorably underlined remains the driving force for the action: lose the sales contest, lose your job. The key to success is finding the right candidates to pitch the properties to, but the rub is that the premium leads—the “Glengarry leads” that the company spent big money on— are locked away, and the office manager doles them out to the top

MAY 18th @ 5:30 DeGArMo PArk 199 LeorA ct.

Over a dOzen fOOd trucks Live Music bY ALice PeAke

sellers only. This leaves the guys at the bottom of the board with the scraps—the “fucking deadbeat magazine subscription leads”—and little hope of moving up. For this production, director Amber Miller and the Blue Room have assembled a Murderers’ Row of local players to fill the juicy parts of this tight character drama: Joe Hilsee, Shawn Galloway, Roger Montalbano, Sean Green, Rob Wilson, Steve Swim and David Sorensen. Scene-chewing is required for the rapid-fire dialogue of Manet’s professional bullshitters, especially in the iconic roles of alpha dog Richard Roma and washed-up Shelley Levene. And two of Chico’s most skilled players—Galloway and Hilsee, respectively—devoured those parts on opening night (May 3), relishing in the crude, poetic interplay in seamless, naturally magnetic performances. The opportunity to witness a seasoned cast of committed players thrown into the same room to fight over some of the meatiest dialogue in modern American theater is not to be missed. It was thrilling and entertaining to watch these dogs lie, cheat, steal, flatter, intimidate and fight to survive. One of the best moments of the production happens just before the play’s big reveal. A pissed-off

free tO attend!

Top dog Richard Roma (Shawn Galloway) dresses down his office manager (Roger Montalbano) as Shelley Levene looks on. PHOTO BY RENEE BOYD

Roma is dressing down his office manager for bungling a deal with a client. As Galloway goes for the throat of Montalbano’s suddenly passive Williamson (“You fucking shit! Where did you learn your trade? ... Who ever told you you could work with men?”), Levene stands silently in the background. Hilsee is doing nothing, just standing there, his emotionless face half in darkness and half in light. But it was mesmerizing, and a clever bit of lighting (kudos to Miller, as well as Wilson, who doubled as lighting designer, and board operator Dani Kay) that catches the character at the moment before everything changes for him. Great stuff. Once the play is over, however, and one starts to dig deeper and connect the dots between financial schemes of the play’s past, and the mortgage scams and unscrupulous developers-turned-presidents of the real-life present, an uneasy feeling sets in. As it’s soberly spelled out in the program notes: “[Glengarry Glen Ross] makes you realize that once upon a time men without ethics were considered sleazy swindlers. Today, they are respected members, and indeed the leaders, of society.” Ω

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CN&R

27


NIGHTLIFE

THURSDay 5/10—WEDNESDay 5/16 MATT RUFF: Singer-songwriter performs and the Range has food available for purchase. Fri, 5/11, 6pm. Purple Line Urban Winery, 760 Safford St., Oroville. purplelinewinery.com

MaLTESE 8 yEaR aNNIVERSaRy Saturday, May 12 The Maltese

MICHAEL RUSSELL TRIO: Original

SEE SaTURDay

blues, roots rock and hints of Americana. Fri, 5/11, 8pm. Unwined Kitchen & Bar, 980 Mangrove Ave.

DISaSTER aRTISTS

Burmese (pictured) has been pummeling audiences with unhinged noise rock for years. The band is in constant flux, picking up and discarding musicians like an ouroboros shedding skin and leaving a trail of destruction from coast to coast. Witness the high-order sonic terrorists as a four-piece at Naked Lounge on Tuesday, May 15, with drone artist Douglas Katelus performing as Solo Organ and emo-violence trio Letters to Catalonia, plus sets from Voyeur and Rogue Squadron.

NORTHERN TRADITIONZ: Country rock BLACK FONG: McKinley & Co. turn it

10THURSDay

KELLY TWINS ACOUSTIC: Jon and Chris dust off some old favorites with an acoustic evening of “living room” music. Thu, 5/10, 6pm. Two Twenty Restaurant, 220 W. Fourth St.

CAR & BIKE NIGHT: Hosted by the

Wanderers MC with live music and a raffle. Thu, 5/10. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfallscasino.com

HIPPIE TRAP: Dirt twirlin’ on the patio

during the Thursday Market. Thu, 5/10, 6pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

11FRIDay

BRANDED: Dance country in the

lounge. Fri, 5/11, 8:30pm. Gold Country Casino & Hotel, 4020 Olive Highway, Oroville.

and Pat Benatar, the queens of ’70s and ’80s rock ’n’ roll. Fri, 5/11, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfallscasino.com

Sons of Jefferson, The Threesome, Banjo Jack and Brad Petersen. Fri, 5/11, 8pm. $7. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave. maltesebarchico.com

LIVE MUSIC FRIDAYS: A different band

BIG MO & THE FULL MOON BAND: Blues

each week, plus wine, cocktails, beer, pizza and small bites. Fri, 5/11, 6pm. Free. Almendra Winery & Distillery, 9275 Midway, Durham., 530-343-6893.

and funk in the plaza. Fri, 5/11, 7pm. Free. City Plaza.

JOSH HEGG TRIO: Jazz standards and originals. Thu, 5/10, 6:30pm. Farm Star Pizza, 2359 Esplanade.

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530 BASH: DJ/musician/promoter Nina Loco hosts a mixer for local beatmakers, MCs, producers and music fans upstairs at the Bear. Sat, 5/12. Madison Bear Garden, 316 W. Second St.

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28

OPEN MIC: Tito hosts music, comedy,

BRANDED: See Friday. Sat, 5/12,

8:30pm. Gold Country Casino & Hotel, 4020 Olive Highway, Oroville.

DETROIT LEGENDS: Motown hits, R&B classics and soul favorites performed by singer Nathan Owens and a seven-piece backing band. Sat, 5/12, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfallscasino.com

DIRECT ACTION SOLIDARITY FUNDRAISER: Central Valley Project, Gork and Black Magnet perform to support Ruby Montoya and Jessica Reznicek, two activists who took action against the Dakota Access Pipeline and are now facing legal battles. Sat, 5/12, 7pm. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

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with local rappers and Bay Area guests Mikey Stacks, Freddie Gee, HIPHERC, Lightweight Literate, Zell and Ozer. Fri, 5/11, 8pm. $7. Naked Lounge, 118 W. Second St.

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JETT BENATAR: Tribute to Joan Jett

ALL AMERICANA, ALL NIGHT: Music from

JAZZ NIGHT: The Chico Jazz Collective

gets down. Thu, 5/10, 7pm. Down Lo, 319 Main St.

out on the patio. Funk, soul, R&B and rock to make the booty move. The band took home the 2018 CAMMIE for Best Live Act. Fri, 5/11, 8:30pm. Argus Bar + Patio, 212 W. Second St.

on The Ridge. Fri, 5/11, 9pm. $10. White Water Saloon, 5571 Clark Road, Paradise., 530-877-7100.

Buy online anytime with a credit card or in person with cash, check or credit card M-F 9am – 5pm at 353 E. Second Street, Downtown Chico.

Starting in June 2018, the Chico News & Review’s Goin’ Chico issue offers unmatched early access to the freshest faces in town with distribution to new students and their parents at Summer Orientation at Chico State. Make sure you connect with these potential new patrons from their first day in town with an ad in Goin’ Chico. For more information, call an advertising representative today at (530) 894-2300.


THIS WEEK: FIND MORE ENTERTaINMENT aND SPECIaL EVENTS ON PaGE 24 Charles Mingus, followed by an open jam. Mon, 5/14, 7:30pm. Naked Lounge, 118 W. Second St.

Ray REyNOLDS JR.

OPEN MIC TWOFER: The evening kicks off with Jimmy Reno’s musical open mic, followed by a comedy session until midnight. Mondays are bring your own mug, so you can get up to 40 oz. of Sierra Nevada for five bucks. Mon, 5/14, 6pm. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

Saturday, May 12 Tackle Box SEE SaTURDay

OPEN MIC AT THE LIBRARY: Share haiku and sonnets, short stories and autobiographies, or folk songs and instrumental pieces. Wed, 5/16, 7pm. Free. Chico Library, 1108 Sherman Ave., 530-891-2726. buttecounty.net

OPEN MIKEFULL: At Paradise’s only open mic, all musicians get two songs or 10 minutes onstage. Wed,

5/16, 7pm. $2. Norton Buffalo Hall, 5704 Chapel Drive, Paradise., 530-877-4995.

PETER WILSON: Live music and bocce

on the patio. Wed, 5/16. Red Tavern, 1250 Esplanade.

SKIP CULTON: Singer-songwriter

performs. Wed, 5/16, 6pm. Unwined Kitchen & Bar, 980 Mangrove Ave.

THE SECRET STOLEN: Old school Chico post-punk band reunites with opening sets from Sunny Acres and Tripping on a Hole in a Paper Heart. Sat, 5/12, 8pm. Lost on Main, 319 Main St.

