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CHICO’S FREE NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY VOLUME 41, ISSUE 33 THURSDAY, APRIL 12, 2018 WWW.NEWSREVIEW.COM

TIME BOMB Without prevention, wildfires will continue ravaging California’s forests PAGE

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8 JESUS CENTER DRAMA 17 DOWNTOWN REMODEL 27 GET MEDIEVAL

S E I M M A C LOCAL MUSIC! See page 26


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CN&R

INSIDE

Vol. 41, Issue 33 • April 12, 2018 OPINION 

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Editorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Guest Comment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Second & Flume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Streetalk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4 4 5 5 7

NEWSLINES 

8 

Downstroke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Sifter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

HEALTHLINES  Appointment . Weekly Dose .

12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

GREENWAYS 

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Eco Event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 

EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS 

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15 Minutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 The Goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

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Our Mission: To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring . To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare . To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live . Editor Melissa Daugherty Managing Editor Meredith J . Cooper Arts Editor Jason Cassidy Staff Writer Ashiah Scharaga Calendar Editor Nate Daly Contributors Robin Bacior, Alastair Bland, Michelle Camy, Vic Cantu, Josh Cozine, Bob Grimm, Howard Hardee, Miles Jordan, Mark Lore, Landon Moblad, Conrad Nystrom, Ryan J . Prado, Juan-Carlos Selznick, Ken Smith, Robert Speer, Brian Taylor, Evan Tuchinsky, Carey Wilson Managing Art Director Tina Flynn Editorial Designer Sandy Peters Creative Services Manager Christopher Terrazas Creative Director Serene Lusano Publications Designer Mike Bravo Web Design & Strategist Elisabeth Bayard Arthur Ad Designer Catalina Munevar Director of Sales and Advertising Jamie DeGarmo Advertising Services Coordinator Ruth Alderson Senior Advertising Consultants Brian Corbit, Laura Golino Advertising Consultants Chris Pollok, Autumn Slone Office Assistant Amanda Geahry Distribution Director Greg Erwin Distribution Manager Mark Schuttenberg Distribution Staff Ken Gates, Bob Meads, Pat Rogers, Mara Schultz, Larry Smith, Lisa Torres, Placido Torres, Jeff Traficante, Bill Unger, Lisa Van Der Maelen

COVER STORY  

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ARTS & CULTURE 

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Music feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 This Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Fine arts listings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Scene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Nightlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Reel World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Chow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 In The Mix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Arts DEVO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Brezsny’s Astrology . . . . . . . . . . . . 35

CLASSIFIEDS  

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REAL ESTATE  

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ON THE COVEr: DEsigN by TiNa FlyNN

President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Director of Nuts & Bolts Deborah Redmond Nuts & Bolts Ninja Leslie Giovanini Director of People & Culture David Stogner Project Coordinator Natasha vonKaenel Payroll/AP Wizard Miranda Hansen Accounts Receivable Specialist Analie Foland Developer John Bisignano System Support Specialist Kalin Jenkins N&R Publications Editor Michelle Carl N&R Publications Associate Editor Laura Hillen N&R Publications Writers Anne Stokes, Rodney Orosco Marketing & Publications Consultants Steve Caruso, Joseph Engle, Elizabeth Morabito, Traci Hukill 353 E. Second Street, Chico, CA 95928 Phone (530) 894-2300 Fax (530) 892-1111 Website www .newsreview .com Got a News Tip? (530) 894-2300, ext 2224 or chiconewstips@newsreview .com Calendar Events cnrcalendar@newsreview .com Calendar Questions (530) 894-2300, ext . 2243 Want to Advertise? Fax (530) 892-1111 or cnradinfo@newsreview .com Classifieds (530) 894-2300, press 2 or classifieds@newsreview .com Job Opportunities jobs@newsreview .com Want to Subscribe to CN&R? chisubs@newsreview .com Editorial Policies: Opinions expressed in CN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons, or other portions of the paper. CN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or review materials. Email letters to cnrletters@newsreview.com. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form and to edit them for libel. Advertising Policies: All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes the responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. CN&R is printed at Bay Area News Group on recycled newsprint. Circulation of CN&R is verified by the Circulation Verification Council. CN&R is a member of Chico Chamber of Commerce, Oroville Chamber of Commerce, Downtown Chico Business Association, CNPA, AAN and AWN. Circulation 41,000 copies distributed free weekly.

april 12, 2018

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OPINION

Send guest comments, 340 words maximum, to gc@newsreview.com or to 353 E. Second St., Chico, CA 95928. please include photo & short bio.

EDITORIAL

City drops the ball Public discussion has long been a key to progress in the city of Chico, and

it’s clear to this newspaper that the city dropped the ball when it comes to its collaboration with the Jesus Center on that organization’s proposed move and expansion on city-owned property. The sticking point for the City Council appears to be that the nonprofit is intent on purchasing that property, rather than entering into a lease agreement (see “Staying or going?” page 8). That doesn’t surprise us, considering we’ve seen no discussion at the dais about a potential sale of the land on Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway. Indeed, back in November, at the meeting in which the plan was discussed at greatest length, a lease agreement was specifically denoted in a unanimous vote for the city to move forward in collaboration with the nonprofit. The only indication that a sale of public property was on the table were a few references in a memorandum of understanding between the city and the nonprofit that again mentioned the development of a lease agreement but also included this: “and/or alternative legal arrangement for use of the property.” Moreover, that MOU was approved months later as part of the consent agenda, meaning no in-depth discussion preceded its approval. That’s a big deal. Keep in mind that this is taxpayer-owned land. The citizens of Chico should have had an opportunity to weigh in on the prospect of selling it—most definitely not an insignificant detail. That brings us back to this newspaper’s major gripe about this entire effort: that it lacks transparency. As we said last November, a much more thorough vetting of this potential project is needed. It should include not only the stakeholders (the Torres Community Shelter, the Chico Housing Action Team, etc.), but also input from the public on the full scope of the project. That’s the only way to fix the city’s failure on this effort. □

GUEST COMMENT

The gun-debate voices yet to be heard with combat experience in Iraq, I believe arming Aveterans and placing us in schools in the role of s a local high school teacher and former soldier

armed counter-attacker is akin to assigning a SWAT team member to teach my students Aristotle’s three forms of rhetorical appeals. My full-time job is to teach high school English; the SWAT team member’s job is to respond to armed attacks with lethal force if necessary. Like most readers and cable by news viewers, however, I find Ken Hardy encouragement and optimism The author, a retired in the articulate, impassioned Army lieutenant young voices that have sparked colonel who served the inevitable post-gun traumatic in Desert Storm and event debate. We have read and Desert Shield, lives in Chico and teaches heard the emergent voices of English at Gridley American teenagers ranging from High School. emotional pleas to reasonable proposals (Aristotle calls these appeals pathos and logos, respectively). The strongest of these articulate and knowledgeable voices originate from the student-victims of

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Florida’s Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. They challenge the status quo and demand action. Unfortunately, they are engaged with the wrong opposition, the old guard of NRA, CEO Wayne LaPierre, and spokeswoman Dana Loesh. Whom they need to engage are the young voices of the NRA and Second Amendment supporters from whom we have yet to hear. Missing from the debate are the articulate, reasoned and impassioned voices of student-leaders from our more rural Butte County schools. These young voices need our encouragement to not just join in but also lead the opposition discussion. To many of these students, firearms play an integral role not only in their lives and families, but also in their schools (one local high school principal is heading a newly formed skeet-shooting team). Let’s get these students in front of the cameras and behind microphones from inside the halls of the Capitol. Aristotle’s third appeal, ethos, refers to a speaker’s credibility. We all need to help our high school students realize they represent credible voices in this critical debate. Genuine compromise results when both sides of an issue are represented. All of our futures depend on it, perhaps more so for high school students. □

Not above the law President Trump’s spokeswoman told reporters this week that POTUS

believes he has the authority to fire Robert Mueller, the special counsel in charge of the investigation into Russia’s interference in the 2016 general election. That narrative from the White House comes just a day after federal agents raided the office, home and hotel room of Trump’s personal attorney, Michael Cohen, for financial records related to business ventures and payments made to two women who say they had an affair with the president. The president’s response: that the subpoenas were “an attack on our country.” It also corroborates reporting over the past year by major newspapers that Trump on more than one occasion has been trying to figure out how to do just that. In fact, on the same day White House press secretary Sarah Sanders made that assertion, reports surfaced that the president had explored firing Mueller back in December, following erroneous reports that the special counsel had subpoenaed Deutsche Bank for his financial records with that financial institution. But it’s not the first time the commander in chief has debated ousting Mueller, a retired FBI director and longest-running director of that agency since J. Edgar Hoover. The president sought to do the same thing back in June, when he believed the special counsel was entertaining the idea of bringing an obstruction of justice case against him. At the time, White House counsel Don McGahn, reportedly the person Trump tasked with canning Mueller, threatened to quit his job. The president backed off as a result. But POTUS is at it again, and seems to be under the impression he’s above the law. He’s mistaken, and the only way to determine whether he’s criminally liable or not is to see the investigation through to its conclusion. □


LETTERS

SECOND & FLUME by Melissa Daugherty m e l i s s a d @ n e w s r e v i e w. c o m

politicking, indeed The Jesus Center’s plan to abandon its Park Avenue location and move to city-owned land next to the Torres Community Shelter is the CN&R’s lead news item in the current issue. That effort hit a snag last week, as you’ll read in Ashiah Scharaga’s story, and Chico Mayor Sean Morgan and the nonprofit’s administrator both have invoked partisanship as the holdup. To quote Morgan: “While disappointing, this plainly reveals that while some of us are trying to find solutions, others would rather use our transient population as political pawns and turn this into an issue during a campaign year.” That’s from his “From the Desk of the Mayor” letter he posted on Facebook April 5. The same day, Jesus Center Executive Director Laura Cootsona sent a letter to the council. In the paragraph before noting that she and the nonprofit’s board had decided to, as she put it, “pursue alternative options for our relocation (including a rebuild of our current site on 1297 Park Ave.),” Cootsona made a point of saying that Jesus Center representatives have “been encouraged through this process that the Council was willing to put aside partisan concerns to address real human need.” The implication, of course, is that Chico’s elected leaders didn’t hold up their end of the bargain. My question: Exactly who’s getting political here? I mean, newsflash: The conservatives hold the majority on the City Council. They don’t need the liberals to make this deal happen. We don’t know exactly what took place during the negotiating process between the Jesus Center and the city because it happened during closed session. Here’s what we do know: The city has confirmed that the council did not vote to sell the property. And, taken together, Morgan and Cootsona revealed by way of innuendo that concerns about this plan cross party lines. I’m not surprised, considering the questions I have about this less-than-transparent effort (see Editorial, page 4). So why the politicking? To put pressure on the holdouts. What will it accomplish? Creating a deeper divide where there’s already a chasm. That’s a given. It’s definitely not the kind of leadership Chico deserves on this important issue. Speaking of politics and homelessness, I met with someone who’s running for City Council in the fall. On Tuesday, Scott Huber chatted with me about his weekend experiment of “actually going houseless.” Huber suited up during the rainstorm last Friday (April 6) and spent two days and nights trying to experience what life on the streets is like. He slept at the Torres Shelter one night and outside in the elements the next. Daytime involved a lot of walking to find things to meet basic needs—finding food (including at the Jesus Center) and public restrooms, for example. Staying dry was another big challenge. Huber described several instances in which he witnessed acts of compassion by those on the streets toward others newly experiencing homelessness. There’s too much to detail in this small space, but I’m sure Huber will expound for those who are curious. He went home with a renewed gratefulness for his family and the roof over his head. That much was clear from his watery eyes as he described the hardships of those he met while acknowledging that he came from a two-parent family and a life in which he had “every opportunity in the world.”

Melissa Daugherty is editor of the CN&R

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Remembering Molly

Pain Management, Weight Loss, Digestive Issues & Allergies

Molly wished me to thank her community for all the support she received in her final days. You eased her passing. If you knew Molly, please write a remembrance of her and give it to me at the Saturday farmers’ market, so it may be viewed/read at a family-friendly potluck to be held on July 27 at Chico Women’s Club. The event will be followed by the Molly Amick Soul Release Dance Party (per Molly’s request) at the same location. Love to all. Sterling Ogden Chico

Editor’s note: The author is the husband of Chicoan Molly Amick, who passed away March 31 at the age of 53. Amick was the artist behind this year’s Poetry 99 cover art. She also penned some exceptional guest commentaries and letters to the editor in the CN&R over the years.

‘Keyword amendment’ Re “Join the debate” (Editorial, April 5): A few points regarding the Second Amendment; indeed, all amendments. Keyword amendment. The Bill of Rights is a living document, open to revision, amendment, and yes, even overturning. Emancipation, suffrage, prohibition were all historic examples. Revision of or overturning the Second Amendment may be the only course to civilizing our society in the end. Allow me to point something out: Not one of the free and democratic nations I can think of outlaws private gun ownership by citizens. Not one. And yet, they are also not bound (strangled) by America’s fanatical adherence to the presumed “sacred rights” guaranteed by the problematic Second Amendment. I have lived in Canada and Japan, and have traveled extensively throughout Central America, Europe, Southeast Asia and Australia—free countries in which law-abiding citizens are allowed to own firearms even though there is no equivalent to the Second Amendment. Are they less free than we? No. They are, LETTERS c o n t i n u e d

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threaten local news.

The Department of Commerce has assessed preliminary newsprint tariffs, which range as high as 32%. These tariffs are already being collected. Local newspapers, printers, and book publishers cannot absorb these costs. This will lead to fewer jobs and less access to local news in our community.

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statistically, much safer from each other, however. We may be as hindered by the Second as we are presumably made free by it. Free to do what? Free to be whom? A country of gun-happy fanatics bent on national self-annihilation? Revise or overturn the Second Amendment—now! Joe Hlebica Red Bluff

Out of context Re “The mayor’s obligation” (Editorial) and “Fed up” (Newslines, by Ashiah Scharaga, April 5): “If accurate ...” Yes, good faith and integrity are important virtues. The person who “outed” Mayor Sean Morgan lacks either, as revealed by her “quoting” him selectively and out of context to construct her false narrative. Chico First and its supporters are getting used to being the objects of disdain by those who wish to cast all but themselves as “some of the most vile and repugnant expressions of a corrupted human nature.” And all of this time, I thought Chico Friends on the Street was about compassion and charity, but now we can all understand the truth, as spoken by one of its articulate supporters. “My involvement with CFOTS is not motivated by charity, but rather by an expression of my constitutionally guaranteed right to participate in a weekly protest ...” Now we know. It is not compassion and charity for the people in the plaza, but rather a protest, where the homeless are merely the stage props for their theater play. Fortunately, we live under rules of a democratic process, and not under the thumb of those who will say anything if it fits their narrative. Votes, like facts, matter. Rob Berry Chico

City falls short Re “Point of preservation” (Newslines, by Ashiah Scharaga, March 29): The city of Chico is diminishing ORAI’s (Chico Outsiders’) role in maintaining the mitigation and monitoring measures required by the California Environmental Quality Act to protect natural

resources at Peregrine Point Disc Golf Course, and absorbing this increased cost despite the city’s budget deficiencies. ORAI’s role, prescribed in their operating agreement with the city that was signed in 2010 and renewed in 2016, states “Operator (ORAI) shall, at its sole cost and expense, maintain the premises and all disc golf improvements … in good repair….” This contract implements policy adopted by the City Council in 2009 as recommended by the Bidwell Park and Playground Commission (BPPC) in 2008. The city has not cooperated with ORAI to fulfill this policy for the last several years, presumably because ORAI has been unable. The city’s rationale for substituting its scarce resources for ORAI’s is an unsubstantiated, significant increased use of the course by hikers and mountain bikers. Regardless, the city (BPPC and council) is solely legally responsible for maintaining legally required mitigation measures and monitoring their effectiveness at the course. Woody Elliott Chico

On the park and cars Re “Open the gate” (Second & Flume, by Melissa Daugherty, March 1): Based on my own bi-weekly observations, Upper Park Road is one of the most heavily hiked and biked trails in Upper Park. The road has more even terrain than any of the other trails, making it accessible to many who are not physically able to hike or cycle the more challenging smaller trails. Cars on the road are not only disruptive but also jeopardize the safety of these users. To accommodate an even wider range of physical abilities, turn an 8-foot-wide strip of the road into a wheelchair-accessible path that could also be used by parents with strollers, toddlers on bikes and walkers with more pronounced mobility issues. More people of differing abilities can be safely served when cars are not on Upper Park Road. I suggest limiting car access to two days a week or, better yet, eliminating vehicular use altogether. Eve Werner Chico

Deputy fake facebooker? A Tehama County Sheriff’s deputy has a fake Facebook page that he is using to harass supporters of another sheriff’s candidate. After being singled out in a rant by “Corey Davis,” I noted that he has 33 friends since 2009. Most interesting is that “Corey Davis” did an online check-in at the Sheraton Hotel in Dallas, Texas, on Aug. 11, 2015. According to the Tehama County Board of Supervisors minutes from June 23, 2015, Agenda Item 44, Sheriff Dave Hencratt requested approval from the board for outof-state travel for two deputies to go to Dallas on Aug. 9-13, 2015, to attend the Crimes Against Children Conference. One of those deputies is almost certainly “Corey Davis.” The sheriff does not deny that his deputy was the person behind the fake page. “I will continue to investigate your allegation as it may pertain to a policy violation within my department. If there is a policy violation I will take the appropriate action.” This deputy is a hero according to his bio, but the cowardly act of hiding behind a fake profile to denigrate political opponents casts a shadow over his public actions. At the least. Aaron Standish Manton

‘Same-old, same-old’ I think this city needs to put an effort into either changing our voting dates in June to a time when students who can vote are in town or willing to fill out an absentee ballot when on vacation. Otherwise, get ready to settle for the same-old conservatives who do not represent what I think are the more liberal attitudes of the majority. The conservatives did this on purpose, and it’s obvious to me—otherwise, get ready for the same-old, same-old tired and selfish governmenting in our beautiful city of Chico. Naomi Ruth Eisenberg Chico

Editor’s note: The June primary includes the Butte County Board of Supervisors race in which two contested seats are those that represent Chico. However, the City Council race takes place during the November general election.


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NEWSLINES DOWNSTROKE

The Jesus Center’s current location  at 1297 Park Ave.  

HostAge situAtion turns deAdly

On Saturday (April 7), Oroville Police responded to calls of gunshots heard inside a home on the 700 block of Pomona Avenue between 3 and 5 a.m. Officers received no response from residents. At 5:41 a.m., a woman reported a gun was being pointed at her sister, who was inside the residence with two children. Oroville Police noticed a bullet hole in a front window and called Butte County Sheriff’s Office. A man, later identified as Larry Siordia, 33, of Oroville, allegedly exited the residence about 8 a.m. carrying a pistol and started shooting at law enforcement. A BCSO sergeant fired one shot at Siordia, who later died at Oroville Hospital. The Butte County Officer Involved Shooting and Critical Incident Protocol Team is investigating.

Housing for veterAns

Butte County’s Housing Authority will receive 30 vouchers, a value of $173,052, to house homeless veterans, according to a U.S.

