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CHICO’S FREE NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY VOLUME 41, ISSUE 20 THURSDAY, JANUARY 11, 2018 WWW.NEWSREVIEW.COM

Exploring the internet’s underbelly By JASON SMITH page

30 5 UFO-WATCH

22 NOISE POP

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WHERE’S THE WEED?


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January 11, 2018

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CN&R

INSIDE

Vol. 41, Issue 20 • January 11, 2018 OPINION

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Editorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Guest Comment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Second & Flume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Streetalk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

NEWSLINES 

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Downstroke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Sifter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Eye on 45 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11

HEALTHLINES  Appointment . Weekly Dose .

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12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

GREENWAYS 

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Eco Event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 

EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS 

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15 Minutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 The Goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

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COVER STORY  

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ARTS & CULTURE 

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Music feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 This Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Fine arts listings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Scene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Nightlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Reel World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Chow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 In The Mix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Arts DEVO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Brezsny’s Astrology . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31

CLASSIFIEDS  

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REAL ESTATE  

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On THE COVEr: IllusTraTIOn by sErEnE lusanO

Our Mission: To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring . To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare . To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live . Editor Melissa Daugherty Managing Editor Meredith J . Cooper Arts Editor Jason Cassidy Staff Writers Ashiah Scharaga, Ken Smith Calendar Editor Howard Hardee Contributors Robin Bacior, Alastair Bland, Michelle Camy, Vic Cantu, Bob Grimm, Miles Jordan, Mark Lore, Landon Moblad, Conrad Nystrom, Ryan J . Prado, Juan-Carlos Selznick, Robert Speer, Brian Taylor, Evan Tuchinsky, Carey Wilson Intern Josh Cozine Managing Art Director Tina Flynn Editorial Designer Sandy Peters Design Manager Christopher Terrazas Designers Kyle Shine, Maria Ratinova Creative Director Serene Lusano Marketing/Publications Designer Sarah Hansel Web Design & Strategy Intern Elisabeth Bayard Arthur Director of Sales and Advertising Jamie DeGarmo Advertising Services Coordinator Ruth Alderson Senior Advertising Consultants Brian Corbit, Laura Golino Advertising Consultants Chris Pollok, Autumn Slone Distribution Director Greg Erwin Distribution Manager Mark Schuttenberg Distribution Staff Ken Gates, Bob Meads, Pat Rogers, Mara Schultz, Larry Smith, Lisa Torres, Placido Torres, Jeff Traficante, Bill Unger, Lisa Van Der Maelen

President/CEO Jeff von Kaenel Director of Nuts & Bolts Deborah Redmond Director of People & Culture David Stogner Nuts & Bolts Ninja Leslie Giovanini Executive Coordinator Carlyn Asuncion Director of Dollars & Sense Nicole Jackson Payroll/AP Wizard Miranda Hansen Accounts Receivable Specialist Analie Foland Sweetdeals Coordinator Hannah Williams Project Coordinator Natasha VonKaenel Developer John Bisignano System Support Specialist Kalin Jenkins N&R Publications Editor Michelle Carl N&R Publications Associate Editor Laura Hillen N&R Publications Writer Anne Stokes Marketing & Publications Consultants Steve Caruso, Joseph Engle, Traci Hukill, Elizabeth Morabito 353 E. Second Street, Chico, CA 95928 Phone (530) 894-2300 Fax (530) 892-1111 Website www .newsreview .com Got a News Tip? (530) 894-2300, ext 2224 or chiconewstips@newsreview .com Calendar Events cnrcalendar@newsreview .com Calendar Questions (530) 894-2300, ext . 2243 Want to Advertise? Fax (530) 892-1111 or cnradinfo@newsreview .com Classifieds (530) 894-2300, press 2 or classifieds@newsreview .com Job Opportunities jobs@newsreview .com Want to Subscribe to CN&R? chisubs@newsreview .com Editorial Policies: Opinions expressed in CN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permissions to reprint articles, cartoons, or other portions of the paper. CN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or review materials. Email letters to cnrletters@newsreview.com. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form and to edit them for libel. Advertising Policies: All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes the responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. CN&R is printed at Bay Area News Group on recycled newsprint. Circulation of CN&R is verified by the Circulation Verification Council. CN&R is a member of Chico Chamber of Commerce, Oroville Chamber of Commerce, Downtown Chico Business Association, CNPA, AAN and AWN. Circulation 41,000 copies distributed free weekly.

january 11, 2018

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OPINION

Send guest comments, 340 words maximum, to gc@newsreview.com or to 353 E. Second St., Chico, Ca 95928. Please include photo & short bio.

EDITORIAL

a worthy project We’ve seen a lot of knee-jerk reactions to the City’s Council’s decision to

move forward on a plan to build a bicycle/pedestrian bridge over East 20th Street. That effort is aimed at closing the gap in Chico’s Bikeway 99, the route that begins at the Skyway and ends at Eaton Road. In case you missed it, the council voted unanimously (with one member absent) to direct staff to accept the project’s feasibility study and go after grant funding—about $13 million—to construct what’s estimated to be a $14.7 million project (see “Up and over,” Newslines, Jan. 4). Among some of the responses we’ve seen on social media is one that goes something like this: “So, the city can’t afford police and firefighters, but it can spend millions on a bike bridge?” But here’s the thing: City employees, including fire and law enforcement personnel, are paid from the general fund, the city’s operating budget. That’s not the pool of money the city would use to fund the bridge project. Rather, the monies would come from development impact fees earmarked specifically for bicycle infrastructure as well as additional grant funding through a federal program for projects that mitigate congestion, thereby improving air quality. What that means is the proposed bridge would not take away the city’s ability to buoy staffing—public safety or otherwise. Sure, the city could use those impact fees for bicycle improvements elsewhere in the city. But we can’t think of a better way to leverage those funds. This project is, quite simply, a major piece of infrastructure that a rural city of Chico’s size would be fortunate to develop for many reasons beyond those that benefit cyclists. Indeed, in addition to completing the city’s bicycle and pedestrian highway, this project has the potential to reduce crime and air pollution and it even may attract tourists, thereby bringing in much-needed sales taxes that are the primary source of general fund revenue—money that does pay for employees. It’s a worthy project and money well-spent. □

GUEST COMMENT

The malevolent seven be obvious. He has a skillfully arranged Tpileshould of unnaturally blonde hair sitting atop his orange he first name on my list of worst people of 2017

face, accenting the untanned white skin around his eyes, making him look like a raccoon in an alternate universe. Still need a hint? His initials are D.J. and he is, surrealistically, the current president of the United States, if God or justice hasn’t intervened between the time I write these words and whenever they appear in print. Here are the others (the list was depressingly easy to by compile, and the space for it Jaime O’Neill inadequate): The author is a 2. VP Mike Pence. I knew retired community more than a few self-righteous college instructor. religious hypocrites when I was growing up, but I never met a slimier one than this smiling and shameless creep, nor did I ever see anyone suck up to the boss in such repellent ways. 3. Republican Speaker of the House Paul Ryan.

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January 11, 2018

DWr: We’re watching We’re not yet quite sure what to make of the independent forensic report

When it comes to unprincipled hypocrisy, a smug sense of entitlement and the ability to dissemble without blushing, they just don’t make ’em any worse. 4. Sen. Mitch McConnell. He wears his corruption on his face. Look up the word and chances are it will be accompanied by his mug shot. 5. Doug LaMalfa. Speaking of corruption, our own sleazy congressional representative, along with 11 other California Republicans, voted to take away the income tax deduction for union dues, and to eliminate the federal tax deduction for home mortgage interest that hits those of us in California, New York and other blue states especially hard. LaMalfa’s fine, though; he’ll still get his rice subsidies and big bucks from big campaign donors. 6. Sarah Huckabee Sanders, the White House press secretary. Has anyone ever done haughty snottiness and an undeserved sense of personal superiority better? Anthony Scaramucci and Sean Spicer would have also made this list had there been space for them. 7. Donna Brazile, former chair of the Democratic National Committee. Self-promoter and bookpromoter extraordinaire, she’s the embodiment of why so many people are so unhappy with the DNC. □

on last year’s Oroville Dam incident that was released last week. For one, it’s 584 pages and includes investigation results ranging from initial construction to the interpersonal working relationships of employees at the state Department of Water Resources, which owns the dam. It’s hard to know where to start. Second, the report doesn’t lay blame on any one chain of events or any one individual or departmental error. It was, as the summary explains, a “long-term systemic failure.” This does not put us at ease, nor should it help those living below the dam sleep at night. Cracks were noted in the spillway as early as 1969, the report says, and their importance was ignored and, ultimately, “normalized.” Oroville has long felt like a jilted lover in the whole dam scheme. When the structure, which is at the center of the State Water Project, was built in the 1960s, promises were made—many of them lofty, none of them realized. Once it was in place, it was as if the commitments were no longer deemed necessary. (Why buy the cow ….) The report indicates further that the primary objectives of the DWR, when it came to Oroville Dam, were not infrastructure and maintenance (i.e., the safety of Oroville residents) but rather water delivery to points south and power production to reduce costs. These priorities “came to some extent at the expense of more long-term attention to proactively preventing infrastructure problems and managing the associated risks.” This is a big eye-opener. DWR has put Butte County at risk in favor of water transfers to our southerly neighbors. Going forward, we must watch vigilantly as repairs are made. Hard questions must be asked. Promises must be made and kept. We know we’ll be watching. □


LETTERS Send email to cnrletters@newsreview.com

SECOND & FLUME by Melissa Daugherty m e l i s s a d @ n e w s r e v i e w. c o m

intelligent life Over the holidays, I read an interesting and widely reported story about four U.S. Navy personnel flying in two F/A-18F Super Hornets and their encounter with an unidentified flying object off the Southern California coast. The incident happened in 2004 but the federal government, which, between 2007 and 2012, operated a program to investigate such phenomena, only recently verified that it took place. Before you envision me wearing a tinfoil hat, keep in mind that the feds also copped to the existence of the heretofore under-theradar program—the so-called Advanced Aviation Threat Identification Program (AATIP)—in response to questions from The New York Times. Moreover, the government released a portion of audio and video of the aforementioned incident. You can read about it in-depth in the Times or check out articles in dozens of other newspapers, magazines and TV outlets—everything from Fox News to Newsweek. Here’s the quick version: The pilots were summoned to the location of the object—reportedly 100 miles from shore—by officials on an aircraft carrier who’d spotted something on the vessel’s radar. What the men found was described as whitish, oval-shaped and about 40 feet long. And as they tried to investigate further, it “accelerated like nothing I’ve ever seen,” one of the pilots, Cmdr. David Fravor, told the Times. Fravor, in a separate interview with the newspaper, emphasized that he sticks by his account. His answer, when questioned about what the thing was: “Something not from Earth.” That’s a direct quote. The statement is eyebrow-raising, as is him presumably having been given the go-ahead to talk about it publicly. Also stunning is the Pentagon’s recent acknowledgment that the AATIP was real. It’s clear that the agency didn’t want the public to know about the program—its $22 million in annual funding was buried in the Defense Department’s $600 billion budgets just for the purpose of keeping it secreted. So, why now, I wonder, is the government opening the door— albeit cracking it ever so slightly—into this shadowy effort to investigate UFOs? A trial balloon, perhaps? I don’t have any answers, but I do know this: It’s hard to dismiss the testimony of U.S. fighter pilots—aviation experts—who witnessed advanced aircraft that a) they didn’t recognize, and b) outmaneuvered their planes in a way that is apparently impossible based on known technology. I’ve often wondered if extraterrestrial life exists, and, if so, what aliens might think of Earth and its inhabitants. If we have been visited, as Cmdr. Fravor suggests, I wonder for what purpose. I can just picture an alien hovering its ship over the ocean, just like he described, studying the ecological damage human beings have done to the planet. I certainly hope the good old US of A isn’t judged based on the “very stable genius” who currently occupies the White House or the greedy corporations that helped put him there. I cringe at the thought. AATIP was only partially declassified, and has purportedly been shuttered since 2012, though some former federal officials say it’s still active. Considering the recent revelations, you’d hope such research would continue. Then again, based on current events, the money might be better spent searching for intelligent life here on Earth.

Melissa Daugherty is editor of the CN&R

The distractor’s destruction Re “Don’t be fooled by the distractorin-chief” (Guest comment, by Roger Beadle, Jan. 4): Destructive policies are the keynote of the Trump regime, as Mr. Beadle’s research illustrates. He’s done his homework on Scott Pruitt and the EPA, which, under the Trump regime, might as well be renamed the Environmental Destruction Agency. Trump has assaulted every agency, and with his lies and provocations wages a daily assault on sanity and human decency. His assault on the reality of climate change is perhaps the most egregious and enduring, second only to bullying a despot and playing with the idea of nuclear war, which is, for sane people at least, unthinkable. Mr. Trump is a petulant child who is delusional, ignorant, impulsive and dangerous. He needs to be removed from office before it’s too late. We can’t wait for the year 2020.

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One possible solution Re “Stalemate” (Newslines, by Howard Hardee, Dec. 21): The single most vexing and divisive problem facing our community for years now is homelessness. If we don’t insist on making it the central issue of upcoming elections, then we deserve the inaction bound to follow. Some upcoming City Council decisions hold promise for progress. Several states are using granny units, or accessory dwelling units (ADU), to increase the volume of affordable housing stock. Chico is updating local policy to comply with recent state laws intended to reduce obstacles to homeowners building ADUs. Councilmembers Karl Ory and Ann Schwab are to be thanked for vocally advancing affordable housing goals and Vice Mayor Reanette Fillmer also expressed some openness. Only Mayor Sean Morgan was flatly opposed to reducing fees for affordable units, stating that housing prices don’t drive homelessness here, but he might want to review the housing element of the Chico general plan again, because it indicates otherwise. LETTERS c o n t i n u e d

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LETTERS c o n t i n u e d f r o m pa g e 5 Title 19 land-use code is also being updated soon, and increasing flexibility to allow creative and very low-cost options for our neighbors experiencing homelessness would be outstanding. Please ask the members of the City Council to establish whatever incentives and support possible in order to encourage building the quantity of affordable housing ADUs required by our crisis.

an idiot, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing.” Ernie Bean Paradise

I see that 45 maintains that he’s a “very stable genius.” The only connection he has with the word “stable” is that he’s full of what you try not to step in when you visit one.

Trash talk

Re “About that village” (Letters, by Charles Withuhn, Jan. 4): Charles Withuhn says that if you build Simplicity Village (SV), it will not attract homeless to Chico. But of course, it will. Think Black Friday. One thousand people for 100 TVs. Nine hundred don’t get one, but they show up and look around to see what bargains are to be had. SV may “sell out” quickly, but it isn’t permanent housing. There will be some influx of homeless hoping to get a vacancy and sticking around just in case. Withuhn’s defense of his project seems based on his point of view, and not that of the homeless. They will come regardless of a complex application process and a limited number of spots. They will come based on their needs and hopes. They will come because Chico is saying, “We are homelessfriendly.” They will come for everything else besides SV. The number of homeless people in California is daunting, so let me be clear. SV will decrease net homelessness. That’s a good thing. But it will also incentivize a demographic shift of homeless toward and into Chico. Therefore, SV is more than 60 beds. It is a defining moment for the city. Make your decision with eyes wide open, not wool pulled over them. Peter Bridge Ord Bend

On Trump’s tweets Perhaps the Trump tweets are: Merging emotional tales from the past with “prestige enhanced memory distortion.” On the other hand, that is far too polite an explanation. Maybe Shakespeare said it better: “It is a tale told by 6 

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january 11, 2018

—nina Widlund

Miles Jordan Chico

Dan Everhart Chico

Open your eyes

“WM has been given a monopoly on residential trash service in Chico, yet the company now charges more per bill to use this monopoly.”

When the Chico City Council was reorganizing the companies to pick up garbage in Chico, the panel announced that if you had to switch companies, your bill would remain the same. My last bill from Recology was $64.85 (two cans) for a quarter. My bill now with Waste Management is $85.38 (one can). That is an increase of $20.82. When I called the phone number on the bill and asked why my new bill was not the same as the City Council said it would be, the lady responded by saying, “Oh, I wasn’t at the meeting, because I live in Phoenix, Ariz.” (How is that for an intelligent response from Waste Management?) A supervisor was not available. The lady went on to say that, since I was 87, I could apply for a senior discount, but I would have to appear in person at 2569 Scott Ave., Chico, with a picture ID card and it had to be for the smallest can for $42.33 a quarter. It just so happened that there were about a dozen people behind me in line with similar problems. I think the Chico City Council should revisit this matter and inform Waste Management to abide by their agreement or forfeit its business in Chico. Don Rogers Chico

Is anyone else dissatisfied with Waste Management trash service? 1. On Dec. 30, there was a three-man crew going through our neighborhood changing out trash cans. These men were not adequately protected for the job they were doing. They had to transfer full trash cans into the new cans. Yet, the scheduled pickup came by shortly after their switch out. Wouldn’t it have made more sense to have them exchange the new cans for the old, after the trash cans had been

emptied? Why would WM subject these men to exposure of trash that may contain dangerous items or substances? What kind of company exposes workers to this kind of risk? 2. When I called in to discuss my bill, the hold time was unreasonably long. WM has been given a monopoly on residential trash service in Chico, yet the company now charges more per bill to use this monopoly. So we get to pay more and have longer hold times. Why? 3. WM invoices state, for payment: “Due Upon Receipt.” Not everyone is able to pay their bills on day of receipt. Why is there no reasonable due date? How easy would this be to remedy? Nina Widlund  Chico

Biased toward BHS It was recently announced that the city of Chico is looking to contract out city animal services and is currently accepting bids. As director of the League of Humane Voters, Butte County affiliate, I wrote a letter to each City Council member and the city manager, stating my opposition to the expected bid from the Butte Humane Society (BHS), which is undoubtedly the front-runner. BHS ran animal services for 25 years and ran it poorly. BHS asked for more funds from the city on an annual basis; it was never enough. As a result, my letter was shared with the executive director of BHS, Katrina Woodcox, who reached out to me wanting to discuss my letter and dispute my concerns. This shows blatant bias and favoritism toward BHS and is extremely inappropriate. In 2012, the city finally took charge of the Chico Animal Shelter and since then has made major improvements to the quality of the staff and vast improvements to the care of the animals it takes in. The

euthanasia rate has plummeted to an all-time low as well. This is something we can be proud of, and it is my belief that the Chico Animal Shelter should continue to be run as-is. Sarah Downs Chico

People want pot Our so-called president and attorney general seem to have an “ax to grind” over cannabis in their campaign against liberal Californians, but what about our veterans with medical cannabis and others who have the opportunity to live a better life? Cannabis is not a violenceinducing drug like meth and other drugs or alcohol. People who are violent with cannabis in their system likely have something else in their body, most likely alcohol. I am a Vietnam vet with a Silver Star and Purple Heart who has been using cannabis for almost 51 years, which is as long as I’ve been married. I retired at 68 and excelled in all of my jobs. History of violence—none. Tried other drugs—none. PTSD—no signs. I had been an alcohol drinker (sociably) for many years, but my whole attitude changes for the worse when I drink, so I quit that. The president, Jeff Sessions and the Butte County Board of Supervisors need to wake up and do what the people voted for.