DRIVER: Rock ’n’ roll trio. Sat, 5/12,

Clark Road, Paradise., 530-877-7100.

8057 Highway 99, Los Molinos, 530-384-0315.

MUD CREEK KENNY: Good time music on

9pm. Free. The Cabin Saloon,

INSIGHT: Power trio rocks out in the

lounge. Sat, 5/12, 8:30pm. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

MALTESE ANNIVERSARY PARTY: A packed night of music, drag queens, food and Chico vibes with Lo & Behold, The Vesuvians, Quips & Chains and Skin Peaks. Sat, 5/12, 7pm. $7. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave. maltesebarchico.com

MICHAEL RUSSELL TRIO: Blues, roots,

rock and Americana. Sat, 5/12, 9pm. Free. White Water Saloon, 5571

the hill. Sat, 5/12, 5pm. Rock House Dining & Espresso, 11865 Highway 70, Yankee Hill.

ROCK JAZZ REGGAE: Rock, some jazz and groovy tunes from the Chuck Epperson, Jr. and Reggae with Triple Tree. Sat, 5/12, 8:30pm. Free. Ramada Plaza Chico, 685 Manzanita Court, 530-895-8257.

RAY REYNOLDS JR.: Reynolds Jr. plays all the Hanks—Hank Williams, Hank Williams Jr. and Hank III, followed by a second set of covers curated from the classic country canon. Sat, 5/12, 9:30pm. $10-$15. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave.

STAMPEDOS: Honky-tonk and clas-

sic country revue. Sat, 5/12, 8pm. Unwined Kitchen & Bar, 980

Mangrove Ave. unwinedchico.com

13SUNDay

NO DIK JUST JANE: Stand-up comedy

for Mother’s Day. Sun, 5/13, 9pm. $5. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave. maltesebarchico.com

14MONDay

JAZZ JAM: The night opens with

the Uncle Dad all-stars paying tribute to legendary bass player

15TUESDay

AGAINST ME!: Transformative

Gainesville punk band with opening acts Chris Farren and Sharp/ Shock. Tue, 5/15, 7:30pm. $22.50. Senator Theatre, 517 Main St. jmaxproductions.net

BURMESE: Noise rock monsters rip a hole in downtown Chico with Solo Organ, Letters to Catalonia, Rogue Squadron and Voyeur. Tue, 5/15, 8pm. $7. Naked Lounge, 118 W. Second St.

SHaPE SHIFTER

Anthemic and overwhelmingly melodic, Against Me! has been cranking out heartfelt punk rock for more than 20 years and the band’s music has only grown more sincere and insightful on its two most recent albums. You can expect a set packed with fist-in-the-air choruses, sing-alongs and meaty, pop-punk riffs when the band plays the Senator Theatre on Tuesday, May 15, with Chris Farren (Fake Problems and Antarctigo Vespucci) and Sharp/Shock.

16WEDNESDay

BLUES JAM: The Southside Growlers host. Wed, 5/16, 7:30pm. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

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REEL WORLD FILM SHORTS Reviewers: Bob Grimm and Juan-Carlos Selznick.

Opening this week Breaking In

When bad guys take her kids hostage, a grieving daughter (Gabrielle Union) takes the fight to them as she battles to save her children and protect her father’s estate. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

Lean on Pete

The latest from English director/screenwriter Andrew Haigh (45 Years) tells the story of a teen boy who befriends a fading racehorse. Pageant Theatre. Rated R.

Life of the Party

Melissa McCarthy stars in this comedy about a divorcée who returns to college, joining her college-aged daughter in class and the party scene. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

Now playing Avengers: Infinity War

The Avengers, the Guardians of the Galaxy, and Black Panther and his Wakandan army join forces to try and defeat Thanos before he destroys the universe. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

‘A bright interior sun’

I Feel Pretty

Juliette Binoche shines in intimate portrait of divorcée seeking romance

Ienergetically divorcée. She’s smart, independent, attractive and seeking a renewal of her (by no means sabelle (Juliette Binoche) is an artist and recent

dormant) romantic life. In this new film by French auteur Claire Denis (Beau Travail, Nenette by Juan-Carlos & Boni, White Material, etc.), Selznick Binoche’s Isabelle finds herself pairing off with a disparate series of lovers and colleagues, most of whom run hot or cold or both, but rarely in the same ways. As such, Let the Sunshine In is a darkly glowing roundelay in which all relationships Let the are unstable mixtures of satisfaction Sunshine In and disappointment. Starring Juliette Part of what makes all this espeBinoche. Directed by Claire Denis. Now cially engaging is a matter of the streaming on demand human intimacy that Denis, Binoche (Xfinity and DirecTV). and a fine supporting cast bring to Rated R. this offbeat parade of tangled emotions and fragmented relationships. There is no conventional romance to be found here, but the ebb and flow of romantic feelings glimmers throughout. At the outset, Isabelle is involved in an unraveling affair with a burly banker (actor-director Xavier Beauvois). The rousing conflicts in their relations crop up in a different form later on—in her brief liaison

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with a fellow painter (Philippe Katerine) and yet again in the long night she spends with an actor (Nicolas Duvauchelle), immersed in lusty talk and verbal tangos of self reflection. Denis and co-scenarist Christine Angot also devise provocative scenes for Isabelle with an art gallery executive (Alex Descas), her ex-husband (Laurent Grévill), and a psychologist/clairvoyant (Gérard Depardieu, seen mostly shrouded in shadow). She dances rapturously with a rough-looking stranger (Paul Blain) while Etta James’ “At Last” plays on a nightclub’s jukebox. Josiane Balasko and Sandrine Dumas play gallerists with whom Isabelle has mixed feelings. Valeria Bruni Tedeschi has an impossible-to-miss cameo: She’s the passenger in the automobile that brings Depardieu into the story. Finally, a word about the title: in French it is Un beau soleil intérieur, which translates roughly as “a bright interior sun.” It echoes a phrase directed toward Isabelle late in the film, and it’s closer to the heart of the matter than the English-language versions of the title in the U.S. or in Britain (where Bright Sunshine In was at least a little closer to the mark). Ω

1 2 3 Poor

Fair

Good

4 Very Good

5 Excellent

Amy Schumer plays a young woman struggling with insecurity who, after hitting her head, starts believing she’s extremely capable and beautiful. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

Isle of Dogs

5

Isle of Dogs is another of Wes Anderson’s feature-length ventures into animation and epic cartoon yarn-spinning, and watching it waa, for me, a joy. The main characters are dogs, mostly, and the plot involves the battle of a small boy (Koyu Rankin) and some outcast dogs against a cat-loving tyrant who means to eliminate all the canines in his realm. There’s an obvious hint of allegory with dark echoes of modern history running through that, but Isle of Dogs is more of a mock epic in a rowdy and whimsically comical mode. A scruffy joyousness comes by way of the playful and nonchalant pacing, the amusingly antic (and quasi-Japanese) visuals, and the frisky and varied personalities of nearly a dozen dog characters. There’s also an impressive cast on hand (Bryan Cranston, Bill Murray, Edward Norton, Scarlett Johansson, among others) to provide the

Tully

dog voices, but rambunctious storytelling and wise-acre character touches are the main founts of serious fun here. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13 —J.C.S.

Overboard

The male and female roles that Goldie Hawn and Kurt Russell made famous in the 1987 version of this comedy are flipped with Eugenio Derbez playing the rich jerk with amnesia and Anna Faris as the blue-collar worker with life lessons to impart. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

A Quiet Place

4

John Krasinski directed, co-wrote and stars—he’s Lee, a father trying to protect his family in a post-apocalyptic world besieged by horrific aliens who will tear you apart if you make so much as a peep. The aliens don’t respond to regular ambient sounds—a river running, birds chirping—but rather sounds that are more interruptive, like fireworks or a person screaming after stepping on a nail. The gimmick lends itself to some faulty logic at times, but it does provide an overall interesting premise. Playing Lee’s wife Evelyn, Emily Blunt gives a standout performance as somebody forced to keep quiet in especially difficult circumstances—e.g., after a painful injury, or giving birth in a bathtub while an alien clicks and claws nearby. And Krasinski complements his impressive directing chops with a fine performance as a guy doing everything to keep his sanity and protect his family, including a young deaf daughter (played by the superb Millicent Simmonds, who is actually deaf) and son (Noah Jupe). Both of the kids are terrific here. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13 —B.G.

Rampage

A government experiment results in dangerous animals growing to Hulk proportions, and it’s up to a primatologist played by The Rock and his now super-sized albino gorilla buddy named George to put a stop to the rampaging monsters. Cinemark 13, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

Ready Player One

Steven Spielberg directs this sci-fi adventure about a virtual-reality world to which people of a desolate future Earth escape for fun and work, and in which its creator has planted an Easter egg that promises control of the whole digital reality to whomever finds it. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13.

Super Troopers 2

The Broken Lizard comedy crew returns to its roots, bringing the cast of the 2001 original film back for a sequel that finds the Vermont state troopers tasked with overseeing a disputed territory on the border of Canada and America. Cinemark 14. Rated R.

