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CHICO’S FREE NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY VOLUME 41, ISSUE 15 THURSDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2017 WWW.NEWSREVIEW.COM

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CN&R

INSIDE

Vol. 41, Issue 15 • December 7, 2017 OPINION Editorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Guest Comment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Second & Flume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Streetalk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

NEWSLINES 

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Downstroke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Sifter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

HEALTHLINES 

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Appointment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Weekly Dose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

GREENWAYS 

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Eco Event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 

EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS 

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15 Minutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 The Goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

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COVER STORY   ARTS & CULTURE Music feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . This Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fine arts listings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nightlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Reel World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . In The Mix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Arts DEVO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Brezsny’s Astrology . . . . . . . . . . . .

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CLASSIFIEDS  

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REAL ESTATE  

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ON THe cOVer: DesigN by TiNa FlyNN

Our Mission: To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring . To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare . To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live . Editor Melissa Daugherty Managing Editor Meredith J . Cooper Arts Editor Jason Cassidy Staff Writers Kevin Fuller, Ken Smith Calendar Editor Howard Hardee Contributors Robin Bacior, Alastair Bland, Michelle Camy, Vic Cantu, Bob Grimm, Miles Jordan, Mark Lore, Landon Moblad, Conrad Nystrom, Ryan J . Prado, Juan-Carlos Selznick, Robert Speer, Brian Taylor, Evan Tuchinsky, Carey Wilson Intern Josh Cozine Managing Art Director Tina Flynn Editorial Designer Sandy Peters Design Manager Christopher Terrazas Designers Kyle Shine, Maria Ratinova Creative Director Serene Lusano Marketing/Publications Designer Sarah Hansel Web Design & Strategy Intern Elisabeth Bayard Arthur Director of Sales and Advertising Jamie DeGarmo Advertising Services Coordinator Ruth Alderson Senior Advertising Consultants Brian Corbit, Laura Golino Advertising Consultants Chris Pollok, Autumn Slone Office Assistant Sara Wilcox Distribution Director Greg Erwin Distribution Manager Mark Schuttenberg Distribution Staff Ken Gates, Bob Meads, Pat Rogers, Mara Schultz, Larry Smith, Lisa Torres, Placido Torres, Jeff Traficante, Bill Unger, Lisa Van Der Maelen

President/CEO Jeff von Kaenel Director of Nuts & Bolts Deborah Redmond Director of People & Culture David Stogner Nuts & Bolts Ninja Leslie Giovanini Executive Coordinator Carlyn Asuncion Director of Dollars & Sense Nicole Jackson Payroll/AP Wizard Miranda Hansen Accounts Receivable Specialist Analie Foland Sweetdeals Coordinator Hannah Williams Project Coordinator Natasha VonKaenel Developers John Bisignano, Jonathan Schultz System Support Specialist Kalin Jenkins N&R Publications Editor Michelle Carl N&R Publications Associate Editor Laura Hillen N&R Publications Writer Anne Stokes Marketing & Publications Consultants Steve Caruso, Ken Cross, Joseph Engle, Traci Hukill, Elizabeth Morabito 353 E. Second Street, Chico, CA 95928 Phone (530) 894-2300 Fax (530) 892-1111 Website www .newsreview .com Got a News Tip? (530) 894-2300, ext 2224 or chiconewstips@newsreview .com Calendar Events cnrcalendar@newsreview .com Calendar Questions (530) 894-2300, ext . 2243 Want to Advertise? Fax (530) 892-1111 or cnradinfo@newsreview .com Classifieds (530) 894-2300, press 2 or classifieds@newsreview .com Job Opportunities jobs@newsreview .com Want to Subscribe to CN&R? chisubs@newsreview .com Editorial Policies: Opinions expressed in CN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permissions to reprint articles, cartoons, or other portions of the paper. CN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or review materials. Email letters to cnrletters@newsreview.com. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form and to edit them for libel. Advertising Policies: All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes the responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. CN&R is printed at Bay Area News Group on recycled newsprint. Circulation of CN&R is verified by the Circulation Verification Council. CN&R is a member of Chico Chamber of Commerce, Oroville Chamber of Commerce, Downtown Chico Business Association, CNPA, AAN and AWN. Circulation 41,000 copies distributed free weekly.

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OPINION

Send guest comments, 340 words maximum, to gc@newsreview.com or to 353 e. Second St., chico, cA 95928. Please include photo & short bio.

EDITORIAL

believe us now? Since the moment Donald Trump declared his candidacy for president,

GUEST COMMENT

Look out, kids I

checks that average $1,342 a month. When the incomes of a mere handful of the richest Americans reading these words in a doctor’s waiting room. are factored in, however, it can look like old people People my age are often found there, skimming through whatever reading material is at hand in vain have a pretty sweet ride. They don’t. And politicians, mostly Republicans, work ceaselessly to attempts to kill boredom and make it worse, looking to cut and/or privatize Social divert dread. Security and other vital programs and That was what services. I was doing when ... if I were Still, if I were young now, the I came across a bit young now, the generational disparity in wealth would of information in generational piss me off. In fact, though I am far Today’s Senior, a disparity in from young, it pisses me off, anyway. free pulp magazine Old people aren’t the enemy. laden with adverwealth would However, far too many of us fall prey tising featuring piss me off. to political manipulations that persuade smiling geriatrics by us to vote against our best interests. who just bought Jaime O’Neill And too many young people are too disengaged to The author, a magalia a catheter or took out a reverse look out for their own futures. Hell, about a third mortgage. resident, is a retired of millennials support Trump and Republicans, the community college I skimmed a page devoted instructor. very people most likely to blight their futures. to extolling the wealth us baby So, kiddos, you’d be well-advised to pay attenboomers have to spend, and tion. Because, if you don’t, you’ll be out of luck and learned that us old Deadheads, Vietnam vets, or anti-war protest- out of money when you wake up superannuated. A few old oligarchs will still have most everything, ers control a stash that represents 75 percent of all but you’re statistically unlikely to be among them. personal wealth. And trust me, that day will arrive sooner than Most people my age are far from wealthy—the you can possibly imagine. □ majority of us barely scraping by on Social Security f you’re an aging baby boomer, you might be

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we at the CN&R have taken nothing he’s stated at face value. His utterances—whether serious or scandalous, policy or profanity—defy credulity and often rise to the level of outright delusion. Never mind that the GOP has proven consistently not to act in the best interest of anyone other than the richest Americans; Trump said he would “drain the swamp” in the nation’s capital and clamp down on Wall Street because bankers and financiers were “getting away with murder.” He got elected, bolstered by supporters in rural regions such as the North State. Despite a mountain of setbacks that would have crippled or toppled other administrations, he retains support. The CN&R gets letters defending him; our congressman, Doug LaMalfa, follows him fervently, like other Republican lemmings. “Fake news!” “Alternative facts!” The power of belief is strong. But now, with so-called tax reform from the GOP, might some of his followers finally see through the ruse? This is the bill that Republican senators couldn’t push through fast enough—voting literally in the wee morning hours last Saturday (Dec. 2). Many of the same legislators who lambasted Obamacare as a lengthy bill they didn’t have time to read before voting on have no problem with this bill that passed with last-minute, handwritten addenda. The Congressional Budget Office, which is nonpartisan, determined that the Senate plan would hit people with annual incomes under $30,000 the hardest and first, then those at $40,000 or less, then those under $75,000. Best off: those making six and seven figures. Stumping for the bill, Trump told a rally: “This is going to cost me a fortune, this thing, believe me, believe me.” Believe him? Believe us: This is going to cost you—big time. □

common sense be damned A hail Mary effort has gotten underway recently to halt a pending city

ordinance prohibiting the local cannabis trade, as well as outdoor growing of the herb. As Howard Hardee reports in Newslines this week (see page 9), a recently organized group led by a local cannabis delivery service owner has been attempting to gather enough signatures to put the issue before voters. That’s a huge undertaking, even for folks with vast experience in such efforts, so we don’t expect that the group will be successful by the deadline to submit the petition, today (Dec. 7). As of Tuesday evening, the effort was far short of reaching the 5,000-signature threshold. But here’s the thing: We’re fairly certain how the community would weigh in, because citizens have already given their stance on cannabis legalization. Indeed, a solid majority of city residents approved Proposition 64 (60.9 percent voted yes; 39.1 percent no) during the 2016 general election. That’s a greater percentage than the results statewide (57.1 percent). Despite that clear message from voters, the City Council’s conservative majority has rammed through its prohibition policy. What does this mean for the community? For starters, the city will lose out on a much-needed source of potential revenue—in the form of taxes and fees that could be collected from permitting commercial operations. Additionally, it means that folks who use the herb, both recreationally and medicinally, will find it more difficult to procure. And irony of all ironies, the move will simply serve to enrich the black market. All of this is common sense—a concept the council majority has trouble grasping. □


LETTERS Send email to cnrletters@newsreview.com

SECOND & FLUME by Melissa Daugherty m e l i s s a d @ n e w s r e v i e w. c o m

red flags I covered my first Chico City Council meeting back in 2001, as a journalism student, but starting in 2009, after being promoted to CN&R’s news editor, I began spending a lot of time at the council chambers. My duties included covering the regular meetings on the first and third Tuesdays of the month, as well as the annual day-long budget sessions and public workshops (aka charettes, aka study sessions). Then there were the gatherings of boards and commissions. I loved reporting on the council meetings during that time, because I was fascinated by the personalities setting policy. I made it my mission to inform readers in a way that captured their political maneuverings and nuances lost on other local media. But back at the office, I’d complain to my then-boss, Robert Speer, that the politicians lingered too long on certain issues, especially to justify their votes. “Boy, do they love hearing themselves talk,” I’d say to him. Indeed, oftentimes the meetings would drag on until nearly midnight, pushing my patience, not to mention the council members’ sanity, to the edges. One person on the then-liberal-majority body was borderline insufferable. While many of the current City Council members can be accused of the same ego-centric behavior, the panel has largely managed to keep its meetings shorter, which is a feat. The downside is that not enough talk is happening, and that’s a disservice to the community. Case in point: A few weeks ago, I wrote about the lack of transparency regarding the Jesus Center’s proposed move and expansion of services at a city-owned property near the Torres Community Shelter (see “Plan lacks transparency,” Editorial, Nov. 16). That plan was well in the works by the time it was revealed by Chico’s city manager and the head of the nonprofit homeless service provider, both of whom have obviously spent a lot of time on the effort. The public heard about it only after the plan had been shaped. Think about that. We’ve had all sorts of charettes over the past decade or so (parking, development, Enloe’s expansion, to name a few) and a study session on downtown vagrancy just a few years ago. Yet an effort involving public resources aimed at addressing one of the most controversial and important community issues of the past decade has taken place behind closed doors with cooperation of the city’s top official. Moreover, it’s being spearheaded by a woman who, based on her LinkedIn CV, has little experience in the social services realm and has led the Jesus Center for only two years. We’re talking multiple red flags here. None of this inspires confidence.

in other news: Here at the corner of Second and Flume streets,

we at the CN&R are prepping for the holidays. Among other things, we’re doing our part to ensure the kids living at the Esplanade House don’t get left out this season. Despite the schism between the agency that runs the organization and its founders, we’ve once again partnered with the nonprofit. Several tags bearing the name of a child still hang in our office, where they will remain until a reader—or, in some instances, a CN&R staff member—signs up to buy gifts for him or her. Each card gives suggestions on what to purchase, from practical gifts, such as shoes and clothing, to toys big and small. Please stop in if you’d like to participate. Thanks, in advance.

Melissa Daugherty is editor of the CN&R

On the cover story Re “Under the gun” (Cover story, by Ken Smith, Nov. 30): Thanks for making midnight shopping safe from deadly flowerpots. I feel secure that men in black with guns impersonating police officers are protecting my right to consume. Since when do crimes against property merit capital punishment? And when did security guards and police become the judge, jury and executioner? So much for the Sixth Amendment to our Constitution that states, “the accused shall enjoy the right to a speedy and public trial by an impartial jury of the state and district wherein the crime shall have been committed.” This type of “law enforcement” makes a mockery of our constitutional rights and shows disdain for the sanctity of life. Since flowerpots are now considered a deadly weapon, can we issue them to law enforcement in the place of guns? Molly Amick Chico

It’s starting to feel as if we’re in a state of martial law around here, so I have a suggestion: try mounted police. I’m from San Jose, where mounted police routinely patrol outdoor concerts, parades, parks. The system works well because it is more than an exercise in crime control—it’s an excellent way to enhance public relations. An unruffled policeman on a fine-looking horse can ease the tensions before they have a chance to get worse. Anyone who has ever ridden a horse knows that the rider must remain calm in order to stay in control, and these days self-control in law enforcement is sadly lacking. Lest anyone think that this is simply a ruse to avoid confrontation with evildoers, be assured that the rider will have a radio at all times. If the city can afford a big budget for armed guards, it can certainly afford to keep a horse or two. Besides, the kids love it. Susan Grant Paradise

LETTERS c o n t i n u e d

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‘Opposing viewpoints’ At two homelessness forums last week, opposing viewpoints were apparent. Some want to improve and concentrate services by relocating and expanding the Jesus Center. Others believe that keeping the homeless close to downtown assures they’re not forgotten. While the factions debate, wet and freezing weather is imminent. The Jesus Center relocation is only proposed at present, so we can assume build-out is years away. At the same time, our parks and downtown continue to feel less safe, and city residents are increasingly uncomfortable using them. In times of crisis, triage focuses on solving the most immediate needs first. Toilets are the first and arguably easiest problem to solve. It’s foolish to believe we can deny bathroom access while hoping to curb unsanitary “improvising.” If we need to find the most vandalproof portables available and hire security, let’s do it. The alternative is unacceptable. Before we can effectively encourage homeless people away from parks and shopping areas, we need secure shelter to redirect them to. A quick and relatively inexpensive remedy is CHAT’s tiny house proposal; even faster and cheaper—homeless campgrounds such as those in Auburn, San Diego and Portland, Ore. Ask City Council to implement short-term solutions to this pressing crisis. Scott Huber Chico

At a recent panel discussion on homelessness, Jesus Center Executive Director Laura Cootsona was asked about the cost and fate of the Robert Marbut “deep dive” study, which was commissioned by the Jesus Center last spring. Cootsona declined to reveal the cost and indicated the study was kept in-house and would not be made public. When pressed on whether the report was shared with Chico city government, Cootsona indicated it was not. Since Marbut is a controversial consultant, who recommends that municipalities build one central compound and contain the homeless—by means of deprivation (ending citywide food and clothing distribution, etc.) and criminalization (a choice between county jail 6 

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It’s foolish to believe we can deny bathroom access while hoping to curb unsanitary “improvising.” —Scott Huber

and a compound)—it’s important to know if his report was in fact held in strict confidence at the Jesus Center. Since influential Jesus Center board member Mayo Ryan brought Marbut to Chico, is it reasonable to think he would not have shared Marbut’s recommendations with City Manager Mark Orme? If he did share these recommendations, is it reasonable to think it happened without Cootsona’s knowledge? It’s an interesting coincidence that Marbut was here last spring and a few months later Orme presented the Jesus Center with city property for a compound. What gives? Patrick Newman Chico

Editor’s note: For more on this subject, see Ken Smith’s report on page 8.

Fun with guns It has become apparent to me that assault rifle enthusiasts are only getting half the exciting experience of being well-armed. The butt end of the thing is pretty cool, but the real excitement comes from being shot at by someone equally wellarmed. There’s nothing quite like a hail of rifle bullets whizzing by your noggin to wake you to life’s real possibilities. I therefore propose that we bring back legal dueling. Assault rifles at 100 yards would be good—much closer and it would be over too fast. Cover could be optional, but a restricted lateral space would be necessary for safety, and, of course, two good backstops. Each guy (or gal) would have one full mag—two in California because of the 10-round restriction. Put it on TV and help fund the schools, like the lottery. My preference would be for the M-14—the best all-around assault rifle ever made. Then you have something substantial in your hands if it ever comes to butts and bayonets,

unlike the various M-16s, which are kinda winky.

Dave Cowan Chico

GOP’s next agenda Now that the Republicans passed their massive tax giveaway to the rich, they’re coming for our Social Security and Medicare. Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) just revealed to Politico the Republicans’ plan to eviscerate the retirement of American workers. They’re connected: the Paygo law (“pay-as-you-go”) requires federal deficit increases to be offset by spending cuts. The new tax cut will expand the deficit by $1.5 trillion over 10 years, triggering cuts. Budget deficits are intentional: they force cuts to or elimination of programs Republicans abhor. Government can’t help the American people because every available tax dollar must be given away to their rich donors. Now they’re taking away our Social Security, Medicare and the last remnants of the tattered safety net. They won’t stop until the last morsel is picked from the last bone of the U.S. economy. To the barricades, people! Take to the streets! March on Washington! It’s time for the American people to take back our government from the plutocrats and restore our republic! Charles Holzhauer Chico

This is the new simplified tax form for the 99 percent. Line one: How much did you make last year_____? Line two: Send it in. Pete Piersons Chico

Write a letter  Tell us what you think in a letter to the editor. Send submissions of 200 or fewer words to cnrletters@ newsreview.com. Deadline for publication is noon on the Tuesday prior to publication.


