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2015

ChiCo’s News & eNtertaiNmeNt weekly

Volume 39, issue 7

thursday, oCtober 15, 2015

www.NewsreView.Com


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President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Chief Operations Officer Deborah Redmond Human Resources Manager Tanja Poley Business Manager Nicole Jackson Accounting Specialist Kourtnee Angel Sweetdeals Coordinator Courtney deShields Senior Support Tech Joe Kakacek Developer John Bisignano System Support Specialist Kalin Jenkins 353 E. Second Street, Chico, CA 95928 Phone (530) 894-2300 Fax (530) 894-0143 Website www.newsreview.com Got a News Tip? (530) 894-2300, ext. 2245 or chiconewstips@newsreview.com Calendar Events cnrcalendar@newsreview.com Calendar Questions (530) 894-2300, ext. 2225 Classifieds (530) 894-2300, press 4 Editorial Policies Opinions expressed in the Chico News & Review are those of the author and not Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint portions of the paper. The Chico News & Review is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or review materials. Email letters to cnrletters@newsreview.com. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to edit letters for length (200 or fewer words), clarity and libel or not to publish them.

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Cruelest city in America? If Chico’s leaders aren’t careful, they’re going to give our fair burg a

Feral cats and humanity awareness about feral cats and trap-neuter-return N(TNR), the most humane and effective way to deal ational Feral Cat Day on Oct. 16 is set to raise

with feral cats in our community. Cats have lived alongside humans for thousands of years and feral cats, also called community cats, thrive in every part of the world. Feral just means a cat that is not socialized to humans. Through TNR, outdoor cats are humanely trapped and brought to a veterinarian to be spayed or neutered and vaccinated. While under anesthesia, by a small portion of the ear is Tracy Mohr painlessly removed to show, at The author is animal a glance, that the cat has been services manager altered. After they recover from at the Chico Animal surgery, cats are returned to Shelter. their outdoor home. Studies have shown that less than 1 percent of cats that are trapped need to be euthanized because of illness. TNR has proven to be more effective in managing cat

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OCTOBER 15, 2015

populations and reducing the number of unwanted kittens born each year than the traditional practice of just trapping and removing stray cats, which is both costly and never-ending. Removing cats creates a “vacuum effect,” whereby other cats move in to take advantage of resources like food and shelter, and reproduction increases to fill the void. By altering cats and returning them to their original location, the population stabilizes, and will begin to decrease over time because no new kittens are being born. Unwanted behaviors like spraying and fighting are also reduced. TNR is also more cost effective because fewer cats enter shelters, meaning fewer cats being housed and cared for, and in the end, far fewer cats being euthanized. Chico has joined many cities and counties across the nation, including San Jose, Palm Beach County, Fla., and Atlantic City, N.J., in supporting TNR as a valid way of managing community cats. If you have community cats in your neighborhood, call the Chico Animal Shelter (894-5630) or Neighborhood Cat Advocates (324-2292) for more info about TNR resources, including no-cost TNR. Neighborhood Cat Advocates also needs volunteers to help with TNR, a great service for our cats and our community. □

reputation as one of the cruelest cities in America. How’s that? Well, about a month ago, with the exception of one member of the seven-member City Council, the panel voted to adopt a new ordinance that makes it easier to hand out citations to individuals for storing personal items on city property and camping there, too. And now, even before that ordinance has gone into effect, at least one representative, Councilwoman Reanette Fillmer, is saying the law should be expanded citywide. We’re concerned that such a move The pending law, will open the city up to civil rights litigawhich goes into tion. In fact, we’re surprised the city isn’t effect early next being sued right now. month, targets local That’s because the pending law, homeless people, which goes into effect early next month, an already targets local homeless people, an already marginalized population. marginalized What the so-called Offenses Against population. Waterways and Public Property ordinance does is make it easier for police officers to confiscate homeless people’s belongings and move them along, presumably to some other piece of public property (you know, since they don’t have homes) or, if they have been given enough citations, directly to Butte County Jail. The law was approved under the premise that it would mitigate vagrancy, camping, illicit-drug use, littering, public urination, etc., along creeks and streams and at the so-called Civic Center (City Hall, the council chambers and City Plaza). Thing is, laws against all of those things are already on the books. As we’ve said previously, the real purpose of this punitive new law is to make it as difficult as possible for people without homes to live in Chico. Any argument that it applies to everyone in Chico is laughable, considering that people with homes generally don’t live outdoors in public spaces. If Chico takes steps to further criminalize homelessness, the city may not only face an expensive lawsuit, but also scrutiny well beyond the scope of this newspaper. Now is the time to decide whether we want Chico to be known as one of the cruelest cities in the nation. If not, the question is, do we have what it takes to get to the roots of the homeless problem? □

Celebrate the best With this, the CN&R’s annual Best of Chico issue, we get an opportunity to

learn a little more about so many of the businesses and service providers that make Chico unique and exciting. And we get to celebrate all our favorite people and places, too, in a way thanking them for enriching our lives. But voting for local businesses is not the only way to thank them. Actually visiting them, and spending your money there, goes a whole lot further. While you flip through these pages and read about the best things in Chico, keep in mind that these businesses wouldn’t be here without us. If we don’t shop locally, we won’t have local shops. If we sit at home, click a few buttons, and order 15 things on Amazon or Overstock, that money leaves our community; by spending locally, that money stays here. The CN&R has long been a champion of the “shop local” mantra, and we want to take this opportunity to repeat it. Put down that computer mouse and resist the urge to shop online. Instead, continue to patronize your favorite local restaurants and stores. And by reading about the Best of Chico, maybe you’ll discover a few new local gems. We certainly have a lot of them! □


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LETTERS Send email to cnrletters@newsreview.com

SECOND & FLUME by Melissa Daugherty m e l i s s a d @ n e w s r e v i e w. c o m

thanks, Ms. Fillmer My former boss, retired CN&R Editor Robert Speer, found himself in the unusual (for him) position of standing at the podium in front of the full City Council last week during that panel’s regular meeting. Speer’s on a mission to change the current method of at-large, citywide council elections. He and the group he’s a part of, Districts for Chico, propose that the city be carved into six districts of equal populations and that the residents therein vote in a candidate to represent their district (someone who lives within the boundary). The nonpartisan group has many good points. Currently, Districts for Chico maintains, citizens and neighborhoods lack effective representation, elections are extremely partisan and expensive, and with few exceptions, those who win seats are white. During last week’s meeting, Speer’s objective was to get the panel to agendize a public hearing about the group’s proposal. It didn’t go as planned. He was peppered with questions about the particulars of the concept, some of which haven’t been fully vetted, including the exact language that would amend the city’s charter. When asked about the benefits of districts, one of the many issues Speer brought up was how constituents would have better access to their representatives. He told an anecdote about Butte County District 2 Supervisor Larry Wahl attending a Love Chapmantown Coalition meeting, noting that Wahl likely would not have been there if that neighborhood wasn’t in his district. Speer’s point seemed to be a bit over newbie Councilwoman Reanette Fillmer’s head. She seemed to think that the representatives under the proposal would be able to attend only the meetings within their own districts. Not so. Moreover, issues would still be voted on by the full council. In short, there was some confusion about the concept. A public hearing would have been helpful to the council and the community, including the Chico E-R’s editorial board, which, big shocker, weighed in on the issue prior to hearing its merits. To Fillmer’s credit, after Mayor Mark Sorensen made a motion to agendize discussion, she voted aye. She was joined by Councilwoman Tami Ritter, creating an oddball split vote that didn’t go in Speer’s favor. Stay tuned on that front. For me personally, the most entertaining part of the exchange was hearing Fillmer throw barbs my way. I’m sure it stems from me writing about her callous comment about how she “stepped in shit” while in San Francisco—and how needing to buy a new pair of shoes was the determining factor in her voting for the city’s new anti-homeless law. At first it was hard to understand what she was getting at when she said, “the media plays a really big role in the nonpartisan and partisanship that is happening.” Huh? But then she went on to say that the media tends to play the parties against each other. Blaming the media—how original. But the best thing to come out of the thin-skinned neophyte’s mouth was when she told Speer that she would love it if he would go back to being CN&R’s editor (i.e., replace yours truly). I cannot think of a higher compliment a politician could pay to a journalist. So, thank you, Ms. Fillmer.

Melissa Daugherty is editor of the CN&R

Cheapskate Walmart Re “It’s baaaaaack” (Newslines, by Meredith J. Cooper, Oct. 8): The recent article about the Walmart in Chico proposing to expand stated that Walmart was bragging that it donated $13,000 to Chico nonprofits. This has to be a typo. Walmart has annual revenues of $473 billion! There are many families in the Chico area who donate more than $13,000 to local charities. Walmart is known nationally as a cheapskate when it comes to supporting local communities, but just $13,000? Bob Mulholland Chico

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On aid-in-dying Re “Virginia and Brittany” (Second & Flume, by Melissa Daugherty, Oct. 8): Thank you for your editorial about Virginia and Brittany [Maynard]. My cousin, Julie, passed away from the same brain tumor, glioblastoma, in July of 2014. She was diagnosed in early April of the same year with three tumors, all inoperable. She was only 56 years young and a lover of life—a competitive runner, a hiker, very physically fit. She loved riding quads with friends, especially after the first snow. To watch her waste away was incredibly difficult. A weaker person would have never lasted as long as she did. I fully support this bill and the option that it provides to terminal individuals. Julie’s family will never know if she would have chosen that option, but I truly wish it would have been available for her. So many times during her decline, I recall conversations with her sister discussing how we end our animals’ lives when there is no longer any hope and why couldn’t there be an option like this. I will miss her beautiful smile but will always hold her in my heart! Patty Ellis Magalia

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‘Guns don’t kill people ...’  Re “Quit pandering to the NRA” (Guest comment, by Dean Carrier, Oct. 8): The public outcry for tighter gun control laws that always follows rare but highly publicized shootings is superstitious. Such would only make it harder for law-abiding citizens to LETTERS c o n t i n u e d

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LETTERS c o n t i n u e d f r o m pa g e 7 get guns; criminals steal their guns or buy them on the black market. Further, tighter restrictions would have little effect on the more than one gun per person already circulating in America. Even if every gun could be seized and destroyed, disgruntled citizens would then likely switch from mass shootings to mass burnings, bombings, gassings and poisonings, which could be even deadlier. It’s been said again and again: Guns don’t kill people, people kill people. The way to end gun violence isn’t to make it harder for law-abiding citizens to get guns. Rather, it’s to eradicate the tensions and injustices that drive all forms of violence. Nathan Esplanade Corning

paradigm has shifted, but the feminist front cannot accept it because it would expose the fabric of lies that holds feminism together. Mike Peters Chico

The wage gap can be accounted for by taking into account women’s choices in career paths. A 2009 paper commissioned by the Department of Labor (An Analysis of Reasons for the Disparity in Wages Between Men and Women) concluded that the 23 percent wage gap can be explained by “the result of individual choices being made by both female and male workers.” But. I agree. Women are just in general weaker than men and need all the help they can get in order to compete in the job market today. John Harbour Chico

‘About the same’ Re “Bridging the gap” (Editorial, Oct. 8): The mythology of feminism continues to perpetuate the erroneous political belief that men make more money then women, when in fact they don’t. Men and women make about the same. The feminist math leaves all kinds of factors out of the equation, such as men working more overtime, men doing 98 percent of the dangerous heavy construction labor and constituting 91 percent of workplace injuries, men staying longer on the job and acquiring seniority (women have the luxury of dropping out of the workplace), men being four times as likely to ask for a raise, etc. Single men on a yearly basis actually make less than single women, because much of male work is seasonal. In large metropolitan areas single women without kids make 8 percent to 20 percent more than single men. The

Editor’s note: After adjusting for women’s career choices, even the most conservative figures from studies, including the one mentioned above, reveal a wage gap of 4.8 percent to 7.1 percent. In other words, men continue to make more money than women.

Trump/Hitler comparison Re “Of Trump and Hitler” (Letters, by Nathan Esplanade, Oct. 8): I would like to thank Mr. Esplanade for clarifying that he truly is as anti-Semitic and racist as his first letter (“Trumpeting Trump”) implied. I had managed to convince myself that no one in this day and age would endorse a candidate by comparing him to Hitler, and that I must have misinterpreted his comparison. Luckily, he wrote again to explain how Jews “push as brazenly and as hard as they can

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to take all they can until someone legally or physically stops them.” Thank goodness Hitler had the foresight to “legally and physically [stop] them.” (Lest anyone misinterpret my letter, that was sarcasm.) Mr. Esplanade appears to hope that Trump will employ a similarly final solution against Mexican immigrants. I suppose I should also thank him for providing me with such a perfect example to discuss in my class on prejudice, hate and racism. Dory Ann Schachner Chico

I am so glad that Nathan Esplanade lets us know that he is “not anti-Semitic or anti-Mexican.” Otherwise we might take his stupid and blatantly anti-Semitic and anti-Mexican remarks at their face value. Just as a point of information, Jews and Mexicans have been on this continent since the 1500s. Neither group needs anyone’s approval to be good Americans.  Michael Mulcahy Chico

I read Nathan Esplanade’s letters to the editor on Trump and Hitler. It is clear whose side Mr. Esplanade would have been on in World War II and it ain’t the winner’s. Beau Grosscup Chico

Forgive my cynicism regarding any sentence that begins with, “I’m not anti-Semitic or anti-Mexican,” when it follows “Trump is like Hitler in recognizing that a race of people are selfishly and aggressively displacing a native population’s own race, culture, values and control of the country.” Nice. I’m sure the Brownshirts

would be quick to agree. Robert Quist Chico

‘An ignorant man’ Uncle Ben Carson with the grinning face of that American icon on every box of white rice, is anathema to my upbringing as an African-American. His exiguous mindset plays into the hands of those who want this country to go backward. I have friends who are black conservatives, but are not in his league at all. He is an ignorant man when it comes to social skills, just as Donald Trump is. We have seen enough of this tearing down of America since the almost eight years of do-nothing Republicans and Tea Party backlash against President Obama. Ben Carson’s achievements as an intelligent surgeon are unquestioned. There is nothing wrong with having an ego, but being an egoist can be very harmful to certain men and women. In fact, this would-be emperor has no clothes. Jerry Harris San Francisco/Chico

Banners are inappropriate Re “Beyond the banner” (Editorial, Oct. 1): How do you decide what’s important? How about the biggest discretionary item in the U.S. budget? As first reported in Mother Jones magazine, in January of this year, then in the Fiscal Times in March, and then by Reuters in June, $8.5 trillion in taxpayer money given to the Pentagon has not been accounted for. That’s our tax money we are talking about! Do you really want to put up plastic banners for a group that

can’t tell us where our money goes? As long as we have so many homeless veterans and as long as the Pentagon budget is so out of control, it seems inappropriate, at this time, to put up Chico Military Heroes’ banners. Charles Withuhn  Chico

A bill worth considering At the North State Water Action Forum on Sept. 22, state legislators and Rep. Doug LaMalfa joined a crowd at the Elks Lodge to discuss a proposed new water storage project for the North State. A main theme of the evening was planning for the future in our endeavors now, and working across the aisle to gain support for projects. One of the easiest ways Rep. LaMalfa can do this for our community and the rest of our country is with the PREPARE Act, named a “low-hanging fruit” by the National Taxpayers Union, which names 10 pieces of legislation per year that any legislator, regardless of party, should find no reason not to support. PREPARE is listed at No. 2 for good reason. This bill will update our national emergency preparedness plans and empower regional branches of federal service agencies to use best practices that save extensive and unnecessary costs on postemergency repairs. With ever-increasing extreme weather events, wildfires included, this bill practically has “help Northern California!” stamped at the top. Please encourage our CA-1 district representative to co-sponsor this bill by calling or emailing his office today, as we continue to tend fire evacuees in the region. Meagan Fischer Chico

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NEWSLINES DOWNSTROKE THOU SHALT NOT BURGLE

The man convicted of robbing a string of churches and schools in Chico was sentenced on Oct. 22 to five years in Butte County Jail followed by nine years probation. Between October 2014 and March 2015, Kyle Hubbard, 26, ransacked and vandalized 18 different primary schools and churches and one business in the Chico area. Judge James Reilley ordered the long probationary period to make it easier for Hubbard to repay $50,000, according to a press release from Butte County District Attorney Mike Ramsey. Hubbard pleaded no contest in July and, according to the release, told authorities he committed the crimes to fuel his methamphetamine addiction. He was arrested after police discovered security footage of Hubbard burglarizing the Madison Bear Garden and palm prints left at multiple crime scenes.

Horde of the flies Jamee Mendonca with her 5-year-old daughter, June, and her yellow Lab, Cash, at the family’s home on Chico River Road.

FAKE INJURY, REAL CRIME

An Oroville man was sentenced to one year in jail on five felony counts of worker’s compensation fraud for faking injuries from a 2009 incident, according to the Butte County District Attorney’s office. Howard Neel, 59, was working as a private security guard in December 2009, when his company car was hit by another vehicle as he was fueling up. He claimed the impact spun his car around and knocked him to the ground, causing extensive back, neck and leg pain. Investigators later acquired security footage showing the impact was minor and Neel had not been harmed. Another hearing will be held Dec. 11 to determine if Neel will pay restitution of approximately $245,000.

SUCH IS GONE

After more than a decade as executive director of the Jesus Center, a local nonprofit serving the homeless and less fortunate, Bill Such “will no longer be serving in the role,” according to a press release. In the statement, the organization’s board of directors cited “a difference of opinion on the future vision and direction of the Jesus Center.” While the release commended Such for his heart and contributions to the community, board President Ryan Vaught declined further comment when contacted by the CN&R. As director, Such (pictured) was an altruistic and articulate champion of local homeless peoples’ rights, always urging for the humane treatment of those hindered by poverty, drug addiction and mental illness. “We’ve got mentally ill people on the street who are not pieces of shit, is my point,” he told the CN&R during a recent, particularly candid interview.

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Overrun with pests, neighbor of water treatment plant questions connecting Paradise to Chico’s sewer uninhabitable before the sun dips in the Jevening and it cools down at her home on amee Mendonca’s backyard is often

Chico River Road. It’s at its worst between 5 and 6 p.m., when she and her husband, story and photo by Howard Hardee Justin, like to barbecue and their two daughters h owa rd h @ want to play basketball n ew srev i ew. c o m in the driveway. It’s the flies. They never really go away. In the morning they’re an inconvenience the family can swat away, but with the heat they appear in lifedisrupting numbers, swarming over screen doors, vehicles and even the family’s dog, a yellow Lab named Cash. “They bite him until he bleeds,” Mendonca said. The Mendoncas live on 10 acres of almond and walnut orchards, property that’s been in the family since the 1930s. Those orchards buffer their home from the Water Pollution Control Plant, where all of Chico’s sewage ends up. The liquids are treated and fed into the Sacramento River. The solids, though, have to dry out before being trucked to the Neal Road landfill. That means “biosolids”—i.e., human feces—sit outside the plant for days at a

time, which attracts flies. Lots of flies. Over the years, the plant generally has been a good neighbor, Mendonca says. The family catches a nasty whiff on the breeze “only very rarely.” When the flies become unbearable, she’ll notify the plant manager, who may increase the frequency of spraying insecticide on the piles of solid waste. What really has Mendonca worked up is a well-publicized proposal to build an 8-mile pipe along the Skyway that would send Paradise’s sewage to the Chico plant for treatment. She has doubts about the city taking on more waste at a facility that, based on her family’s experiences, struggles to move the solid stuff off-site in a timely manner. “I’m realistic about it,” she said. “I know the plant isn’t going anywhere. I just want them to have a plan and manage what they have. I don’t think that’s unreasonable.” Paradise Vice Mayor Jody Jones floated the

pipeline proposal during the Chico City Council meeting on Sept. 1. She described the decaying septic systems in her town’s commercial core and touted potential benefits for Chico, such as increased revenue through hook-up fees and selling the extra

treated water to irrigation districts downstream. As Jones told the council, Paradise is the “largest incorporated city west of the Mississippi River still wholly dependent on septic systems.” And they’re deteriorating, especially in the town’s commercial core—27 septic systems already have failed, 39 are expected to fail in five years, and 56 more likely will fail within 10 years, Jones said. (The issue likely will come back before the Chico City Council in November, she said in an email.) The aging systems pose a potential threat to groundwater and also the local economy if businesses aren’t able to expand or are discouraged from opening in the first place, Jones told the council. “If one area suffers an economic decline, it can pull down the entire region.” Rather than Paradise building its own treatment plant or smaller clustered systems in commercial areas, the preferred solution—at least for the Paradise Town Council—is building the pipeline. The idea has been kicked around for years, but whether it’s feasible and environmentally sound remain open questions, said Erik Gustafson, Chico’s acting director of Public Works. He says that the project “really needs to be analyzed further.”