Tully

The Juno writer-director team (Diablo Cody and Jason Reitman) collaborate once again for this story about an overwhelmed mother of three (Charlize Theron) who is gifted a “night nanny” (Mackenzie Davis) with whom she develops a rich friendship. Cinemark 14. Rated R.


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Pork bun, egg foo yung, steamed dumplings and coconut chicken at Kwando Buffet.

habits than I do. So, “all-you-can-” is not an M option on the “where-do-you-wanna-” eat menu.

However, when she goes out of town … I’m on my bike, salivating all the way to the not-so-guilty pleasure of my story and single-for-the-night fallback: photo by Kwando Buffet. Jason Cassidy The blanket description for j asonc @ the food at Kwando is “Asian”— newsrev iew.c om specifically, it’s a mix of Chinese and Japanese—and even though Kwando Buffet the restaurant offers a pretty 740 Mangrove Ave. Americanized version, the choices 343-6788 are more exotic than at your typifacebook.com/ cal meat-and-potatoes buffet, such kwandobuffetinchico Hours: Sunday-Thursday, as the old Hometown Buffet on 11 a.m.-9:30 p.m.; Friday- Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway Saturday, 11 a.m.-10 p.m. that closed a couple of years ago. I was super stoked when another Hibachi Grill Buffet all-you-can-eat Asian spot— 2021 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway Hibachi Grill Buffet—opened in 891-1144 the Hometown space in February, hibachigrillbuffetchico.com advertising Vietnamese and Hours: Sunday-Thursday, Korean in addition to Chinese and 11 a.m.-9 p.m.; FridaySaturday, 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Japanese selections. A scouting expedition was in order. But first, for comparison’s sake, I revisited Kwando. The restaurant overcomes its strip-mall identity with its interior décor: red candles and lanterns, flowers and the trippy yet inviting entryway with its small pond stocked with huge koi and two live turtles! Kwando is set up in stations with two steam tables filled with a couple dozen (mostly) Chinese dishes, a sushi bar, a dim-sum/soup station, a salad and fruit bar, a dessert bar and a separate bar of raw meats and vegetables for the chef to cook up on a hibachi grill. Before I get to the food, some caveats: I don’t go to an Asian buffet for American food or desserts; I am a little shy about seafood in a city that’s four hours from the coast; and I don’t go to a buffet to wait for my food to be cooked (so, no hibachi for me). My first plate at Kwando is filled with the hot Chinese dishes—garlic green beans, one of the

&

T S T U D IO

Antique, Vintage, & Handcrafted

A tour of Chico’s Asian buffets

y partner in life has much more healthy eating

eeker's

B O U T IQ U E

meat-and-veggie combos, and of course breaded-andfried meats in sauce. There were six chicken dishes this recent afternoon—sweet-and-sour, General Tso’s and coconut from the deep-fried side, and Peking, saltand-pepper and jalapeño from the stir-fry. All were fresh and excellent, especially the fried-and-saucy dishes (they are masters of the frialated arts). I didn’t have egg rolls or soup this time around (both are great), and I also didn’t brave the sushi (it’s been decent, if unremarkable), but I did try a couple of items from the bamboo baskets at the dim-sum bar: a fluffy but fairly bland pork bun and several servings of my go-to, the luscious little soup dumplings stuffed with ginger-accented pork and bursting with broth. I could live off of them. Overall, a typically satisfying sampling of flavors in a fun environment, all for only $9.45 (dinners are $12.45). The following week, I tried out Hibachi for dinner ($14.49 per person, self-serve drinks included; $11.49 for a weekday lunch). It has a much bigger dining room than Kwando, with a clean, unadorned look that brings to mind a generic food court. The food is set up similarly to Kwando. Except for the dim-sum, Hibachi had all the same general stations, plus a meat/seafood counter, and a make-your-own pho bar. Hibachi didn’t have the greatest selection of composed Chinese dishes, but the ones I tried— orange chicken, coconut shrimp—were very good, on par with Kwando yet crispier and not as drowning in sauce. The bite of sushi I stole from my dining mate’s plate was not good (with a gummy, flavorless square of indiscernable protein at the center), but their selections of roasted meat (both the duck and the chicken) were great, fall-off-the-bone tender, with crispy skin and a slight sweetness that mixed perfectly with what tasted like five-spice seasoning. It was the highlight of a pleasant meal. Though both spots offer an affordable culinary adventure, my preference is Kwando. I would return to Hibachi for the meat, and the pho is intriguing. But Kwando’s greater selection of Chinese dishes, its warm setting, and the dim-sum bar tip things in its favor. For a deeper assessment of sushi, salad, American food and desserts, you’ll have to taste for yourself while I sit here dreaming of savory dumplings. Ω

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Why Haven’t Senior Homeowners Been Told These Facts? Keep reading if you own a home in the U.S. and were born before 1955.

It’s a well-known fact that for many senior citizens in the U.S. their home is their single biggest asset, often accounting for more than 50% of their total net worth. Yet, according to new statistics from the mortgage industry, senior homeowners in the U.S. are now sitting on more than 6.1 trillion dollars of unused home equity.1 With people now living longer than ever before and home prices back up again, ignoring this “hidden wealth” may prove to be short sighted. All things considered, it’s not surprising that more than a million homeowners have already used a government-insured Home Equity Conversion Mortgage or “HECM” loan to turn their home equity into extra cash for retirement. However, today, there are still millions of eligible homeowners who could benefit from this FHA-insured loan but may simply not be aware of this “retirement secret.” Some homeowners think HECM loans sound “too good to be true.” After all, you get the cash you need out of your home but you have no more monthly mortgage payments.

NO MONTHLY MORTGAGE PAYMENTS?2 EXTRA CASH? It’s a fact: no monthly mortgage payments are required with a government-insured HECM loan;2 however the homeowners are still responsible for paying for the maintenance of their home, property taxes, homeowner’s insurance and, if required, their

HOA fees. Another fact many are not aware of is that HECM reverse mortgages first took hold when President Reagan signed the FHA Reverse Mortgage Bill into law 29 years ago in order to help senior citizens remain in their homes. Today, HECM loans are simply an effective way for homeowners 62 and older to get the extra cash they need to enjoy retirement. Although today’s HECM loans have been improved to provide even greater financial protection for homeowners, there are still many misconceptions. For example, a lot of people mistakenly believe the home must be paid off in full in order to qualify for a HECM loan, which is not the case. In fact, one key advantage of a HECM is that the proceeds will first be used to pay off any existing liens on the property, which frees up cash flow, a huge blessing for seniors living on a fixed income. Unfortunately, many senior homeowners who might be better off with HECM loan don’t even bother to get more information because of rumors they’ve heard. That’s a shame because HECM loans are helping many senior homeowners live a better life. In fact, a recent survey by American Advisors Group (AAG), the nation’s number one HECM lender, found that over 90% of their clients are satisfied with their loans. While these special loans are not for everyone, they can be a real lifesaver for senior homeowners. The cash from a HECM loan can be used for any purpose. Many people use the money to save on interest

FACT: In 1988, President Reagan signed an FHA bill that put HECM loans into law. charges by paying off credit cards or other high-interest loans. Other common uses include making home improvements, paying off medical bills or helping other family members. Some people simply need the extra cash for everyday expenses while others are now using it as a “safety net” for financial emergencies. If you’re a homeowner age 62 or older, you owe it to yourself to learn more so that you can make an informed decision. Homeowners who are interested in learning more can request a free 2018 HECM loan Information Kit and free Educational DVD by calling American Advisors Group toll-free at 1-(800) 820-8916. At no cost or obligation, the professionals at AAG can help you find out if you qualify and also answer common questions such as: 1. What’s the government’s role? 2. How much money might I get? 3. Who owns the home after I take out a HECM loan? You may be pleasantly surprised by what you discover when you call AAG for more information today.

Source: http://reversemortgagedaily.com/2016/06/21/seniors-home-equity-grows-to-6-trillion-reverse-mortgage-opportunity. 2If you qualify and your loan is approved, a Home Equity Conversion Mortgage (HECM) must pay off any existing mortgage(s). With a HECM loan, no monthly mortgage payment is required. A HECM increases the principal mortgage loan amount and decreases home equity (it is a negative amortization loan). AAG works with other lenders and nancial institutions that offer HECMs. To process your request for a loan, AAG may forward your contact information to such lenders for your consideration of HECM programs that they offer. When the loan is due and payable, some or all of the equity in the property no longer belongs to borrowers, who may need to sell the home or otherwise repay the loan with interest from other proceeds. AAG charges an origination fee, mortgage insurance premium, closing costs and servicing fees (added to the balance of the loan). The balance of the loan grows over time and AAG charges interest on the balance. Interest is not tax-deductible until the loan is partially or fully repaid. Borrowers are responsible for paying property taxes and homeowner’s insurance (which may be substantial). We do not establish an escrow account for disbursements of these payments. A set-aside account can be set up to pay taxes and insurance and may be required in some cases. Borrowers must occupy home as their primary residence and pay for ongoing maintenance; otherwise the loan becomes due and payable. The loan also becomes due and payable when the last borrower, or eligible non-borrowing surviving spouse, dies, sells the home, permanently moves out, defaults on taxes or insurance payments, or does not otherwise comply with the loan terms. American Advisors Group (AAG) is headquartered at 3800 W. Chapman Ave., 3rd & 7th Floors, Orange CA, 92868. (CA Loans made or arranged pursuant to a California Finance Lenders Law license (603F324) and Licensed by the Department of Business Oversight under the California Residential Mortgage Lending Act (4131144)). V2017.08.23_OR

1

These materials are not from HUD or FHA and were not approved by HUD or a government agency.