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NEWSLINES DOWNSTROKE JuDge siDes with walmart

After nearly a year since a petition was filed to halt expansion of Chico’s Walmart on Forest Avenue, Butte County Superior Court Judge Stephen Benson shot it down. In December 2016, lawyers for Chico Advocates for a Responsible Economy (CARE) filed a lawsuit against the city of Chico and Walmart arguing the environmental impact report had not adequately considered certain impacts, in particular urban decay caused by similar retail stores closing. Last week (Nov. 30), Benson ruled that the EIR was, in fact, adequate. CARE formed over a decade ago to oppose previous plans to turn the existing Walmart into a supercenter and to build a second store in north Chico. Those efforts were successful. The group could choose to appeal last week’s ruling.

One wilD night

A woman found passed out behind the wheel of a stolen vehicle was arrested early Tuesday morning (Dec. 5) on a litany of charges, including arson and burglary, according to a press release from the Butte County Sheriff’s Office. Jennifer Britt, 37, was found unconscious by Chico police behind the wheel of a Jeep towing a trailer that had collided with a locked metal gate on Pomona Avenue at about 2 a.m. Tuesday. The vehicle had been stolen from a home at the 1600 block of Dayton Road. Responding to the residence, BCSO deputies and Chico police officers found a shop behind the house in flames. An investigation indicated that Britt allegedly lit a fire inside the shop, stole medication and other property, and left in the Jeep. She is being held in Butte County Jail on $82,000 bail with other charges, including drug offenses, possession of stolen property and two counts of vehicle theft.

leaDership change at chip

Community Housing Improvement Program

(CHIP) President and CEO Dave Ferrier is moving on from the organization and Vice President Kris Zappettini (pictured) has been named the interim president. Ferrier recently accepted a position as housing director for the Rural Community Assistance Corp., one of CHIP’s partner organizations, according to a CHIP press release. “Now, 35 years later, it’s time for me to move to the next phase of my life and leave CHIP in the hands of the dedicated staff and under the direction of a fantastic board of directors,” Ferrier said in the release. He has been with CHIP, which provides affordable housing and services in seven Northern California counties, since 1983. 8

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compassion or containment? Homeless advocates, service providers discuss differing philosophies and the Jesus Center’s proposed move

EthingCounty’s Housing Authority, has someof a grim appraisal of the overall d Mayer, executive director of Butte

effort to combat homelessness, which he shared at a forum on the issue held last Friday story and (Dec. 1) at Chico State. photo by Ken Smith “We’re moving our way forward, whether kens @ we like it or not, toward n ew srev i ew. c o m a new contract with society, because we cannot stand to see the homeless population continue to grow,” he said. Mayer was summarizing his views on the current state of homelessness, exacerbated by a lack of affordable housing and widespread economic disparity he compared to the Great Depression. “We’re seeing it grow, and we don’t see any factors at play in our current society that are going to mitigate that trend.” Mayer was part of a six-person panel hosted by the California Faculty Association. Also participating were Jesus Center Executive Director Laura Cootsona; Emily Foxworthy, a health education specialist at Chico State’s Center for Healthy Communities; homeless advocates Patrick Newman and Siana Sonoquie; and Oscar Rodriguez, a Chico State student and for-

mer homeless and foster youth. Each offered some insight on how widespread and consuming homelessness and its root cause—poverty—are in the community, affecting young and old alike. Foxworthy, who oversees the campus’ CalFresh Outreach Program, noted 46 percent of Chico State students are “food insecure,” meaning they lack a reliable source of healthy food, while Mayer noted the fastest growing segment of the nation’s homeless population is senior citizens. “These are seniors who, basically, by virtue of a serious medical condition, have exhausted their resources,” he said. “They’re healthy again, but they’ve lost their homes in the meantime, and have to go live in a car and essentially wait to die.” Cootsona offered a rundown of the Jesus

Center’s services, and said cooperation between service providers is essential. “What I hope to communicate is that part of what we do to address homelessness is that we do something together,” she said. “This isn’t something that any entity is going to do single-handedly. I really believe that the mark of a healthy community is one where we each take care,

provide opportunities and come alongside those who are suffering, who are on the margin for whatever reason.” Sonoquie and Rodriguez shared their own experiences with poverty, and spoke of the importance of involvement and volunteerism. Sonoquie explained how she left a high-paying job in the commercial sector to dedicate herself to social causes. Rodriguez, who will graduate from Chico State this month, emphasized the importance of education and mentoring. Though Mayer also highlighted the impor-

tance of cooperation, he noted that, in Chico, substantive attempts to deal with homelessness are hindered by two diverging currents of thought. “We have two streams in this community, each working without relation to the other,” he said. “We have the stream that involves the city administration and police who have criminalized homelessness and do everything they can to chase them out of our community. All they’ve done, since they’re from our community, is to chase them into the cracks and into the neighborhoods. “The other is the social service stream. We have a wonderful collaboration and an array of social service agencies and


Emily Foxworthy, Laura Cootsona, Ed Mayer and  Siana Sonoquie—pictured from left to right— participated in a panel on homelessness held at  Chico State Friday night (Dec. 1).   

entities in this county that work very well together, and our job is to find the homeless and provide them services, which has been aggravated by the fact that the city is now chasing the homeless to where we can’t find them.” During the panel’s Q&A section, an exchange between Newman and Cootsona highlighted other philosophical rifts among advocates and service providers. Cootsona is a proponent of working with Chico’s business sector to strike a balance between serving the needy and protecting commerce, while Newman is outspoken in his support of homeless individuals’ rights to occupy public spaces. He expressed concerns that the Jesus Center’s proposed move to south Chico is an effort to contain the homeless population away from the city center. Robert Jones, a philosophy professor at Chico State, asked Cootsona why the Jesus Center hired controversial homeless consultant Robert Marbut last spring to gather data on local homelessness, how much the study cost and why Cootsona hasn’t released Marbut’s report. Marbut regularly advises communities to focus shelter and services into large, single “campuses” separated from commercial districts. Cootsona justified hiring Marbut by saying she likes to draw information from varied sources, and refused to share the cost of the study. “We felt it would be more controversial than helpful, so we chose not to share [the results of the study],” she said. “We didn’t think it brought enough value to create more concern about the data.” Newman expressed concerns that the report had been shared with city officials and was being used to determine policy, including its support of the Jesus Center’s move. Cootsona denied having shown city officials the report, and said the Jesus Center—not the city of Chico—is overseeing the move. Mayer interjected, noting how important it is for homeless people to remain visible in the larger community: “What is the strongest political stance the homeless can take on behalf of themselves?” he asked. “The answer, quite frankly, is to be right in the middle of downtown, right in our face. That compels us to rough up against this situation every day. If we relocate that population somewhere else, it’s out of sight, out of mind. “The homeless best advocate for themselves by being visible and by being present.” □

Last-ditch effort Loose collective stages late opposition to Chico law banning commercial cannabis

a month ago, Samuel Monteon Lsetesswasto than alarmed to learn about a new local law go into effect today (Dec. 7), which

could put his medicinal cannabis delivery service, Fire Pharmaceuticals, out of business. The Chico City Council’s conservative majority had been pushing the ordinance banning commercial cannabis and all outdoor grows for months, but Monteon first heard about the law after its final reading on Nov. 7—meaning he had missed the opportunity to speak up. He felt blindsided. “Truth be told, I should have been attending these council meetings,” he told the CN&R. “I had no idea this was going on; I really didn’t. In my opinion, it was secretive, but it’s been a hard lesson for me as a young entrepreneur that I should be involved with political decisions that may affect my business.” Monteon may have been in the dark, but he isn’t alone. He estimates the law will affect some 40 local cannabis collectives and delivery businesses, so he started organizing meetings and drumming up opposition. He’s since formed a loose collective that’s pushing a last-minute referendum effort, circulating

a petition calling for the repeal of the city’s ordinance and to allow dispensary and delivery services in town. In addition to petitioning at farmers’ markets, the group has been blasting the word on social media and delivery drivers have been gathering signatures at patients’ homes. Monteon admits the effort is a long shot. As of Tuesday, the group had gathered about 3,700 signatures, but they were scrambling to double that to be on the safe side by the deadline today (Dec. 7). They need to secure 5,000 verifiable signatures of registered voters to get the measure on

SIFT ER Fatter, but OK with it The average self-reported weight among Americans has crept up over the last 10 years, but fewer people consider themselves overweight, according to a recent Gallup survey. The average weight of people polled in 2003-2007 was 174 pounds, compared with 177 pounds in 2013-2017. Ideal weights (also self-reported) have likewise increased, from 157 to 161 pounds. Only 38 percent of those polled during the more recent period say they are overweight, compared with 41 percent in the earlier survey. Women were more likely to self-identify as overweight in both time periods, with 40 percent of females (compared with 35 percent of men) polled since 2013 saying they carried extra pounds. Regardless of self-image regarding weight, the survey also notes the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported in October that nearly 40 percent of U.S. adults are “obese.”

Samuel Monteon, owner of a local medicinal cannabis-  delivery business, is leading an effort to overturn the   Chico City Council’s ban on commercial cannabis.  Photo by howarD harDee

the June ballot. Still, the group made a strong showing during the Chico City Council meeting on Tuesday (Dec. 5), when more than a dozen people spoke against the law during business from the floor. They framed the ordinance as overly restrictive, especially given that a majority of local voters favored Proposition 64, and urged for a thoughtful regulatory scheme rather than outright prohibition. “Instead of being soft or hard on drugs, you can be smart on drugs,” Rosemary Febbo told the council. Since the matter was brought up outside of the scheduled agenda—and the law has already been passed—the council took no action and offered no comments. If the referendum effort is unsuccessful, Monteon would risk penalties by continuing to operate his business in Chico. But for personal reasons, he said, it would be tough to move to a city with a less restrictive stance on cannabis. “It’s hard for me to say I’ll just leave, because I have patients I really do care about,” he said, adding that many of his customers are home-bound or bed-ridden. “When you’re delivering to people once or twice a month, you really get to know people who are using cannabis for a better NEWSLINES c o n t i n u e D D e c e m b e r 7, 2 0 1 7

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“When you’re delivering to people once or twice a month, you really get to know people who are using cannabis ... to eat when they’re not hungry, to help them sleep, to calm their irrational thoughts. Am I just going to leave and hope they all figure it out for themselves?” —Samuel monteon

quality of life—to eat when they’re not hungry, to help them sleep, to calm their irrational thoughts. Am I just going to leave and hope they all figure it out for themselves?” In other council news, the panel

voted unanimously to update the city’s ADA Transition Plan under the Americans with Disabilities Act. With the help of a citizens’ committee, the city identified the area along West Ninth Avenue between The Esplanade and Mangrove Avenue as a high priority for accessibility improvements. The area is seen as a potential extension of the greater Esplanade Corridor Safety and Accessibility Improvement Project, said Councilman Randall Stone, who is a member of the citizens’ committee. Eventually, the project could provide people with disabilities— not to mention cyclists and pedestrians—easier transit from the avenues to downtown and Bikeway 99, the city’s major north-to-south thoroughfare for bicyclists. But it’s all just a plan, for now. “We’re talking years out before any of this comes to fruition,” Stone said. “We still need a funding source.” —Howard Hardee h owa rd h @ newsr ev iew.c o m


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Gaining ground California makes headway on cutting greenhouse gases, but policies get little recognition

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s Gov. Jerry Brown was making his way through Europe last month, striking an evangelical tone about the global peril represented by climate change, California’s Air Resources Board released good news about emissions reported by companies covered under the state’s cap-and-trade system. Its report showed greenhouse gas emissions reduced by almost 5 percent in 2016, propelling the state toward meeting its ambitious goals. And for that we can thank Mother Nature. According to analyses from the air board and independent experts, last year’s emissions drops came about not because of technological breakthroughs or drastic pollution reductions from oil refineries or other industries, nor did the lauded cap-and-trade program make a significant difference. It was the rain. Record winter precipitation, especially in the northern part of the state, brought hydroelectric dams back into play and allowed utilities to rely less on gas-fired power. And the air board’s report credits electricity generation for the biggest cuts: Emissions from in-state electricity generation decreased more than 19 percent last year, and emissions from imported electricity dropped nearly 23 percent. And California’s policy con-

Shasta Dam is one of California’s largest generators of hydroelectric power. PHOTO VIA BUREAU OF RECLAMATION

tinues to add green power to the grid: Large-scale solar generation increased by 32 percent and wind generation increased by 11 percent. That trend is in keeping with a report issued last month by the California Public Utilities Commission that found that the state’s major utilities have met or will soon exceed the target of 33 percent clean electric energy by 2020. On the other hand, emissions from oil refineries, transportation fuels and cement plants increased slightly. In the case of the cement manufacturing, the air board attributed the increase to ramped up production. The air board report did not attri-

bute the emissions decrease to any one of the state’s myriad programs intended to reduce energy consumption and industrial pollution. But the world heard a different story from Brown during his trip to attend the U.N. Climate Change Conference in Bonn, Germany. The governor was an enthusiastic salesman of the cap-andtrade program, in which certain industries are required to limit their emissions. If they operate under their caps, the companies may sell any carbon “credits” in an auction or on the private market. When laying out the California environmental success story to the world last month, Brown most often mentioned cap and trade as the cor-

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About this story:

This is an abridged version of the full story, which is available at calmatters.org. CALmatters is a nonprofit, nonpartisan media venture explaining California policies and politics.

nerstone of the state’s policies. The most recent auction results indicate why cap and trade is popular with some legislators, having raised nearly $5 billion since its inception. The end of November’s permit auction achieved recordhigh sales of $800 million, with every permit sold. But it is not a prime mover of greenhouse gas reductions, and the air board considers it an adjunct program supporting California’s other policies. Brown, however, has made cap and trade a signature policy, and he’s its fiercest defender. Given the emphasis he’s placed on the program, it seems to underdeliver on real carbon-cutting results. But in an interview with CALmatters in Bonn, Brown denied he gives cap and trade primacy over other of the state’s carbon-cutting programs. “That’s not true. I don’t talk only about it,” he said. “I talk about solar, about electric cars. Energy efficiency. You want to say cap and trade is not that important [for greenhouse gas reduction]. I know that.” For Democratic Assemblywoman Cristina Garcia of Bell Gardens, it’s time to recognize the other programs that are helping the state meet its emission-reduction goals. “We definitely have a responsibility when we are out here on the world stage and saying to people, ‘Learn from us.’ One is making it clear that we have a portfolio of initiatives,” said Garcia, who was also attending the U.N. conference. As an example, she cited the state’s requirement to procure power from renewable resources, its clean air policy and its push to electrify the transportation fleet. “Cap and trade is a piece of it,” she said, “but it’s not all of what we do.”

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HEALTHLINES Jade Reese, Enloe’s trauma program manager, demonstrates wound compression.

Preparing for the worst Enloe Medical Center and Adventist Feather River are ready for mass casualty incident story and photo by

Evan Tuchinsky

evantuc hin sk y @ n ew sr ev i ew. com

OCenter Center got a call from Mercy Medical Redding. A gunman’s shooting spree n the morning of Nov. 14, Enloe Medical

in Rancho Tehama had left nearly a dozen people—adults and children—in need of critical care; how many could Chico treat? Such an inquiry isn’t shocking at Enloe, the region’s trauma center, which routinely handles crises. Nor, really, are gunshot wounds unfamiliar to smaller hospitals’ emergency rooms. Still, staff at Enloe took pause. A question arose: Is this a drill? Because, right at that moment, Enloe was getting ready to rehearse a medical response to a mass casualty incident with gunshot victims. Hospitals statewide were conducting similar drills, either that day or two days later, to ensure preparedness for actual incidents. “We had to verify first that whatever this event going on in Rancho Tehama [was] was in fact a real event,” said Bob Kiuttu, Enloe’s emergency services manager. “We confirmed that pretty quickly. But in the back of our minds was like, Is this somebody who started a drill and didn’t announce it?” Enloe, of course, called off its drill and prepared to receive actual patients. Five arrived: two adults, three children. The hospital was staffed for more; under its mock scenario, a driver would mow down a crowd downtown, then exit the car and shoot bystanders—leaving around 50 injured. The emergency response team didn’t need to set up the special receiving area in their plan (a large tent, provided by FEMA), though otherwise followed standard protocol for a crisis. On one level, reality was simpler than fiction. “Except for that we were getting truly

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injured patients, some of them being children, which is always the worst,” noted Judy Cline, director of the emergency department and trauma services. “But, yes, in doing disaster drills, preparing for large-scale disasters, we like to prepare for the worst. We feel if we prepare for the worst situations, then the ones that aren’t so bad, hopefully we’ll be even more prepared for at the time. “That is exactly how this event went for us.” After a pause, she added: “We don’t expect to always be that lucky.” Jade Reese, Enloe’s trauma program manager,

learned of the Rancho Tehama shootings while sitting in an airport in Chicago, waiting to fly home from a conference. After landing, she texted Cline asking if she needed to come in; the answer was no. Of the five patients, three were treated and released; the others were discharged by

last week. “It was handled quickly and efficiently,” she said. “Everything I heard, talking to my counterpart in Redding, was they felt it went well there [too].” Along with participating in crisis-action

planning at the hospital, Reese spearheads Enloe’s efforts to teach average citizens how to save lives on-scene. The program—part of a national campaign called Stop the Bleed (BleedingControl.org), co-sponsored by the American College of Surgeons—offers instructional materials and courses demonstrating techniques to stem blood flow from bullet holes, gashes and severed limbs. In the past few years, Reese explained, medical and disaster-response professionals determined “bleeding was the major cause of death for traumatically injured patients”—not the traumatic injury itself. “Bleeding can be stopped by laypeople, just like we teach people CPR or how to help someone choking in a restaurant,” she continued. “We want them to know what to do, not just in a mass casualty incident, but if you’re out hunting or come across a vehicle accident or your child cuts themself.” The basic steps: • Call 9-1-1. • Grab a piece of fabric—for instance, a T-shirt. • Clear the wound from debris and clots. • Stuff as much of the fabric as possible into the wound. • Hold pressure as hard as possible until help arrives. “It’s almost easier than CPR or the Heimlich maneuver,” Reese said. “It’s not sterile, it’s painful for the victim … but you’re saving their life.” To block massive bleeding from a limb, use the fabric to fashion a tourniquet and tie the band tightly. First responders—EMTs, firefighters, police—all carry manufactured tourniquets in their vehicles; so do Reese and Cline. “It used to be we never used tourniquets,” Reese said, for fear of irreparably harming the body part deprived of blood, but research has found that “the amount of time it would take for the tourniquet to do that amount of damage is so extensive that usually you can get to a facility in time. So you’re usually

APPOINTMENT REMEMBER THEM Members of the Chico community who have lost a loved one in the past year are invited to Enloe Hospice’s 30th annual Evening of Remembrance, held tonight (Dec. 7) at Enloe Conference Center (1528 Esplanade) from 7-8 p.m. Hospice staff will commemorate these community members as well as former patients with music, photographs and readings. Refreshments to follow. For more information, call Enloe Hospice at 332-6060.