To make sense of this, one needs to accept that a black dress makes a woman less attractive. Want to make a statement? Come in a burqa and donate to charity the thousands otherwise spent on your hair, makeup and revealing black dresses. I personally do not know any men who see women as sex objects. I know many who see women as sexual human beings. Evolution has made it that way. There are men (and women) who abuse power. We are justified in rebelling against such. This letter is about touching. No woman has ever been a man. Often women are unaware of the image they portray. People are imperfect beings. Garrison Keillor, one of the warmest, most gentle people I have ever met, was reportedly fired for putting his hand on the back of a woman during a photo op. Zero tolerance is euphemistic for infinite intolerance. That cannot stand. Bruce Balgooyen Chico

Support teachers Chico Unified Teachers Association (CUTA) will provide an opportunity to view the movie Backpack Full of Cash, a documentary exploring the growing trend of privatizing public schools. Only a limited number of screenings have been scheduled throughout the nation at present. The movie will be shown on Monday, Jan. 15, Martin Luther King Jr. Day, at Pleasant Valley High School, 1475 East Ave., at 3 p.m. It is narrated by Matt Damon. For more details, call the CUTA office at 343-0226 or visit the group on Facebook. Everyone who is rooting for the survival of public education, and wants to support our great public school teachers and thank them for the sacrifices they make in order to teach, will want to see this movie. Carolyn Dorn Chico

Bud Twilling Oroville

‘Infinite intolerance’ At the Golden Globes, the red carpet was replete with actresses donning black dresses, purportedly to make a statement against men in power touching women inappropriately. The rationale, as I understand it, is that men see women as sex objects, and therefore touch them.

Write a letter  Tell us what you think in a letter to the editor. Send submissions of 200 or fewer words to cnrletters@ newsreview.com. Deadline for publication is noon on the Tuesday prior to publication.


STREETALK

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NEWSLINES DOWNSTROKE Dam report Damning

Last week (Jan. 5), an independent investigative team released its forensic report of last February’s Oroville Dam spillway failure. It was, pun intended, quite damning. It calls the entire incident “textbook” as far as human error is concerned, pointing to issues dating back to the design and construction of the dam half a century ago and leading up to poor management and safety protocols today. According to the report’s summary: “The Oroville Dam spillway incident was caused by a long-term systemic failure of the California Department of Water Resources (DWR), regulatory and general industry practices to recognize and address inherent spillway design and construction weaknesses, poor bedrock quality, and deteriorated service spillway chute conditions.” What’s more, the report indicates that Oroville Dam is not alone: “Like many other large dam owners, DWR has been somewhat overconfident and complacent regarding the integrity of its civil infrastructure ….”

Stabbing on campuS

Citizens driving through downtown on Sunday evening (Jan. 7) may have noticed a police commotion. University Police Department officers were responding to a knife fight between two homeless men on the Chico State campus that sent the pair to the hospital with minor wounds. William Veaver and Joshua Stoecklein allegedly stabbed each other between the Physical Science Building and Big Chico Creek around 5:40 p.m. University spokesman Sean Murphy said there was no information about what motivated the attack. Neither man was a student.

two homiciDeS launch 2018

Butte County law enforcement started the new year with two separate homicide investigations. On Jan. 4, the Butte County Sheriff’s Office responded to a report of a suspicious death off Black Bear Road in Berry Creek. The victim was identified as 69-year-old William Chrisman. An investigation is ongoing. The same day, Oroville police responded to the 2700 block of Fort Wayne Street after a 911 caller reported a shooting. According to the OPD, Julius Ruff suffered a fatal gunshot wound to the chest. Later, officers discovered another person, Christy Seim, had been injured in the shooting. The same shot that killed Ruff grazed her head. She was treated and released into police custody for further questioning. Joshua Sealy (pictured) was named as the suspected shooter. Four days later, Sealy was arrested in the parking lot of Lakeside Market & Gas. According to OPD, all three parties knew each other. 8

CN&R

January 11, 2018

From the ashes Service providers collaborate to comfort displaced fire victims Weece’s bare feet as he stumbled Fthrough the smoke-filled house he shared alling embers singed 73-year-old Jerry

with 10 roommates in the Avenues, frantically making his way to the door without the story and assistance of his walker. photo by It was just before 6 a.m. Ken Smith on Veteran’s Day (Nov. 11), and the situakens @ n ew srev i ew. c o m tion conjured memories of other trauma he’d Lend a hand: experienced in his life. the house occupied by “I thought, ‘Saigon, fire victims still needs here I come,’” Weece— a few items, such as a washing machine. who served in the Army to help out, contact during the Vietnam joy@torresshelter.org. War—said last Friday (Jan. 6). Many of the residents of the building, a converted fourplex at 723 W. Second Ave. then operating as a shared housing facility, were senior citizens. Two were confined to wheelchairs and five regularly used walkers. All received government assistance and had been homeless before they shared the space on Second Avenue. Kathie Coulter, who was awake when the house’s fire alarms sounded, ran from room to room rousting her housemates and helping them exit the residence. All were

able to escape without serious injury, but those interviewed said they lost most of the few possesions they had. As the building still smoldered that Saturday morning, service providers from local agencies assembled at the scene to help. A handful of the former residents have moved into a new home made possible by the ongoing efforts of two of those organizations, Chico Housing Action Team (CHAT) and Torres Community Shelter. The four—Coulter and Weece, along with Penni Harvey and Mike Spurgeon— spoke about the fire while sitting in the living room of their new home. They say they are some of the fortunate ones: Most of their former roommates have been rehoused with friends, family or in assisted living facilities, but they’ve lost contact with others and fear they’ve returned to life on the streets. Chico Fire Department and medical person-

nel responded to the property after one of the residents called 911. “When we showed up, there was fire shooting out of three of the windows,” CFD Capt. Eric Thau recalled. “About a third of the building was involved, so we knew right away we had a potential

life rescue situation there. We’d been on calls in that building before, and knew that some of the residents there are nonambulatory.” A CFD report on the incident notes the fire was accidental and caused by “undetermined smoking material” that ignited a mattress in one of the bedrooms. Fire personnel contacted the Red Cross, which Thau said is standard procedure when residents are displaced. This set off a chain of events that led to other agencies joining the relief effort. Daryl White, a Red Cross worker based in Yuba City, contacted CHAT as he headed north. CHAT’s Bob Trausch and Leslie Johnson reached out to other local service providers, and were joined at the site by staff from the Torres Shelter, Jesus Center and Stairways Programming. “We all worked together to figure out what their immediate needs were and to start figuring out how to shelter them,” said Jesus Center Executive Director Laura Cootsona. She said the latter task was complicated because some of the fire victims’ medical needs—particularly mobility issues—were greater than the local shelters can typically handle. As Joy Amaro, executive director of the Torres Shelter, assessed whom her facil-


Mike Spurgeon, Kathie Coulter, Joy Amaro and Jerry Weece discuss the fire that displaced 11 residents of a shared housing facility for formerly homeless individuals.

ity could take in, Trausch worked out a deal with the housing facility’s manager and property owner to reimburse a portion of that month’s rent to the displaced residents. Staff from Stairways brought the fire victims oatmeal and more blankets to supplement those provided by the Red Cross. Cootsona contacted local churches, and St. John’s Episcopal Church agreed to house them for about a week. She was also able to coax another fire victim—Weece and Coulter’s frightened cat, Sheba—out of her hiding place in a bush and into a pet carrier. The Torres Shelter housed several of the victims, but doing so required some special arrangements. Shelter guests generally must leave from 6:40 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., but Red Cross gave the shelter $200 a day to provide staff to allow them to stay during that time. Home health care workers visited the shelter daily. Amaro and CHAT continued working together to find a more permanent housing solution, and secured the house that the four—along with Sheba— moved into in mid-December. It is the 12th overseen by CHAT’s supportive housing program and is the first collaborative effort between that organization and the Torres Shelter. Amaro serves as case manager for the home, which was furnished by yet another service group, the Chico Posse Foundation. “Moving here has been a real bless-

ing for us,” said Coulter, who sat on a couch in the new home next to Weece, with Sheba purring on her lap. Still, even those who’ve been rehoused have endured further hardships brought about by the fire. Harvey had to send her dog, a chihuahua named Leo, to live with friends after being displaced. Leo has since passed away, and she believes his death was due to trauma from the fire and separation. Spurgeon, who is wheelchair-bound and missing a leg, was without shelter from mid-November until mid-December. “I was sleeping under the cameras outside of the Jesus Center [for protection],” he said before adding, half-jokingly, “I let people know, in no uncertain terms, that if anybody messed with me I was gonna pound them into the pavement with my prosthetic.” The residents say the manager of their former home has offered for them to move back into the property after it is rebuilt, but that they’re happy where they are. □

Before you grow What to know about Chico’s pot regulations n Chico, there’s a price that comes with growing pot––$281, to be exact––but so far, Inobody’s paying it. That comes as no surprise to Jessica MacKenzie, of the advocacy group Inland Cannabis Farmers’ Association. People are not willing to go to City Hall, say they are growing cannabis in their homes and ask for a permit, she said. A case in point: Permits have been available for indoor medical marijuana gardens since 2011, and the city still has no applications on file. “Nobody is playing your game,” MacKenzie said. “They weren’t playing it before.” While the city cannot prohibit recreational marijuana use for those 21 and older, granted with the passage of Proposition 64, in November the Chico City Council adopted an ordinance banning commercial activity and restricting personal gardens to indoors, while setting up a permitting scheme. It was a contentious topic that passed 4-3 without much discussion on alternative approaches, with Councilmembers Karl Ory, Ann Schwab and Randall Stone dissenting. From a code enforcement standpoint, Chico is going to treat marijuana permits like “any other required permit,” city Community Development Director Leo DePaola told the CN&R. He said he thinks people have avoided getting permits because they believe the city has a hidden agenda. “People think we’re trying to single out people who want to grow their own marijuana,” he said. “We actually want people to grow their own marijuana compliantly.”

So, what do potential growers have to do to get started? • Submit an application, available online or at City Hall, along with site plans. • Pass three code enforcement inspections. • Provide written approval from a landlord. • Pay a $281 fee (additional information and

fees are required for any electrical, plumbing, mechanical or gas modifications or the building of a structure larger than 120 square feet).

That’s the bulk of the process for the two-

year permit, but applicants should also be aware of additional permit provisions. For example, city code enforcement, police and/ or the community development director can request inspection of a grower’s property with a minimum 72-hour notice. DePaola said these inspections will be conducted on a

SIFT ER Year of disaster Since 1980, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has kept track of the economic impact of extreme climate events in the country, and in that time there have been 219 disasters in the United States that have reached $1 billion or more in damages/costs. According to the NOAA’s most recent update, 2017 was the most expensive year yet, with the cumulative cost of the 16 events that met the billiondollar threshold—eight severe storms, three tropical cyclones (hurricanes), two floods, one freeze, one drought, one wildfire (all Western fires were lumped into one event)— totaling $306.2 billion. The average number of billion-dollar disasters per year in the U.S. between 1980 and 2017 was 5.8, but since 2013, the average reached 11.6 events per year.

complaint-driven basis. The minimum for all other code enforcement inspection notices is 24 hours, DePaola said, and citizens can always deny entry, in which case the city has to pursue an inspection warrant signed by a civil court judge. However, the ordinance says refusal can be grounds to revoke the permit, which is legally required for growing. DePaola said this is standard for all code enforcement issues. Permit information is also subject to California Public Records Act requests— an issue brought up during Planning Commission talks about the subject late last year—but the city “may redact personal identifying information of the applicant to protect the medical privacy rights or general privacy interests of the applicant,” according to the City Clerk’s Office, based on feedback from the City Attorney’s Office. According to the ordinance, the regula-

tions were created for the “preservation and protection of the public health, safety and welfare” of the city, because personal cultivation activities “give rise to or pose a significant risk of giving rise to” burglaries and robberies, trespassing, personal and property crimes, fire and building hazards, chemical and waste disposal, mold growth, offensive odors and possession and use by those younger than 21. Violations will be responded to like other code enforcement cases, with a warning followed by a citation/fining process and potential for an infraction or misdemeanor charge. Any violation of city, county or state law can make the grower susceptible to losing his or her permit. Revocation can always NEWSLINES c o n t i n u e d January 11, 2018

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Hey, ya weirdos! Got a strange talent? A freaky act? A singular performance style? A bizarre approach to entertaining crowds of people? The Chico News & Review wants to hear about it! Submissions are now being accepted for the fifth annual Keep Chico Weird Talent Show, happening March 3, 2018, at the Senator Theatre

✶$300 cash prize to first-place winner

✶Artists of every performance

We’re also accepting submissions for the Keep Chico Weird Art Show, March 1-4, at the Museum of Northern California Art (Monca)

c o n t i n u e d f r o m pa g e 9

be challenged by filing an appeal within 10 days of the revocation notice, which will be resolved by the city manager. “Yes, we are regulating [cannabis] maybe more restrictively than other communities, but we aren’t prohibiting recreational use of marijuana,” DePaola said. “We are trying to treat it just as any other permit or code enforcement case. We just prohibit commercial operation in the city.” MacKenzie called the council’s deci-

2018 TALENT SHOW TICKETS ON SALE NOW! $16/advance ($20/door)

www.cnrsweetdeals.newsreview.com or Chico News & Review office (during regular business hours) Also at: www.ticketweb.com and all JMax Productions outlets NOTE: General admission; seating is first come, first served

DEADLINE to enter is Jan. 17, 2018

Get Your Ac t Together!

✶Art of all media is accepted Visit www.facebook.com/keepchicoweird for submission guidelines.

sion “incredibly short-sighted.” She’s never been a huge proponent of “grow-your-own” as the solution to “safe, regulated access,” but she values the right. Growing doesn’t provide a solution for people today, simply because of the nature of the plant’s cycle, she said. “If the goal is safe, regulated access, it has to be immediate. You need commercial, just like I am able to go into the store and buy cough syrup.” Butte County could be Northern California’s inland cannabis hub because of its climate, soil and the skillset of its farmers, MacKenzie said. It could have taken a leading position and become an economic powerhouse. “We are throwing away an industry that could salvage us and make us a mecca.” Enforcement of laws that do not work (i.e., indoor growing requirements and prohibition of commercial activity) ends up being paid for out of taxpayers’ pockets, MacKenzie added, with the alternative being a regulated industry that generates money to fund itself and the city, including enforcement against violators. “I don’t see how you can make an argument against that,” she said, adding that municipalities with precarious financial standings—including Chico—would be wise to consider it. Cannabis farmers have been here for decades, and they want to be legitimate, MacKenzie summed up. “Every city in the county and the county itself is saying, ‘No, you can’t. We are going to continue to treat you like crooks and criminals and outlaws. We’re going to continue to make you hide.’”

Available at:

style are eligible to participate

✶Must be 18-over

NEWSLINES

353 East Second Street, Chico 530-894-2300 •M-F, 9am-5pm

—AshiAh schArAgA ash ia h s@ newsr ev iew.c o m 10

CN&R

January 11, 2018


EYE ON 45 A rundown of news out of the White House and Congress

T

Act—“a law prohibiting federal employees from he CN&R’s latest installment of Eye on 45 using their offices to campaign for or against politiattempts to keep up with the chaos stemming cal candidates.” from the White House and Capitol Hill over the past two months. We’ll start with a tweet from Dec. 2: Trump tweets that he fired his onetime POTUS that hits close to home. national security adviser, Michael Flynn, based on him having lied to the vice president and the FBI. Nov. 14: President Trump accidentally shares The tweet sets off renewed calls for obstruction of his condolences with the people of Sutherland justice charges against the president, since it was Springs, Texas, the site of a mass shooting in early basically an admission that Trump knew Flynn was November, instead of Rancho Tehama, the North guilty when he pressed former FBI Director James State community in which a man shot 18 residents, Comey to go easy on him. The next day, Trump’s killing five, during a series of shootings beginning on personal attorney claimed to have written that Nov. 13. incriminating message. He further charged that Nov. 15: Republican Senate candidate Roy Moore the president cannot obstruct justice because he fires back at Sen. Mitch McConnell, who called for “is the chief law enforcement officer under (the the wannabe senator to step down from his camConstitution’s Article II) and has every right to paign based on multiple women accusing him of express his view of any case.” sexual harassment or assault. Moore’s response via Twitter: “Dear Mitch McConnell: Bring. It. On.” Dec. 5: Mueller allegedly issued a subpoena to Deutsche Bank seeking Trump’s financial records, Nov. 16: The Wall Street Journal reports that reports Reuters. Special Counsel Robert Mueller, back in October, subpoenaed more than a dozen of Trump’s top Dec. 6: Trump formally recognizes Jerusalem as campaign officials for documents related to Russia. the capital of Israel, rather than Tel Aviv—a move A few days later, ABC News reports that he has denounced by both U.S. allies and adversaries. sought documents from the Justice Department as Dec. 11: A trio of women who had previously well. accused the president of sexual harassment call on Congress to launch an investigation. Nov. 17: The New York Times reports that Trump’s son-in-law, Jared Kushner, failed to disDec. 12: Doug Jones, the Democrat in the race close to investigators an attempt by a Russian offifor the Alabama Senate seat previously held by cial to set up a meeting between Russian President now-Attorney General Jeff Sessions, defeats the Vladimir Putin and his father-in-law. embattled Roy Moore. Nov. 21: Despite mounting reports of Roy Moore’s Dec. 14: As feared, the Federal Communications alleged sexual misconduct, including a claim by a Commission, led by its controversial new chairman, then-teenager, President Trump voices support for former Verizon executive Ajit Pai, votes to scrap his candidacy. net neutrality. Nov. 26: The Congressional Budget Office’s analyDec. 19: Both the House and Senate vote to pass sis of the Senate’s tax plan reveals that America’s the so-called Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, a $1.5 trillion tax poorest citizens would be harmed, not helped, by bill that in the short-term will save most Americans the proposed law that largely stands to benefit money but will be costly to most—especially the those making over $100,000 annupoor and middle class—within a ally. decade. The bill also further erodes the federal health care law, the Nov. 27: The president uses Affordable Care Act, and primarily Twitter to lash out at the media— enriches the wealthy. one of his favorite pastimes— particularly CNN. Among other Dec. 23: CBS News reports that, things, POTUS called for a contest during a party at Mar-a-Lago, for networks that are “dishonest, Trump’s Florida estate, the presicorrupt and/or distorted in their dent told his friends “You all just political coverage. … Winner to got a lot richer,” a reference to receive FAKE NEWS TROPHY!” he the recently passed tax bill. exclaimed. Jan. 2: After North Korea On the same day, The Hill leader Kim Jong Un noted that reports that Access Hollywood, that the “nuclear button is always Steve Bannon on the desk of my office,” Trump the cable-TV show and source of PHOTO COURTESY OF WIKIMEDIA responded in a tweet that he has a the now-infamous tape on which “bigger” and “more powerful” butTrump is heard bragging about ton that “works!” groping women without permission, verified that the tape is indeed real. The move comes as reports Jan. 3: The Guardian reports that Steve Bannon, surface that Trump—though he’d previously apoloformer White House chief strategist, described gized for his comments—had recently implied the Donald Trump Jr.’s 2016 meeting with Russians at tape was fake. Trump Tower as “treasonous” and “unpatriotic” in a book by Michael Wolff. Nov. 29: The Hill reports that White House counTrump fired back the same day, saying Bannon sel Kellyanne Conway is the subject of an inveswas fired and has since “lost his mind.” tigation of the U.S. Office of Special Counsel due to comments besmirching Roy Moore challenger —MELISSA DAUGHERTY Doug Jones. Doing so may have violated the Hatch m e l i ss ad @new srev i ew. c o m

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HEALTHLINES Julie Ceccato, Chico police dispatch supervisor,   showcases the city’s new  emergency notification  system, OnSolve’s CodeRED,  which uses geo-targeting  technology to send messages  to citizens during disasters.