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Brad Dufour welcomes his wall at the finish line.

THE PEOPLE’S WALL Now, this is a ridiculous

building project that Arts DEVO can get behind. In Welcome Wall messages (here, and below) response to 45’s hair-brained plans for building a divisive monstrosity along the U.S./Mexico border, Chico State art major Brad Dufour decided his senior project would be a wall of another kind, “The Welcome Wall.” Last Thursday (May 3), as an extended performance piece, Dufour and a crew of volunteers spent five hours building and taking down a wall made from 93 cinder blocks. The 4-foottall, 20-foot-wide structure started in front of Kendall Hall and, block by block, was methodically walked across campus and into the courtyard of the Arts & Humanities Building. It was in place long enough for a three-hour reception before being dismantled. As it sat in place, Dufour invited his tired but elated builders and anyone else who wanted to tag the structure with chalk and help him realize his intent of creating a “site for connection” as opposed to a “symbol of division.” Nice work by all involved. Now, if Drumpf’s unwelcome day ever comes, let’s all meet down south with some bulldozers, cranes and spray paint and repeat this process.

MOTEL ART If you dig looking at art and maybe even displaying some of it in

your own home, the Art at the Matador spring expo is your jam. This weekend, Friday (4-9 p.m.) and Saturday (11 a.m.-7 p.m.), May 11-12, 99 artists will have galleries set up inside and outside the rooms of the Matador Motel on The Esplanade. Local musicians (including Red Dirt Bullies and Warren Haskell) will perform, margaritas will be available and most of the local arts organizations will be on hand for this rad annual event.

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• A history of strings: Do you want to go to your grave having never witnessed the nyckelharpa (a Swedish keyed fiddle) in action? Don’t add another regret to your life. Go hear the New World String Project—a quartet playing Celtic, Nordic and unconventional folk music on the nyckelharpa and more—Friday, May 11, 7:30 p.m., at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship. Tickets: $20 ($10 16-under).

• We are such stuff as dreams are made on, and our little life is rounded with a sleep: Join Slow Theatre at Blackbird on Tuesday, May 15, at 7 p.m., for Shakespeare Mix Tape, and hear local actors reading monologues, short scenes, songs and sonnets from the Bard.

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New Arthritis Painkiller Works on Contact and Numbs the Pain in Minutes New cream works faster and is more targeted than oral medications. Key ingredients penetrate the skin within minutes to relieve joint arthritis pain. Users report significant immediate relief.

By Robert Ward Associated Health Press BOSTON – Innovus Pharmaceuticals has introduced a new arthritis pain relief treatment that works in minutes. Sold under the brand name Apeaz™, the new pain relief cream numbs the nerves right below the skin. When applied to an arthritic joint, or a painful area on the body, it delivers immediate relief that lasts for hours and hours. The powerful painkilling effect is created by the creams active ingredient, a special medical compound. Anesthetics are used in hospitals during surgery. They block nerve signals from the brain so that patients don’t feel pain and they work fast. The anesthetic found in Apeaz™ is the strongest available without a prescription. The cream form allows users to directly target their area of pain. It works where it is applied. The company says this is why the product is so effective and fast acting. “Users can expect to feel relief immediately after applying,” explains Dr. Bassam Damaj, President of Innovus Pharmaceuticals. “There will a pleasant warming sensation that is followed by a cool, soothing one. This is how you know that the active ingredients have reached the infected joint and tissue.”

Works In Minutes

For arthritis suffers, Apeaz offers impressive advantages over traditional medications. The most obvious is how quickly it relieves discomfort. The cream contains the maximum approved dose of a top anesthetic, which penetrates the skin in a matter of minutes to numb the area that’s in pain. This relief lasts for several hours.

• • • •

Additional ingredients in the cream help suppress inammation around tissues and joints. Published pre-clinical studies have shown that the ingredients in Apeaz™ can also prevent further bone and cartilage destruction. There are also no negative side effects from the oral medication. Apeaz™ delivers its ingredients through the skin. Oral medications are absorbed in the digestive tract. Overtime, the chemicals in pills can tear the delicate lining of the stomach, causing ulcers and bleeding. When compared to other arthritis medications, Apeaz™ is a fraction of the cost. At less than $2 a day, the cream quickly is becoming a household name. Those with terrible arthritis in their hands and ngers, love how easy Apeaz™ is to open. The jar ts in the palm of the hand, which makes it much easier to use.

Instant Pain Relief Without a Prescription

Many Apeaz™ users report signicant improvements in daily aches and pain. Many more report increased exibility and less stiffness. They are moving pain free for the rst time in years, like Henry Esber, and early user of Apeaz™. “I’ve tried more pills than I can count. I’ve also had a handful of cortisone shots. Nothing is as effective as this product. With Apeaz™, I get relief right away. I rub a little on my knees and some through my hands. It keeps the pain away. It also prevents the pain from getting really bad. It’s completely changed my life.”

How It Works

“Apeaz™ contains the highest, non-prescription dose of a medical compound that ghts pain on contact. When applied to the skin it goes to work within minutes by penetrating right to the source of your pain, numbing the nerve eendings.” d gs.

Apeaz™ is an FDA drug with approved claims for the pain relief of the following conditions: Arthritis pain • Simple back pain Strains • Sprains Athletic injuries • Muscle stiffness and pain Wrist, elbow, shoulder, hip, knee, ankle, foot, muscle or joint pain

Apeaz™: Quick Acting Pain and Arthritis Cream is Now Available Without a Prescription “This is why Apeaz™ is so effective for people with arthritis. It reduces pain while adding an additional layer of joint protection,” explains Damaj.

A New Way to Treat Pain

Although Dr. Damaj and his team say that their cream is the fastest and most effective way to relieve arthritis pain, they believe there is still a reason to take joint pills. The most effective are those which help to further strengthen and support the joints. That’s why every container of Apeaz™ comes with ArthriVarx™, a breakthrough pill that’s taking on joint support in an entirely new way. ArthriVarx™ works on your joints, making it the perfect companion to Apeaz™. “ArthriVarx™ contains special compounds published to lubricate the joints and connective tissues that surrounds them. With daily use, they improve joint health and can give an extra cushion,” explains Dr. Damaj. “When combined with Apeaz™, it becomes the perfect system to tackle arthritis. While the anesthetic component of Apeaz™ is working on the outside, relieving pain on contact, ArthriVarx™ is working on the inside, adding cushioning to the joints”’

A Powerful Combination For Arthritis and Joint Pain

With daily use, Apeaz™ plus ArthriVarx™ helps users live a more vital, pain free life without any of the negative side effects or interactions associated with oral drugs.

By delivering fast, long-lasting, and targeted relief from joint pain and reducing inammation and swelling that causes joint damage, Apeaz™ and ArthriVarx™ is the newest, most effective way to tackle your arthritis pain. You can now enjoy an entirely new level of comfort that’s both safe and affordable. It is also extremely effective, especially if nothing else has worked well for you.

How to Get Apeaz™ in California

This is the ofcial public release of Apeaz™. As such, the company is offering a special discounted supply to any jointpain arthritis-sufferer who calls within the next 48 hours. A special hotline number and discounted pricing has been created for all California residents. Discounts will be available starting today at 6:00AM and will automatically be applied to all callers. Your Toll-Free hotline number is 1-800-452-9623 and will only be open for the next 48 hours. Only a limited discounted supply of Apeaz™ is currently available in your region. Consumers who miss out on our current product inventory will have to wait until more becomes available and that could take weeks. Experience the guaranteed Apeaz™ relief already enjoyed by thousands of consumers. The company advises not to wait. Call 1-800-452-9623 today.