Department of Housing and Urban Development

press release. The vouchers provide rental assistance, case management and clinical services and are funded by HUD’s Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing (VASH) program and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. Participants rent privately owned homes and generally pay no more than 30 percent of their income for rent. Medical centers provide assessments and refer veterans to housing agencies based on factors like how long a person has been homeless. Nationally, $43 million was awarded to 325 local public housing agencies to house more than 5,200 homeless veterans.

staying or going? Jesus Center and city collaboration on relocation, expansion continues

Dandpartnership between the Jesus Center the city of Chico had ended, property espite the initial impression that a

riverbend pArk renovAtion

Riverbend Park, heavily damaged during the Oroville Dam spillway crisis, will be closed through July while undergoing flood damage restoration. Phase 1 of the project, undertaken by the

Feather River Recreation and Park District

(FRRPD), will include terraforming the soccer fields and surrounding hills/berms, installing new turf and restoring water and power to park facilities. FRRPD General Manager Randy Murphy (pictured) said what wasn’t damaged by the storm has been damaged by vandals. “It’s really been an ongoing nightmare, so it’ll be nice to get this done and back open for everybody,” he said. Total costs are estimated at $7 million to $8 million, according to project manager Shawn Rohrbacker, of Melton Design Group. Insurance will cover most of the work, aside from a $250,000 deductible, which FRRPD intends to have the Federal Emergency Management Agency cover. 8 

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April 12, 2018

negotiations are ongoing, the CN&R has learned. During a closedstory and session meeting last photo by Ashiah Scharaga Tuesday (April 3), the City Council discussed as h i a h s @ selling about 3.5 acres n ew srev i ew. c o m of land by the Silver Dollar Fairgrounds to the Jesus Center (a More info: request made by the the homeless consoli- nonprofit) but chose not dated services concept first surfaced at a City to entertain a vote on Council meeting on the issue, directing City nov. 7, 2017. After its Manager Mark Orme to unanimous approval, provide the Jesus Center a memorandum of understanding was with an update. While details about drafted for the Jesus Center and the city, what transpired during approved on feb. 6. closed session aren’t to view the staff public record, negotiareports and minutes, go to tions appeared to have tinyurl.com/832xrdl. reached a standstill

based on statements by Jesus Center Executive Director Laura Cootsona and Mayor Sean Morgan last Thursday (April 5). In a letter addressed to the council, Cootsona wrote that the nonprofit will look at alternative locations for moving and expansion. Meanwhile, the mayor addressed the issue in a public statement chiding his colleagues. Earlier this week, however, Cootsona made it clear during an interview with the CN&R that the plan hasn’t been nixed— the nonprofit is still negotiating with the city. “We’re still on really good terms with the city,” she said. “It’s not a done deal.” The concept, approved unanimously by the council in November, is for the city to work with the nonprofit on the goal of moving its operations from 1297 Park Ave. to city-owned land near the Torres Community Shelter on Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway. It’s part of a biggerpicture project that would create a consolidated services center in partnership with other providers to serve homeless indi-

viduals. Additionally, it would require the relocation of Silver Dollar BMX, which currently leases the property in question. Though both the consolidated services concept and memorandum of understanding with the Jesus Center were approved by the council unanimously, Morgan’s statement via his online newsletter indicates the issue has taken a political turn: “While disappointing, this plainly reveals that while some of us are trying to find solutions, others would rather use our transient population as political pawns and turn this into an issue during a campaign year.” Cootsona’s letter states that the Jesus Center has been “encouraged through this process that the Council was willing to put aside partisan concerns to address real human need.” When asked if a political shift could have occurred, she told the CN&R she thinks the issue is bipartisan, but noted that it is an election year. “I don’t see any reason why we as a community can’t work on this together … without politics being a part,” she said.


one of the hangups appears to surround

the purchase of the property, versus a lease. Cootsona posted about the news last Friday on her Facebook page, upon which Councilman Karl Ory commented: “I’m OK with whatever decision Jesus Center makes, but I’d welcome an explanation why a very long-term lease (like Torres Shelter, CHIP, etc) doesn’t work for you. 50 yrs? It is a standard requirement for publicly owned property. Best of luck.” Cootsona’s response was simply, “Closed Session.” Ory declined to elaborate to the CN&R on those comments. Setting aside the consolidated services concept, he said, “I hope this isn’t a distraction to the greater housing crisis we have.” Regarding a sale as opposed to a lease, Cootsona said the Jesus Center’s board proposed purchasing the property because it felt that made the most long-term fiscal sense for the private nonprofit, which relies on donations. Owning the property would offer the Jesus Center more control, she said. If they build a $15 million facility there, it would be theirs. A lease could be possible, Cootsona continued, but there are still some unanswered questions. “It’s just not a good investment,” she said. Rebuilding at the current site, she added, is “not the best plan B,” so the center is searching for other properties. “We know that what we can and cannot do in this location is not enough to change the status quo,” she said. The center’s goal is to “broaden our options to helping those who are most vulnerable.” Moving forward, Orme said the city is exploring all options, as well as continuing to work with the Jesus Center. The MOU between the pair, which outlines each party’s role and responsibility while working together on the project near the fairgrounds, is still in effect. “We brought a lot of partners together in this effort to evaluate potential impacts, to evaluate potential successes that can be achieved in this type of effort,” Orme said. “We’re going to continue to strive to see if it can be brought together. Obviously it’s a big item; this is not a simple flick of the switch.” As for the future of Silver Dollar BMX, which is located on the property the city has been eying for the Jesus Center, the city has identified a potential privately owned spot elsewhere in Chico, Orme said, but he declined to divulge the location. □

Deadline nearing Informational meeting reveals new as well as longstanding concerns about annexation into Chico uly 1, 2020, is a date that looms large in the minds of many Chapmantown Jresidents. That’s when a major part of their

neighborhood will be annexed into the city, and they’re anxious and in some cases angry about the prospect. That was evident at a community meeting held Tuesday (April 10) in the multipurpose room at Chapman Elementary School. More than 100—perhaps as many as 150—residents put up with having to sit for 90 minutes on backless benches designed for third-graders in return for the opportunity to lob questions—and potshots—at about a dozen city and county officials, who at least enjoyed the relative comfort of sitting on folding metal chairs. This unintentional disparity was mirrored by the comments one man made early on in response to protestations on the part of both city and county officials that there simply wasn’t enough money to solve all of the neighborhood’s problems. “That’s because it’s all going to your salaries,” he shouted. Then, turning to the audience, he asked, “Who here makes $80,000 or more? Raise your hand.” Not a single hand went up. That set the tone for the opening halfhour of the meeting, which saw questions and comments flying around the room like escaped finches. Casey Hatcher, the county’s economic and community development manager, who was moderating the meeting, tried desperately to bring it to order.

It wasn’t until 40 minutes in, when someone asked a question about the annexation’s impact on the problems arising from homelessness, that things settled down. That’s because Chico’s police chief, Mike O’Brien, stood up to answer the question. He’s a tall man with an imposing but not unfriendly bearing, and besides he had a gun on his hip. Homelessness is a problem everywhere in California, he said. It’s not going to be solved by law enforcement, but rather by collaboration among all the service and governmental groups. His department has a Target Team that now includes a mobile crisis officer who can direct mentally ill homeless people to the appropriate service providers. “A lot of people in this community need help,” he said. “It’s not compassionate to leave people to sleep under a bridge.” One major audience concern was a recent proposal from the Chico Area Recreation and Park District to ease auto congestion on the 20th Street/Community Park’s east side by

SIFT ER taking it to the streets A recent poll conducted by The Washington Post and Kaiser Family Foundation aimed to determine how activism has changed since Trump took office . It found, significantly, that 1 in 5 Americans attended some kind of protest, political rally, demonstration or speech in the past two years . Of that group of “rallygoers,” as the poll categorizes them, 53 percent said they don’t consider themselves to be activists . Rallygoers were asked if they’d attended an event to express their views on a variety of issues . Here are the top causes that got people out of their houses and into the streets:

The environment . . . . . . . . . . 32 percent Immigration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 percent The Affordable Care Act . . . 28 percent LGBT issues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 percent Abortion/birth control . . . . 26 percent Police conduct . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 percent

Chico City Manager Mark Orme speaks at a meeting   regarding Chapmantown’s annexation Tuesday night   (April 10). photo by robert Speer

extending the current park road to connect with Ohio Street on the park’s west side. Several residents were concerned about the impact this would have on that neighborhood. Brendan Vieg, the city’s deputy director for planning services, said he could see the merits of the proposal, but nothing official has happened yet. If CARD does submit a formal proposal, it will have to go through an extensive environmental assessment before being approved, he said. Otherwise, the questions posed were more or less the same as those that have been broached at other annexation meetings. Several had to do with hooking up to the sewer system. No, it will not be required unless your septic tank fails. People also wanted to know whether their taxes would go up. No, but those who have a landline phone will be required to pay a utility user’s tax of 5 percent. Others wanted to know whether services, especially police and fire, will improve. The answer was that, in general, the city can provide identical or improved police and fire protection. Others asked whether the city would maintain the neighborhood’s semi-rural nature and not start installing curbs, gutters and sidewalks. The answer was yes. Finally, it was noted that a major advantage of annexation is that residents will be able to vote in city elections and serve on city boards and commissions. If they don’t like what the city is doing to their neighborhood, they can run for office. —RobeRt SpeeR r ob e r tspe e r @ newsr ev iew.c o m

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New local group proposes citizen oversight of Chico PD in wake of last year’s killings n August 2016, when news came out about two college women Ibeing manhandled by a Chico

Police officer—and caught on cellphone video—Emily Alma took notice. It made her concerned about use of force by local law enforcement. A little over six months later, Desmond Phillips, a young man in the midst of a mental health crisis, was shot and killed by police. Shortly thereafter, she and a few other like-minded Chicoans formed a group to bring about change. “What is law enforcement doing? Are they changing their culture as a result of this killing and other incidents that seemed to me to be an excessive use of force?” Alma said this week by phone. “Like those college women—the way they were treated was just outrageous to me. And I wasn’t seeing any real deep levels of change in the police culture.” The group Alma joined is about 10 strong and calls itself Concerned Citizens for Justice.

Since its formation last summer— and solidification following the officer-involved shooting death of Tyler Rushing last July—members have met and discussed how they can make a difference. Just last month, they finalized their vision statement and member Margaret Swick presented it to the Chico City Council. Now, she said, they’re ready to reach out to the greater community, increase membership and move forward on their goals. Chief among them is the creation of a citizens oversight committee for the Chico Police Department that would increase the transparency of the department while having some authority to hold it accountable. “We want to create transparency, and at this point there is no transparency in police departments,” Swick said. “We also believe oversight is essential. The military, they have Congress watching them. But who’s watching police departments?” Indeed, this is an issue that is being addressed in cities all over

the United States, she added. “Across the country, citizens and civic groups want to see increased transparency within police departments and less use of force on troubled, vulnerable, perhaps addicted or even mentally ill citizens,” she told the City Council on March 20. In addition to an oversight committee, and even as part of its functioning, Concerned Citizens for Justice is focused on a few key points: increasing the use of de-escalation tactics to minimize use of force, more training in crisis intervention, avoidance of implicit bias by law enforcement, demilitarization of the police force, support and care for officers and expansion of community-oriented policing. Some of these areas are already being addressed by the Chico PD, Alma and Swick Margaret Swick was prompted to action after the officer-involved shootings of Desmond Phillips and Tyler Rushing last year. photo by meredith J. cooper


Learn more:

To find out more about Concerned Citizens for Justice, email chicocitizens4justice@ gmail.com or attend the community meeting on June 18 at the Chico branch of the Butte County Library.

agreed. For instance, both said they are heartened by the fact that behavioral health specialists are now involved in crisis intervention. That’s not enough, though—those personnel are on the clock only for certain hours each day, Alma said. “It’s a great step, and I know that it’s happened because of Desmond Phillips’ death and Tyler Rushing’s death,” she said. “But I have a young friend who recently was having a psychotic breakdown, but it was after 6 [p.m.]. And he was tased. I don’t know if [the officer] would have called for help, intervention, but you don’t have to be in a hurry to use a weapon. De-escalation is a very refined skill that has many layers. The first thing is not to be in a hurry.” A citizens oversight committee ideally would be able to review the training requirements for officers in areas like de-escalation or crisis intervention, Swick said. From there, it could make recommendations based on best practices and community input on whether that training is adequate. “We have an excellent police chief who is aware of the things that caused problems in Ferguson and other cities,” Swick said, “and he’s already increasing community involvement in policing. Yet, we want oversight.” A committee would need to be approved by the City Council, and bringing forward such a proposal is still some time coming. “We’re still not sure exactly what it would look like,” Swick said. She is hoping that a community meeting in June will increase Concerned Citizens for Justice’s numbers and they’ll be able to better gauge the level of support for such a committee. They’ll move forward from there. “Citizen oversight with some authority is necessary,” Alma said. “But we want to be clear—we want to work with law enforcement, to work with them and be part of the process of changing the culture.” —MEREDITH J. COOPER mere d i thc @ n ew sr ev i ew. com

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Kicking the habit Practical advice for overcoming opioid addiction

by

Emily Bazar

RopioidIfaddiction, you or a loved one wants to beat an first make sure you have a ule No. 1: Stay alive.

handy supply of naloxone, a medication that can reverse an overdose and save your life. “Friends and families need to keep naloxone with them,” says Dr. David Kan, an addiction medicine specialist in Walnut Creek who is president of the California Society of Addiction Medicine. “People using opioids should keep it with them, too.” More than 42,200 Americans died from opioid overdoses in 2016, victims of a crisis that’s being fueled by the rise of a powerful synthetic opioid called fentanyl, which is 30 to 50 times more potent than heroin. Rock stars Prince and Tom Petty had fentanyl in their systems when they died. People can become addicted to opioids through long-term use, or misuse, of prescription painkillers. In most cases, that leads to heroin use, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse. If you’re ready to address your own addiction, or that of a loved one, know that

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you may not succeed—at first. You probably won’t be able to do it without outside help or medications. And you’ll probably have to take those medications for years—or the rest of your life. “Getting over a drug addiction is a process. There are going to be ups and downs,” says Patt Denning, director of clinical services and training at the Center for Harm Reduction Therapy in San Francisco and Oakland. “We need to hang with people while they’re struggling. It might take awhile.” That’s why Denning and others suggest you start with having naloxone on hand, which can help you stay alive through the process. Last year in San Francisco, about 1,200 potentially fatal overdoses were reversed by naloxone administered by regular folks—not doctors, police or paramedics, Kan says. Naloxone, which can be administered as a nasal spray or injection, is available without a prescription in more than 40 states, including California. Ask your pharmacy if it stocks the drug. Needle exchange programs also offer the medication at no charge, Denning says, as do some public health clinics. People addicted to opioids face staggering

relapse rates of 80 percent to 90 percent within 90 days if they try short-term rehab or detox programs that wean them off the

drugs without assistance from medications, says Richard Rawson, a UCLA psychiatry professor emeritus. Rawson warns that rehab can also increase the risk of an overdose, because your body’s tolerance to opioids is lower after you withdraw from them. “If you leave rehab and take the same dose you used to take, you’re not just going to get high, you’re going to be dead,” he says. Instead of treating opioid addiction like a curable illness, he and other experts liken it to lifelong, chronic conditions such as diabetes that require ongoing management. “This isn’t going to be one visit. If you

have an addictive disorder, this is going to be the rest of your life,” says Dr. Stuart Gitlow, an addiction specialist in New York City who is past president of the American Society of Addiction Medicine. Chronic illnesses often require medication. Rawson and others point to two drugs in particular that may help break your addiction: buprenorphine and methadone. There is some unwarranted stigma attached to these drugs, along with a belief that “you’re just exchanging one addiction for another,” Kan says. While these medications are actually opioids themselves, they control craving and withdrawal—and help prevent the compulsive and dangerous behavior often associated with addiction. They also reduce your chances of an overdose, Rawson says. And they protect you from other risks that come with opioid addiction, such as exposure to blood-borne infections from sharing needles, including HIV and hepatitis C. Essentially, the medications make you “comfortable enough physically” to confront the issues behind your addiction, from anxiety and depression to post-traumatic stress disorder, Denning says. The federal government agrees. “Abundant scientific data show that long-term use of maintenance medications successfully reduces substance use, risk of relapse and overdose, associated criminal behavior, and transmission of infectious disease, as well as helps patients return to a healthy, functional life,” according to the Surgeon General’s 2016 report on addiction in America. To obtain methadone, you must visit a clinic governed by state and federal rules. “These clinics are not particularly patient-friendly. You have to go every day. You can’t travel,” Denning says. “It takes over your life.” HEALTHLINES c o n t i n u e d

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appointMent Bleeding control basics You don’t need to be a Boy Scout to be ready to act when accidents happen. According to the World Health Organization, uncontrolled bleeding is the leading cause of preventable death among trauma patients. We should all know how to control bleeding until first responders arrive. Enloe hopes to help, with a free two-hour class as part of a national campaign to increase survival rates from bleeding. You’ll learn how to identify life-threatening bleeding and stop it with whatever is available, MacGyver-style. The class requires no medical training and takes place Thursday, April 12, at 6 p.m. in the Planetree Room of the Enloe Conference Center at 1528 Esplanade. More information at enloe.org/events.


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Buprenorphine, on the other hand, can be obtained from doctors, including primary care physicians, who have undergone training and received federal approval. “The beauty of buprenorphine is it can be prescribed like any medication out of a doctor’s office,” Denning says. To find a doctor who prescribes buprenorphine, go to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration website at samhsa.gov and click on the “Find Help & Treatment” link from the home page. There are more than a dozen physicians listed in Chico alone. Though you can receive care from your primary care physician, Gitlow recommends that you also consult with an addiction specialist. In California, find one by visiting the California Society of Addiction Medicine’s website at csam-asam.org and clicking on the “Physician Locator” tab. There are three listed in Chico: Jason Hott, Brandan Stark and Deborah Stewart. Once patients start one of the

medications, it’s not clear how long they should stay on—a question that deserves further research, Rawson says.

About this story:

this story was produced by Kaiser Health news, which publishes california Healthline, an editorially independent service of the california Health care foundation.

“The longer people stay on treatment, the lower the death rate is and the more they’re able to function,” he says. Often patients face pressure from family members, who badger them to get off the medications even though it would be better for them to stay on them, Kan says. “We don’t say to patients who suffer from diabetes … ‘Have you changed your diet enough so you can get off insulin?’” he says. Kan and other addiction specialists generally don’t encourage medication treatment alone, no matter how long you stay on it. Pairing the medication with therapy or other support, including 12-step programs such as Narcotics Anonymous, can reduce relapse rates further, they say. “Twelve-step is something I encourage for everybody. I don’t consider it a treatment, per se. It’s like mutual support,” he says. □

WEEKLY DOSE Coping with chronic pain When you feel pain, whether it’s from a bee sting or a toothache, it’s your body’s way of telling you that something needs immediate attention. Chronic pain, however, is defined as lingering pain that lasts longer than three months. It can affect your everyday life and lead to mental health issues. Work together with your doctor to address the source of the problem and try these tips for dealing with chronic pain: • Deep breathing and meditation can help you relax. • Reduce stress, which can intensify chronic pain. Massage can help. • Release natural endorphins with regular exercise. Find a way to stay active without triggering additional pain. • Cut back on alcohol, drug and tobacco use. Substance abuse affects sleep patterns, which can exacerbate chronic pain. • Track your pain level every day. Rank each day on a scale of 1 to 10 and note what activities make it better or worse. • Eat healthy. A balanced diet will aid diges tion, reduce your risk of heart disease and improve your blood sugar level.