Goodbye, Charlie For one, it’s not easy digging along the Skyway, and burying an 8-mile pipeline surely would pose challenges. Hooking up to the sewer collection system—the series of pipes that takes water from residences and businesses to the treatment plant—is another problem, Gustafson said. “Could the collection system handle the additional flow? Right now, the answer is yes, but it would limit the residential growth” in the area nearest to the connection, he said. “It would likely mean improvements to underground infrastructure.” The treatment plant itself could handle the load, he said. It has the capacity to treat 12 million gallons per day, but operates at about half that, and he says there’s room, both in terms of physical space and potential improvements to infrastructure, to expand capacity to 15 million gallons per day. As for Mendonca’s specific concerns,

Gustafson said he’s heard them loud and clear. “It’s a wastewater treatment facility, so absolutely, yes, there will be flies,” he said. “But we do everything we can to try to control the fly issue out there.” The city contracts with a pest control company to spray the solid waste about once a week, and they’ve recognized that “the more you move and turn the biosolids, the more flies you’re going to attract.” By cutting back on that during the drying process, he says, staff noticed fewer flies around the plant over the summer. Removing biosolids more quickly is a possible way to limit the number of flies, Gustafson said. The city is looking at entering into a contract with a hauler to move most of the solid waste without drying it first, an agreement that could begin within the next few months. “I absolutely understand Jamee’s concerns,” Gustafson said. “We want to be good neighbors and help with any fly issues she has at her home. Hopefully there’s a solution on the horizon.” In the meantime, Mendonca hopes the city and its residents carefully consider all of the ramifications of the proposed Paradise pipeline, which she believes the media has painted as a winwin. She personally doesn’t have much of a voice as a county resident, albeit one directly affected by operations of the city. “I’m not a Chico resident, but I’m having to deal with the city’s flies,” she said. “It’s the city’s poop.” □

Chico State Greek community and others mourn passing of youth advocate

C

harles William Preusser, 71, was mostly known as Charlie—but also “everyone’s favorite old man,” “Mr. Chico,” “Chico’s oldest frat boy” and, in his youth, “Checkbook Charlie.” He was a founding father of the Tau Gamma Theta fraternity and local Greeks say he’s the only person to have served as the president of two different Chico fraternities. He was a bright, engaging man and a steadfast advocate for students and youth, say those who knew him. “He was such a generous, upbeat and outgoing man. I could talk to him about anything. He was the wisest man I’ve met in my life,” said Chris Downham, a Tau Gamma Theta member. Preusser died at Enloe Medical Center following an extended illness last Tuesday, Oct. 6. He’d spent his last years living at the Tau Gamma Theta house at 10th and Chestnut streets. Before that, he lived across town near the apartment complex known as “The Zoo,” where he held weekly dinners for his “family,” the men of his fraternity. Preusser was wheelchair-bound for more than a year before his death. “Taking care of him was the least we could do for the man who motivated us to work harder and accomplish more,” said Downham, his primary caretaker. “He made sure all of our needs were met. We made sure all of his needs were met, too. We wanted him to have comfort and peace.” Preusser never married or had his own children. He was a smoker and drinker and socialized regularly with his younger fraternity brothers until just a few weeks before his

SIFT ER Best (and worst) of California What are California’s best and worst cities for families, and where does Chico fall in that lineup? According to WalletHub, our fair city ranks 150th out of 240 municipalities, based on four categories: 1) family life and fun; 2) education, health and safety; 3) affordability; and 4) socioeconomic environment. Cities in the Sacramento and Bay Area regions took the majority of the top spots in the study. Folsom placed first, followed by Eastvale (So Cal), and then the East Bay cities of San Ramon, Dublin and Pleasanton. The cities ranked the lowest include Calexico, Compton, San Bernardino, Oakland and Huntington Park. For the full list, visit www.wallethub.com.

death. Tau Gamma Theta Alumni Association President Michael Da Virro described him as the consummate bachelor. He noted that over the past 50 years Preusser’s large extended fraternity family had grown to more than 650 members, all of whom he cared about greatly. In Preusser’s last days, Da Virro told him, “For someone with no money, you’re the wealthiest person I know.” Fraternity brother Kevin Rys remembered him fondly as well. “One of the things I’ll always remember is spending the holidays with Charlie at the fraternity. He always made sure that anyone who didn’t have a place to go for the holidays had a spot at the fraternity, whether they were a fraternity brother or not. “He would spend hours cooking for us, because to him, we were his family. For many, he was a second father, and for some, the closest thing they ever had [to a father].” Local businessman Bill Sheridan remembers

Preusser as a tireless advocate for students. “He was charming. He had a scorchedearth approach to youth civil rights,” Sheridan said. Preusser was vocal—and

Charlie Preusser (in wheelchair) is surrounded by his extended fraternity family at Tau Gamma Theta in this photo posted last May. PHOTO COURTESY OF FACEBOOK

bluntly so—at City Council meetings when it came to issues that affected students. Sheridan shared on social media, “You are the best friend the youth of Chico ever had. On top of that, an absolute joy to be around. An incurable romantic and a [total] class act.” Dustin Teibel, 35, a 2000 Tau Gamma Theta pledge, said he owes much of his success to Preusser. Now a district manager for a large company, Teibel said he was a lost soul when he met Preusser at 19 years old. “Charlie got me a job, taught me about leadership, open-mindedness and to be polite,” Teibel said. Preusser grew up in Orland and was the last surviving member of his immediate family, which consisted of his father, mother and a brother. His cousin, Jan Holman, said it gives the family solace and comfort to know Charlie found his extended fraternity family. “He was a very caring man with a wonderful belly laugh. You couldn’t help but laugh along with him.” Among his many accomplishments, personal and professional, Preusser served as the president of Phi Kappa Tau; founding president of Tau Gamma Theta (1968); Chico State A.S. president (1970-71); member of Students for a Democratic Society; Interfraternity Council president (1972); executive director of Rancho Chico Days; founding president of the South Campus Neighborhood Association; founding member of the Celebration of People; member, A.S. Commission on Judicial Affairs (199889); member, Downtown Chico Business Association board of directors; and was active with the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU). Plans for a memorial service are in the works. —MANDY FEDER

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Local cab drivers wary of a future with ride-sharing company in town

Yellow Cab driver Jim Mead says only time will tell how Uber will fare in Chico. PHOTO BY MEREDITH J. COOPER

J

on Warner squatted down over the chipped concrete floor at the Chico Yellow Cab office and took out a clipboard with notes and numbers. He assigned out a pickup at the Amtrak station and the driver panicked a bit as her designated arrival time was growing close. “You have time,” Warner reassured her. As assistant manager, he’s responsible for scheduling and assigning rides to about a dozen drivers. Chico Yellow Cab—and the rest of the dozen or so taxi companies in town—faces a new competitor, and some say it doesn’t play fairly. Uber, a ride-sharing business popular in big cities and available in 60 countries, went live in Chico last week. And it has local cab companies concerned. With low fares, the ease of a smartphone app to hail a ride (Liberty Cab also has an app, which it launched last month) and the flexibility for drivers to create their own hours, Uber presents a unique challenge in Chico’s taxi world. The company recently held a recruitment event at the Residence Inn, during which hundreds of interested Chico drivers stopped by, said Laura Zapata, Uber spokeswoman. To become an Uber driver, an applicant must be 21 years or older, submit and pass a background check, have a clean driving Compare the rates:

An Uber base fare is $1, vs. the $2.50 base fare for a Chico Yellow Cab. In addition, Uber charges an extra 16 cents per minute and 19 cents per mile, while Yellow Cab charges $2.50 per minute.

record and have an eligible vehicle—2005 model or newer, with four doors, a clean title, and able to pass a vehicle inspection. Uber’s entry in the Chico market came as the result of a large number of app downloads by people in the area, according to Zapata. “We expect it’s going to be an exciting market,” she said. Uber sounds like a great idea to Ben Etherington, a crash safety technician in Chico. His experience with the app started while standing on a curb with his cat after visiting a veterinarian in Chicago. After an encounter with a rude taxi dispatcher, he decided to download the Uber app. It was easy, he said. He signed up, took a photo of his credit card instead of typing in the information, and started browsing for a driver. Someone was there almost immediately. Etherington drove for Lyft, another ride-sharing company, in Chicago this past summer. Although he prefers Lyft to Uber because of its smaller business scale, he’s considering applying to become a part-time Uber driver in Chico. Drivers set their own schedule and receive 75 percent of a customer’s fare. Jim Mead, a Chico Yellow Cab driver,

said it’s too early to say if Uber will change the local taxi climate, but he did not notice a change in calls the week Uber went live. Although there is concern, he said his customer base will help keep the business afloat. “Chico is a very unique city,” he said. “I don’t know if Uber is

going to survive.” What bothers Warner is that Uber is not held to the same standards as local cab companies. Under Chico’s municipal code, local cab companies are required to have a city business license, proof of insurance, be drug and alcohol tested, have background checks, and have their photograph and fingerprints on file with the Chico Police Department. If Uber had to follow suit, Warner would be more receptive to the idea, he said. An Uber representative spoke to interim Lt. Rob Merrifield to let the Chico Police Department know the company was going to start business in Chico. As of today, Uber is not following the same municipal codes as taxis, he said. Talks with the city attorney are underway to determine if Uber should be following the same rules, or if it will be exempt like charter party carriers, which are regulated by the California Public Utilities Commission. Kevin Stites, who’s been driving a Chico Yellow Cab on and off for about three years, says the company will remain competitive by maintaining good relationships with clients who use taxis. He acknowledged, however, that some of his colleagues might not be as optimistic. “They don’t really know what to make from it and they feel threatened,” he said. “Once they calm down, we’ll just keep doing what we’re doing and do it better. I mean, what else can we do?” —ESMERALDA RAMIREZ

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CN&R

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HEALTHLINES

It’s rare for a severely battered woman

expecting and abused Local murders shed light on domestic violence against pregnant women by

Howard Hardee howardh@ n ewsr ev i ew. com

A

lready a mother of six, Jenilee Sides,

31, was pregnant with another child when she was shot and killed by her husband, Justin, outside the family’s home in Dairyville last August. As the Tehama County Sheriff’s Department reported to local media, deputies arrived at the home and then found Justin dead from a gunshot wound in a nearby field, apparently having turned the gun on himself. One detail of the murder-suicide is telling: Justin shot his wife in the stomach. Violence against pregnant women is more common than most people might think. An expectant mother’s risk of physical harm at the hands of an intimate partner increases as her belly grows, and “reproductive areas” of her body are often targeted by abusers, said Tracy Weeber, director of

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Enloe Medical Center’s Nettleton Mother & Baby Care Center. That’s at least partially because pregnancies aren’t always planned or welcomed. “It can be a good thing in people’s lives, but it isn’t always,” Weeber said. “You have financial stress and relationship stress that really puts a strain on whatever relationship you have.” It’s also possible that a partner becomes abusive out of jealousy that the mother’s attention has turned to her unborn baby, said Melody Proebstel, education and outreach program coordinator for Catalyst Domestic Violence Services. “The pregnant woman is paying more attention to her body and taking better care of herself because she’s trying to protect the baby,” she said. “That can seem threatening to the abusive partner because they don’t have as much control.” Including the Sides murder, five women in communities from Redding to Oroville have been killed by their partners in the past two years. (Mary Abby Tucker of Oroville

was in the first trimester of pregnancy when her boyfriend, Olabaku Norman Jones, beat her to death in 2013.) Proebstel cautioned against linking the murders to an overarching trend of severe domestic violence in the North State, but she acknowledged that the circumstances are unusual. “We anticipate one domestic violence death every 18 months,” she said. “So, having five deaths in 24 months is pretty extreme. It’s not normal, but it does help to propel the discussion locally.” As part of national Domestic Violence Awareness Month this October, Catalyst is honoring those five women with the help of a few local restaurants, each of which has agreed to reserve five visible table-settings for an evening during an event called A Place at the Table. “By symbolically saving them a place at the table, we’re remembering that their deaths were tragic, but they were more than victims of domestic violence,” Proebstel said. “They lived full lives and had jobs and children and families.”

to seek care at the Mother & Baby Care Center, Weeber says, but that’s not necessarily reflective of the level of abuse in the community. “Usually, those women either won’t seek care or their partner won’t allow them to get care when there’s evidence of abuse,” she said. “So, they might not even show up on our doorstep unless they feel they can confide in us and feel safe, or it’s so severe that it’s life-threatening.” When a patient—pregnant or not—does show signs of abuse, Weeber’s staff follows a set of procedures required by California law, including identifying victims; documenting related injuries; referring victims to crisis intervention services; and reporting to law enforcement. “We’re mandated to ask: “Are you experiencing any violence, or are you in fear?” Weeber said. “It may not be violence; it could be verbal. And a lot of women say the verbal abuse is more damaging than the violence, because it’s so consistently hammering at their self-worth.” Connecting an abused mother with intervention services, such as those offered by Catalyst, usually isn’t straightforward, Weeber explained. For instance, a woman going into labor is usually accompanied by HEALTHLINES c O n t i n u e d

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her family—including her abusive husband or boyfriend. An obvious sign of intimate partner violence is when he won’t let her answer questions. If she does talk about being abused, nurses will enlist the assistance of one of Enloe’s medical social workers to become the mandated reporter, and police generally come to the hospital to investigate, Weeber said. After making sure the woman gets proper physical and psychological treatment, Weeber’s staff will call Catalyst. “We can have them come to the hospital if it’s a pretty bad case,” she said. “They’ll figure out if she’s in a safe situation and whether she plans to leave her partner or not. Many women aren’t interested, initially, in leaving. They may not have the resources to support themselves, especially if they’re pregnant, or they may have other children in the home. For them to leave would mean leaving their children. “We try to meet them at the need they have.” Compared with severe violence,

though, a far more common form of domestic abuse is “reproductive coercion,” Weeber said. “Because domestic violence is about control—who has the

c O n t i n u e D F r O M PA g e 1 4

All month long:

For a complete schedule of Domestic Violence Awareness Month events in butte county, including movie screenings, fundraisers and restaurants participating in A Place at the table, go to catalystdvservices.org/events.

Report a crisis:

to report any form of domestic abuse, call catalyst’s 24-hour hotline at (800) 895-8476.

power—an abusive partner can sabotage your birth control to make you become pregnant, force you to keep a pregnancy or force you to abort a pregnancy,” she said. “All those things actually do happen.” And as with all forms of abuse, it isn’t only men victimizing women. According to the 2011 National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey, which included 18,049 interviews of men and women across all 50 states, about 10 percent of men reported having a partner who tried to get pregnant against their wishes; meanwhile, roughly 9 percent of women reported having a partner who tried to get them pregnant when they didn’t want to, or refused to use a condom. “It may be that the sex is consensual, but not using contraception isn’t consensual,” Proebstel said. “That’s a lot more prevalent than we realized in the past.” □

WEEKLY DOSE To a crisp Gay and bisexual men use indoor tanning beds at a rate three to six times higher than heterosexual men and, probably not by coincidence, they’re about twice as likely to develop skin cancer, according to WebMD.com. That was determined by researchers at the California Pacific Medical Center in San Francisco, who sifted through state and federal data on about 78,500 straight men and more than 3,000 gay and bisexual men. They found that heterosexual men face about a 3 percent risk of skin cancer, compared with nearly 7 percent among men in the sexual minority. Why the trend? It’s simple. The researchers pointed to similar studies of young white women—the demographic most likely to use tanning beds—which concluded that enhancing appearance is the most likely motivation behind using the machines.

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10

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West Nile Virus continues to be a big concern in the area. To find out how to protect yourself, report a dead bird, or to sign up for email notifications please visit www.BCMVCD.com.

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  CN&R 

17


GREEN

embracing whole foods Local author touts benefits of a plant-based diet by

Carey Wilson

L

ani Muelrath was a dynamic presence

with carefully tousled ash-blonde hair flowing about her deeply dimpled and often smiling, youthful face as she addressed a crowd of 25 or so interested listeners seated in Barnes & Nobles’ magazine aisle Sunday (Oct. 11). Clad in a soft blue velvety dress that accented her fit physique, the 63-yearold author, lifestyle coach and plant-based diet advocate is a walking advertisement for the virtues of healthful living delineated in her latest book, The Plant-Based Journey: A Step-by-Step Guide to Transition to a Healthy Lifestyle and Achieving Your Ideal Weight. The Magalia-based writer and lecturer spent 20 years teaching sixth grade in Durham and currently lectures as associate faculty in kinesiology at Butte College— where her book has been adopted as a required course textbook. She’s also been a guest lecturer at San Francisco State University and appeared multiple times on national television shows. Muelrath is certified in plant-based nutrition by Cornell University and maintains multiple teaching credentials in California. She recently sat down to converse, via keyboard, with the CN&R about her lifetime of struggling with weight and subsequent “plant-based journey” to better fitness and health, and her recent book on the subject, which has spent 14 weeks as the No. 1 selling vegetarian cooking book on Amazon.com.

CN&R: What motivated your decision to base your own diet on plant-based foods?

Muelrath: Health and weight management, the environmental impact of what we put on our plates, and the lot [i.e., inhumane treatment] of animals are three reasons that inspired my dietary choices.

What type of diet did you have before?

We had a mixed, omnivorous diet yet with a decided “healthy” perspective. My

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OctOber 15, 2015

mother was keen about eating whole grains, eschewing junk food and eating lots of vegetables and fruit. Any particularly memorable life events that fueled the decision or facilitated (or hindered) your pursuit of a healthier diet?

For decades, I sought a way of eating that would allow me to be full without being fat—which was delivered by following the whole foods, plant-based diet that I describe in depth in The Plant-Based Journey, including the rules of satiety that plant-based eating is a perfect match for. This success, harnessed with my work as an environmental educator and volunteer field biologist, have informed my decision to live and teach plant-based living.

How does a whole-food, plant-based diet differ from a vegan or vegetarian diet?

Whole plant foods include whole grains, starchy vegetables, vegetables, fruits, nuts and seeds in their intact form. This means all of their properties are intact, including fiber. For example, a slice of white bread might be vegan and vegetarian, but it is not a whole plant food. Whole grain bread and wholewheat kernels and cracked wheat are whole plant foods. This makes a big difference when it comes to health and weight management. This is the part of whole-food, plantbased living that makes weight management without hunger so easy.

The Plant-Based Journey continues online: Visit www.lanimuelrath.com for more info on Muelrath and her book as well as resources for your own plantbased journeying.

Was the improvement of your own health the motivation for researching and writing your book?

The Plant-Based Journey is not only informed by my personal journey and 50-pound weight loss—which has been sustained now for 17 or so years—but by extensive research on plant-based nutrition, experience with hundreds of individuals and clients who I have had the opportunity to coach and work with, and the over 1,200 surveys I conducted of people who had transitioned successfully to plant-based nutrition. The overwhelming impact of our dietary choices on the environment and the lives of [food] animals are also deeply influential issues.

Local author Lani Muelrath, at Farm Sanctuary in Orland with  her husband, Greg. Muelrath says the inhumane treatment of  animals is one reason she transitioned to a plant-based diet. PhOtO cOurtesy Of Lani MueLrath

be cultivated easily through simple physical activity (because of the affect it has on your brain) and mindfulness practice—achieving some degree of awareness of and mastery over habits of thinking—as well as developing awareness of some of the challenges to change that are always part of making a transition [in one’s lifestyle or habits]. □

ECO EVENT

Did/does living in this highly agricultural environment help in developing interest in and providing access to healthful foods?

Compared to clients and friends I have back East ... living in Northern California can put one at a distinct advantage with access to good produce. Yet anyone can easily get more whole plant foods and less of everything else in their diet—even without farmers’ markets and backyard gardens, there are frozen and canned foods that make plant-based living delicious and easy.

You also emphasize that mindfulness is important in creating and maintaining a healthy, plant-based lifestyle—what mental, physical and spiritual practices do you follow that might help others enhance their motivation and success on transitioning into plant-based living?

I am physically active and also engage in mindfulness meditation daily. Getting some degree of mastery over ingrained habits of thinking is very crucial. This can

TO THE BAT CAVE! In keeping with the spooky season, The Gateway Science Museum (625 Esplanade) is holding a special series of Museum Without Walls events called “Things That Go Bump in the Night” every Wednesday in October at 7:30 p.m. The next presentation, on Oct. 21, is titled “Caves as Bat Habitat,” and cave biologist Serban Sarbu will offer attendees a look at the flying animals’ subterranean lairs. The final event, on Oct. 28, will focus on owls. Entrance fee is $3, or free for students and museum members.


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Get Your Bike Back! Every year the Chico Police Department recovers thousands of dollars in stolen property that they are unable to return to the rightful owner. Follow these important steps to safeguard yourself and your property against theft. Make a list of all your serialized property and include the following: MAKE • MODEL • COLOR • SERIAL NUMBER • PHOTOGRAPHS Make multiple copies of the list so that you can find it when and if your property gets stolen. Chico Velo is working with the Chico PD to reduce bike theft. Contact us at 530 343 8356.

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october 15, 2015


THE GOODS PhOtO by whitney Garcia

15 MINUTES

Grappa and goodbyes

hey, Moe’s! College students and business partners Marjon “Moe” Blount and Andrew Davis (pictured, left and right) put their young, business-savvy minds to the test when their dessert trailer, Moe’s New Orleans Snoballs, made its debut this semester. They decided that Davis would focus on public relations and marketing, while Blount carried on as the operations manager. Soon, however, they realized that because of their opposite schedules and additional responsibilities, both would have to become capable in all areas of the sweet treats business. The entrepreneurs also have had to learn to navigate the requirements of acquiring a business license and a permit that allows them to operate on public property. Blount and Davis sat down with the CN&R and talked about their new venture and what it’s like to operate it while also having to hit the books. Follow Moe’s Snoballs on Facebook, Snapchat and Instagram.

What’s it like being college students and business owners? Davis: It’s very difficult because

THE BOTTOM LINE

it has to work around our school schedule, because school is most important. I wouldn’t say that my business major has taught me a lot about business, because having a business has taught me way more. Students are our main consumer; they are the ones spending the money, and so they are the ones we try to push our product toward.

I like to say it’s a New Orleans twist on a classic American taste. By not advertising it, it makes it like a “secret menu” sort of thing. Once people know about it, they start talking about it, and the more people talk about it the more people show up.

What goes into making a snoball?

Blount: We are trying to expand the things we are offering to the students. Over time, we are going to start venturing with different ice cream or shaved ice flavors, like coffee, mocha or caramel. We don’t know how soon, but we hope to be bringing a Hawaiian snowball to the menu. And as we get more popular, we want to be involved with the little leagues, or churches, or other events where we can bring our product to those who have never tasted it.

Blount: It’s fairly simple actually. We have a gourmet ice machine that shaves down the ice to make it a consistency like sorbet. We make the syrup ourselves and we have multiple flavors like peach, pink lemonade, mango and tiger’s blood. And the New Orleans style is available, but only on request.

Why only on request? Davis: The New Orleans style is a scoop of vanilla ice cream in the center and condensed milk on top.

What happens when more people show up?