The drill Enloe planned—and thought

enloe will conduct a bleeding control basic course at 7 p.m. Wednesday (dec. 13) at the enloe conference center (1528 esplanade). rSVP at www.enloe.org/events.

What if Enloe Hospital is 100 percent, completely full, and there’s 30 patients? We could take five of them.” Feather River conducted its drill Nov. 3—independent of, but related to, the state exercise. The Butte County Office of Emergency Management got grant funding from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security to conduct a crisis response scenario in Paradise; the mid-November dates did not work for all the agencies (local, county, state and federal) involved. Oroville Hospital did not answer requests for information about its disaster planning or participation in the Statewide Medical and Health Exercise by the CN&R’s deadline. Enloe runs disaster simulations twice a year. Feather River has done so three straight years. Both hospitals also prepare for an active shooter on-site. “We even talk about when the big, big, big one hits—the earthquake on the coast,” Barnard said. “I don’t care if it’s from Redding or Orland or San Francisco or Chico, we do all coordinate and prepare to be there for other people.” □

gifts

Mercy might have been running— constituted Chico’s piece in the California Statewide Medical and Health Exercise. The California Department of Public Health and California Emergency Medical Services Authority designate a disaster for each annual runthrough; the theme for 2017 was “active shooter” due to prevalence. With an integrated response system, kept sharp with planning and drilling, “we’re way more advanced than any other state,” said Melissa Barnard, emergency department director and emergency management committee chair at Adventist Feather River in Paradise. Enloe is a designated disaster control facility for four North State counties—Butte, Colusa, Glenn and Plumas—as Mercy is for counties near Shasta. Its incident command center is like an air traffic control tower for patients and surrounding hospitals. Other facilities prepare, too. While they’re more likely to handle hometown incidents, facilities such as Feather River and Oroville Hospital could get the call Enloe did Nov. 14. “When there was a bus that crashed on I-5 [in April 2014], we were on standby,” Barnard said by phone. “Because we’re available.

Life-saving lessons:

give

better off saving a life than worrying about losing a limb.”

WEEKLY DOSE Art for life We all handle difficult situations differently. For some people, talking everything out with a loved one is the best medicine. For others, an activity, such as exercise, helps clear the mind. But for the artistically oriented among us, creativity can be therapeutic; in fact, making art can improve cognitive function, foster self-esteem, cultivate emotional resilience, promote insight and resolve conflicts and distress. Here are just a few of the suggested projects: • Picture perfect: Draw what a perfect day would look like to you. • Get outside: Paint or draw to get closer with nature. • Have a heart: Fill in a heart shape with art representative of your feelings. • Turn it up: Put on some music and the let creativity flow freely. Source: arttherapy.org d e c e m b e r 7, 2 0 1 7

CHI

12.07

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GREENWAYS

Seeds of tomorrow

Volunteers watch as Chico Urban Forest Manager Richie Bamlet digs a hole where acorns will be planted.

City project aims to replenish canopy of oak trees in Lower Bidwell Park story and photo by

Kevin Fuller

kev in f@ newsrev i ew. com

Ctakeisn’tits content to sit back and let nature course when it comes to reviving

hico Urban Forest Manager Richie Bamlet

forest canopy needs a hand. (BEC organizes a similar project that focuses on oak restoration in Upper Park.) Lower Bidwell Park’s tree canopy. “There’s areas that are currently open space, “Some people have said, ‘Why don’t you and we’ve looked at it and thought, They’re just let the squirrels do it,’” he said. “Well, not fully or heavily utilized as open space, so they kinda eat some of the merchandise them- let’s extend the canopy,” Bamlet said. selves.” The group started with planting acorns On a recent morning, Bamlett and about near Sycamore Pool and moved on to two 20 volunteers dug up dirt and planted acorns other areas in the park. Next up was a plot on a patch of grass in front of Sycamore Pool of land between the pool and ball fields, and in an effort to not only replace some trees that then a large area near South Park Drive later recently have fallen there but also to spread in the day. the tree canopy and help provide a healthy The groups dug up a couple inches of population of oak trees that will fill a gap dirt in about a 3-foot radius. They then took when many of the park’s a long circular tube, aging trees die. about 6 inches in The work was the “One of the issues diameter and about 3 first of an organized in length, called we have in Bidwell feet effort by the city in a Tubex tree shelter, Lower Bidwell Park and stamped a circle is we have a lot “One of the issues in the center of the of mature trees, we have in Bidwell is larger hole. Three and they’re kind we have a lot of mature acorns were placed trees, and they’re kind of of coming towards inside, similar to a coming towards the end Mercedes Benz logo, the end of of their life,” Bamlet said. as Bamlett referenced, “Trees don’t live forever. with the sprouting their life.” We need to make sure side facing the center. —chico Urban Forest manager richie bamlet we have the replacement The tube was then trees coming in.” placed over the three Dozens of the old oak trees have fallen at acorns and about an inch of dirt placed One-Mile Recreation Area in recent years, on top. City staff then placed large metal due to drought, heavy winds and rains, or just protective grates, like ones seen downtown the fact that they were old and vulnerable to around smaller trees, over the tubes. the elements. The rest of the park has seen Bamlet said three seeds are planted to its fair share of oaks crashing to the ground, increase the probability of a tree taking hold too. City of Chico staff, Butte Environmental because not all the acorns sprout. Council (BEC) and Chico Tree Advocates “We don’t really know if they’re going to have joined forces to identify areas where the take,” he acknowledged.

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The initiative stems from the Bidwell Park

Master Management Plan, which aims to ensure oak woodland sustainability by increasing young trees in the park as well as practicing responsible oak landscaping. Bamlet was brought on board about six months ago to oversee city trees. As for the acorn planting, City Councilman Andrew Coolidge brought the idea to the City Council back in May, following conversations with a citizen who lobbied for the city to do something about the aging tree population in the green space. “When you look at the park, there’s trees there now, but if we don’t start planting trees to replace them, in 30 to 40 years the park will look completely different,” he told the CN&R by phone. Coolidge said the council could have directed staff to make the project happen. However, he saw the project as crucial enough to make a resolution. “It was something I thought was important enough where I thought council needed to take a stand and make a vote on,” he said. The project was approved in time for a fall planting. However, a dry summer almost stalled the effort due to a lack of available acorns. “We seem to have had a light year this year,” Bamlett said. Bamlet and Robert Dresden, head naturalist at the Chico Creek Nature Center, collected acorns around the park near some of the most healthy oak trees. They then tested the seeds to see how plantable they were by placing them in a 5-gallon bucket filled with water. Those that rose to the surface were discarded. “Typically, if they are not mature, or they have bugs in them, they will float,”

Bamlet explained. Dresden then stored the remaining acorns in a box filled with sawdust and kept them in his refrigerator for six weeks in order to mimic winter conditions, so that the seeds would start sprouting right away. After the seeds were planted, volunteers found existing saplings in the park and placed tubes around them to protect them from being eaten by squirrels and other animals. The group hopes to continue the project, planting the acorns on a yearly basis, to fill the park with healthy trees of all different ages, helping create a healthy canopy. “I think if we don’t have that foresight to look to the next 30, 40, 50 years at the park and what it can become—if we’re not looking ahead and planning for that—it’s going to lose a lot of the trees and replacements would take years and years and years to fill in the spots,” Coolidge said. “You have to be active with this.” □

ECO EVENT RAPTOR RUN Search for raptors in Butte County with Altacal Audubon Society on Saturday, Dec. 9. Guide Matt Forster will help participants spot hawks, eagles, falcons and owls near Table Mountain outside of Oroville. Then the group will head south to Richvale to check out swans, geese and ducks. Bring binoculars, spotting scopes, water, lunch, walking shoes and proper clothing. Meet at Chico Park and Ride off Highway 32 at 8:30 a.m. and plan for a five- to six-hour trip. Call (619) 347-2269 for more information.


EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS Photo by Kevin fuller

15 MINUTES

THE GOODS

camera, action, eat

construction in college town

Local real estate agent Brandi Laffins doesn’t like to cook. So, naturally she’s well-versed in the local restaurant scene. That’s exactly why she and her team started Chico Chow, a video series that highlights local restaurants. “I have absolutely no background in food,” Laffins says. “Our background is we like to eat. I try to avoid cooking if I can.” The series has featured eateries such as Wine Time, Lovely Layers Cakery, The Coffee Ranch and Pop’s Pizza. The video series is developing a following on Facebook, where the videos are hosted. Laffins recently sat down to discuss the project with the CN&R.

There’s a lot of action going on over in the south campus neighborhood lately, in particular down the Walnut Street corridor and stretching over to Cedar Street. I’ve written in recent weeks and months about the opening of a few new restaurants in that area, as well as a shake bar. Well, there’s more going on worth mentioning. First, there’s a sizable housing project going in at Fifth and Walnut. Dubbed The Urban Apartments, this bad boy is springing up fast. Designed similarly to Campus Walk just up the road at 330 Nord Ave. (both built by Modern Building Co.), it will feature fully furnished accommodations (36 of them), available to rent by the room. A two-bedroom is going for anywhere from $1,600 to over $2,000. Granted, they look awfully nice. But wow. Another project happening in college town is just a block over, at Fifth and Cedar streets, in the old Cafe Culture building. Cafe Culture closed in 2011, and I’ve long wondered if that place would find a new tenant and at long last it has. I stopped by and chatted with the new building owners, Paul Hendricks and Mitch Robison, who were busy sprucing the place up. Turns out, the pair are from Red Bluff and they both recently graduated from Long Beach State—Hendricks studied marketing and Robison, economics. They also share a love of rock climbing. So, they hatched an idea to open a rock climbing gym and Chico just happened to fit the bill for location. Terrain Park Climbing Center will feature climbing walls and an indoor slackline, along with a workout room, showers and a study. The idea, Hendricks said, is to cater to true rock climbers, so they’ll offer memberships. But, the center also will be open to groups for parties and work team building exercises. It turns out that with the climbing wall at the Wildcat Recreation Center, there are a ton of local Chico State grads who are itching for a place to practice their sport. Work is coming along and the two hope to be up and running in January. Check out Terrain Park Climbing Center on Facebook for updates.

What gave you the idea for Chico Chow? There is another realtor in San Diego that was going around town and interviewing specific businesses. He’d put it out on Facebook and where he got the most views was when he went to restaurants. We wanted to copy that idea and focus on restaurants. We’re always, “Where should we go today,” kind of looking for places that people haven’t thought of or people forgot about or the ones that are popular and we just want to highlight them because they have great food. That’s why we did it.

What does your production look like? We pick a day when the entire

team can be there. It only takes an hour and a half or less to shoot it. We have three little segments we have to shoot: Us walking into the restaurant, the interview with the restaurant owner or manager, and at the end we do our “ciao for now” and start eating the food. And we really do eat the food. That’s pretty much it.

What have you discovered about the Chico food scene that maybe you didn’t know before? I think we’ve discovered that there’s a lot of really amazing food out there. There are some great restaurants in our small little town that have a lot to offer. And they’re all really different. A lot of restaurants are going to vegan and gluten-free. There’s a lot more of that out there than I realized. And, how many use local products. We try to always feature that in the show.

What are you hoping to accomplish with the project? I think what we want to do is just be part of the community. We are also starting a Santa shuffle. We are going to start doing 5k fundraisers throughout the year. We just want to get involved with the community more than just housing. Any way we can help with fundraising events, and/or, in this case, just enlightening the community about different restaurants in the area.

What kind of feedback have you gotten? They’re very grateful that we are there. They feel like it’s a great opportunity for the exposure. We are getting anywhere from 5,000 to 20,000 views on Facebook. We have a few people who are asking us if they can be a part of it, which is great. I think they love the idea of it. It’s a really fun thing for us to do. —Kevin FUlleR kev i nf@new srev i ew. c o m

new faces popping up around town. The first to catch my eye is The Brisket Pit, which has a decent website (thebrisketpit.com) complete with menus and ordering information. Run by “pitmaster” Paul Schooler, this mobile eatery promises “the best in central Texas BBQ.” Obviously, he serves brisket, plus pulled pork and a wide variety of sides. Check the website and find The Brisket Pit on Facebook. And, finally, another newbie: Shift Bicycle Cafe. Run by John and Brisa HannaBarton, this mobile coffee cart is a thing of beauty. Plus, the couple are serving up quality, organic coffees and teas (including Chico Chai) all over town. Check Facebook for location updates.

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Northern California’s lush kelp forests are disappearing, leaving behind barren sea urchin territory BY ALASTAIR BLAND

Kelp forests provide food and shelter for thousands of fish, invertebrates and marine mammal species. PHOTO BY INUSUKE/ISTOCK

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About this story:

This story first appeared in Yale Environment 360 (e360.yale.edu), an online magazine published at the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies.

A

steady increase in ocean temperatures—nearly 3 degrees Fahrenheit in recent decades—was all it took to doom the once-luxuriant giant kelp forests of eastern Australia and Tasmania: Thick canopies that once covered much of the region’s coastal sea surface have wilted in intolerably warm and nutrient-poor water. Then, a warm-water sea urchin species moved in. Voracious grazers, the invaders have mowed down much of the remaining vegetation and, over vast areas, have formed what scientists call urchin barrens, bleak marine environments largely devoid of life. Today, more than 95 percent of eastern Tasmania’s kelp forests—luxuriant marine environments that provide food and shelter for species at all levels of the food web—are gone. With the water still warming rapidly and the long-spine urchin spreading southward in the favorable conditions, researchers see little hope of saving the vanishing ecosystem. “Our giant kelp forests are now a tiny fraction of their former glory,” says Craig Johnson, a researcher at the University of Tasmania’s Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies. “This ecosystem used to be a major iconic feature of eastern Tasmania, and it no longer is.” The Tasmanian saga is just one of many examples of how climate change and other environmental shifts are driving worldwide losses of giant kelp, a brown algae whose strands can grow to 100 feet. In western Australia, increases in ocean temperatures, accentuated by an extreme spike in 2011, have killed vast beds of an important native kelp, Ecklonia radiata. In southern Norway, ocean temperatures have exceeded the threshold for sugar kelp—Saccharina latissima—which has died en masse

since the late 1990s and largely been replaced by thick mats of turf algae, which stifles kelp recovery. In western Europe, the warming Atlantic Ocean poses a serious threat to coastal beds of Laminaria digitata kelp, and researchers have predicted “extirpation of the species as early as the first half of the 21st century” in parts of France, Denmark and southern England. And in Northern California, a series of events that began several years ago has destroyed the once-magnificent bull kelp forests along hundreds of miles of coastline. A brief shutdown of upwelling cycles left the giant algae groves languishing in warm surface water, causing a massive die-off. Meanwhile, a disease rapidly wiped out the region’s urchin-eating sea stars, causing a devastating cascade of effects: Overpopulated urchins have grazed away much of the remaining vegetation, creating a subsurface wasteland littered with shells of starved abalone. Scientists see no recovery in sight. A 2016 study noted a global average

decrease in kelp abundance, with warming waters directly driving some losses. But the researchers said that a


ACT characteristic of kelp forest declines is their extreme regional variability. Some areas are even experiencing a growth in kelp forests, including the west coast of Vancouver Island, where an increasing population of urchin-hunting sea otters has reduced the impacts of the spiny grazers, allowing kelp to flourish. Ultimately, researchers say, warming ocean waters are expected to take a toll on the world’s kelp forests. The 2016 paper, co-authored by 37 scientists, concluded that “kelp forests are increasingly threatened by a variety of human impacts, including climate change, overfishing and direct harvest.” In eastern Tasmania, sea surface temperatures have increased at four times the average global rate, according to Johnson, who along with colleague Scott Ling has closely studied the region’s kelp forest losses. This dramatic environmental change began in the mid-20th century and accelerated in the early 1990s. Giant kelp— Macrocystis pyrifera—does best in an annual water temperature range of roughly 50 to 60 degrees Fahrenheit, according to Johnson. He says routine summertime spikes into the mid-60s pushed the kelp over the edge. First in Australia, and subsequently in Tasmania, the kelp forests vanished. The Australian government now lists giant kelp forests as an endangered ecological community. As waters warmed, something else also happened. The long-spine sea urchin, which generally cannot tolerate temperatures lower than 53 degrees Fahrenheit, traveled southward as migrant larvae and established new territory in Tasmanian waters. Lobsters— which prey on urchins—had been heavily fished here for decades, and consequently few predators existed to control the invading urchins, whose

numbers boomed. Since the 1980s, long-spine urchins—Centrostephanus rodgersii— have essentially taken over the seafloor in southeastern Australia and northeastern Tasmania, forming vast urchin barrens. An urchin barren is a remarkable phenomenon of marine ecology in which the animals’ population grows to extraordinary densities, annihilating seafloor vegetation while forming a sort of system barrier against ecological change. Once established, urchin barrens tend to persist almost indefinitely. “For all intents and purposes, once you flip to the urchin barren state, you have virtually no chance of recovery,” Johnson says. In some places, like the southwestern coast of Hokkaido, in Japan, and the Aleutian Islands, urchin barrens have replaced kelp forests and have remained for decades. This bodes poorly for eastern Tasmania, where expansive areas in the north have already been converted into barrens. Urchins have not yet overrun southeastern Tasmania. “But we’re seeing the problem moving south, and we’re getting more and more urchins,” says Johnson, who expects roughly half the Tasmanian coastline will transition into urchin barrens. “That’s what we have in New South Wales.”