On alert County rolls out new emergency notification system story and photo by

Ashiah Scharaga ashiahs@ n ewsrev i ew. com

Aof Bangor last summer, Nate Graber was already returning to his home to pack up a s flames whipped through the small town

second load of valuables when he received an emergency alert about the Wall Fire, which destroyed 41 homes in the area. “By the time we got the text, we had already seen the fire, because the fire had already started within miles of my home,” he said. “I was already evacuating by the time the alert came through.” Many others were woken by neighbors and family in the middle of the night. They never saw an official alert. A similar situation occurred last 12  

CN&R 

january 11, 2018

February, when 180,000 people fled from the city of Oroville and points south in fear of the dam’s emergency spillway collapsing. Phones buzzed with call and text alerts and televisions and radios issued emergency broadcasts. But the news didn’t reach everyone that way—officers pounded on doors, parents got frantic calls from their adult children and strangers drove around offering rides to those without cars. While the county has had emergency notifications in place for years, public safety officials are hoping the implementation of a new system, OnSolve’s CodeRED, will help them to reach more people and, in turn, save lives. It was rolled out in phases over the past couple of months in Butte County, Chico and Paradise. Other municipalities have not signed on to the system, but that doesn’t mean residents cannot use the service.

CodeRED allows dispatchers to let community members know when something disastrous is impacting their neighborhood or immediate location. Chico Police Chief Mike O’Brien said the city is going to focus on using the system for urgent emergencies only, such as active shooters, fires, flooding, gas leaks, train derailments, missing persons, evacuation orders and evacuation shelter locations. Citizens have to sign up and create a free profile online, which includes providing a home or business address, phone number(s) or email. People are then able to be contacted via text, email, landline and/or cellphone,

as well as social media. Additionally, CodeRED’s smartphone app can send alerts based on the phone’s current location, even if the user is traveling outside the region affected by an emergency. Reaching people across many platforms with

just a few clicks of a mouse is about the most expedient, efficient way to get critical safety information to the community, O’Brien said. It’s not enough to flash a warning from the screen of a television or through the

aPPOInTMEnT SPREAD WARMTH Imagine sleeping outside during these cold winter months. Not pretty, right? Safe Space Winter Shelter and Chico Friends on the Street are seeking gently used sleeping bags and blankets for people who are living without shelter in our community. Your donation could save a life. You can drop off items in barrel in the lobby of Sportsman’s Warehouse (765 East Ave.). Contact chat4people@ gmail.com or 520-6412 for more information.

HEALTHLINES c O n T I n u E d

O n Pa g E 1 5


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January 11, 2018


HEALTHLINES

c o n t i n u e d f r o m pa g e 1 2

speakers of a radio anymore, he added. “It’s tough to get information to people across the board, nowadays. We’ve had to adapt to the changing nature of communication.” OnSolve already has contact information in its database collected from commercial data in its network and the city and county’s old notification system. However, there is no guarantee that a citizen’s information is in there unless he or she signs up.

Sign up:

residents can sign up to receive notifications by email, text message, cellphone and/or landline by going to tinyurl.com/ buttecodered. for more information about codered, contact 897-5888.

Be prepared:

the department of Homeland Security shares these tips to help people prepare for disasters.

Draft a family communication plan:

create paper copies of critical contact information for family members, doctors, schools and other service providers. identify someone as a point of contact outside of your community to help your household reconnect. decide on safe, familiar places to meet if separated.

Build a disaster kit:

these include important documents like insurance policies, identification cards and financial records, along with prescription medications, pet and infant food, basic hygiene items, maps, flashlights, a first-aid kit, batteries, water and food.

City staff also benefit from the system—which can generate in-department messages, alerting officers or firefighters all at once. O’Brien recalled the days when a pager was responsible for that job. OnSolve provides the service for Chico, Paradise and Butte County for $37,500 annually. O’Brien said that the city chips in nearly $6,000 per year. Miranda Bowersox, county spokeswoman, said the county and Paradise pay about the same, with the remainder being grant-funded. “For what you’re getting, it’s a pittance, as far as value,” O’Brien said. “Really you want to be prepared. You can’t wait for disasters. You want to have these things in place.” A test run in Chico in December reached about 100,000 points of contact—email, text, phone call or otherwise. And, the systems are connected, so if any police or sheriff dispatch center is disabled, the others can send out emergency notifications in their place. Cindi Dunsmoor, county emergency services officer, said the goal of these systems is to focus on the safety of residents, who should make sure they are signed up. The program even has a feature that allows people to designate a point of contact, such as a trusted relative, who will also be notified if disaster strikes. “Mother Nature sometimes throws curve balls at us,” Dunsmoor said, “and we do the best we can to keep people safe.” □

WEEKLY DOSE Love yourself We tend to beat up on ourselves if we don’t meet goals—if we, say, fail to follow through on our New Year’s resolutions. But there is alternative: self-compassion. This means treating yourself with kindness when things go wrong, and it’s something worth practicing year-round. • Rewrite your negative self-story: Every time you notice you’re being hard on yourself for, say, eating too much pizza last night or procrastinating on your homework this morning, give it a rest. Momentary lapses don’t mean you’re a bad person. • Stay present: Self-compassion is different depending on the situation. Maybe you need to have a good, long cry, or maybe you need to kick yourself in the pants and get something done. • Put self-care first: Prioritize the activities and habits that bring you health and happiness, rather than pushing them off until you’ve done your work for the day. • Let it hurt: Don’t block out difficult emotions. Step into the discomfort, longing and pain and find value and substance in these experiences.

Source: psychologytoday.com

january 11, 2018

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GREENWAYS

Bidding in secret

The town of Courtland, on the Delta, fears the twin tunnels could decimate its community.

Officials quietly solicit contracts on ‘twin tunnels’ project despite lawsuits, lack of permits

story and photo by

Scott Thomas Anderson sc ot ta@ n ewsrev i ew. com

project in the Delta were breathing a sigh Oof relief last fall when a $3 billion hole was

pponents of the embattled “twin tunnels”

suddenly blown into its financing scheme. Nevertheless, in December, California officials quietly opened a construction bidding process on the conveyance system—despite the missing funding, the project’s lack of permits, dozens of pending lawsuits, 90 percent of needed design work, a damning state auditor’s analysis, and the fact that environmental impact hearings on the tunnels haven’t taken place yet. California officials didn’t announce they were now soliciting contracts to any media, but rather went with the minimal legal requirement of notification on an obscure state website. Officially known as California WaterFix, the twin tunnels project would take a huge volume of fresh water from the north Delta and divert it primarily to an arid agricultural industry south of Fresno. Conservationists and independent scientists have predicted catastrophic effects on the Delta if the project is built—the result of salt water incursions moving up the estuary from the Bay. That development alone could put farmers, fishers and marina owners out of business from Freeport to Isleton, and kill much of Sacramento County’s annual $507 million agricultural economy. State scientists deny this will happen. In August, N&R analysis of the twin tunnels’ 40,000-page environmental impact report (EIR) revealed additional impacts

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january 11, 2018

from 14 years of nonstop construction, including massive excavation, deep dredging, steel pile-driving, the razing of historic homes, the draining of ground wells, and hundreds of heavy diesel trucks rolling across 90-year-old bridges every day for over a decade. The EIR’s graphics indicate that the north Delta’s bucolic riverbanks and sloughs will become a permanent industrial zone. Tunnel foes saw a ray of hope in September when the Westlands Water District unexpectedly voted not to help fund the project, creating an estimated $3 billion shortfall in its budget. But then, on Dec. 6, the Department of Water Resources held what it called “a California WaterFix Industry Day” at the Sheraton Grand Hotel in Sacramento— and put the event on in conjunction with Metropolitan Water District, one of the largest beneficiaries of the tunnels. Standing in front of some 250 drilling and construction contractors, DWR Director Grant Davis said the state was now accepting requests for proposals for a project he estimated was about a year from breaking ground. “That certainly has a nice ring to it, doesn’t it?” Grant told the contractors and consultants in the audience. “I see a lot of people nodding—bidding opportunities.” The next presentation came from WaterFix program manager Chuck Gardner, whose PowerPoint presentation hinted at the construction boom by referring to “a megatunnel project.”

That was echoed by the management team’s John Bednarski, who said the tunnels will equal “massive construction efforts taking place.” Bednarski said the bidding processing was starting the next day. His presentation acknowledged only four of the 11 major state and federal permits for the tunnels have been approved. The design of the tunnels and their Herculean intakes is only 5 percent complete, officials also conceded. During a question-and-answer session,

Department of Water Resources contract specialist Nikki Hatcher admitted her department had not notified or advertised the opening of the bidding process in any media, but rather posted the news on the Cal eProcure website, which is a different website than the state’s official California WaterFix site. “I haven’t heard of the website before,” said Barbara Daly of North Delta CARES, a nonprofit watchdog group that opposes the tunnels. Responding to an inquiry from the N&R, DWR spokeswoman Erin Mellon wrote in an email that a general timeline for bidding on the project’s construction is posted on the official WaterFix website. However, the graphic that Mellon referred to only notes that the proposals process is slated for some time within a year. Daly stressed that specific notification about the bidding process to media is important—or at least having it spelled out on the state’s official website—because

many Californians think the project is on hold. That’s because of an array of lawsuits over eminent domain, business loss and environmental impact, as well as the missing $3 billion in funds and a recent state auditor’s report decrying the project’s skyrocketing costs. The state Water Resources Control Board also hasn’t yet held hearings on recreational and environmental impacts from the tunnels project. “Now they’re signing all of these contracts, but what will happen if the project doesn’t move forward and the contracts are broken?” Daly asked. “Are the California taxpayers going to be liable?” □

ECO EVENT BLOCK PARTY

This month’s Block Party With a Purpose is set for Saturday, Jan. 13, starting at 9 a.m. at the corner of Bidwell and Nord avenues. Hosted by local environmental nonprofit Butte Environmental Council, the event is a community-supported cleanup designed to bring neighbors together and make a positive difference in the community and our waterways. Email watershed@becnet.org or call 891-6424 for more information.


EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS phoTo by joSh Cozine

THE GOODS

15 MINUTES

outdoorminded For Brian Curtis, the road to owning an outdoor-oriented and eco-friendly jewelry business like Tarma Designs was more of a roundabout. A week after graduating from Chico State in 1989—with degrees in accounting and graphic design—Curtis hit the road for the Bay Area, where he had a design job lined up. But big-city life didn’t agree with him and a year later he found himself back in Chico. “I was sitting on the 101 one day between Palo Alto and Redwood City and it took me an hour to get home—which was about 6 miles—and I just decided I didn’t want to keep doing that,” he says. Shortly thereafter, Curtis opened his own design and online marketing company, MC2 Design Group. There, he met Michael Coogan, now his business partner, as well as Sky George, creator of Tarma Designs. After working with George as an MC2 client for years, Curtis got to know and appreciate Tarma’s sustainable, outdoor jewelry line. He even offered to buy the company should George ever want to sell. A little over a year ago, George took him up on the offer. In December 2016, Curtis and Coogan bought Tarma and moved operations into their MC2 office on Mangrove Avenue. For more info, check out Tarma online at tarmadesigns.com, or on Facebook.

by

The future is now

What’s the meaning of the stacked rocks logo?

What materials are used to make the jewelry?

The logo is based on the cairn, the stacked stones, which represents balance in a lot of cultures, so it’s kind of a spiritual thing.

Recycled stainless steel, nylon poly cord, silver and white bronze in our casted jewelry. It originally started with using recycled refrigerator stainless steel—it’s durable and doesn’t tarnish. The poly cord dries really quickly, and it’s all made for outdoors people. A lot of jewelry, it can break—the clasp breaks or the chain breaks; this was built for the outdoor lifestyle.

Why were you originally interested in purchasing Tarma? I liked the business model. I’m an outdoor advocate, and I have a Prius and solar panels, so I’m completely entrenched in keeping my [carbon] footprint small. The previous owner was an executive with CamelBak in the marketing department. So [he was] already in the outdoor industry, and decided he’d had it with corporate culture and went on a sabbatical to figure out what he wanted to do. While he was hiking the Pacific Crest Trail ... he realized there wasn’t any outdoor, active jewelry for men and women that was made out of sustainable materials.

What plans do you have for the future? We’re just coming out with our Happy Camper line. It’s more generally outdoor-related, so we’re reaching out to more people that aren’t necessarily elite [outdoor] athletes, but still consider themselves to be outdoors people. We also started selling wearables—beanies, hats and T-shirts—with the Tarma brand on them. —JoSh Cozine

! Y E N O M U O Y S E SAV Sunny Garden Montessori You pay $10

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Sip ‘n’ Shop Downtown’s Starbucks Coffee is sponsoring a fun, month-long event at cool clothing boutique Anika Burke (211 Main St.). Pop on over on Tuesdays from 10:30-11:30 a.m. for a free cup of coffee, pastry and some sweet shopping deals. More on TueSdayS If you know me, you probably don’t picture me doing yoga. That’s because I don’t, though it sounds like it’d probably be fun (and good for me) in the right environment. So, mix it with beer and I might just give it a shot. For those of you like me, here’s our chance: The Chico Tap Room (2201 Pillsbury Road, Ste. 114) is offering Bends & Beers on Tuesdays through January. Hosted by local yogi Amy Yurus, the class (6:15-7:30 p.m.) in the game room costs $20 and includes an ice-cold brew. Check the Tap Room’s Facebook page for info and send a direct message to reserve your spot.

Shake your groove Thing For those who have the itch to get out on the dance floor but lack the confidence to do so, head on over to Downtown Dance at 7 p.m. on the second Saturday of the month for a free beginner’s lesson in West Coast swing—and stick around for the dance at 8. No partner necessary!

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About six months ago, I wrote a cover story about the state of the arts in Chico, in particular public art. Much of what makes this town beautiful, after all, lies in the murals that adorn building façades, the colorful art benches that line our streets and the whimsical statues sprinkled throughout our parks. What I found, however, is a long list of much-needed repairs and very little money with which to address them. Enter Daniel Cahill, who earlier this week posted on Facebook about his creative solution to finding a missing finger on the statue of a man on a bench on Vallombrosa Avenue (in front of the CARD Community Center). “I used my camera and 3-D scanned the whole statue and took measurements, went home and digitally reconstructed a finger, 3-D printed it, and reattached,” he wrote. I reached out to Cahill, who sadly noted that his replacement finger had already been stolen just days after being attached. Not to fear, though, he said he had multiple others at the ready. What’s extra cool: He says he’s reached out to Chico State to see about creating a permanent replacement finger. The process is not all that complicated, he said, and thanks to technology it’s much easier and cheaper than it would have been a decade ago. “Now, with this 3-D scanning method,” he told me, “it can be taken one step further. This 3-D model can also be thrown into a VR experience … people can view and interact with the model online/digitally. It’s also a great way to physically show people what repairs are needed.” Damn, technology is cool. Cahill works at Transpose 3D Scanning in Chico, which scans and prints super-detailed items for use in games, movies and even archaeological preservation. Check them out on Facebook to find out more. I’ll post updates on the finger as they become available.

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january 11, 2018

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17


INTO THE DARK W BY JASON SMITH

Exploring the virtual bazaar of the World Wide Web— where anything goes

About the author:

Jason Smith is a Northern California writer who’s the author of the memoir The Bitter Taste of Dying.

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limbing the wooden steps of a rundown triplex somewhere on the outskirts of the Sacramento grid, I wiped the sweat from my eyes with a sticky T-shirt that felt pasted to my chest. July was bleeding into August and it was hot. The flesh around my eyes sagged and my corneas felt like they were sprinkled with sawdust, strained by a staring contest my ceiling and I had been having since the night my AC went out. I was really in no condition to be doing any work that day, but I was flat broke, behind on rent and out of cigarettes. So there I was, chasing a ghost.

The door opened before I was halfway up the steps. Drug dealers in my experience have always demonstrated exceptional environmental awareness, so I wasn’t shocked that he knew I was there. I was shocked, however, at his appearance. He looked like a kid, the type who could be seen on any high school campus. What he didn’t look like was what he was—a drug-smuggling cocaine dealer on the run. His name was Jim, which is to say his name probably wasn’t Jim. I don’t know his real name. Jim made his living in a corner of the World Wide Web called the “dark web,” something that came along after I retired from that life in 2012, meaning I was unfamiliar with it. But I knew that life. I knew it well. I fought a vicious opiate and benzo addiction for 17 years, before I finally let the compassion and love of others seep in. In December 2012, I said enough was enough. It had been long enough to drift into Jim’s world comfortably, but not so long that it was unrecognizable. Using easy-to-get encryption software, Jim orders his illicit product from nearly untraceable web pages, then has it shipped through the U.S. Postal Service, which screens only a fraction of its packages. “This is the next generation of drug dealer, these dark web guys,” said William Ruzzamenti, director of the Central Valley High-Intensity Drug Trafficking Area, which is a division of the Office of National Drug Control Policy. “Thanks to

them, the United States Postal Service is now the largest drug courier on the planet.” Shaking my hand, Jim welcomed me inside his hideout, where I sat down on a black futon covered with a gray comforter that looked like it had been used recently. “I know,” he said as he carried a laptop over to where I was sitting, placing it in front of me on the coffee table. “I look young.” That’s when he said he was 19 years old.

Anatomy of an online drug trafficker Also known as the “dark net,” the dark web is an expanding virtual space where anything goes. Think of it like eBay designed by Caligula, where digital currency can purchase any vice or horror man has dreamed up—drugs, stolen IDs, assassins, even webcam access to child dungeons. And all of it virtually untraceable. Both Ruzzamenti, who works alongside state and federal agencies as part of a narcotics task force out of the Sacramento County Sheriff’s Department, and DEA Special Agent Casey Rettig suspect the dark web played a role in the mysterious fentanyl overdoses that scourged 14 lives in the Sacramento region last year. Only one person has been tangentially connected to the conspiracy. Authorities still can’t say why counterfeit Norco tablets containing the much stronger synthetic opioid fentanyl were

made and distributed, or who was behind it. It sounded like science fiction to me. I knew the old-school drug game. Late-night drives with two hands on the wheel, praying the tail lights were functioning. I was used to sundown hand-to-hands. Jim was used to coffee roasters and street fairs. Before his current troubles, Jim spent his days soaking up the south Florida sunshine, buying uncut cocaine with Bitcoin from a seller off the dark web. Jim would spend his nights flipping the product at retail prices to college kids, spring breakers, professional athletes, businessmen and tourists, who he claimed spent “stupid money” on the drug. “Everybody wants to get high when they vacation down there, including people who’d never sniff coke back home,” he said. Less than a month before, Jim says, the feds kicked in the unlocked doors of his home just before sun-up. Drugs were seized, the occupants’ hands were zip-tied and the apprehended were counted: The suspects were all there except for one. Two days before the raid, a neighbor told Jim he’d seen some guys that looked like cops trying hard not to look like cops going through his trash. He had a feeling something was about to go down. He broke the neighbor off a gram to say “thank you,” then caught the first flight to Sacramento, where he had a friend in a shabby triplex

Think of it like eBay designed by Caligula, where digital currency can purchase any vice or horror man has dreamed up—drugs, stolen IDs, assassins, even webcam access to child dungeons.