—WhiTney GArCiA

by Toni Scott tonis@newsrev iew.com

Aside from one visit to the Empire Club a few years back and a few stops at the taco truck, I’ve rarely had an excuse to get out of my car in Durham. About the only reason I stop in the town is because I’m forced to at the four-way stop on the Midway. I love Durham—and have some great friends who come from the small town—but as far as commerce, not much has called me there. At least until now. Berton and Carol Bertagna of Bertagna Son Kissed Vineyards are in the process of opening a distillery and tasting room where the old Holiday Market once was. The signs are already up for Almendra Winery and Distillery at 9275 Midway and the business is in the process of taking all the necessary steps to open (hopefully) soon. The Bertagnas plan to use the space both as a distillery—with spirits like grappa, vodka and gin being made on-site—as well as a tasting room for local wines. The business is certain to be a great boost for the town and I can guarantee a lot more people are going to be hopping out of their cars in downtown Durham with Almendra on the block. Goodbyes. My boss at my day job is a frozen yogurt fiend. I’m convinced the only reason he attends weekly Chico Rotary meetings is because there’s a frozen yogurt shop in his path that he hits on his way back to the office. The man has a fro-yo stamp card for shops 45 miles outside of Chico and we rarely make any business trip without a stop somewhere along the highway for dessert. A few weeks ago, he called me with the most dejected tone in his voice. He was standing outside of Brain Freeze, on The Esplanade, watching a frozen yogurt machine being loaded into a moving truck. The shop was closed. I swung by the next day and sure enough, the signs were off the building and a phone call to the number listed for the business couldn’t connect. Brain Freeze had been around since 2010—and I know one very loyal customer who is sad to see it go. I was also bummed to see that The Fashion Lounge is closing its doors, too. The juniors and women’s retail clothing store, located in the Safeway shopping center on Mangrove, will close this month. The store was formerly downtown, in the old Lulu’s space on Main Street, but moved last year to Mangrove.

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  CN&R 

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CN&R 

october 15, 2015


The winners are crowned All hail the kings and queens of 2015’s Best of Chico contest!

Y

ou heard that right! The ballots have been cast and tallied, and the winners of this year’s sought-after Best of Chico honors determined. Chicoans turned out in force this year to vote for their favorite people, places and things in this fair town—and in Oroville and on The Ridge. Many also offered their reasons for choosing their faves, the best of which made it into print in this issue alongside our winner bios. One of the things we at the CN&R love about this issue is the overwhelming positivity behind it—so, thank you to everyone who voted and all who offered their thoughts on their picks. And thank you to all the winners for bringing such wonderful food, drink, entertainment, goods, services, personality and charity to Chico. Our lives are better for it. As always, local businesses, service providers and owners worked hard this past year to earn their crowns. Congratulations to you all!

Readers’ Picks Goods & Services ................ 24 Food & Drink ........................ 31 Nightlife & the Arts ............... 36 Health & Wellness ................ 40 Community ............................ 42

Editors’ Picks CN&R staffers name their favorite things in Chico ......... 44

15 OCTOBER 15, 2015

CN&R

23


R e a d e R s ’ PICkS

G oo ds

& S e rV i c e

The people and places locals love most

s

Heel & Sole phOtO by pAulA schultz

Antiques stOre

cAr deAlership

1ST PLACE: Eighth & Main Antique Center 745 Main St., 893-5534

1ST PLACE: Chuck Patterson 200 East Ave., (888) 403-4962

Walking through the Eighth & Main Antique Center, located at the southern end of downtown, is like taking a stroll through time. The colossal space hosts dozens of different vendors selling their curated collections from bygone eras, ensuring that new wonders from different decades await around every corner. There’s something for everyone and every budget, including plenty of small items—vintage toys, postcards, dishes—if you’ve only got a few bucks to spare, and big-ticket items—pristine vintage furniture, framed artwork—for those with more elegant tastes.

Chuck Patterson is on a streak when it comes to being voted Chico’s favorite place to buy a car. The business has been family-owned and -operated for just shy of 50 years and today offers a vast selection of new Toyotas, as well as new Scion, Dodge, Chrysler and Jeep vehicles, and many other makes and models of pre-owned cars and trucks. The dealership’s salespeople are friendly and knowledgeable, as are the folks in the service department. If you’re in the market for a new ride, you’ll want to browse here.

2ND PLACE: Vintage Hen 973 East Ave. J, 894-1311 3RD PLACE: Country Squyres’ Antiques 164 E. Third St., 342-6764

2ND PLACE: Courtesy Motors  2520 Cohasset Road, 345-9444 3RD PLACE: (tie) Chico Nissan Hyundai  575 Manzanita Ave., 891-1777 3RD PLACE: (tie) New Autos Inc. 720 Main St., 894-2886

AutO pAint/bOdy shOp

bAby/kids’ clOthier

1ST PLACE: Concours Elite 2267 Esplanade, 891-0234 When it comes to fixing up your ride so it looks brand new—or even better than it did when it was new—Concours Elite is repeatly named No. 1. The shop consists of 17,000 square feet of work space, which includes a six-bay wash/detail building, two frame racks and the capacity to paint up to eight vehicles at a time. From estimate to pin-striping, Concours Elite has Chico’s cars and trucks covered.

2ND PLACE: Knockout Collision Repair 3225 Esplanade, 899-9202 3RD PLACE: JP’s Paint & Body Works 1840 Park Ave., 342-1328

AutO repAir shOp 1ST PLACE: Affordable Automotive 2106 Park Ave., 892-1774 Owned and run by Mike Button for 19 years, Affordable Automotive has earned a reputation for fast, friendly, reliable service. Specialties include everything from regular maintenance and oil changes to brake and transmission work and emergency repairs. But don’t let that fool you—customers have come to rely on Affordable Automotive for just about every repair they need.

2ND PLACE: C & M Automotive Services 1188 E. Lassen Ave., 343-5613 3RD PLACE: Spencer Automotive 2303 Esplanade, Ste. 80, 345-5600

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OctOber 15, 2015

1ST PLACE: Apple Blossom Baby 1372 Longfellow Ave., 345-1617 Families with kids know that Apple Blossom Baby is a full-service shop, perfect for a new mom and the rest of her little ones, as there’s a nursing chair and a play area in addition to everything the kiddies might need. Merchandise includes high-quality used as well as new items, and baby and birthday registries make it simple for your friends and families to choose the perfect gift. What more could a parent ask for in a store?

2ND PLACE: Kat’s Meow 138 W. Third St., 899-8811 3RD PLACE (tie): F.K.O. 365 East Ave., 893-3454 3RD PLACE (tie): Kohl’s 1505 Springfield Dr., 897-0920

WOMen’s clOthier 1ST PLACE: For Elyse 228 Broadway, 893-0106 It’s not just the stylish selection of shoes, skirts, handbags and other necessities that have spurred Chico fashionistas to name this Broadway boutique Best Women’s Clothier— it’s also the service. The store’s staff use their expertise to make such astute recommendations that For Elyse fans say it’s like having your own personal stylist. The store also does brisk business online, and lets customers in on the best deals via its Facebook page and a sale blog found at forelyse.com.

Men’s clOthier

2ND PLACE: 5th Street Clothing Co. 328 Broadway, 345-5754 3RD PLACE: Anika Burke 211 Main St., 918-8850

1ST PLACE: Formal Education 334 Broadway, 809-1839

shOe stOre

Don’t look any further than Formal Education if you’re a guy who wants to get spiffy. With an in-house tailor and barber, this slick downtown shop offers more than just business casual to formal wear (and shoes), and the customer service is friendly and attentive. You’ll walk out looking like a new man.

2ND PLACE: Men’s Wearhouse 1950 E. 20th St., 342-1769 3RD PLACE: Trucker 232 Broadway, 343-1073

1ST PLACE: Heel & Sole Shoes 708 Mangrove Ave., 899-0725 Whether you’re searching for the perfect pair of boots for winter, fancy heels for your best friend’s wedding, running shoes for that upcoming marathon or just a chill pair of flipflops for hanging around, Heel & Sole is the place to go. The store looks small from the outside, but behind those doors are aisle upon aisle of every brand and style of shoe one can imagine, for men and women, and children, too.

2ND PLACE: Johnson’s Comfort Shoes 801 East Ave., Ste. 145, 343-8923; and 1950 E. 20th St., Ste. 701, 342-2310 3RD PLACE: Baker’s Birkenstock 333 Broadway, 345-4880

bike shOp 1ST PLACE: Pullins Cyclery 801 Main St., 342-1055 With its worn door handles and wooden floors, cycle-centric antiques and conversation pieces on the walls, Pullins Cyclery has a weathered charm. It’s been a Chico institution for decades, and what keeps customers coming back for generations are the shop’s dynamic duo—owner Steve O’Bryan and longtime mechanic Dan Cernuda. In addition to knowing every little thing about your classic Schwinn, O’Bryan and Cernuda are always good for conversation, sans pressure or attempts to upsell.

2ND PLACE: Greenline Cycles 515 Main St., 894-7885 3RD PLACE: North Rim Adventure Sports 178 E. Second St., 345-2453

AttOrney 1ST PLACE: Michael M. Rooney Rooney Law Firm, 1361 Esplanade, 343-5297 Chicoans trust Michael M. Rooney with many a court-related matter, from criminal defenses to family law to personal

injury suits. Satisfied customers rave about Rooney’s willingness to work on their behalf and his staff’s compassionate nature and true desire to help.

2ND PLACE: Nicole Plottel Harris & Plottel LLP, 3120 Cohasset Road, Ste. 10, 893-2882 3RD PLACE (tie): Denver Latimer The Law Office of Denver Latimer, 330 Wall St., 345-1396 3RD PLACE (tie): Aaron J. Stewart Law Offices of Aaron J. Stewart, 2619 Forest Ave., Ste. 100, 345-2212

My fave: Made in chico Why: they have all local artisans, are strong supporters of our community, and the ladies rock! —Bridget Abifadel


bank/credit uniOn 1ST PLACE: Tri Counties Bank multiple locations Tri Counties Bank has branches in way more than just “tri” counties these days. Even though today it is spread across 24 California counties, the bank founded in Chico in 1974 still maintains its small-town charm. The six Chico branches have a friendly down-home feel thanks to their personable tellers and knowledgeable managers.

2ND PLACE: Wells Fargo Bank multiple locations 3RD PLACE (tie): Sierra Central Credit Union  352 E. First St., 345-3625 3RD PLACE (tie): Golden 1 Credit Union 239 W. Second St., (877) 465-3361

cab cOmpany 1ST PLACE: Liberty Cab 898-1776 Whether they need a ride to the grocery store or a late-night pickup, Chicoans know they can rely on Liberty Cab—which celebrated its 10th birthday this year—to be fast, friendly and reliable. The taxi company recently launched an app—Trac My Ride— that allows customers to book and check on the progress of their cabs. Liberty also makes a point to give back to local and national charities, making each ride a little bit sweeter.

2ND PLACE: Ecocab 591-3186 3RD PLACE: Chico Yellow Cab 893-4444

grOcer 1ST PLACE: S&S Organic Produce   & Natural Foods 1924 Mangrove Ave., 343-4930 S&S Organic Produce & Natural Foods started in Gridley in 1967, and a year later

opened a roadside produce stand selling a limited selection of natural foods in Chico. It’s grown a great deal from those humble beginnings, and since 1997 has been housed—along with a full-service deli and butcher shop—in its current building. Today, S&S boasts one of the largest selections of certified organically grown produce in the North State.

2ND PLACE: Trader Joe’s 801 East Ave., Ste. 110, 343-9920 3RD PLACE: Chico Natural Foods Co-op 818 Main St., 891-1713

Hardware stOre 1ST PLACE: Collier Hardware 105 Broadway, 342-0195 Collier Hardware has been serving Chico—in the same location nonetheless— since 1871, and it’s no wonder why the venerable storefront is a perennial Best of Chico favorite. Not only do they carry everything a do-it-yourselfer might desire, but also a diverse collection of quality kitchenware (including products by Le Creuset and AllClad), barbecues and gifts galore. The building and business have acquired a great deal of character in the last 150-or-so years, and the feeling of walking the aged wood floors through aisles of lumber and tools is an experience the big boxes can never capture.

2ND PLACE: Lowe’s 2350 Forest Ave., 895-5130 3RD PLACE: Orchard Supply Hardware 231 W. East Ave., 332-9226

Jeweler 1ST PLACE: Kirk’s Jewelry 246 W. Third St., 891-0880 Step inside the spacious downtown confines of Kirk’s Jewelry and it’s apparent you’re in the showroom of a master

craftsman. Owner Kirk Bengston has been honing his craft in Chico since 1973, creating one-of-a-kind pieces that make his shop part jewelry store/part art gallery. You don’t last 42-plus years without doing a lot of things right, and Kirk’s has built and polished a shining reputation as Chico’s favorite.

2ND PLACE: Olde Gold Estate Jewelry 225 Main St., Ste. 3, 891-4610 3RD PLACE: Gabrielle Ferrar 214 Main St., 345-1500

Are you interested in joining a support group for people living with physical disabilities?

Please come check out our new physical disability support group! WHEN: Every Monday,2:30-4:00 2:30-4:00 2nd & other 4th Mondays, WHERE: Disability Action Center office, Formerly ILSNC 1161 East Ave, Chico 95926

liquOr stOre 1ST PLACE: Spike’s Bottle Shop 1270 E. First Ave., 893-8410 In 2012, Spike’s Bottle Shop was the site of a fire that could have put owner Kevin Jaradah out of business for good. Instead, Jaradah retooled the store to focus on the rising craft beer market upon reopening, and Spike’s rose like a phoenix from the ashes to help secure the fad’s foothold in the North State. Spike’s now offers more than 1,000 types of beer, and is more than just a neighborhood liquor store, but a destination for devoted beer fans.

2ND PLACE: Star Liquors 959 Nord Ave., 891-4842 3RD PLACE: Mangrove Bottle Shop 1350 Mangrove Ave., 342-7575

ContactAnna Jennique at 893-8527 QUESTIONS? Contact at 893-8527 or or jennique@actionctr.org anna.smith@ILSNC.org

A different way to divorce C O L L A B O R AT I V E P R A C T I C E

lOcal cOmputer stOre 1ST PLACE: Chico Computer Clinic 1304 Mangrove Ave., 636-1337 Fast turn-around service is what customers appreciate at Chico Computer Clinic. Reasonable prices, and the staff’s experienced and welcoming service are also touted as pluses. One reviewer writes, “They fixed my laptop in one day. It had a ton of viruses,

READERS’ PICKS c O n t i n u e d

Physical Disability Support Group

O n pa g e 2 6

A process in which a divorcing couple, together with trained professionals, work as a team to resolve disputes respectfully, without going to court. Kimberly A . Hender son C ollaborative A ttorney & Mediator 641 – 643 Flume Street | Chico 530.899.5100 | www.divorceoption.com

More than a Business

Our MissiOn: help dOgs

With the help of our community, The Canine Connection has raised over $35,000 for Butte Humane Society and Chico Animal Shelter – just in the last 2 years! Owner Sarah Richardson is a Certified Professional Dog Trainer and Dog Behavior Consultant. • Group Classes • Private Lessons • Dog Boarding • Dog Daycare • Puppy Socials and more!

Making Chico Dogs & Owners HAPPY for 14 YEARS!

The Address pHOtO by paula scHultz

(530) 345–1912 www.TheCanineConnection.com

Check out our happy dogs yourself on our website & Facebook OctOber 15, 2015

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A&T AUTO CARE

READERS’ PICKS c O n t i n u e d

894–5850 • 3106 Esplanade

2ND PLACE: PCI Business Services 225 Main St., 924-4848 3RD PLACE: Computers Plus 2477 Forest Ave., Ste. 150, 891-7587

Honest

Dependable

•Experienced

10% FREE WINTER CHECK UP

Anti-freeze • Hoses Belts • Fluids Heater • Brakes

MUST CALL FOR APPOINTMENT MUST BRING IN COUPON. EXP. 10.29.15.

Jeff Sponsler

SIMPLY

OFF LABOR SERVICE OVER $100 EXP. 10.29.15.

Good Food!

WE ALS O CAT ER!

f r O m pa g e 2 5

and now it runs great!”

LOcaL pet stOre 1ST PLACE: Trailblazer Pet Supply 752 Mangrove Ave., 892-1848 Trailblazer Pet Supply, located in the Safeway shopping center on Mangrove Avenue, is a one-stop shop with all the necessities to keep Chicoans’ four-legged companions healthy and happy. In addition to a wide selection of healthy foods and fun toys for cats and dogs, the locally owned pet store also features grooming services, dog training and puppy socialization classes, nutrition consultations and much more.

2ND PLACE: Pet Smart 2019 Forest Ave., 961-9188 3RD PLACE (tie): Chico Pet Works   and Pet Salon 2201 Pillsbury Road, 345-0934 3RD PLACE (tie): Northern Star Mills 510 Esplanade, 342-7661

nursery 1ST PLACE: Magnolia Gift and Garden 1367 East Ave., 894-5410

Come experience The Black Kettle! LOCALLY SOURCED INGREDIENTS • VEGAN, VEGETARIAN & GLUTEN FREE OPTIONS!

Stalk us on facebook www.facebook.com/ blackkettlechico 530.354.1013

MORE THAN JUST

REAL ESTATE Finding Solutions Tailored to Your Life & Dreams! Specializing in Residential Real Estate | Over 11 years of industry experience 5 Star Zillow rating | 2 time award recipient: “Greatest Closed Volume” Active member of the Chico Community

261 E. 3rd Street · 530.570.8489

www.BuyAndSellChico.com • John@JohnBarroso.com

CELEBRATING 5 SPECTACULAR YEARS!

A big THANK YOU to all who are and who continue to be loyal "Crusaders"! We love you. We are now DELIVERING right to your door! Order at least 24 hours in advance and we'll deliver your cupcakes right to you.....for FREE! As a big thank you to all our fans, we’re offering discounts (through November) in addition to our free delivery! BEST ES CUPCAK IN CHICO 5 YEARS G! RUNNIN

Order six, get Order a dozen, Order two dozen or more, ONE 10% 15% OFF. FREE. OFF. OFFER GOOD THROUGH NOVEMBER 30, 2015. MUST HAVE COUPON TO RECEIVE DISCOUNT.

The Cupcake Crusader • (530) 899-1100 • www.thecupcakecrusader.com 26  

CN&R 

OctOber 15, 2015

Magnolia Gift and Garden doesn’t just offer all of the plants and decorations needed to turn a home garden into a little slice of paradise; it also supplies a healthy dose of inspiration. The nursery’s East Avenue location is downright beautiful, with a brilliant mix of natural greenery and artistic touches bound to give gardeners a few good ideas for sprucing up their own green space. Owners Courtney Paulson and Chris Hunter and the Magnolia staff definitely know their stuff, and are quick to offer friendly and helpful gardening advice.

2ND PLACE: The Plant Barn & Gift Shop 406 Entler Ave., 345-3121 3RD PLACE: Little Red Hen Nursery 189 E. Eighth St., 891-9100

pLace tO buy hOme furnishings 1ST PLACE: The Address 2444 Cohasset Road, 898-9000 The Address, a stylish furniture store at East Avenue and Cohasset Road, urges customers to “Live with the things you love.” To assist in that goal, the store is home to a full range of home furnishings and decorations to appoint your living space in the most comfortable, stylish and expressive way possible. They also offer custom furniture and an array of decorating services, from help with fabric selection to complete room design.

2ND PLACE: Nantucket Home 603 Broadway, 895-1038 3RD PLACE: Finds Design and Decor 1341 Mangrove Ave., 892-1905

gift shOp 1ST PLACE: Hubbs Stationery 956 Mangrove Ave., 892-4940 In addition to offering high-quality stationery as its name implies, Hubbs Stationery also sells a wide array of knickknacks, brica-brac, scented candles, fine chocolates and other delightful gifts, and has been chosen by readers as Chico’s Best Gift Shop for several

consecutive years. The original store opened in Southern California about 60 years ago, and the Chico location is itself quite venerable, having served Chicoans for nearly two decades.

2ND PLACE: Made in Chico 127 W. Third St., 894-7009 3RD PLACE: Little Red Hen Gift Shop 897 E. 20th St., 897-0100

pLace tO buy music gear 1ST PLACE: The Music Connection 973 East Ave., Ste. V, 898-0110 The readers have spoken once again: The Music Connection is where they prefer to buy their noise-makers. It’s understandable, since there’s a great selection of instruments and gear and the employees are some of the best musicians in town—which is probably why their music lessons are top notch, too.

2ND PLACE: Herreid Music 824 Oroville Ave., 894-7777 3RD PLACE: Guitar Center 2027 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway, 879-1731

pLace tO buy OutdOOr gear 1ST PLACE: Mountain Sports 176 E. Third St., 345-5011 Whether your outdoor endeavors involve climbing Monkey Face or Mount Shasta, Mountain Sports has everything you need to make it to the top. The store offers topof-the line equipment for hiking, biking, rockclimbing and many other outdoor activities in a convenient downtown location. You’ll also get the necessary information—maps, books and insider information from a staff made up of hardcore hobbyists—to ensure the safety and success of any adventure.

2ND PLACE: Chico Sports LTD 698 Mangrove Ave., 894-1110 3RD PLACE: Sportsman’s Warehouse 765 East Ave. Ste. 170, 897-0500

spOrting gOOds 1ST PLACE: Dick’s Sporting Goods 1922 E. 20th St., 343-3351 Dick’s Sporting Goods is hard to beat, whether you’re looking to outfit a little league team or a local militia. This impressively sized store at the Chico Mall is full of the A to Z of sporting-good needs, from

my fave: preston’s shoe repair Why: he is the absolute best guy in downtown chico, hands down. so friendly and he does awesome work. a local gem! —Stephanie Almond


archery targets shaped like wild animals to Reebok ZPumps. Dick’s friendly service and huge inventory make it a favorite Hubbs Stationery for sports fans and survivalists alike.

2ND PLACE: Sports LTD 698 Mangrove Ave., 894-1110 3RD PLACE: Big 5 Sporting Goods 1717 Mangrove Ave., 891-1545

phOtO cOurtesy Of facebOOk

thrift stOre 1ST PLACE: The Arc Store 2020 Park Ave., 343-3666 Need a gently used coffee table? Maybe a microwave, or a pair of heels, or a bike? Well, look no further than the Arc Store, the actual place where one man’s trash becomes another’s treasure. If that’s not enough, all the proceeds go to a great cause—helping Butte County’s developmentally disabled adults—so you can feel good about paying $10 for that old desk; it’s money well-spent.

The BEST in ACUPUNCTURE

2ND PLACE: Goodwill 765 East Ave., 893-8578 3RD PLACE: Elite Repeat (Salvation Army) 700 Broadway, 342-9192

Vintage/secOnd-hand threads 1ST PLACE: Three-Sixty Ecotique 511 Main St., 342-8752 Three-Sixty Ecotique is a little oasis in Chico, a place where one can spend far too much time browsing all the unique, funky, artful clothing and accessories—simply because there’s so much cool stuff to admire. The owners bring their own personal styles to each rack, offering a mixture of hand-picked vintage items—which Chicoans clearly love— and new pieces by creative designers.