Source: WebMD


GREENWAYS Pebble Beach has reportedly begun better gathering balls sent flying into the waters below, but each year hundreds of thousands of golf balls go missing at the popular course.

land of lost balls A young environmentalist launches study of golf’s effect on our oceans by

Alastair Bland

her snorkel and dives to the bottom of ACarmel Bay, a calm coastal cove several

lex Weber takes a deep breath through

kilometers south of Monterey. Just meters away, atop the small cliffs that drop into the waves, golfers tread on the emerald greens of Pebble Beach Golf Links. The golfers swing their way from hole to hole on the famed golf course. Unfortunately, their aim is rarely perfect. Weber surfaces 45 seconds later and drops nearly a dozen golf balls into a yellow mesh bag held open by her father, Mike, who is also in a wetsuit and snorkeling gear. The pair have been in the water for several hours and have collected more than 1,500 golf balls—the fallout of a sport that has unseen, and probably significant, consequences for the ocean. About 1.2 billion golf balls are manufactured every year, according to a 2017 report in Chemical & Engineering News, and more than half may be lost in the environment. A New York Times story in 2010 reported that an estimated 300 million disappear each year in the United States alone. With many of the planet’s approximately 32,000 golf courses located beside the ocean, countless golf balls find their way into the water, where they sink and accumulate more rapidly than anyone is cleaning them up. Weber, a senior in high school, is doing her best, but is barely putting a dent in the collection of drowned balls. Just two weeks earlier, Weber and her father spent several hours snorkeling in the same cove and cleared the seafloor of about 2,000 balls. Now, the ocean bottom is again awash with golf balls. “Big waves come through and uncover them,” says Weber, who started collecting

golf balls here in 2016. “It can sometimes make what we’re doing feel futile.” Her effort began as a simple volunteer cleanup job but has morphed into a novel research project in which the golf balls are data and Weber is a groundbreaking scientist. To date, she and her helpers have collected more than 20,000 golf balls. Weber keeps the stash at home in buckets and barrels, where the balls are sorted by collection site and graded by level of wear. Number ones, she explains, appear new, still shiny and covered with dimples. Fours are as smooth as ping-pong balls, their outer layers of plastic polished away. The fives are so old their shells have worn away entirely, allowing spaghetti-like rubber to erupt out the sides. To better understand the problem, Weber is collaborating with ecologist Matthew Savoca, a California Sea Grant state fellow who earned his doctorate studying the effects of plastic and marine debris on the ocean. Together, they are writing a paper they hope to have published before the end of the year. Their research, Weber says, is intended to set a baseline understanding of the problem while exploring why the balls gather in certain areas, how long it takes for them to break down, and what it all means for marine life—all topics that nobody else, it seems, has closely explored. Some of this subject matter may be explored in more depth in subsequent studies, Weber says. “But in this first paper,” she explains,

About this story:

This is an abridged version of a story that originally printed in Hakai Magazine (hakaimagazine.com).

“we’re basically just saying there are golf balls in the ocean.” According to a former golf pro at Pebble Beach, that course alone hosts about 62,000 rounds of golf per year, and Weber says caddies working the course have told her that three or four balls are lost per round. Even a conservative estimate would suggest that tens—and perhaps hundreds—of thousands of them reach the ocean. In his 2012 book Sandy Parr at the 19th Hole, author Mohamed Noorani reported that 1 billion golf balls—almost 46 million kilograms, much of it plastic—disappear every year. Some of this material is recovered. A cottage industry, in fact, is based upon collecting and selling lost golf balls. Todd Baker, an Indiana golfer who manufactures wooden Eco Golf Balls that float in water and biodegrade, says entrepreneurial collectors retrieve millions of golf balls from ponds, lakes and rivers each year and sell them to vendors. “But golf balls that go into the ocean are pretty much goners,” he says. They don’t just sit inertly on the seafloor, either. As Weber has documented, they corrode. A standard golf ball weighs about 46 grams, but those she has recovered have lost as much as a third of their mass. That means for every 1,000 submerged golf balls, several kilograms of microplastic are shed into the ocean. Such debris may enter the food chain through creatures such as copepods and anchovies. Plastic tends to attach to a variety of contaminants that may be present in the water, including PCBs, and research has shown these particles can bioaccumulate in aquatic organisms, disrupting behavior and cellular functions.

University of Toronto scientist Chelsea

Rochman studies microplastics, one of the planet’s most concerning but least understood forms of pollution. “It’s ubiquitous now,” she says. “We find microplastic virtually everywhere we sample. It affects wildlife, and it’s in our seafood.” Although a leader in her research field, Rochman has not studied golf ball toxicity, nor has she ever found a golf ball in a trawlnet trash survey—probably, she guesses, because she has not surveyed areas near golf courses. Rochman notes that much microplastic is so degraded that it cannot be traced back to its source. “So it’s really important that people are focusing on the bigger material, because that can influence policy change,” she explains. There’s no question how the golf balls landed in Carmel Bay. “They’re different from other types of plastic pollution in that way—you’ve got a very clear point source,” Savoca says. As another example, participants in the Bering Sea Ice Classic Golf Tournament, an annual event held in western Alaska, play on the frozen surface of the sea, and an online bulletin promoting the event says golf balls used in the competition “have a tendency to roll into cracks in the ice or get lost in snow drifts.” This marine region, Richard Steiner, a retired professor of marine conservation at the University of Alaska, points out, is a summer feeding zone for gray whales. “They scoop up their food from the seafloor,” he says. GREENWAYS CONTiNUED ON pAgE 16 April 12, 2018

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Buy online anytime with a credit card or in person with cash, check or credit card M-F 9am – 5pm at 353 E. Second Street, Downtown Chico.

In fact, golf balls have been found in the stomachs of at least two gray whales found dead in Washington State—one in 2010, the other in 2012—though the balls were not identified as the cause of either death. Golf balls also appear in bird stomachs on occasion— something Steiner says he has seen scores of times while inspecting decayed albatross carcasses in the northwestern Hawaiian Islands. Golf balls may even find their way into birds’ reproductive tracts—in one documented case, a golf ball encased in shell was laid by a Canada goose. “I’m very frustrated at the lack of enforcement as it clearly contributes long-lived plastic pollution to the oceans,” Steiner says. In Monterey, officials have not bounced into action either. Scott Kathey, the federal regulatory coordinator for the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary—the area of water that abuts Pebble Beach Golf Links—says his agency learned of Weber’s discovery in September 2016 and has since been monitoring the situation. No action has been taken to stifle the

flow of golf balls from the fairway into the water, though Kathey says, “We are reviewing potential mitigation measures.” He also notes that the resort is beginning regular sweeps of the shoreline and is ramping up efforts to reduce the number of golf balls entering the ocean. Pebble Beach Resorts, however, did not reply to requests for comment. Weber says she ultimately hopes her work will act as “a catalyst for not only a policy change but a mindset change in the golf community.” To spark these shifts, she continues to collect the white plastic data key to her research. “There’s an aggregation over here!” her father calls, pointing downward while treading water. Weber swims over and dives. A sandy trough about three meters wide and flanked by two lines of craggy rock is filled with hundreds of golf balls. Weber pauses. As a young scientist, she is driven, focused and methodical—but for just a moment, with golf balls in every direction, she doesn’t know where to begin. □

ECO EVENT

Chico is one of the best bike towns in the U.S. and locals and students alike are peddling where they need to go more than ever. Our annual celebration of local bicycle culture is tied with Chico Velo’s Wildflower Century ride, which attracts over 4,000 cyclists to our town. Include your business in this extremely popular issue that will not only reach our nearly 118,000 regular readers, but also the 4,000 Wildflower visitors too!

ON STANDS APRIL 26 For more information, call an advertising representative today at (530) 894-2300

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Climate aCtivist XiuhtezCatl martinez Chico State’s institute for sustainable Development hosts Xiuhtezcatl martinez, who will give a presentation on how we can all contribute to positive environmental change. Martinez is an outspoken advocate, hip-hop artist, author and the youth director of Earth Guardians, a group calling attention to our escalating climate catastrophe. Martinez is a lead plaintiff in the landmark youth-led lawsuit against the U.S. government alleging its failure to protect the Earth’s atmosphere for future generations. The april 16 event begins at 3 p.m. and advanced registration is required. Donations are encouraged. More information at csuchico.edu/sustainable future/events and earthguardians.org


EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS photo By Meredith J. cooper

15 MINUTES

THE GOODS

garden party

Blast from the past

Like many others, Boris and Lory Breckenridge were tired of being caught up in the rat race in the Bay Area, prompting them to look for somewhere nicer to live. Lory’s grandparents were walnut farmers in Vina, so she was familiar with Chico, and when the couple visited, they knew they’d found their new home. One of their favorite places to spend time in the Bay was a local nursery that had a coffee cart. Aiming to replicate that experience, they recently opened Mockingbyrd Coffee Co.—the name is an homage to Charles Bukowski, Boris says— at Magnolia Gift & Garden (1367 East Ave.). During a recent visit, Boris—who also books music at the Naked Lounge and Tender Loving Coffee—took a few minutes to talk about the new business and what he hopes it will bring to Chico.

Tell me about your cafe. Everything is organic and fairtrade. I roast all of my own coffee beans. And all of our baked goodies are home-baked. We are just very DIY.

This is an unusual place to find a coffee cart. Why Magnolia Gift & Garden? We were inspired by this place called Flowerland in Albany— they’re a nursery. We wanted to bring that same archetype here. This was by far our favorite nursery in town, and we approached them and asked if

we could fill a spot for them and hopefully enhance the experience here. We want people to kind of unwind here. We want to have real interactions, conversations. I didn’t want to just be a place where people grab a cup of coffee and go. Of course, we’re here if people want that. But I want to make connections with people. We have [tables and chairs]—we want people to come out and enjoy the garden. I tell everyone we have the best view in Chico. We have dog treats—we’re petfriendly.

French cafe in Danville and I’m sort of a Francophile at heart. Romantically, I love what they do—it’s moreso with purpose than Westerners. They have a love for food. There’s little pretense behind it all.

How did you learn to roast coffee beans and make drinks?

You also book music in town?

I was actually what they call a barista before it was ever called that, about 20 years back. That’s actually where I met my wife was at a cafe. So, again, we made a certain connection over coffee so we’re hoping to expand on that. I worked at a

Why the big move? We were ready to scale back a little and simplify things. We don’t have tremendous overhead, it’s just my wife and I doing everything. We don’t plan to expand or even have employees. We just want to keep the integrity of our product really high. Yeah, I’m just trying to multitask and hopefully enhance the cultural experience in Chico. We just love the collaborative atmosphere here, versus the combative way of the Bay Area. —MeReDiTH J. CooPeR m e re d i t h c @new srev i ew. c o m

by

Meredith J. Cooper meredithc@newsreview.com

As many may have heard by now—and many surely have, as demonstrated by the crowd I witnessed earlier this week—House of Rice is preparing to permanently shut its doors. In speaking with owner Harold Park, his wide smile at the mention of closing indicates he’s ready for change. “After we close May 31, we will go on a worldwide tour,” he said, referring to himself and wife, Catherine. “We’ve been open 44 years. That’s 10 hours a day, seven days a week. I’m 79 years old—I decided to quit before my 80s.” House of Rice is one of those unique Chico spots, filled with beautiful Asian artwork and furniture, plus a variety of foodstuffs unavailable almost anywhere else, cooking and dining utensils and knickknacks of all stripes. There’s also a wall filled with Harold’s photography. After a 45-day cruise around the world, Harold said, Catherine plans to spend some time learning the art of flower arrangement. For his part, he hopes to thrust himself fully into his photography and even has plans to compile a book of photographs of Chico. I, for one, will miss the quirky little shop, which has resided at 338 Broadway for 28 years. Upon mentioning the CN&R, Harold laughed—“I was the CN&R’s first customer!” he said. The store will be open until May 31.

Bigger picture House of Rice isn’t the only business departing the Morehead Building. I received an email last week from Janet Lombardi Blixt, whose Chico Art School & Gallery has resided on the second floor for nine years. “Wayne Cook is expanding the Hotel Diamond and my upstairs rental place is part of his expansion plans so I had to move,” she told me. The good news: She’s relocated to a super cute house just a few blocks away, at 261 E. Third St. She held her first class there Monday (April 9). Of course, I was familiar with Cook’s expansion and renovation plans—he laid them out years ago, but they are just now coming to fruition. He brought them before the city’s Architectural Review and Historic Preservation Board last week and they were approved, according to Associate Planner Kimber Gutierrez. The plans include a full façade remodel of the Morehead Building to its original state, including an expansion of the Hotel Diamond into that building’s second floor. Schematics show House of Rice becoming a restaurant with an outdoor patio that will be shared with The Rawbar (eliminating two parking spaces on Broadway). The remaining first-floor tenants—Red Fly and 5th Street Clothing Co.—appear unaffected (and when I popped in to chat, employees at both said they planned to remain in place).

An artist’s rendering of the remodeled Morehead Building.

april 12, 2018

  CN&R 

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‘ENVIRONMENTAL CATASTROPHE’ BY JULIE CART

D

ave Kinateder has a keen eye for trees. But when Kinateder, a fire ecologist in the Plumas National Forest, surveys a hillside lush with pines, he doesn’t see abundance or the glory of nature’s bounty. He sees a disaster-in-waiting. “It’s a ticking time bomb,” he said, gazing across the dense, green carpet of trees near Quincy, a small community high in the northern Sierra Nevada.

Last year’s wildfires, the worst in modern California history, have put a microscope on the forests that cover a third of the state—in particular, on managing these wooded lands in ways that would reduce the frequency and intensity of such blazes. California is grappling with the counterintuitive dilemma of too many trees, packed too closely together, robbed of the space they need to thrive—and with how to clear out more than 100 million dead trees, felled by drought or insects, that provide tinder for the next infernos. Curing these unhealthy forests is both difficult and expensive, and as with human health, prevention is far less costly than treatment. But these days the state firefighting agency, Cal Fire, spends the bulk of its

resources battling fires rather than practicing preventive measures. At stake is nothing less than life, property, air quality and the lands that hold most of California’s water. A state commission recently prescribed radical changes to address what it terms the “neglect” of California’s largest forests. A 19th century California forest would

have held fewer than 50 trees an acre. Today, the state’s forests have grown to an unnatural 300 to 500 trees an acre, or more. That doesn’t count the 2 million droughtstressed trees a month lost to bark beetles that have killed entire stands. Gov. Jerry Brown, who in 2014 declared tree mortality a state of emergency, said in

his January State of the State address that California needs to manage its forests more intelligently. He vowed to convene a task force “to review thoroughly the way our forests are managed and suggest ways to reduce the threat of devastating fires.” California has dozens of agencies attacking the problem but still cannot keep up with the work. Crews around the state have been busy clearing trees as fast as funding allows. This wielding of chainsaws they call “whacking and stacking” leaves massive wood piles along highways in some areas. But it amounts to no more than triage: Cal Fire removes trees on fewer than 40,000 acres a year, far short of its goal of clearing a half-million acres annually. Kinateder estimates that removing trees

About this story:

It was produced by Cal Matters, an independent public journalism venture covering California state politics and government. Learn more at calmatters.org.

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Can California play catch-up on forest management to prevent future disastrous wildfires?

in this way costs as much as $1,400 an acre. By comparison, controlled burns—those set by fire managers to remove vegetation from forests—is a bargain at less than $150 an acre. Fighting a wildfire comes in at just over $800 an acre, according to the report. Far from the forest floor, California officials are wrestling with the financial and environmental cost of the state’s forest practices. At a hearing in March in Sacramento, legislators listened to lurid descriptions of raging fire and wrenching stories of human misery recounted by a stream of state and local officials: flames rearing up like an enormous beast, residents running for their lives, neighborhoods leveled, fire burning so hot and for so long that soils were rendered sterile. A portion of the proceedings focused on

a recent report about wildfires and forest health from the Little Hoover Commission, an independent state oversight agency that gave its findings to the governor and Legislature in February. The document pulled no punches, calling the state of the Sierra Nevada’s forests “an unprecedented environmental catastrophe.” It cited a century of “mismanaging” the 10 million wooded acres in the Sierra, calling out state and federal firefighting agencies for their longstanding policy of aggressively putting out all fires rather than letting those that can safely burn do so, thereby thinning the choked woodlands. Helge Eng, deputy director of Cal Fire, acknowledged the report was “spot on” in its assessment of the state of the Sierra, adding

that the analysis “did an especially good job of recognizing that there are no easy, black-andwhite answers to the problems we are facing.” Cal Fire boasts that it stops 95 percent of

fires at 10 acres or less, saving lives, property and entire forests from conflagration. Fire experts argue that a negative could be turned into a positive if fire bosses let them burn while still steering them away from people and structures and toward overgrown wildlands in need of clearing. That’s an approach sometimes used by the National Park Service, but it’s difficult to

A 19th century California forest would have held fewer than 50 trees an acre. Today, the state’s forests have grown to an unnatural 300 to 500 trees an acre, or more.

defend when forests are ablaze, frightening the public and elected officials alike. Still, the report said, “it is not enough for agency leaders, scientists and advocates to recognize the benefits of fire as a tool; the bureaucracy of the state government and public sentiment as a whole must undergo a culture shift to embrace fire as a tool for forest health.” Eng said Cal Fire is considering adopting the managed-burn approach, when appropriate, but noted that federal firefighters are often working in wild settings, away from development. “Cal Fire’s mission is different; we protect life and property” in areas that may be WILDFIRE C O N T I N U E D

O N PA G E 2 0

Helge Eng, deputy director of Cal Fire, says his agency is far from reaching its goal of clearing a half-million acres per year. PHOTO COURTESY OF CA.GOV

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WILDFIRE c o n t i n u e d

f r o m pA g e 1 9

densely populated, Eng said in a written response to questions. “There is most often not an opportunity to let a fire burn. The risk to human life is just too great.” The report also detailed a public safety threat from 129 million dead trees, the crushing cost—up to $1,000 a tree—to private property owners to have trees removed from their land and the enormous burden on rural governments to both recover from fire and prepare their forests to mitigate the intensity of the next one. In no uncertain terms, the commission prescribed dramatically ramping up tree-thinning projects and, as awful as the optics are, creating and controlling some fires to achieve the same result. Eng agreed that the state firefighting agency was far from achieving its “aspirational” goal of clearing a half-million acres of land each year, citing such impediments as “the logistics of capacity of staff and equipment and environmental compliance,” among other factors. In a moment notable for its rarity in Sacramento, there was bipartisan agreement in the hearing room this month about the problem, its scope and the appropriate measures to deal with it. Focus more intensely on the problem, they agreed, and throw money at it. The state spent $900 million fighting fires last year. Just one of those late-season blazes caused more than $9 billion in reported property damage. “We’ve made mistakes, and we’ve created systems that are unwieldy …. “It’s all of our fault,” Jim Branham, executive officer of the Sierra Nevada

california’s troubled forests

33 million

number of forested acres in california

129 million

number of dead trees in california

500,000

number of acres cal fire aspires to clear each year

40,000

number of acres cal fire does clear each year Source: Little Hoover Commission report on   forest management in California, February 2018

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Moreover, when trees die, they stop absorbing carbon from the atmosphere. The state depends on that critical service to help reduce greenhouse gases. Research suggests that severely burned areas regrow with shrubs or grasses, plants that store about 10 percent less carbon than trees do. John Moorlach, a Republican state senator

Jim Branham, executive officer of the Sierra Nevada  Conservancy, says the state’s forests have become unwieldy. photo courtesy of cA.gov

Conservancy, a state agency, told CALmatters. “Money alone won’t solve it, but we won’t solve it without money, either.” The mosaic of land ownership in California

means the state owns only 2 percent of the forests but has legal responsibility over much more: 31 million acres, including land in rural counties. Cal Fire received more than $200 million for forest health projects last year and has proposed an additional $160 million for the next fiscal year. Those sums are on top of the agency’s current $2.7 billion budget. Cal Fire, in turn, doles out millions of those dollars in grants to local governments and community groups to do some thinning themselves, and it teams up with the federal Forest Service to tackle clearing projects. The work to improve forest health dovetails with other state priorities—protecting water sources and reducing greenhouse-gas emissions. The Sierra Nevada range is the headwaters for 60 percent of California’s developed water supply. Burned, denuded hillsides don’t store water efficiently when it rains. Sediment cascades downhill, filling streams, affecting water quality and loading up reservoirs, reducing their storage capacity. The carbon equation is equally direct: When trees burn or decay, they release greenhouse gases. The 2013 Rim Fire near Yosemite National Park produced emissions equal to those of 2.3 million cars in a year. Prescribed burns emit less carbon than higher-intensity fires, because managed fire is aimed at smaller trees and shrubs. Cleared forest land may still ignite, but it will burn with less intensity and fewer emissions.

from Costa Mesa, suggests the Democratic governor, a champion of the fight against climate change, has a “gigantic blind spot” when it comes to reducing carbon emissions. Moorlach said in an interview that Brown’s emphasis on electric cars, for example, ignores the role of fire in California’s greenhouse gas inventory. “We’re being absolute phonies about climate change if we are not dealing with the real driver of greenhouse gas; that’s these wildfires,” said Moorlach. He has proposed that the state dedicate 25 percent of the revenue from its cap and trade greenhousegas-reduction system to help counties’ fire mitigation efforts. Counties would welcome the help. Randy Hanvelt, a supervisor in Tuolumne County, said that where forest management is concerned, there’s a “leadership problem.” “Talk is cheap,” he said. “We have got ourselves a giant, colossal mess. This is a war of sorts. Time is against us. Every available tool has to be applied.” One such tool is carefully designed burns. But the meticulous planning necessary can take two to three years, and the burns require favorable weather, a permit from the local air district and, crucially, buy-in from local communities that must first be educated about the benefits. And controlled doesn’t mean risk-free. “Politically, you have to have the ability to make mistakes and move on,” he said. Nick Bunch, who plans thinning projects for the Plumas National Forest, pointed to a partly cleared hillside outside of Quincy where one of his extensively planned prescribed burns went awry, undone by a shift in the wind. “We were about an hour into the burn and the smoke started going into town,” Bunch said, shaking his head at the memory. Even though the burn was going as planned, the smoke was not acceptable to nearby residents, who protested to fire officials. “Phones started ringing. Calls were made, and we shut it down.” Another method is used in Florida, which

trains and certifies private property owners to burn their overgrown land and provides limited liability coverage in some cases. Florida cleared 2.1 million acres this way last year. Scott Stephens, who heads a wildland fire research lab at UC Berkeley, said the widespread adoption of the policy has educated residents on both its benefits and risks. Back in Plumas County, a hulking building in a parking lot outside a community

the cost of fires combAt or prevention?