WEB with rickety steps. I tracked down Jim through a matrix of online message boards where people discuss the type of things people discuss when they think nobody’s looking: sex, drugs, money laundering, credit card fraud, financial scams. Needless to say, popping in with, “Hey, I’m a writer doing a story on the dark web, would you be willing to talk?” wasn’t received with warmth. Jim was understandably hesitant at first, but eventually warmed to the idea of talking after skimming a few pieces I’d written. Jim says he never ventured into the darker side of the dark web because it scared him, but he has plenty of acquaintances who did. He claims it changed them. He couldn’t say how, exactly, but it just did. “So the first thing you wanna do,” Jim began, immediately absorbed by his computer, “is get a VPN. It’s a ‘virtual private network.’ It’s like a condom for your phone or computer. Everyone needs to use one of these, even if you’re just using the surface web.”

How the dark net works The “surface web” Jim was referring to is the internet that most of us use day-to-day. The terms “deep” and “surface” were cemented in a 2001 white paper written by Michael K. Bergman for the Journal of Electronic Publishing, which explained that the surface web is the portion of the internet that can be found by search engines like Google, Bing or Yahoo. Any link that pops up in a search is considered part of the surface web. According to Bergman, the vast majority of the World Wide Web resides below the surface, where pages and URLs are not found by search engines. These sites are part of the “deep web.” For example, your bank’s homepage is on the surface web. However, the intranet used by bank employees to communiNarcotics investigator William Ruzzamenti describes the dark web as the next generation for drug dealers. PHOTO VIA FACEBOOK

cate with each other is the deep web. There’s no way for someone to find those pages using a search engine. These are the internet’s two neighborhoods— surface and deep. The surface is accessible to anyone, the deep is more exclusive. But that exclusive neighborhood—the deep web—has a red light district. A dirty, shady, libertarian utopia where the black market adheres strictly to free market principles, absent of any government regulation. This is the dark web. Media outlets often conflate the two terms, colloquially using “deep web” and “dark web” synonymously. They are not, however, the same. To gain entry to the dark web, Jim explained, you need to download Tor, which is tech shorthand for “the onion router.” According to the book WikiLeaks: Inside Julian Assange’s War on Secrecy, Tor was originally developed in the mid ’90s by the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory with the goal of facilitating communication between members of the U.S. intelligence community. The Naval Research Laboratory released the opensource code for Tor to the public in 2004, and it’s been maintained by the nonprofit The Tor

Project since 2006. “Tor is a mask that hides your identity,” Jim explained. “You have to be wearing the mask to get to the good shit. No mask, no entry.” With Tor and a VPN masking your IP address, you can then access what’s called the onion network. Here, instead of a site’s URL ending in .com, .gov or .edu, it ends in .onion. According to Sarah Jamie Lewis, an independent privacy and anonymity researcher and dark web expert, data coming across the onion network is encapsulated by multiple layers of encryption, similar to layers of an onion. When using the surface web without Tor, she explains, a computer requests data from a server directly from its IP, or “internet protocol,” which refers to a set of networking guidelines that allow two or more computers to communicate. This IP leaves a trace, meaning anything that’s sent or received leaves behind a device’s fingerprint, which can be traced back to the person. Tor makes tracing someone’s movements on the dark web almost impossible, Lewis said in an email. Tor renders the user anonymous as it routes encrypted data requests through

Writer Jason Smith viewing a listing for MDMA crystals for sale on the dark web. PHOTO BY KARLOS RENE AYALA

three different servers, positioned anywhere on the globe where internet access is available. “The Tor [makes] three hops, [or in] the case of a hidden service connection, six stops—three from the user making the request, and three from the service responding to the request,” she wrote. “Each hop introduces a new layer of encryption.” Not even the servers know what the requests passing through them are. They’re simply conduits of encrypted data. Were law enforcement able to somehow intercept the transfer of data between servers, they would still need to decode the encryption. Even then, there’d be no way of determining who made the request, since the Tor masks one’s identity and location. In her email, Lewis called it a “robust” scheme. Jim put it more succinctly. “It’s total privacy, total anonymity,” he said. DARK WEB C O N T I N U E D JANUARY 11, 2018

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Preying on human error Authorities have claimed a couple of big dark net victories, but they’re the exceptions that prove the rule. Last July, one month before I found Jim, Attorney General Jeff Sessions took a victory lap for shutting down a group of dark web marketplaces, the biggest of which was a site called AlphaBay. These sites sold drugs, guns, child pornography and offered services ranging from hacking someone’s Facebook to ordering a hitman. The investigation involved the FBI, Drug Enforcement Administration, Dutch National Police and Europol. Sessions praised law enforcement for what he called good, oldfashioned police work. But according to Phil Muncaster, an information technology journalist for the MIT Technology Review, traditional police work is only a factor once human error has occurred. “Law enforcement has been able to capitalize on basic mistakes made by some of the perps,” Muncaster wrote in an email. “[I]f they all used Tor and anonymizing services correctly, police would stand no chance.” The first and most infamous dark web marketplace was Silk Road, launched in 2011. Wired magazine called it the “Amazon of contraband,” but investigators were able to track down the site’s founder only after the real IP address, unmasked without Tor, was accidentally broadcast. Investigators were tipped off by a Reddit thread attempting to alert users of the breach. AlphaBay founder Alexandre Cazes was discovered after password resets for the site were sent directly from his hotmail account, pimp_alex_91@hotmail.com.” That email was connected to his LinkedIn account for a computer repair service in Canada, leading investigators to his real identity and, eventually, his residence in Bangkok, Thailand. Cazes was found last July hanging in his jail cell, dead from an apparent suicide. “We should remember that it still takes some skill to turn those rookie mistakes … into a concrete conviction,” Muncaster said. Law enforcement has reacted by getting creative, which both the American Civil Liberties Union and the Electronic Frontier 20

CN&R

JANUARY 11, 2018

SURFACE WEB

DEEP WEB Financial information Medical records Government resources Company intranets Subscription-only sites

DARK WEB [ TOR-encrypted sites] Drug trafficking

Child porn

Fraudulent documents

Hired assassins

Weapons

Political dissidents

Foundation claim raises constitutional concerns. In February 2015, a dark website that hosted child pornography called Playpen inadvertently revealed its IP address, giving the FBI the physical location of its server. According to the FBI’s website, the agency said it used “court-approved investigative techniques” for a joint investigation named “Operation Pacifier.” But some government watchdogs believe the feds may have gone too far. Court records show that the FBI hijacked the Playpen server and ran the site for two weeks, distributing child pornography but using a custom malware that exploited a hole in the Firefox browser, allowing the FBI to infect the computers and identify those who were downloading their illegal bait. U.S. Judge Robert Bryan, a federal magistrate in Tacoma, Wash., ruled that Jay Michaud, one of the defendants caught in the Operation Pacifier sting, had a right to see the malware code that infected his computer as part of the case’s discovery.

Federal prosecutors in Seattle chose instead to drop the charges and protect the code’s secrecy. Annette Hayes, a federal prosecutor for the Western District of Washington, wrote in a motion following the judge’s decision that, “Disclosure is not currently an option.”

Light amid the dark Despite being a professor of computer science at Sacramento State University, June Dai said the dark web is a place he chooses not to visit. Dai, also the director for the Center of Information Assurance and Security, did point out, however, that the dark web is also used by political dissidents to organize in countries with strict censorship, and where real-world political activism risks a prison sentence. “The dark web anonymity can be used for things other than bad things,” he said. “It is also used for protecting rights and speaking out against governments in places where such things are not permitted.”

Cindy Cohn, executive director of the Electronic Frontier Foundation, told The Guardian in August, “We see Tor use go up whenever a dictatorship takes over or a coup occurs. Tibetans, United Arab Emirates, Tunisia, Egypt. The list goes on and on.” The journal Survival: Global Politics and Strategy published a study last year that found 40 percent of the dark web was used for illicit purposes. Cohn points out that, therefore, 60 percent is not. Many newspapers, including USA Today, The New York Times and The Guardian, have launched their own secure drop servers for whistleblowers to upload documents using Tor and the dark web. The Panama Papers and recent FIFA scandals both came to light thanks to whistleblowers utilizing these tools to protect their identities. SecureDrop is an open-source submission system used by media outlets to gather information from sources whose identities cannot be revealed, protecting both the source and the journalist. Jim doesn’t concern himself much with political activism, but he does think the dark web has its public safety benefits. Retrieving a package from the closet with markings indicating it was shipped via the U.S. Postal Service to a P.O. box, he sits down and peels it open. Inside the cardboard envelope is a paper envelope, and inside that paper envelope are two vacuum-sealed packages: one containing white powder, the other containing a dozen pink pills.

“TOR makes tracing someone’s movements on the dark web almost impossible ... [it] renders the user anonymous as it routes encrypted data requests through three different servers, positioned anywhere on the globe.” —Sarah Jamie Lewis, independent privacy and anonymity researcher

“These were freebies,” he said, pointing to the pills. “My coke guy hooks me up. Once you make reliable connects on here, they start giving you better deals and sending you free shit. It’s like Yelp. They need a good rating to survive.” He pulled up the site where he placed the order for the cocaine. Vendors indicate everything from purity of the drug to the methods they use for shipping. Most state they’re willing to walk first-time buyers through the process to mitigate the risks of shipping. When a vendor says their cocaine is uncut, previous buyers leave reviews either confirming or disputing the claim of purity. It’s easy to see from the outset which vendors deliver on the product they promise, and which do not. The DEA’s Rettig strongly disagrees with Jim’s assessment that these rating systems reduce harm for addicts or for the community. “You cannot apply a rating system that works in the regular world, and apply it to an illicit substance,” she said. “A person ordering on the dark web still has no idea what they’re getting,” she added. “I don’t think reviews by a bunch of drug addicts are going to make it safer.” Jim seemed to disagree. “The people I order from, I know them and they know I test what they send me,” he said. “This is 10 times safer than buying something that was cut with God knows what.” In the meantime, there may be no stopping the dark web. When AlphaBay was shut down, it had 10 times the number PHOTO COURTESY OF UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA


Alexandre Cazes hanged himself in his cell after being caught operating a dark web marketplace. IMAGES VIA FACEBOOK

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Ghost of a chance Jim had disappeared. He stopped responding to emails, and I couldn’t find his username on any message boards. I remember him saying he’d lived in eight different states since 2012. That restless trait hadn’t diminished, it seemed. Ghosts. They never say goodbye when they go. Summer begrudgingly yielded to fall, with winter looming on the other side of Thanksgiving. Pulling the door open at Sacramento Harm Reduction Services, I’m greeted by Executive Director Melinda Ruger. As its name suggests, the clinic meets drug users where they are in their addiction—providing resources to those who want to get clean, and overdose prevention training, clean syringes and other harm-reducing tools to those who are not yet ready. The place is an island in America’s rekindled drug war,

which is expanding to new frontiers thanks to both Sessions and criminal innovation. Meanwhile, guys like Jim proceed to order Schedule I narcotics online the same way the rest of us order Christmas gifts for our families. There’s a tragic disconnect here that no one seems to be acknowledging. How do we stop a generation— my generation—from killing itself with drugs? The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention published a report in the December 2016 National Center for Health Statistics that found, for the first time in more than two decades, American life expectancy has actually declined. National public health and safety experts pointed to the rise in overdose deaths and suicides as the culprit. CDC maps show California has been hit particularly hard. Deaths by “drug poisoning” have increased statewide more than 50 percent since 2002, far outnumbering car accidents. Overdoses have become the leading cause of death for people below the age of 50, and the CDC report found precisely what Special Agent Rettig and Officer Ruzzamenti both told me were decimating a population of young people across the country: illicit fentanyl from China being ordered over the dark web. Neither Ruzzamenti nor agent Rettig sounded optimistic about the nation’s outlook. Law enforcement currently sits patiently awaiting the next dark web slip up, while USPS carriers continue operating as inadvertent drug mules.

It’s a clusterfuck. People are dying, prisons are filling up, and nothing changes. More people died last year than at the height of the AIDS epidemic. More Americans died from drug overdoses in 2016 than died during the entire duration of the Vietnam War. As I watched Ruger and her staff interact with individuals caught in the grips of the epidemic, I realized I was witnessing something that was missing until now. All the interviews of dark web and cyber security experts, and DEA agents, and law enforcement officers, and drug dealers, they were all missing what was on full display at Harm Reduction Services: Humanity. When a homeless woman walked in, crying hysterically, because all of her belongings had been stolen, I watched three different staff members approach her, give her a hug, rub her back, and tell her it was going to be OK. Here, drug addicts were treated by staff with kindness and empathy and understanding. They were treated as equals, with dignity. I thought back to what Jim told me in the beginning. He told me there was humanity in my writing. I didn’t understand what he meant, and I didn’t care. That was my ticket in. I still don’t know what he meant. But humanity wasn’t just my ticket in. Seeing humanity, in the flesh, up close and personal, shown to a group so used to being shown the opposite. Humanity. Turns out, it was also my ticket out. Ω

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Yoga Center of Chico of users that Silk Road had. More than 400,000 users shopped the 369,000 listings spending $800,000 per day, according to Deep Dot Web, which monitors dark web frequency. Every expert interviewed for this story agreed that shutting down the dark web is not realistic. Like it or not, they all agree, the dark web is here to stay. “It’s not a civilized world, this underground market,” professor Dai said. “There’s no way to shut it down or regulate it.” Asked if this was the future of the internet, he paused. “I don’t know,” he said, still considering the question. “Nobody can answer this. Maybe. Maybe not.”

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DO YOU THINK YOU HAVE WHAT IT TAKES TO BE A REPORTER?

Interns wanted!

Want to work on your skills at a real-life newspaper? Well, you might just be in luck. The CN&R is looking for writing interns. Must be a college student and willing to work—we’ll send you out on assignment, not to get us coffee and run errands. To apply, submit your résumé and

at least three writing clips to: CN&R Managing Editor Meredith J. Cooper at meredithc@ newsreview.com and include “internship” in the subject line.

JANUARY 11, 2018

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Arts &Culture Surfer Blood (from left): guitarist Michael McCleary, drummer Tyler Schwarz, bassist Lindsey Mills, vocalist/guitarist John Paul Pitts. PHoTo by VicToria SanderS

THIS WEEK 11

THu

bittersweet ride

Theater THE GLASS MENAGERIE: The play that catapulted playwright

Surfer Blood frontman reflects on band’s ups and downs to stand around in the parking Alot used of his south Florida school and smoke s a high school junior, John Paul Pitts

cigarettes. He thought he was pretty cool, so he was surprised when a freshman girl— by Howard Lindsey Mills—walked Hardee up and asked if his band could play at her birthh oward@ newsrev iew.c om day party. Pitts recalls saying “yes” because it Preview: was disarming to be so Surfer blood performs boldly approached by a Monday, jan. 22, 8:30 p.m., at duffy’s ninth-grader. “You know, two Tavern. Terry Malts and bad Mana open. years is a big age gap in cost: $8 high school,” Pitts said. “But she’s always been Duffy’s Tavern 339 Main St. like that; she’s never 343-7718 been afraid to ask.” The two became friends and Mills ended up joining Pitts’ band years later. But in the meantime, his indie-pop band Surfer Blood released its debut single, “Swim,” in 2009 and an album, Astro Coast, the following year. The group got caught up in an intense wave of buzz, suddenly thrown onto stages at major music festivals and cast by critics as indie tastemakers. It was a lot to handle for the band’s young members who, by Pitts’ recollection, hadn’t mastered anything more 22

CN&R

january 11, 2018

subtle than bashing away at guitars with their amps turned up to 11. It’s possible that Pitts—who spoke to the CN&R ahead of Surfer Blood’s show at Duffy’s Tavern on Jan. 22—was underselling how good the band has been from the beginning. It’s always cleverly used the pop format to explore interesting territory, and Pitts, in particular, has a track record of producing curious twopart songs that end nowhere near where they started. For example, “Anchorage,” a 6 1/2-minute epic on Astro Coast, is split almost directly in half, with a headnodding guitar riff kicking in around the 3-minute mark and looping through to the end. It’s been a winning formula throughout the band’s history. Surfer Blood experienced a dizzying rise, but the hype slowly leveled off—and then things got rocky. In 2015, just prior to the release of the band’s third album, 1,000 Palms, guitarist and founding member Thomas Fekete quit after being diagnosed with sarcoma, a rare form of cancer that had spread to his lungs and spine. “I was feeling pretty dejected, honestly,” Pitts said. “Tom was still alive and fighting, but it was pretty clear he wasn’t going to come back anytime soon. It occurred to me to get a full-time job and do the band as a weekend warrior kind of thing. Maybe I would have done that, but Tom got sick at this time when we’d booked 60 or 70

shows all over the country. It felt like the pieces were scattered everywhere and I had to run around picking them up.” With little choice but to keep going, the band picked up guitarist Mike McCleary—whom they knew from gigging around south Florida—and he learned about 35 songs in a week to play on the tour. Another blow came later, however, when longtime bassist Kevin Williams told Pitts he was done with the band, too. Pitts immediately thought of recruiting an old high school friend to play bass, but Fekete had been one step ahead of him. “Lindsey [Mills] was also really good friends with Tom, who was really sick but must have played matchmaker,” Pitts said. And Mills wasn’t shy about it: “She called me a few days later and straight-up asked to be in the band.” As the group’s bassist, Mills’ backup vocals lend rich, warm undertones to songs on the new album, Snowdonia, released in February 2017. She and McCleary are both light-hearted people, Pitts said, and they helped steer him away from writing what could have been a somber record, as the first following Fekete’s death in 2016. Still, there are emotionally heavy moments throughout Snowdonia. “Bittersweet is always what I’ve always kind of gone for in my songwriting,” Pitts said, “and this is no exception.” □

Tennessee Williams to fame is based on the narrator and protagonist’s shaky recollection of his mother Amanda and his sister Laura. Tom cautions the audience that what they see may not be precisely what happened. Amanda Detmer directs. Thu, 1/11, 7:30pm. $14. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. www.blueroomtheatre.com

anTidiVaS

Sunday, Jan. 14 Chico Women’s Club See Sunday, MUSIC


FINE ARTS oN NEXT pAGE

THE GLASS mENAGERIE

Thursday-Saturday, Jan. 11-13 Blue Room Theatre

SEE THURSDAy-SATURDAy, THEATER

14

SUN

Special Events BRIDAL FAIR: Featuring catering and cake samples, DJs, photographers, wedding planning magazines, photo booths, party rental companies and more. Sun, 1/14, 11am. $10. Silver Dollar Fairgrounds, 2357 Fair St. www.chicobridalshow.com

12

FRI

Special Events

Music

MEMBER SHOWCASE RECEPTION: An opening

ANTIDIVAS: The all-female a capella group’s annual concert and Snowball. Sun, 1/14, 6pm. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St.

reception for a non-juried exhibition to showcase the work of the center’s members. Fri, 1/12, 5pm. Chico Art Center, 450 Orange St. www.chicoartcenter.com

16

TUE

Music CONCERTOS, RAGS & OTHER RICHES: The club’s Ebony and Ivory concert series continues with young players Diego Bustamante and Oliver Moore on piano and Amanda Culbreath and McKenna Reale on violin. Fri, 1/12, 6pm. $15. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St. www.chicowomensclub.org

Theater THE GLASS MENAGERIE: See Thursday. Fri, 1/12, 7:30pm. $14. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. www.blueroomtheatre.com

13

SAT

Special Events

CLASSICAL GUITAR pRojECT Saturday, Jan. 13 Museum of Northern California Art SEE SATURDAy, MUSIC

Music

Voodoo Glow Skulls and Big Sandy. Tue, 1/16, 8:30pm. $20. Lost on Main, 319 Main St. www.jmaxproductions.net

17

WED

Music DECOMPOSITION - DREAM SHOW: Uncle Dad’s Art Collective continues its month-long residency centered around the theme of decay in music, art and culture. Audience members can “decompose” music to its core elements and create a piece on the fly for the house band to perform. This week’s guest, The Dream Show boys, with a profoundly absurd evening of entertainment. Wed, 1/17, 7:30pm. $10-$15. Naked Lounge, 118 W. Second St. www.uncledad.co

REVEREND HORTON HEAT: The Texas-based trio known as a pioneering and influential group in the pyschobilly genre. Support from

FoR moRE MUSIC, SEE NIGHTLIFE oN pAGE 26

BLOCK PARTY WITH A PURPOSE: A communitysupported cleanup designed to bring neighbors together and make a positive difference in the community and our waterways. Sat 1/13, 9am. Free. Corner of Pine Street & Humboldt Avenue, Chico. 530-8916424. www.becnet.org

Music CLASSICAL GUITAR PROJECT: Former Chico State guitar student Carlos Rivera performs. Sat, 1/13, 7:30pm. $15. Monca, 900 Esplanade. www.monca.org

THAT 1 GUY: A one-man band singing and using a variety of homemade musical instruments. Locals Low Flying Birds open. Sat, 1/13, 9pm. $10-$12. Lost on Main, 319 Main St. www.lostonmainchico.com

Theater THE GLASS MENAGERIE: See Thursday. Sat, 1/13, 7:30pm. $14. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First

EDITOR’S PICK

pSyCHoBILLy FREAKoUT! Those of you who used to play once-ubiquitous video game Guitar Hero 2 may remember a particularly challenging song called “Psychobilly Freakout” by Reverend Horton Heat. In addition to being a showcase of mad-crazy shredding, the song is a perfect example of the psychobilly genre, which is a wild brand of honky-tonk punk pioneered in part by none other than the good Reverend. Heat and the band are playing Lost on Main on Tuesday, Jan. 16, and you can expect a sweaty, boot-stomping sort of time. No plastic guitars allowed.