PREDATORS OF THE PURPLE SEA URCHIN Where did they go? SEA OTTER

SPINY LOBSTER

Habitat disrupted with loss of kelp forests

Overfished

SUNFLOWER SEA STAR

Disease wiped out vast colonies PHOTO BY BRIAN GRATWICKE VIA FLICKR

Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, the purple sea urchin, has proliferated exponentially due to a loss of predators, and continues to gorge on the once-luxuriant kelp forests.

A similar scenario is unfolding in

Northern California, where local divers and fishermen have watched the area’s bull kelp forests collapse into an ecological wasteland. As in Tasmania, the change has resulted from a one-two punch of altered ocean conditions combined with an urchin boom. The problems began in 2013, when a mysterious syndrome wiped out VANISHING C O N T I N U E D

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Left unchecked, the purple sea urchin turns the life-sustaining kelp forest into an empty urchin barren. PHOTO COURTESY OF THE NATIONAL PARK SERVICE

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Oh, abalone Experts, divers lament the end of the beloved mollusk’s fishery balone diving, a tradition among thousands of Californians, could soon become a thing of the past as numbers of North A Coast red abalone freefall.

VANISHING C O N T I N U E D

outnumber live abalone by a ratio of 2:1, she said. At best, there are four live abalone per empty shell. “I never thought I would see these kinds of low densities on the North Coast,” Catton said, noting that Southern California’s abalone population has been depleted for years. There is hardly an abalone diver in California who has not seen the dwindling kelp, the proliferating urchins, and the starving abalone. Still, Bay Area diver Jon Edens said experienced divers can collect their limits of healthy abalone—if they know where to fish. “It depends on where you go—you have to find the places where the kelp is abundant, and the abalone are thriving in those places,” said Edens, who owns the Marin Diving Center, a dive shop in San Rafael. Frank Hurd, Coastal Fisheries project director with The Nature Conservancy, is also optimistic. He has personally surveyed parts of the North Coast and says the severity of the situation has been overstated. He said that, even in some regions where the bull kelp has mostly disappeared, the abalone have not. “They’ve congregated in shallow water to the point where somebody doing a scuba survey wouldn’t see them,” Hurd said.

The giant sea snails, which eat seaweed and kelp, have been left with little to eat after the North Coast’s kelp forests collapsed during the past three years. Now, hundreds of thousands, if not millions, of abalone are dead or starving. In places where the sea snails used to be fat, healthy and phenomenally abundant, there are few, if any, left, according to numerous accounts from recreational divers and researchers. Phil Sammet, a diver from Monterey, dove for abalone near Fort Ross in Sonoma County in mid-October—what he believes was probably his last California abalone hunt. “It used to be covered with abalone on the bottom, and we saw one here, one there,” Sammet said. The 2017 abalone fishing season closed at the end of October, and the Catton agreed that most surviving abalone harvest is in danger of not resuming have moved to shallower waters to seek next spring. The California Department intertidal vegetation. However, there is more of Fish and Wildlife has recommended to the story than that, she said: Depths that the lawmaking Fish and Game beyond about 30 feet are out of range of Commission close the 2018 seamost breath-holding abalone divers. As a son, according to Cynthia Catton, a result, the deeper waters have served for biologist with the agency. Catton, who decades as a sort of ad hoc reserve, largely works at the UC Davis Bodega Marine untouched by divers and a regenerative Laboratory, has closely studied the source for abalone. North Coast’s red abalone population However, even this deeper water, Catton and its environment since 2002. said, is now a dead zone. “The deep-water “The department has recommendabalone are no longer there,” she said, ed a full closure,” she said. explaining they seem to have either died or Catton said a decision probably will moved into the shallows, where various turf be made at the commission’s meeting seaweeds remain in relative abundance. in San Diego today (Dec. 7). Catton’s supervisor, Sonke Mastrup, Chicoan Matt Daugherty holds a freshly caught abalone during a trip to Mendocino in 2009. A closure would hardly be unwarDepartment of Fish and Wildlife’s environmenPHOTO BY MELISSA DAUGHERTY ranted. While abalone densities have tal program manager for invertebrate fisherbeen declining slowly for years in certain locations largely ies, agrees that abalone abundance in shallow waters is a mirage. due to unchecked poaching, the recent population plunge is a “You might have your patches of kelp where you can find distinctly different and more alarming phenomenon. The crisis abs, but patches don’t make a healthy fishery,” said Mastrup, began about four years ago, when a disease wiped out the an abalone diver himself. “When you look back at the abalone West Coast’s sea stars. These creatures prey on sea urchins, densities we had back in the mid-2000s—that is so far gone. In and their absence has resulted in the proliferation of purple places, there are almost none left. This fishery is collapsing.” sea urchins. Urchins, like abalone, eat kelp, and the boom in the Because sea urchins can survive long periods of time withspiny echinoderms has driven the North Coast’s bull kelp forout food, their numbers are not declining. In fact, the animals ests into collapse. Today, purple urchins cover the sea floor in are still reproducing—as evidenced by the seafloor presence extraordinary numbers from San Francisco and Marin counties of urchins as large as tennis balls and as small as marbles. at least as far north as Humboldt County and have turned previ- In other parts of the world, such as Japan and the Aleutian ously lush kelp forests into a massive marine desert. Islands, kelp forests that have collapsed into urchin-dominated The change has spelled doom for abalone, and divers who environments have persisted as such for decades. There is little frequent the North Coast’s waters have become familiar with reason to think Northern California’s kelp forests will rebound the subsurface sight of withered, starving anytime soon, Catton said. abalone and heaps of shells—basically abaSammet warns fellow abalone divers that the fishery they About this story: It first appeared in the lone graveyards. grew up with is probably gone for the foreseeable future. “You East Bay Express. Catton said underwater surveys have can melt your ab iron, because abalone diving is over,” Sammet quantified the extent of the collapse. “Prior to said. “You will not dive for abalone again in California in your the crisis, we would see about one empty shell per 100 live abs,” lifetime.” she said. Now, in many places, empty shells litter the sea floor and —ALASTAIR BLAND 18

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F R O M PA G E 17

many of the sea star species of the North American west coast. Sea stars—especially Pycnopodia helianthoides, the sunflower sea star—eat urchins. With the predators abruptly absent in the region, the population of purple sea urchin—Strongylocentrotus purpuratus— began growing rapidly. By coincidence, a simultaneous onset of unusual wind and current patterns slowed the upwelling of cold, nutrient-rich bottom water, which typically makes the waters of the west coast of North America so productive. Kelp forests, already under attack by armies of urchins, disappeared. The upwelling cycles have since resumed. “But the system just can’t recover, even with a shift back in water temperature,” says Kyle Cavanaugh, an assistant professor of geography at UCLA who has studied global kelp ecosystems. “The urchins are just everywhere.” Divers surveying the sea floor have seen purple urchin numbers jump by as much as 100-fold, according to Cynthia Catton, a biologist with the California Department of Fish and Wildlife who has been surveying the environment since 2002. Urchins—dozens per square meter in places— continue to gnaw away the remnant scraps of the vanishing kelp forests, 95 percent of which have been converted to barrens, Catton says. Other animals also depend on kelp, and the region’s red abalone are now starving in droves (see sidebar). The population has collapsed, and the recreational harvest could be banned in the coming year, Catton says. Juvenile fish use kelp as nursery habitat, and certain species of rockfish may see declines in the absence of protective vegetation. Predatory fish, like lingcod, may move elsewhere to hunt. Populations of the commercially valuable red urchin, Mesocentrotus franciscanus, are also being impacted as their gonads—finger-sized golden wedges listed on sushi menus as uni—shrivel away, making the urchins no longer worth harvesting. An urchin barren is considered to be an “alter-

native stable state” to the kelp forest ecosystem and is almost invincibly resistant to change. Johnson says that while it takes relatively high urchin densities to graze a kelp forest down to a barren, the animals must be almost eradicated entirely to allow a shift back to a kelp forest. In other words, he says, “The number of urchins needed to create a barren is much greater than the number of urchins needed to maintain it.” Part of the reason urchin barrens are difficult to reverse is the hardiness of the urchins themselves. Foremost, they are almost immune to starvation, and once they’ve exhausted all vegetation will outlive virtually every other competing organism in the ecosystem. In the urchin barrens of Hokkaido, which formed roughly 80 years ago for reasons that remain unclear, individual urchins have lived in the collapsed environment for five decades, according to a 2014 analysis.


It’s as easy as 1-2-3 to make

Christmas special for the

Kids at the

Esplanade House 1. Stop by the Chico News & Review office What’s worse, the hungrier urchins get, the more destructive they become. Research has shown that the calcite deposits that form urchins’ jaws and teeth enlarge when the animals are stressed by hunger—a rapid adaptation that allows them to utilize otherwise inedible material. “They’re now eating through barnacles, they’re eating the calcified coralline algae that coats the rocks, they’re eating through abalone shells,” Catton says of the purple urchins in Northern California. “The magnitude of their impact increases as their food supply diminishes.” They become aggressive, too. Whereas urchins in healthy kelp ecosystems tend to dwell in crevices for much of their lives and wait for drifting kelp to come their way, in a barren state they exit their hiding places and actively hunt for food. “They form these fronts, and they graze along the bottom and eat everything,” says Mark Carr, a marine biologist at the UC Santa Cruz.

The Mendocino Bay, pictured here in 2013, the year a disease began wiping out the sea star population. PHOTO BY MELISSA DAUGHERTY

populations of predatory rock lobsters. Fishery officials are on board with the plan, Johnson says, and have tightly restricted lobster harvest in order to help increase their numbers. Johnson and Ling also have been directing the translocation of large lobsters into test site barrens. But the measures have been only moderately successful. Ling is currently resurveying dozens of study sites first assessed in 2001, and he says urchin density has more than doubled in some locations. On relatively small barrens surrounded by healthy reef ecosystems, the scientists have seen progress as translocated lobsters knock down urchin numbers sufficiently to allow some vegetation to grow back. “But on those extensive barrens, you can pour in as many large lobsters as you like, and they will eat hundreds of thousands of urchins, but they cannot reduce the urchins enough for any In the kelp forests of Alaska’s Aleutian Islands kelp to reappear,” he says. “Even if you turned chain, urchin barrens began forming in the all those urchin barrens into marine protected 1980s, causing local declines in various fishes, areas tomorrow, you could wait 200 years and bald eagles and harbor seals. The transition you still wouldn’t get a kelp forest back.” began when the population of sea otters started In Central California, kelp forests are still to decline, possibly because of increased predathriving, a fact Carr credits to one animal. tion by killer whales. Green urchin numbers “We have sea otters down here, and they’re skyrocketed, and the animals destroyed the kelp voracious predators of urchins,” he says. forests along hundreds of miles of the archipelCarr, both a research diver and a recreationago. “The densities are getting ridiculous,” says al abalone diver, says he has watched the decline Matthew Edwards, a San Diego State University of Northern California’s kelp forests with great biologist who has studied the region. “In some sorrow. places we have hundreds of urchins “It’s like seeing a forest you per square meter.” once knew turn into a desert,” he In Tasmania, Johnson and Ling About the author: says. “Not only do you lose all are leading an effort to protect areas Alastair Bland, a longtime the trees, but all the smaller plants CN&R contributor based in that haven’t yet been overwhelmed around them die, until there’s nothSan Francisco, writes reguby the long-spine urchin. The best larly about wildlife, fishering left.” Ω chance they see is to boost localized

and choose a child’s name. 2. Purchase age-appropriate gifts and wrap them. 3. Drop off the wrapped gifts at the CN&R office no later than Wed., Dec. 20th.

Be a Special Santa to benefit the children of the Esplanade House, a transitional shelter facility for homeless families.

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Arts &Culture Scout Parker makes experimental beats with rudimentary gear.

THIS WEEK

digital discovery

7

THU Local solo artist Scout takes beats from bedroom to Big Room

Asale—it scored a keyboard from a garage was free “because it was so

couple of years ago, Scout Parker

shitty,” the 23-year-old recalled—and then started experimenting with the keystory and board’s preset noises photo by and a sampler. Howard Hardee “I would put a beat h owardh@ down and be like, ‘All newsrev iew.c om right, that’s kind of cool, that’s capturing what I’m feeling,’ and then sing over it,” said Preview: Parker, who performs Scout performs and records as Scout. tonight, dec. 7, 8 p.m., “I just had some at the Naked Lounge with Sacramento’s tunes in my head and Pregnant. Part of the pushed a couple of Uncle dad’s buttons.” Art collective’s It was new territory Listen Up series. for the young musicost: $10 cian whose experience Naked Lounge was based mostly in 118 W. Second St. fingerpicking songs on banjo and acoustic guitar at charity events and parties around Chico, and recording a pair of gorgeous folk albums under the moniker Scout the Wise. At the time, Parker was in a toxic relationship and started feeling like acoustic music “wasn’t capturing the volume of what I was feeling. I was getting tired of everything sounding the same, sounding kind of cheesy.” The songwriter needed to mix things up. 20

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At that point, Parker—who identifies as gender nonbinary—was making music purely for the sake of it and didn’t intend to release an album. And the digitalmusic newbie also knew very little about the technical side of music production. “I don’t understand any of that stuff; I really don’t,” Parker said. “I don’t have almost any equipment, and I’ve never taken any [music] classes, which is awful because, if I did, my music would be so much more dope.” Still, after a while, Parker had a solid collection of soulful, hip-hop-infused, electronic R&B tracks that felt more authentic than the singer-songwriter stuff. “It was never supposed to be good, but people liked it,” Parker said. “I was showing my friends and they were like, ‘You’ve gotta put this out.’” The result, 2015’s Nervous, is one of the most distinct releases from a Chico-based musician in recent memory. Across 13 tracks, Parker’s delicate voice delivers heart-wrenching lyrics through a haunting, lo-fi haze. On the achingly sad “History,” Parker sings: “You are my sweetheart/I only have eyes for you/ You’re tearing me apart/With these things you do.” With some coaxing from supporters in the local music community, the naturally shy Parker has been gradually stepping into the role of performer. In September, Parker played Nervous standout “Diff-erent-ly” with a full orchestra during Small Town Big Sound,

the multiartist collaboration produced by Uncle Dad’s Art Collective at Sierra Nevada’s Big Room. It took a bit of liquid courage. “I was drunk,” Parker admitted. Parker’s about halfway through recording a new album (due out early next year), but is grappling with doubts about drawing from the same well of inspiration. “When I wrote Nervous, I was not aware I was going to have to perform those songs,” Parker said. “After a performance, I wouldn’t feel good—it wasn’t fun, really, playing those sad songs. Now I feel like I should probably write songs that don’t make me feel awful, but I’m taking my time because I don’t want to fake it.” Sonically, the idea is to keep it lo-fi. Higher production quality would be a “distraction from what I’m authentically feeling,” Parker said, adding that the shyness factor probably would be an impediment to working with an outside producer, anyway. But accessing some reliable gear is problematic; that free keyboard recently crapped out for good and Parker doesn’t own a computer. However it gets done, Parker doesn’t want the new music to take the same melancholy tone as Nervous. “It’s like, super-obnoxious to me when I listen to it now,” Parker said. “I was just whining a bunch. I’m like, ‘Shut up, Scout, you’re fine.’” □

Special Events WOMEN’S CLOTHING SWAP: Bring 10-15 items of clothing, footwear or jewelry to swap during this event including wine, beer and food. Thu, 12/7, 6pm. $10. Museum of Northern California Art, 900 Esplanade. www.monca.org

Music COREY SMITH: The country singer-songwriter appears in support of his 10th record, While the Gettin’ Is Good. Thu, 12/7, 7pm. $20. Senator Theatre, 517 Main St. www.jmaxproduc tions.net

Theater THE GAME’S AFOOT: When one of the guests is stabbed to death, the festivities in this isolated house of tricks and mirrors quickly turn dangerous. Thu, 12/7, 7:30pm. $10-$18. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Road, Paradise. 530-877-5760. www.totr.org

GREAT EXPECTATIONS: Join narrator Pip in this Dickens classic about wealth, poverty, love rejection and redemption. Thu, 12/7, 7:30pm. $15. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. 530-8953749. www.blueroomtheatre.com

PINK mArTINI Friday, Dec. 8 Laxson Auditorium See FrIdAY, MUSIC


VOOm VOOm VARIeTY SHOW & WINTeR bIZARRe bAZAAR

FINE ARTS ON NeXT PAGe

Friday, Dec. 8 & Saturday-Sunday, Dec. 9-10 Chico Women’s Club

See FRIdAY, SPECIAL EVENTS & SATURdAY-SUNdAY, SPECIAL EVENTS

WILLY WONKA: Hooker Oak Theater Department presents its fall production featuring more than 50 student players. Fri, 12/8, 6pm. $5. Hooker Oak Elementary School, 1238 Arbutus Ave. www.willywonka.eventzilla.net

WINTER ONE ACTS: The Butte College Drama Club performs a series of original one-act plays written, directed and organized by students. Fri, 12/8, 7:30pm. $5. Black Box Theatre, Butte College’s main campus. www.butte.edu/drama

9

SAT

Special Events ANIMATION CHICO FESTIVAL: The annual showcase IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE: A musical based on the classic film, which follows the story of how George Bailey gains a new perspective on his childhood dreams and midlife disappointments. Thu, 12/7, 7:30pm. $16-$22. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. 530-894-3282. www.chicotix.com

8

FRI

Special Events CHRISTMAS WITH THE BIDWELLS: California State Parks annual event featuring tours of the mansion, live music, a silent auction, appetizers and wine tastings. Proceeds benefit education and interpretation at Bidwell Mansion. Fri, 12/8, 6pm. $30-$35. Bidwell Mansion State Historic Park, 525 Esplanade. 530-513-1454.