$800

Average cost per acre to fight a california fire

$150

Average cost per acre to clear a california forest by controlled burn

$1,400*

cost per acre to thin a california forest of undesired trees *Estimate from fire ecologist Dave Kinateder

health complex may offer the final piece of the forest-health puzzle: creating a market for trees removed from California’s forests. Part of a project managed by the Sierra Institute for Community and Environment, the unremarkable square structure shows a potential use for California trees. The building is the state’s first to be fully constructed from crosslaminated timber—layers of wood pressed together to make thick sheets and posts— equal to or greater than the strength of steel. In addition, the $2.3 million facility will house a large boiler to provide heat for the health center by consuming 500 tons of local wood chips a year. The project is the brainchild of the institute, which envisions it as a way to boost the economies of forest communities. It’s the kind of innovation the governor and Legislature hoped to promote by establishing a Wood Products Working Group to develop commercial uses for the piles of trees beside the state’s roads. There’s little left in California today of the early 20th century’s timber cutters, sawmills and biomass industry. If the state follows the Little Hoover Commission’s recommendations and accelerates forest thinning, an entire segment of state industry would need to be rejuvenated. Meanwhile, officials emphasize the need to educate Californians about the role of forests in the ecosystem. “If you want people to care about something, they have to understand why it matters,” said Pedro Nava, chairman of the Little Hoover Commission. “They need to understand the deep connection between the health of our state and the state of our forests.” Branham, of the Sierra Nevada Conservancy, said that won’t be easy. “Some of our messages are counterintuitive: We must cut down healthy living trees to save the forest,” he noted. “It’s a challenge.” Ω


Sex without consent is a crime. Being forced into any unwanted sexual situation can do lasting emotional damage.

BUSINESS OFFICES HOURS: Monday – Friday (excluding Holiday) 10a-6pm Butte/Glenn: 530-891-1331 or 877-452-9588 @ 2889 Cohasset Road, Suite 2 Chico, CA 95973 Tehama: 530-529-3980 Calling from Corning: 530-824-3980 @ 725 Pine Street, Red Bluff, CA 96080

april 12, 2018

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Arts &Culture All genres are invited to the stage with jazz quintet Ryan Keberle (center) and Catharsis. pHoTo by JoHn rogers

THIS WEEK

structured improv

12

THU Trombonist takes classical approach to jazz

Penergy erful is the physical sensation of sonic moving through space, says Ryan art of what makes live music so pow-

Keberle. When he pushes air through his trombone, he’s creating sound waves that lisby teners can feel resonatHoward ing inside themselves. Hardee “Sound moves our physical bodies,” Preview: Keberle said. “When Chico performances you go see a jazz perand Uncle Dads art formance, there’s some Collective present: pretty sophisticated ryan Keberle and Catharsis sunday, sonic resonance happenapril 15, 7:30 p.m. ing on stage that people Tickets: $22 in the audience can feel. ($10 students) They may not be aware Zingg Recital Hall of it, but it changes the Chico state way they experience 898-6333 the music and it’s not www.chico something you can get performances.com from a record.” As something of a rock star trombonist and composer out of New York City, Keberle tends to think deeply about music in general and jazz in particular. In addition to sound waves, he’s fascinated by the way jazz has evolved since its inception in the speakeasies of New Orleans, Chicago and New York. Whereas musicians used to pick it up by listening to records, sharing handwritten sheet music or simply jamming together, it’s become a far more

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april 12, 2018

academic discipline over the years. “Now, we have two generations of musicians who learned jazz in conservatories and institutions,” he said. “That academic setting has played a profound role in influencing the direction jazz has taken, because most of these conservatories also teach classical music. It’s only natural that you’d have musicians overlapping and participating in both genres.” Speaking to the CN&R from his lakeside cabin in the Catskill Mountains in New York, Keberle said his flagship ensemble, Catharsis, merges the two art forms in a subtle way. Listeners probably won’t hear much classical-sounding stuff during the quintet’s set at Chico State’s Zingg Recital Hall (Sunday, April 15), which will touch on South American folk and indie-rock, as well as traditional jazz. But Keberle approaches the arrangements with the mindset of a classical composer, meticulously notating each musician’s parts. Keberle was raised in a musical family and was classically trained from an early age. Over the years, he’s had various stints in rock, folk, funk, Latin and hip-hop groups, and he’s performed with musicians ranging from David Bowie to Alicia Keys. “You name it, I’ve had the opportunity to play just about every style of music that exists in New York City,” he said, “and that’s been hugely influential in very

deep and real ways, ways that are hard to describe or measure. Music is a part of me.” As a composer, Keberle places great emphasis on melodic invention, using his deeply ingrained musical instincts as a guide. Though the trombone is his performance instrument of choice, the piano is his main compositional tool. He said it’s a subconscious process, something akin to speaking a native language. “For me, playing in all these different musical arenas has been like living in many different foreign countries,” he said. “When I’m composing, I’m drawing from all of the musical languages I have inside of me. I’m generally improvising and trying to get in a creative state of mind where I can kind of speak music, hopefully uninhibited by outside distractions and self-critique.” After playing something he likes, he’ll whip out his smartphone and record the phrase or progression, and when it’s time to make a record, he’ll revisit those captured musical moments to flesh them out in a more structured way. “Really, I’m trying to balance that large-ensemble mentality of notating everything and being specific about what I want my musicians to play with the small-group mentality of spontaneity and letting each musician’s personality shine through,” he said. “It’s about balancing those two worlds, because they both have so much to give an audience.” □

Special Events THE BANFF MOUNTAIN FILM FESTIVAL WORLD TOUR: Adventure Outings and Chico Performances bring the outdoors into Laxson with two nights of adventure films curated by the Banff Center. Feature films showcase the best in mountain culture and adrenaline sports from around the world. Thu, 4/12, 7:30pm. $10-$17. Laxson Auditorium, 400 W. First Street. 530898-6333. csuchico.edu

Theater BRIGHTON BEACH MEMOIRS: Hysterical and touching, Neil Simon’s semi-autobiographical comedy documents teenage life, youthful infatuation and baseball during the Great Depression in Brooklyn. Thu, 4/12, 7:30pm. $10-$20. Theatre On The Ridge, 3735 Neal Road, Paradise. 530-877-5760. totr.org

OLLI’S APRIL FOOLS & FOLLIES: Osher Lifelong Learning Institute’s theater festival returns with plays written, directed and performed by Chico OLLI members. Enjoy three short comedies, two old-timey radio dramas and a 40-minute, one-act comedy/thriller. Thu, 4/12, 7:30pm. $10. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. rce.csuchico.edu/osher

OUR TOWN: Students from Inspire School of Arts and Sciences perform Thornton Wilder’s Pulitzer-winning play. Narrated by the nameless Stage Manager, this hard-hitting drama finds two young lovers grappling with lost potential, the sacrifices one makes for love and the search for beauty. Thu, 4/12, 7pm. $10-$16. California Regional Theater, 3851 Morrow Lane, Ste. 7. inspirecusd.org

MarCH For sCienCe Saturday, April 14 Chico State

see saTUrDay, SPECIAL EVENTS


FINE ARTS ON NEXT pAGE NOISES OFF

Through April 29 Chico Theater Company SEE FRIDAY-SUNDAY, THEATER

WITH A LITTLE HELP FROM OUR FRIENDS: Jazz

13

FRI

Special Events BACKYARD BEEKEEPING: Introductory class covers honey bee biology, the inner workings of the hive and the tools required for beekeeping. Fri, 4/13, 5:30pm. $40. TJ Farms, 3600 Chico Ave. jeffersonbeeco.com

THE BANFF MOUNTAIN FILM FESTIVAL WORLD TOUR: See Thursday. Fri, 4/13, 7:30pm. $10-$17. Laxson Auditorium, 400 W. First Street.

PARADISE DANCERS: Troupe’s 16th annual Rhythm ’n Motion exhibition features student and youth dancers. Fri, 4/13, 7pm. $10-$15. Paradise Performing Arts Center, 777 Nunneley Road, Paradise. paradise performingarts.com

TRAXXAS MONSTER TRUCK TOUR: Ticket price pays for the whole seat, but you’ll only need the edge! Fri, 4/13, 7:30pm. $10-$25. Silver Dollar Fairgrounds, 2357 Fair St. monstertruck tour.com

Theater BRIGHTON BEACH MEMOIRS: See Thursday. Fri, 4/13, 7:30pm. $10-$20. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Road, Paradise. 530-877-5760. totr.org

MRS. WARREN’S PROFESSION: George Bernard Shaw’s witty and provocative play tells of a confrontation that pits mother and daughter against each other. Modern, Cambridge-educated Vivie hasn’t seen her

BANFF MOUNTAIN FIlM FESTIVAl

Thursday & Friday, April 12 & 13 Laxson Auditorium SEE THURSDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS

mother, Kitty, in years. When her mother makes a surprise visit, Vivie discovers her mom is not the woman she thought she knew and a battle of wills ensues. Fri, 4/13, 6:30pm. $12. Birdcage Theatre, 1740 Bird St., Oroville. birdcagetheatre.org

NOISES OFF: Possibly the best farce ever written, this hilarious romp follows the backstage happenings and performances of a play dubbed Nothing’s On. Featuring slamming doors, falling trousers and flying sardines, Noises Off is a manic menagerie of itinerant actors who attempt to stitch together a sex comedy that’s sure to flop. Fri, 4/13, 7:30pm. $14-$18. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. 530-8943282. chicotheatercompany.com

OLLI’S APRIL FOOLS & FOLLIES: See Thursday. Fri, 4/13, 7:30pm. $10. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. 8313451940. rce.csuchico.edu/osher

OUR TOWN: See Thursday. Fri, 4/13, 7pm. $10-$16. California Regional Theater, 3851 Morrow Lane, Ste. 7. inspirecusd.org

14

SAT

Special Events A NIGHT IN CASABLANCA: Dinner and auction to support CASA of Butte County, who advocate for abused and neglected children. Sat 4/14, 6pm. $75. The Palms, 2947 Nord Ave. 530-2473372. nvcss.org

BLOCK PARTY WITH A PURPOSE: Communitysupported cleanup to bring neighbors together and make a positive difference in our town and waterways. Sat 4/14, 9am. Corner of Bidwell and Nord avenues (next to Thai Express), Chico. 530-891-6424. becnet.org

KING OF THE CAGE: MMA dudes beat the living crap out of each other. Sat 4/14, 7pm. $50$80. Gold Country Casino & Hotel, 4020 Olive Highway, Oroville. featherfallscasino.com

MARCH FOR SCIENCE: It’s absurd that we need to defend science, yet here we are. If your life has been saved by medicine, if you’ve breathed clean air or if you’ve used the Internet, you know science is real. Stand up for a fact-based reality! The peaceful, nonpartisan event begins at Trinity Commons with activities and speeches, followed by a march through downtown. Sat 4/14, 10am. Chico State, 400 W. First St. 925-8993598. marchforsciencechico.com

PARADISE COOK-OFF: Master and amateur chefs cook up their best. Sample dishes, have some drinks from the cash bar and enjoy live entertainment. Local celebrities will judge the winners and you can vote for the people’s choice award. Sat 4/14, 4pm. $15-$50. Paradise Veterans Hall, 6550 Skyway Road, Paradise. 530-899-0335. bgcnv.org

PARADISE DANCERS: See Friday. Sat 4/14, 2pm & 7pm. $10-$15. Paradise Performing Arts Center, 777 Nunneley Road, Paradise. paradiseperformingarts.com

RUMMAGE SALE: Proceeds donated to Butte Humane Society. Sat 4/14. Members 1st Credit Union, 550 Salem St.

TRANS ENDING OPPRESSION: Fifth annual Trans Conference features speakers, workshops and a panel dedicated to celebrating and honoring the diverse identities and experiences of trans individuals. Anyone with a desire to learn and better our community is welcome. Sat 4/14. Free. AS Gender & Sexuality Equity Center, Chico State, BMU 004. 530-898-5724.

X-Press celebrates its 10-year anniversary of their performance at the Telluride Jazz Festival. Alumni of the group and special guests will share the stage during this reunion performance. Sat, 4/14, 7:30pm. $6-$15. Harlen Adams Theatre, Chico State, PAC 144. 530-898-5739. schoolofthearts-csuchico.com

Theater BRIGHTON BEACH MEMOIRS: See Thursday. Sat, 4/14, 7:30pm. $10-$20. Theatre On The Ridge, 3735 Neal Rd, Paradise. 530-877-5760. totr.org

MRS. WARRENS PROFESSION: See Friday. Sat, 4/14, 6:30pm. $12. Birdcage Theatre, 1740 Bird St., Oroville. birdcagetheatre.org

NOISES OFF: See Friday. Sat, 4/14, 7:30pm. $14$18. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. (530) 894-3282. chicotheater company.com

OLLI’S APRIL FOOLS & FOLLIES: See Thursday. Sat, 4/14, 7:30pm. $10. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. 8313451940. rce.csuchico.edu/osher

OUR TOWN: See Thursday. Sat, 4/14, 7pm. $10$16. California Regional Theater, 3851 Morrow Lane, Ste. 7. inspirecusd.org

15

SUN

Special Events BIRDS & TREES WALK: Altacal Audubon Society leads a 3-mile intermediate hike along Butte Creek. Bring sturdy shoes or boots, water and snacks for a three-hour hike. Sun, 4/15, 8am. Butte Creek Canyon Ecological Reserve, 1182 Humbug Road.

CHICO BREAD FESTIVAL: Meet local bakers, get elbow-deep in dough, participate in workshops, sample food and much more. Proceeds benefit the Chico Children’s Museum. Sun, 4/15, 11am. Tin Roof Bakery, 627 Broadway St. chicobreadguild.com

COMMUNITY NETWORKING: Live music, speakers, drum circle, potluck and networking to

help strengthen our community. Sun, 4/15, 3pm. Free. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St. thesourcedirectory.org

LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS WINE TASTING: Fortyfifth annual benefit and longest-running community event of its kind, the League offers a spread of delicious appetizers to complement more than 100 wine varietals and brews from 35 wineries and breweries. Sun, 4/15, 4pm. $40-$45. Lakeside Pavilion, 2565 California Park Drive, 530-8282226. lwvbuttecounty.org

Music CHICO IDOL: Finalists perform in Children’s Choir of Chico’s singing contest. Sun, 4/15, 4pm. $10. St. John’s Episcopal Church, Browne Hall, 2341 Floral Ave. 530-342-2775. childrenschoirofchico.org

IAN ETHAN CASE: Genre-hopping fingerstyle player performs on a double-neck, 18-string guitar. Super impressive and talented musician. Sun, 4/15, 7pm. $15. Norton Buffalo Hall, 5704 Chapel Drive, Paradise. nortonbuffalohall.com

MARK O’CONNOR: Spectacular fiddler Mark O›Connor brings his progressive folk/blue-

grass outfit to Sierra Nevada. Sun, 4/15, 7:30pm. $35-$57. Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St. sierranevada.com

THIS WEEK CONTINUED ON pAGE 24

TRAXXAS MONSTER TRUCK TOUR: See Friday. Sat 4/14, 7:30pm. $10-$25. Silver Dollar Fairgrounds, 2357 Fair St. monstertruck tour.com

WALK4WATER: Tenth annual event begins with walkers carrying empty buckets. During the 2K or 5K, they’ll pass by educational stations to learn what it would be like to gather water in a developing country and explore water conservation. At the midpoint, walkers will fill their buckets to carry the remainder of the walk. Sat 4/14, 8:30am. $10-$20. Bidwell Park, 965 Fir St. 530-342-5746. btg4water.org

Music DREAM BIG!: Youth music festival and fundraiser to benefit participating Butte County school music programs. Sat, 4/14, 3pm. $10. Oroville State Theatre, 1489 Myers St., Oroville.

FREE lISTINGS! Post your event for free online at www.newsreview.com/calendar, or email the CN&R calendar editor at cnrcalendar@newsreview.com. Deadline for print listings is Wednesday, 5 p.m., one week prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

EDITOR’S PICK

COME HOME Legendary fiddle player Mark O’Connor keeps his home close at hand. That’s easy when your band includes your own talented family. O’Connor’s current lineup includes his wife, Maggie, son Forrest and daughter-in-law Kate Lee, all stellar players in The O’Connor Band. O’Connor was a fiddle, guitar and mandolin champion in his teens and has since won three Grammy awards, most recently for his album Coming Home, and was named Musician of the Year by the Country Music Association six years in a row. You can expect a memorable performance of cutting-edge Americana when the family hits the Big Room stage on Sunday, April 15.