St. www.blueroomtheatre.com

FREE LISTINGS! Post your event for free online at www.newsreview.com/calendar, or email the CN&R calendar editor at cnrcalendar@newsreview.com. Deadline for print listings is Wednesday, 5 p.m., one week prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

jANUARy 11, 2018

CN&R

23


FINE ARTS

Snow Goose Festival WEDNESDAY – SUNDAY JANUARY 24 – 28 CHICO, CALIFORNIA • WWW.SNOWGOOSEFESTIVAL.ORG WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 24 FIELD TRIPS Wed 6am-Sat 2pm 7:30am - 12noon 7:30am - 12noon 9am - 2pm 9am - 3pm 9:30am - 4:30pm 12noon - 4:30pm 12noon - 4:30pm 12:30pm - 7pm 2pm - 6:30pm

River Partners 4-day Birding Competition (NEW) Soils, Landforms, & Vegetation of Bidwell Park Wings & Olive Tasting in Corning (NEW) Up the Creek with a Pair of Binoculars Colusa National Wildlife Refuge & Vicinity (NEW) Birding, History, & Wine Tasting in Durham (NEW) SOLD OUT Oxidation Ponds & Indian Fishery SOLD OUT Raptor Run SOLD OUT Sacramento Refuge Fly-Off Eagle Roost Safari SOLD OUT

7am - 12noon 7am - 6pm 7:30am - 12noon 8am - 3pm 8am - 4pm 8:15am - 3pm 8:30am - 11am 8:30am - 12:30pm 12:30pm - 7pm 2pm - 6:30pm 2pm - 6:30pm 4pm - 7pm 4:30pm - 9pm 4:30pm - 9pm

Bird Photography at Rancho Esquon WS/FT SOLD OUT Marathon Big Day Birding in Plumas County (NEW) SOLD OUT Upper Bidwell Park’s Yahi Trail Winter Raptors with Jon L. Dunn SOLD OUT Divide Ranch (includes lunch) SOLD OUT Gray Lodge Wildlife Area Bidwell Park Bird Walk Foothill Bird Trek (NEW) SOLD OUT Delevan NWR & Sacramento Refuge Fly-Off Eagle Roost Safari SOLD OUT Historic Rancho Llano Seco SOLD OUT Bat Safari Winter Northern Saw-whet Owl Banding SOLD OUT Winter Northern Saw-whet Owl Banding SOLD OUT

3pm - 5pm

“Heron in Flight” Painting Class (NEW)

7am - 6:30pm 7:30am - 1:30pm 7:30am - 3pm 7:45am - 3pm 8am - 12noon 8am - 4pm 8am - 5pm 8:15am - 12:30pm 8:30am - 11am 8:30am - 2pm 8:45am - 2:30pm 9am - 12:30pm 9am - 1:30pm 9:30am - 2pm 12:30pm - 7pm 1pm - 4pm 1pm - 5pm 2pm - 6:30pm 7pm - 8:30pm

Marathon Big Day Birding in Butte County SOLD OUT Wilbur Road & the Afterbay (NEW) Red Bluff Recreation Area Lake Oroville Pontoon Boat Tour (NEW) SOLD OUT Rancho Llano Seco – Farms, Water, & Wildlife Sutter Buttes Hike – Dean Ranch with Jon L. Dunn SOLD OUT Yana Trail SOLD OUT Rancho Esquon Bidwell Park Bird Walk Colusa National Wildlife Refuge Dye Creek Preserve Richvale Birds & Rice Growers Birds & Wine with Purple Line Sandhill Cranes & Winter Raptors SOLD OUT Sacramento Refuge Fly-Off Raptor Run thru Butte County SOLD OUT Intermediate Bird Photography WS/FT (NEW) SOLD OUT Eagle Roost Safari SOLD OUT Family Owl Prowl

THURSDAY, JANUARY 25 FIELD TRIPS

THURSDAY, JANUARY 25 WORKSHOPS FRIDAY, JANUARY 26 FIELD TRIPS

This guy saves you money.

19TH ANNUAL

OuTDOOr LIFE On THE rIDGE – THEn & nOW

FRIDAY, JANUARY 26 PRESENTATIONS & WORKSHOPS 8:30am - 11am 11am - 4pm 3pm - 5pm

Basic Nature & Wildlife Photography Workshop Bird Carving Seminar for Beginners “Owl” Painting Class (NEW)

6:30am - 4:30pm 7am - 12noon 7am - 5pm 7:30am - 3pm 7:45am - 4pm 7:45am - 4pm 8am - 1:30pm 8am - 3pm 8am - 4pm 8:15am - 12noon 8:15am - 12:15pm 8:30am - 12:30pm 8:30am - 3pm 8:45am - 2pm 9am - 3pm 10am - 12noon 11:30am - 4pm 12noon - 4:30pm 12:30pm - 4:30pm 1pm - 3:30pm 1pm - 4pm 2pm - 6:30pm

Valley Wetlands & Wintering Waterbirds Raptor ID, Trapping, & Banding SOLD OUT Refuge to Refuge – Snow Geese Galore! Bird the Shores of Black Butte Lake SOLD OUT Sutter Buttes Hike - State Park’s Peace Valley Sutter Buttes - State Park’s PV & “House Hill” Tundra Swan Viewing – District 10 (includes lunch) Lassen Volcanic NP Snowshoe Hike Sutter Buttes Hike – Dean Ranch Birds & Trees of the Chico Seed Orchard Vina Plains to Pine Creek & the River Llano Seco Viewing Platform with Jon L. Dunn SOLD OUT Wings & Wine Tasting in Vina SOLD OUT Winter Birding in the Foothills (NEW) Explore the Wild Side of Butte Creek (NEW) Family Hike at Verbena Fields Oxidation Ponds & Indian Fishery SOLD OUT Raptor Run SOLD OUT Tundra Swan Viewing – District 10 Youth Nature Photography Field Trip Lundberg Family Farms (NEW) Eagle Roost Safari SOLD OUT

Shows through Feb. 25 Gold Nugget Museum SEE MUSEUMS

SATURDAY, JANUARY 27 FIELD TRIPS

5:30pm - 10pm

“Gathering of Wings” Banquet & Silent Auction

7am - 12noon 7:30am - 3pm 7:45am - 11am 7:45am - 12noon 8am - 12noon 8am - 4pm 8am - 4pm 8am - 5pm 8:15am - 4:30pm 8:30am - 12:30pm 8:30am - 1pm 9am - 1pm 9am - 1:30pm 10am - 4pm 2pm - 6:30pm

Raptor ID, Trapping, & Banding SOLD OUT Coast Range Foothills via Newville Road (NEW) SOLD OUT Beginning Birding by Ear SOLD OUT Birds, River & Habitat Restoration (NEW) Birds & Trees of Butte Creek Ecological Preserve Sutter Buttes – Mid Mountain Sutter Buttes – Summit Ascent Marathon Big Day Birding in Colusa County Gray Lodge & Cordi Winery Llano Seco Viewing Platform Upper Bidwell Park’s Yahi Trail Rancho Esquon Oxidation Ponds & Indian Fishery Wing-It to the Sacramento NWR Eagle Roost Safari SOLD OUT

Works by Jenny C. Marr, watercolor paintings, soapstone sculptures and pine needle baskets by the Northern California artist. The Healing Art Gallery of features artists whose lives have been touched by cancer. Through 1/19. 265 Cohasset Road.

SATURDAY, JANUARY 27 BANQUET

SUNDAY, JANUARY 28 FIELD TRIPS

SUNDAY, JANUARY 28 PRESENTATIONS & WORKSHOPS 9am - 10:30am 10am - 11:30am 12noon - 1:30pm

24

The Great Gray Owl Chico Backyard Birds Freeway Birding – San Francisco to Seattle

CN&R

january 11, 2018

BOLT’S ANTIQUE TOOL MUSEUM: Hand Tools,

HEALING ART GALLERY - ENLOE CANCER CENTER:

Event, Trip & Workshop fees range from $5 – $95. Some events sell out early, so please check our website or call the Snow Goose office to receive updates on closed events.

REGISTER NOW AT www.snowgoosefestival.org • (530) 592-9092

Cnrsweetdeals.newsreview.Com

Less Lawn, More Wildlife – Gardens as Habitat Soundscapes of California Alaska, Land of Many Dreams (NEW) The Surprising Benefits of Snag Forests/Nature’s Nurseries (NEW) Celebrating Cranes (NEW) The Photography of Ron & Nancy Sanford The History & Mystery of the Sutter Buttes The Life of the Rough-legged Hawk

Museums

CHICO ART CENTER: Member Showcase, an annual non-juried exhibition to showcase the work of the center’s members. Through 2/2. 450 Orange St. www.chico artcenter.com

SATURDAY, JANUARY 27 PRESENTATIONS & WORKSHOPS 9am - 10:30am 9am - 10:30am 11am - 12:30pm 11am - 12:30pm 1pm - 2:30pm 1pm - 2:30pm 3pm - 4:30pm 3pm - 4:30pm

Art

JAMES SNIDLE FINE ARTS: Paintings, by local artist Jerry Frost. Through 2/28. 254 E. Fourth St. www.jamessnidlefinearts.com

MUSEUM OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA ART: 1078 Gallery Pop-up Show, featuring eight North State artists of demonstrating performance, installation, and soundand object-based art. Through 1/28. 900 Esplanade, 530-487-7272. www.monca.org

PARADISE ART CENTER: Monochromatic, a display of works created using only dark and light values of one color. Through 1/30. 5564 Almond St. www.paradise-artcenter.com

rotating displays of more than 12,000 kinds of tools. Through 6/2. $3. 1650 Broderick St., Oroville, 530-538-2528. www.boltsantiquetools.com

BUTTE COUNTY HISTORICAL MUSEUM: WWI Exhibition, recently renovated exhibits demonstrating the profound changes in American society caused by The Great War. Through 7/29. 1749 Spencer Ave.

CHICO CREEK NATURE CENTER: Permanent Exhibits, including the The Janeece Webb Living Animal Museum and the Nature Play Room. Through 12/15. 1968 E. Eighth St. www.ccnaturecenter.org

GOLD NUGGET MUSEUM: Outdoor Life on the Ridge - Then & Now, presenting a local perspective on the great outdoors and activities such as fishing, hunting, camping, horseback riding, swimming and winter sports. Through 2/25. 502 Pearson Road, Paradise, 530-872-8722. www.gold nuggetmuseum.com


SCENE

Down at the jam lab

Sacramento-based steelpan virtuoso Shawn Thwaites at the Naked Lounge.

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Serving Butte, Glenn & Tehama Counties

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24 hr. hotline (Collect Calls Accepted) www.rapecrisis.org

Deconstructing Uncle Dad’s new music series

Owerehouse sat a big piece of poster board. Affixed to it enlarged copies of the sheet music for Al Green’s n the small stage inside the Naked Lounge coffee

classic love song “Let’s Stay Together” divided into moveable, stick-on sections, sort of story and like a giant-size, musical version photo by of those refrigerator magnet poetry Carey Wilson pieces. Audience members were invited to reorganize the pieces into a Review: Decomposition, “decomposed” arrangement that the featuring the Shawn house band would perform at the end Thwaites Rebel of the show. Trio and the Uncle This evening (Jan. 3) was the first Dad’s Art Collective. installment of Decomposition, an Wednesday, Jan. 3, at the Naked Lounge. experimental concert series hosted by Chico’s Uncle Dad’s Art Collective. Decomposition series The four-week residency was curated continues Jan. 17 (with by the collective’s managing director, Dream Show) and Jan. 24 (Rob Reich and Joshua Hegg, and features guest artBen Goldberg). ists joining the house band for a night of “visual, auditory and performance art based on the concept of decomposition as it relates to art, science and culture.” The Uncle Dad’s house band—led by Hegg and featuring his Bogg bandmates Michael Bone on bass and drummer Madison DeSantis, plus a horn and woodwind section composed of flautist Samantha Nickel, Roxanne Winslow on trumpet, Evan Goodson on French horn, and trombonist Aria Radick—started the concert with “Tapestry,” a spoken-word piece recited by writer Angela Youngblood over music composed by Hegg. The horn players delivered their parts from different parts of the room, giving the piece an ambient, surround-sound effect, and the slow tempo of Hegg’s music perfectly complemented the rhythmic flow of Youngblood’s words, which unfortunately often became submerged and obscured beneath the rolling waves of sound. Bone then took to the mic for his new song, “Same Old Same Old,” a piece that resonated with subtle dynamics and reminded me a bit of some of

XTC’s moodier moments. The Uncle Dad’s set ended with Hegg’s luxuriously languorous “592,” which gave lots of space to the horns, which were highlighted by Winslow’s bouncy trumpet solo followed by the dulcet reply of Goodson’s French horn, all underpinned by the dexterous interplay of the rhythm section. After a short intermission, the night’s featured act, the Shawn Thwaites Rebel Trio, took the stage, which at this point was dominated by the Sacramentobased band leader’s highly polished pair of steelpans. Accompanied by bassist Ben Kopf and drummer Lem McEwen, Thwaites upped the energy in the room with a quick-tempo, calypso-flavored opener titled “Black Fist,” that in a more open space probably would have inspired some spirited dancing. An ascending bassline led into the next piece, with Thwaites exploring the tonal and dynamic parameters of his very musical percussion instruments via runs of notes from trilling vibrato rolls to chiming clear single notes and metallic low notes. Trumpeter Winslow stepped in for an improvised solo that closed the song and garnered a round of enthusiastic cheering. Mixing original compositions with such classics as Bob Marley’s “Jammin’” and Jackie Wilson’s “(Your Love Keeps Lifting Me) Higher and Higher,” Thwaites’ set left the audience in high spirits and open to enjoy the performance of their interactive “decomposition.” “Let’s Stay Together” sounded fine, but came off more as an enjoyably clever parlor trick than a high-concept act “centered around the theme of decay” as stated in the preshow press release. High-concept or not, the quality of the house players and the range of visiting artists is more than enough reason to come out to the Naked Lounge on a Wednesday night to enjoy some well-played new music in an intimate venue while sipping a beer or coffee drink. Still to come: the surreal comedy of the creators of the local Dream Show (Jan. 17) and a collaboration of acclaimed San Francisco musicians, pianist/accordionist Rob Reich and clarinetist Ben Goldberg (Jan. 24). □

FRONT COUNTRY LIVE AT

THE BIG ROOM TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2018 BACK BY POPULAR DEMAND! “They somehow strike that perfect blend of soaring vocals, impressive playing and interesting song choices. One of the hottest bands currently playing the roots/Americana circuit.” ~Fretboard Journal Get your tickets early and yes, the dance floor is open!

SIERRA NEVADA BREWING CO. 1075 E. 20TH ST., CHICO, CA 95928 ON THE MEZZANINE. IN-PERSON RESERVATIONS ONLY. TICKETS $17.50 •ON SALE 01/14/18

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CN&R

25


NIGHTLIFE

THurSDay 1/11—WEDnESDay 1/17 PUB SCOUTS: A Chico tradition: Irish music for happy hour. Fri, 1/12, 3:30pm. $1. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St.

jEFF PErSHInG BanD

REGGAE NIGHT: Reggae, dancehall, dub and jungle tunes from Circuit Tree, Wagon Burna and DankyGirl. Fri, 1/12, 8pm. $5. The Naked Lounge, 118 W. Second St.

Saturday, Jan. 13 Ramada Plaza SEE SaTurDay

SURROGATE: The local indie-rock veterans are joined by new 1990s cover band Tripping on a Hole in a Paper Heart. Fri, 1/12, 9pm. $5. Maltese Bar & Tap Room, 1600 Park Ave.

THUNDER COVER: Top 40 dance hits in

the lounge. Fri, 1/12, 8:30pm. Gold Country Casino & Hotel, 4020 Olive Highway, Oroville.

ZZ TUSH: ZZ Top covers. Fri, 1/12,

9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

13SaTurDay

12FrIDay

ACOUSTIC SHOW: Featuring the folk-

THE EZ STREET BAND: Rock, blues and country. Fri, 1/12, 8pm. Unwined Kitchen & Bar, 980 Mangrove Ave.

HAWAII STRONG - LASAGNA FEED:

punk stylings of Chico’s Nothing Left, as well as Charly and Dylan West out of Redding. Sat, 1/13, 7:30pm. Blackbird - Books, Gallery & Cafe, 1431 Park Ave.

Gasper. Includes performances by Symblance and Northern Traditionz. Fri, 1/12, 5pm. $13. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave.

ORGONE: Heavy, raw funk and sweat-

An evening of food and music to raise funds for the cancer treatment of 17-year-old Brandon

dripping soul from L.A. Amburgers open. Fri, 1/12, 9pm. $15-$18. Lost on Main, 319 Main St.

CLASSICAL GUITAR PROJECT: Former Chico State guitar student Carlos Rivera displays his chops and

FarEWELL, Man BODS

artistry. Sat, 1/13, 7:30pm. $15. MONCA, 900 Esplanade.