LIBRARY BAZAAR: Craft items and holiday decor, plus baked goods. Proceeds benefit

ANImATION cHIcO Saturday, Dec. 9 Chico Theater Co.

See SATURdAY, SPECIAL EVENTS

children’s programs and books. Fri, 12/8, 10am. Paradise branch of the Butte County Library, 5922 Clark Road, Paradise.

STUFF THE BUS TOY DRIVE: Donate a new unwrapped toy during KRCR’s News Channel 7’s annual toy drive. Fri, 12/8, 6am. City Plaza, downtown Chico. www.krcrtv.com

VOOM VOOM VARIETY SHOW: Funky art/fashion troupe Chikoko hosts it annual showcase of local performing artists to kick off its Bizarre Bazaar weekend. Fri, 12/8, 6pm. $5. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St. www.chikoko.com

Music CELEBRATE THE SEASON: A holiday performance by the United States Air Force Band of the Golden West. Fri, 12/8, 7pm. Paradise Performing Arts Center, 777 Nunneley Road, Paradise. 530-872-8454. www.paradise performingarts.com

GARETH EMERY: EPIC & Collective Effort Events present a neon party with English dance music producer Gareth Emery. Fri, 12/8, 8pm. $20-$25. El Rey Theatre, 230 W. Second St. www.ticketfly.com

GUITAR ENSEMBLE - MYSTERIOUS JOURNEYS: Top classical guitar students at Chico State

perform solos in small and large ensembles during a program exploring the mysterious nature of music. Fri, 12/8, 5pm. Free. Rowland-Taylor Recital Hall, Chico State. 530898-5739. www.schoolofthearts-csuchico.com

NORTH STATE SYMPHONY’S HOLIDAY CONCERT: A festive performances of a variety of sacred and popular holiday music, featuring guest artists Daun Weiss and the Shasta College choirs. Ends with a sing-along. Fri, 12/8, 7:30pm. $15-$30. St. John’s Episcopal Church, 2341 Floral Ave. 530-898-5984. www.north statesymphony.org

PINK MARTINI - HOLIDAY SPECTACULAR: The cocktail/world pop artists return to Laxson to sing classic and undiscovered holiday gems. Fri, 12/8, 7:30pm. $44-$62. Laxson Auditorium, Chico State. 530-898-6333. www.chicoperformances.com

Theater THE GAME’S AFOOT: See Thursday. Fri, 12/8, 7:30pm. $10-$18. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Road, Paradise. 530-877-5760. www.totr.org

of short animated films from around world, celebrating forms such as 2-D, computer, experimental and stop-motion. This year’s judges include artists who have worked on such films as Shrek, Madagascar and Book of Life. Sat 12/9, 10:30am. $5-$10. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. www.animationchico.com

BLOCK PARTY WITH A PURPOSE: A community-supported cleanup designed to bring neighbors together and make a positive difference in the community and our waterways. Sat 12/9, 9am. Free. Corner of Pine Street & Humboldt Avenue, Chico. 530-891-6424. www.becnet.org

BREAKFAST WITH SANTA: A pancake breakfast including photos with Santa himself, children’s activities and a silent auction. Proceeds benefit Little Red Hen. Sat 12/9, 9pm. $8. Eagles Hall, 1940 Mulberry St. www.littleredhen.org

CHIKOKO’S WINTER BIZARRE BAZAAR: The Chikoko design/artist collective hosts its annual alternative holiday craft faire, featuring handmade clothing, jewelry and utilitarian works by local artists. Sat 12/9, 10am. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St. www.chikoko.com

HOLIDAY TEA & FASHION SHOW: Holiday music, fashion show, tea and food, plus arts and crafts, the museum gift shop, and tours of historic Glenwood Farm House. Sat 12/9, 1pm. $20. Patrick Ranch Museum, 10381 Midway, Durham. 530-342-4359. www.patrick ranchmuseum.org

LIBRARY BAZAAR: See Friday. Sat 12/9, 10am. Paradise branch of the Butte County Library, 5922 Clark Road, Paradise.

PARADE OF LIGHTS: Featuring floats decorated for the season. Sat 12/9. Downtown Oroville, Montgomery Street, Oroville. 530-552-1233.

SANTA SHUFFLE: A 5K and 1-mile fun run/walk to raise money for the Salvation Army. Sat 12/9, 8:30am. $35. One-Mile Recreation Area, Lower Bidwell Park. www.runsignup.com

Music JIM HURST TRIO: The award-winning country and bluegrass singer-songwriter and multiinstrumentalist performs with Erik Alvar and Justin Branum. Sat, 12/9, 7pm. $20. Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 1289 Filbert Ave. 530-894-1449.

UGLY GOD: An American rapper and record producer from Houston best known for his 2016 single, “Water.” Support from Akarii the Assasin and CD Ent. Sat, 12/9, 8:30pm. $25. Senator Theatre, 517 Main St. www.jmaxpro ductions.net

Theater THE GAME’S AFOOT: See Thursday. Sat, 12/9, 7:30pm. $10-$18. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Road, Paradise. 530-877-5760. www.totr.org

GREAT EXPECTATIONS: See Thursday. Sat, 12/9, 7:30pm. $15. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. 530-895-3749. www.blueroomtheatre.com

THIS WEEK cONTINUed ON PAGe 22

GREAT EXPECTATIONS: See Thursday. Fri, 12/8, 7:30pm. $15. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. 530-895-3749. www.blueroomtheatre.com

IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE: See Thursday. Fri, 12/8, 7:30pm. $16-$22. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. 530-894-3282. www. chicotix.com

VICTORIAN DINNER CELEBRATION: A benefit for the Chico High School Choral Music Program, during which the hall is transformed into a British manor for a holiday celebration including period costumes, singing, a comical play and a four-course meal. Fri, 12/8, 7pm. $30. Lincoln Hall, Chico High School. 530-321-9826. www.chs.chicousd.org

FRee LISTINGS! Post your event for free online at www.newsreview.com/calendar, or email the CN&R calendar editor at cnrcalendar@newsreview.com. Deadline for print listings is Wednesday, 5 p.m., one week prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

EDITOR’S PICK

dIcKeNS SeASON Poverty, violence and dead parents. Sounds like the makings of a story for the holidays! The Blue Room Theatre’s production of the stage version of Charles Dickens’ Great Expectations is billed as “family-friendly,” so it likely won’t get too dark. But to have a story of redemption, there’s going to be at least some bad to go along with the good. Join Pip the orphan on his journey to manhood in mid-19th-century England. Opens tonight, Dec. 7, and shows Thursday-Saturday, through Dec. 23.

d e c e m b e R 7, 2 0 1 7

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THIS WEEK cONTINUed frOm page 21

FINE ARTS

IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE: See Thursday. Sat, 12/9, 7:30pm. $16-$22. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. 530894-3282. www.chicotix.com

WILLY WONKA: See Friday. Sat, 12/9, 6pm. $5. Hooker Oak Elementary School, 1238 Arbutus Ave. www.willywonka.event zilla.net

WINTER ONE ACTS: See Friday. Sat, 12/9, 7:30pm. $5. Black Box Theatre, Butte College - main campus. www.butte.edu

10

SUN

Special Events CHIKOKO’S WINTER BIZARRE BAZAAR: See Saturday. Sun, 12/10, 10am. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St. www.chikoko.com

Music CHRISTMAS CONCERT & SING-ALONG: The Chico Community Concert Band plays contemporary holiday music and a traditional collection of Christmas carols. Sun, 12/10, 2pm. Free. Lakeside Pavilion, 2565 California Park Drive.

THE GRATEFUL BLUEGRASS BOYS: A rockin’ bluegrass band playing classic-rock favorites from bands such as the Grateful Dead, Bob Dylan, Van Morrison, The Eagles, The Rolling Stones and more. Sun, 12/10, 7:30pm. $15. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St.

Theater IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE: See Thursday. Sun, 12/10, 2pm. $16-$22. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. 530894-3282. www.chicotix.com

WILLY WONKA: See Friday. Sun, 12/10, 2pm. $5. Hooker Oak Elementary School, 1238 Arbutus Ave. www.willywonka. eventzilla.net

Music CHRISTMAS BAND CONCERT: Paradise Community Band’s Christmas concert, including musical tributes to Elvis, Rogers and Hammerstein, and Neil Diamond, plus a variety of Christmas tunes. Mon, 12/11, 7pm. Free. United Methodist Church, 6722 Clark Road, Paradise. 530-762-7352. www.paradise band.org

13

Wed

Special Events CHICO VELO’S HOLIDAY FUNDRAISER: Celebrate the season with Chico’s cycling community with guest speakers, and awards ceremony, food, a no-host bar, a silent auction and a live dessert auction. Wed, 12/13, 5:30pm. $5-$35. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St. www.chicovelo.org

HOLIDAY BAZAAR: Gifts from Thailand, Nepal, Bali, Guatemala and India, plus holiday treats. Wed, 12/13, 11am. Valene L. Smith Museum of Anthropology, Chico State.

STOrIeS SIX Art

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See ART

1078 GALLERY POP-UP: Stories Six-1078 Gallery Pop-Up Show, the annual group exhibition bringing together five artists with strong links to Chico. Through 12/23. At private residence: 1143 Salem St. www.1078gallery.org

B-SO SPACE: BFA Culminating Exhibition, featuring ceramics by Blake Gardner. Through 12/8. Chico State.

BLACKBIRD - BOOKS, GALLERY, CAFE: Photography Exhibition, featuring prints by Miles Claibourn, California Travis, Khari Cowell, and Sean Mellon. Through 12/31. Free. 1431 Park Ave.

CENTER FOR SPIRITUAL LIVING: Christmas Art Exhibit, paintings, photographs, stained glass, collage art and handmade items depicting Christmas and the holiday season. Through 12/30. 789 Bille Road, Paradise.

CHICO ART CENTER: Winter Gift Show, local artists set up shop to sell one-of-a-kind handcrafted goods such as pottery, jewelry, paintings, prints and more. Through 12/28. 450 Orange St.

HEALING ART GALLERY - ENLOE CANCER CENTER: Works by Jenny C. Marr, watercolor paintings, soapstone sculptures and pine needle baskets by the Northern California artist. The Healing Art Gallery of features artists whose lives have been touched by cancer. Through 1/19. 265 Cohasset Road.

JACKI HEADLEY UNIVERSITY ART GALLERY: Vanished Reading, a reading with writers Heather Altfeld and Troy Jollimore as they share excerpts from their contributions to the Vanished exhibition. 12/7, 5:30pm. Vanished, a chronicle of loss and discovery across half a million years. Through 12/15. Chico State. universityartgallery.word press.com

JAMES SNIDLE FINE ARTS & APPRAISALS: Watercolors, dreamy, translucent works by Frances Miller. Through 12/29. 254 E. Fourth St., 530-343-2930.

MERIAM LIBRARY: We’ve Been Here, We’ll Always Be Here, traditional and contemporary Native American art. Through 12/15. Chico State.

MUSEUM OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA ART: Panel Discussion - Finding the Landscape, a conversation about the life and art of James Kuiper. 12/8, 5-8pm. Notes From a Spanish Dutchman, a retrospective exhibition of art work created by James Kuiper, artist and long-time faculty emeritus with the Chico State Art Department. Through 12/31. 900 Esplanade. www.monca.org

PARADISE ART CENTER: Teachers & Facilitators

fOr mOre MUSIC, See NIGHTLIFE ON page 24

1078 Gallery pop-up

Show, paintings and drawings by the gallery’s instructors. Through 12/16. 5564 Almond St. www.paradise-art-center.com

WINCHESTER GOOSE: Furious Beauty of Earth, photography by Owen Bettis, including images from his time in China and Singapore as well as sweeping landscapes from Western America. Through 12/31. 800 Broadway St.

Museums BOLT’S ANTIQUE TOOL MUSEUM: Hand Tools, rotating displays of more than 12,000 kinds of tools. Through 6/2. $3. 1650 Broderick St., Oroville., 530-538-2528. www.bolts antiquetools.com

BUTTE COUNTY HISTORICAL MUSEUM: WWI Exhibition, recently renovated exhibits demonstrating the profound changes in American society caused by The Great War. Through 7/29. 1749 Spencer Ave., Oroville.

CHICO MUSEUM: Chico Vecino - Chico’s Neighbor, a talk with historian Dave Nopel about the area known today as the avenues followed by a roundtable discussion with Ed Birtcil and Marge Maddux. 12/9, 10am. $5. 141 Salem St., 530-518-7369.

GATEWAY SCIENCE MUSEUM: Circuits Investigation Station, explore the world of electricity and currents. Switch on a light, make a wacky sound, or design a battle ship game with snap circuits. 12/9, 1-3pm. Zoo in You The Human Microbiome, exploring the vibrant world of our inner microorganisms through engaging, interactive and bilingual exhibits. Also on display: Journey to Africa: Elephants and Tiger, Tiger! Through 1/7. $5-$7. 625 Esplanade, 530-898-4121. www.csuchico. edu/gateway

GOLD NUGGET MUSEUM: Permanent exhibits include a collection of Maidu Indian artifacts, blacksmith and print shops, gold sluices, a miner’s cabin, a schoolhouse and a covered bridge that spans the width of a rushing creek. Through 12/31. Free. 502 Pearson Road, Paradise, 530-872-8722. www.goldnuggetmuseum.com

JANET TURNER PRINT MUSEUM: The Meaning of Life - Visual Analogy, an exhibition adding visual layers to the biggest question—how we assign meaning to human existence. Through 12/9. Chico State., 530-898-4476. www.theturner.org

PARADISE DEPOT MUSEUM: Remembering World War II, sharing the artifacts of local young men and women who ventured abroad in service of their country. Through 12/31. 5570 Black Olive Drive, Paradise, 530-877-1919.

VALENE L. SMITH MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY: Shadow & Water, a display of puppets from Indonesia and Vietnam. Through 12/20. Free. Chico State.


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Mother Hips bandmates onstage when we finish our Tconversation. It’s a benefit show for a woman whose im Bluhm is just minutes away from joining his

husband recently died, leaving her and three children. While this type of show isn’t anyby thing new for the band, the idea of Mark Lore helping others has taken on more significance for the 47-year-old ma rk l@ guitarist-vocalist, who’s had himself newsrev iew.c om a hell of a couple years. This is probably the fifth or sixth Preview: KZFr presents time I’ve interviewed Bluhm over Tim bluhm, with the past two decades, each marking Jason crosby, a different chapter in The Mother Tuesday, Dec. 12, Hips’ career: Major label drama, hia7:30 p.m., at chico Women’s club. tuses, comebacks, critical acclaim. Tickets: $20 (available This particular occasion finds the at KZFr, chico Paper musician emerging from the most co. and brownpaper challenging stretch of his life. tickets.com). Back in September 2015, Bluhm bluhm and crosby was involved in an accident while also will perform live on the air (90.1 Fm) speed-flying (a winter sport where monday, Dec. 11, the rider uses a parachute to hover 6:30 p.m. down a slope and land on skis) that Chico Women’s left him with his pelvis broken and Club his left foot nearly torn off. Listening 592 e. Third St. to Bluhm tell the story is harrowing www.kzfr.org (he’s lucky to be alive). Around the same time, he separated from his wife and musical partner, Nicki Bluhm. But the support of his family, bandmates and even fans (a GoFundMe campaign set up by Hips photographer Jay Blakesberg raised nearly $50,000 for Bluhm’s massive medical expenses) got him through the worst of it. Now, after two years of intensive surgeries, complications and convalescing, Bluhm is gearing up for a busy 2018, although the avid surfer and outdoorsman’s active lifestyle is on hold indefinitely. “It hurts; it’s hard to walk,” says Bluhm, who, by his own account is at about 40 percent. “At this point I’d be stoked to be able to walk a mile without pain.” Bluhm considers himself a positive person by nature. He’s maintained the same even-keeled disposition throughout The Mother Hips’ long and winding career. They were the kings of Chico in the early 1990s, and to this day remain the town’s biggest musical export next to Barbara Manning. The band signed with Rick Rubin’s American Recordings in 1994 at the behest of Black Crowes frontman Chris Robinson, and released three records with the label (which, in

JOHN mCCuTCHEON LIVE AT

After a long rehab, The Mother Hips’ Tim Bluhm is back in the studio and  on the road.  PhoTo by Jay blaKeSberg

addition to the Crowes, included Danzig, Slayer and Johnny Cash) before being unceremoniously dropped. During that time Bluhm and guitarist-vocalist Greg Loiacono were quietly trying to kick heroin habits. Once they got things under control, they self-released the countrified and much-beloved Later Days with new (and current) drummer John Hofer in 1998. “It’s a tenacious record,” Bluhm said. “It was a mellow sort of, ‘fuck you—we are not going to be plowed under.’” And they weren’t. Since that time, the Hips have released critically successful records like Green Hills of Earth (2001) and Kiss the Crystal Flake (2007), while their fanbase has continued to steadily grow. All on the band’s terms. Bluhm sums it up perfectly: “The Mother Hips are like a secret surf spot. We’re still kind of a secret band—we haven’t been exploited by the media machine.” Over the past two years, Bluhm admits that his mind has plunged to some dark places, but that overall he’s remained optimistic. He’s definitely had more time to concentrate on music. Bluhm is currently producing records for four other artists, as well as finishing up a new solo album. And there’s a new Mother Hips record called Chorus already in the can for a mid2018 release on Blue Rose Records. Things are looking up—slowly and steadily. And while Bluhm’s body is still on the mend, his optimism and soul are fully intact. “I’ll be all right,” he says. “It’ll take a lot more than that to take me down.” □

THE BIG ROOm SuNDAy, JANuARy 7, 2017 “John McCutcheon is not only one of the best musicians in the USA, but also a great singer, songwriter, and song leader. And not just incidentally, he is committed to helping hard-working people everywhere to organize and push this world in a better direction.” – Pete Seeger

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NIGHTLIFE

THUrSdAY 12/7—WedNeSdAY 12/13 TAYLOR DAYNE: The brewery celebrates its seven-year anniversary with the Grammy Award-nominated pop singer. Thu, 12/7, 8pm. $15. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. www.featherfalls casino.com

08FrIdAY

BASSMINT: A weekly bass music party with a rotating cast of local and visiting producers and DJs. Fri, 12/8, 9:30pm. Peking Chinese Restaurant, 243 W. Second St.

cITYSIcK eP reLeASe

COMEDY NIGHT: Three stand-up comics from Sacramento—Michael Cella, Joey Stults and Benton Harshaw. Fri, 12/8, 10pm. Fusion Hookah Lounge, 245 Walnut St.