ApRIl 12, 2018

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Now Serving Lunch Monday – Friday 11am – 2pm

Featuring Sandwiches, Wraps, and Salads

6am – 5pm weekdays 7am – 2pm weekends • Drive Thru • Dog friendly patio 1288 E. 1st AVE Chico • 530-809-9338 • coffeeranchchico.com

THIS WEEK cONTiNUED frOM pagE 23

FINE ARTS

RYAN KEBERLE & CATHARSIS: Keberle’s group Catharsis combines elements of chamber music, South American folk and indie rock within a traditional jazz framework. Opening set from Shigemi Minetaka’s trio. Sun, 4/15, 7:30pm. $10$22. Zingg Recital Hall, Chico State, ARTS 279. 530-898-6333.

Theater BRIGHTON BEACH MEMOIRS: See Thursday. Sun, 4/15, 2pm. $10-$20. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Road, Paradise. 530-877-5760. totr.org

MRS. WARRENS PROFESSION: See Friday. Sun, 4/15, 1pm. $12. Birdcage Theatre, 1740 Bird St., Oroville. birdcagetheatre.org

NOISES OFF: See Friday. Sun, 4/15, 2pm. $14$18. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. (530) 894-3282. chicotheatercompany.com

C r av i n g s o m e t h i n g m o r e ?

OLLI’S APRIL FOOLS & FOLLIES: See Thursday. Sun, 4/15, 2pm. $10. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. 831-345-1940. rce.csuchico.edu/osher

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C H I CO P E R F O R M A N C E S

2018 Spring Events

16

MON

Special Events ENLOE BLOOD DRIVE: Give blood! To make an appointment, please go to bloodsource. com/drives and use location code H004. Closed for lunch from 2:30pm3:30pm. Mon, 4/16, 11:30am. Enloe Conference Center, 1528 Esplanade.

SASHA PIMENTEL: Critically acclaimed poet reads selections from her latest book For Want of Water. Mon, 4/16, 7:30pm. Zingg Recital Hall, Chico State, ARTS 279.

XIUHTEZCATL MARTINEZ: Indigenous climate activist gives presentation on the Roots of Revolution. Martinez’s group Earth Guardians is suing the federal government for the right to clean air, clean water and a healthy future. Mon, 4/16, 3pm. Bell Memorial Union, Chico State.

17

TUE

Music THE BANFF MOUNTAIN FILM FESTIVAL

A NIGHT OF SOUTHERN GOSPEL MUSIC: Tue, 4/17, 6:30pm. Free. Oroville State Theatre, 1489 Myers St., Oroville.

APRIL 12/13

REBIRTH BRASS BAND: Founded in ’83, the

THE BANFF MOUNTAIN FILM FESTIVAL WORLD TOUR

15

RYAN KEBERLE AND CATHARSIS

22

AIDA: SAN FRANCISCO OPERA

27

BROADWAY BOOGIE

MAY 6 RYAN KEBERLE

ST. LAWRENCE STRING QUARTET

TICKETS NOW ON SALE

MORE INFO AT: WWW.CHICOPERFORMANCES.COM 898-6333

24

CN&R

april 12, 2018

brass band’s roots go back over a century to the marching bands that inspired the invention of jazz. Expect a raucous, funky and deeply authentic concert from these second line masters. Tue, 4/17, 8pm. $15. Lost on Main, 319 Main St. lostonmainchico.com

18

WED

Special Events THANKS FOR THE MEMORIES—THE AGING BRAIN: Jonathan Day, Ph.D. discusses how our memories are affected by age. In conjunction with the Brain exhibit at Gateway Science Museum. Wed, 4/18, 7:30pm. Free. Gateway Science Museum, 625 Esplanade.

fOr MOrE MUSIC, sEE NIGHTLIFE ON pagE 28

Art B-SO GALLERY: David Barta, artist’s 10-10-20 show. Through 4/13. Also, Mercedez Matta’s BFA exhibition. 4/16-4/27. Free. Chico State, Ayres Hall, Room 105.

faDED glOrY

Reception Friday, April 13, Shows through May 31 Satori Hair Salon sEE ART

CENTENNIAL CULTURAL CENTER: Water Reflections, juried show from the Artists of River Town. Through 4/27. 1931 Arlin Rhine Memorial Drive, Oroville.

CHICO ART CENTER: Creative Fusion, exceptional student works features fresh twists on traditional assignments and explorations in digital media. Through 4/27. Free. 450 Orange St. chicoartcenter.com

IDEA FAB LABS CHICO: Lenses, Max Kokinakes’s works combine woodworking, 3D modeling and graffiti art. Free. Bar proceeds benefit a STEM scholarship fund. Saturday, 4/14, 3-6pm. 603 Orange St. ideafablabs.com

JAMES SNIDLE FINE ARTS GALLERY: Michael Bishop, latest sculptures in metals and Czechoslovakian glass, along with bold prints made on industrial Turkish felt. Cool stuff. Through 4/28. Free. 254 E. Fourth Street., 530-343-2930. jamessnidlefinearts.com

MASTERS OF FINE ARTS GALLERY: MFA Exhibition, featuring the work of Hope Blackwell. Through 4/13. Free. Chico State, ARTS 122.

MUSEUM OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA ART: 3 Keys, world premiere of Josh Funk’s fantasy/ thriller short film, followed by a Q&A with director and cast. Friday and Saturday, 4/134/14, 6:30pm. $5 900 Esplanade. monca.org

ORLAND ART CENTER: Dancing to Different Tunes, mother and daughter Pat Vought and Alyson Mucci display their diverse works. Through 5/19. 732 Fourth St., Orland.

PARADISE ART CENTER: Hangin’ Around, fired arts and ceramics on the walls of Wheeler Gallery. Through 4/26. 5564 Almond St., Paradise.

SATORI HAIR SALON: Faded Glory: Photographs of Havana, Michael Goloff’s photographs of Cuban buildings and street scenes. Reception on Friday, April 13, 5:30-8:30pm. Through 5/31. Free. 627 Broadway, Ste. 120, 530-514-6264. michaelgoloffphotography.com

Museums BOLT’S ANTIQUE TOOL MUSEUM: Hand Tools, rotating displays of more than 12,000 kinds of tools. $3. 1650 Broderick St., Oroville, 530538-2528. boltsantiquetools.com

BUTTE COUNTY HISTORICAL MUSEUM: WWI Exhibition, recently renovated exhibits demonstrating the profound changes in American society caused by The Great War. Through 7/29. 1749 Spencer Ave.

CHICO CREEK NATURE CENTER: Permanent Exhibits, including the The Janeece Webb Living Animal Museum and the Nature Play Room. 1968 E. Eighth St. ccnaturecenter.org

GATEWAY SCIENCE MUSEUM: Brain—The World Inside Your Head, an exhibit exploring the inner workings of the brain—neurons and synapses, electricity and chemistry. Through 5/6. $5-$7. 625 Esplanade. csuchico.edu

VALENE L. SMITH MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY: Imprisoned at Home, excellent and enlightening exhibit on Japanese Americans held at the Tule Lake Incarceration Camp during WWII. Through 5/18. Also, Sacred Splendor, exhibit chronicles the history and influence of Christian colonization, underscoring the faith’s movement across the globe from Indo-Portuguese carvings to a William Morris cartoon. From the collection of Judith E. Hilburg. Through 5/11. Chico State. csuchico.edu


SEXUAL VIOLENCE HAS NO BOUNDARIES

All Gender Identities, Races, Ages, Social Classes & Ethnicities are Affected • 1 in 5 women will be raped in their lifetime • Nearly 1 in 2 women and 1 in 5 men experience sexual violence victimization other than rape at some point in their lives • Intimate partner sexual assault and rape are used to intimidate, control, and demean survivors of domestic violence • Intimate partner sexual assault is more likely than stranger or acquaintance assault to cause physical injury • 40-50% of women in abusive relationships will also be sexually violated during the course of the relationship • 18% of female survivors of spousal rape say their children witnessed the crime • Only 1 in 10 report being sexually violated. Marital rape is the most under-reported form of sexual assault.

KNOW YOUR RIGHTS about sexual assault. If you, or someone you know, has been sexually assaulted you can receive a free forensic medical examination, regardless of whether or not you choose to participate in the criminal justice process.

WE ARE HERE TO LISTEN

Butte/Glenn: 530-891-1331 Tehama: 530-529-3980 24hr CRISIS LINE: 530-342-RAPE (7273) Collect Calls Accepted april 12, 2018

CN&R

25


APRIL 5-22

CAMMIES PRESENTS:

CHICO AREA

MUSIC FESTIVAL

LOCAL MUSIC THIS WEEK THURSDAY 4/12

CAMMIES at Maltese

Hot Flash

6pm, LaSalles, 229 Broadway St.

8pm, The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave. $7 With Black Fong, Triple Tree, Mad Chemist and The Primers.

Kelly Twins acoustic

The Americas & Black Magnet

6pm, Two Twenty Restaurant, 220 W. Fourth St.

Weiner, Lish Bills, Zolavibe

8pm, Naked Lounge, 118 W. Second St. $7

Swamp Zen

8pm, Naked Lounge, 118 W. Second St.

8pm, Unwined Kitchen & Bar, 980 Mangrove Ave.

FRIDAY 4/13

SATURDAY 4/14

Pub Scouts

3:30pm (happy hour), Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St. $1

Tyler DeVoll

4pm, LaSalles, 229 Broadway St.

Open mic

6pm, Lost on Main, 319 Main St.

Live music Fridays

6pm, Almendra Winery & Distillery, 9275 Midway, Durham.

Paisani Concert

6:30pm, Center for Spiritual Living, 789 Bille Road, Paradise. $15 Lisa Flores and her band play a variety of Italian, Latin and French jazz

Cee Dub

5pm, Rock House, 11865 Highway 70, Yankee Hill.

Big Mable & The Portholes

7pm, Argus Bar + Patio, 212 W. Second St.

With a Little Help from Our Friends 7:30pm, Harlen Adams Theatre, Chico State, 898-5739. $6-$15 Chico State’s Jazz X-Press performs with alumni guests.

Quips and Chains & Sons of Jefferson 8:30pm, Ramada Plaza, 685 Manzanita Court

facebook.com/chicocammies 26

CN&R

APRIL 12, 2018

FINALE & AWARDS SHOW

Mixtape

9pm, Studio Inn Lounge, 2582 Esplanade

MONDAY 4/16

Sunday, April 22, 2-7 p.m. at Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. SCHEDULED PERFORMERS:

Open Mic Madness

6pm, Maltese Bar & Tap Room, 1600 Park Ave.

TUESDAY 4/17 The Bidwells

6pm, Farm Star Pizza, 2359 Esplanade

Armed for Apocalypse & Touch Fuzzy Get Dizzy

8pm, Naked Lounge, 118 W. Second St. $7

WEDNESDAY 4/18 Blues jam

7pm, Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. $5

Open Mikefull

7pm, Norton Buffalo Hall, 5704 Chapel Drive, Paradise, 877-4995. $2

Another Maltese CAMMIES Showcase

8pm, The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave. $7 With DJ Dub Heezy, Michael Russell Trio, Cory Himp Hunt and Citysick.

Sponsored by:

Smokey the Groove XDS Wolfthump The Josh Hegg Trio Citysick Michelin Embers Severance Package Black Fong West by Swan Scout Hot Potato Solar Estates Taste Like Crow

➡ FRESEION ADMIS

A FREE outdoor concert at the new Container Bar at Sierra Nevada Brewing Co., featuring two stages filled with local acts, plus the announcement of the 2018 CAMMIES Awards. • Low-back chairs, blankets and dogs are welcome. • No outside food or drink. Food and drinks available for purchase. • Alternative transportation encouraged—carpool, bike, bus or cab. Bike valet provided by Chico Velo.


SCENE Anon, Viking Tom.

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DeGarmo park 199 leora ct.

of weather divination remains an uncertain form of augury. Many story and photo by a soothsayer Ken Smith foretold that last week’s spring squall would wreak havoc on the North State through the weekend, but the omens miraculously proved wrong. The organizers and attendees of the Feather Falls Renaissance Faire owe that deity a debt of gratitude. The sun shined brightly on the festival held last weekend (April 7-8)—the first of its kind at the KOA campground at Feather Falls Casino—much to the delight of the smiling faces of vikings, faeries, pirates, peasants and muggles milling about the mud and hay-sopped encampment. I’ve thrown my share of 20-sided die and I own a pair of nunchucks, but until last weekend attending a Ren Faire went unchecked on my geek bucket list. The local fair was an excellent introduction—it was free, fun and the Renaissance-at-arancheria location added greatly to the event’s intrinsic surrealism. The vendors and performers included a mix of locals and fantasy festival circuit regulars, many of whom were eager to offer insight into their unique skills and peculiar passions. “I’m Viking Tom!” a bearded guy dressed in a loincloth and little else said as he shook my hand, his voice and demeanor a far cry from what his imposing physique and garb might indicate—he was more Ned Flanders than bloodthirsty Norseman. Tom lives outside of Redding and tows his “ship”—a

Over a dOzen fOOd trucks Live Music by swett trio

free tO attend!

converted flatbed trailer fashioned to resemble a Viking longboat—to festivals and kids’ parties around Northern California. The ship is outfitted with toy guns, swords and costumes. There were plenty of real weapons—swords, blunderbusses, battle axes and more—at the fair as well, prompting an interesting conversation with Captain Chaos Vane (né Dan Barnard), an arms-dealing pirate from Washington who runs Iron Dragon Trading Co. He explained the firearms he deals can be sold with no red tape because they were manufactured before 1898, and are mostly sold to reenactors and black-powder enthusiasts to fire blanks. Sword and knife laws vary by city, county and state and Vane said he sometimes denies weapons to customers who are too drunk or act blatantly irresponsible. “I used to deal in modern weaponry, but honestly with all the school shootings and the politics, I got out of that because it started to feel gross,” Vane said. “I hang out with a bunch of pirates, we go out in the field and shoot blanks and have a great time and talk about science and politics. I’m a lot more comfort-

able [with that] than hanging around a bunch of rednecks bum-firing.” More wonders abounded at the fair, including handmade leather, metal and ceramic crafts, full-contact combat matches by armed and armored players of a live-action role-playing (LARP) game called Empire of Medieval Pursuits, and bird-handling demonstrations by West Coast Falconry. I unfortunately missed the raptor action, but briefly met a falconer named Dave Myers and his companion—an African hawkeagle—when he stopped by the beer tent to wet his beak. Over a few flagons of ale and a tasty cup of mead, I had more interesting conversations there with a veritable rogues gallery of characters, including a nimble dipsomaniac called The Bawdy Juggler and Gabe Zonotto, a Gridley artist who’s spent decades building a life-size, fire-breathing metal dragon named Claude. Some people might consider LARPers and fantasy-loving folks easy punchlines, but I walked away impressed. Be it for a weekend or a lifetime, they live life on their own terms. □ April 12, 2018

CN&R

27


NIGHTLIFE

THUrSDaY 4/12—WEDNESDaY 4/18 WEINER, LISH BILLS & ZOLAVIBE: Artist

iaN ETHaN CaSE Sunday, April 15 Norton Buffalo Hall

Matthew Weiner’s new project, singer-songwriter Lish Bills and neo-soul/jazz outfit ZolaVibe. Thu, 4/12, 8pm. Naked Lounge, 118 W. Second St.

SEE SUNDaY

IN THIS MOMENT: Gothic metal group fronted by former “Rock Goddess of the Year” Maria Brink perform with the Word Alive and Ded. Thu, 4/12, 7pm. $29.50. Senator Theatre, 517 Main St. senatortheatrechico. com

12THUrSDaY

DANTE HH & RED DEVIL VORTEX:

Colombian psychobilly punk band Dante HH and Brazilian metal band Red Devil Vortex perform with local group Mad Chemist. Thu, 4/12, 8:30pm. $8. Lost on Main, 319 Main St. lostonmainchico.com

HEADRUSH: Acoustic duo per-

forms. Thu, 4/12, 6:30pm. $7. Chico Guild Hall, 2775 Nord Ave.

HOT FLASH: Booty shaking music on the patio during the Thursday Night Market. Thu, 4/12, 6pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

KELLY TWINS ACOUSTIC: Jon and Chris dust off some old favorites with an acoustic evening of “living room” music. Thu, 4/12, 6pm. Two Twenty Restaurant, 220 W. Fourth St.

MAUI BREWING: Meet the brewer and sample great Hawaiian beers, plus live music. Thu, 4/12, 5pm. Unwined Kitchen & Bar, 980 Mangrove Ave.

THE RETURN OF BELTAIN: Americana/

Celtic fusion folk band. Thu, 4/12, 6:30pm. Free. Farm Star Pizza, 2359 Esplanade, 530-343-2056.

ROAD TO SERENITY: FutureBass/ glitch/dubstep artist Trevor Kelly performs on The Patio. Thu, 4/12, 9pm. The Beach, 191 E. Second St.

13FriDaY

AMERICAS & ANTIPHONY: Tour kick-off show with opening set by excellent noise rock band Black Magnet. Fri, 4/13, 8pm. $7. Naked Lounge, 118 W. Second St.

ANDRE NICKATINA: Bay Area rapper hits town touring on his crowdfunded album Pisces with support from Smoov-E and local DJs. Fri, 4/13, Doors at 9pm. $25. Lost on Main, 319 Main St. lostonmainchico. com

HIGH VOLTAGE: Classic rock, country

and Top 40 hits. Fri, 4/13, 9pm. White Water Saloon, 5571 Clark Road, Paradise.

HUNKS MALE REVUE: So many abs. Fri, 4/13, 9pm. $20-$40. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave.

LIVE MUSIC FRIDAYS: A different band each week, plus drinks and small bites. Fri, 4/13, 6pm. Almendra Winery & Distillery, 9275 Midway, Durham.

PAISANI CONCERT: Lisa Flores and her band play a variety of Italian, Latin and French jazz on accordion, mandolin and guitar. Lasagna dinner also available. Fri, 4/13, 6:30pm. $15. Center for Spiritual Living, Paradise, 789 Bille Road, Paradise, 530-877-5673.

PUB SCOUTS: Irish music for happy

hour. Fri, 4/13, 3:30pm. $1. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St.

STraiGHT OUT OF BOGOTa

A pair of South American bands descend on Chico this Thursday, April 12, for a big rock show at Lost on Main. Over-the-top and full of fury, Colombian punk rock band Dante HH brings psychobilly and old-school snarl to the stage. A shockingly good-looking band of Brazilian hard rockers, the cute dudes in Red Devil Vortex deliver a fun, bombastic live show sure to get your head banging. Local prog-metal trio Mad Chemist opens the show.

REGGAE/PUNK/FUNK/METAL: Black Fong, Triple Tree, Mad Chemist and The Primers all perform at this 2018 CAMMIES show. Fri, 4/13, 8pm. $7. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave. maltese barchico.com

REV-ATOMICS: TGIF party with live

music, dinner and drinks. Fri, 4/13, 5pm. Chico Elks Lodge, 1705 Manzanita Ave.

STRAIT COUNTRY: Nobody does it like the King of Country, but this tribute act comes close. Barroom ballads, honky-tonk hits and fool-hearted memories. Fri, 4/13, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfalls casino.com

STRUNG NUGGET GANG: Live music, plus grub from Gnarly Deli. Fri, 4/13, 6pm. Purple Line Urban Winery, 760 Safford St., Oroville.

SWAMP ZEN: Genre-spanning group

brings you to the dance floor. Fri,

DO YOU THINK YOU HAVE WHAT IT TAKES TO BE A REPORTER?

4/13, 8pm. Unwined Kitchen & Bar, 980 Mangrove Ave. unwinedchico. com

TYLER DEVOLL: Happy hour music. Fri, 4/13, 4pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway

St.

WEIRD SCIENCE: Totally rad ’80s covers in the lounge. Fri, 4/13, 8:30pm. Gold Country Casino & Hotel, 4020 Olive Highway, Oroville.