FORTUNATE SON: A tribute to

Creedence Clearwater Revival. Sat,

1/13, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls

Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

JEFF PERSHING BAND: Rock and funk covers and originals. Sat, 1/13, 8:30pm. Ramada Plaza, 685 Manzanita Court.

JIM SCHMIDT & LARRY PETERSON: Playing an eclectic set for listen-

ing and dining pleasure. Sat, 1/13, 6:30pm. Two Twenty Restaurant, 220 W. Fourth St.

OPEN MIC: For musicians of all

ages. Sat, 1/13, 7pm. The End Zone, 250 Cohasset Road.

ROCKHOUNDS: Classic rock in the

lounge. Sat, 1/13, 8:30pm. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

SONS OF JEFFERSON: The local bluegrass players are joined by rockers Royal Oaks and The Damaged Goods. Sat, 1/13, 8:30pm. $7. Maltese Bar & Tap Room, 1600 Park Ave.

TEAM SKINS FAREWELL SHOW: The mathy, chaotic Chico crew calls it a day. Local heavyweights Touch Fuzzy Get Dizzy and Black Magnet open. Sat, 1/13, 9pm. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St.

319 Main St. • Downtown Chico

Jan 13 That 1 Guy with Low Flying Birds Jan 16 Revered Horton Heat with Voodoo Glow Skulls Jan 20 Noche Latina con Banda La Marinera y Grupo Explosion Jan 25 Afroman Jan 26 Object Heavy with Lumbercat Jan 27 local hip hop showcase Feb 2 Blaze1 CD release

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Feb 10 Greg Loicano with Reed Mathis

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CN&R

january 11, 2018

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Feb 3 Birds of Fortune with Michael Russell Trio CNRSWEETDEALS.NEWSREVIEW.COM

Buy online anytime with a credit card or in person with cash, check or credit card M-F 9am – 5pm at 353 E. Second Street, Downtown Chico.

THUNDER COVER: Top 40 dance hits in

the lounge. Sat, 1/13, 8:30pm. Gold Country Casino & Hotel, 4020 Olive Highway, Oroville.

and using a variety of homemade musical instruments. Locals Low Flying Birds open. Sat, 1/13, 9pm. $10-$12. Lost on Main, 319 Main St. www.lostonmainchico.com

UP TO 11: Covers of classic hard-rock and heavy metal songs. Sat, 1/13, 9pm. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave.

celebrate!

Pita Pit

OFF

Naked Lounge

THAT 1 GUY: A one-man band, singing

Let’s

ON SWEET MEALS! Jan 12 Orgone with Amburgers

For the last couple of years, the members of Team Skins have graced Chico with their stripped-down shows, as in taking off their shirts and then playing a loose and wild version of post-punk math rock. But the bare-skinned bros shall soon rock no longer—at least, not together— because their final show is at Duffy’s Tavern on Saturday, Jan. 13. They’ll get a little help from their local friends Touch Fuzzy Get Dizzy and Black Magnet.

0.895 .0676

Invite party organizers to your door with the Chico News & Review’s party guide, which covers a full range of parties and what our readers need to make them happen. Let’s Celebrate! is inserted into the Chico distribution of the CN&R and distributed at select businesses and events around town throughout the year.

Look for Let’s CeLebrate! on stands february 15. ContaCt your aCCount exeCutive to be part of the guide (530) 894-2300.

Let’s

2017

CeLebrate

Chico News & review’ s party guide

tips for planning your next party, including:

Venues rentals Food & More!

!


THIS WEEK: FInD MOrE EnTErTaInMEnT anD SPECIaL EVEnTS On PaGE 22 SCHIZOPHOnICS & WOOLLy BuSHMEn Sunday, Jan. 14 The Naked Lounge SEE SunDay

OLD TIME FIDDLERS: A good, old-

fashioned jam. Mon, 1/15. $3. Bolt’s Antique Tool Museum, 1650 Broderick St., Oroville.

OPEN MIC MADNESS: Live music open

Woolly Bushmen

14SunDay

LOKI MILLER & PAT HULL: Intimate

performances by two talented local musicians. Support from Valleys. Sun, 1/14, 7pm. $5. Blackbird - Books, Gallery & Cafe, 1431 Park Ave.

SCHIZOPHONICS & WOOLLY BUSHMEN: A night of punky garage rock featuring San Diego’s The Schizophonics

and The Woolly Bushmen out of south Florida. Mr. Malibu opens. Sun, 1/14, 8pm. $7. The Naked Lounge, 118 W. Second St.

15MOnDay

MUSIC/COMEDY OPEN MIC: Live music open mic hosted by Jimmy Reno, followed by stand-up comedy. Mon, 1/15, 6pm. Maltese Bar & Tap Room, 1600 Park Ave.

Do you think you have what it takes to be a news photographer?

mic hosted by Jimmy Reno. Followed by stand-up comedy. Mon, 1/15, 6pm. Maltese Bar & Tap Room, 1600 Park Ave.

16TuESDay

REVEREND HORTON HEAT: A Texas-based trio known as a pioneering and influential group in the pyschobilly genre. Support from Voodoo Glow Skulls and Big Sandy. Tue, 1/16, 8:30pm. $20. Lost on Main, 319 Main St.

STEAKSAUCE MUSTACHE: A hardcore band out of Medford, Ore. Also melting faces: Heated from Stockton and locals Pervert and Gigantes. Tue, 1/16, 8pm. $7. Naked Lounge, 118 W. Second St.

17WEDnESDay

DECOMPOSITION - DREAM SHOW: Uncle

Dad’s Art Collective continues its month-long residency centered around the theme of decay in music, art and culture. Audience members can “decompose” music to its core elements and create a piece on the fly for the house band to perform. This week’s guests: the Dream Show boys, with a profoundly absurd evening of entertainment. Wed, 1/17, 7:30pm. $10-$15. The Naked Lounge, 118 W. Second St. www.uncledad.co

ERIN HALEY & FIREFLY: Acoustic rock

to dine by. Wed, 1/17. Free. Izakaya Ichiban, 2000 Notre Dame Blvd.

FULL HOUSE BLUES JAM: Bring your ax and sign up to play with the house band, The Southside Growlers, or just sit back and enjoy the tunes. Wed, 1/17, 7:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

OPEN MIC AT THE LIBRARY: Share everything from haiku to sonnets, short stories to autobiographies, and folk songs to instrumental guitar pieces. Wed, 1/17, 7pm. Free. Chico Library, 1108 Sherman Ave., (530) 891-2726. www.buttecounty.net

OPEN MIC COMEDY: Stand-up come-

OPEN MIKEFULL: At Paradise’s only open mic, all musicians get two songs or 10 minutes onstage. Wed,

1/17, 7pm. $1-$2. Norton Buffalo Hall, 5704 Chapel Drive, Paradise.

OnE CraZy Guy

That 1 Guy knows how to make a scene. He’s a one-man band who sings while using a variety of insane-looking handmade musical instruments as well as his hands and feet to pound out industrial and tribal rhythms. His performances combine classical and electronic elements and are often accented with psychedelic light shows. He’ll be at Lost on Main on Saturday, Jan. 13. Local jamgrass band Low Flying Birds opens.

dians test their material in front

of a live Studio Inn audience. Wed, 1/17, 8pm. Studio Inn Lounge, 2582 Esplanade.

Hey there, students!

The Chico News & Review is seeking a talented photographer to join our crew as a photojournalism intern. Must be enthusiastic, and be able to photograph live events as well as portraits and planned photo shoots. Your goal: Tell a story through your lens.

Interested candidates should email Managing Editor Meredith J. Cooper at meredithc@newsreview.com with a résumé, cover letter explaining your goals for an internship at the CN&R and a link to your portfolio.

january 11, 2018

CN&R

27


REEL WORLD FILM SHORTS Reviewers: Bob Grimm and Juan-Carlos Selznick.

Opening this week The Commuter

Liam Neeson plays an insurance salesman who gets caught up in a potentially deadly criminal mystery on a train during his commute home. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

Jane

Documentary on the life and work of primatologist Jane Goodall drawn from more than 100 hours of never-before-released footage from National Geographic archives. Pageant Theatre. Rated PG.

Paddington 2

The second entry in the UK-made animated film series based on the beloved bear from Michael Bond’s children’s books. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG.

The Post

The sporting life An energetic take on the life of the notorious Molly Bloom real-life infamous poker game organizer and Jformer championship skier, and nails it. Molly’s essica Chastain takes the role of Molly Bloom,

Game—based on a true story that seems too crazy to be real—is a great movie about a woman’s struggle against the jusby tice system and the perils of gamBob Grimm bling outside the already dangerous bg rimm@ newsrev iew.c om realm of a casino. Chastain is firing on all cylinders here. Making the experience all the more enjoyable is screenwriter Aaron Sorkin (The Social Network) in his stylish, snappy directorial debut. Bloom was a top-notch athlete, Molly's Game Starring Jessica shepherded by her domineering Chastain, Idris alba, father (played by an excellent Michael Cera and Kevin Costner), who had all of her Kevin Costner. plans laid out before her. She was Directed by aaron Sorkin. Cinemark 14. going to medal at the Olympics, rated r. go to law school, and graduate to entrepreneur status. Her plans started to hit a snag when it was discovered she had spinal issues. Following major surgeries, she managed to get back on the slopes, only to suffer a colossal crash after being struck by a pine branch. After that disaster, Bloom found herself working high-stakes poker games populated by big gamblers and celebrities. Michael Cera shows up in the movie as one of the players, allegedly based on actor and notorious card player Tobey Maguire. Cera is great in the role, though it would’ve been fantastically weird if they could’ve gotten Maguire to play himself.

4

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CN&R

January 11, 2018

Bloom graduated from working the games, to organizing them, eventually hosting the higheststakes game in New York before things go awry. That’s where Idris Elba, playing Bloom’s lawyer, enters the fray and scorches the screen alongside Chastain. Both benefit from precisely written, fiery dialogue courtesy of Sorkin. The screenplay and direction are so good, the courtroom scenes in this film actually stand as some of the movie’s greater moments. That’s coming from a guy whose eyes often glaze over during courtroom dramas. The film also makes good use of narration by Chastain, which—given the complexity of Bloom’s story—helps take the excitement to another level. Cera, whose official role name is Player X, gets a good chance to go a little darker and more dramatic than usual here, and it pays off. He’s one of the more underrated, reliable comedic actors in play right now, and his work shows he’s capable of so much more. If you need to cast a major prick, put Cera on your list. Costner’s resurgence continues in this film after his triumph last year in Hidden Figures. He’s making a name for himself as an elder statesman. The cast is rounded out by strong, colorful characters around the poker tables and inhabiting the courtroom. In Molly’s Game, Sorkin’s dialogue (adapted from Bloom’s autobiography) has the kinetic energy of the best David Mamet scripts. While there are quiet moments, the movie generally fires along at an energetic level that never becomes overbearing. That’s where Sorkin gets big kudos for his directing chops. He keeps a heavily worded, constantly moving movie tremendously entertaining and remarkably coherent. Ω

Stephen Spielberg directs this biographical drama about events surrounding the publishing of the Pentagon Papers by The Washington Post and The New York Times. Starring Tom Hanks, Meryl Streep and Bob Odenkirk. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

Proud Mary

Taraji P. Henson stars as a mob hitwoman whose life takes an unexpected turn when she encounters a young boy during a job. Cinemark 14. Rated R.

Now playing All the Money in the World

Ridley Scott (The Martian, Gladiator) directs this biographical crime drama about the 1973 kidnapping and subsequent negotiations for the release of then-16-year-old John Paul Getty III, grandson of the billionaire industrialist of the same name. Starring Michelle Williams, Christopher Plummer and Mark Wahlberg. Cinemark 14. Rated R.

Coco

A 3-D animated feature rooted in the Day of the Dead aesthetic that follows the story of a boy named Miguel who goes on an adventure fueled by his desire to play music. Cinemark 14. Rated PG.

Daddy’s Home 2

Just in time for A Bad Moms Christmas across the cineplex comes another parental invasion featuring two dads (Mel Gibson and John Lithgow) of two co-dads (Mark Wahlberg and Will Ferrell) making a nuisance of themselves around the holidays. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13.

Darkest Hour

Joe Wright (Pride & Prejudice, Atonement) directs Gary Oldman as Winston Churchill in this biopic set during the early days of World War II, when the British prime minister was faced with the difficult decisions in the face of Hitler’s advancing troops. Paradise Cinema 7. Rated R.

Ferdinand

Actor/wrestler John Cena stars as the voice of Ferdinand, a peace-loving bull who, upon being captured and delivered into the world of bullfighting, is joined by a misfit team of animals for a daring adventure. Cinemark 14,

Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

The Greatest Showman

A musical based on the life of P.T. Barnum, with Hugh Jackman starring as the showman/ creator of P.T. Barnum’s Grand Traveling Museum, Menagerie, Caravan & Hippodrome—precursor to the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

Insidious: The Last Key

The fourth installment in the Insidious horror series finds the resident parapsychologist investigating a haunting in her own home. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle

A fantasy-adventure flick about four teens who, after being transported into the action of a video game, inhabit four characters (played by The Rock, Kevin Hart, Jack Black and Karen Gillan) as they battle to beat the game and return to the real world. A sequel to the 1995 film Jumanji, which was based on Chris Van Allsburg’s celebrated children’s book. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

Lady Bird

4

Christine McPherson, a Sacramento teenager finishing up her high school years at a Catholic institution, prefers to be called “Lady Bird.” She’s a bright, angry and somewhat uninhibited misfit, and she’s the youthfully conflicted title character in a pungent new comedy/drama written and directed by Greta Gerwig. Gerwig is a Sacramento native herself, and for her directorial debut she’s concocted a briskly incisive entertainment that is part coming-of-age tale, part comedy of California manners, part oddball rom-com. Saoirse Ronan (Brooklyn) plays the title role with quietly bristling mixtures of irony and charm, with occasional touches of Gerwiggian friskiness. Cinemark 14. Rated R —J.C.S.

Molly's Game

4

See review this issue. Cinemark 14. Rated R —B.G.

Pitch Perfect 3

With their individual post-college lives not living up to expectations, members of the Bellas a capella crew reunite for a USO tour. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13.

Star Wars: The Last Jedi

3

In The Last Jedi, we get our older Luke and Leia movie. Mark Hamill and Carrie Fisher get to do what Harrison Ford did in The Force Awakens by having a little more time in their iconic roles. When this film focuses on the saga of Luke and the young scavenger-turnedwarrior Rey (Daisy Ridley), it is nothing short of epic. When the camera is fixed on the late Fisher, it’s heartwarming and, yes, sad. When writer-director Rian Johnson takes the action to the characters of Poe (Oscar Isaac), Finn (John Boyega) and a new character named Rose (Kelly Marie Tran), the film falters. Poe, the X-wing pilot who was so engaging in The Force Awakens, seems underdeveloped here. While the Resistance fights an oddly prolonged and bizarre space battle against the First Order, Poe just whines a lot, to the point where you are actually happy when Leia smacks him across his face. I’m recommending it for its best parts, including Ridley’s continued greatness as Rey and some inspired moments of fun and humor. But, be forewarned, it does goes into “Jar Jar bad” territory at times. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13 —B.G.

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CHOW

1 tacos

$

The crabs are back

every Tuesday

With Dungeness season in full bloom, Henri is itchin’ to make cioppino

530-566-7745 • 1002 W 5th St., Chico

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TWash., the fishing village of Dungeness, one of the first places— he Dungeness crab is named for

along with San Francisco—to begin harvesting it, in 1848. Native to by Henri the Pacific Coast of Bourride North America, the Dungeness ranges in large numbers from the Aleutian Islands to the Morro Bay area, where the water begins to grow significantly warmer. The Northern California crab season normally begins around the beginning of December and lasts through mid-summer, although winter is peak season. Assuming storms have not kept the boats from going out, grocery stores and fish markets usually have the best crab at the best prices right around Christmas and New Year’s. This year, however, even though the Bay Area and central coast seasons have been underway since November, commercial crabbing in many areas from Northern California through Washington have been delayed due to low or poor-quality meat, causing the price to spike around the holidays. But with the ban scheduled to be lifted Jan. 15, affordable crab—and with it the traditional New Year’s meal of cioppino—is on the horizon Cioppino is a rich red fisherman’s stew, perfect for a winter evening. Though some swear by specific recipes, it was originally defined—just like its cousins bouillabaisse, paella, and various fish chowders—basically by whatever the boats brought back, along with tomatoes and most anything else that happened to be on hand. Cioppino originated in San Francisco during the latter half of the 19th century, when Italian

PIES! WHILE SUPPLIES LAST EACH DAY CHICO LOCATION ONLY

2396 ESPLANADE • 530-343-3968 fishermen returning to the docks would share the day’s catch. While some claim the word “cioppino” comes from the Italian for “chopped fine,” a more colorful— though most likely apocryphal— story is that the fishermen would call out to each other as they filled their boiling pots, “Chip in! Chip in!” their Italian accents adding the “o” at the end. Below is a favorite version of the classic San Francisco crab-andtomato stew from my auld friend from The City, Claudio, which he learned from his grandmother. Feel free to improvise, depending on what you can find at the fish counter as well as in your own refrigerator and cabinets. Claudio’s Famous Cioppino 1/4 cup butter 2 onions, sliced 1/4 cup olive oil 2 bay leaves 4 cloves crushed garlic 6 fresh tomatoes (or the equivalent from cans) 1/4 cup chopped celery 1/4 cup parsley 2 tsp. dried basil 1 tsp. dried oregano

1 8-oz. can tomato paste 1/4 cup vermouth 2 cups white wine 1/4 cup lemon juice 1 cup red wine (or one cup tomato sauce) 1 2-lb. crab, cleaned 12 clams 12 mussels 2 lbs. rockfish (or any firm white fish) 2 dozen large shrimp

In a large pot, melt the butter and sauté the onion. Add the olive oil, bay leaves, garlic, tomatoes, celery, herbs, tomato paste, wine, vermouth and lemon juice. Simmer for at least an hour. When sauce is done, thin to desired consistency with tomato sauce or red wine—there should be enough sauce to cover the fish. Add the crab, mussels and clams, and simmer another 10 minutes or so (at least until clams open), stirring occasionally and gently so as to not break up crab too much. Add the shrimp and white fish and cook another 10 minutes. Serve with fresh San Francisco sourdough bread, Caesar salad and a good pinot noir or zinfandel. Happy New Year, Chico. □ January 11, 2018

CN&R

29


ARTS DEVO

IN THE MIX Late Than Never

by JASON CASSIDY • jasonc@newsreview.com

Hunter & Wolfe Self-released One night in 2011, Michael Maffei and Sundeep Kapur found themselves in Chicago. The guys spent the evening telling people they worked at a law firm by the name of Hunter & Wolfe, and while the firm was made up, the name stuck and became the duo’s band moniker. From that came a debut in 2014, and now Late Than Never, this follow-up EP. These few songs are full of a range of clear dynamics, from the simple build of “I Followed” to the pop-rock punch of “All the Vultures.” Maffei’s vocal delivery is polished with a timbre at times crossing over into Rufus Wainwright or Elvis Perkins territory. For the most part, these are pianodriven numbers, but almost always buoyant and uplifting in their pop approach. The short closer, “All Too Much,” is carried by bright piano that’s hit with distorted guitar blows that bring drama to the second half of the song. It’s a fairly bare-bones track that’s stronger for its simple dynamics. Here’s hoping a full-length follows.