2ND PLACE: Pepper Grand Culee’s   Funky Trunk 1112 Mangrove Ave., 894-8065 3RD PLACE: Bootleg 126 W. Second St., 895-1426

dry cleaner 1ST PLACE: 3rd Generation Cleaners 1354 East Ave., 899-0333 Despite the nature of their work, “wet cleaning” is the key to 3rd Generation’s process, an environmentally friendly approach free of toxic chemicals. Owners Stuart and Van Depper are committed to the process and to offering friendly customer service and a knack for getting out even the toughest stains. The prices are reasonable and they also have a seamstress on hand for alterations.

2ND PLACE: Chico Express Cleaners 641 Walnut St., 343-6013; and 752 East Ave., 343-8844 3RD PLACE: Esplanade Cleaners 164 E. Second Ave., 342-4306

flOrist 1ST PLACE: Christian & Johnson 250 Vallombrosa Ave., Ste. 100, 891-1881 This Chico icon has been in its present location alongside Big Chico Creek for more than a century, and its reputation for providing the highest-quality flowers—most selected from the San Francisco Flower Market—with attentive customer service has made it Chico’s go-to spot for gorgeous arrangements, not to mention its beautiful and healthy plants and well-stocked gift shop.

OPEN 6 DAYS A WEEK 1815 Mangrove Avenue, Chico • 530.345.5300 2ND PLACE: Flowers by Rachelle 2485 Notre Dame Blvd., Ste. 240, 345-2661 3RD PLACE: Cambray Rose Florist 10 Whitehall Place, 514-4710

hOtel/MOtel 1ST PLACE: Hotel Diamond 220 W. Fourth St., 893-3100 With its prime downtown location and the shining beacon of its copper-topped cupola, the Hotel Diamond lives up to its boast of being the “jewel” of Chico. Originally opened in 1904, the historic building was completely remodeled from top to bottom and outfitted with modern conveniences and artisan furnishings to complement the classic architecture. A luxurious getaway in the heart of our little college town.

2ND PLACE: Oxford Suites 2035 Business Lane, 899-9090 3RD PLACE: Holiday Inn 685 Manzanita Court, 345-2491

laundrOMat 1ST PLACE: Bubbles Laundry 664 Mangrove Ave., 343-8815 Despite enduring a rash of burglaries over the summer and the closing of its West Sacramento Avenue sister store earlier this year, Bubbles Laundry on Mangrove Avenue remains Chico’s favorite laundromat. Regular users praise the clean, well-lit facility and attentive staff who help keep patrons up to date on improvements and outages through the laundromat’s Facebook page.

2ND PLACE: Chico Laundry Co. 1000 W. Sacramento Ave., 342-9274 3RD PLACE: East Avenue Coin Laundry and  Dry Cleaning 986 East Ave., 891-8805

www.ChicoCommunityAcupuncture.com

real estate agent 1ST PLACE: John Barroso Keller Williams Realty, 261 E. Third St., 5708489 A nine-year veteran of the real estate industry, John Barroso lives and works in downtown Chico. His specialties are commercial and residential real estate and in 2012, he earned the “Greatest Closed Volume” award from his employer, Keller Williams Realty. Barroso’s background in loans helps him advise his clients in the diverse aspects of investing and financing.

FALL IS FOR PLANTING

2ND PLACE: Teresa Larson Century 21 Jeffries Lydon, 1101 El Monte Ave., 345-6618 3RD PLACE: Brandi Laffins Century 21 Jeffries Lydon, 1101 El Monte Ave., 345-6618

day spa

CHICO’S BULK SEED SPECIALIST

1ST PLACE: Sweetwater Day Spa 1031 Village Lane, 894-7722 For the third year in a row, Sweetwater has taken home the prize for Best Day Spa in Chico. And it’s really no surprise, as the staff there are full-time relaxation specialists. Patrons can expect robes and slippers upon arrival and before settling in for some serious pampering. Whether they’re in the mood for a facial or massage or want a professional makeup or waxing session, Sweetwater is where Chicoans turn, again and again.

2ND PLACE: Urban Medspa 3221 Cohasset Road, 891-8772 3RD PLACE: Renew Float Spa 1030 Village Lane, 588-7378

READERS’ PICKS c O n t i n u e d

ChiCo Mix

Lawn seed specially blended for a year-round dark green, fine bladed lawn for the Chico area.

510 Esplanade

in ow r G

Dwarf fesCue

Improved drought tolerable turf-type tall fescue.

g Chico for 117 Y ear s (530)

(Opposite Bidwell Mansion)

342–7661

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You are invited to mY studio! open studio art tour saturday oct 17 & 24th 10am-5pm

Watercolor painting demonstrations by Carol miles, amber Palmer, or myself. Please bring a friend!

Sally Dimas Art Gallery 493 east ave., suite 1 | 530.345.3063

Gallery Hours: tues–sat 11am–4pm or by appointment

Chico’s Premier Auto Repair Facility Independent Toyota, Lexus & Scion Specialists “I always have a good experience at Chico Car Care. I’ve gone to them for service for many years and they always go above and beyond to help me.”

f r O m pa g e 2 7

barbershOp 1ST PLACE: Forever Fades 748 W. Fifth St., 636-4417 “Picasso with the clippers” is how one reviewer describes Jessica Hahn, a stylist at Chico’s top-voted barber shop. Forever Fades is also noted for its multicultural vibe, hip tunes and friendly customer service. People go in for the cuts, and to have fun soaking in the style of the place.

2ND PLACE: Chico’s Barber Shop 162 E. Third St., 487-7373 3RD PLACE: Gearhead Barbershop 221 Normal Ave., 894-2889

hair salOn 1ST PLACE: Dimensions Salon 810 Broadway, 894-2515 Customers love stepping into the historic building that houses Dimensions Salon for great cuts and hair color. “A gorgeous environment and friendly staff” are one customer’s raves. Others noted the stylists’ ability to listen to customers’ hairstyle wishes, and to make suggestions tailored to each individual’s needs. Reasonable prices, quality cuts and atmosphere are what Dimensions is known for.

2ND PLACE: Hair Co. 2760 Esplanade, 894-2002 3RD PLACE: Crucial Salon 744 Wall St., 487-7077

— A.M., Chico

1369 E. 9th St., Chico • 343-1130 info@chicocarcare.com chicocarcare.com •

READERS’ PICKS c O n t i n u e d

/chicocarcare

SAME DAY SERVICE.

place fOr a mani/pedi 1ST PLACE: Tammy’s Nails 1354 East Ave., 899-8912 For years now, Chicoans have voted Tammy’s Nails in the Safeway shopping center off East Avenue their favorite place for a mani/pedi. Whether they’re pampering themselves with a spa pedicure or getting a little gloss and bling for a weekend out, customers love Tammy’s for the professional, personable service.

2ND PLACE: U.S. Nails & Spa 726 Mangrove Ave., 345-2520 3RD PLACE: Bliss Nails & Spa 2033 Forest Ave., Ste. 100, 891-3538

tanning salOn 1ST PLACE: Tropical Zone Exotic Tanning 1354 East Ave., Ste. L, 893-3300

Get your prescription eyewear today! OUR ONSITE LAB FEATURES: • Varilux progressive lenses • Premium anti-glare coating • Precise digital technology

OVER 1000 DESIGNER FRAMES IN STOCK

Quality lenses, locally crafted. 605 W. East Ave. • (530)895-1727 • ChicoEye.com 28  

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OctOber 15, 2015

When it comes to tanning—either in a traditional tanning bed or via spray—Tropical Zone is where Chicoans go. “The staff is always fantastic, friendly and helpful. The beds are always clean, with fresh bulbs. The pricing is great. Can’t imagine ever going anywhere else,” one longtime customer raves. The Tropical Zone seeks to provide a family atmosphere, and also sells accessories and clothes to capture that tropical mood.

2ND PLACE: California Sun 706 Mangrove Ave., 674-7600 3RD PLACE (tie): The Electric Lounge 995 Nord Ave., Ste. 140, 894-7090 3RD PLACE (tie): Euro Bronze 2454 Notre Dame Blvd., 342-2990 3RD PLACE (tie): Lovely Glow Tanning Salon 206 Walnut St., 898-1316

tattOO parlOr 1ST PLACE: Eye of Jade 319 Main St., Ste. 200, 345-5233 Getting a tattoo can be a deeply per-

Dimensions Salon phOtO cOurtesy Of facebOOk

sonal—not to mention permanent—experience, and choosing the right artist and venue are the first steps in making a decision you’ll either regret or cherish for the rest of your life. Eye of Jade’s clean and comfortable Chico shop is home to a stable of fantastic tattooists—Ben Lucas, Chris Peplow, Jeremy Golden and Jackie Rabbit. Two more excellent artists, Max Kilbourne and Chad

Nicely, hold down the fort at Eye of Jade’s Paradise location.

2ND PLACE: Red Room Tattoo 231 Nord Ave., 342-1287 3RD PLACE: Victory Tattoo 1818 Mangrove Ave., 896-1818

READERS’ PICKS c O n t i n u e d

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C

H

I

C O

S



ENGAGEMENT RING

Headquarters

214 Main Street • Chico, California • (530) 345-1500 • GabrielleFerrar.com

Small School,

Big Results!

carpet

LAW SCHOOL INFORMATION DAY

Mon, October 19th, 2015 | 6:30pm to 8:00pm JOIN US AND MEET Students | Faculty | Alumni AFFORDABLE 1/3 the cost of traditional law schools ACCESSIBLE Part time evening J.D. program ACCREDITED By the CA State Bar PRACTICAL Experience & Instruction

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Five-year Cumulative Bar Pass Rate Among the highest of all California Accredited Law Schools!

CAL NORTHERN SCHOOL of LAW

(530) 891-6900 • www.calnorthern.edu Celebrating 32 Years of Quality Legal Education!

®

FLOORS october 15, 2015

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Chico’s Only Homemade Ice Cream & Candy Store.

Open Daily till 10pm 178 E. 7th Street, Chico, CA 95928 (530) 342-7163 www.shuberts.com

Voted Best Margarita Enjoy our Scrumtious Food Menu as you Experience an ever changing collection of artisan beers.

2005-2014

Come taste the best!

N O O P W E N !

13

Fiesta Hour Daily 4-6 Frozen House Margs $4

1st & Broadway • Downtown Chico • 342-0425 CN&R 

LU N C H

DINNER

Celebrating Chico Culture Outdoor Seating & Take-Out Available New Menu Options

over 125 premium tequilas

30  

B R E A K FA S T

october 15, 2015

Open Daily | Mon-Fri: 7am-9pm | Sat: 8am-9pm | Sun: 8am-8pm facebook.com/midtownlocal | 365 E. 6th Street | 530.966.0054


R e a d e R s ’ PICKS

F oo d LOcaL restaurant (chicO) 1ST PLACE: The Pour House 855 East Ave., Ste. 270, 893-3000 Fans of the Pour House have made their voices heard. The casual but elegant spot serves a creative menu of lunch and dinner temptations. Standard fare like burgers and wraps are complemented by the delicious fish tacos and creative salad combinations. A favorite appetizer to share is the deep-fried green beans, scrumptiously seasoned and ready for dipping in ranch dressing. There’s also a swankily decorated bar that entices the happy hour crowd to relax in style.

2ND PLACE: 5th Street Steakhouse 345 W. Fifth St., 891-6328 3RD PLACE: Leon Contemporary California  Bistro 817 Main St., 899-1105

new restaurant (Opened in the Last year) 1ST PLACE: Forcella Italian Bistro 1600 Mangrove Ave., 809-1530 Lovers of fresh, fine Italian pastas have been rejoicing since Forcella Italian Bistro opened its doors in February. Owners Jon Meyer and Aaron Johnson, friends for nearly 20 years, have a hit on their hands. The place offers sit-down dining for lunch and dinner, and customers can phone in orders to go. Starting from scratch each day, Forcella makes its own pastas, breads, mozzarella and ricotta as well as Italian sausage.

2ND PLACE: The Foodie Café 999 Marauder St., 433-5539 3RD PLACE: Buffalo Wild Wings North Valley Plaza, 592-3251

LOcaL restaurant (OrOviLLe) 1ST PLACE: The Steak House Gold Country Casino, 4020 Olive Highway, (800) 334-9400 From delicious dry-aged rib-eye steaks to jumbo crab-stuffed prawns, the Steak House at Gold Country Casino in Oroville offers fine dining on an epic level. Diners rave about the panoramic windows, which overlook the foothills and create the perfect ambiance for enjoying a premium cocktail or glass of wine with appetizers while awaiting a meal that’s sure to be memorable.

2ND PLACE: The Café Gold Country Casino, 4020 Olive Highway, (800) 334-9400 3RD PLACE: Tong Fong Low 2051 Robinson St., 533-1488

LOcaL restaurant (ridge) 1ST PLACE: Black Bear Diner 5791 Clark Road, 877-0877 Visitors to Black Bear Diner are greeted

& D r in k

Chicoans’ go-to spots to satisfy their cravings

by a bevy of smiling, carved, wooden bears, and things just get better from there. Black Bear is a diner-lover’s dream, offering hefty, delicious portions of classic comfort foods. Paradise diners especially love this restaurant for breakfast, as it offers all the staples plus a few extra standouts, like the chickenfried steak and corned beef.

2ND PLACE: Casa de Paradiso 5667 Clark Road, 877-4107 3RD PLACE: The Depot Café and Restaurant 6818 Depot Lane, 876-9903

breakfast 1ST PLACE: Sin of Cortez 2290 Esplanade, 879-9200 If pleasure is a sin, then Chico’s favorite little breakfast spot—on weekends, there’s regularly a line out the door—is aptly named. Sin of Cortez’s seasoned potatoes, berry pancakes and Mexican-inspired fare are all made in-house and are to die for. Not to mention the coffee is excellent.

2ND PLACE: Café Coda 265 Humboldt Ave., 566-9476 3RD PLACE: Morning Thunder 352 Vallombrosa Ave., 342-9717

champagne brunch 1ST PLACE: Nash’s 7th Avenue Omelette House 1717 Esplanade, 896-1147 Chicoans know what’s up when it comes to champagne brunch—and it’s Nash’s. With a broad menu of delicious breakfast items, from biscuits and gravy to a wide array of omelets, the food here is always top-notch. And on weekends diners know they can wash it all down with endless champagne. What’s better than that? Oh yeah, nothing.

2ND PLACE: Café Coda 265 Humboldt Ave., 566-9476 3RD PLACE: Christian Micheals Ristorante 192 E. Third St., 894-4005

Lunch 1ST PLACE: T. Tea Bar & Fusion Café 250 Vallombrosa Ave., 895-8100; and 555 Flying V St., 809-1545 Many a Tea Bar regular comes for the tea and gets hooked by the food. The eatery’s menu is elegantly simple, focusing on madeto-order “fusion” bowls and wraps. Patrons choose a protein (steak, chicken, salmon, shrimp, pork tenderloin or tofu) to top their choice of greens and grains, and the whole shebang is further flavored with a choice of delicious dressing. It’s a quick and healthy meal now easily available to hungry folks at two locations.

2ND PLACE: Broadway Heights 300 Broadway, 899-8075 3RD PLACE: The Banshee 132 W. Second St., 895-9670

Forcella Italian Bistro phOtO by pauLa schuLtz

date-night dining 1ST PLACE: Crush Italian Cuisine and Lounge 201 Broadway, 342-7000 One of Chico’s swankiest joints, Crush is a great place to make a first impression or romance your longtime sweetheart. There’s no lack of ambiance, thanks to the modern dining area and bar, candlelit tables, waterfall fountain and patio overlooking downtown. Locals love Crush for its happy hours, leading them to vote it Best Happy Hour, too. Add a martini (also a winner for Crush), fine wine or sumptuous Italian fare and your date night is sure to be memorable.

2ND PLACE: 5th Street Steakhouse 345 W. Fifth St., 891-6328 3RD PLACE: Christian Michaels Ristorante 192 E. Third St., 894-4005

fine dining 1ST PLACE: 5th Street Steakhouse 345 W. Fifth St., 891-6328 Upon walking into 5th Street Steakhouse, the aroma is enough to make eager diners’ mouths water. The Chico institution is a steaklover’s dream, offering all the best cuts and any extras you might desire (how about a New York strip topped with blue cheese?). Of course,

there are other options as well, including fish, chicken and a killer surf and turf, and the bar, known for its delicious cocktails, is almost as much of a draw.

2ND PLACE: Leon Bistro 817 Main St., 899-1105 3RD PLACE: Christian Michaels Ristorante 192 E. Third St, Chico , 894-4005

chef 1ST PLACE: Ann Leon   (Leon Contemporary California Bistro) 817 Main St., 899-1105 Since chef Ann Leon opened her namesake restaurant in 2008, she’s been introducing Chicoans to her unique brand of Frenchinfluenced fusion cuisine, focused on local, fresh ingredients. Leon gained inspiration at famed Berkeley restaurant Chez Panisse, working under renowned chef Alice Waters. And Chicoans are the lucky ones who not only get to enjoy the fruits of her labor, but also can learn from her in her cooking classes.

2ND PLACE: James Taylor (Sicilian Café) 1020 Main St., 345-2233 3RD PLACE (tie): Jason Colabove   (Crush Italian Cuisine and Lounge) 201 Broadway, 342-7000

3RD PLACE (tie): Lisa Sereda (Wine Time) 26 Lost Dutchman Dr., 899-9250

fOOd server 1ST PLACE: Mathew Korody, Christian  Michaels Ristorante 192 E. Third St., 894-4005 When people dine at Christian Michaels, they expect the best—in food, drink and, of course, service. Mathew Korody is a prime example of what a fine-dining food server should be. The Southern California transplant who also speaks Spanish always offers friendly, attentive service with a smile. That’s enough to make people return again, and again.

2ND PLACE: Tommy Bradford, Grana 198 E. Second St., 809-2304 3RD PLACE: Amanda Rhoads, Mom’s  Restaurant 209 Salem St., 893-3447

bakery 1ST PLACE: Upper Crust Bakery & Eatery 130 Main St., 895-3866 The Upper Crust reigns supreme in the Best Bakery category year after year. The

READERS’ PICKS c O n t i n u e d OctOber 15, 2015

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AGE WITH COURAGE Anxiety is not a normal process of aging. If you, or someone you know is suffering from depression, anxiety or suicidal thoughts please seek help. For more information please contact

Connections Program

530.898.6191 | passagescenter.org S ervices provided at no cost.

C A R IN G FOR PE T S IS O UR

FAMILY TRADITION

BY APPOINTMENT MON-THU 8AM-6PM | FRI 8AM-5PM | SAT 8AM-12PM 1150 EL MONTE AVE | CHICO (corner of hwy 32E & el monte) 530.343.0713 | www.EVERSVETCLINIC.com

CHICO’S BEST LIQUOR STORE we can beat ANY Liquor store price!

READERS’ PICKS C O N T I N U E D

F R O M PA G E 3 1

downtown eatery’s baked goods—cookies (the Fudgie! Yum!), muffins, cakes, pastries and pies—are mouth-wateringly delicious. The other food fare, including its hearty soups and those made-to-order sandwiches on freshly baked bread, make Upper Crust a destination location for the breakfast and lunch crowds all year round.

2ND PLACE: Tin Roof Bakery 627 Broadway, 892-2893 3RD PLACE: Lovely Layers Cakery 131 Meyers St., 828-9931

CATERER 1ST PLACE: Bacio Catering & Carry Out 1903 Park Ave., 345-7787 Bacio Catering is committed to serving delicious and healthy foods for any size gathering. Owned by Amanda Leveroni, Bacio (which also offers take-out from its Park Avenue storefront) focuses on seasonal fruits and vegetables and uses organic ingredients whenever possible. One of the reasons Chicoans love Bacio is that it’s full-service, so in addition to taking care of the food, it offers table decorations, buffet packages and bar service.

2ND PLACE: Roots Catering 3221 Esplanade, 891-4500 3RD PLACE: Special Times Catering 2500 Floral Ave., Ste. 10, 892-2837

LOCAL COFFEEHOUSE 1ST PLACE: Naked Lounge Tea & Coffeehouse 118 W. Second St., 895-0676 Upon walking into Naked Lounge, it’s immediately obvious why Chicoans have named it Best Local Coffeehouse (again). The atmosphere is at once comfortable and practical, both for easy conversation and getting work or homework done. Add to that freshly brewed, locally roasted coffee and espresso, plus a wide variety of teas, and baristas who know how to concoct a killer mocha or cappuccino, and you have a winning combination.

2ND PLACE: Bidwell Perk 664 E. First Ave., 899-1500 3RD PLACE: Midtown Local 365 E. Sixth St., 966-0054

DINER 1ST PLACE: Cozy Diner 1695 Mangrove Ave., 895-1195 There’s always a friendly face ready to greet you and your group at Cozy Diner, where you’re sure to be served generous helpings of comfort food, for reasonable prices, for breakfast, lunch and dinner. The broasted chicken dinner meals-to-go are a

favorite family option, and the luscious-looking pies, displayed at the counter up front, are always worth a second look (and taste!). This diner truly lives up to its name, which is why Chicoans love it.

2ND PLACE: Morning Thunder Café 352 Vallombrosa Ave., 342-9717 3RD PLACE: Jack’s Family Restaurant 540 Main St., 343-8383

2ND PLACE: Cocodine Thai Cuisine 2485 Notre Dame Blvd., 891-1800 3RD PLACE: Sipho’s Restaurant and Café 1228 Dayton Road, 895-1866

LOCAL WINERY

ASIAN CUISINE

1ST PLACE: New Clairvaux Vineyard 26240 Seventh St., Vina, 839-2200 What’s not to love about the Abbey of New Clairvaux? The gorgeous 10-acre vineyard on the larger monastery property in Vina is tended by resident Trappist-Cistercian monks. The harvest is then handed over to fifth-generation winemaker Aimée Sunseri, who crafts several bold and delicious varietals, including Barbera, petite sirah and tempranillo. Visit the winery’s tasting room daily, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., and see why readers voted it Best Local Winery.