3/29/18 9:07 AM

sailors return from their overseas voyage/hiatus to take the stage for this Audrey Denney for Congress fundraiser. Sat, 4/14, 7pm. Argus Bar + Patio, 212 W. Second St.

Interns wanted!

Want to work on your skills at a real-life newspaper? Well, you might just be in luck. The CN&R is looking for writing interns. Must be a college student and willing to work—we’ll send you out on assignment, not to get us coffee and run errands. To apply, submit your résumé and at least three writing clips 28304334_4.9_x_5.4.indd CN&R a p r1i l 1 2 , 2 0 1 8

14SaTUrDaY

BIG MABLE & THE PORTHOLES: Salty

to: CN&R Managing Editor Meredith J. Cooper at meredithc@ newsreview.com and include “internship” in the subject line. Independent local journalism, since 1977. Now more than ever.


THIS WEEK: FiND MOrE ENTErTaiNMENT aND SpECial EVENTS ON paGE 22 HIGH VOLTAGE: See Friday. Sat, 4/14,

9pm. White Water Saloon, 5571 Clark

Road, Paradise.

BUrialS, TOUCH FUZZY GET DiZZY & arMED FOr apOCalYpSE

City Riot and Sons of Jefferson perform during a wide-ranging night of tunes. Sat, 4/14, 8:30pm. Ramada Plaza Chico, 685 Manzanita Court.

all your favorite hits. Sat, 4/14, 9pm. Studio Inn Lounge, 2582 Esplanade.

THE GATEWAY SHOW: Stand-up comedians tell their very best jokes. Then they go get really high and return to the stage to attempt more. Billy Anderson hosts. Sat, 4/14, 9pm. $12-$20. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave. maltesebar chico.com

Burials CEE DUB: Local guitarist and songwriter. Sat, 4/14, 5pm. Free. Rock House Dining & Espresso, 11865 Highway 70, Yankee Hill, 530-532-1889.

GENE EVARO JR.: Soul, folk and funk

CHICO SOUL: Jazz, hip-hop and

R&B. Sat, 4/14, 8pm. $5. Down Lo, 319 Main St.

DANCE NIGHT: J-Ho and Uyes turn

it up and turn it out. Sat, 4/14, 9:30pm. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St.

DEFCATS: Upbeat party band plays pop and classic rock with fivepart vocal harmonies. Sat, 4/14, 9pm. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave.

musician from Joshua Tree comes to town touring on his third album Like It’s 1965. The mighty Black Fong opens. Sat, 4/14, 9pm. $10-$13. Lost on Main, 319 Main St. loston mainchico.com

GENERATION IDOL: Veteran Vegas performer Craig Knight does a spot-on Billy Idol impersonation in this tribute act that takes you from Gen X to today. Sat, 4/14, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

MOMMA T & THE SHAKY GROUND BAND: Feel-good hits, rock, pop and a bit of country in the lounge. Sat, 4/14, 8:30pm. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

REGGAE PARTY: Heavyweight Sounds with Larry Hacken, plus local OneUp the Acoustic DJ. Sat, 4/14, 5pm. Sipho’s, 1228 Dayton Road.

SOUL POSSE: Dance band, plus wine and tapas available from the bar. Sat, 4/14, 6pm. Free. Wine Time, 26 Lost Dutchman Drive, 530-828-8040.

WEIRD SCIENCE: See Friday. Sat, 4/14,

8:30pm. Gold Country Casino & Hotel, 4020 Olive Highway, Oroville.

fingerstyle player performs on a double-neck, 18-string guitar. Sun, 4/15, 7pm. $15. Norton Buffalo Hall, 5704 Chapel Drive, Paradise.

Mark O’Connor brings his progressive folk/bluegrass outfit to Sierra Nevada. Sun, 4/15, 7:30pm. $35-$57. Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St. sierra nevada.com

17TUESDaY

THE BIDWELLS: Duo performs Tax

Day show. Spend your return on pizza (and tips for the band)! Tue, 4/17, 6pm. Farm Star Pizza, 2359 Esplanade.

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night of music with DJ Dub Heezy, Michael Russell Trio (blues rock), Cory Himp Hunt (hip-hop) and Citysick (emo). Wed, 4/18, 8pm. $7. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

DUFFY’S DANCE NIGHT: DJ Lois and Amburgers spin funk, pop and hiphop. Wed, 4/18, 10pm. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St.

KiNGS OF NEW OrlEaNS

Full of funk, brimming with innovation and critically acclaimed, the Rebirth Brass Band has grown from the streets of the Big Easy to concert halls and festival stages worldwide. The band is a Grammy-winning mobile party unit with legions of fans, and we should feel blessed when its members grace the stage at Lost on Main, Tuesday, April 17. Don’t miss this opportunity to catch a stunning, uplifting group for only 15 bucks.

GET LOUD: Local shredders Armed for Apocalypse and Touch Fuzzy Get Dizzy host proggy PDX band Burials who go from blasting hardcore to sweeping black metal. Tue, 4/17, 8pm. $7. Naked Lounge, 118 W. Second St.

REBIRTH BRASS BAND: Expect a raucous, funky and deeply authentic concert from these Grammy winners. Tue, 4/17, 8pm. $15. Lost on Main, 319 Main St. lostonmainchico. com

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CN&R

29


REEL WORLD

FILM SHORTS Reviewers: Bob Grimm and Juan-Carlos Selznick.

to remove “cock” and replace it with an image of a rooster. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated R.

Opening this week

Chappaquiddick

Isle of Dogs

The latest from Wes Anderson is a stopmotion animated feature about a young Japanese boy who runs off to the trash island where all the dogs of his city have been banished to try and find his canine companion, Spots. Cinemark 14, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

I Can Only Imagine

Loveless

This haunting Russian film, about a 12-year-old boy who runs away from home in reaction to his parents’ divorcing, was nominated for Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film. Pageant Theatre. Rated R.

Rampage

Silent but deadly Make a sound and die in A Quiet Place

NthatAhunt Quiet Place, a horror film in which blind aliens by sound would literally kill you—and oise-intolerant neighbors are taken to all levels in

everyone else at your party—if you turned your stereo up. by John Krasinski directed, co-wrote Bob Grimm and stars—he’s Lee, a father trying to protect his family in a post-apocalyptic bg rimm@ world besieged by horrific aliens newsrev iew.c om who will tear you apart if you make so much as a peep. In the opening sequence, Lee, his wife, Evelyn (Krasinski’s real-life wife, Emily Blunt), and three children are taking A Quiet Place a very quiet walk home from a drug store. One of them makes a sudden Starring John Krasinksi and Emily noise, and the results are pretty scary Blunt. Directed by for a PG-13 movie. John Krasinksi. The aliens don’t respond to reguCinemark 14, Feather lar ambient sounds—a river running, river Cinemas and paradise Cinema 7. birds chirping—but rather sounds that rated pG-13. are more interruptive, like fireworks or a person screaming after stepping on a nail. The gimmick lends itself to some faulty logic at times, but it does provide an overall interesting premise: Speak audibly in relatively quiet surroundings and you will get your head bitten off. It’s like everyday life is a hellish library where the penalty for gabbing or dropping something is death. Krasinski’s film gives you no real back story about the aliens. A few glimpses of newspaper front pages let you know that the world has been ravaged by the species. One look at them (they are a cross between Ridley Scott’s alien and the Cloverfield monster) and you know that just a few days with these things run-

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CN&R

April 12, 2018

ning around would decimate the world’s population. Blunt gives a standout performance as somebody forced to keep quiet in especially difficult circumstances—e.g., after a painful injury, or giving birth in a bathtub while an alien clicks and claws nearby. It’s scenes like those, as well as one involving a crying baby in a flooded basement, that give Blunt a chance to call upon myriad facial expressions that will chill your blood. She pulls you into every moment with an earnestness that feels real. Krasinki’s done well with family drama before (2016’s The Hollars was a good, if little noticed, movie), but this horror-thriller shows him as a director of true ingenuity. And Krasinski complements his directing chops with a fine performance as a guy doing everything to keep his sanity and protect his family, including a young deaf daughter (played by the superb Millicent Simmonds, who is actually deaf) and son (Noah Jupe). Both of the kids are terrific here. The monsters themselves are stellar CGI creations, a nice achievement considering the movie was made on a relatively low budget. Cinematographer Charlotte Bruus Christensen provides excellent camera work, while Marco Beltrami’s score punctuates the jarring scary moments while also giving you something to listen to during a pretty quiet film in which the performers communicate mostly through sign language and whispering. While there are some “Yeah, right!” moments where the story’s own rules are broken, there are far more sequences that are extremely well done. It’s an original concept that, combined with the great acting and direction, make for a movie that you won’t soon forget and might leave you treading more lightly around your house at night. □

A government experiment results in dangerous animals growing to Hulk proportions, and it’s up to a primatologist played by The Rock and his now super-sized albino gorilla buddy named George to put a stop to the rampaging monsters. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

Truth or Dare

In this game, if you tell a lie or dare not to take a dare, you lose your life. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

Now playing

4

Black Panther

With its black superhero and predominantly black cast, and its special mixture of action fantasy and social history, Black Panther is a monumental cultural event. And a key part of its specialness is that it’s also a richly entertaining movie. Writer-director Ryan Coogler and co-writer Joe Robert Cole have produced a very engaging mixture of action movie and epic/utopian allegory. It’s an impressively mounted production throughout, and even with elements that are routine or generic, it makes fine use of a large and appealing cast. Chadwick Boseman has the title role. He is T’Challa, the newly coronated king of the fictional African nation of Wakanda. His Black Panther-infused superpowers derive from vibranium, the super-strong metal that is the basis of Wakanda’s radically advanced technology. A key premise of the tale is that Wakanda has heretofore kept its highly developed civilization hidden from the rest of the world. Eventually, the new king will move to change all that, and Boseman proves to be well attuned to both the warrior and the statesman in the character. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13 —J.C.S.

Blockers

A historical drama retelling the events surrounding the Chappaquiddick incident, the 1969 car accident in which Sen. Ted Kennedy drove off a bridge into a pond leading to the death of campaign strategist Mary Jo Kopechne. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

For this coming-of-age comedy about parents teaming up to stop their three daughters from making good on a lose-their-virginity-on-prom-night pact, the producers were OK showing John Cena butt-chugging in the commercial, but for the title they had

The true story behind the chart-topping single “I Can Only Imagine,” which was recorded by the Christian rock band MercyMe. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

The Leisure Seeker

Helen Mirren and Donald Sutherland star as an elderly married couple who run away from the children and doctors trying to take care of them and their serious issues and head out on one last road trip in their old RV. Pageant Theatre. Rated R.

The Miracle Season

Helen Hunt and William Hurt star in this story based on the real-life events surrounding a girls high school volleyball tram’s run of success after its star player is killed in an accident. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

Pacific Rim: Uprising

It’s been a decade since the humans-insidegiant-robots defeated the creatures from The Breach, but now in this sequel the huge Kaiju are back and a new generation of robot weapons must battle to save Earth. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

4

A Quiet Place

See review this issue. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13 —B.G.

Ready Player One

Steven Spielberg directs this sci-fi adventure about a virtual-reality world to which people of a desolate future Earth escape for fun and work, and in which its creator has planted an Easter egg that promises control of the whole digital reality to whomever finds it. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

Sherlock Gnomes

A 3-D computer-animated sequel to Gnomeo & Juliet, featuring the previous film’s title gnomes hiring a gnome named Sherlock Gnomes to help them find some other gnomes. Gnome sayin’? Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

A Wrinkle in Time

The classic sci-fi/fantasy novel by Madeleine L’Engle gets the blockbuster treatment (complete with Oprah Winfrey). The story follows Meg (Storm Reid), who, along with her brother and friend, is tasked with going to space and rescuing her scientist father from an unspeakable evil. Cinemark 14. Rated PG.

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Beers in bloom Three brews to welcome in the season of change Old Chico Pale Bock—Sierra Nevada Brewing Co.

Helles bock is the quintessential spring beer style. The German-born creation is a hoppier and paler (“helles” means “light” or “pale”) version of the sweet and malty centuries-old bock style, making it a more quaffable rendition to enjoy during spring celebrations. Sierra Nevada’s Pale Bock is part of its Old Chico series, a lineup of resurrected versions of some of the brewery’s classic yet discontinued beers beloved by locals and re-released only in Chico and its surrounding areas. Crystal Wheat is the flagship and the only Old Chico brand on shelves year round. In addition to Pale Bock, other seasonal or one-off varieties have included Brown Ale, ESB and Session IPA. After much clamoring from local enthusiasts, Pale Bock was revived in 2014, and comes out each year just before spring. The 2018 is on local shelves now, and it is outstanding. The golden-hued, mediumhopped lager is indeed very easy to drink on a sunny, spring day, yet it has tons of flavor, with a nice, mildly sweet, bready malt backbone pairing well with the floral hops. It also has a sneaky alcohol content (6.8 percent) that, if you don’t pace yourself, can feel like a “bock” (“billy goat”) kicked you over.

—Jason Cassidy

Enjoy By 04.20.18—Stone Brewing

Stone Brewing’s ongoing Enjoy By series of IPAs is a stroke of marketing genius. If you don’t drink it by the date on the label, they say, you can expect a diminished experience as hop flavors fade. Having been brewed specifically not to last, there’s a compelling incentive to buy now. The San Diego brewery’s latest concoction—Enjoy By 04.20.18—is a big, citrusy and floral double IPA brewed

with 10 different hops and weighing in at a hefty 9.4 percent alcohol. That’s definitely on the stronger side, and this iteration has a sharp alcoholic bite, especially on the first few sips, but it’s surprisingly light-bodied for a double. If one were attracted to pretty labels (and one certainly is), this is particularly eye-catching and also makes overt references to reefer. The “enjoy by” date is April 20, after all, and it professes to be “devastatingly dank.” Disappointingly, it doesn’t taste like somebody squeezed a fat bag of weed and bottled the juice; it’s more just like a super-stiff IPA with a spritz of citrus. If that’s your thing, you’d better get some while it lasts.

—Howard Hardee

Pfriem Saison—Pfriem Family Brewers

One could make a (very) compelling argument that Pfriem is making the best beer in the state of Oregon. It’s great for those who live there, but a real bummer for those who don’t (Pfriem rarely finds its way into Northern California beer shops and bars). The Hood River-based brewery’s beers stand out for the choice of hops and the always clean finish, and the saison is no exception. It’s a relatively traditional version, but the flavors explode—tropical fruits, and the (sometimes divisive) funkiness that saisons (or farmhouses) typically include. Pfriem unleashes this particular saison (the brewery also makes a kumquat farmhouse ale, a super saison at 9.5 percent ABV, and a black saison) in the spring—just in time to imbibe in the sun—and it typically doesn’t last much past April. Worth a trip up to Oregon for serious beer geeks, or some old-fashioned bartering for a few good California brews.

—Mark Lore April 12, 2018

CN&R

31


Goin’ ChiCo Your guide to food, fun and adventure

Your LivinG LoCaL Guide

Starting in June 2018, the Chico News & Review’s Goin’ Chico issue offers unmatched early access to the freshest faces in town with distribution to new students and their parents at Summer Orientation at Chico State. Make sure you connect with these potential new patrons from their first day in town with an ad in Goin’ Chico. For more information, call an advertising representative today at (530) 894-2300.

IN THE MIX The Colpix Singles Nina Simone rhino Few vocalists can match the ageless power of Nina Simone, with her unyielding raw voice and flawless melodies. The release of The Colpix Singles, two discs of remastered versions of some of Simone’s work with Colpix Records, underlines the point. It starts with “Chilly Winds Don’t Blow,” a buoyant horn-led shuffle with Simone bellowing in a slightly lower timbre than usual. “Since My Love Has Gone” (1960), with its sweeping orchestration and canned choral harmonies cradling Simone’s vibrato, nicely capture its era. Her classic rendition of Gershwin’s “Summertime” is lovely in its sultry simplicity, with soft percussion and twinkling piano aligned with Simone’s effortless performance. Though they’re all good, the best moments in the collection are the simple ones, such as her rendition of “Cotton Eyed Joe,” a slow, sparse, stunning performance that bears little resemblance to typical fiddleheavy line-dance versions of the traditional American folk song.

MUSIC

—Robin Bacior

Twin Fantasy Car Seat Headrest Matador Car Seat Headrest’s Will Toledo’s decision to re-record Twin Fantasy, his 2011 solo album, with his current band is an almost unheard of move in music. Right away, this risky decision results in a masterwork, with its cascading guitars, skyrocketing melodies and goosebump-inducing dynamic moments. Toledo borrows liberally from any decade that suits the song, and echoes of The Cars, The Strokes and Pavement can be heard at various moments throughout. Toledo’s chief focus moves violently between sex and death, as the now 25-year-old revisits his former teenage self’s preoccupation with the body, both its worship and its collapse. Across its fried and fuzzed guitar-heavy expanse, Twin Fantasy is equally preoccupied with the light and dark, an indie-rock opera fluctuating and fading in a celebration of life and its ecstatic summation.

MUSIC

Hey there, students! DO YOU THINK YOU HAVE WHAT IT TAKES TO BE A NEWS PHOTOGRAPHER?

The Chico News & Review is seeking a talented photographer to join our crew as a photojournalism intern. Must be enthusiastic, and be able to photograph live events as well as portraits and planned photo shoots. Your goal: Tell a story through your lens. Interested candidates should email Managing Editor Meredith J. Cooper at meredithc@newsreview.com with a résumé, cover letter explaining your goals for an internship at the CN&R and a link to your portfolio. Independent local journalism, since 1977. Now more than ever.

—Conrad Nystrom

Live From San Pedro Jeff Hamilton Trio Capri Recorded in 2017, Live From San Pedro is the second trio CD drummer Jeff Hamilton has recorded with pianist Tamir Hendelman since they hooked up 17 years ago. Their association also includes working with the Clayton-Hamilton Jazz Orchestra. They’re joined here by bassist Christoph Luty in a program of mostly originals. The non-originals include a marvelously luxurious six-minute version of “Poinciana” that allows each musician a chance to demonstrate his talents. Hamilton’s spotlighted on “Hammer’s Tones,” a tune written for him on which he demonstrates his awesome brush work while Luty’s arco bowing introduces Hendelman’s gorgeous playing on an old standard, “I Have Dreamed.” These guys really know their onions, and after a fast romp through Thelonious Monk’s “In Walked Bud” and a brace of Hamilton originals, Hendelman gets a shot at his uptempo “Bennissimo,” a real flag-waver. But the CD’s highlight for me is “Gary, Indiana,” a sumptuous samba on which the trio—especially Hendelman—really cooks!