APEAZ IS AN FDA OTC COMPLIANT DRUG NDC # 57483-001-04 APPROVED FOR THE RELIEF OF PAIN FROM MUSCLES AND JOINTS INCLUDING ARTHRITIS PAIN. ARTHRIVARX STATEMENTS HAVE NOT BEEN EVALUATED BY THE FDA. ARTHRIVARX IS NOT INTENDED TO DIAGNOSE, TREAT, CURE, OR PREVENT ANY DISEASE AND IS NOT A DRUG. RESULTS MAY VARY. 302745_10_x_10.8.indd 34   CN&R  M ay1 1 0 , 2 0 1 8

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY For the week oF May 10, 2018 ARIES (March 21-April 19): The Torah

is a primary sacred text of the Jewish religion. It consists of exactly 304,805 letters. When specially trained scribes make handwritten copies for ritual purposes, they must not make a single error in their transcription. The work may take as long as 18 months. Your attention to detail in the coming weeks doesn’t have to be quite so painstaking, Aries, but I hope you’ll make a strenuous effort to be as diligent as you can possibly be.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Born

under the sign of Taurus, Edmund Wilson was a renowned twentieth-century author and critic who wrote more than 30 books. He also served as editor for Vanity Fair and The New Republic, and influenced the work of at least seven major American novelists. When he was growing up, he spent most of his free time reading books: 16 hours a day during summer vacations. His parents, worried about his obsessive passion, bought him a baseball uniform, hoping to encourage him to diversify his interests. His response was to wear the uniform while reading books 16 hours a day. I trust you will be equally dedicated to your own holy cause or noble pursuit in the coming weeks, Taurus. You have cosmic clearance to be single-minded about doing what you love.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): It’s pos-

sible you could pass for normal in the next three weeks; you might be able to fool a lot of people into thinking you’re an average, ordinary contributor to the dull routine. But it will be far healthier for your relationship with yourself if you don’t do such a thing. It will also be a gift to your less daring associates, who in my opinion would benefit from having to engage with your creative agitation and fertile chaos. So my advice is to reveal yourself as an imperfect work-in-progress who’s experimenting with novel approaches to the game of life. Recognize your rough and raw features as potential building blocks for future achievements.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): “Paradise

is scattered over the whole earth,” wrote the scientific poet Novalis, “and that is why it has become so unrecognizable.” Luckily for you, Cancerian, quite a few fragments of paradise are gathering in your vicinity. It’ll be like a big happy reunion of tiny miracles all coalescing to create a substantial dose of sublimity. Will you be ready to deal with this much radiance? Will you be receptive to so much relaxing freedom? I hope and pray you won’t make a cowardly retreat into the trendy cynicism that so many people mistake for intelligence. (Because in that case, paradise might remain invisible.) Here’s my judicious advice: Be insistent on pleasure! Be voracious for joy! Be focused on the quest for beautiful truths!

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): These days, your

friends and allies and loved ones want even more from you than they usually do. They crave more of your attention, more of your approval, more of your feedback. And that’s not all. Your friends and allies and loved ones also hope you will give more love to yourself. They will be excited and they will feel blessed if you express an even bigger, brighter version of your big, bright soul. They will draw inspiration from your efforts to push harder and stronger to fulfill your purpose here on Planet Earth.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): One of the

advantages you get from reading my horoscopes is that I offer confidential information about the gods’ caprices and leanings. For example, I can tell you that Saturn—also known as Father Time—is now willing to allot you a more luxurious relationship with time than usual, on one condition: that you don’t squander the gift on trivial pursuits. So I encourage you to be discerning and disciplined about nourishing your soul’s craving for interesting freedom. If you demonstrate to Saturn how constructively you can use his blessing, he’ll be inclined to provide more dispensations in the future.

by rob brezsny LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Vincent van

Gogh’s painting “The Starry Night” hangs on a wall in New York’s Museum of Modern Art. He created it in 1889 while living in a French asylum. Around that same time, 129 years ago, a sheepherder in Wyoming created a sourdough starter that is still fresh today. A cook named Lucille Clarke Dumbrill regularly pulls this frothy mass of yeast out of her refrigerator and uses it to make pancakes. In the coming weeks, Libra, I’d love to see you be equally resourceful in drawing on an old resource. The past will have offerings that could benefit your future.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Love

everyone twice as much and twice as purely as you ever have before. Your mental health requires it! Your future dreams demand it! And please especially intensify your love for people you allegedly already love but sometimes don’t treat as well as you could because you take them for granted. Keep this Bible verse in mind, as well: “Don’t neglect to show kindness to strangers; for, in this way, some, without knowing it, have had angels as their guests.”

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

After meditating on your astrological aspects for an hour, I dozed off. As I napped, I had a dream in which an androgynous angel came to me and said, “Please inform your Sagittarius readers that they should be callipygian in the next two weeks.” Taken back, my dreaming self said to the angel, “You mean ‘callipygian’ as in ‘having beautiful buttocks’?” “Yes, sir,” the angel replied. “Bootylicious. Bumtastic. Rumpalicious.” I was puzzled. “You mean like in a metaphorical way?” I asked. “You mean Sagittarians should somehow cultivate the symbolic equivalent of having beautiful buttocks?” “Yes,” the angel said. “Sagittarians should be elegantly well-grounded. Flaunt their exquisite foundation. Get to the bottom of things with flair. Be sexy badasses as they focus on the basics.” “OK!” I said.

CLASSIFIEDS Print ads start at $6/wk. www.newsreview.com or (530) 894-2300 ext. 2 Phone hours: M-F 9am-5pm. Deadlines for print: Line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Display ad deadline: Friday 2pm

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AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): In his

1931 painting “The Persistence of Memory,” Salvador Dali shows three clocks that seem to be partially liquefied, as if in the process of melting. His biographer Meredith Etherington-Smith speculated that he was inspired to create this surrealistic scene when he saw a slab of warm Camembert cheese melting on a dinner table. I foresee the possibility of a comparable development in your life, Aquarius. Be alert for creative inspiration that strikes you in the midst of seemingly mundane circumstances.

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PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): “My whole

life is messed up with people falling in love with me,” said Piscean poet Edna St. Vincent Millay. She spoke the truth. She inspired a lot of adoration, and it stirred up more chaos than she was capable of managing. Luckily, you will have fewer problems with the attention coming your way, Pisces. I bet you’ll be skilled at gathering the benefits and you’ll be unflummoxed by the pitfalls. But you’ll still have to work hard at these tasks. Here’s some help. Tip No. 1: Stay in close touch with how you really feel about the people who express their interest in you. Tip No. 2: Don’t accept gifts with strings attached. Tip #3: Just because you’re honored or flattered that someone finds you attractive doesn’t mean you should unquestioningly blend your energies with them.

www.RealAstrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888.

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CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Now

is a favorable time to discuss in elegant detail the semi-secret things that are rarely or never talked about. It’s also a perfect moment to bring deep feelings and brave tenderness into situations that have been suffering from half-truths and pretense. Be aggressively sensitive, my dear Capricorn. Take a bold stand in behalf of compassionate candor. And as you go about these holy tasks, be entertaining as well as profound. The cosmos has authorized you to be a winsome agent of change.

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as GEOLOGY ROCKS AND MINERALS, KCV CONSULTING at 835 Main St Chico, CA 95928. GEOLOGY ROCKS! AND MINERALS LLC 835 Main St Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: KASEY VALLE, PRESIDENT Dated: April 4, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000465 Published: April 19,26, May 3,10, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as AFFORDABLE AUTO GLASS at 6 Geneva Lane Chico, CA 95928. ALAN JAMES MOON 6 Geneva Lane Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ALAN MOON Dated: April 5, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000477 Published: April 19,26, May 3,10, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CRYSTAL TREASURES at 5455 Platt Mountain Road 839 Forest Ranch, CA 95942. PATRICIA CROWNOVER 5455 Platt Mountain Road 839 Forest Ranch, CA 95942. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: PATRICIA CROWNOVER Dated: April 2, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000444 Published: April 19,26, May 3,10, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BLACK BART BIKES at 1346 Myers St Oroville, CA 95956. CURTIS ALLEN ELWELL 4760 Seacrest Dr Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by an Individual.