My fave: Tin Roof Bakery Why: They have magical macaroons! —Heather Parker

2ND PLACE: LaRocca Vineyards 12360 Doe Mill Road, Forest Ranch, 899-9463 3RD PLACE: Bertagna Son Kissed Vineyards 3363 Hegan Lane, 343-8014

INTERNATIONAL CUISINE 1ST PLACE: Priya Indian Cuisine 2574 Esplanade, 899-1055 Priya has reached epic status as far as lunches go in Chico. Offered between 11 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. daily, its buffet items vary from day to day but always include a mix of vegetarian and meat offerings, such as chana masala (garbanzo beans in a tomato and onion sauce), navratan kurma (veggies in a creamy spiced sauce) and tandoori chicken. Dinners include the thali—a choice of main dish and six small sides, plus freshly baked naan and dessert.

1ST PLACE: Tong Fong Low 2072 E. 20th St., Ste. 100, 898-1388 Although Tong Fong Low’s Chico spot opened just a few years ago, the venerable Oroville location has been operating since 1912. With king-size servings of classic Chinese dishes and recipes perfected over generations, it’s no wonder Tong Fong Low has secured itself in the hearts and bellies of adoring Chicoans. Tong Fong Low also won Best Takeout.

2ND PLACE: Happy Garden 180 Cohasset Road, 893-2574 3RD PLACE: Cocodine Thai Cuisine 2485 Notre Dame Blvd., 891-1800

ITALIAN CUISINE 1ST PLACE: Italian Cottage 2234 Esplanade, 343-7000; and 2525 Dominic Drive, 342-7771 As things change in Chico, it’s comforting that this staple restaurant hasn’t changed all too much. Italian Cottage’s floor is still covered in wood shavings, the long tables still have red-and-white checkered tablecloths, and the servers still wear those Old World period garments that give the place part of its charm. Yep, Italian Cottage is a throwback and Chicoans love returning again and again for Italian comfort cuisine, from lasagna and pizza to sandwiches and salads.

2ND PLACE: Forcella Italian Bistro 1600 Mangrove Ave., 809-1530 3RD PLACE: Sicilian Café 1020 Main St., 345-2233

MEXICAN CUISINE 1ST PLACE: Sol Mexican Grill 3269 Esplanade, 342-4616 If it’s authentic, inexpensive and delicious Mexican food you’re after, look no further than Sol Mexican Grill. The north Chico restaurant offers a simple but varied menu of Mexican favorites, from tacos and burritos to sopes and tortas. Locals love it for dinein, take-out, and even for catering a family reunion or work holiday party.

2ND PLACE: Casa Ramos 216 W. East Ave., 894-0119; and 2490 Fair St., 893-5050 3RD PLACE: La Hacienda 2635 Esplanade, 893-8270

CHEAP EATS 1ST PLACE: La Comida 954 Mangrove Ave., 345-2254

always clean, always friendly, always low prices!

933 Nord Ave. • Chico • 530.891.4842 STAR LIQUORS 32

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Some locals hold La Comida with the same esteem saved for the Bidwell Mansion and Sycamore Pool. This bonafide institution is known for its small prices and huge portions, and its one-of-a-kind take on Mexican food has been enjoyed by generations of Chicoans since 1968. Sierra Nevada Brewing Co.

2ND PLACE: Gordo Burrito 1295 E. Eighth St., 809-1211

PHOTO BY MELANIE MACTAVISH

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Deanna McCoy ACA, BC-HIS

Hearing Aid Dispensr Lic #HA3884

Earning Praises of Clients Every Week.

“The Chico Hearing Aid Center and the people that fit and dispense the hearing aids are the BEST – bar none.” ~ Dick Mudd “All of my experiences were excellent… I was given several options with no pressure to purchase a particular model. I am very happy that I made the decision to change my hearing care provider and recommend Chico Hearing Aid Center to anyone who needs to “hear” better.” ~ J. R. Trimmer Changing lives through Better Hearing since 1949

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READERS’ PICKS c O n t i n u e d

Fresh. Local. One-of-a-kind. Pleased to be a part of a wonderful community that allows us to feature the finest locally grown ingredients. Dinner Service Tues. - Sun. 5 pm to close - Sun. brunch 10am-2 pm 1250 Esplanade • Chico • 530.894.3463 • www.redtavern.com

f r O m pa g e 3 2

3RD PLACE (tie): Aca Taco 133 Broadway, 894-0191; and 1000 W. Sacramento Ave., 343-0909 3RD PLACE (tie): Sol Mexican Grill 3269 Esplanade, 342-4616

drunk munchies 1ST PLACE: The Banshee 134 W. Second St., 895-9670 2ND PLACE: Aca Taco 133 Broadway, 894-0191; and 1000 W. Sacramento Ave., Ste. D, 343-0909 3RD PLACE: Main Street Pizzeria 331 Main St., 566-9337

craft beer selectiOn 1ST PLACE: Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. 1075 E. 20th St., 893-3520 Even with beer bars cropping up all over town, it’s not surprising that Chico’s No. 1 beer success story, Sierra Nevada Brewing Co., takes home the prize. While other bars naturally serve a wider selection of craft brands, Seirra Nevada’s roster of its own creations— from the classics (Torpedo, Celebration) to the specialties (Hop Hunter, the Ovila series, barrel-aged rarities)—offers more choices than several breweries combined. Can’t decide? Try a sampler! Cheers!

2ND PLACE: Winchester Goose 800 Broadway, 715-0099 3RD PLACE: The Handle Bar 2070 E. 20th St., Ste. 160, 894-2337

barbecue 1ST PLACE: Smokin’ Mo’s BBQ 131 Broadway, 891-6677 The whole family is welcome at this downtown barbecue lover’s paradise, where all the meats are smoked and cooked on the premises. While the pulled pork sandwiches, burgers and salads are always popular, it’s the variety of rib preparations that set this place at the top. The homemade side dishes include traditional potato salad, baked beans and cole slaw. Pass the napkins!

2ND PLACE: Kinder’s Meat & Deli 221 Normal Ave., 342-3354 3RD PLACE: Ike’s Smokehouse 245 Walnut St., in the Ray’s Liquor parking lot, 343-1901

burger 1ST PLACE: Nobby’s 1444 Park Ave., 342-2285

We

Roast it betteR

Roasted coffee has more organic flavor compounds than red wine. We use a different roast to bring out the absolute best of each of our coffees. We don’t roast by feel or routine. Our goal is to treat the coffee as carefully as the growers do to honor the months of labor it took to get the crop to our door. Great State Coffee is available at Naked Lounge, S&S Produce, Chico Natural Foods, or direct online. Contact us or Six Degrees Coffee Service for wholesale inquiries

www.greatstatecoffeecompany.com • 530.343.3637 34  

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If you’re craving a burger experience that’s a 180-degree turn from franchises, this Chico icon will not let you down. Affordable and homey, Nobby’s is a comfort-food, good-times favorite, housed in a former gas station. Generous helpings of fresh, hot fries are also

served by friendly staff. Order up at the old-fashioned counter, and pull up a bench. Nobby burgers are most often craved for their “cheese skirts,” a technique that results in deliciously crunchable cheese around the outsides.

Nobby’s phOtO by paula schultz

2ND PLACE: Burgers  & Brew 301 Broadway, 879-9100 3RD PLACE:   Burger Hut 2451 Forest Ave., 891-1430; and 3211 Cohasset Road, 342-4555

burritO 1ST PLACE: Aca Taco 133 Broadway, 894-0191; and 1000 W. Sacramento Ave., 343-0909 With a veritable armada of taco trucks steering the streets and docking in many a Chico neighborhood, along with a large selection of sit-down Mexican restaurants, local competition for Best Burrito is fierce, and Aca Taco has once again emerged on top (the eatery also clinched the equally competitive “Best Taco” category).

2ND PLACE: Gordo Burrito 1295 E. Eighth St., 809-1211; and Eighth and Pine streets 3RD PLACE: Chipotle 620 Mangrove Ave., 343-8707

hOt dOg 1ST PLACE: The Dog House 1008 W. Sacramento Ave., 894-3641; and 1354 East Ave., 894-2242 A well-made hot dog is a thing of beauty, and local connoisseurs prefer the fine selection offered at The Dog House’s multiple locations—a storefront on the east side of town and an old-school, parking-lot snack shack on the west (there’s also a seasonal snack bar at One-Mile Recreation Area that runs from May to September). The dogs here come as you like ’em, naked or dressed to the nines with cheese, bacon, pineapple and more. Also a great selection of sausages, chicken sandwiches and burgers. Try the lemonade!

2ND PLACE: Costco 2100 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway, 342-6494 3RD PLACE: Zot’s Hot Dogs & Deli 225 Main St., 345-2820

ice cream

my fave: red tavern why: i love having dinner and cocktails while listening to mandolin jazz music on the patio. —Maureen Baumgartner

1ST PLACE: Shubert’s Ice Cream   & Candy 178 E. Seventh St., 342-7163 2ND PLACE: Jon & Bon’s Yogurt Shoppe 300 Broadway, 899-9580; and 1722 Mangrove Ave., 899-0484 3RD PLACE: Cold Stone Creamery  146 Broadway, 891-3331

pizza 1ST PLACE: Celestino’s 101 Salem St., 896-1234; and 1354 East Ave., 345-7700 Whether you’re craving vegetarian heavyhitter the Godfather or the classic meat-covered Tom Jones, Celestino’s is the go-to spot for a lunch or dinner pizza. This thin-crust pizza is awesome by the slice or the whole pie. Create your own using any number of regular and specialty toppings and sauces.

2ND PLACE: Woodstock’s Pizza 166 E. Second St., 893-1600 3RD PLACE: Farm Star Pizza  2359 Esplanade, 343-2056

sandwich 1ST PLACE: Spiteri’s Delicatessen 971 East Ave., 891-4797 Walk in to Spiteri’s during lunch and there’s usually a line to the door. Why? Because this deli, hidden away in the Fairview Center in north Chico, is a local favorite. The menu offers specialty sandwiches, but diners can choose from a large list of meats, cheeses, breads and other toppings. Hot or cold, it’s up to you.

2ND PLACE: Fast Eddie’s Sandwich Shop 788 East Ave., 342-8555 3RD PLACE: Broadway Heights  300 Broadway, 899-8075

small bites (apps/tapas) 1ST PLACE: Wine Time 26 Lost Dutchman Dr., 899-9250 Considering Wine Time specializes in small plates and, of course, wines, it’s only fitting that it would take home the win—again—for Best Small Bites (Apps/Tapas). Small plates range from the always delicious meat and local cheese plate to the vegetarian-friendly roasted beet and garlic hummus. What’s better? Each one has a recommended wine pairing!

2ND PLACE: Christian Michaels Ristorante 192 E. Third St., 894-4005 3RD PLACE: The Pour House 855 East Ave., Ste. 270, 893-3000


1ST PLACE: Gordo Burrito Eighth and Pine streets Chicoans love their Mexican food and food trucks have been taking over the streets, so there was certainly plenty of competition in this category. Gordo Burrito, with its satisfying, low-cost Mexican fare served hot and quickly off the grill, takes home the prize. The Chicken Burrito Supreme is a favorite.

2ND PLACE: Mayhem! Gourmet Grilled Cheese Various locations, 717-3968 3RD PLACE: Wander Various locations, 680-3871

SuShi 1ST PLACE: Japanese Blossoms 2995 Esplanade, 891-9022 Beautifully prepared and -presented sushi, nigiri and sashimi—and a variety of other Japanese specialties to round out any meal—make Japanese Blossoms Chico’s favorite spot for sushi. The seafood is always fresh and the chefs clearly take pride in their presentations. Sushi is available by the roll or by the platter, and catering is available. You can even learn to make your own rolls at one of the restaurant’s classes, held in your own home.

2ND PLACE: The Rawbar Restaurant & Sushi 346 Broadway, 897-0626 3RD PLACE: Big Tuna Sushi Bistro 1722 Mangrove Ave., 345-4571

my fave: Sweet cottage why: always amazing food and drinks, and even more amazing atmosphere and customer service.

—Reilly Hail

tacO 1ST PLACE: Aca Taco 133 Broadway, 894-0191; and 1000 W. Sacramento Ave., 343-0909 2ND PLACE: Sol Mexican Grill 3269 Esplanade, 342-4616 3RD PLACE: Gordo Burrito 1295 E. Eighth St., 809-1211; and Eighth and Pine streets

takeOut 1ST PLACE: Tong Fong Low 2072 E. 20th St., Ste. 100, 898-1388 2ND PLACE: Happy Garden 180 Cohasset Road, 893-2574 3RD PLACE: Bacio Catering 1903 Park Ave., 345-7787

patiO 1ST PLACE: Tres Hombres Long Bar & Grill 100 Broadway, 342-0425 2ND PLACE: The Pour House 855 East Ave., Ste. 270, 893-3000

SpOt tO SatiSfy yOur Sweet tOOth 1ST PLACE: Shubert’s Ice Cream & Candy 178 E. Seventh St., 342-7163 How people can drive down Seventh Street without popping into Shubert’s is a mystery. The shop is a go-to destination for sweet-treat fans of all ages. That has a lot to do with its decadent housemade candies and ice creams, such as the local favorite Chico Mint (who can resist those little green mint chips?). And because Shubert’s has been in business so long—more than 75 years!—it’s pretty much a local landmark.

2ND PLACE: Powell’s Sweet Shoppe  121 W. Third St., 332-9866 3RD PLACE: Jon and Bon’s Yogurt Shoppe 300 Broadway, 899-9580; and 1722 Mangrove Ave., 899-0484

Private & Community Walk-ins Welcome Jennifer Conlin L.Ac. Bill Nichols L.Ac.

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place fOr tea 1ST PLACE: T. Tea Bar & Fusion Café 250 Vallombrosa Ave., 895-8100; and 555 Flying V St., Ste. 1, 809-1545 2ND PLACE: Naked Lounge Tea & Coffeehouse 118 W. Second St., 895-0676 3RD PLACE (tie): Bidwell Perk 664 E. First Ave., 899-1500 3RD PLACE (tie): Sweet Cottage 220 Broadway, 513-2044

AMANDA BECERRIL CERTIFIED EYELASH TECHNICIAN SPECIALIST

place fOr vegetarian fOOd

Offer expires 12.31.15

1ST PLACE: Wild Oak Café 196 Cohasset Road, 343-4876 Wild Oak Café has taken the art of vegetarian cooking to a new level, ensuring that there’s something for everyone on the menu. Vegetarians and vegans go for the curry tofu sandwich, or the grilled veggie burgers, served with chips and hummus. For carnivores, bison meat burgers are a delicious choice. The café also offers a variety of fish options.

2ND PLACE: T. Tea Bar & Fusion Café 250 Vallombrosa Ave., 895-8100; and 555 Flying V St., Ste. 1, 809-1545 3RD PLACE: Priya Indian Cuisine 2574 Esplanade, 899-1055

cSa (cOmmunity SuppOrted agriculture) 1ST PLACE: GRUB CSA Farm 3269 W. Sacramento Ave., 680-4543 Seven years after launching, the GRUB Collective has called it quits. But luckily for Chicoans, the CSA Farm is sticking around. A fixture at local farmers’ markets, GRUB always offers a bounty of local fruits and veggies. And for those who subscribe—the CSA runs from April through December and costs $84 a month—they know they can rely on a variety of farm-fresh produce ready to pick up regularly.

Celebrating 41 years in business

Harold and Catherine Park, Harold and Catherine Park, sole owners & operaters of sole owners & operaters of Dowtown Chico’s Chinatown, Dowtown Chico’s Chinatown, would wouldlike liketotoexpress expresstheir their gratitude for the past gratitude for the past 40 41 years of support from the years of support from the community. community.

1209 Esplanade Ste 1 (corner of West 2nd Ave) 530.342.2895 • 10am–4pm M–F or by Appt AmericanChi.net

N OP OW EN

Street fOOd

Low Cost Acupuncture

3RD PLACE: Burgers & Brew 301 Broadway, 879-9100

THANK YOU, THANK YOU, CHICO! Celebrating 40 years in business

Stop in and discover the wonders inside Chico’s House of Rice Oriental Imports & Gifts.

Since 1974

530.828.5542

Tough Questions 2015

Pastor Matthew Raley addresses questions gathered from the community

This sunday:

If God Can’t Change, Why Should We Pray? Begins at 10:15am 355 Panama ave. www.chicogb.com

Now Open

4th & Broadway • Downtown Chico • 893-1794 • OPEN Mon-Sat 10-5:30pm

If you can’t recycle, repurpose. Feel good Recycling.

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2ND PLACE: Comanche Creek Farms 240 Speedway Ave., 894-7775 3RD PLACE: Chico State University Farm  311 Nicholas C. Shouten Lane,898-5844

book your appointment online today!

READERS’ PICKS c O n t i n u e d

O n pa g e 3 6

530.894.4091 • spapierman.com

Chico: 2300 Fair St. • 343-8641 • Hours: Monday-Saturday 8am–4pm OctOber 15, 2015

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& A rts T H E

Recognizing Chico’s most entertaining people and places

BAR (CHICO) 1ST PLACE: The Banshee 134 W. Second St., 895-9670 Stepping through The Banshee’s doors in downtown Chico is like taking a trip into another world. Its classy, old English-style furnishings make visitors feel as if they’ve walked into a big-city joint. Cozy tables await guests in back, or sit by the front to make new friends.

While food can be a tasteless afterthought in some pubs, the fare at The Banshee is prepared and served with care—which explains why this downtown hotspot also won the category of Best Drunk Munchies.

2ND PLACE: Duffy’s Tavern 337 Main St., 343-7718 3RD PLACE: Argus Bar + Patio 212 W. Second St., 520-8223

BAR (OROVILLE)

MIXOLOGIST

1ST PLACE: Spirits Lounge Gold Country Casino, 4020 Olive Highway, 538-4560

1ST PLACE: Liz von Aspern Christian Michaels Ristorante, 192 E. Third St., 894-4005

Spirits Lounge offers a comfortable break from the lights and sounds of Gold Country’s busy casino. With regular live music, ranging from bands to DJs, and a monthly lineup of drink specials, a night at the Lounge is never a dull affair. So, sit back with a local beer or a signature cocktail and have fun!

There’s no shortage of friendly bartenders in this booze-loving college town. So, to be named the best—and the Best Mixologist at that, as the art of mixology takes much more than the ability to pour a beer—is a particular honor. One happy returning customer noted: “Liz von Aspern has a great personality, and does everything in her ability to make the customers happy. She has a million-dollar smile, and is a very genuine person.” We’ll drink to that!

2ND PLACE: Feather Falls Casino Brewing Co. 3 Alverda Dr., 533-3885 3RD PLACE (tie): Miner’s Alley Brewing Co. 2053 Montgomery St., 693-4388 3RD PLACE (tie): Sweetwater Saloon 1849 Sixth St., 533-5242

BAR (RIDGE) 1ST PLACE: Canteena 6067 Skyway, 877-5215 For several years running, the Canteena on Paradise’s main drag has scored the most votes for best watering hole on the Ridge. The Canteena offers food, live music, bigscreen TVs and friendly vibes in a sports-bar atmosphere, keeping those up the Hill entertained since 2003.

2ND PLACE: King’s Tavern 5771 Clark Road, 877-7100 3RD PLACE (tie): The Wine Room & Pub 6256 Skyway, 872-8889 3RD PLACE (tie): Lynn’s Optimo 9225 Skyway, 872-1788

2ND PLACE: Scott Barwick Two Twenty Restaurant, 220 W. Fourth St., 895-1515; and Argus Bar + Patio, 212 W. Second St., 520-8233 3RD PLACE: Jason Corona Crush Italian Cuisine & Lounge, 201 Broadway, 342-7000

HAPPY HOUR

basketball season, hockey season—heck, any sports season—this is the place to be, assuming you can squeeze in. Bella’s Sports Pub is that narrow (but cozy!) bar on Broadway that gets raucous on game days and always draws people from all corners of Chico. Their wings are absolutely top-notch, and sports fans are otherwise satiated with the bigscreen TVs and cheap and plentiful beer.

2ND PLACE: The Graduate 344 W. Eighth St., 343-2790 3RD PLACE: The End Zone 250 Cohasset Road, 899-7070

WATERING HOLE FOR TOWNIES 1ST PLACE: The Handle Bar 2070 E. 20th St., Ste. 160, 894-2337 When Carolyn and Brian Kanabrocki opened The Handle Bar in Chico, they aimed to create an unpretentious, comfortable atmosphere and offer quality microbrews in the early days of the craft beer revolution. They’ve succeeded at both in spades, and this is the second consecutive year their bar on the south side of town has been named the top townie bar.

1ST PLACE: Crush Italian Cuisine and Lounge 201 Broadway, 342-7000 2ND PLACE: Christian Michaels Ristorante 192 E. Third St., 894-4005 3RD PLACE: The Pour House 855 East Ave., Ste. 270, 893-3000

2ND PLACE: Duffy’s Tavern 337 Main St., 343-7718 3RD PLACE: Studio Inn Lounge 2582 Esplanade, 343-0662

SPORTS BAR

1ST PLACE: Sierra Nevada Big Room 1075 E. 20th St., 893-3520

1ST PLACE: Bella’s Sports Pub 134 Broadway, 893-5253 During football season, baseball season,

VENUE FOR LIVE TUNES Perfect acoustics, a big dance floor and the world-class brews of Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. flowing all night long make the

The Banshee PHOTO BY PAULA SCHULTZ

OCTOBER 15, 2015

1ST PLACE: Has Beans Coffee & Tea Co. 501 Main St., 894-3033 For many years, this downtown coffee shop has hosted weekly musical open mic nights, where anyone’s invited to take the stage and share their talents. There is a handful of regulars, but you can also discover new local talent. The shows are 7-10 p.m. Thursdays, and musicians sign up the day of at the shop. Bring your own instrument, or use the guitar and drum set the house makes available.

2ND PLACE: The Maltese Open Mic Comedy 1600 Park Ave., 343-4915 3RD PLACE: Studio Inn Comedy Night 2582 Esplanade, 343-0662

oroville 2745 Oro Dam Blvd.

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Paradise 6640 Clark Rd.