MUSIC

—Miles Jordan 32

CN&R

April 12, 2018


ARTS DEVO by Jason Cassidy • jasonc@newsreview.com

AnAlyticA shmyticA Based on our available records, neither you nor

your friends logged into “This Is Your Digital Life.” As a result, it doesn’t appear your Facebook information was shared with Cambridge Analytica by “This Is Your Digital Life.” Well, that’s a relief. arts dEVo has absolutely nothing to worry about! Not that I was actually worried. As a drooling meat sack in a post-human world where digital information is mined and traded in volumes and at speeds beyond my ability to process, I long ago gave up any delusions of privacy. I assume that all corporations, multiple governments and a couple of 19-year-olds in Kazakhstan know my credit card numbers and that my poodle Honey is a sugar-booger. And the revelation that some super-rich people spent millions of dollars to run our “likes” through their profiling algorithms elicited little more than a: “Well, yeah.” It’s especially unsurprising that the mined data obtained by British political consultants Cambridge analytica came via Facebook. That’s what Facebook is: a service offered to users in exchange for their “non-personally identifiable” being used to sell targeted ads. Mark Zuckerberg’s entire business model is built on that arrangement, with 98 percent of revenues in 2017—just under $40 billion—coming from selling digital advertising. Whether you read the terms of service (for Facebook and many of the third-party apps you use) or not, you agree to be sold (and sold to) when you sign up. And, as all the cameras were on Senate hearings in D.C. this week, where Zuckerberg offered his mea culpas for Cambridge Analytica as well as the social-media disinformation campaign waged by Russian operatives during the last presidential election, it was fascinating the degree to which Facebook users have been left out of the conversation in the data-mining debacle. Don’t we bear the bulk of responsibility for willfully opening up our lives to constant intrusion? We enjoy the convenience of the platform and the apps, populate Facebook with details about our lives and the lives of everyone close to us, and then act surprised when the site does what it said it would do? Don’t get me wrong, I know that Cambridge Analytica is shady. And its procurement of Facebook data obtained from another party—the This is your digital Life app—in order to target potential voters in the recent presidential primaries (on behalf of Ted Cruz) and the presidential race (for donald Trump) is as troubling as Facebook’s negligence in ensuring that its clients wouldn’t operate outside of the scope of the agreement—including allowing the data of unsuspecting friends of the 300,000 who signed up for the app to be mined, up to 87 million total. But if we truly value privacy over convenience and connection, maybe we shouldn’t offer a public company a moment-by-moment account of our personal lives. Personally, I wouldn’t care if info about my Facebook activity was shared with Cambridge Analytica. (I’m much more concerned about Russian troll farms and using free Wi-Fi at the coffee shop.) I also don’t care that my data was used to target me for ads by several Republican political candidates in Texas, the nuclear Energy institute, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Washington Post, California WorldFest and shaquille o’ neal. I downloaded an archive of my Facebook account, and included is a list of the entities that have recently targeted people with my interests and attributes. Also included is a list of keywords associated with my account, and a sampling does paint a pretty accurate picture: male, mammal, emotion, david Lynch, newspapers, andrew W.K., sonic youth, EsPn, sierra nevada Brewing, electric guitar, cheese, Mexican cuisine, Bernie sanders, huevos, dEVo. And I’m not too worried about Shaq knowing that there’s a cheese-eatin’ mammal living in Chico, even if it means I have to scroll past a few Krispy Kreme ads to get to the day’s nBa scores.

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You are craving doughnuts, Arts DEVO. April 12, 2018

CN&R

33


PAID ADVERTISEMENT

New 2-in-1 Sex Pill for Men Improves Erections and Arousal Key ingredients stimulate the production of a molecule required to achieve firm, long lasting erections; clinical studies show users experience significant improvements in sex drive, erection quality, and performance. By Ryan Steele Mens Health News Syndicate MHNS, San Diego – Although drugs like Viagra®, Cialis® and Levitra® all promise harder erections, more stamina and a better sex drive, for the vast majority of men these promises never come true. And that’s because these drugs do not stimulate a man’s desire or interest in sex! But now Nobel Prize winning research has inspired the creation of a new kind of pill, created just for older men. It’s called Vesele® and its formula is designed to stimulate a man’s body and his brain which studies show significantly improves sex drive and erection strength.

MADE FOR THE AGING MAN According to experts, Vesele® is not a drug. It’s something completely different. And because Vesele does not require a prescription and is not sold in stores, the makers are doing everything they can to keep up with the demand. “Orders are coming in so fast we may have to start a waiting list.” reports the head of fulfillment at Innovus Pharma Laboratories, the makers of Vesele®.

KEEPS YOU AROUSED ALL DAY Vesele is a pill that focuses on restoring blood flow, allowing it to work on both the brain and body. It does this by stimulating the production of a key sex molecule known to dilate the small arteries in the penis that support a strong erection. As men age, they lose their ability to create this critical molecule and their sex life suffers. Vesele contains the active ingredient which gets men producing it again! And unlike other sex pills, this doctor formulated formula contains a patented ingredient called Bioperine® which has been shown in clinical studies to increase absorption of this miracle molecule by as much as 1544%. This means your brain and your body receive more of this crucial sex compound resulting in harder, firmer, longer lasting erections.

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THE SCIENCE BEHIND VESELE® According to the Journal of Vascular Research changes in blood flow to and from the penis are thought to be the most frequent cause of male erectile dysfunction. Vesele® combines two clinical strength, pharmaceutical grade circulation boosters into one easy to use pill. Research shows that they work by increasing the production of a key molecule in the male body, which triggers blood flow to the penis. Studies on Vesele show that it can increase levels of this molecule by a staggering 95%, which is why so many users report stunning improvements in the quality of their erections. Pills like Viagra® work in a similar way, but only focus on blood flow to the penis and not the brain, which is why man men never feel an improvement in sex drive like they do with Vesele.

IMPRESSIVE CLINICAL TRIALS In a recent clinical study men between the ages of 45 to 65 were asked to take the main ingredient in Vesele® once a day. They were then instructed not to change the way they eat or exercise. The results were truly amazing. Virtually every single man who took Vesele® reported a huge difference in their desire for sex. They were like teenagers again. They also reported experiencing harder erections that lasted for almost 20 minutes. The placebo group experienced no change. In a separate double-blind study reported in The Journal of International Impotence Research, participants were given nutrients like those found in Vesele® and asked to record their sexual function/dysfunction in diaries. After just one month erectile function was restored to normal, and intercourse frequency doubled.

OVERWHELMING DEMAND Because of the amazing results users are achieving and the fact that Vesele® doesn’t require a prescription – men are reaching for it first before trying other more costly or dangerous alternatives. “When the results came in, we knew we had something every aging man would want and need, said Dr. Damaj. Our phones ring non-stop daily with order re-

Enhances Sex Drive and Triggers Erections: Vesele is a 2-in-1 doctor formulated pill that stimulates a man’s brain and body, resulting in significant improvements in every area of sexual health. quests, It’s been really crazy. We know how important it is so we’re doing everything in our power to meet the overwhelming demand for Vesele®.”

VESELE® 2 PILLS IN 1 According to experts it takes more than just getting an erection to enjoy sex. That’s because arousal and desire are key elements to the joy of sex. That’s where drugs like Viagra® and Cialis® miss the boat. By stimulating just an erection without the passion or intensity the experience will be less enjoyable for you and your partner. “As an expert in the development of sexual dysfunction, I’ve studied the effectiveness of Nitric Oxide on the body and the brain and I’m impressed by the way it increases desire as it increases penile blood flow. The result is evident in the creation of Vesele®”, said Dr. Damaj.

HOW TO GET VESELE® This is the first time we offered Vesele® to the public since its news release. In an effort to get Vesele® in the hands of as many men as possible, Innovus Pharma is offering one time discounts for first time buyers. A special hotline has been set up for readers in your area to take advantage of this limited offer. The Special TOLL-FREE Hotline number is 1-800-770-2568 and will be open 24-hours a day. If you miss out on our current product inventory you will have to wait until more becomes available, which could take 6 weeks or more. We advise you to call 1-800-770-2568 now.

These statements have not been reviewed by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. Vesele is not a drug. Results based upon averages. Models are used in all photos to protect privacy.

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3/28/18 4:24 PM


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY For the week oF april 12, 2018

by rob brezsny

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Aries states- LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Your allies man Thomas Jefferson was the third President of the United States. He wrote one of history’s most famous documents, the Declaration of Independence. He was an architect, violinist, inventor, and linguist who spoke numerous languages, as well as a philosopher who was knowledgeable about mathematics, surveying, and horticulture. But his most laudable success came in 1789, when he procured the French recipe for macaroni and cheese while living in France, and thereafter introduced the dish into American cuisine. JUST KIDDING! I’m making this little joke in the hope that it will encourage you to keep people focused on your most important qualities, and not get distracted by less essential parts of you.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): In the

early 1990s, Australian electrical engineer John O’Sullivan toiled on a research project with a team of radio astronomers. Their goal was to find exploding mini-black holes in the distant voids of outer space. The quest failed. But in the process of doing their experiments, they developed technology that became a key component now used in Wi-Fi. Your digital devices work so well in part because his frustrating misadventure led to a happy accident. According to my reading of your astrological omens, Taurus, we may soon be able to make a comparable conclusion about events in your life.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): In the

fictional world created by DC Comics, the superhero Superman has a secret identity as a modest journalist named Clark Kent. Or is it the other way around? Does the modest journalist Clark Kent have a secret identity as the superhero Superman? Only a few people realize the two of them are the same. I suspect there is an equally small number of allies who know who you really are beneath your “disguises,” Gemini. But upcoming astrological omens suggest that could change. Are you ready to reveal more about your true selves? Would you consider expanding the circle that is allowed to see and appreciate your full range and depth?

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Playwright

Tennessee Williams once spent an evening trying to coax a depressed friend out of his depression. It inspired him to write a poem that began like this: “I want to infect you with the tremendous excitement of living, because I believe that you have the strength to bear it.” Now I address you with the same message, Cancerian. Judging from the astrological omens, I’m convinced you currently have more strength than ever before to bear the tremendous excitement of living. I hope this news will encourage you to potentize your ability to welcome and embrace the interesting puzzles that will come your way in the weeks ahead.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Are you finished

dealing with spacious places and vast vistas and expansive longings? I hope not. I hope you will continue to explore big bold blooming schemes and wild free booming dreams until at least April 25. In my astrological opinion, you have a sacred duty to keep outstripping your previous efforts. You have a mandate to go further, deeper, and braver as you break out of shrunken expectations and push beyond comfortable limitations. The unknown is still more inviting and fertile than you can imagine.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Between

December 5 and 9, 1952, London was beset with heavy fog blended with thick smog. Visibility was low. Traffic slowed and events were postponed. In a few places, people couldn’t see their own feet. According to some reports, blind people, who had a facility for moving around without the aid of sight, assisted pedestrians in making their way through the streets. I suspect that a metaphorically comparable phenomenon may soon arise in your sphere, Virgo. Qualities that might customarily be regarded as liabilities could at least temporarily become assets.

are always important, but in the coming weeks they will be even more so. I suspect they will be your salvation, your deliverance, and your treasure. So why not treat them like angels or celebrities or celebrity angels? Buy them ice cream and concert tickets and fun surprises. Tell them secrets about their beauty that no one has ever expressed before. Listen to them in ways that will awaken their dormant potentials. I bet that what you receive in return will inspire you to be a better ally to yourself.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): In the

coming weeks, I suspect you will be able to find what you need in places that are seemingly devoid of what you need. You can locate the possible in the midst of what’s apparently impossible. I further surmise that you will summon a rebellious resourcefulness akin to that of Scorpio writer Albert Camus, who said, “In the midst of hate, I found there was, within me, an invincible love. In the midst of tears, I found there was, within me, an invincible smile. In the midst of chaos, I found there was, within me, an invincible calm. No matter how hard the world pushes against me, within me, there’s something stronger— something better, pushing right back.”

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

In 1936, Herbert C. Brown graduated from the University of Chicago with a bachelor’s degree in science. His girlfriend Sarah Baylen rewarded him with the gift of a twodollar book about the elements boron and silicon. Both he and she were quite poor; she couldn’t afford a more expensive gift. Brown didn’t read the book for a while, but once he did, he decided to make its subject the core of his own research project. Many years later, he won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his discoveries about the role of boron in organic chemistry. And it all began with that two-dollar book. I bring this story to your attention, Sagittarius, because I foresee you, too, stumbling upon a modest beginning that eventually yields breakthrough results.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): In

20 B.C., Rome’s most famous poet was Quintus Horatius Flaccus, known to us today as Horace. He prided himself on his meticulous craftsmanship, and advised other writers to be equally scrupulous. Once you compose a poem, he declared, you should put it aside for nine years before deciding whether to publish it. That’s the best way to get proper perspective on its worth. Personally, I think that’s too demanding, although I appreciate the power that can come from marshaling so much conscientiousness. And that brings me to a meditation on your current state, Capricorn. From what I can tell, you may be at risk of being too risk-averse; you could be on the verge of waiting too long and being too cautious. Please consider naming a not-too-distant release date.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Luckily,

you have an inventive mind and an aptitude for experimentation. These will be key assets as you dream up creative ways to do the hard work ahead of you. Your labors may not come naturally, but I bet you’ll be surprised at how engaging they’ll become and how useful the rewards will be. Here’s a tip on how to ensure you will cultivate the best possible attitude: Assume that you now have the power to change stale patterns that have previously been resistant to change.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): May I sug-

gest that you get a lesson in holy gluttony from a Taurus? Or perhaps pick up some pointers in enlightened self-interest from a Scorpio? New potential resources are available, but you haven’t reeled them in with sufficient alacrity. Why? Why oh why oh why?! Maybe you should ask yourself whether you’re asking enough. Maybe you should give yourself permission to beam with majestic self-confidence. Picture this: Your posture is regal, your voice is authoritative, your sovereignty is radiant. You have identified precisely what it is you need and want, and you have formulated a pragmatic plan to get it.

www.RealAstrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888.

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as DEADMAN SPRINGS TRUCKING COMPANY at 81 Gopher Rd Oroville, CA 95966. JAMES NATHAN ANDERSON 81 Gopher Rd Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JAMES ANDERSON Dated: March 14, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000355 Published: March 22,29, April 5,12, 2018 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CATCH IT QUICK BALLOONS, CATCH IT QUICK JUGGLER, CATCH IT QUICK JUGGLING COMPANY at 2062 Chadwick Dr Chico, CA 95928. MICHAEL G. TAYLOR 2062 Chadwick Dr Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: MICHAEL G. TAYLOR Dated: March 12, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000333 Published: March 22,29, April 5,12, 2018 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as MID VALLEY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT at 2720 Cohasset Road Ste B Chico, CA 95973. ELLEN K SHEPHERD 2513 El Paso Way Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ELLEN K. SHEPHERD Dated: March 13, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000345 Published: March 22,29, April 5,12, 2018 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BOMBSHELL BLOWOUTS at 3093 3rd Street Biggs, CA 95917. ANGELA CLOSSON 3093 3rd Street Biggs, CA 95917. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ANGELA CLOSSON Dated: March 15, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000367 Published: March 22,29, April 5,12, 2018 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BUBBLES LAUNDRY at 664 Mangrove Ave Chico, CA 95926. MCR GROUP, LLC 6 Merle Ct Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: MARY RUMIANO, MANAGER Dated: March 13, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000344 Published: March 22,29, April 5,12, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as OROVILLE CAR WASH at 2525 Feather River Blvd Oroville, CA 95965. FADI ABDULMASIH 424 Windham Way Chico, CA 95973. RITA ABDULMASIH 424 Windham Way Chico, CA 95973. ORO DAM CAR WASH INC 424 Windham Way Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: FADI ABDULMASIH, OWNER Dated: March 16, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000371 Published: March 22,29, April 5,12, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as DYE HAIR SALON at 6412 Skyway Paradise, CA 95969. MICHELE JULIANA LEWIS 1676 Nunneley Road Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: MICHELE LEWIS Dated: March 19, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000376 Published: March 22,29, April 5,12, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as ACCURATE PAYROLL AND SECRETARIAL SERVICE INC at 2720 Cohasset Road Suite A Chico, CA 95973. ACCURATE PAYROLL AND SECRETARIAL SERVICE INC 2720 Cohasset Road Suite A Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: DEBORAH PELAK Dated: March 6, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000315 Published: March 22,29, April 5,12, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as MORNING SUN MARTIAL ARTS at 181 East 9th Ave Chico, CA 95926. MARIANNE A EBERHARDT 3254 Dayton Road Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: MARIANNE A. EBERHARDT Dated: March 22, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000393 Published: March 29, April 5,12,19, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BLUEBIRD HOUSE CLEANING at 679 E Third Ave. Chico, CA 95926. JESSICA BENDER 679 E Third Ave. Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JESSICA BENDER Dated: March 16, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000373 Published: March 29, April 5,12,19, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as THE GRATEFUL BEAN COFFEE HOUSE at 6 West Eaton Rd Chico, CA 95973. FOUR FATCHEN BEANS 5291 Nord Hwy Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: NORMA FATCHEN, PRESIDENT Dated: March 21, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000387 Published: March 29, April 5,12,19, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as OROVILLE NEWS ONLY at 1539 6th Avenue Oroville, CA 95965. TERESITA PAEZ-SISINO 1539 6th Avenue Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: TERESITA PAEZ-SISINO Dated: January 29, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000145 Published: March 29, April 5,12,19, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as LOTTIE LEATHER COMPANY at 865 Karen Dr Chico, CA 95926. KATHRYN COOK 865 Karen Dr Chico, CA 95926. KEVIN COOK 865 Karen Dr Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by A Married Couple. Signed: KEVIN COOK Dated: March 20, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000381 Published: March 29, April 5,12,19, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following persons have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name TEN BEAR BUILDERS at 1606 Laurel St Chico, CA 95928. DILLON CREASY 1606 Laurel St Chico, CA 95928. ANALIA CREASY 1606 Laurel St Chico, CA 95928. This business was conducted by A Married Couple. Signed: DILLON CREASY Dated: March 16, 2018 FBN Number: 2015-0001405 Published: March 29, April 5,12,19, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as TC LIVESTOCK at 3730 Rodgers Ave Chico, CA 95928. CASSIDY LOUISE CUNNINGHAM 3730 Rodgers Ave Chico, CA 95928. TANNER HORN 3730 Rodgers Ave Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Joint Venture. Signed: CASSIDY CUNNINGHAM

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Dated: March 14, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000351 Published: March 29, April 5,12,19, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BROKEN WHEEL MEDIA at 95 Key West Loop Chico, CA 95973. CODY MICHAEL JOHNS 95 Key West Loop Chico, CA 95973. MARIE NICOLE RODRIGUEZ 429 Nord Ave Apt 450 Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: MARIE RODRIGUEZ Dated: March 22, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000395 Published: March 29, April 5,12,19, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as HANGIN LOCAL, HANGING LOCAL at 6268 Skyway Road Suite A Paradise, CA 95969. JOEL ALLEN 911 Central Park Drive Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JOEL ALLEN Dated: March 22, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000398 Published: March 29, April 5,12,19, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as EARTHHAVEN CENTER FOR SPIRITUAL ENRICHMENT, EQUALITY PRESS at 42 Ranchita Way Chico, CA 95928. GAYLE HALLIE KIMBALL 42 Ranchita Way Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: GAYLE KIMBALL Dated: March 21, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000384 Published: March 29, April 5,12,19, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BARBER JOHNS, THE ORIGINAL BARBER JOHNS at 532 Nord Ave Chico, CA 95926. DIANNE FUNKHOUSER 2388 Serviss Street Durham, CA 95938. RICHARD FUNKHOUSER 2388 Serviss Street Durham, CA 95938. This business is conducted by A Married Couple. Signed: DIANNE FUNKHOUSER Dated: March 26, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000404 Published: March 29, April 5,12,19, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as ACCOUNTING SOLUTIONS at 15283 Forest Ranch Way Forest Ranch, CA 95942. PERRYMAN AND ASSOCIATES, INC. 15283 Forest Ranch Way Forest Ranch, CA 95942. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: VICKI PERRYMAN, PRESIDENT Dated: March 26, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000413 Published: April 5,12,19,26, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as RISING BEAUTY at 1324 Mangrove Ave. #212 Chico, CA 95926. KAELA JONES 1650 Forest Ave Apt 15 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: KAELA JONES Dated: March 28, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000428 Published: April 5,12,19,26, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as F.E.W. PRODUCTS at 5050 Cohasset Rd. Unit 50 Chico, CA 95973. RICHARD A WALDSMITH 14064 Limousin Dr Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: RICHARD A. WALDSMITH Dated: June 6, 2016 FBN Number: 2016-0000736 Published: April 5,12,19,26, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ABUNDANT LIFE COACHING ACADEMY, KESHA HAYNIE MINISTRIES at 574 E 12th Street Chico, CA 95928. KESHA DANINE FORTUNE FORTUNE-HAYNIE 6576 Oakland Drive Magalia, CA 95954. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: KESHA HAYNIE Dated: March 29, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000441 Publilshed: April 5,12,19,26, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BY.TIGERHEART at 35 Tarn Circle Oroville, CA 95966. SANJIVANI M PATHAK-FARISH 35 Tarn Circle Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: SANJIVANI M. PATHAK-FARISH Dated: March 29, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000438 Published: April 5,12,19,26, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as DEL REAL COMPANY at 2080 Bidwell Avenue Chico, CA 95926. DEL REAL INTERNATIONAL, INC. 142 W. 2nd Street Suite A Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: M. MAX DEL REAL, PRESIDENT/CEO Dated: February 23, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000270 Published: April 5,12,19,26, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as HEALTH CLAIM, SACRED EDIBLES at 4918 Maplespring Rd Yankee Hill, CA 95965. JODI DAVIS 4918 Maplespring Rd Yankee Hill, CA 95965.