MUSIC

—Robin Bacior

Too Many Bad Habits Johnny Nicholas & Friends The People’s Label This is a self-produced reissue of Johnny Nicholas’ 1977 Blind Pig LP, Too Many Bad Habits, with an additional 12 tracks on a second CD. Now 69, the Rhode Island native wound up playing guitar in various bands with several musicians later associated with Roomful of Blues before working with bluesmen like the late Johnny Shines and Big Walter Horton, who have major roles here. There’s an agreeable old-timey flavor on these 26 tracks that’s due to their focus on older blues with Nicholas’ 15 songs (including the title track) also in that groove. Things get off to a lively start with Nicholas playing mandolin on—what else?—“Mandolin Boogie,” with some solid help from some Asleep at the Wheel members. Guitarist Shines and harmonicist Horton, who also wrote some songs, join Nicholas—whose piano and vocals are more than adequate to the task he’s set himself—on several selections. This is a delightful document of a vanished era. A lot of great photos of all involved are printed on the inside covers, too.

MUSIC

—Miles Jordan

Travel Log 1 Panteon Self-released After years on the road with artists like Sleigh Bells, Little Boots, Lulu Gainsbourg, Eli “Paperboy” Reed, Brooklyn-based/Germanyborn singer/songwriter Yvonne Ambrée took to the open road and sea—traveling solo to the likes of Colombia, New York, Czech Republic— and came back with a small batch of songs and a new moniker, Panteon. The tunes from Travel Log 1 have a warm, shimmery essence. “Ballyvaughn” features a modest piano line, with subtle synth and vocal harmonies padding the rich tones and Ambrée’s clean, honeyed vocals floating above. Right when it starts dipping into retro territory, the horn interlude comes in with a parallel synth to give a dreamy electro R&B feel. In the midst of these quilted pieces are field-recording interludes, strong aural visuals that help root the listener in Ambrée’s travels. One listen and you’ll likely get the bug.

MUSIC

—Robin Bacior 30

CN&R

JANUARY 11, 2018

WHAT’S THE CITY COUNCIL BEEN SMOKING? Arts DEVO would never have imagined that in his

lifetime he would write these words: CV is cooler than Chico. By CV, I mean the little city of Shasta Lake, which used to be called Central Valley when I lived there during my high school years, and is where I recently exercised my new right as a Californian to purchase weed. No medical referral needed, just the cash in my hand and an ID showing I was at least 21 years old. As unreal as it might seem, the city where a dart tournament at the Silver Dollar Club is considered a big night out is enlightened enough to capitalize on the legalization of cannabis in California in order to improve the city’s dire financial situation. Meanwhile, in the “university town” of Chico, if you want weed, you still have to “know a guy.” The CN&R has followed with frustration as the conservative majority on the Chico City Council ignored the will of the people (61 percent of the city’s voters were in favor of Proposition 64) as well as the potential financial benefits that cannabis-related jobs and increased tax revenue could bring to the cash-strapped city, and voted to ban all commercial production and sales of cannabis (not just for recreational use, but medical as well). You can grow your own, but only if you do so indoors and after getting a permit (see “Know before you grow” on page 9). Look, I’m not a pot dude. Other than a handful of tentative tokes in my adult life, I don’t partake, and I’ve never advocated for it. I have learned to tolerate crunchy hippies, but I still believe there should be a limit on the number of Grateful Dead cover bands allowed to play in Chico city limits in a calendar year. But biases aside, I realize that the majority of the people I know in Chico smoke recreationally. I also believe that pot is less of a threat to the health of adult humans than booze, white sugar, prescription painkillers or Chalupa Supremes. Like anything else addictive (yes, people can develop use disorders related to pot, no matter what your local burnout says), it should be regulated and all efforts should be made to keep kids and their still-forming brains away from it, but for Joe and Maryjane Adult, getting a buzz on is one of life’s great pleasures. And pleasure is a good thing. Since Chico is missing out on history, on Sunday I decided to satisfy my curiosity and take the 90-minute drive to Shasta Lake, where three dispensaries—530 Cannabis, Queen of Dragons and Leave It to Nature—are licensed for recreational sales. Shasta Lake hookup. I stopped at 530 Cannabis, where after an ID check in the lobby customers are directed to a room that’s set up like a candy shop for adults. A flower menu on the wall gives prices for the different varieties of buds stored in clear jars in the cases below, with most being in either the lower $6-$7 per gram range (Chocolate Fruity Pebbles, Querkle …) or upper $10-$16 range (False Teeth, Pure Kush, etc.). I explained my inexperience to the clerk, and she directed me to Clementine, a sativa strain that smelled like skunky citrus hops. She carefully plucked 2 grams worth of fuzzy buds with tiny tongs, assured me that it was a good choice for a newbie who might get up the nerve to smoke (and who had friends who would step in as needed), and sealed it in a little silver bag. I also picked up some edibles—530 is stocked with a range of prepackaged sweets, drinks, etc.—a THC-infused cookie and dark chocolate bar. When the sales tax was added along with the state’s 15 percent excise tax, the total for my order was about $70. Shasta Lake also has its own tax of 6 percent of gross receipts for its dispensaries, which in the 2016-17 fiscal year generated $571,419 for the city, a figure that will surely grow significantly thanks to the recreational market. If you include the burger I got for lunch and the tank of gas I purchased in Redding along with my cannabis order, it all added up to more than $100 that I alone spent at businesses in Shasta—not Butte—County. I gave the cookie to an appreciative Chico friend (of legal age)—in broad daylight! And as for the dank nugs and funny chocolate, I’ve tucked my white plastic childproof envelope of goodies between bottles of wine and tequila in the pantry, where it’ll sit until at least the next backyard barbecue.


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY For the week oF january 11, 2018 ARIES (March 21-April 19): I’m happy to

inform you that life is giving you permission to be extra demanding in the coming weeks—as long as you’re not petty, brusque, or unreasonable. Here are a few examples that will pass the test: “I demand that you join me in getting drunk on the truth;” “I demand to receive rewards commensurate with my contributions;” “I demand that we collaborate to outsmart and escape the karmic conundrums we’ve gotten ourselves mixed up in.” On the other hand, Aries, ultimatums like these are not admissible: “I demand treasure and tribute, you fools;” “I demand the right to cheat in order to get my way;” “I demand that the river flow backwards.”

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Are you

familiar with the phrase “Open sesame?” In the old folk tale, “Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves,” it’s a magical command that the hero uses to open a blocked cave where treasure is hidden. I invite you to try it out. It just may work to give you entrance to an off-limits or previously inaccessible place where you want and need to go. At the very least, speaking those words will put you in a playful, experimental frame of mind as you contemplate the strategies you could use to gain entrance. And that alone may provide just the leverage you need.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): While

thumping around the internet, I came across pointed counsel from an anonymous source. “Don’t enter into a longterm connection with someone until you’ve seen them stuck in traffic,” it declared. “Don’t get too deeply involved with them until you’ve witnessed them drunk, waiting for food in a restaurant for entirely too long, or searching for their phone or car keys in a panic. Before you say yes to a deeper bond, make sure you see them angry, stressed, or scared.” I recommend that you take this advice in the coming weeks. It’ll be a good time to deepen your commitment to people who express their challenging emotions in non-abusive, nonpsychotic ways.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): My high

school history teacher Marjorie Margolies is now Chelsea Clinton’s mother-in-law. She shares two grandchildren with Hillary Clinton. Is that something I should brag about? Does it add to my cachet or my happiness? Will it influence you to love me more? No, nah, and nope. In the big scheme of things, it’s mildly interesting but utterly irrelevant. The coming weeks will be a good time for Cancerians like you and me to renounce any desire we might have to capitalize on fake ego points like this. We Crabs should be honing our identity and self-image so they’re free of superficial measures of worth. What’s authentically valuable about you?

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): If I were your

mentor or your guide, I’d declare this the Leo Makeover Season. First I’d hire a masseuse or masseur to knead you firmly and tenderly. I’d send you to the nutritionist, stylist, dream interpreter, trainer and life coach. I’d brainstorm with the people who know you best to come up with suggestions for how to help free you from your illusions and infuse your daily rhythm with twenty percent more happiness. I’d try to talk you out of continuing your association with anyone or anything that’s no damn good for you. In conclusion, I’d be thorough as I worked to get you unlocked, debugged and retooled.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): “It takes an

extraordinary person to carry themselves as if they do not live in hell,” says writer D. Bunyavong. In accordance with the astrological omens, I nominate you Virgos to fit that description in the coming weeks. You are, in my estimation, as far away from hell as you’ve been in a long time. If anyone can seduce, coax or compel heaven to come all the way down to earth for a while, it’s you. Here’s a good way to get the party started: Gaze into the mirror until you spy the eternal part of yourself.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): In accordance with the astrological omens, I encourage

by rob brezsny you to move the furniture around. If you feel inspired, you might even want to move some of that old stuff right out the door and haul it to the dump or the thrift store. Hopefully, this will get you in the mood to launch a sweeping purge of anything else that lowers the morale and élan around the house: dusty mementos, unflattering mirrors, threadbare rugs, chipped dishes and numbing symbols. The time is ripe, my dear homies, to free your home of deadweight.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): When he

was 16 years old and living in New York, Ralph Lifshitz changed his name to Ralph Lauren. That was probably an important factor in his success. Would he have eventually become a famous fashion designer worth $5.8 billion dollars if he had retained a name with “shitz” in it? The rebranding made it easier for clients and customers to take him seriously. With Ralph’s foresight as your inspiration, Scorpio, consider making a change in yourself that will enhance your ability to get what you want.

CLASSIFIEDS Print ads start at $6/wk. www.newsreview.com or (530) 894-2300 ext. 2 Phone hours: M-F 9am-5pm. Deadlines for print: Line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Display ad deadline: Friday 2pm

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): A rite

of passage lies ahead. It could and should usher you into a more soulful way of living. I’m pleased to report that this transition won’t require you to endure torment, confusion or passive-aggressive manipulation. In fact, I suspect it could turn out to be among the most graceful ordeals you’ve ever experienced—and a prototype for the type of breakthrough that I hope will become standard in the months and years to come. Imagine being able to learn valuable lessons and make crucial transitions without the prod of woe and gloom. Imagine being able to say, as musician P.J. Harvey said about herself, “When I’m contented, I’m more open to receiving inspiration. I’m most creative when I feel safe and happy.”

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PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): The

Kalevala is a 19th-century book of poetry that conveys the important mythology and folklore of the Finnish people. It was a wellspring of inspiration for English writer J.R.R. Tolkien as he composed his epic fantasy novel The Lord of the Rings. To enhance his ability to steal ideas from The Kalevala, Tolkien even studied the Finnish language. He said it was like “entering a complete wine-cellar filled with bottles of an amazing wine of a kind and flavor never tasted before.” According to my reading of the astrological omens, Pisces, in 2018 you will have the potential of discovering a source that’s as rich for you as Finnish and The Kalevala were for Tolkien.

www.RealAstrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888.

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CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

Three centuries ago, Capricorn genius Isaac Newton formulated principles that have ever since been fundamental to scientists’ understanding of the physical universe. He was also a pioneer in mathematics, optics and astronomy. And yet he also expended huge amounts of time and energy on the fruitless attempt to employ alchemy to transform base metals into solid gold. Those efforts may have been interesting to him, but they yielded no lasting benefits. You Capricorns face a comparable split. In 2018, you could bless us with extraordinary gifts or else you could get consumed in projects that aren’t the most productive use of your energy. The coming weeks may be crucial in determining which way you’ll go.

STILL

all advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of acceptance. Further, the news & review eview specifically reserves the right to edit, decline or properly classify any ad. Errors will be rectified by re-publication upon notification. The n&r is not responsible for error after the first publication. The n&r assumes no financial liability for errors or omission of copy. In any event, liability shall not exceed the cost of the space occupied by such an error or omission. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes full responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. *nominal fee for some upgrades.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

In 1956, the prolific Spanish poet Juan Ramón Jiménez was awarded the Nobel Prize in literature. The award committee praised his “high spirit and artistic purity.” The honor was based on his last 13 books, however, and not on his first two. Waterlilies and Souls of Violet were works he wrote while young and still ripening. As he aged, he grew so embarrassed by their sentimentality that he ultimately tried to track down and eradicate every copy. I bring this to your attention, Sagittarius, because I think it’s a favorable time for you to purge or renounce or atone for anything from your past that you no longer want to be defined by.

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as THE CHEROKEE CHASER at 51 Red Tape Road Oroville, CA 95965. STEPHEN C LINGER 51 Red Tape Rd Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: STEPHEN C LINGER Dated: December 8, 2017 FBN Number: 2017-0001613 Published: December 21,28, 2017, January 4,11, 2018 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as THRIVE MASSAGE AND YOGA at 392 Connors Court Suite C Chico, CA 95926. BUFFY FRANCO 466 E 5th Avenue Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: BUFFY FRANCO Dated: December 11, 2017 FBN Number: 2017-0001624 Published: December 21,28, 2017, January 4,11, 2018

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as SHORT N SWEET BAKERY at 1715 Diamond Ave Chico, CA 95928. CAMERON MARTINEZ 1715 Diamond Ave Chico, CA 95928. TASHIA MARTINEZ 1715 Diamond Ave Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by A Married Couple. Signed: TASHIA MARTINEZ Dated: December 8, 2017 FBN Number: 2017-0001612 Published: December 21,28, 2017, January 4,11, 2018 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as D. N. QUEEN CHICO NAILS at 801 East Ave Ste 112 Chico, CA 95926. DOANH VIET LE 400 Mission Ranch Blvd Apt 73 Chico, CA 95926. THANH NHAN NGUYEN 400 Mission Ranch Blvd Apt 73 Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by A Married Couple. Signed: THANH NHAN NGUYEN Dated: December 11, 2017 FBN Number: 2017-0001628 Published: December 21,28, 2017, January 4,11, 2018 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following person has abandoned the use of the fictitious business name HL QUEEN CHICO NAILS at 801 East Ave Suite 112 Chico, CA 95926. HARRY LE 400 Mission Ranch Apt 41 Chico, CA 95926. This business was conducted by an Individual. Signed: HARRY LE Dated: December 11, 2017 FBN Number: 2015-0000503 Published: December 21,28, 2017, January 4,11, 2018 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BEBER at 1729 Oakdale St Apt 3 Chico, CA 95928. ARIELLE REBECCA HILTON DANAN 1729 Oakdale St Apt 3 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ARIELLE DANAN Dated: December 15, 2017 FBN Number: 2017-0001651 Published: December 21,28, 2017, January 4,11, 2018 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PROFESSIONAL PROPERTY MANAGMENT, SIMPLISTIC REALTY, SKYWAY MINI STORAGE at 6400 Skyway Paradise, CA 95969. MICHAEL ZUCCOLILLO 6400 Skyway Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: MICHAEL ZUCCOLILLO Dated: December 7, 2017 FBN Number: 2017-0001603 Published: December 21,28, 2017, January 4,11, 2018 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as LE BEAU VISAGE PERMANENT

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COSMETICS, NORTH STATE SCALP CENTER at 1163 East Avenue Ste 104 Chico, CA 95926. ADVANCED COSMETIC AESTHETICS, LLC 1163 East Avenue Ste 104 Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by A Limited Liability Company. Signed: MICHELLE L. THAU, MANAGER Dated: December 13, 2017 FBN Number: 2017-0001646 Published: December 21,28, 2017, January 4,11, 2018 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CARLSON OPTOMETRY, INC. at 2200 5th Ave. Oroville, CA 95965. CARLSON OPTOMETRY, INC. 2200 5th Ave. Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by A Corporation. Signed: GEOFFREY P CARLSON, PRESIDENT Dated: September 25, 2017 FBN Number: 2017-0001288 Published: December 21,28, 2017, January 4,11, 2018 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following persons have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name J AND B PLUMBING at 1589 Arch Way Chico, CA 95973. JARED D DERRICK 1589 Arch Way Chico, CA 95973. BILLIE A BIGGS 821 Big Sky Dr Paradise, CA 95969. This business was conducted by A General Partnership. Signed: JARED DERRICK Dated: December 11, 2017 FBN Number: 2015-0000624 Published: December 21,28, 2017, January 4,11, 2018 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as HEEL AND SOLE SHOES at 708 Mangrove Ave Chico, CA 95926. RICK NORMAN STUELPNAGEL 4730 Songbird Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: RICK STUELPNAGEL Dated: December 6, 2017 FBN Number: 2017-0001588 Published: December 21,28, 2017, January 4,11, 2018 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BLACK KNIGHT TRUCKING at 1601 Cherry Street Chico, CA 95926. DABIN LAMBERT 1710 Spruce Ave Chico, CA 95926. THOMAS WILSON 1601 Cherry Street Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by A General Partnership. Signed: DABIN LAMBERT Dated: December 18, 2017 FBN Number: 2017-0001657 Published: December 21,28, 2017, January 4,11, 2018 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as RHYTHMS HENNA AND THREADING LOUNGE at 118 W East Ave, Ste B Chico, CA 95926. GURBHEJ SINGH 3564 Bridger Drive Redding,

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CA 96002. NAVTEJ SINGH 3564 Bridger Drive Redding, CA 96002. This business is conducted by A General Partnership. Signed: NAVTEJ SINGH Dated: December 19, 2017 FBN Number: 2017-0001661 Published: December 28, 2017 January 4,11,18, 2018 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as SOUPER SUBS at 1780 Oro Dam Blvd E Oroville, CA 95966. CHRIS LIGHTLE 35 Flying Cloud Dr Oroville, CA 95965. EDNA LIGHTLE 35 Flying Cloud Dr Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by A General Partnership. Signed: CHRIS LIGHTLE Dated: December 4, 2017 FBN Number: 2017-0001573 Published: December 28, 2017, January 4,11,18, 2018 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as DAHLS MOTEL at 2010 Feather River Blvd Oroville, CA 95965. PHILLIP LEROY WILSON 878 Palermo Road Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: PHILLIP LEROY WILSON Dated: December 20, 2017 FBN Number: 2017-0001663 Published: December 28, 2017, January 4,11,18, 2018 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as FUNES ENTERPRISES LLC at 13371 Hog Ranch Road Oroville, CA 95965. FUNES ENTERPRISES LLC 13371 Hog Ranch Road Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by A Limited Liability Company. Signed: STACY FUNES, SECRETARY Dated: December 27, 2017 FBN Number: 2017-0001692 Published: January 4,11,18,25, 2018 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as X09A LEGACY at 116 Henshaw Avenue Chico, CA 95973. KATHLEEN M CARPENTER 1095 Sierra Vista Way Chico, CA 95926. BENJAMIN D KNIGHT 2606 Widgeon Lane Durham, CA 95938. This business is conducted by A General Partnership. Signed: KATHLEEN M CARPENTER Dated: December 26, 2017 FBN Number: 2017-0001688 Published: January 4,11,18,25, 2018 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BENCHMARK BUILDING MAINTENANCE at 123 W 6th Street Ste 130 Chico, CA 95928. APARTMENT EQUITIES, INC 123 W 6th Street Ste 130 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by