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2ND PLACE: Nash’s 7th Avenue Omelette House 1717 Esplanade, 896-1147 3RD PLACE: Joe’s Bar 749 W. Fifth St., 894-3612

(Corner of 8th & Broadway @ the Junction)

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956 Mangrove Ave • Chico, Ca • 530.892.4940

Call for details (530) 899–0110

1ST PLACE: Duffy’s Tavern 337 Main St., 343-7718 Each bartender at Duffy’s has his or her own little twist on the Bloody Mary. Some pour in a little Guinness, some a nip of Pale Ale, along with the horseradish, Worcestershire sauce and staples of vodka and tomato juice, salt and pepper. But let’s not forget the other delicious accoutrements—green beans and olives. This is a topnotch Bloody Mary and Chicoans know it!

804 Broadway

is supported by BCDBH MHSA funding.

BLOODY MARY

READERS’ PICKS C O N T I N U E D

JLD REV. DATE

APPROVED BY:

2ND PLACE: The Beach 191 E. Second St., 898-9898 3RD PLACE (tie): Lost on Main 319 Main St., 892-2445 3RD PLACE (tie): Madison Bear Garden 316 W. Second St., 891-1639

Single thickness, cut direct from the hide, plain or tooled.

ACCT. EXEC.

AD APPEARS AS REQUESTED

When it comes to boot-scootin’, Chicoans need not go any farther than the Crazy Horse Saloon. The cowboy-themed bar attracts a wide range of people, from college kids to older country fans. And with a huge dance floor smack in the middle of the bar, it’s no wonder it’s locals’ favorite for cutting loose.

Chico’s Best Hand Crafted Leather Belts

NEWS & REVIEW BUSINESS USE ONLY

APPROVED BY:

1ST PLACE: Crazy Horse Saloon 303 Main St., 342-7299

Expires 11/15/15

NEWS & REVIEW BUSINESS USE ONLY

CONTACT INFO (PHONE, ADDRESSES, ETC.)

PLACE TO DANCE

2ND PLACE: Maltese Bar & Tap Room 1600 Park Ave., 343-4915

13

530.894.2002 530.894.2002

OPEN MIC

Walk out on the back patio of the Mad Bear on a Monday and just try to resist going up to the mic to belt out a rendition of your favorite Katy Perry song. That’s right, Monday night is Bear-e-oke night, and that’s where you’ll find all of Chico’s lead-singer wannabes—and hopefuls. Even if you don’t sing, it’s always fun to see all the crooners and entertainers try their hand on the stage.

13

2760 Esplanade, Ste 150 2760 Esplanade, Ste 150

LOCAL COMEDIAN

1ST PLACE: Madison Bear Garden 316 W. Second St., 891-1639

12

Skin Care • Walk-Ins Welcome

3RD PLACE: Studio Inn Lounge 2582 Esplanade, 343-0662

My fave: Monstros Pizza Why: Monstros has selflessly opened its doors to the alternative music scene for over nine years. In doing so, it has become a beloved place for local youth. Also, they have the best pizza in town.

www.thearcstore.org

13

Hair • Nails • Waxing • Waxing SkinHair Care• •Nails Walk-Ins Welcome

2ND PLACE: Bogg 3RD PLACE: Kyle Williams

2ND PLACE: Annie Fischer 3RD PLACE (tie): Kyle Bowen 3RD PLACE (tie): Melissa J 3RD PLACE (tie): Steve Swim

12

12

Classic rock from the ’60s to the ’90s is what you get at a Defcats show. Members Aaron Lyon, Ron Relf, Shawn Bentley, Tom O’Conner and Mick Nantel come together to celebrate dance tunes at nightclubs and casinos around the area, as well as community events like the recent Omega Nu Barn Dance. And they’re booked to rock the Halloween party at the Chico Elks Lodge Oct. 30.

Chris Bobertz has been described as “the strong silent type … with an air of mystery.” He is often seen performing comedy at venues around town, peeking out from the hood of his sweatshirt. His soft-spoken demeanor and truthful subject matter connect with audiences in a pure way. “Whether it’s his kids, his stay-at-home fathering, his passion for the workplace or his elusive wife, Chris’ stories will leave you in stitches,” says one friend.

13

chico 2020 Park Ave.

1ST PLACE: Defcats

1ST PLACE: Chris Bobertz

12

any purchase of $15 or more

Good at all arc StoreS

13

12 12

LOCAL MUSIC ACT

KARAOKE NIGHT

CN&R

PHOTO BY BRITTANY WATERSTRADT

2ND PLACE: Lost on Main 319 Main St., 892-2445 3RD PLACE: The Tackle Box Bar & Grill 379 E. Park Ave., 345-7499

—James A. Lopez

36

$5 OFF

Has Beans beautiful Big Room the best place in Chico to catch an eclectic mix of touring and local folk, Americana, rock, blues and funk acts.

T S E B S ’ O CHIC RS! BURGE ARE GOOD, OUR HOTDOGS IF YOU THINKRGERS. TRY OUR BU BE DISSAPOINTED! YOU WON’TPASTURE RAISED BEEF. ALL NATURAL,

The Dog House Serving Butte, Glenn & Tehama Counties

342-RAPE

O N PA G E 3 9

24 hr. hotline (Collect Calls Accepted) www.rapecrisis.org

www.chicodoghouse.com 1354 EAST AVE. | 894-2242 MAIN STORE (Next to the East Ave. Safeway) 1008 W SACRAMENTO AVE. | 894-3641 (In the Nord Ave. Safeway parking lot)

OCTOBER 15, 2015

CN&R

37


N i g h tl i f e R E A D E R S ’ PICKS

& A rts T H E

Recognizing Chico’s most entertaining people and places

BAR (CHICO) 1ST PLACE: The Banshee 134 W. Second St., 895-9670 Stepping through The Banshee’s doors in downtown Chico is like taking a trip into another world. Its classy, old English-style furnishings make visitors feel as if they’ve walked into a big-city joint. Cozy tables await guests in back, or sit by the front to make new friends.

While food can be a tasteless afterthought in some pubs, the fare at The Banshee is prepared and served with care—which explains why this downtown hotspot also won the category of Best Drunk Munchies.

2ND PLACE: Duffy’s Tavern 337 Main St., 343-7718 3RD PLACE: Argus Bar + Patio 212 W. Second St., 520-8223

BAR (OROVILLE)

MIXOLOGIST

1ST PLACE: Spirits Lounge Gold Country Casino, 4020 Olive Highway, 538-4560

1ST PLACE: Liz von Aspern Christian Michaels Ristorante, 192 E. Third St., 894-4005

Spirits Lounge offers a comfortable break from the lights and sounds of Gold Country’s busy casino. With regular live music, ranging from bands to DJs, and a monthly lineup of drink specials, a night at the Lounge is never a dull affair. So, sit back with a local beer or a signature cocktail and have fun!

There’s no shortage of friendly bartenders in this booze-loving college town. So, to be named the best—and the Best Mixologist at that, as the art of mixology takes much more than the ability to pour a beer—is a particular honor. One happy returning customer noted: “Liz von Aspern has a great personality, and does everything in her ability to make the customers happy. She has a million-dollar smile, and is a very genuine person.” We’ll drink to that!

2ND PLACE: Feather Falls Casino Brewing Co. 3 Alverda Dr., 533-3885 3RD PLACE (tie): Miner’s Alley Brewing Co. 2053 Montgomery St., 693-4388 3RD PLACE (tie): Sweetwater Saloon 1849 Sixth St., 533-5242

BAR (RIDGE) 1ST PLACE: Canteena 6067 Skyway, 877-5215 For several years running, the Canteena on Paradise’s main drag has scored the most votes for best watering hole on the Ridge. The Canteena offers food, live music, bigscreen TVs and friendly vibes in a sports-bar atmosphere, keeping those up the Hill entertained since 2003.

2ND PLACE: King’s Tavern 5771 Clark Road, 877-7100 3RD PLACE (tie): The Wine Room & Pub 6256 Skyway, 872-8889 3RD PLACE (tie): Lynn’s Optimo 9225 Skyway, 872-1788

2ND PLACE: Scott Barwick Two Twenty Restaurant, 220 W. Fourth St., 895-1515; and Argus Bar + Patio, 212 W. Second St., 520-8233 3RD PLACE: Jason Corona Crush Italian Cuisine & Lounge, 201 Broadway, 342-7000

HAPPY HOUR

basketball season, hockey season—heck, any sports season—this is the place to be, assuming you can squeeze in. Bella’s Sports Pub is that narrow (but cozy!) bar on Broadway that gets raucous on game days and always draws people from all corners of Chico. Their wings are absolutely top-notch, and sports fans are otherwise satiated with the bigscreen TVs and cheap and plentiful beer.

2ND PLACE: The Graduate 344 W. Eighth St., 343-2790 3RD PLACE: The End Zone 250 Cohasset Road, 899-7070

WATERING HOLE FOR TOWNIES 1ST PLACE: The Handle Bar 2070 E. 20th St., Ste. 160, 894-2337 When Carolyn and Brian Kanabrocki opened The Handle Bar in Chico, they aimed to create an unpretentious, comfortable atmosphere and offer quality microbrews in the early days of the craft beer revolution. They’ve succeeded at both in spades, and this is the second consecutive year their bar on the south side of town has been named the top townie bar.

1ST PLACE: Crush Italian Cuisine and Lounge 201 Broadway, 342-7000 2ND PLACE: Christian Michaels Ristorante 192 E. Third St., 894-4005 3RD PLACE: The Pour House 855 East Ave., Ste. 270, 893-3000

2ND PLACE: Duffy’s Tavern 337 Main St., 343-7718 3RD PLACE: Studio Inn Lounge 2582 Esplanade, 343-0662

SPORTS BAR

1ST PLACE: Sierra Nevada Big Room 1075 E. 20th St., 893-3520

1ST PLACE: Bella’s Sports Pub 134 Broadway, 893-5253 During football season, baseball season,

VENUE FOR LIVE TUNES Perfect acoustics, a big dance floor and the world-class brews of Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. flowing all night long make the

The Banshee PHOTO BY PAULA SCHULTZ

OCTOBER 15, 2015

1ST PLACE: Has Beans Coffee & Tea Co. 501 Main St., 894-3033 For many years, this downtown coffee shop has hosted weekly musical open mic nights, where anyone’s invited to take the stage and share their talents. There is a handful of regulars, but you can also discover new local talent. The shows are 7-10 p.m. Thursdays, and musicians sign up the day of at the shop. Bring your own instrument, or use the guitar and drum set the house makes available.

2ND PLACE: The Maltese Open Mic Comedy 1600 Park Ave., 343-4915 3RD PLACE: Studio Inn Comedy Night 2582 Esplanade, 343-0662

oroville 2745 Oro Dam Blvd.

13

Paradise 6640 Clark Rd.

DESIGNER

ISSUE DATE

ACCT. EXEC.

BC

10.16.14

JLD

DESIGNER

ISSUE DATE

10.16.14 FILEBC NAME FILE NAME THEHAIRCOMPANY101613R1 THEHAIRCOMPANY101613R1

REV. DATE 10.10.13

10.10.13

USP (BOLD SELECTION) USP (BOLD SELECTION) PRICE / ATMOSPHERE / EXPERT / UNIQUE

PRICE / ATMOSPHERE / EXPERT / UNIQUE

PLEASE CAREFULLY REVIEW YOUR NV Talk Line is a program of NVCSS and THE FOLLOWING: ADVERTISEMENT AND VERIFY PLEASE CAREFULLY REVIEW YOUR

2ND PLACE: Nash’s 7th Avenue Omelette House 1717 Esplanade, 896-1147 3RD PLACE: Joe’s Bar 749 W. Fifth St., 894-3612

(Corner of 8th & Broadway @ the Junction)

ADVERTISEMENT ANDXVERIFY AD SIZE (COLUMNS INCHES)THE FOLLOWING:

Downtown Chico • 342-4788

SPELLING

AD SIZE (COLUMNS X INCHES) NUMBERS & DATES

SPELLING

Step back in time to 1929

CONTACT INFO (PHONE, ADDRESSES, ETC.)

NUMBERS & DATES

AD APPEARS AS REQUESTED

Chico’s Best Gift Shop Gifts • Fashion • Home

Bi-Plane Flight

BEST

the view of the N. Valley

HUBBS

Schooler Flying Co.

NO.

It Is A Complete sentenCe

STATIONERY

956 Mangrove Ave • Chico, Ca • 530.892.4940

Call for details (530) 899–0110

1ST PLACE: Duffy’s Tavern 337 Main St., 343-7718 Each bartender at Duffy’s has his or her own little twist on the Bloody Mary. Some pour in a little Guinness, some a nip of Pale Ale, along with the horseradish, Worcestershire sauce and staples of vodka and tomato juice, salt and pepper. But let’s not forget the other delicious accoutrements—green beans and olives. This is a topnotch Bloody Mary and Chicoans know it!

804 Broadway

is supported by BCDBH MHSA funding.

BLOODY MARY

READERS’ PICKS C O N T I N U E D

JLD REV. DATE

APPROVED BY:

2ND PLACE: The Beach 191 E. Second St., 898-9898 3RD PLACE (tie): Lost on Main 319 Main St., 892-2445 3RD PLACE (tie): Madison Bear Garden 316 W. Second St., 891-1639

Single thickness, cut direct from the hide, plain or tooled.

ACCT. EXEC.

AD APPEARS AS REQUESTED

When it comes to boot-scootin’, Chicoans need not go any farther than the Crazy Horse Saloon. The cowboy-themed bar attracts a wide range of people, from college kids to older country fans. And with a huge dance floor smack in the middle of the bar, it’s no wonder it’s locals’ favorite for cutting loose.

Chico’s Best Hand Crafted Leather Belts

NEWS & REVIEW BUSINESS USE ONLY

APPROVED BY:

1ST PLACE: Crazy Horse Saloon 303 Main St., 342-7299

Expires 11/15/15

NEWS & REVIEW BUSINESS USE ONLY

CONTACT INFO (PHONE, ADDRESSES, ETC.)

PLACE TO DANCE

2ND PLACE: Maltese Bar & Tap Room 1600 Park Ave., 343-4915

13

530.894.2002 530.894.2002

OPEN MIC

Walk out on the back patio of the Mad Bear on a Monday and just try to resist going up to the mic to belt out a rendition of your favorite Katy Perry song. That’s right, Monday night is Bear-e-oke night, and that’s where you’ll find all of Chico’s lead-singer wannabes—and hopefuls. Even if you don’t sing, it’s always fun to see all the crooners and entertainers try their hand on the stage.

13

2760 Esplanade, Ste 150 2760 Esplanade, Ste 150

LOCAL COMEDIAN

1ST PLACE: Madison Bear Garden 316 W. Second St., 891-1639

12

Skin Care • Walk-Ins Welcome

3RD PLACE: Studio Inn Lounge 2582 Esplanade, 343-0662

My fave: Monstros Pizza Why: Monstros has selflessly opened its doors to the alternative music scene for over nine years. In doing so, it has become a beloved place for local youth. Also, they have the best pizza in town.

www.thearcstore.org

13

Hair • Nails • Waxing • Waxing SkinHair Care• •Nails Walk-Ins Welcome

2ND PLACE: Bogg 3RD PLACE: Kyle Williams

2ND PLACE: Annie Fischer 3RD PLACE (tie): Kyle Bowen 3RD PLACE (tie): Melissa J 3RD PLACE (tie): Steve Swim

12

12

Classic rock from the ’60s to the ’90s is what you get at a Defcats show. Members Aaron Lyon, Ron Relf, Shawn Bentley, Tom O’Conner and Mick Nantel come together to celebrate dance tunes at nightclubs and casinos around the area, as well as community events like the recent Omega Nu Barn Dance. And they’re booked to rock the Halloween party at the Chico Elks Lodge Oct. 30.

Chris Bobertz has been described as “the strong silent type … with an air of mystery.” He is often seen performing comedy at venues around town, peeking out from the hood of his sweatshirt. His soft-spoken demeanor and truthful subject matter connect with audiences in a pure way. “Whether it’s his kids, his stay-at-home fathering, his passion for the workplace or his elusive wife, Chris’ stories will leave you in stitches,” says one friend.

13

chico 2020 Park Ave.

1ST PLACE: Defcats

1ST PLACE: Chris Bobertz

12

any purchase of $15 or more

Good at all arc StoreS

13

12 12

LOCAL MUSIC ACT

KARAOKE NIGHT

CN&R

PHOTO BY BRITTANY WATERSTRADT

2ND PLACE: Lost on Main 319 Main St., 892-2445 3RD PLACE: The Tackle Box Bar & Grill 379 E. Park Ave., 345-7499

—James A. Lopez

36

$5 OFF

Has Beans beautiful Big Room the best place in Chico to catch an eclectic mix of touring and local folk, Americana, rock, blues and funk acts.

T S E B S ’ O CHIC RS! BURGE ARE GOOD, OUR HOTDOGS IF YOU THINKRGERS. TRY OUR BU BE DISSAPOINTED! YOU WON’TPASTURE RAISED BEEF. ALL NATURAL,

The Dog House Serving Butte, Glenn & Tehama Counties

342-RAPE

O N PA G E 3 9

24 hr. hotline (Collect Calls Accepted) www.rapecrisis.org

www.chicodoghouse.com 1354 EAST AVE. | 894-2242 MAIN STORE (Next to the East Ave. Safeway) 1008 W SACRAMENTO AVE. | 894-3641 (In the Nord Ave. Safeway parking lot)

OCTOBER 15, 2015

CN&R

37


38  

CN&R 

october 15, 2015


READERS’ PICKS c O n t i n u e d

f r O m pa g e 3 7

margarita 1ST PLACE: Tres Hombres Long Bar & Grill 100 Broadway, 342-0425 2ND PLACE: La Hacienda 2635 Esplanade, 893-8270 3RD PLACE: Casa Ramos 216 W. East Ave., 894-0119; and 2490 Fair St., 893-5050

martini 1ST PLACE: Crush Italian Cuisine and  Lounge 201 Broadway, 342-7000 2ND PLACE: Christian Michaels Ristorante 192 E. Third St., 894-4005 3RD PLACE: 5th Street Steakhouse 345 W. Fifth St., 891-6328

place fOr a glass Of wine 1ST PLACE: Wine Time 26 Lost Dutchman Dr., 899-9250 2ND PLACE: Monks Wine Lounge 128 W. Second St., 343-3408 3RD PLACE: Crush Italian Cuisine and  Lounge 201 Broadway, 342-7000

place tO see art 1ST PLACE: 1078 Gallery 820 Broadway, 343-1973 The 1078 is an integral piece of Chico’s identity as a place for artists, and it’s been that way for 34 years. The gallery hosts a rotating mix of showcases for contemporary and experimental artists working in all media—visual, performance, literature, film and music.

SICILIAN CAFE Since 1984

my fave: northern traditionz why: i’ve known most of the northern traditionz guys for many years. their band and music are awesome! great guys! i’ve been in love with their talents and music for a very long time. i love watching them rise up higher and higher, and watching them grow.

1ST PLACE: Blue Room Theatre 139 W. First St., 895-3749

Dinner, 7 Nights a Week at 5 pm

Reservations Recommended Private Parties, Caterings and Special Events Call 345-CAFE 1020 Main Street • Chico

A Rare Piece of

ChiCo history

455 E. 20th St. (20th & Mulberry) | Chico, CA

(530) 899-7270 | redmountaingreencycyle.com | facebook.com/rmgreencycle

Visit us

AT THE HOME & GARDEN SHOW • OCTOBER 24 & 25

open houSe Sat. 10/17, 11-2:30pm • 935 poplar St.

The Blue Room Theatre is something of an institution here in Chico, despite going through many changes over the years. One thing that hasn’t changed is its dedication to offering a strong mix of classic and contemporary plays, some even written locally, and all performed by an excellent cast of local actors. Let’s not forget its Young Company, either, which works with young aspiring actors to hone their craft.

Visual artist

casinO

2ND PLACE: Caitlin Schwerin 3RD PLACE: Christine Fulton

Our Guests are the Best

Test ride the new A2B ALVA+ • 50 miles per charge • No licensing or DMV registration required

theater cOmpany

2ND PLACE: Chico Theater Company 166 E. Eaton Road, Ste. F, 894-3282 3RD PLACE: California Regional Theatre (800) 722-4522

For several years now, Janet Lombardi Blixt has been recognized as Chico’s Best Visual Artist. That might be because she makes some beautiful paintings, many of them of local landmarks, but also because she takes pride in sharing her skills with other aspiring artists in town through her Chico Art School.

ARRIVING DAILY

—Tr i s h a A n n D o d g e

2ND PLACE (tie): Chico Paper Co. 345 Broadway, 891-0900 2ND PLACE (tie): Chico Art Center 450 Orange St., 895-8726

1ST PLACE: Janet Lombardi Blixt

NEW 2016 MODELS

Built by famous architect O.E. 'Bud' Tracy. 1920's home with antique glass door knobs, jacuzzi tub, french doors, arched front door, double ovens, convection oven, picture frame molding, RV parking, solid oak cabinets & shelves, Oak & Doug Fir flooring, phone seat in hallway, timered driplines and automatic sprinklers.

Shawn Smith, Realtor, BRE 01821530 PeoPle’s ChoiCe Brokers

530.308.7162 • ShawnSellsChico@gmail.com

1ST PLACE: Gold Country Casino 4020 Olive Highway, Oroville, 538-4560 2ND PLACE: Feather Falls Casino 3 Alverda Dr., Oroville, 533-3885 3RD PLACE: Rolling Hills Casino 2655 Everett Freeman Way, Corning, 528-3500

READERS’ PICKS c O n t i n u e d

O n pa g e 4 0

kitchen remodeling

Martini (Crush) phOtO cOurtesy Of facebOOk

122 w. third street • chico • 530.895.1161

All work done by Jin Bo Li Construction, Lic #995513 OctOber 15, 2015

  CN&R 

39


R E A D E R S ’ PICKS

H ea l t h

& W e ll n ess

Hats are off to those who make Chicoans healthy, happy LOCAL HEALTH CARE PROVIDER 1ST PLACE: Argyll Medical Group 100 Independence Circle, 899-0295 Dr. Roy L. Bishop founded Argyll Medical Group in 2001, so naming the group as a tip of his hat to his Scottish heritage. Patients say they appreciate the staff’s care and efficiency, and the ability to make appointments with ease. Not having to wait all day at the office is another reason patients choose to make Argyll their go-to spot for health concerns.