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TIMOTHY NEBEL 4918 Maplespring Rd Yankee Hill, CA 95965. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: JODI DAVIS Dated: March 16, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000370 Published: April 12,19,26, May 3, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as HANDS OF LOVE DOULA SERVICES at 1988 Poppy View Terrace Chico, CA 95928. BONNIE JOHNSTON 1988 Poppy View Terrace Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: BONNIE JOHNSTON Dated: March 12, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000334 Published: April 12,19,26, May 3, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as HAPPY CAMPERS RV RENTALS at 1675 Carol Ave Chico, CA 95928. MATHEW DUNCKEL 1675 Carol Ave Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: MATT DUNCKEL Dated: April 3, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000448 Published: April 12,19,26, May 3, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as AIC ELECTRIC at 3804 Hicks Lane Chico, CA 95973. AGRICULTURAL INDUSTRIAL COMMERCIAL ELECTRIC, INC. 3804 Hicks Lane Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: KRISTIN FLOCK, OFFICE MANAGER Dated: March 27, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000421 Published: April 12,19,26, May 3, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following persons have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name AIC ELECTRIC at 3080 Thorntree Drive Suite #85 Chico, CA 95973. GARY R AKE 286 White Ave Chico, CA 95926. WILLIAM T WILLIAMS 6567 Oak Park Drive Magalia, CA 95954. This business was conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: KRISTIN FLOCK, OFFICE MANAGER Dated: March 27, 2018 FBN Number: 2008-0000267 Published: April 12,19,26, May 3, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as KSARTA SQUARE at 360 Starlight Ct Paradise, CA 95967. ANTHONY ROACH 360 Starlight Ct Paradise, CA 95967. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ANTHONY ROACH Dated: April 4, 2018

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FBN Number: 2018-0000461 Published: April 12,19,26, May 3, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as THE CITRINE FOREST at 100 Risa Way Apt 229 Chico, CA 95973. SARAH R TORKELSON 100 Risa Way Apt 229 Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: SARAH TORKELSON Dated: April 3, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000447 Published: April 12,19,26, May 3, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as IRONGATE GARDEN INN at 4673 Nord Highway Chico, CA 95928. ROBERT GROVE ESTATE AND VALUATION SERVICES, INC 3151 Canyon Oaks Terrace Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: KRISTA GROVE, SECRETARY Dated: March 23, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000400 Published: April 12,19,26, May 3, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CREED STRENGTH AND FITNESS at 1607 Ridgebrook Way Chico, CA 95928. TAYLOR CREED CATRETT 1607 Ridgebrook Way Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: TAYLOR C. CATRETT Dated: March 22, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000394 Published: April 12,19,26, May 3, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as COACH WORKS at 2844 A Northgate Dr Chico, CA 95973. SALVADOR VILLEGAS 13043 Orchard Blossom Lane Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: SALVADOR VILLEGAS Dated: April 6, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000482 Published: April 12,19,26, May 3, 2018

NOTICES NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF BUTTE Case Number: 18PR00141 NOTICE TO CREDITORS OF In re THE MARYLEE SHAFFER LIVING TRUST dated April 22, 2013 MARYLEE SHAFFER, Decedent Notice is hereby given to the creditors and contingent creditors of the above-named decedent that all persons having claims against the decedent are required to file them with the Superior Court, at 1775 Concord Avenue, Chico, California, 95928 and mail or deliver a copy to Richard S. Matson, as Trustee of The Marylee Shaffer Living Trust

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dated April 22, 2013, of which the Decedent was the settlor, at 1342 The Esplanade, Suite A, Chico, California 95926, within the later of 4 months after April 12, 2018, or, if notice is mailed or personally delivered to you, 60 days after the date this notice is mailed or personally delivered to you, or you must petition to file a late claim as provided in Probate Code section 19103. A claim form may be obtained from the court clerk. For your protection, you are encouraged to file your claim by certified mail, with return receipt requested. Dated: April 3, 2018 Signed: RICHARD S. MATSON Richard S. Matson, Trustee The Marylee Shaffer Living Trust 1342 The Esplanade, Suita A Chico, California 95926. Published: April 12,19,26, 2018

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner SAVANNAH ROSE SANDERS filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: SAVANNAH ROSE SANDERS Proposed name: JUDITH ANNE BEDBURY THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 4, 2018 Time: 9:00am Dept: TBA Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: MICHAEL P. CANDELA Dated: March 13, 2018 Case Number: 18CV00677 Published: March 22,29, April 5,12, 2018

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner JOSE DE JESUS FLORES BOTELLO filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: JOSE DE JESUS FLORES BOTELLO Proposed name: JESUS FLORES THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 11, 2018 Time: 9:00am

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Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: March 14, 2018 Case Number: 18CV00736 Published: March 22,29, April 5,12, 2018

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner BAMBI BERDAHL/AIMEE SMITH filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: WARREN NICHOLAS FRATERS-BERDAHL Proposed name: WARREN NICHOLAS BERDAHL THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 11, 2018 Time: 9:00am Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: March 14, 2018 Case Number: 18CV00725 Published: March 29, April 5,12,19, 2018

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner KHIRY WYATT filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: KASON ROBERT MICHAEL WYATT Proposed name: KHYREN ROBERT MICHAEL WYATT THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 11, 2018 Time: 9:00am Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: MICHAEL P. CANDELA Dated: March 9, 2018 Case Number: 18CV00326 Published: March 29, April 5,12,19, 2018

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: ADAM JOHN BRITT Proposed name: ADAM JOHN MCCLASKEY THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 25, 2018 Time: 9:00am Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: MICHAEL P. CANDELA Dated: March 23, 2018 Case Number: 18CV00784 Published: April 5,12,19,26, 2018

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner ALYSSA JACQUELINE MARIE BROOKS filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: ALYSSA JACQUELINE MARIE BROOKS Proposed name: ALYSSA JACQUELINE MARIE BURNETT THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 11, 2018 Time: 9:00am Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: March 21, 2018 Case Number: 18CV00867 Published: April 5,12,19,26, 2018

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner CASANDRA ROSE RAGSDALE filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: CASANDRA ROSE RAGSDALE Proposed name: CASANDRA ROSE HEARTSTRONG THE COURT ORDERS that all

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persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 25, 2018 Time: 9:00am Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: MICHAEL P. CANDELA Dated: March 23, 2018 Case Number: 18CV00698 Published: April 5,12,19,26, 2018

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner MICHAEL JAMES SMITH filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: MICHAEL JAMES SMITH Proposed name: KISMET GABRIEL HEARTSTRONG THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 18, 2018 Time: 9:00am Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L MOSBARGER Dated: March 27, 2018 Case Number: 18CV00700 Published: April 5,12,19,26, 2018

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner ANGELICA HELTON filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: ANGELICA HELTON Proposed name: ANGELICA COLEMAN THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition

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should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 18, 2018 Time: 9:00am Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: March 27, 2018 Case Number: 18CV00852 Published: April 12,19,26, May 3, 2018

SUMMONS SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: ANDREA E STROHL AKA ANDREA E TAYLOR YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: BUTTE COUNTY CREDIT BUREAU A CORP NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The Court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Avenue Chico, CA 95928 LIMITED CIVIL CASE The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney is: JOSEPH L SELBY (#249546) Law Office of Ferris & Selby 2607 Forest Avenue Ste 130 Chico, CA 95928. (530) 366-4290 Dated: May 30, 2017 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Case Number: 17CV01525 Published: March 29, April 5,12,19, 2018

SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: LISA NICOLE MUCK YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: BUTTE COUNTY CREDIT BUREAU A CORP NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The Court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Avenue Chico, CA 95928 LIMITED CIVIL CASE The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney is: JOSEPH L SELBY (#249546) Law Office of Ferris & Selby 2607 Forest Avenue Ste 130 Chico, CA 95928. (530) 366-4290 Dated: September 1, 2017 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Case Number: 17CV02674 Published: March 29, April 5,12,19, 2018

SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: RACHEL ANNE SANDOVAL YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: BUTTE COUNTY CREDIT BUREAU A CORP NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California

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Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The Court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Avenue Chico, CA 95928 LIMITED CIVIL CASE The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney is: JOSEPH L SELBY (#249546) Law Office of Ferris & Selby 2607 Forest Avenue Ste 130 Chico, CA 95928. (530) 366-4290 Dated: October 2, 2017 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Case Number: 17CV02839 Published: April 12,19,26, May 3, 2018

SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: AUSTIN D GIANECCHINNI YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: BUTTE COUNTY CREDIT BUREAU A CORP NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online

this Legal Notice continues

Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The Court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Avenue Chico, CA 95928 LIMITED CIVIL CASE The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney is: JOSEPH L SELBY (#249546) Law Office of Ferris & Selby 2607 Forest Avenue Ste 130 Chico, CA 95928. (530) 366-4290 Dated: July 24, 2017 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Case Number: 17CV02180 Published: April 12,19,26, May 3, 2018

PETITION NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE FAY S. ENGELAGE To all heirs and beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: FAY S. ENGELAGE A Petition for Probate has been filed by: CYNTHIA D. COMER in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: CYNTHIA D. COMER be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or conseted to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: April 24, 2018 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: C-18 Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a

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notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: RAOUL J. LECLERC P.O. Drawer 111 Oroville, CA 95965 (530) 533-5661 Case Number: 18PR00133 Published: April 5,12,19, 2018

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE SETH OTT, AKA SETH M. OTT, AKA SETH MICHAEL OTT To all heirs and beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: SETH OTT, AKA SETH M. OTT, AKA SETH MICHAEL OTT A Petition for Probate has been filed by: PAULA HILL-OTT, MICHAEL OTT in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: PAULA HILL-OTT, MICHAEL OTT be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or conseted to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: MAY 8, 2018 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: PROBATE Room: TBA Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may

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want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: CLAYTON B. ANDERSON 20 Independence Circle Chico, CA 95973 (530) 342-6144 Case Number: 18PR00139 Published: April 12,19,26, 2018

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE BURGESS, JOHN MILO To all heirs and beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: JOHN MILO BURGESS A Petition for Probate has been filed by: JUDITH BURGESS in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: JUDITH BURGESS be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or conseted to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: MAY 8, 2018 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: TBA Room: TBA Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice

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(form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: HEATHER SALVADOR 468 Manzanita Avenue #6 Chico, CA 95926 (530) 636-4923 Case Number: 18PR00077 Published: April 12,19,26, 2018

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE WILLIAM LADD KINCHELOE, AKA WILLIAM L. KINCHELOE, AKA WILLIAM KINCHELOE To all heirs and beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: WILLIAM LADD KINCHELOE, AKA WILLIAM L. KINCHELOE, AKA WILLIAM KINCHELOE A Petition for Probate has been filed by: KATHRYN NAKAMOTO in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: KATHRYN NAKAMOTO be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or conseted to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: MAY 1, 2018 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: PROBATE Room: TBA Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate,

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you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: REBECCA YUHASZ McKernan, Lanam, Bakke & Williams LLP 732 Fir Street Paradise, CA 95969 (530) 877-4961 Case Number: 18PR00147 Published: April 12,19,26, 2018

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Something Else

I get lots of emails and texts from people asking about KDV, the guy I constantly refer to as my real estate mentor. He is Ken DuVall, and those of us who knew him consider him a local real estate icon, who loved laughing and knew more jokes than all of us put together. He was something else. Ken was teacher and mentor; guide and guru. He said, “Follow me, and then rise to your own level of incompetence.” The man loved to have fun, but he was serious about doing a good job. He knew more about real estate than all of us put together. KDV passed away in 2012. His friends quote him and talk about him a lot, and it seems we evoke his memory on a daily basis. Memories like KDV smoking one of his handrolled specialty-tobacco cigarettes and blowing the smoke out the skylight of his car; lecturing a roomful of people who are doubled-up laughing as he fires off a string of jokes, then in all seriousness, waving a real estate contract in the air saying,

“You gotta love the details and technicalities in this business, babe, but above all, you gotta love people. Every client deserves a fair shake, no matter who they are.” KDV was also known as “Hollywood.” He grew up in the Hollywood Hills and was an actor and stuntman in “the picture business.” From 1977 until 2012, KDV sold north valley eeal estate. He was a friend to Realtors, clients, and people off the street. “Remember,” he said, “youth and skill are always overcome by age and treachery.” And, “Experience is important, but luck is essential.” He also said, “We’re in this life to live it, not just exist. Live with no regrets. And laugh, my friend, laugh.” Hollywood Ken DuVall: Something else. RIP KDV.

Got a question or comment? i’d like to hear from you. email escrowgo@aol.com or call 530-680-0817. Doug Love is sales manager at century 21 Jeffries Lydon.

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TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

3371 Summit Ridge Ter 2640 Cactus Ave 1931 Potter Rd 819 Shepard Ln 3046 Paso Grande Ct 2870 Wingfield Ave 640 Burnt Ranch Way 1876 Auburn Oak Way 3213 Rogue River Dr 1581 Warner St 843 Netters Cir

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico

$625,000 $540,000 $510,000 $509,000 $455,000 $455,000 $449,000 $387,000 $385,000 $375,000 $370,000

4/3 4/2 3/2 3/3 3/2 4/3 4/4 4/3 3/2 3/1 5/4

38  

CN&R 

april 12, 2018

JOYCE TURNER

Making Your Dream Home a Reality

License#01145231

Jeffries Lydon

SMILES ALWAYS!

Paul Champlin | (530) 828-2902

You don’t have to spell it out for me to sell it!

SQ. FT. 2780 2247 2017 2086 1802 1927 3159 2165 1759 1560 2426

Curious about your homes value in today’s marketplace? Call me, I can help!

570–1944 • joyce_turner@ymail.com

Sponsored by Century 21 Jeffries Lydon ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

1564 East Ave 2368 England St 1324 W Sacramento Ave 359 Brookside Dr 1030 Clotilde Way 50 Losse Way 395 E 9th St 381 E 5th Ave #1 10068 Cohasset Rd 1263 Orchard Ln 328 W 10th Ave

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico

$370,000 $370,000 $367,000 $357,000 $340,000 $335,000 $329,000 $325,000 $307,500 $307,000 $301,000

3/2 4/4 4/3 4/2 4/3 3/2 2/1 3/3 4/3 3/2 3/1

SQ. FT. 1125 1472 1545 1590 1880 1631 1901 1772 3132 1513 1388


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Teresa Larson (530)899-5925 BRE #01177950 chiconativ@aol.com

UPDATED AMBER GROVE 3 bed/ 2 bth 1,904 sq ft home, .25 lot ........................................................................................... $439,900 4 BED/2 BTH, 1,819 sq ft with formal living/dining + family rooms! NICE ...................................................................... $369,500 BEAUTIFUL CALIFORNIA PARK 3 bed/2.5 bath, 2,738 sq ft with views of the lake, hardwood floors, and more ........................... $569,977 2-HOMES ON .77 OF AN ACRE IN TOWN! Custom 3 bed/2 bth, 3,000 sq ft + 3 bed 2 bth, 1,110 2nd home ............................ $575,000 BUTTE VALLEY 2-custom homes, private setting on 235 acs, horse or cattle ................................................................. $1,999,000 FOREST RANCH, adorable 3 bed/2 bth, 1,204 sq ft with updates, fully fenced .43 acres. ............................................... $235,000 GUEST UNIT ATTACHED with this beautiful bed/3 Gbth, updated 3,000 sq ft home PEN4DIN located on 1.17 acres with pool, shop, and more! .................................................................................................... $689,000 G open floor plan, .2,468 sq ft on .89 acs, SHOP! ............................... $499,000 BEAUTIFUL 3 bed/3 bth, plus office + craft room, DIN PEN LARGE LIVING ROOM,, updated master bth, lovely G3 bed/2 bth, 1,566 sq ft on .27 acs. ................................................... $319,000 DIN PEN

Newer, IMMACULATE, Richie Blt home, 1835 sq ft, 3 D bedrooms, 2SOL baths, $359,000.00 North Chico, 2013 Epick blt home, 2280 sq ft, 4 bedrooms, SOLD 3 baths, 3 car garage, on large lot $499,000 1163 sq ft home with many upgrades, newer HVAC, newer SOLD ROOF, new interior and exterior paint. $290,000, Discovery Home in North Chico 1682 sq ft, 3 bedrooms, 2 D baths on 10,000SOL sq ft lot $349,000.00 KIMBERLEY TONGE | (530) 518-5508

New construction just blocks to Bidwell Park: 3/2 $369,000 4/3 & 3 car garage $499,000 20 acres with views $145,000

Alice Zeissler | 530.518.1872

The following houses were sold in Butte County by real estate agents or private parties during the week of March 26, 2018 – april 2, 2018 The housing prices are based on the stated documentary transfer tax of the parcel and may not necessarily reflect the actual sale price of the home. ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

1056 Eaton Rd

Chico

$281,000

2/2

1236

120 Blazeford Gulch

Oroville

$425,000

3/2

1824

2855 Calecita Way

Chico

$275,000

3/1

1256

289 Skyline Blvd

Oroville

$285,000

3/2

1904

1073 Diablo Ave

Chico

$272,000

3/2

1039

93 Grand Ave

Oroville

$250,000

3/1

1666

438 W 10th St

Chico

$255,000

3/2

1074

215 Mira Loma Dr

Oroville

$244,500

4/2

1687

9730 Cohasset Rd

Chico

$250,000

3/2

2052

822 Wagstaff Rd

Paradise

$380,000

3/3

1945

1540 Sheridan Ave

Chico

$230,000

3/2

1530

5741 Academy Dr

Paradise

$330,000

5/3

3532

1 Claremont Cir

Chico

$210,000

3/2

1589

1578 Marston Way

Paradise

$329,000

2/2

1232

1125 Sheridan Ave #22

Chico

$174,000

2/2

978

6243 Oak Way

Paradise

$310,000

3/2

1766

955 Aspen St

Chico

$170,000

4/2

1215

6243 Oliver Rd

Paradise

$272,500

3/2

1561

2400 Kennedy Ave

Chico

$108,000

2/1

1104

731 N Cloud Dr

Paradise

$245,000

2/2

1613

Oroville

$540,000

3/2

2124

890 Central Park Dr

Paradise

$245,000

2/1

1144

3858 Adobe Ln

SQ. FT.

ADDRESS

april 12, 2018

SQ. FT.

  CN&R 

39


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