Saturday, Dec. 9 Naked Lounge See SATUrdAY

FIGHT! KIDS WITH CANCER: A comedy

07THUrSdAY

COREY SMITH: The country singer-

and music show benefiting the FXCK Cancer Foundation. Featuring stand-up comedians Travis Dowdy, Corey Finnegan and Andrea Bartunek, plus local bands Up to 11 and Rigmarole. Fri, 12/8, 7pm. $7. Maltese Bar & Tap Room, 1600 Park Ave.

LISTEN UP SERIES: A night of critical

songwriter appears in support of his 10th record, While the Gettin’ Is Good. Thu, 12/7, 7pm. $20. Senator Theatre, 517 Main St. www.jmax productions.net

listening presented by Uncle Dad’s Art Collective. This installment features the fusion/electronic music of Pregnant and support from Scout. Thu, 12/7, 8pm. $10. Naked Lounge, 118 W. Second St.

GRINGO: Sun-drenched surf music rendered in low fidelity. Joined by Tents. Fri, 12/8, 8pm. Naked Lounge, 118 W. Second St.

Last-Minute Holiday Guide

GLeAmING GrILL

Here’s a blast from the mid-aughts: Paul Wall. At one point, he was a super big deal in hip-hop circles alongside his studio partner, Chamillionaire (remember Chamillionaire?), but if that doesn’t jog your memory, he’s that dude who rapped on “Drive Slow” on Kanye West’s 2005 LP, Late Registration—and he’s the one with the big, shiny chrome grill where his teeth should be. He’s playing Lost on Main on Friday, Dec. 8.

KENNY FRYE BAND: Contemporary

country hits and classics. Fri, 12/8, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino &

Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

GARETH EMERY: EPIC & Collective Effort Events present a neon party with English dance music producer Gareth Emery. Fri, 12/8, 8pm. $20-$25. El Rey Theatre, 230 W. Second St.

OPEN MIC: An open mic hosted by Tito (aka Thunder Lump). All forms of performance art welcome. Fri, 12/8, 7pm. $1. DownLo, 319 Main St.

PAUL WALL: Houston’s “Po Up Poet”

hits Chico. Fri, 12/8, 9pm. $30-$65. Lost on Main, 319 Main St. www.lostonmainchico.com

PUB SCOUTS: A Chico tradition: Irish music for happy hour. Fri, 12/8, 3:30pm. $1. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St.

THE ROCK HOUNDS: A holiday party with the local classic-rockers. Bring a new, unwrapped toy to donate to Mattress Firm’s annual drive. Fri, 12/8, 6pm. Ramada Plaza, 856 Manzanita Court.

ROCKOLOGY: Live rock in the lounge. Fri, 12/8, 8:30pm. Gold Country Casino &

Hotel, 4020 Olive Highway, Oroville.

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d e c e m b e r 7, 2 0 1 7

emo/indie rock band releases new EP Get Better. Support from Like Roses, Higuera and Creekside. Sat, 12/9, 8pm. $7. Naked Lounge, 118 W. Second St.

only on bass, drums and vocals. Monarch and Amarok open. Sat, 12/9, 8pm. Cafe Coda, 265 Humboldt Ave.

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THIS WEEK: FINd mOre eNTerTAINmeNT ANd SPecIAL eVeNTS ON PAGe 20 THe GrATeFUL bLUeGrASS bOYS Sunday, Dec. 10 Sierra Nevada Big Room See SUNdAY

11mONdAY

BEER RELEASE PARTY: Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. celebrates the release of Hazy Little Thing and Hop Bullet. Features music by classic-rock band Defcats. Mon, 12/11, 6pm. $10. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St. www.sierranevada.com

TRIVIA NIGHT: Get quizzed on useless THE YULE LOGS: The hardest-working band in snowbiz continues its series of rockin’ holiday parties. Sat, 12/9, 9pm. $7. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St.

DEVOLL: The local alternative pop band appears with Of the Grey out of Paradise and Otis Bog People. Sat, 12/9, 9pm. $7. Lost on Main, 319 Main St. www.lostonmainchico.com

LEGAL ADDICTION: A variety of classicrock, R&B and country hits in the lounge. Sat, 12/9, 8:30pm. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

OPEN MIC: For musicians of all

ages. Sat, 12/9, 7pm. The End Zone, 250 Cohasset Road.

ROCKOLOGY: Live rock in the

lounge. Sat, 12/9, 8:30pm. Gold Country Casino & Hotel, 4020 Olive Highway, Oroville.

THE RUGS: Twangy soul and rock. Support from Slow Caves and The Empty Gate. Sat, 12/9, 9pm. $7. Maltese Bar & Tap Room, 1600 Park Ave.

SUPER HUEY: A Huey Lewis tribute

act. Sat, 12/9, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

UGLY GOD: An American rapper and record producer from Houston best known for his 2016 single, “Water.” Support from Akarii the Assasin and CD Ent. Sat, 12/9, 8:30pm. $25. Senator Theatre, 517 Main St. www.jmaxproductions.net

10SUNdAY

THE GRATEFUL BLUEGRASS BOYS: A

rockin’ bluegrass band playing classic-rock favorites from bands such as the Grateful Dead, Bob Dylan, Van Morrison, The Eagles, The Rolling Stones and more. Sun, 12/10, 7:30pm. $15. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St.

knowledge. Mon, 12/11, 9pm. No Cover. Down Lo, 319 Main St.

12TUeSdAY

TIM BLUHM: The frontman of The

Mother Hips performs classic rock, Americana, folk and psychedelic blues. Presented by KZFR 90.1 FM. Tue, 12/12, 6:30pm. $20. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St. www.kzfr.org

OPEN MIKEFULL: At Paradise’s only open mic, all musicians get two songs or 10 minutes onstage. Wed, 12/13, 7pm. $1-$2. Norton Buffalo Hall, 5704 Chapel Drive, Paradise.

TRIVIA NIGHT: Face off against rival teams with your squad of up to six fellow trivia enthusiasts. Wed, 12/13, 8pm. No Cover. Woodstock’s Pizza, 166 E. Second St.

UPPER RIVER BLUES SOCIETY JAM: A blues jam to benefit Inspire School of Arts and Sciences. Wed, 12/13, 6pm. Scotty’s Landing, 12609 River Road.

cATcH SOme rAYS

The Redding-based garage rock band Gringo makes washed-out, sun-drenched surf music à la Mac DeMarco, but a little messier and more psychedelic. From listening to the group’s latest EP, Down South, you can practically see the sandy beaches, beer cans and bikinis. If you check them out at Naked Lounge on Friday, Dec. 8, remember to bring sunscreen.

13WedNeSdAY Lounge covers of pop hits from identical twin brothers. Wed, 12/13, 8pm. Argus Bar + Patio, 212 W. Second St.

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tage Western. Sun, 12/10, 6pm. Farm Star Pizza, 2359 Esplanade.

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eclectic set of music for dining pleasure. Sun, 12/10, 6pm. 5th Street Steakhouse, 345 W. Fifth St.

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8pm. $5. Maltese Bar & Tap Room,

ents an all-local lineup of bands including High MInds Cafe, Dial Up Days and Chico Feet. Wed, 12/13,

Messiah d e c e m b e r 7, 2 0 1 7

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All signs point to Oscar Three Billboards is loaded with award-worthy performances In Bruges, Seven Toddball-sounding Psychopaths) is fully loaded, front and back. The title—Three Billboards Outside he new film by Martin McDonagh (

Ebbing, Missouri—signals its offbeat tendencies as well as its plain-spoken boldness, and the marquee names at the top of by the cast list (Frances McDormand, Juan-Carlos Woody Harrelson, Sam Rockwell, Selznick etc.) set the tone for the lively gallery of quirky characterizations and vivid performances that propel the story. The eponymous billboards are the work of one Mildred Hayes Three Billboards (McDormand), the grief-scarred Outside Ebbing, mother of a teenage daughter who was Missouri raped and murdered. The better part of Starring Frances a year afterward, the police have made mcDormand, Woody no discernible progress with the case, Harrelson and Sam and the aggrieved mother decides rockwell. Directed by martin mcDonagh. to rent the long-neglected billboards cinemark 14, Feather and have them emblazoned with a river cinemas, message asking local police chief Paradise cinema 7. (Harrelson) for an explanation. rated r. The billboards succeed in renewing the murder investigation, but a great deal more than that gets stirred to contentious life in the process. Police Chief Willoughby, of course, doesn’t appreciate that kind of calling out, but his story also has some ongoing complications of its own, as does that of dimwitted deputy Jason Dixon (Rockwell). The murder mystery continues in Three Billboards, but with a small multitude of little, but equally urgent dramas, public and private, running alongside. While they’re ostensibly sympathetic to Mildred’s loss, the local townsfolk don’t take kindly to the billboards or to criticism of their esteemed police

5

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D e c e m b e r 7, 2 0 1 7

chief. Among those most irritated by the billboards is Mildred’s ex-husband Charlie (John Hawkes), a former cop who now sports a ditzy 19-year-old girlfriend (Samara Weaving). Among those caught in the highly fraught emotional crossfire are Robbie (an excellent Lucas Hedges), Mildred’s loyal, late-teens son, and “the town midget,” a car salesman (Peter Dinklage) whose tentative admiration of Mildred becomes more than she can handle. Harrelson’s Chief Willoughby is a family man, with two kids and a wife (Abbie Cornish) who’s smart, pretty and well-spoken. Rockwell’s farcically brutish deputy lives alone with his mother (Sandy Martin), a sedentary chunk of malice who might have been a cheerleader for lynch mobs in her younger days. The youthfully erratic Red Welby (Caleb Landry Jones), the current proprietor of the town’s billboard business, becomes a particularly dramatic victim of the ensuing “collateral damage.” A carefully groomed desk sergeant (Zeljko Ivanek) is the main approximation of a voice of reason within the increasingly crazed circus of the Ebbing Police Department. A briskly effective government agent (Clarke Peters) arrives to restore order, but just how much he or anybody else can do to fully resolve these matters remains very much in doubt. The film’s assorted dramas—of revenge, redemption, lethal innocence and unappeased guilt, madness and devotion—converge ultimately in the contrasting characters and stories of Mildred and Jason. McDormand and Rockwell give the best performances in this very well-acted film, and since Three Billboards is a movie that consistently and persistently refused to settle into the satisfactions and resolutions that its audiences have reason to hope for, the nuances, inflections and deflections of those two characterizations emerge as the chief reward here. □


FILM SHORTS Reviewers: Bob Grimm and Juan-Carlos Selznick.

Opening this week The Disaster Artist

James Franco directs and stars (with his brother Dave) in this biopic on the making of the 2003 film The Room, now a cult classic regarded by many as the worst film ever made. Cinemark 14. Rated R.

Just Getting Started

Two rivals—a former FBI agent (Tommy Lee Jones) and a former mob lawyer now in witness protection (Morgan Freeman)—must team up for comic shenanigans while trying to foil a criminal plan. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

Loving Vincent

A team of 115 artists created the 65,000 individual oil paintings on canvas (in the postimpressionist style of Vincent van Gogh) that make up this one-of-a-kind animated biopic on the painter. Pageant Theatre. Rated PG-13.

Now playing Coco

A 3-D animated feature rooted in the Day of the Dead aesthetic that follows the story of a boy named Miguel who goes on an adventure fueled by his desire to play music. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG.

Goodbye Christopher Robin

Biopic about British author A. A. Milne and his son Christopher Robin, the real-life inspiration for his Winnie-the-Pooh stories. Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG.

4

Lady Bird

Christine McPherson, a Sacramento teenager finishing up her high school years at a Catholic institution, prefers to be called “Lady Bird.” She’s a bright, angry and somewhat uninhibited misfit, and she’s the youthfully conflicted title character in a pungent new comedy/drama written and directed by Greta Gerwig. Gerwig is a Sacramento native herself, and for her directorial debut she’s concocted a briskly incisive entertainment that is part coming-of-age tale, part comedy of California manners, part oddball romcom. Saoirse Ronan (Brooklyn) plays the title role with quietly bristling mixtures of irony and charm, with occasional touches of Gerwiggian friskiness. Heretofore known chiefly as an actor (Frances Ha, etc.), Gerwig does not appear in this film, but her zest for the offbeat is evident throughout. And even with assorted hints of autobiography turning up in Christine/Lady Bird, the picture is also distinguished by a large and distinctively observed cast of secondary characters. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R —J.C.S.

3

is a tightly wound perfectionist sporting a monstrous handlebar mustache. He’s also a genius-level fussbudget with a small but very telling touch of the tragicomic buffoon to him. Branagh the director, however, seems more the exuberantly antic extrovert here, reveling in the extravagant visions that the machinery of the movies makes possible. Branagh uses CGI and bizarre camera angles to wild, near-surreal effect for scenes whose main action is mostly a matter of intimate and/or fraught conversation. Branagh seems to have encouraged offbeat subtleties in several of the main performances, but this film doesn’t give that talented cast a whole lot to explore in depth. Cinemark 14, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13 —J.C.S.

Roman J. Israel, Esq.

Denzel Washington stars as an idealistic attorney with a great legal mind and limited interpersonal skills who is faced with crises as a series of events challenge his conscience. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13.

The Star

A Christian faith-based computer-animated feature with Bo the donkey and his animal friends as the heroes of the first Christmas. Cinemark 14. Rated PG.

4

Thor: Ragnarok

The hallucinogenic plot drops Thor (Chris Hemsworth) on a crazy garbage planet bent on round-the-clock violent entertainment and led by the Grandmaster (Jeff Goldblum). The Grandmaster shaves Thor’s head, dresses him in gladiator gear, and throws him into the ring for a bout with his prized competitor. That would be the Hulk, held captive on the planet for the past couple of years. He’s been nothing but the Hulk the whole time, with alter ego Dr. Bruce Banner (Mark Ruffalo) trapped inside. Thor and Hulk have a battle royale for the ages. There’s a whole other, apocalyptic subplot going on, where Thor’s long-lost sister Hela (Cate Blanchett) is causing major havoc on his home planet of Asgard. To say the result of all this is trippy is an understatement. The movie looks like Thor meets Boogie Nights (minus the porn) meets The Lord of the Rings. It scores high marks in the fantasy genre realm while being one of the year’s funniest movies, and that’s high praise. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13 —B.G.

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Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

See review this issue. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated R —J.C.S.

Wonder

Julia Roberts and Owen Wilson star as parents of a fifth-grade boy with genetic facial deformities who is struggling to make a go of it in a mainstream school where some students are less than accepting. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG.

Murder on the Orient Express

There are plenty of stellar faces and presences on hand for director Kenneth Brnagh’s update of the Agatha Christie murder mystery. In addition to Branagh himself in the lead role of detective Hercule Poirot, Johnny Depp, Michelle Pfeiffer, Penélope Cruz, Willem Dafoe, Judi Dench, Derek Jacobi, Leslie Odom Jr., Daisy Ridley and Josh Gad have roles of some consequence as the mysteries aboard that snowbound luxury train unfold once again. Branagh’s Poirot

Still here

A Bad Moms Christmas Cinemark 14. Rated R.