2ND PLACE: Mission Ranch Primary Care 114 Mission Ranch Blvd., Ste. 10, 894-0500 3RD PLACE: Enloe Medical Center 1531 Esplanade, 332-7300

GENERAL PRACTITIONER

ing complex issues and he’s a good listener. No wonder he’s a repeat winner!

patients report less stress and faster healing times after just a few visits.

2ND PLACE: Julie Archer Archer and Alonso MDs, 1645 Esplanade, Ste. 1, 896-0386 3RD PLACE: Dr. Roy Bishop Argyll Medical Group, 100 Independence Circle, 899-0130

2ND PLACE: The Pinwheel Community  Acupuncture Project 740 Flume St., 345-5566 3RD PLACE: American Chi Center for Health 1290 Esplanade, Ste. 1, 342-2895

ALTERNATIVE HEALTH CARE PROVIDER 1ST PLACE: Chico Community Acupuncture 1815 Mangrove Ave., 345-5300 2ND PLACE (tie): American Chi Center   for Health 1290 Esplanade, Ste. 1, 342-2895 2ND PLACE (tie): Chico Naturopathic Medicine 669 Palmetto Ave., 332-9355

1ST PLACE: Stuart Mishelof 100 Independence Circle, 899-2106

ACUPUNCTURE CLINIC

A physician assistant at Argyll Medical Group since 2008, Stuart Mishelof is noted for his approachability, overall knowledge and thoroughness with patients. He specializes in adult and adolescent medicine, including diabetic management, men’s health, sports medicine and preventive health. Patients keep coming back because they trust Mishelof’s expertise, say he’s good at explain-

Patients at Chico Community Acupuncture pay only what they can afford, $15-$35 on a sliding scale, to receive services and help. “User-friendly, community health care” is how one satisfied patient describes the center, which helps people get at the root of pain wherever it’s present in the body. Other

1ST PLACE: Chico Community Acupuncture 1815 Mangrove Ave., 345-5300

CHIROPRACTOR 1ST PLACE: Preference Chiropractic 1635 Magnolia Ave., 895-0224 Patients praise the staff and service at Preference Chiropractic, where even the check-in process is comfortable and inviting. “I have always come away feeling free of pain,” one satisfied client raved. Others call the capable staff smart, knowledgeable and especially caring. Chiropractic care for the whole family is their focus.

2ND PLACE: Tenenbaum Chiropractic 1049 Village Lane, 680-8920 3RD PLACE: Spine Chiropractic 1166 Esplanade, Ste. 2, 809-2695

DENTAL CARE 1ST PLACE: Nelsen Family Dentistry 1307 Esplanade, Ste. 4, 898-8511 The husband-and-wife team of Drs. John and Missy Nelsen are the backbone of the family-oriented Nelsen Family Dentistry, now in Caper Acres PHOTO BY PAULA SCHULTZ

its 25th year. The Nelsens have a large team of friendly, professional hygienists and assistants to take expert care of their patients’ teeth. Nelsen Family Dentistry provides routine cleanings, root canals, dentures and other services to keep their patients smiling.

2ND PLACE: Willow Creek Dentistry 2765 Esplanade, 891-6611 3RD PLACE: William Moon, DDS 227 W. Sixth St., 342-3525

EYE-CARE SPECIALIST 1ST PLACE: Chico Eye Center 605 W. East Ave., 895-1727; and 2056 Talbert Dr., Ste. 100, 893-1695 With two locations in Chico and a third in Paradise, Chico Eye Center has become a trusted name when it comes to taking care of people’s eyes and vision needs. Many services are offered, including basic lenses, contacts, cataract care and LASIK surgery. Special treatments for issues like puffiness and insufficient eyelashes are also available. Friendliness, efficiency and patient-centered care make the center a trusted place.

2ND PLACE: Family Eye Care 2565 Ceanothus Ave., Ste. 155, 899-3939 3RD PLACE: North Valley Eye Care 114 Mission Ranch Blvd., 891-1900

PEDIATRICIAN 1ST PLACE: Dr. Patrick Tedford 643 W. East Ave., 342-0502

In Motion Fitness is a powerhouse in the local gym world. With multiple workout rooms filled with countless cardio and weight machines, not to mention all the free weights. In addition, there are several rooms specially built for the numerous classes—from yoga and pilates to boxing and Zumba. Knowledgable staff members offer personal training sessions and are always on hand for a questioning customer. No wonder In Motion is so beloved.

2ND PLACE: Dr. John Asarian Chico Pediatrics, 10 Governors Lane, 343-8522 3RD PLACE: Dr. Paul Wassermann 1430 Esplanade, Ste. 5, 891-0553

Farshad Azad, the sensei/owner of Azad’s Martial Arts, is a grand master who’s practiced his craft for more than 35 years. Azad shares his skills, as well as his immense knowledge about the history and philosophy of martial arts, with children and adults. The center, which is staffed by several accomplished teachers, also trains law enforcement personnel and offers classes for seniors.

When the four-legged, furry residents of Chico are in need of medical care, Valley Oak Veterinary Center is the first place many of their human companions call. The state-ofthe-art, impeccably clean and comfortable clinic (they even offer free cookies and coffee for humans) is open around the clock and on holidays for emergency visits.

2ND PLACE: Chico Hospital for Cats 548 W. East Ave., 892-2287 OCTOBER 15, 2015

1ST PLACE: In Motion Fitness 1293 E. First Ave., 343-5678

2ND PLACE: Chico Sports Club 260 Cohasset Road, Ste. 190, 345-9427 3RD PLACE: North Rim Crossfit 2954 Highway 32, Ste. 900, 520-7520

1ST PLACE: Valley Oak Veterinary Center 2480 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway, 342-7387

CN&R 

GYM

Dr. Patrick Tedford is a veteran pediatrician who graduated from Notre Dame University more than 40 years ago, and has overseen the health and welfare of an astounding three generations of Chicoans. It’s no wonder he’s been named Best Pediatrician by CN&R readers multiple times. Dr. Tedford is particularly beloved for his caring, compassionate nature and listening skills.

VETERINARIAN

40  

3RD PLACE: Chico Animal Hospital 3015 Esplanade, 342-0518

MARTIAL ARTS STUDIO 1ST PLACE: Azad’s Martial Arts 313 Walnut St., Ste. 150, 892-2923

2ND PLACE: Haley’s Martial Arts Center 260 Cohasset Road, 895-3114 3RD PLACE: Morning Sun Martial Arts 135 W. Eighth Ave., Ste. A, 342-5833

MASSAGE THERAPIST 1ST PLACE: Babette Maiss 13 Williamsburg Lane, 321-5668 German-born Babette Maiss has been practicing massage in Chico for more than 15 years, attracting a large clientele who


5

for

$

65

ACUPUNCTURE 15 ON SALE THROUGH 10/31/14 Regular Price: $

15-35

per treatment

You decide what you pay

Open Tues - Sat Open 7 days 740 Flume Street 345-5566 | PinwheelChico.com

Great Wines including Port Style Amazing Views Chico Community Acupuncture phOtO bY hOWard hardee

Picnic Area

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community. Students say they like the clean and attractive studio, the helpful teachers and “soothing environment.” In addition to classes, the Yoga Center of Chico offers retreats, workshops, massage and a retail store.

2ND PLACE: In Motion Fitness 1293 E. First Ave., 343-5678 3RD PLACE: Chico Sports Club 260 Cohasset Road, 345-9427

YOga studiO

1ST PLACE: Caper Acres

1ST PLACE: Yoga Center of Chico 250 Vallombrosa Ave., Ste. 150, 342-0100 Tom Hess and Rex Stromness, both longtime local yogis, teamed up to create their own place dedicated to serving Chico’s yoga

—Heidi Jones

Caper Acres is a longtime winner in this category, and it’s likely it will be for years to come. The fairy-tale-themed play place reopened recently after some work to install new lighting and is expected to go through a transformation in the coming years that will greatly upgrade its infrastructure. In the meantime, parents and kids (adults may enter only in the company of children) can enjoy the current fun play features, such as the slides, giant block of cheese and the boat being stalked by a giant mosaic sea serpent.

2ND PLACE: Bidwell Park  3RD PLACE: In Motion Fitness  1293 E. First Ave., 343-5678

place tO take a dip 1ST PLACE: Sycamore Pool at One-Mile  Recreation Area There’s no place like Sycamore Pool in the summertime. The pool, fed by the running waters of Big Chico Creek, has been where Chicoans (and visitors from miles around) like to go to escape the blazing valley heat for generations. It’s also a pleasure to visit the rest of the year for some quiet meditation and easy-to-access communion with nature.

2ND PLACE: In Motion Fitness 1293 E. First Ave., 343-5678 3RD PLACE: Bear Hole

READERS’ PICKS c O n t i n u e d

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My fave: simply pilates Why: beth koch is amazing, and her physical-therapy-based pilates studio has changed my life. i suffer from scoliosis, and after attending classes at simply pilates for just a few months, i stopped having back pain for the first time in my life!

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2ND PLACE: Kristen Boberts  The Olive Branch Wellness Spa, 2889 Cohasset Road, 591-9700 3RD PLACE: Ben Beckman  Built for Body Work, 1166 Esplanade, Ste. 2, 809-2695

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swear by her magical hands. She is trained in and performs many kinds of massage. Her wide-ranging specialties include Swedish, deep tissue, neuromuscular therapy, sports massage, reflexology, ortho-bionomy, prenatal and lymphatic massage.

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845 east ave. • chico • 530.592.3251 OctOber 15, 2015

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C o mm u n i t y R e a d e R s ’ PICKS

Bidwell   Presbyterian Church phOtO by paula schultz

All of the inspiring locals and feel-good parts of Chico

cOmmunity vOlunteer

yOuth OrganizatiOn

1ST PLACE: Nicholas Mertz Stonewall Alliance Center, 358 E. Sixth St., 893-3336

1ST PLACE: Boys & Girls Club of the North Valley 628 Wall St., 879-5653

An active member of Chico’s Stonewall Alliance Center, Nicholas Mertz is a champion for the local LGBT community. But he’s been named Chico’s Best Community Volunteer because he also does so much more. Mertz works tirelessly for Relay for Life, raising funds for cancer research, and volunteers through the Alex Project, a local text-based crisis line for youth. Says one collaborator: “It is Chico’s good fortune to have him.”

2ND PLACE: Farshad Azad Azad’s Martial Arts Family Center, 313 Walnut St., Ste. 150, 892-2923 3RD PLACE: Jim Secola Christbridge Ministry, 984 Myrtle Ave., 9900822

charitable cause 1ST PLACE: Butte Humane Society 2580 Fair St. 343-7917 Butte Humane Society is a repeat winner in the category of Best Charitable Cause, and it’s easy to see why. The organization does a bang-up job of caring for companion animals and finding them loving “furever” homes. This local nonprofit’s good work doesn’t end there; it also helps provide low-cost spay and neuter services to help curtail the number of unwanted pets in the community. Former adopters know BHS is a cause worth supporting.

2ND PLACE: Stonewall Alliance Center  358 E. Sixth St., 893-3336 3RD PLACE: The Jesus Center  1297 Park Ave., 345-2640

my fave: rock of life fellowship Why: amazing leadership, incredible music and singers and supportive people who have made a difference to the hurting, lost and ill. they are brand new and will have a massive impact on chico in coming years. —Christine Maness

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Since 1993, this nonprofit organization has worked tirelessly to provide the youth of our communities new opportunities, so it’s no wonder it continues to take home the honor of Best Youth Organization. At the club, kids can play games, get help with homework, socialize outside of school and just be kids. The organization is committed to offering children education and career skills, character and leadership development, health and life skills, exposure to the arts, as well as sports, fitness and recreation.

2ND PLACE: Girls on the Run of Butte County gotrbuttecounty.org, 636-0786 3RD PLACE: Youth for Change 578 Rio Lindo Ave., Ste. 3, 894-5933

lOcal persOnality 1ST PLACE: Linda Watkins-Bennett CBS 12 and NBC 24 You’ve seen her on TV, the trusted face producing and anchoring our local news, for decades. You may also have seen her around the community, judging parades (and the Keep Chico Weird Talent Show!), or as a friendly volunteer and mom. Last year, the Chico native was even named an “Official Chico Icon” by the popular facebook group “You Know You’re From Chico When … ”

2ND PLACE: Megan McMann CBS 12 and NBC 24 3RD PLACE: Mike “G-Ride” Griffith G-Ride Pedi Cab, 354-9885

cOmmunity event 1ST PLACE: Chico Certified Farmers’ Market It doesn’t get much better than shopping for produce picked that very morning from local farms. But that’s what Chicoans can expect every Saturday (rain or shine!) from the fantastic Chico Certified Farmers’ Market at the corner of Second and Wall streets. That’s where visitors will find rows of fresh fruits and veggies, as well as jams, other tasty treats, plants and trees, unique crafts and art and other locally made wares. The market is a Chico experience that is not to be missed.

2ND PLACE: Taste of Chico  3RD PLACE: Thursday Night Market 

place tO vOlunteer 1ST PLACE: Butte Humane Society 2580 Fair St., 343-7917 2ND PLACE: Community Action  Volunteers in Education Chico State BMU Room 308, 898-5817

3RD PLACE: Jesus Center 1297 Park Ave., 345-2640

farmers’ market vendOr 1ST PLACE:  Chico Chai 1919 Park Ave., 897-0822 On Saturday mornings, market-goers love to stop for a locally made Chico Chai to sip while they shop. Served hot or over ice—and even in bulk—the delicious local drink is handcrafted by brewmistress Sarah Adams. Chico Chai products, which also include loose-leaf teas, are microbrewed and simmered slowly in small batches. Yum!

2ND PLACE: Rico’s Tamales 900 Cherry St., 898-1212 3RD PLACE: GRUB CSA Farm 3197 W. Sacramento Ave., 680-4543

instructOr/prOfessOr 1ST PLACE (tie): Rebecca Brunelli Biological sciences, Chico State Rebecca Brunelli has a reputation for dedication to her students, and going out of her way to help them understand and appreciate science and other subject matters. She is passionate about teaching, and takes every student seriously. Current and former students report how her classes have positively helped them, not only academically, but in

Chico Chai phOtO by hOWard hardee

other areas of their lives, so it’s no wonder she’s so beloved.

1ST PLACE (tie): Sanjay Dev Math departments, Butte College and Chico State Lots of people around town know Sanjay Dev for his Devastation Sounds radio show on KZFR 90.1 FM. And apparently that chill vibe he sends out on the airwaves translates to his classrooms at Chico State and Butte College as well. Students rave about Dev’s ability to explain difficult math principles, his sense of humor and his “heart of gold.” That’s why they give him an A+!

3RD PLACE: Janet Lombardi Blixt Chico Art School, 336 Broadway, Ste. 20, 570-3895

teacher (k-12) 1ST PLACE:  Carol Stein Sierra View Elementary School, 1598 Hooker Oak Ave., 891-3117 If you’re between the ages of 5 and 25 and grew up in Chico, there’s a chance your life has been touched by Carol Stein. A kindergarten teacher at Sierra View Elementary School, Stein’s been molding young minds for more than 20 years, bringing passion and optimism to her classrooms. “Carol Stein teaches from the heart, making staff, students and families feel special and important, with her warm smile and kind spirit,” says Sierra View Principal Mele Benz. Clearly local families agree!


My fave: from the ground Up farms Why: because these people grow food and give it away for free to food programs and pantries. they give free workshops teaching anything from gardening to nutrition to cooking. did i mention free? amazing people and program!

—Jenny Lowrey

2ND PLACE: Liz Albright Little Chico Creek Elementary School, 2090 Amanda Way, 891-3285 3RD PLACE: Carin Anderson Sherwood Montessori, 746 Moss Ave., 345-6600

place tO tie the knOt 1ST PLACE: White Ranch 214 Hagenridge Road, 342-6530 The White Ranch offers lush, spacious grounds for romantic weddings amid nature. Step outside the city, to the north off Keefer Road, to discover this picturesque location, filled with flowers, fountains, vegetation and lots of cozy areas to relax. Perfect for intimate weddings or large affairs, and the freedom to bring your own food, drinks, DJ and decorations, plus the convenience of tables and chairs on-site, make the White Ranch paradise for bride, groom and everyone else.

2ND PLACE: The Palms 2947 Nord Ave., 894-8000 3RD PLACE: Bidwell Park

place tO pray 1ST PLACE: Bidwell Presbyterian Church 208 W. First St., 343-1484 Chicoans clearly find sanctuary and comfort in Bidwell Presbyterian Church, as this year they’ve named it their favorite place to pray. Named for Chico’s founders, John and Annie Bidwell, the historic, majestic church sits on First Street in downtown, right next to the Chico State campus. Services range from joyous affairs complete with live music and lively sermons, to the more traditional, ensuring every type of prayer is welcome.

2ND PLACE: Bidwell Park 3RD PLACE: Chico New Thought Center 14 Hillary Lane, 895-8395

place fOr eavesdrOpping 1ST PLACE: Naked Lounge Tea & Coffeehouse 118 W. Second St., 895-0676 2ND PLACE: Starbucks Multiple locations 3RD PLACE: Chico Certified Farmers’ Market

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Ep di ict ok rss ’

11th Street phOtO by hOward hardee

Best grocery store sommelier

Dave Mettler at Safeway

CN&R staffERs CRowN thEiR favoRitE thiNgs iN ChiCo

720 Mangrove Ave. Safeway’s large selection of vino, from local wineries to international vintners, sometimes makes it tough for customers to choose a bottle (or, ahem, bottles). But never fear, wine steward Dave Mettler works at the Mangrove Avenue store and is the go-to guy for helping shoppers choose between that Bordeaux they’ve been eyeing or that Petite Syrah with the pretty label. Mettler’s been a Safeway employee for close to 30 years. He knows his stuff, including when something fancy has been temporarily discounted, so he’s a great resource to guide customers to what their tastebuds desire. Whether they are searching for a pricy special-occasion wine with lots of tannins or a fruity Chardonnay under $10, Mettler’s the guy to ask.

Best reason to get stoked on next summer

Return of the Chico Heat

The past few summers have been a bit boring for local baseball fans, especially those who followed the professional teams that played under the lights at Chico State’s Nettleton Stadium— first the Chico Heat, from 1997 to 2002, and then the Chico Outlaws, from 2005 to 2011. But

excitement is mounting for next June, when the Heat will return as part of a new collegiate woodbat circuit, the Great West League, which will recruit NCAA players from across the country. What’s more, the Heat will be led by Chicoan Fred Ludwig, the head coach of Pleasant Valley High School’s baseball team. Like many locals, we can’t wait for high-level baseball, hot dogs and fireworks on warm summer nights.

Best neighborhood makeover

11th Street

For years, the quiet residential block on 11th Street near Park Avenue was marred by four vacant and dilapidated houses. On top of the area being plain ugly, neighbors were plagued by nighttime disturbances from squatters, harddrug users and criminals stashing stolen goods. But residents say they’ve experienced far fewer nuisances since Habitat for Humanity of Butte County purchased and demolished two of the homes to make way for the construction of new houses for low-income families. And just down the street, at the corner of East 11th and Nelson streets, a previously vacant Queen Anne-style home has been beautifully renovated by local historian Michele Shover, who lives nearby in the yellow-and-white A.H. Chapman House. It’s all added up to a remarkable turnaround for the blighted neighborhood—though that warehouse at the corner of 11th Street and Park Avenue is still an eyesore.

Best place to get your hands dirty

Big Hot Crab

Heater the Dragon

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701 Main St., 879-1822 When was the last time you donned a bib, threw all your food out on the table and just dug in? If it’s been a while, you probably need to head on over to Big Hot Crab, where getting dirty is so regular an occurrence that they’ve installed a hand-washing station in the dining room. If that’s not enough, the food—from Dungeness crab legs and lobster tails to plump shrimp and tender mus-


Guardians Trail phOtO by jasOn cassidy

sels—is off-the-hook. It’s a great place to bring a group of friends, because then you can try a little bit of everything. Sauces range from garlic butter to traditional Cajun—spicy or mild—and all are rich and delicious. There’s also a fried menu, featuring onion rings, fries and beer-battered cod.

Best breakfast hike

Guardians Trail Upper Bidwell Park Starting from the Centennial Avenue trailhead, take Annie Bidwell Trail until it splits off. Follow Guardians Trail up the ridge until you’ve gone about 2 miles total. There you’ll find a rock outcropping over the canyon that is just begging to be picnicked upon. It’s the perfect observation platform for taking in the scope of the Big Chico Creek canyon while enjoying a morning meal, and you get the added benefit of a 4-mile round-trip hike to work off your breakfast.

Best morning greeting

Sharon Stern and Edgar Ovalle Frequent users of Lower Bidwell Park, especially those who go to the green space in the morning, may be familiar with Sharon Stern and Edgar Ovalle. The Chico couple are Park Watch volunteers who, after

their jogging and bicycling routines, spend several hours most mornings on or near a bench at Vallombrosa and Manzanita avenues. Stern and Ovalle greet park users and answer their questions about the space, keep an eye out for hazards, and do things like pick up litter. In addition to greeting hundreds of park-goers by name, they also smile and wave to the “regulars” who drive down Vallombrosa in the mornings. Their friendly greeting helps hundreds of Chicoans have a good start to their day.

Park Avenue Pub tots phOtO cOurtesy Of park ave. pub

Best way to spend the whole day jammin’

Reggae shows at Sipho’s, mon! 1228 Dayton Road, 895-1866 Every so often—maybe it’s Jamaican Independence Day, maybe it’s a random Sunday—Sipho’s transforms from a chilledout (and awesome) restaurant into a full-on reggae fest. The stage on the back patio becomes home to a string of performers, many of them professional artists, and the vibe is nothing but peace, happiness and Jah love. Sipho’s Jamaican Restaurant and Café also boasts some killer jerk chicken, curried goat and ital stew. If you’re lucky, during the show, they’ll set out a buffet of many of their specialties (for a set price) and you can sit Edgar Ovalle and Sharon Stern phOtO by brittany waterstradt

back with some great food, a Red Stripe and the chill beats of some seriously cool Jamaican bands.

Best use of the Frialator

Tots at Park Avenue Pub 2010 Park Ave., 893-3500 Let’s be real. The question—“Would you like fries or tots with that?”—is just a formality, right? The wait staff at the Park Avenue Pub in south Chico has to know that, when it comes to marrying the humble tater to hot cooking oil, the geometry of a tot, with its ridges and secret nooks, provides more opportunity for crisping and subsequent drooling and crunching than any fry could. And Park Avenue’s cooks are masters of the frialated arts—pushing the tots to the edge, to a deep-golden crispiness, and leaving the center hot and moist.