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Signed: CURTIS ELWELL Dated: April 10, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000501 Published: April 19,26, May 3,10, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as SCC CONCRETE at 325 Crater Lake Dr Chico, CA 95973. MATT SADLER 325 Crater Lake Dr Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: MATT SADLER Dated: April 10, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000499 Published: April 19,26, May 3,10, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as GETHSEMANE RANCH at 3825 Silvera Ct Paradise, CA 95969. JAMES D HOEPPNER 3825 Silvera Ct Paradise, CA 95969. NATALIE E HOEPPNER 3825 Silvera Ct Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by A Married Couple. Signed: NATALIE E HOEPPNER Dated: April 6, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000483 Published: April 19,26, May 3,10, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PAINT PARTIES BY DAWN at 5660 Skyway Suite C Paradise, CA 95969. DAWN HICKEY 13771 Sugar Pine Drive Magalia, CA 95954. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: DAWN HICKEY Dated: April 13, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000517 Published: April 19,26, May 3,10, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as MAKE CHICO, WPINONECLICK at 2559 New Heather Way Chico, CA 95973. JEFFREY SAMORANO 2559 New Heather Way Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JEFFREY SAMORANO Dated: April 9, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000484 Published: April 19,26, May 3,10, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as EAGLE PLUMBING at 1560 East Avenue Chico, CA 95926. ROBERT RINEHART 1560 East Avenue Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ROBERT RINEHART Dated: March 14, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000357 Published: April 19,26, May 3,10, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as VIRTUAL IMAGE SOLUTIONS at 1585 Filbert Ave Chico, CA 95926. JOESHAK ENTERPRISES INC 1585 Filbert Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: JOE KOSHAK, CEO Dated: March 21, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000388 Published: April 19,26, May 3,10, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as F.E.W. PRODUCTS at 5050 Cohasset Rd. Unit 50 Chico, CA 95973. LANCE A WALDSMITH 14064 Limousin Dr Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: LANCE WALDSMITH Dated: March 27, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000418 Published: April 26, May 3,10,17, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ELEVATE at 180 Erma Ct, Suite #130 Chico, CA 95926. ROBERT L NORMAN 2780 Pillsbury Rd 202 Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ROBERT L. NORMAN JR. Dated: April 18, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000541 Published: April 26, May 3,10,17, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as GREEN BELT MANUFACTURING at 21 Valley Ct Chico, CA 95973. TIMOTHY VANDERHEIDEN 21 Valley Ct Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: TIMOTHY VANDERHEIDEN Dated: April 10, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000498 Published: April 26, May 3,10,17, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BEYOND FITNESS at 7224 Skyway Paradise, CA 95969. BEYOND FITNESS CLUB, LLC 7224 Skyway Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: STEVE GIBSON, MANAGING PARTNER Dated: April 10, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000500 Published: April 26, May 3,10,17, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as 3 DOWNTOWN BARS, 3-DB at 175 E. 2nd St. Chico, CA 95928. 3 DOWNTOWN BARS, INC. 177 E. 2nd St. Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by

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a Corporation. Signed: JOSHUA COKER, CFO Dated: April 5, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000474 Published: April 26, May 3,10,17, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CHICO EVENT CENTER at 191 E. 2nd St. Suite 3 Chico, CA 95928. ROBERT MOWRY 3 Crusader Ct Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JOSHUA COKER Dated: April 5, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000473 Published: April 26, May 3,10,17, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as UNIVERSITY BAR at 200 Wall St. Chico, CA 95928. ROBERT MOWRY 3 Crusader Ct Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JOSHUA COKER Dated: April 5, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000471 Published: April 26, May 3,10,17, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as THE BEACH, THE BEACH IN CHICO at 191 E. 2nd St. Chico, CA 95928. ROBERT MOWRY 3 Crusader Ct Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JOSHUA COKER Dated: April 5, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000472 Published: April 26, May 3,10,17, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PANAMA BAR CAFE at 177 E. 2nd St. Chico, CA 95928. ROBERT MOWRY 3 Crusader Ct Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JOSHUA COKER Dated: April 5, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000470 Published: April 26, May 3,10,17, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as JP CONSTRUCTION at 6603 Woodward Dr Magalia, CA 95954. JOEL PRENTISS 6603 Woodward Dr Magalia, CA 95954. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JOEL PRENTISS Dated: April 13, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000515 Published: April 26, May 3,10,17, 2018

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as TWIN DRAGON SERVICES at 999 East Ave Apt C Chico, CA 95926. VICTOR SCOTT RUTTMAN 999 East Ave Apt C Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: VICTOR RUTTMAN Dated: April 17, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000535 Published: April 26, May 3,10,17, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following person has abandoned the use of the fictitious business name SALON CONCEPTS at 6607 Skyway Paradise, CA 95969. BARBARA J RYAN 4333 Pentz Rd 4B Paradise, CA 95969. This business was conducted by an Individual. Signed: BARBARA RYAN Dated: April 20, 2018 FBN Number: 2016-0001236 Published: April 26, May 3,10,17, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as WOOD, WATER AND STONE at 6408 Crossroads Rd Magalia, CA 95954. BRIAN TIMOTHY MARSHALL 6408 Crossroads Rd Magalia, CA 95954. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: BRIAN T. MARSHALL Dated: April 9, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000494 Published: April 26, May 3,10,17, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ELITE EXPOSITIONS, EXOTIC BIRD AND ANIMAL MART at 1045 Hazel St Gridley, CA 95948. VAN THI THU NGUYEN 1045 Hazel St Gridley, CA 95948. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: VAN NGUYEN Dated: March 5, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000312 Published: April 26, May 3,10,17, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as JP ROOFING at 4 Woodrose Ln Chico, CA 95973. JEREMY ALAN PETTERSEN 4 Woodrose Ln Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JEREMY PETTERSEN Dated: March 28, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000432 Published: May 3,10,17,24, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as J & S OFFICE MAINTENANCE at 2817 Dolphin Bend Chico, CA 95973. JAMES PATRICK RICHARDS 2817 Dolphin Bend Chico, CA 95973. SHAWNA RICHARDS 2817 Dolphin Bend Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by

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A Married Couple. Signed: JIM RICHARDS Dated: April 9, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000490 Published: May 3,10,17,24, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BAJA BONSAI at 443 Stilson Canyon Road Chico, CA 95928. JOHN E. MCDONALD 443 Stilson Canyon Road Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JOHN MCDONALD Dated: April 30, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000597 Published: May 3,10,17,24, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as AFFORDABLE DRONE SERVICES at PO Box 2896 Paradise, CA 95967. SCOTT S PETERSEN 4842 Media Way Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: SCOTT PETERSEN Dated: April 30, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000595 Published: May 3,10,17,24, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ANDERSON TILE at 165 Mission Olive Rd Oroville, CA 95966. MATTHEW DAVID ANDERSON 165 Mission Olive Rd Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: MATT ANDERSON Dated: April 24, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000574 Published: May 3,10,17,24, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as AMERICAN TOTEM, THE REAL ISSUE PRODUCTIONS at 2314 Estes Road Chico, CA 95928. SUZANNE HILDERBRAND 2314 Estes Road Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: SUE HILDERBRAND Dated: April 3, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000457 Published: May 3,10,17,24, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ADRIANE ESTHETICS at 568 Manzanita Ave Suite 9 Chico, CA 95926. ADRIANE WESTERDAHL 1648 Normal Ave Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ADRIANE WESTERDAHL Dated: April 24, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000568 Published: May 3,10,17,24, 2018

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as GRIDLEY TRAILER PARK at 260 Ohio Street Gridley, CA 95948. JANICE SALL 2195 Robailey Drive Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JANICE SALL Dated: April 24, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000565 Published: May 3,10,17,24, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as TRYON VANCOTT AND ASSOCIATES at 257 Tranquil Drive Paradise, CA 95969. ROSE MARIE TRYON 257 Tranquil Drive Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ROSE M. TRYON Dated: April 19, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000548 Published: May 3,10,17,24, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as HEARTSONG WELLNESS STUDIO AND BOUTIQUE at 6311 Skyway Paradise, CA 95969. CARMI ELISSA HOOKS 759 Red Hill Way Paradise, CA 95969. KRISTEN NICOLE HORST 701 Kinsey Way Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: KRISTEN HORST Dated: April 26, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000587 Published: May 10,17,24,31, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BUTTE MOBILE VETERINARY PRACTICE at 5610 Feather River Place Paradise, CA 95969. MICHAEL LANE SEELY 5610 Feather River Place Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: MICHAEL L. SEELY Dated: April 10. 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000502 Published: May 10,17,24,31, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as LOCALE COMMERCIAL, LOCALE MANAGEMENT, LOCALE RESIDENTIAL at 242 Broadway Ste 12 Chico, CA 95928. VAUGHT, INC 242 Broadway Ste 12 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: RYAN VAUGHT, VAUGHT INC PRESIDENT Dated: April 20, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000552 Published: May 10,17,24,31, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as INTERNATIONAL FARM MANAGEMENT at 2233 Nord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. JOE T CAMARENA JR.

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25725 Moller Ave. Orland, CA 95963. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JOE CAMARENA Dated: May 1, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000602 Published: May 10,17,24,31, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CHICO COMMUNITY ACUPUNCTURE at 1815 Mangrove Ave Chico, CA 95926. OLIVIA STARR PETERS-LAZARO 11802 Meridian Road Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: OLIVIA PETERS-LAZARO Dated: April 4, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000463 Published: May 10,17,24,31, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as NORTHERN BITES at 185 Cohasset Lane Apt F Chico, CA 95926. RACHEL BALMER 185 Cohasset Lane Apt F Chico, CA 95926. DYLAN ROWE 185 Cohasset Lane Apt F Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: DYLAN ROWE Dated: April 17, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000532 Published: May 10,17,24,31, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CHICO ART GALLERY, CHICO ART SCHOOL, CHICO ART SCHOOL AND GALLERY, LOMBARDI BLIXT DESIGN at 261 E. 3rd Street Chico, CA 95926. JANET LOMBARDI BLIXT 290 E. Sacramento Avenue Chico, CA 95926. THOMAS BLIXT 290 E. Sacramento Avenue Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by A Married Couple. Signed: JANET LOMBARDI BLIXT Dated: May 3, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000607 Published: May 10,17,24,31, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as SISTERS EVENTZ at 6904 Dean Place Paradise, CA 95969. AMY BLAIR 553 Barbara Paradise, CA 95969. MEGAN LATTA 6904 Dean Place Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: AMY BLAIR Dated: April 26, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000584 Published: May 10,17,24,31, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as THE BAHAMA HUT at 1008 W Sacramento Ave Suite I Chico, CA 95926. MATTHEW DAVE VERESCHAGIN 6798 State Hwy 32 Orland, CA