Daddy’s Home 2

Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

Justice League

Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

1 2 3 4 5 Poor

Fair

Good

Very Good

Excellent D e c e m b e r 7, 2 0 1 7

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D e c e m b e r 7, 2 0 1 7

2017, the blind-tasting panel F orat Celebrator Beer News out

of Nevada City has once again circled around the table to rate the year’s holiday beers on a scale from 0 stars (“bad; pour it out immediately”) to 5 (“exceptionally great”), and the CN&R is sharing the top-rated selections. For the full list of ratings, pick up the December/January issue or find the PDF at www.celebrator.com. At the holidays, when people stop their busy lives and share some precious time with family and friends, the beer they choose should be equally as special as the time they’re sharing. So a holiday beer should be made to impress, to wow its audience, to stand out. This is the only criterion that should be met by one of these beers: Will it impress? Five-star holiday beers: Brown Shugga’—Lagunitas Brewing Co., Petaluma Bright copper color with a generous tan head and legs to spare. Orange and citrus hop nose with aromas of caramel and Juicy Fruit gum. Good malt backbone, building a rich hop monster of marmalade and spicy citrus flavors. Refreshing and complex, with warming qualities and a dry, sweet finish.

Celebration Fresh Hop IPA— Sierra Nevada Brewing Co., Chico Bright amber color with a generous tan head. Big hop nose with aromas of Fruity Pebbles, citrus and Juicy Fruit gum. Abundant fresh-hop flavors dominate but are well-balanced. It’s the hops that shine through and through, down to the lingering, bitter finish. Delirium Noël—Huyghe Brewery, Belgium Clear bronze color with a tight white head and good lacing. Spicy nose of brown sugar, vanilla and herbal aromas. Sweet, spicy flavors of caramel, cinnamon and nutmeg, with notes of fruit and bittersweet hop character that lingers through a long finish. Gouden Carolus Noël—Het Anker Brewery, Belgium Mahogany color with a thick tan head and nice lacing. Spicy, herbal nose with aromas of anise, caramel, cinnamon, licorice and candy canes. Rich, clean malt with sweet caramel and toffee flavors and a touch of fruit. Great balance and synergy, as everything works together in harmony. Our Special Ale (aka Anchor Christmas Ale)—Anchor Brewing, San Francisco Dark brown color with a tan head. Lightly roasted malt nose with aromas of clove, ginger and allspice. Rich and complex, with

good balance and just a hint of welcoming smokiness. The holiday spices balance the malt throughout with a long, lingering, bittersweet finish. St. Bernardus Christmas Ale—St. Bernardus Brewery, Belgium Deep bronze color with a tan head and good lacing. A complex fruitcake nose that’s also lightly sweet. Good malt base with a complex mélange of flavors. Like a liquid fruitcake, with raisins, vanilla, cherries and spicy hops. Tastes like a Christmas cookie. 10 Lords-A-Leaping—The Bruery, Placentia Dark molasses color with a modest tan head. Complex nose of milk chocolate, sarsaparilla, licorice, ginger and some nuttiness. Clean malt, good balance and complex flavors that include licorice, ginger, herbal hops and roasted malt. A clean, drying finish. Xocoveza: Imperial Stout— Stone Brewing, Escondido Deep black with a generous mocha head. Huge nose of coffee, chocolate, almonds, vanilla and cherries. Cold coffee, roasty flavors with a complex mix of chocolate and mocha that’s well integrated, along with notes of vanilla and cinnamon. It’s spicy coffee with several kinds of jolts. □


IN THE MIX Phases Angel Olsen Jag jaguwar Collections made up of B-sides and rarities— works that didn’t make the cut for one reason or another—can be risky. However, sometimes, like on this latest from Angel Olsen, the lack of extra polish works in favor of the music, keeping things simple, intimate. A lot of the tunes on Phases are loose and sparse, lilting by like passing clouds, pushed mostly by Olsen’s sultry voice. There are a few standouts, specifically the hypnotic seven-minute builder, “Special,” which rumor has it almost turned 2016’s My Woman into a double-LP. The song rides an endless wave with a simple and clear Velvet Underground-esque hook over whirling distortion, rising and falling with Olsen’s curious verses. Then there’s “California,” which taps into a Roy Orbison vocal warble and arching falsetto, and “May as Well,” which begins with a melody similar to Gershwin’s “Someone to Watch Over Me.” Olsen fans won’t be disappointed in the slightest.

MUSIC

—Robin Bacior

! s t f i g t a e r g e k ma Amy Waltz Designs

Operation Ice Storm is the name given to the Drug Enforcement Agency-led meth crackdown that swept through Van Buren County in central Arkansas over the last couple of years. But the real devastation in the new HBO documentary Meth Storm isn’t found in the wake of law enforcement’s efforts to arrest all the drug dealers; it’s in the utterly hopeless conditions of the depressed rural community that has been all but destroyed by ice, the potent form of the highly addictive drug that Mexican cartels have flooded the area with. The documentary follows two main characters: Johnny Sowell is one of the lead DEA agents, a soft-spoken local guy who grew up with many of the people he ends up arresting and whose lives he sees overtaken by their addiction. And Veronica Converse is the meth-addled matriarch of a broken family with two grown strungout, drug-dealing sons who have been in and out of jail their whole lives. Filmmakers Brent and Craig Renaud do a remarkable job of both unflinchingly reporting on the tragedy and creating an empathetic portrait of humans barely surviving in the most hopeless of circumstances.

TV

—Jason Cassidy

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Self-released Sometimes you need to kick up some dirt and make a ruckus. That’s where outlaw country comes in, and it’s familiar territory for a group like Gasoline Lollipops. On the Boulder, Colo., band’s latest, Soul Mine, “Mustangs” stands out with a rodeocountry feel, driven by the kind of raspy barroom vocals and quick licks that keep feet stomping from start to finish. Even with its boisterous nature, there are also down-tempo selections to hear, such as “Burns,” with a somber fiddle and singer Clay Rose’s old-fashioned delivery conjuring up a late night around the campfire. There’s a thrashing quality throughout the album that suits its agnsty reflections on life’s trials and tribulations. One of the last tracks, “Ghost of a Man,” has a soothing cadence, but its overarching vibe is also cathartic. All that dirt kicking can be quite a release.

250 V allom Yoga Cen brosa This is a gift cer #150 ter of Chic Can be use tificate & does not | 530 d with oth expire acc er .342.0 o Cash value discounts & offers ording to CA CC Sec . Cannot be for this cer . 174 100 tificate is used for gra 9.45-1749.6. Not equ al to the am

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—Robin Bacior

Buy online anytime with a credit card or in person with cash, check or credit card M-f 9am – 5pm at 353 e. Second Street, Downtown Chico.

PLUS: Sign up for the newsletter and geT 10% off! D e c e m b e r 7, 2 0 1 7

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29


Hey, ya we

irdos!

Got a strange talent? A freaky act? A singular performance style? A bizarre approach to entertaining crowds of people? The Chico News & Review wants to hear about it! Submissions are now being accepted for the fifth annual Keep Chico Weird Talent Show, happening March 3, 2018, at the Senator Theatre

✶$300 cash prize to first-place winner

✶Artists of every performance style are eligible to participate

✶Must be 18-over

We’re also accepting submissions for the Keep Chico Weird Art Show, March 1-4, at the Museum of Northern California Art (Monca) ✶Art of all media is accepted

DEADLINE to enter is Jan. 17, 2018 r Ac t u o Y Get er! h t e g To

Visit www.facebook.com/keepchicoweird for submission guidelines. 30

CN&R

D e c e m b e r 7, 2 0 1 7

ARTS DEVO by Jason Cassidy • jasonc@newsreview.com

Gallery founD It’s as official as a signed lease: The 1078 Gallery is roaming

no more. The gallery’s new space will be at 1710 Park Ave., inside the gutted former home of sierra Market (which moved into a building across the street), and it’ll be the fourth home for the 36-year-old community art gallery. There are challenges ahead, chief among them an application for a conditional use permit from the city of Chico to allow for hosting live music events. To raise money for the nearly 1078 Galley has landed. $7,000 in permits and fees, the gallery is hosting a fundraiser—The 1078 @ 1710 Party!—Jan. 20 at the Chico Women’s Club, featuring live music, plus food and drinks. Stay tuned for details.

emotional rescue Dude! Citysick is dope! The self-described “super duper emo” Chico band has just released its second EP, Get Better, and it’s one of the best local albums of the year. In general, an emo band has to rock pretty damn hard or be super hyper to make me care about young white guys whining about relationship problems (see The Get Up Kids, Knapsack, et al.), and this bombastic recording (engineered and mixed by lead guitarist david Hollenbeck) from the local four-piece is a super energetic slice of emotional rock that promises to warm all but the most cynical hearts during the chilly holidays. Check it for yourself at the band’s EP-release party Saturday, Dec. 9, 8 p.m., at The naked Lounge (Like Roses, Higuera and Creekside open). Citysick, Get Better Or download a copy at citysickca. bandcamp.com. Keep rocKin’ Speaking of local bands releasing EPs, new local “post pop” crew no Wave just dropped its first recording, the five-song no Wave: Live sessions. Download it at nowavesonlyocean.bandcamp.com.

rip socially steve There has been a lot of hurt felt throughout Chico’s in-

timate creative community this past week, as one of its favorite sons left the scene way too early. stephen Pankhurst died at home on Nov. 28, a day after being released from the hospital following heart surgery. He was 45. Pankhurst was beloved in this town. He was a big-hearted man with an infectious zest for life, something that was on full display at the notorious pool parties he threw and in the hard-partying old-school Chico punk band for which he played bass, socially Pink (winners of a couple of CAMMIES awards). And he was also respected in an entirely different arena— the financial/business world, where he put his innate ability to generate dollars to Stephen Pankhurst work in helping launch local publications Upstate Business Journal and inside out magazine before moving on to do independent marketing and consulting work. An official celebration of life for Pankhurst won’t happen until June 2, 2018 (details forthcoming), but this Saturday, Dec. 9, 2-5 p.m., there will be an informal memorial for the man at The Maltese Bar & Tap Room.

rememberinG ann A memorial for local painter ann Pierce, who died on

Nov. 20, has been announced for Saturday, Dec. 16, 1-3 p.m., at the Museum of northern California art. Also, in lieu of flowers, the family requests donations be made to the “Pierce/Trucksess Studio Art Scholarship” via Chico State’s University Foundation, 400 W. First St., 95926-0999.


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n one of the myriad ways that I was a strange kid, my ice cream preferences always ran toward sherbets and sorbets rather than the oppressive vanilla-chocolate oligarchy. The most desirable treat imaginable was a giant scoop of rainbow sherbet, because it combined many sherbets into one all-powerful sherbet, much like the Transformers and Gobots that I could have cared less about (like I said, strange kid). Meanwhile, the Sherbet strain of cannabis combines the Pink Panties and Girl Scout Cookies strains into one delicious indica-dominant hybrid. A sister of the Sunset Sherbet strain, Sherbet is known for its creamy and cookie-like flavors, as well as the ability to provide pain numbing, stress relieving and mood uplifting effects with lower risks of adverse reaction. The Sherbet strain grown in California by Four County Farms and distributed

Ca 215 & H&s Code 11362.5 Compliant | 7 days a Week 12-8pm | Chico area | Lic. # bL-004622 through Sacramento-area delivery service Herbish comes colored light green with light brown pistils, with a sweet smell of fruits and cream. Each hit offers a flavor excursion, starting creamy and sweet, growing piney and nutty on the tongue, and morphing into dank candy on the exhale, with a slightly grassy aftertaste.

It’s like a smoke-able version of that giant scoop of rainbow sherbet, delicious and comforting. It’s like a smoke-able version of that giant scoop of rainbow sherbet, delicious and comforting and comprised of the best of the best, but the effects of the Four County Farms Sherbet strain are as compelling as the smell and taste. In classic fashion, their Sherbet offers tensionmelting relief with low doses of anxiety and sedation. Just make sure you stock up on ice cream first. Produced by N&R Publications, a division of News & Review.

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY For the week oF december 7, 2017 ARIES (March 21-April 19): You may get

richer quicker in 2018, Aries—especially if you refuse to sell out. You may accumulate more clout—especially if you treat everyone as your equal and always wield your power responsibly. I bet you will also experience deeper, richer emotions—especially if you avoid people who have low levels of emotional intelligence. Finally, I predict you will get the best sex of your life in the next 12 months—especially if you cultivate the kind of peace of mind in which you’ll feel fine about yourself if you don’t get any sex at all. P.S.: You’d be wise to start working on these projects immediately.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): The mem-

bers of the fungus family, like mushrooms and molds, lack chlorophyll, so they can’t make food from sunlight, water, and carbon dioxide. To get the energy they need, they “eat” plants. That’s lucky for us. The fungi keep the earth fresh. Without them to decompose fallen leaves, piles of compost would continue to accumulate forever. Some forests would be so choked with dead matter that they couldn’t thrive. I invite you to take your inspiration from the heroic fungi, Taurus. Expedite the decay and dissolution of the worn-out and obsolete parts of your life.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): I’m guess-

ing you have been hungrier than usual. At times you may have felt voracious, even insatiable. What’s going on? I don’t think this intense yearning is simply about food, although it’s possible your body is trying to compensate for a nutritional deficiency. At the very least, you’re also experiencing a heightened desire to be understood and appreciated. You may be aching for a particular quality of love that you haven’t been able to give or get. Here’s my theory: Your soul is famished for experiences that your ego doesn’t sufficiently value or seek out. If I’m correct, you should meditate on what your soul craves but isn’t getting enough of.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): The

brightly colored birds known as beeeaters are especially fond of eating bees and wasps. How do they avoid getting stung? They snatch their prey in mid-air and then knock them repeatedly against a tree branch until the stinger falls off and the venom is flushed out. In the coming weeks, Cancerian, you could perhaps draw inspiration from the bee-eaters’ determination to get what they want. How might you be able to draw nourishment from sources that aren’t entirely benign? How could you extract value from influences that you have be careful with?

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): The coming

months will be a ripe time to revise and rework your past—to reconfigure the consequences that emerged from what happened once upon a time. I’ll trust you to make the ultimate decisions about the best ways to do that, but here are some suggestions. 1. Revisit a memory that has haunted you, and do a ritual that resolves it and brings you peace. 2. Go back and finally do a crucial duty you left unfinished. 3. Return to a dream you wandered away from prematurely, and either re-commit yourself to it, or else put it to rest for good.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): The astrological omens suggest that now is a favorable time to deepen your roots and bolster your foundations and revitalize traditions that have nourished you. Oddly enough, the current planetary rhythms are also conducive to you and your family and friends playing soccer in the living room with a ball made from rolled-up socks, pretending to be fortune-telling psychics and giving each other past-life readings, and gathering around the kitchen table to formulate a conspiracy to achieve world domination. And no, the two sets of advice I just gave you are not contradictory.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): In accordance

with the long-term astrological omens, I invite you to make five long-term promises to yourself. They were formulated by the teacher Shannen Davis. Say them aloud a

by rob brezsny few times to get a feel for them. 1. “I will make myself eminently teachable through the cultivation of openness and humility.” 2. “I won’t wait around hoping that people will give me what I can give myself.” 3. “I’ll be a good sport about the consequences of my actions, whether they’re good, bad, or misunderstood.” 4. “As I walk out of a room where there are many people who know me, I won’t worry about what anyone will say about me.” 5. “I will only pray for the things I’m willing to be the answer to.”

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): To

discuss a problem is not the same as doing something practical to correct it. Many people don’t seem to realize this. They devote a great deal of energy to describing and analyzing their difficulties, and may even imagine possible solutions, but then neglect to follow through. And so nothing changes. The sad or bad situation persists. Of all the signs in the zodiac, you Scorpios are among the least prone to this disability. You specialize in taking action to fulfill your proposed fixes. Just this once, however, I urge you to engage in more inquiry and conversation than usual. Just talking about the problem could cure it.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

As far back as ancient Egypt, Rome, and Greece, people staged ceremonies to mark the embarkation of a new ship. The intention was to bestow a blessing for the maiden voyage and ever thereafter. Good luck! Safe travels! Beginning in 18th-century Britain and America, such rituals often featured the smashing of a wine bottle on the ship’s bow. Later, a glass container of champagne became standard. In accordance with the current astrological indicators, I suggest that you come up with your own version of this celebratory gesture. It will soon be time for your launch.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): You

may feel quite sure that you’ve gotten as tall as you’re ever going to be. But that may not be true. If you were ever going to add another half-inch or more to your height, the near future would be the time for it. You are in the midst of what we in the consciousness industry call a “growth spurt.” The blooming and ripening could occur in other ways, as well. Your hair and fingernails may become longer faster than usual, and even your breasts or penis might undergo spontaneous augmentation. There’s no doubt that new brain cells will propagate at a higher rate, and so will the white blood cells that guard your physical health. Four weeks from now, I bet you’ll be noticeably smarter, wiser, and more robust.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): You

come into a delicatessen where you have to take a numbered ticket in order to get waited on. Oops. You draw 37 and the counter clerk has just called out number 17. That means 20 more people will have their turns before you. Damn! You settle in for a tedious vigil, putting down your bag and crossing your arms across your chest. But then what’s this? Two minutes later, the clerk calls out 37. That’s you! You go up to the counter and hand in your number, and amazingly enough, the clerk writes down your order. A few minutes later, you’ve got your food. Maybe it was a mistake, but who cares? All that matters is that your opportunity came earlier than you thought it would. Now apply this vignette as a metaphor for your life in the coming days.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): It’s one of

those bizarre times when what feels really good is in close alignment with what’s really good for you, and when taking the course of action that benefits you personally is probably what’s best for everyone else, too. I realize the onslaught of this strange grace may be difficult to believe. But it’s real and true, so don’t waste time questioning it. Relish and indulge in the freedom it offers you. Use it to shush the meddling voice in your head that informs you about what you supposedly SHOULD be doing instead of what you’re actually doing.

www.RealAstrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888.