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A Corporation. Signed: WES HILL, PRESIDENT & CEO Dated: December 21, 2017 FBN Number: 2017-0001675 Published: January 4,11,18,25, 2018 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as MULTIFAMILY ASSET ADVISORS at 123 W 6th Street Ste. 130 Chico, CA 95928. APARTMENT EQUITIES INC 123 W 6th Street Ste 130 Chico, CA 95928. TIM EDWARDS 670 E 5th Street Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by A General Partnership. Signed: WES HILL Dated: December 21, 2017 FBN Number: 2017-0001688 Published: January 4,11,18,25, 2018 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as PATHOLOGY SCIENCES MEDICAL GROUP at 183 E 8th Avenue Chico, CA 95926. PRISCILLA S CHANG 2962 Chico River Road Chico, CA 95928. HEIDI A JESS 34 Sparrow Hawk Lane Chico, CA 95928. NELSON K KANEISHI 979 E 6th Street Chico, CA 95928. MARK R CARTER MD A PROFESSIONAL MEDICAL CORPORATION 621 Breanna Lane Chico, CA 95973. ANTHONY NASR 4523 Garden Brook Drive Chico, CA 95973. GEOFFREY T SASAKI 3156 Shallow Springs Terrace Chico, CA 95928. LESTER K WONG 347 Legion Avenue Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by A General Partnership. Signed: LESTER K WONG MD Dated: December 7, 2017 FBN Number: 2017-0001599 Published: January 11,18,25, February 1, 2018 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as VILMA AUTO SALES at 2961 Hwy 32 Suite 1 Chico, CA 95973. AYMAN KHALIL 8238 Leesburg Way Elk Grove, CA 95624. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: AYMAN KHALIL Dated: January 4, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000017 Published: January 11,18,25, February 1, 2018 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as GOD PREPARED A FISH at 108 Oak Grove Pkwy Oroville, CA 95966. DARVIS MCCOY 108 Oak Grove Pkwy Oroville, CA 95966. DONNA MCCOY 108 Oak Grove Pkwy Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by A Married Couple. Signed: DARVIS MCCOY Dated: January 2, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000005 Published: January 11,18,25, February 1, 2018 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as DAVIS HAMMON & CO at

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2080 Myers St Suite 3 Oroville, CA 95966. BLACKLINE PARTNERS, LLC 2330 Albatross St San Diego, CA 92101. This business is conducted by A Limited Liability Company. Signed: TERESE LINK, SECRETARY Dated: December 21, 2017 FBN Number: 2017-0001673 Published: January 11,18,25, February 1, 2018 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ALIVE PRODUCT DESIGN at 1000 Deveney Street Chico, CA 95928. AARON DAVIDSON 1000 Deveney Street Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: AARON DAVIDSON Dated: December 7, 2017 FBN Number: 2017-0001604 Published: January 11,18,25, February 1, 2018 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as OLDE WORLD ART STUDIO at 3341 Hackamore Lane Chico, CA 95973. SHAWN GLEN HAGSTROM 3341 Hackamore Lane Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: SHAWN G. HAGSTROM Dated: December 26, 2017 FBN Number: 2017-0001687 Published: January 11,18,25, February 1, 2018 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as NORTHWEST HYDROSEEDING at 3355 Bell Road Chico, CA 95973. MARK A BROWN 3355 Bell Road Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: MARK A. BROWN Dated: October 27, 2017 FBN Number: 2017-0001440 Published: January 11,18,25, February 1, 2018 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as SPORTS BARBERSHOP at 1722 Mangrove Ave, Suite 34 Chico, CA 95926. THIENVU D HO 4070 Nord Hwy #145 Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: THIENVU D HO Dated: January 2, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000002 Published: January 11,18,25, February 1, 2018 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as HAPPY GARDEN RESTAURANT at 180 Cohasset Road Chico, CA 95926. HAPPY CHICO INC 180 Cohasset Road Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by A Corporation. Signed: LAN HENG, OFFICER Dated: January 3, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000011 Published: January 11,18,25, February 1, 2018 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as ESPLANADE MINI STORAGE at 2904 Esplanade Chico, CA

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95973. STEVEN J DEPA 3161 Canyon Oaks Terrace Chico, CA 95928. NANCY HAAS-DEPA 3161 Canyon Oaks Terrace Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by A Married Couple. Signed: NANCY HAAS-DEPA Dated: January 2, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000007 Published: January 11,18,25, February 1, 2018 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PORCHLIGHT REAL ESTATE BROKERS at 1251 East Ave Chico, CA 95926. SIMA SABOURY 1251 East Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: SIMA SABOURY Dated: January 2, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000006 Published: January 11,18,25, February 1, 2018 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BIDWELL THERAPEUTIC SERVICES at 2251 St. George Lane Suite F Chico, CA 95926. SARA LYNN WATTS 54 Barker Ct Chico, CA 95928. SESHA ELAINA ZINN 30 Herlax Circle Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by A General Partnership. Signed: SESHA ZINN Dated: December 7, 2017 FBN Number: 2017-0001605 Published: January 11,18,25, February 1, 2018 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as WBM CONSTRUCTION at 106 Grand Ave Apt 1 Oroville, CA 95965. WILLIAM BLAIR MATTIS 106 Grand Ave Apt 1 Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: WILLIAM BLAIR MATTIS Dated: January 2, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000003 Published: January 11,18,25, February 1, 2018

14801 Humbug Road Magalia, CA 95954. This business is conducted by A Married Couple. Signed: SUSAN E. EPPERSON Dated: December 21, 2017 FBN Number: 2017-0001667 Published: January 11,18,25, February 1, 2018 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CHICO ANIMAL HOSPITAL at 3015 Esplanade Chico, CA 95973. DM VETERINARY GROUP, INC. 957 East 1st Avenue Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: STEVEN R. DENNIS, CEO Dated: December 29, 2017 FBN Number: 2017-0001700 Published: January 11,18,25, February 1, 2018 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as NORTH VALLEY CHILD DEVELOPMENT CENTER at 1628 E Lassen Ave Chico, CA 95973. TAMARA WANINK 1628 E Lassen Ave Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: TAMARA WANINK Dated: January 5, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000034 Published: January 11,18,25, February 1, 2018 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BRAIN-FRIENDLY DYNAMICS, WINTER CONSULTING at 975 Filbert Avenue Chico, CA 95926. BRAIN-FRIENDLY DYNAMICS 975 Filbert Avenue Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: SCOTT S. WINTER, PRESIDENT Dated: January 5, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000028 Published: January 11,18,25, February 1, 2018

NOTICES

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as WHIPPLE INDUSTRIAL PARK at 1451 Manzanita Ave Chico, CA 95926. JOEL G MONTGOMERY TRUSTEE 1451 Manzanita Ave Chico, CA 95926. PRISCILLA A MONTGOMERY TRUSTEE 1451 Manzanita Ave Chico, CA 95926. JOHN C WHIPPLE TRUSTEE 1962 Modoc Dr Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Unincorporated Association. Signed: PRISCILLA A. MONTGOMERY, TRUSTEE Dated: January 2, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000001 Published: January 11,18,25, February 1, 2018

NOTICE OF LIEN SALE Pursuant to CA Business Code 21700, in lieu of rents due, the following units contain clothes, furniture, boxes, etc. KARINA BAUMGART-COBB #476 ACC (5X10) (misc. boxes) CANDACE CARBY #219 ss (6X12) (misc. boxes, clothes, bike) CONSTANCE CHELBUS #167ss (7x7) (misc. boxes, Art) RACHEL LEHMUNKEL #209ss (12X12) (furniture, boxes) COLEEN POWER #381cc1 (6X12) (misc. boxes) AARON ROONEY #474cc (5x12) (misc. boxes) Contents to be sold to the highest bidder on: January 27, 2017 Beginning at 12:00pm Sale to be held at: Bidwell Self Storage 65 Heritage Lane Chico, CA 95926. (530) 893-2109 Published: January 11,18, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as B. E. LEGAL SERVICES at 6439 Skyway Paradise, CA 95969. BRUCE GREGORY EPPERSON 14801 Humbug Road Magalia, CA 95954. SUSAN ELISE EPPERSON

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner TIMOTHY B. VIERRA filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: TIMOTHY B. VIERRA Proposed name:

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TIMOTHY B. WILSON THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: February 16, 2018 Time: 9:00am Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: MICHAEL P. CANDELA Dated: December 12, 2017 Case Number: 17CV03484 Published: December 21,28, 2017, January 4,11, 2018

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner SARA HEIM filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: ETHAN MILLER Proposed name: ETHAN HEIM THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: February 23, 2018 Time: 9:00am Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: STEPHEN E. BENSON Dated: December 20, 2017 Case Number: 17CV03583 Published: January 4,11,18,25, 2018

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner GEORGE EDWARD FREDSON filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: GEORGE EDWARD FREDSON Proposed name: GEORGE BRIAN FREDSON THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition

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should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: February 16, 2018 Time: 9:00am Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: STEPHEN E. BENSON Dated: December 12, 2017 Case Number: 17CV03544 Published: January 11,18,25, February 1, 2018

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner EMILY KEETON filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: BRAYDON SHAY CLIFF-CARPENTER Proposed name: BRAYDON SHAY KEETON THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: February 23, 2018 Time: 9:00am Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: MICHAEL P. CANDELA Dated: December 27, 2017 Case Number: 17CV03646 Published: January 11,18,25, February 1, 2018

PETITION NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE JOHN EDWIN MOREHEAD To all heirs and beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: JOHN EDWIN MOREHEAD A Petition for Probate has been filed by: JAN KNECHT in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: JAN KNECHT be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decendent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. the will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or conseted to the proposed action.) The independent administration

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authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: February 13, 2018 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: RICHARD S. MATSON Richard S. Matson Law Office, Inc. 1342 The Esplanade, Suite A Chico, CA 95926 (530) 343-5373 Case Number: 17PR00472 Dated: December 21, 2017 Published: December 28, 2017, January 4,11, 2018 NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE MARY P. MCMILLAN, AKA MARY MCMILLAN To all heirs and beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: MARY P. MCMILLAN, AKA MARY MCMILLAN A Petition for Probate has been filed by: SUSAN EIDSON AND AMY BAIRD in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: SUSAN EIDSON AND AMY BAIRD be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decendent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. the will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have

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waived notice or conseted to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: January 30, 2018 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: TBD Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: REBECCA YUHASZ McKernan, Lanam, Bakke & Williams LLP 732 Fir Street Paradise, CA 95969 (530) 877-4961 Case Number: 17PR00473 Dated: December 21, 2017 Published: December 28, 2017, January 4,11, 2018

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Back Rent Blues Realtors try to stay out of landlord-tenant problems, but sometimes we get pulled in. “The guy’s a dirtbag,” said the owner of this house I was hoping to list. “He doesn’t pay rent, and the neighbors complain about loud music and parties.”

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“No, I’m a Realtor. The owner is talking about selling.” “Yeah, well he can do whatever he wants,” he said. “I’m outta here. I got a job in L.A. starting next week. You can let the dear landlord know I’ll be paying up on the rent.”

“You need to evict him,” I said.

“Wait a minute,” I said, “was that you playing Johnny Cash before I came in?”

“It’s in the works. I’ve sent him all the notices, but the jerk ignores ‘em.”

He smiled and played the opening lick to “Folsom Prison Blues.” He sang like Johnny Cash.

Against my better judgment, I went to the house. I wanted the listing and that bad tenant was in the way.

“You play?” he asked. I nodded. He pulled from under the sofa a Martin D-18 guitar.

I heard Johnny Cash as I walked up the weather-beaten staircase. The music stopped after I banged on the door a few times. A big guy answered the door. He looked disapprovingly at my business attire.

We jammed and sang some Hank Williams songs. A couple of his buddies showed up with beer and instruments and we jammed some more. We became great friends.

“Come on in,” he said in a resigned tone. He plopped onto an old sofa and grabbed a beautiful Gibson Hummingbird guitar. “So you’re what, the rent collector or something?” He strummed an E chord.

The next day I called the owner. “Your tenant will be out this weekend,” I said. “I doubt that,” he said. “I got complaints about loud music and partying again last night. The dirtbag!”

Provided by doug Love, Sales Manager at Century 21 Jeffries Lydon. email escrowgo@aol.com, or call 530-680-0817.

TO PARTICIPATE IN HOME OF THE WEEK PLEASE CALL URBAN DESIGN SOLAR AT 345-0005

Open Houses & Listings are online at: www.century21JeffriesLydon.com Great Value Newer 5 beds 3 baths home in Chico $389,000 3/3 blocks to park/ downtown $259,000

Alice Zeissler | 530.518.1872

“Kim got us in to see properties quickly. This definitely helped us when buying our home. She worked with us to write an offer that was fair and creative during a high demand for housing” -Connie from Chico

Vintage Avenues Home! 3/1.5 bath 1618 sq ft w/ updated kitchen, bonus rm, HVAC & dual pane windows and Detached 2 car garage. $329K Don’t wait on this one!

EMMETT JACOBI KIM JACOBI (530)519–6333 CalBRE#01896904 (530)518–8453 CalBRE#01963545

Jennifer Parks | 530.864.0336

Call me if you are ready to go house hunting in 2018! GARRETT FRENCH

530.228.1305 • GarrettFrenchHomes.com

Specializing in residential & agriculture properties in Chico, Orland, Willows.

Homes Sold Last Week ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

66 Fairway Dr 774 Sierra View Way 3259 Middletown Ave 13 Arminta Ct 169 E Sacramento Ave 736 Silverado Estates Ct 530 Burnt Ranch Way 2354 Kennedy Ave 960 Manzanita Ave 2626 Chandese Ln 16 Pelican Park Dr

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico

$750,000 $515,000 $472,500 $435,000 $434,500 $422,000 $392,000 $379,000 $375,000 $360,000 $356,000

4/3 3/2 4/3 3/2 2/1 3/3 4/3 3/2 4/3 3/2 3/2

SQ. FT. 2641 1830 2132 1722 1149 2311 3113 1740 2195 2044 1655

Sponsored by Century 21 Jeffries Lydon ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

2633 Lakewest Dr 562 Desiree Ln 18 Arbor Dr 1727 Lawler St 787 Palmetto Ave 7 Montclair Dr 314 Royal Glen Ln 33 Glenshire Ln 1168 Metalmark Way 2970 Godman Ave 4680 Hicks Ln

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico

$342,000 $327,000 $325,000 $320,000 $320,000 $304,000 $298,000 $297,500 $295,000 $280,000 $275,000

3/2 4/3 3/2 3/3 4/2 3/2 3/2 3/3 3/2 3/3 3/3 january 11, 2018

SQ. FT. 1705 1975 1378 1472 1897 1687 1179 1324 1471 1374 2190

CN&R

33


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Kiersten Morgan BRE#01808835 530-680-8884 • jimcranerealty.com

530.342.6421

HARD TO FIND 4 bed/3 bth, 1,833 sq ft with plan .................................................................$340,000 ING NDfloor PEopen

North Chico Remodeled 3/2 $349,500

BEAUTIFUL CUSTOM ESTATE styled home offering 3 bed/3 bth, 2,638 sq ft with special custom features throughout. . PENDING ...........................................................................................................................................................$525,000 Teresa Larson (530)899-5925 BRE #01177950 chiconativ@aol.com

6ac Creekside on Butte Creek $249,000

ING PEswND BEAUTIFULLY UPDATED 3 bed, 2.5 bath. 1,776 ft. Huge yard & lots of special features! .......................$379,000

3.4 ac, well, septic and power in place $129,000

MANUFACTURED HOME in a Park, 55 years +, 2 bed, 2 bth, 1,512 sq ft, with lovely upgrades. .................$122,500

5 ac lot. Owner carry $39,500

TREED BUILDING LOT, .20 acre in town! ...................................................................................................... $99,000

MARK REAMAN

2-HOMES ON .77 OF AN ACRE IN TOWN! Custom 3 bed/2 bth, 3,000 sq ft + 3 bed 2 bth, 1,110 2nd home ...$575,000

www.ChicoListings.com • chiconativ@aol.com Mark.Reaman@c21jeffrieslydon.com www.ChicoListings.com • chiconativ@aol.com

530-228-2229

The following houses were sold in Butte County by real estate agents or private parties during the week of December 25, 2017 – December 29, 2017. The housing prices are based on the stated documentary transfer tax of the parcel and may not necessarily reflect the actual sale price of the home. ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

1224 Bidwell Ave

Chico

$260,000

3/2

SQ. FT. 1857

20 Knightsbridge Ln

Chico

$256,500

2/1

865

ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

1114 Nord Ave #39

Chico

$155,000

3/2

SQ. FT. 960

1373 Nord Ave

Chico

$100,000

2/2

960

341 W 6th Ave

Chico

$254,000

3/2

1347

576 Lone Tree Rd

Oroville

$290,000

2/2

1908

109 York Dr

Chico

$253,000

4/2

1402

4006 Hildale Ave

Oroville

$281,500

3/2

1698

1276 Parque Dr

Chico

$250,000

2/1

1270

156 Hammon Park Dr

Oroville

$267,000

3/2

1300

3084 Monticello Ln

Chico

$245,000

2/2

972

3827 Hildale Ave

Oroville

$255,000

3/2

1482

2901 Pennyroyal Dr

Chico

$235,000

2/2

1103

36 Tarn Cir

Oroville

$250,000

3/2

1595

6 Jasper Dr

Chico

$234,000

3/3

1176

1391 Delia Way

Paradise

$405,000

3/3

2317

2938 Pennyroyal Dr

Chico

$200,000

2/2

1103

5719 Susie Ln

Paradise

$280,000

3/2

1367

43 River Wood Loop

Chico

$183,000

2/1

1260

1041 Maple Park Dr

Paradise

$248,000

3/2

1513

1042 Alder St

Chico

$182,000

1/1

748

5406 Black Olive Dr

Paradise

$245,000

1/1

1324

34

CN&R

january 11, 2018


ComiNg sooN!

Price reduction! Nice home in quiet neighborhood, Enclosed front/ back porch, 3BD/2BA 1600 SQ FT+, 433A Detached Garage, living/family room, LG Kitchen $196,000 Ad#17

John Hosford | 530-520-3542 clean & affordable! 2BD/2BA w/ bonus room home sits back from the road. 2 car garage, workbench,Cabinets, open floor plan, central heat &air. $175,000 Ad#39

Heather Harper | 530-521-0944

lovely vintage Home! 2BD/1BA Perfect to live in while you build your dream home. Property would be perfect for horses or animals. $139,000 Ad#33

Mike Metz | 530-520-5858 two seParate dwellings on 1 acre! 3BD/2BA on a rural setting, circle drive For ease getting in & out of Clark Road. A family home for many years $159,900 Ad#994

Mike Richards | 530-864-9192

iNCrease your reaCH To people iNTeresTed iN selliNg or buyiNg a New Home. Chico News & Review would like to help increase your reach to people interested in selling or buying a new home. We are creating a new page on our website, NorCal Homes, which offers several ways to keep you in touch with potential home buyers/sellers. We attract readers to this page with a new map showing the last four weeks’ of home sales in the Butte County area, including sale prices. If you are already active on social media, we can spotlight your social media posts on this page. If you have Open Houses, we can include them in a new Open Houses calendar. The CN&R website is the third most viewed website in Butte County, and therefore your presence on this page will greatly increase the number of people who see your social marketing. In addition to the nearly 118,000 readers you reach each week through the printed pages of the CN&R, you can now reach an additional 21,500 readers/month on the CN&R website.

To be part of the NorCal Homes page, contact your advertising representative today at (530) 894-2300.

january 11, 2018

CN&R

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