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95963. DONNA LYNN WETZEL 6798 State Highway 32 Orland, CA 95963. This business is conducted by a Joint Venture. Signed: DONNA WETZEL Dated: May 4, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000619 Published: May 10,17,24,31, 2018

NOTICES CITATION TO APPEAR The People of the State of California: TO: RIGO ROBERTO PRADO-GARIBAY By order of this court, you are hereby cited and required to appear before the above-entitled court located at 1775 Concord Ave, Chico, California 95966, on May 16, 2018 at 1:30 p.m., then and there to show cause, if you have any, why BENJAMIN LOUIS PRADO, MAXWELL BRADLEY PRADO, and HUDSON LEE PRADO, all minors, should not be declared free from your parental control according to the Petition on file herein to free the minors for adoption. The address of the court is 1775 Concord Ave, Chico CA 95928. For a failure without reasonable cause to appear and abide by the order of the court, you will be deemed guilty of a contempt of court. The following information concerns rights and procedure which relate to this proceeding for the termination of custody and control of BENJAMIN LOUIS PRADO, MAXWELL BRADLEY PRADO, and HUDSON LEE PRADO as set forth in Sections 7860-7864 of the Family Code. (1) At the beginning of the proceeding, the court will consider whether or not the interest of BENJAMIN LOUIS PRADO, MAXWELL BRADLEY PRADO, and HUDSON LEE PRADO required the appointment of counsel. If the court finds that the interest of BENJAMIN LOUIS PRADO, MAXWELL BRADLEY PRADO, and HUDSON LEE PRADO do require such protection, the court will appoint counsel to represent them, whether or not they are able to afford counsel. BENJAMIN LOUIS PRADO, MAXWELL BRADLEY PRADO, and HUDSON LEE PRADO will not be present in court, unless they so request, or the court so orders. (2) If a parent of BENJAMIN LOUIS PRADO, MAXWELL BRADLEY PRADO, and HUDSON LEE PRADO appears without counsel, and is unable to afford counsel, the court must appoint counsel for the parent, unless the parent knowingly and intelligently, waivers the right to be represented by counsel. The court will not appoint the same counsel to represent both BENJAMIN LOUIS PRADO, MAXWELL BRADLEY PRADO, and HUDSON LEE PRADO and their parent. (3) The court may appoint either the public defender or private counsel. If private counsel is appointed, he or she will receive a reasonable sum of compensation and expenses, the amount of which will be terminated by the court. The amount must be paid by the real parties in interest, but not by the minor, in such proportions as the court believes to be just. If, however, the court finds that any of the real parties in interest cannot afford counsel, the amount will

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be paid by the county. (4) The court may continue the proceeding for not more than 30-days as necessary to appoint counsel and to enable counsel to become acquainted with the case. Case No: 18AB00025 KATIE WARNER-MEYERS 2021 Cox Lane Oroville CA 9596 In Pro Per Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Dated: March 29, 2018 Published: April 19,26, May 3,10, 2018

NOTICE OF LIEN SALE Pursuant to CA Business Code 21700, in lieu of rents due, the following units contain clothes, furniture, boxes, etc. DOLORES DAVENPORT (5X10) #072cc (boxes, furniture) JANET MOON (5X10) #487cc (boxes) JANET MOON (6X10) #506cc (furniture) JAMES FLUD (12x15) #030ss (furniture, boxes, misc. items) DAVID DUNCAN (6X12) #504cc (misc items) Contents to be sold to the highest bidder on: May 26, 2018 Beginning at 12:00pm Sale to be held at: Bidwell Self Storage, 65 Heritage Lane, Chico, CA 95926. (530) 893-2109 Published: May 10,17, 2018

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: SAVANNAH LEIGH O’HEARN-SERNA Proposed name: SAVANNAH LEIGH O’HEARN THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 11, 2018 Time: 9:00am Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: March 12, 2018 Case Number: 18CV00771 Published: April 19,26, May 3,10, 2018

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner SUSAN LYNN GERLICK filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: SUSAN LYNN GERLICK Proposed name: SUSAN LYNN SMITH PARCO THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted.

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Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 25, 2018 Time: 9:00am Dept: TBA Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: April 11, 2018 Case Number: 18CV01042 Published: April 19,26, May 3,10, 2018

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner SARAH COX filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: SARAH LAUREN COX Proposed name: CALI LECHUGA DEVINNEY THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: June 8, 2018 Time: 9:00am Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: April 11, 2018 Case Number: 18CV01051 Published: April 19,26, May 3,10, 2018

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner CAROLYN ROSE LEBOEUF filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: JAXON ROBERT HORN-CAMPUSANO Proposed name: JAXON ROBERT LEBOEUF THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING

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Date: June 8, 2018 Time: 9:00am Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: April 11, 2018 Case Number: 18CV00946 Published: April 26, May 3,10,17, 2018

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner KERIN GENE CRANE filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: KERIN GENE CRANE Proposed name: KERI GENE CRANE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: June 15, 2018 Time: 9:00am Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: April 17, 2018 Case Number: 18CV01152 Published: May 3,10,17,24, 2018

SUMMONS SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: CHELSEA M HENDRELL YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: BUTTE COUNTY CREDIT BUREAU A CORP NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney,

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NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE JOSEPH ALLEN DOWNS To all heirs and beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: JOSEPH ALLEN DOWNS, JOE DOWNS, JOE A. DOWNS A Petition for Probate has been filed by: COOPER DOWNS in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: COOPER DOWNS be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or conseted to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: June 5, 2018 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: TBA Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law.

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE JOHN FREDERICK LOEWE, AKA JOHN F. LOEWE, AKA JOHN LOEWE To all heirs and beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: JOHN FREDERICK LOEWE, AKA JOHN F. LOEWE, AKA JOHN LOEWE A Petition for Probate has been filed by: KEVIN SWEENEY in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: KEVIN SWEENEY be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or conseted to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: June 5, 2018 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: TBA Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may

want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: CLAYTON B. ANDERSON 20 Independence Circle Chico, CA 95973 (530) 342-6144 Case Number: 18PR00174 Dated: April 25, 2018 Published: May 10,17,24, 2018

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NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE SUZANNE S. WINNIE, AKA SUZANNE WINNIE To all heirs and beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: SUZANNE S. WINNIE, AKA SUZANNE WINNIE A Petition for Probate has been filed by: CAROLYN FEJES in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: CAROLYN FEJES be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or conseted to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: MAY 22, 2018 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: TBA Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney

YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: ROBERT L. HEWITT 3044 Olive Hwy Oroville, CA 95966 (530) 534-8393 Case Number: 18PR00177 Dated: April 30, 2018 Published: May 3,10,17, 2018

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PETITION

knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: REBECCA YUHASZ McKernan, Lanam, Bakke & Williams LLP 732 Fir Street Paradise, CA 95969 (530) 877-4961 Case Number: 18PR00165 Dated: April 20, 2018 Published: April 26, May 3,10, 2018

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SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: JESUS ESPINOSA, AN INDIVIDUAL; AND DOES 1-100, INCLUSIVE YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: PERSOLVE, LLC, A LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county law library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money, and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is:

Chico Courthouse 1775 Concord Avenue Chico CA 95928. The name, address, and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is: MICHAEL H. RAICHELSON/SBN 174607 Persolve Legal Group, LLP (818) 534-3100 9301 Corbin Ave Ste 1600 Northridge CA 91324. Dated: August 31, 2017 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Case Number: 17CV02537 Published: May 3,10,17,24, 2018

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you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The Court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Avenue Chico, CA 95928 LIMITED CIVIL CASE The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney is: JOSEPH L SELBY (#249546) Law Office of Ferris & Selby 2607 Forest Avenue Ste 130 Chico, CA 95928. (530) 366-4290 Dated: October 27, 2017 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Case Number: 17CV03287 Published: April 19,26, May 3,10, 2018

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REAL ESTATE

FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT ADVERTISING IN OUR RE AL E STATE SECTION, C ALL 53 0-89 4-2 3 00

Love’s Real estate

Spring Fix

Callers and e-mailers are asking again about the best bang for their buck on home fix-up, whether considering selling or not.

investment of up to 80 percent at the time of sale, according to the experts.

“Clean it, paint it, and re-carpet it,” is tried and true advice.

Go Back Outside: Check your curb appeal. Funky siding goes right to the top of a buyer’s worry list and makes them wonder about hidden serious problems. Fix it and paint it, and don’t cover it with vinyl if you can help it.

Paint it Red: The front door, that is. “Red says ‘welcome’ in all cultures,” they say. Feng Shui proponents say to choose your color according to the direction your front door faces. You can look it up. Convert it: Converting an attic or storage room or basement into a bedroom is a quick way to add value. Kids move back in with parents and parents move in with kids.