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as EXPEDITE MOBILE NOTARY at 4025 Rio Bravo Dr Chico, CA 95973. KIMBERLY MARIE JOHNSON 4025 Rio Bravo Dr Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: KIMBERLY JOHNSON Dated: October 20, 2017 FBN Number: 2017-0001408 Published: November 16,22,30, December 7, 2017 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as TAQUERIA at 645 West 5th Street #110 Chico, CA 95928. SALVADOR HERNANDEZ HERNANDEZ 43221 County Rd 17 Woodland, CA 95776. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: SALVADOR HERNANDEZ Dated: October 23, 2017 FBN Number: 2017-0001413 Published: November 16,22,30, December 7, 2017 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as APIARY INNOVATION at 2829 Clark Road Oroville, CA 95965. MARK DILLON HOOVER 1467 Hooker Oak Ave Chico, CA 95926. BRYAN JOHN HOUTMAN 343 Roe Road Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by A General Partnership. Signed: BRYAN HOUTMAN Dated: October 26, 2017 FBN Number: 2017-0001434 Published: November 16,22,30, December 7, 2017 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as JOI DE VIE ART AND WORD at 788 Silverado Estates Court Chico, CA 95973. ISABELLA ANNE STEWART 788 Silverado Estates Court Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ISABELLA STEWART

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Dated: November 7, 2017 FBN Number: 2017-0001473 Published: November 16,22,30, December 7, 2017 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as WOLFS CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT CONSULTING at 567 Troy Ave Chico, CA 95973. EDWARD BURCHARDT 567 Troy Ave Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: EDWARD F BURCHARDT Dated: October 23, 2017 FBN Number: 2017-0001416 Published: November 16,22,30, December 7, 2017 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as OLDE CLIPPINGS at 14154 Skyway #2 Magalia, CA 95954. DANIEL ROSS WELTON 13760 W Park Dr Magalia, CA 95954. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: DANIEL R. WELTON Dated: October 16, 2017 FBN Number: 2017-0001378 Published: November 16,22,30, December 7, 2017 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as TURKEY TAIL FARM AND EVERYTHING HERBAL at 10846 Nelson Bar Road Oroville, CA 95965. CHRISTOPHER NELSON TCHUDI 10846 Nelson Bar Road Oroville, CA 95965. SUSAN JANE TCHUDI 10846 Nelson Bar Road Oroville, CA 95965. SAMANTHA ZANGRILLI 10846 Nelson Bar Road Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by A General Partnership. Signed: SUSAN JANE TCHUDI Dated: November 3, 2017 FBN Number: 2017-0001462 Published: November 16,22,30, December 7, 2017 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following person has abandoned the use of the fictitious business name ALTERNATIVE LIMOUSINE SERVICE at 1929 Perservation Oak Dr. Chico, CA 95928. ESTHER BARNES 1929 Preservation Oak Dr. Chico, CA 95928. This business was conducted by an Individual. Signed: ESTHER BARNES Dated: November 6, 2017 FBN Number: 2014-0001345 Published: November 16,22,30, December 7, 2017 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as NETWORK MORTGAGE at 155 E. 3rd Ave Chico, CA 95926. WILSON INVESTMENTS INCORPORATED 155 E. 3rd Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by A Corporation. Signed: DARIN WILSON, PRESIDENT Dated: November 3, 2017 FBN Number: 2017-0001464 Published: November 16,22,30, December 7, 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as AFFORDABLE PLUMBING at 722 Miller Ave Chico, CA 95928. STEVEN NORMAN ALLISON 722 Miller Ave Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: STEVE ALLISON Dated: September 14, 2017 FBN Number: 2017-0001244 Published: November 22,30, December 7,14, 2017 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following persons have abandoned the use of the ficticious business name BAILEY PHOTO BOOTHS at 6427 Moss Ln. Paradise, CA 95969. ASHLEY MARTIN 6427 Moss Ln. Paradise, CA 95969. REBEKAH MARTIN DODSON 6427 Moss Ln. Paradise, CA 95969. This business was conducted by Copartners. Signed: REBEKAH MARTIN DODSON Dated: November 16, 2017 FBN Number: 2016-0001407 Published: November 22,30, December 7,14, 2017 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as PAT’S FLYFISHING at 1010 Lori Dr Chico, CA 95973. DONALD VAN SLEEPER 1010 Lori Dr Chico, CA 95973. PATRICIA EILEEN SLEEPER 1010 Lori Dr Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by A Married Couple. Signed: PATRICIA SLEEPER Dated: November 16, 2017 FBN Number: 2017-0001524 Published: November 22,30, December 7,14, 2017 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ALLADIN ROOFING at 5760 Via Pacana Ave Oroville, CA 95965. MICHAEL JAMES LEDESMA 5760 Via Pacana Ave Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: MICHAEL LEDESMA Dated: November 13, 2017 FBN Number: 2017-0001495 Published: November 22,30, December 7,14, 2017 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as COUNTRY SHEAK AND BOUTIQUE at 1382 Longfellow Ave Chico, CA 95926. ANGELA WALLER 4828 County Road DD Orland, CA 95963. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ANGELA WALLER Dated: November 14, 2017 FBN Number: 2017-0001506 Published: November 22,30, December 7,14, 2017 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as C AND A CLEANING at 1382 Longfellow Ave Chico, CA 95926. LOUCINDA MAE OREAR 15077 Coyote Song Rd Chico, CA 95973. ANGELA MAE WALLER 4828 Co Rd DD Orland, CA 95963.

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This business is conducted by A General Partnership. Signed: ANGELA WALLER Dated: November 15, 2017 FBN Number: 2017-0001511 Published: November 22,30, December 7,14, 2017 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as PARADISE DRUG at 6585 Clark Rd #100 Paradise, CA 95969. DRUG THERAPY SYSTEMS COMPANY 1629 Manzanita Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by A Corporation. Signed: JANET BALBUTIN, OWNER/PRESIDENT Dated: November 6, 2017 FBN Number: 2017-0001467 Published: November 22,30, December 7,14, 2017 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CHICO COFFEE COMPANY DOWNTOWN at 145 Main St Chico, CA 95928. J & S COFFEE LLC 24854 Notre Dame Blvd #390 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by A Limited Liability Company. Signed: JENNIFER SILVA, MEMBER Dated: November 16, 2017 FBN Number: 2017-0001523 Published: November 22,30, December 7,14, 2017 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as TLC CARPET CLEANING at 201 Crater Lake Dr Chico, CA 95973. TIMOTHY SCOTT WEHNAU 201 Crater Lake Dr Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: TIM WEHNAU Dated: November 17, 2017 FBN Number: 2017-0001527 Published: November 30, December 7,14,21, 2017 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BRAIN-FRIENDLY DYNAMICS LLC at 975 Filbert Avenue Chico, CA 95926. BRAIN-FRIENDLY DYNAMICS LLC 975 Filbert Avenue Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by A Limited Liability Company. Signed: SCOTT S. WINTER, PRESIDENT Dated: October 30, 2017 FBN Number: 2017-0001451 Published: November 30, December 7,14,21, 2017 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BIDWELL BRIDGE CLUB at 965 Salem Chico, CA 95928. GALE CARTER ALVISTUR 2057 Hooker Oak Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: GALE ALVISTUR Dated: November 2, 2017 FBN Number: 2017-0001456 Published: November 30, December 7,14,21, 2017

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PALETERIA Y NEVERIA LA FLOR DE MICHOACAN HOMEMADE ICE CREAM SHOP at 668 Mangrove Avenue Chico, CA 95926. ANTONIO ARREGUIN BERMUDEZ 15 Top Flight Court Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ANTONIO ARREGUIN BERMUDEZ Dated: November 17, 2017 FBN Number: 2017-0001528 Published: November 30, December 7,14,21, 2017 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CHICO WINE AND FASHION at 1225 Stewart Avenue Chico, CA 95926. GARY RICHARD SMITH 1225 Stewart Avenue Chico, CA 95926. KELLY LYNN SMITH 1225 Stewart Avenue Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by A Married Couple. Signed: KELLY SMITH Dated: October 17, 2017 FBN Number: 2017-0001385 Published: November 30, December 7,14,21, 2017 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as NORCAL CUSTOM at 13302 Cabin Hollow Ct Suite 110 Chico, CA 95973. JOSH PHILLIPSON 8233 Streng Ave Citrus Heights, CA 95610. TRAVIS STEARNS 2 Benton Way Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by A General Partnership. Signed: JOSH PHILLIPSON Dated: October 27, 2017 FBN Number: 2017-0001436 Published: November 30, December 7,14,21, 2017

Signed: JENNIFER SILVA, MEMBER Dated: November 28, 2017 FBN Number: 2017-0001550 Published: December 7,14,21,28, 2017 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as THE BOOKSTORE at 118 Main St Chico, CA 95928. MUIR Q V F HUGHES 22 Lazy S Lane Chico, CA 95928. JOSH S MILLS 22 Lazy S Lane Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by A Married Couple. Signed: JOSH MILLS Dated: November 13, 2017 FBN Number: 2017-0001500 Published: December 7,14,21,28, 2017

NOTICES NOTICE OF LIEN SALE Pursuant to CA Business Code 21700, in lieu of rents due, the following units contain clothes, furniture, boxes, etc. JOSE AGUIRRE #374cc1 (6X12) (washer, furniture, boxes) DAVID BRANTLEY SR & LADON BRANTLEY #229ss (6X12) (boxes, furniture) HUGO RAMIREZ #084 (5x7) (misc. boxes) Contents to be sold to the highest bidder on: December 23, 2017 Beginning at 12:00pm Sale to be held at: Bidwell Self Storage 65 Heritage Lane Chico, CA 95926. (530) 893-2109 Published: December 7,14, 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as ETTA LANE FARM at 8995 Stanford Lane Durham, CA 95938. JEFF THACKER 8995 Stanford Lane Durham, CA 95938. LINDA THACKER 8995 Stanford Lane Durham, CA 95938. This business is conducted by A Married Couple. Signed: JEFF THACKER Dated: November 29, 2017 FBN Number: 2017-0001553 Published: December 7,14,21,28, 2017

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: MIYAGI COLIN POCOCK Proposed name: MIYAGI TOMEY POCOCK THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: December 15, 2017 Time: 9:00am Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: MICHAEL P. CANDELA Dated: October 17, 2017 Case Number: 17CV02718 Published: November 16,22,30, December 7, 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CHICO COFFEE COMPANY at 107 Parmac Rd Ste 180 Chico, CA 95926. J & S COFFEE LLC 2485 Notre Dame Blvd #390 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by A Limited Liability Company.

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner JAHLELAH FRANCIA PAULUS filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: JAHLELAH FRANCIA PAULUS Proposed name: JAHLELAH FRANCIA

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as SHE DELIVERY at 555 E 15th St Chico, CA 95928. ALYSSA RINCON 1166 E 7th St Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ALYSSA RINCON Dated: November 30, 2017 FBN Number: 2017-0001561 Published: December 7,14,21,28, 2017

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this Legal Notice continues

THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: December 22, 2017 Time: 9:00am Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: STEPHEN E. BENSON Dated: October 17, 2017 Case Number: 17CV02902 Published: November 16,22,30, December 7, 2017 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: NICOLE ELAINE SAMPSON Proposed name: NICOLE ELAINE BARBOUR THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: December 15, 2017 Time: 9:00am Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: MICHAEL P. CANDELA Dated: October 17, 2017 Case Number: 17CV02974 Published: November 16,22,30, December 7, 2017 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner E P.A. ESTELLE PAPPY ANN filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: ESTELLE A. CONWAY, ESTELLE A. JOHN Proposed name: ESTELLE PAPPY ANN (E P.A.-2157) THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed,

this Legal Notice continues

the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: January 12, 2018 Time: 9:00am Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: STEPHEN E. BENSON Dated: November 22, 2017 Case Number: 17CV03252 Published: November 30, December 7,14,21, 2017

SUMMONS SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: JERARD J ACOSTA, KATHLEEN M ACOSTA AKA KATHLEEM M EPP YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: BUTTE COUNTY CREDIT BUREAU A CORP NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The Court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Superior Court of California, County of Butte 1775 Concord Avenue Chico, CA 95928 LIMITED CIVIL CASE The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney is: JOSEPH L SELBY (#249546) Law Office of Ferris & Selby 2607 Forest Avenue Ste 130 Chico, CA 95928. (530) 366-4290 Dated: February 9, 2017 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Case Number: 17CV00397 Published: December 7,14,21,28, 2017 SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: SUSAN E AKINS AKA SUSAN E BILLINGS YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: BUTTE COUNTY CREDIT BUREAU A CORP

this Legal Notice continues

NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The Court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Superior Court of California, County of Butte 1775 Concord Avenue Chico, CA 95928 LIMITED CIVIL CASE The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney is: JOSEPH L SELBY (#249546) Law Office of Ferris & Selby 2607 Forest Avenue Ste 130 Chico, CA 95928. (530) 366-4290 Dated: January 6, 2017 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Case Number: 17CV00057 Published: December 7,14,21,28, 2017 SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: TODD EUGENE DAVIDSON YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: BUTTE COUNTY CREDIT BUREAU A CORP NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court.

this Legal Notice continues

There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The Court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Superior Court of California, County of Butte 1775 Concord Avenue Chico, CA 95928 LIMITED CIVIL CASE The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney is: JOSEPH L SELBY (#249546) Law Office of Ferris & Selby 2607 Forest Avenue Ste 130 Chico, CA 95928. (530) 366-4290 Dated: February 2, 2017 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Case Number: 17CV00317 Published: December 7,14,21,28, 2017 SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: DANIELLE E DEFELICE YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: BUTTE COUNTY CREDIT BUREAU A CORP NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The Court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Superior Court of California, County of Butte 1775 Concord Avenue Chico, CA 95928 LIMITED CIVIL CASE

this Legal Notice continues

The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney is: JOSEPH L SELBY (#249546) Law Office of Ferris & Selby 2607 Forest Avenue Ste 130 Chico, CA 95928. (530) 366-4290 Dated: April 7, 2017 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Case Number: 17CV01014 Published: December 7,14,21,28, 2017 SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: TIMOTHY B MCCRACKEN YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: BUTTE COUNTY CREDIT BUREAU A CORP NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The Court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Superior Court of California, County of Butte 1775 Concord Avenue Chico, CA 95928 LIMITED CIVIL CASE The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney is: JOSEPH L SELBY (#249546) Law Office of Ferris & Selby 2607 Forest Avenue Ste 130 Chico, CA 95928. (530) 366-4290 Dated: April 3, 2017 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Case Number: 17CV00977 Published: December 7,14,21,28, 2017

PETITION NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE JOHN C. LYNN To all heirs and beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: JOHN C. LYNN A Petition for Probate has been filed by: BRANDON LYNN in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte.

this Legal Notice continues

The Petition for Probate requests that: BRANDON LYNN be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or conseted to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: December 26, 2017 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: VANESSA J. SUNDIN Sundin Law Office 341 Broadway Street, Ste. 302 Chico, CA 95928 (530) 342-2452 Case Number: 17PR00449 Dated: November 29, 2017 Published: December 7,14,21, 2017

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Homes Sold Last Week ADDRESS

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TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

SQ. FT.

ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

SQ. FT.

431 C St

Biggs

$183,500

3/1

1128

1255 W 11th Ave

Chico

$340,000

4/3

1790

545 W Shasta Ave

Chico

$626,000

6/3

3095

3 Vintage Ct

Chico

$335,000

3/2

1622

20 Santa Clara Ct

Chico

$495,000

2/3

1844

2741 Manning Ave

Chico

$312,000

3/2

1357

25 Abbott Cir

Chico

$475,000

4/3

2283

5 Cardiff Ct

Chico

$285,000

3/2

1520

2 Picual Ct

Chico

$465,000

4/2

2086

3 Geneva Ln

Chico

$260,000

3/2

1192

787 Eastwood Ave A

Chico

$420,000

5/3

2328

1430 W 4th St

Chico

$257,000

3/3

1330

17 Paseo Haciendas

Chico

$365,000

3/2

2246

2500 Shooting Star Way

Chico

$190,000

2/2

1103

34

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D E C E m b E r 7, 2 0 1 7


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The following houses were sold in butte county by real estate agents or private parties during the week of November 20, 2017 – November 22, 2017. The housing prices are based on the stated documentary transfer tax of the parcel and may not necessarily reflect the actual sale price of the home. ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

SQ. FT.

ADDRESS

Chico

$165,000

2/1

1420

1992 Sycamore Ln

Durham

$263,000

3/2

1338

29 Hollis Ln

Gridley

$226,000

3/2

1196

1790 Sycamore St

Gridley

$179,500

3/1

1488

6253 Brevard Cir

Magalia

$280,000

3/2

1836

1566 6th St

Oroville

$290,000

4/3

2294

237 Grand Oak Dr

Oroville

$265,000

2/2

2590 Nevada Ave

Oroville

$213,500

3/2

146 W Sacramento Ave

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

6 Linda Loma Dr

Oroville

$181,000

2/2

920

2255 Quartz Ave

Oroville

$177,000

2/2

1538

2573 Brown Ave

Oroville

$95,500

2/1

1180

6720 Machuga Ln

Paradise

$290,000

2/3

2751

5270 Beverly Glen Ave

Paradise

$280,000

3/2

1345

1294

1554 Sawpeck Way

Paradise

$270,000

2/1

1008

2207

5445 Princeton Way

Paradise

$250,000

2/3

1440

D e c e m b e r 7, 2 0 1 7

SQ. FT.

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