$565,000 | 14920 WOODLAND PARK DRIVE IN FOREST RANCH This fantastic property is perfectly nestled in the exclusive Humboldt Woodland gated community, just 10 miles East of Chico, surrounded by lush trees and spectacular views. Facing exact south the home was custom built to create a passive solar and perfect Feng Shui environment. The warm and welcoming entry greets you with a bright and open floor plan. Some of the many custom details that your eye will be immediately drawn to are the white oak hardwood floors, the twenty foot high ceilings in the living room, and the beautifully trimmed doors and Loewen casement windows with vertical grain, clear douglas fir.

JOHN BARROSO BRE #01434090

Line your Den: Whether you call it the office or the computer room or the den, the “extra room” it is a big draw. Everyone can use some more space, even after adding the new bedroom.

530.570.8489

REALTOR,RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL

Go Outside: Building a deck is one of the least expensive ways to extend your living space. Building a deck can bring a return on

Help the Cook: The kitchen can be the make it or break it for a home sale. Kitchens are expensive, but you don’t have to go fulltilt. Replacing countertops, faucets, and cabinet hardware can be the missing ingredient. Get Good Glass: Curb appeal again, with the added feature of energy efficiency. People are interested in spending less green on their power bills. Fix it, shine it, and make it better, but don’t turn it into Trump Tower, unless it’s just for you.

Doug Love is Sales Manager at Century 21 Jeffries Lydon. Email escrowgo@aol.com, or call 530-680-0817. See an archive of columns at douglovesrealestate.com.

Open Houses & Listings are online at: www.century21JeffriesLydon.com Beautiful Home

Price Reduced! 4760 County Rd 99 W. 28 acre farm in Orland. 11 acres of 3rd leaf prunes. 11 acres of olives, 2 homes and other income. Owned solar. Only $799,000. Call me for details. This is a good income producing property!

3 bd 2 bth with lots of upgrades. Call now for more info and private showing.

Call today!

Steve KaSprzyK (Kas-per-ziK) You don’t have to spell it out for me to sell it!

(530) 518–4850

Jeffries Lydon

License#01145231

Paul Champlin | (530) 828-2902 Making Your Dream Home a Reality

SMILES ALWAYS!

Joyce Turner

570–1944 • joyce_turner@ymail.com

Homes Sold Last Week ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

4641 Garden Brook Dr 929 Coit Tower Way 217 Yellowstone Dr 389 Silver Lake Dr 2321 Tiffany Way 201 W Frances Willard Ave 1445 Heritage Oak Dr 1371 Keri Ln 1397 Lucy Way 52 Glenshire Ln 240 Henshaw Ave

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico

$795,000 $440,000 $427,000 $409,000 $399,000 $365,000 $335,000 $335,000 $296,000 $295,000 $269,000

4/3 4/3 3/2 3/2 3/2 3/2 4/3 3/2 3/2 3/2 3/2

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SQ. FT. 3204 2181 1956 1956 1634 1562 1656 1545 1126 1496 1194

NEW LISTING!!

Curious about your homes value in today’s marketplace? Call me, I can help!

Super-Clean, Updated 3bd/2ba home in N. Chico On cul-de-sac $274,900

Jennifer Parks | 530.864.0336

Sponsored by Century 21 Jeffries Lydon ADDRESS 6 Claremont Cir 429 W 1st Ave 14 Pebblewood Pines Dr 868 E 19th St 15044 Meridian Rd 2620 Ceanothus Ave 1408 Half Dome Way 139 W Lassen Ave #26 1744 Frank Marion Ln 2381 Durham St 21444 Biggers Ln

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Durham Durham Forest Ranch

$267,500 $260,000 $185,000 $176,000 $154,500 $144,000 $139,500 $90,000 $535,000 $235,000 $380,000

3/2 3/1 2/2 2/1 4/3 4/3 4/3 2/1 4/2 2/1 2/2

SQ. FT. 1351 1086 1487 720 1968 2071 1596 766 2093 884 1772


Our goal is your satisfaction Need a hand with your home purchase? McEckron Real Estate Team

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Bill McEckron

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530-228-3006 BillyMac058@gmail.com

With locations in:

Chico: 894-2612 • Oroville: 533-2414 Paradise: 877-6262 • Gridley: 846-4005 www.BidwellTitle.com

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Take a look aT This 4BD/2Ba BeauTy w/+2100 sF oF living space, beautifully landscaped, gazebo & LG patio deck Call for an appt. today!

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$339,900 Ad#74

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This 2BD/2Ba moBile home on .38 acre. Offers a detached 2 car garage, lrg, Covered front porch, fully fenced level lot.

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Bigger and Better! 2 homes in town on .77 lot along with .20 of an ac adjoining vacant lot. ............. ........................................................................................................................................$575,000 Butte Valley 2-custom homes, private setting on 235 acs, horse or cattle ......................$1,999,000 Stunning 4 bed/2 bth, 2,270 sq ft, .28 ac ............................................................................... $439,900 4 Bed/2 Bth, 1,819 sq ft pen with formal ding living/dining + family rooms! NICE ...........................$349,900 3 bed/2.5 bath, 2,738 sq ft with views of the lake, Beautiful California Park pen ding Teresa Larson hardwood floors, and more .............................................................................................$559,000 (530)899-5925 gueSt unit attaChed with this beautiful 4 bed/3 bth, updated 3,000 sq ft home ding BRE #01177950 located on 1.17 acres pen with pool, shop, and more! .........................................................$689,000 g sqdin ft, stainless steel appliances .............................................$290,000 pen chiconativ@aol.com new roof, 3 Bed/2 Bth, 1,313

3/2 2100 sq ft home, shop, studio apt New construction just blocks to Bidwell Park: 3/2 $349,000 20 acres with views $145,000

GRacIOus 1980 BLT wITh hOME with parklike setting, 3 bed, 2 bath, 2 car garage $320,000 REMOdELEd 1966 BLT hOME, located on a lovely cul-de-sac, 3 bed, 2 bath plus bonus room, lovely gardens and large lot, $310,000 sTuNNING aMBERGROvE hOME, blt 2004, 3 bed, 2 ROvEE hOME ROv ding bath 1784 sqpen ft. $410,000 ch sTYLE hOME,, hOME,,gblt 2007, 1471 sq ft, NEwER RaNch din shopping$316,500 close to schoolspen and shopping$316,500

KIMBERLEY TONGE | (530) 518-5508

Alice Zeissler | 530.518.1872

The following houses were sold in Butte County by real estate agents or private parties during the week of april 23, 2018 – april 27, 2018 The housing prices are based on the stated documentary transfer tax of the parcel and may not necessarily reflect the actual sale price of the home. TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

2835 Cory Creek Rd

ADDRESS

Oroville

$620,000

3/3

SQ. FT. 2378

5030 Chasity Ct

ADDRESS

Paradise

$525,000

3/3

2537

3734 Runaway Rd

Oroville

$450,000

4/2

2259

5783 Bonnie Ln

Paradise

$355,000

3/2

1744

40 Short Ave

Oroville

$440,000

2/3

2301

1880 Stearns Rd

Paradise

$352,000

2/2

1865

3165 Yard St

Oroville

$410,000

6/2

2394

6120 Windtune Pl

Paradise

$346,000

2/2

1542

86 Hercules Ave

Oroville

$330,000

3/2

1757

5731 Reed Ln

Paradise

$295,000

5/3

2467

175 Hope Ln

Oroville

$306,000

2/2

1830

5768 Holly Ln

Paradise

$278,500

5/4

2358

9 Patrick Ct

Oroville

$301,000

3/2

1883

784 Red Hill Way

Paradise

$232,000

2/2

1338

3 La Foret Ct

Oroville

$263,000

3/2

1408

4037 Neal Rd

Paradise

$220,000

2/2

1373

1287 12th St

Oroville

$230,000

2/1

1017

6211 W Wagstaff Rd

Paradise

$190,000

2/2

1208

1455 7th St

Oroville

$203,500

3/2

1170

851 Central Park Dr

Paradise

$182,000

3/2

1440

2490 Ithaca St

Oroville

$86,500

4/2

1256

1450 Moon Way

Paradise

$176,000

4/2

1296

M ay 1 0 , 2 0 1 8

SQ. FT.

  CN&R 

39


EvERy suRvivoR’s jouRnEy is uniquE Healing from INCEST seems impossible, but the guilt and shame one may feel was never theirs to carry.

Insightful Nurturing Self Courageous Empowering Self-Acceptance Triumphant stop the cycle & start the healing

We are here to listen: 530.342.RAPE (7273) ColleCt Calls aCCepted Butte/glenn: 530.891.1331 ¡ tehama: 530.529.3980

all viCtims of sexual assault will reCeive a free forensiC mediCal examination, regardless of whether or not they choose to participate in the criminal justice process.

Know your rights about sexual assault. If you or someone you know has been sexually violated, contact Rape Crisis Intervention & Prevention.

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c-2018-05-10