Best place for little kids of all abilities

Innovative Preschool

2404 Marigold Ave., 343-2028 Innovative Preschool’s learning environment may first appear no different from other preschools. The program is home to all sorts of fun educational toys, games and books. Scheduled curriculum and regular activities are accompanied by free time for the kids to play. But this program, nestled in classrooms at Loma Vista School, is partnered with the Chico Unified School District and offers EDITORS’ PICKS OctOber 15, 2015

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enrollment to children with and without special needs. The inclusionary model not only prepares children for elementary school, but also teaches them to celebrate each other’s differences.

Best reason to drink your breakfast

Live Life Juice Co.

www.livelifejuiceco.com A trip to the farmers’ market just isn’t complete without stopping by the Live Life Juice booth for a cold glass of fresh, raw, unpasteurized goodness. Is it a coincidence that the inspiration behind this 100 percent natural juice company was born on the beaches of Kauai? Maybe. But this business, run by three sisters, seems to have figured out a way to bottle something akin to the island life, aka heaven. Just taste their Chico Chiller (passion fruit, orange and pineapple) or Sunshine Daydream (orange, grapefruit, pineapple and ginger) and try not to smile. Yeah, we didn’t think so. Drink up!

Best ( just The Best)

Duck-fat fries at B Street Public House 117 Broadway, 899-8203 As much as we appreciate a properly deep-fried treat (see Best Use of the Frialator), this naughty appetizer is on a whole other toecurling, blood-slowing,

eyes-rolling-in-the-back-of-your-head level. As the dish’s name suggests, B Street’s chefs cook thin strips of potato in duck fat, then they toss the fries in sea salt and chives and serve them with a tangy fry sauce. The duck fat is a perfect match, adding a silky mouthfeel and richness to the crispy fries. Bring a friend, add a fancy cocktail or two, and you have the perfect night out.

Best place to stock your bug-out bag

Gates Resale

1152 Park Ave., 342-2309 Prepping for the fuzz to hit the fan is so en vogue in post-Y2K America that there are reality shows dedicated to it and Costco offers freeze-dried emergency rations by the bucket-load. Even if you don’t believe modern society’s demise is imminent due to electromagnetic pulse attacks, a zombie apocolypse or Cthulhu sliding out of the sky on a chemtrail, it’s good to follow the Boy Scout motto and “be prepared.” Survivalminded folk advocate keeping a “bug-out bag” stocked with 72 hours’ worth of necessities. The basics: clothes for all weather, water purification tablets, first-aid kit, rations, hand-to-hand and distance weapons—all of which can be conveniently found at Gates Resale. The Chico institution (family-owned since 1944) doubles as a pawn shop, so you can also pick up a sweet guitar and a machete to wander the wasteland Six String Samurai-style.

Best way to serve salmon

With a cannon

higher into the Big Chico Creek watershed to spawn. But the city’s plan to rehabilitate the ladder at a cost of $2.2 million fell through last spring, so in came local eco-firm FISHBIO and Whooshh Innovations, a company based in Bellevue, Wash., that designs and produces vacuum-powered systems to launch fish past manmade obstacles. This May, Whooshh representatives visited Chico and concluded their “cannon” could indeed help salmon clear the fish ladder—at a fraction of the cost. FISHBIO is still pushing to install the Whooshh system, and we hope it’s primed for next spring’s salmon run.

Best save

The Bookstore

Josh Mills and Muir Hughes from The Bookstore phOtO by jasOn cassidy

118 Main St., 345-7441 The community came to the rescue of downtown’s iconic used book store back in 2013, contributing the cash needed for longtime Bookstore manager Josh Mills and his wife, Muir Hughes, to purchase the beloved Chico shop. At the time, the public had no idea that the other book store downtown, Lyon Books, would be closing its doors permanently this year. The Bookstore is not only a survivor, though. The shop has blossomed during the tenure of its new owners, who hold regular poetry and prose readings, as well as other special events. It’s a true Chico fixture.

By serving salmon, we mean helping them and not, like, shooting fish filets at dinner parties. See, the damaged fish ladder in Upper Park’s Iron Canyon has long prevented migrating salmon from proceeding

Abigail and Angelina Rasmussen from Live Life Juice Co. phOtO by hOward hardee

Best unused public space

Traffic roundabout at First, Second and Flume streets The traffic roundabout in front of the CN&R office was the subject of controversy long before it was built, and deciding what to fill it with remained controversial after its 2013 completion. Someone even floated the suggestion it be decorated with the decapitated heads of city officials. Two years later, it is still filled with nothing but what appear to be used wood chips from a hamster cage. (A rogue gardener planted a tree there last year, but that’s since been removed.) We’ve heard something may be in the works, but seeing is believing and—given the space’s prominence—it seems like an ideal project to partner with one or more local nonprofits to create something uniquely Chico.

Best productive way to spend 24 hours

1day Song Club

1daysongclub.bandcamp.com Back in May, local musician Michael Bone (Bogg drummer/Pageant Dads guitarist) challenged local songwriters, both vet-

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Inday’s Filipino Food phOtO by ken smith

erans and neophytes, to write and record a song based on any interpretation of the topic “the future” in 24 hours. Seven musicians answered the challenge, and Bone compiled the songs, showcasing an interesting crosssection of the Chico music scene. Bone has repeated the process every few weeks with different topics—food, jingles, found sounds and more—and most recently completed the 1day Song Club’s 11th collaborative effort. The results are always worth a listen, usually include at least a few rough diamonds and help to unite the many factions of the Chico music scene. Not bad for a day’s work.

Best nonevent

Labor Day float Remember when a crush of students and out-of-towners would hit the Sacramento River by the thousands for a drunken float and raging party at Beer Can Beach? It often resulted in lots of unwanted groping and dozens of water rescues, paramedics transporting highly intoxicated revelers to Enloe Medical Center, or worse—like the alcohol-related drowning of 20-year-old Cal Poly San Luis Obispo student Brett Olson in 2012. But booze-fueled flotillas are a thing of the past. In 2013, the Glenn County Board of Supervisors enacted a Labor Day-weekend alcohol ban on and near the Sacramento River, and the revelry appears to have been quelled as law enforcement reported only a few hundred floaters this Labor Day. We say good riddance.

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Best bugle tune

Taps ...

… as in beer handles. As in the Chico News & Review would like to trumpet the arrival of a flood of new craft-beer taps to the local scene. We’re still bar-crawling our way through the local riches, but our highlights so far include the back bar at Madison Bear Garden, which has doubled its numbers to a whopping 40 taps; the new craft-beer-stocked Clubhouse at the Almond Orchard Round Table; and of course the 64 taps of brewed goodness at the new location of the craft beer and burger mecca, Burgers and Brew.

Best getaway without actually leaving town

Inday’s Filipino Food

1043 W. Eighth St., 520-2593 This past summer, John and Ethel Geiger opened a brick-and-mortar extension of the Inday’s Filipino Food cart, which has supplied delicious lumpia and other Filipino delights to Chico’s citizenry since 2012. When mobile eateries makes such a leap, fans generally expect some of the same flavor that hooked them in the first place, plus some expanded options, and Inday’s storefront location doesn’t disappoint. The food in this cozy, converted home is served Kamayan-style (sans silverware) and is simply fantastic, made all the more enjoyable by the attention to detail the Geigers committed to decorating the restaurant to ensure a unique cultural experience. A Friday or Saturday evening spent at Inday’s is like a brief escape to a tropical paradise. Ω

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Arts & Culture Unearthing the beast: Mastodon. From left: Braun Dailor, Troy Sanders, Bill Kelliher and Brent Hinds. PHOTO BY TRAVIS SHINN

Mammoth sound Metal heavyweights Mastodon set to obliterate Senator Theatre

THIS WEEK 15

THURS current place in the music TworldMastodon’s than guitarist Brent Hinds, wearhere’s no better metaphor for

ing a full Los Angeles Dodgers uniform, getting kicked out of last year’s Grammy by Awards for dropping a Howard Hardee fat bag of weed on the red carpet. No matter howardh@ newsrev iew.com how far Mastodon has come—even rubbing shoulders with Taylor Swift—the band is still Preview: Mastodon performs made up of four misbeThursday, Oct. 22, having metal dudes. 8:30 p.m., at the For the heavySenator Theatre. weights out of Atlanta, Intronaut opens. Tickets: $25, available it’s been a long ascenat Diamond W Western sion to becoming one Wear, Blaze N J’s, of the biggest metal www.ticketweb.com acts in the world. Since their debut album, Senator Theatre 517 Main St. 2002’s Remission, www.jmaxproduc the first in a series of tions.net loose concept albums exploring each of the four elements, they’ve drawn praise from metal critics and scruffy kids in cargo shorts alike for their cohesive records, varied influences, world-class chops and utter heaviness. But starting most notably with 2011’s The Hunter, a glossily produced record more in line with Foo Fighters than early Metallica, they’ve gravitated away from the fringes of extreme sound-making to something more palatable for the masses.

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CN&R

OCTOBER 15, 2015

Drummer Brann Dailor has been integral to that transformation. On a break between tours supporting the group’s latest album, Once More ’Round the Sun, and fall dates in support of metal icons Judas Priest, he spoke with the CN&R from his home in Atlanta in advance of Mastodon’s headlining show at the Senator Theatre on Oct. 22. Dailor began contributing back-up vocals on 2006 album Blood Mountain and has been featured more prominently on subsequent albums, even taking lead on a handful on songs. His voice just doesn’t have the capacity to growl or shriek, he said, so his singing is naturally less gruff than his bandmates’. “I think it’s better to look for some melody,� he said. “The screaming has to make sense in the song, and we realized that, album after album, we were moving away from the super-heavy stuff. ... We wanted a broader spectrum, to have different facets of our musical personalities represented in there and be part of this thing called Mastodon. As time goes on, we’ll have this really vast musical experiment.� And whereas the identity of many bands is tied to lead singers, Mastodon’s sound is characterized to a great extent by the vocal contributions of all four members. Any one of them might take the lead on a given song, but it’s still instantly recognizable as Mastodon. “We’ve been able to maintain that because it’s the same four guys making

the noise,â€? Dailor said. “There’s little we can do to alter our DNA. No matter what format it’s in, it’s going to sound like us because we have our DNA all over it. “We’re not the best singers, to be honest,â€? Dailor continued. “I don’t think that’s any big secret—we do the best with what we have. It takes all of us to get it done. We’re a band in the truest sense because we’re extremely collaborative.â€? As one might imagine, singing and drumming simultaneously poses a challenge, even for Dailor, who’s recognized by some as the most technically proficient member of the band. There are some instances where he has to pull back his drum patterns in order to focus on vocals. “I have to pick my moments,â€? he said. “Sometimes a simpler beat lends itself better to the song, anyway, so I’m not bummed out when I could be doing a lot more technically. I’m trying to serve the song, even though it seems like I’m trying to show off.â€? As for what fans can expect next from Mastodon, Dailor doesn’t foresee any break in writing, recording and touring. “We haven’t stopped in 16 years,â€? he said. “I don’t know how long we can keep it up. Everybody gets tired out there, understandably. You go on no sleep. Everyone starts crying, and then we get off tour and a few weeks later everyone is ready to go again. ²:HÂľOOJRXQWLOZHVWRS,JXHVVÂł Ć?

Special Events CHICO BEER WEEK: Three more days of beer-related fun! Check www.chicobeerweek.net for information on the weekend’s festivities. Th-Sa, 10/17-19. Presented by the Chico News & Review and Sierra Nevada Brewing Co.

Art Receptions CONTAINING SPIRIT—THE VESSEL: A reception for prints from the Turner Collection accompanied by pottery work by the late Jack Windsor. Featuring a guest curator’s talk by Michael Murphy, ceramics professor. Th, 10/15, 5:30pm. Janet Turner Print Museum, Chico State, (530) 898-4476, www.theturner.org.

Theater FUNNY GIRL: The classic musical chronicling the life of Fanny Brice, Th-Sa, 7:30pm, Su, 2pm through 11/1. $15-20. Chico Theater

Company, 166-F Eaton Rd., (530) 894-3282, www.chicotheatercompany.com.

THE ROVER: A modern retelling of the restoration-era comedy exploring issues of forced marriage, fidelity, power, and passion. Th-Sa, 7:30pm & Su, 2pm through 10/18. $6-$15. Harlen Adams Theatre, Chico State, (530) 898-6333, www.schoolof thearts-csuchico.com/calendar/index15-16x.shtml.

YOU’RE A GOOD MAN, CHARLIE BROWN: It’s a Peanuts musical

fundraiser for the CUSD Center for the Arts. Th-Sa, 7:30pm through 10/17, Su, 2pm through 10/18. $15.50-20. Center for the Arts, 1475 East Ave., (530) 899-2692.

CHICO PEACE AND JUSTICE CENTER ANNUAL DINNER Friday, Oct. 16 Chico Masonic Family Center

SEE FRIDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS


FINE ARTS YOU’RE A GOOD MAN, CHARLIE BROWN: See

Thursday. Th-Sa, 7:30pm through 10/17, Su, 2pm through 10/18. $15.50-20. Center for the Arts, 1475 East Ave., (530) 899-2692.

17

SAT

Special Events BBQ SPOOKTACULAR: Family-friendly event bene-

PARADE OF LIGHTS Saturday, Oct. 17 Downtown Chico

SEE SATURDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS

Poetry/Literature LOCAL AUTHORS NIGHT: Local authors Ken Young, Clair Blaz-Valentine, Joan Goodreau and Bob Harrison share their writing. Th, 10/15, 67:30pm. Butte County Library, Paradise Branch, 5922 Clark Rd. in Paradise, (530) 8726319, www.buttecountylibrary.org.

POETRY READING: Shared words and refresh-

ments. Third Th of every month, 6:30pm. Free. The Bookstore, 118 Main St.

16

FRI

Special Events BUTTE COUNTY CHILD ABUSE PREVENTION COUNCIL 40TH ANNIVERSARY: An evening of music and refreshments celebrating the activities the council has participated in. F, 10/16, 5:307pm. Free. Butte College Skyway Center, 2480 Notre Dame Blvd., (530) 519-4248, www.butte childabuseprevention.com.

CHICO BEER WEEK: See Thursday. Th-Sa, 10/17-19. Presented by the Chico News & Review and Sierra Nevada Brewing Co.

CHICO PEACE & JUSTICE CENTER ANNUAL DINNER: Annual fundraising dinner featuring a keynote speaker, raffles, live music and meet and greet with the board, staff and volunteers. F, 10/16, 5pm. $20-$50. Chico Masonic Family Center,

1110 W East Ave. Corner of Nord Avenue and W East Avenue, (530) 342-7143.

HAPPY TAILS MOVIE NIGHT: Pizza and move night. Reservations required. F, 10/16, 6:30-8:30pm. $10 per child, $6 per additional child. Butte Humane Society Education Center, 2156 Pillsbury Rd. Ste. 160, (530) 343-7917 ext. 133.

IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE 2015 FALL BANQUET: Women’s Resource Clinic will host Shawn Carney co-author of 40 Days for Life featuring food, client testimonies and updates about the clinic. F, 10/16, 5-8:30pm. Table: $245 (8 person table), Individual: $32. Chico State BMU, 400 West First St., (530) 897-6101, www.womens resourceclinic.org.

MUSEUM NIGHT OUT: Chico Museum will hold its annual new exhibit fundraiser featuring dinner, drinks, live and silent auctions. This year’s theme: “Under the Shanghai Moon.” F, 10/16, 5:30pm. $75. Butte Creek Country Club, 175 Estates Dr., (530) 343-7979, www.butte creekcountryclub.com.

Art Receptions OPEN STUDIOS ART TOUR RECEPTION: Reception

for annual tour of local art studios. F, 10/16, 57pm. Chico Art Center, 450 Orange St., (530) 895-8726, www.chicoartcenter.com.

OVER THE GARDEN WALL RECEPTION: New work by Christian Davila and Margaret Ramey. F, 10/16, 5-7pm. 3rd Floor Art Gallery, Bell Memorial Union, West Second St. Chico State.

fiting the foundation featuring BBQ, live music, raffles, silent auction, children’s activities and visits with the center’s wildlife. Sa, 10/17, 1-5pm. $10-$20. Barry R. Kirshner Wildlife Foundation, 4995 Durham-Pentz Rd. in Butte Valley, 5331000, www.kirshner.org.

BUTTE HUMANE SOCIETY ADOPTION EVENT: Join us the Butte Humane Society to meet and maybe adopt a new furry friend. Sa, 10/17, 11am-3pm. PetSmart, 2019 Forest Ave., (530) 961-9188.

CHICO BEER WEEK: See Thursday. Th-Sa, 10/17-19. Presented by the Chico News & Review and Sierra Nevada Brewing Co.

CHIKOKO “X”: 10-year celebration show featuring the fashion/art collective’s trademark runway performance and designs. Featuring food, drinks and a mini Chikoko museum with MONCA. Sa, 10/17, 7:30pm. $20-$25. Silver Dollar Fairgrounds, 2357 Fair St., (530) 8954666.

CHILDREN’S CHOIR OF CHICO FUNDRAISER: Pancake fundraiser featuring live performances. Sa, 10/17, 8-11am. $5-7. Bidwell Presbyterian Church, 208 W. First St., (530) 343-1484.

DRAGOPOLIS: “The future of drag” show hosted by Claudette de Versailles. All entertainers welcome to perform. Third Sa of every month, 10pm. $3. Maltese Bar & Tap Room, 1600 Park Ave., (530) 343-4915.

KILL THE KEG, DROP THE MIC: The CN&R teams up with the Goose for Chico Beer Week finale, with 8 local musical acts paired with the best beers from Beer Week. Sa, 10/19, 4pmmidnight. Winchester Goose. 800 Broadway. 895-1350.

THE ROVER: See Thursday. Th-Sa, 7:30pm, Su,

2pm. $6-$15. Harlen Adams Theatre, Chico State, (530) 898-6333, www.schooloftheartscsuchico.com/calendar/index15-16x.shtml.

YOU’RE A GOOD MAN, CHARLIE BROWN: See

Thursday. Th-Sa, 7:30pm through 10/17, Su, 2pm through 10/18. $15.50-20. Center for the Arts, 1475 East Ave., (530) 899-2692.

18

SUN

Special Events ROCK N’ SHOP: Garage sale featuring music and drinks. Su, 10/18, 3-8pm. Maltese Bar & Tap Room, 1600 Park Ave., (530) 343-4915.

TAMALE DINNER FUNDRAISER: Supporting education, art and food programs for kids in Belize and Guatemala featuring a variety of tamales, music, paintings and handmade crafts. Su, 10/18, 5:30pm. $15, $5 for children. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St., (530) 518-9992.

Theater FUNNY GIRL: See Thursday. Thu-Sa, 7:30pm, Su, 2pm through 11/1. $15-20. Chico Theater

Company, 166-F Eaton Rd., (530) 894-3282, www.chicotheatercompany.com.

THE ROVER: See Thursday. Th-Sa, 7:30pm, Su,

2pm. $6-$15. Harlen Adams Theatre, Chico State, (530) 898-6333, www.schooloftheartscsuchico.com/calendar/index15-16x.shtml.

YOU’RE A GOOD MAN, CHARLIE BROWN: See

Thursday. Th-Sa, 7:30pm through 10/17, Su, 2pm through 10/18. $15.50-20. Center for the Arts, 1475 East Ave., (530) 899-2692.

19

M, 10/19, 6-9pm. $5. Sierra Nevada Brewing Co., 1075 E. 20th St., (530) 892-4647, www.sierra nevada.com.

YOUR M.O.M. COMEDY NIGHT: Weekly open mic comedy with 20 open slots. Sign-ups at 8pm. M, 9pm through 8/29. No cover. Maltese Bar & Tap Room, 1600 Park Ave., (530) 343-4915.

20

TUES

Special Events UNIVERSITY FILM SERIES: A weekly presentation of international and domestic films. This week: The Five Obstructions (Denmark, 2003). Tu, 7:30pm. $3 donation. Ayres 106, Chico State, (530) 899-7921.

21

WED

Special Events CLIC’S SEMI-ANNUAL PASTA PALOOZA: The semiannual fundraiser for the Community Legal Information Center featuring a pasta dinner and a raffle. W, 10/21, 4-8pm. $5. Riley’s Bar and Grill, 702 W. Fifth St., (530) 898-4354.

MUSEUM WITHOUT WALLS: Special lectures

series. This week: “Caves as bat Habitat.” W through 10/28. $3. Gateway Science Museum, 625 Esplanade, www.csuchico.edu/gateway.

Theater MACBETH: Adaptation of the classic Shakespeare play. W, Th, Sa, 7:30pm through 10/24. $5-7. Pleasant Valley High School, 1475 East Ave., (530) 879-5100.

MON

Special Events CELEBRATION ALE RELEASE PARTY: Celebrate the release of this Sierra Nevada signature holiday brew with food plus live music by Bahapki.

F O R M O R E M U S I C , SEE

MAKING STRIDES OF CHICO: Breast cancer walk,

FUNNY GIRL: See Thursday. ThuSa, 7:30pm, Su, 2pm through 11/1. $15-20. Chico Theater Company, 166-F Eaton Rd., (530) 894-3282, www.chico theatercompany.com.

THE ROVER: See Thursday. ThSa, 7:30pm, Su, 2pm. $6-$15. Harlen Adams Theatre, Chico State, (530) 898-6333, www.schooloftheartscsuchico.com/calendar/ index15-16x.shtml.

ROCK N’ SHOP

Sunday, Oct. 18 Maltese Bar and Tap Room SEE SUNDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS

NIGHTLIFE O N

PAG E 5 4

fundraiser and survivor celebration. Sa, 10/17,

8:30am. Bidwell Park, Bidwell Park.

EDITOR’S PICK

PARADE OF LIGHTS: This annual Chico tradition

Theater

ON PAGE 51

features cars, trucks and floats decorated with lights. This year’s theme: “At the Movies.” Sa, 10/17, 7:30pm. Downtown Chico.

YOU KNOW YOU’RE FROM CHICO WHEN…: Celebration of Chico for locals and newcomers alike featuring live music, arts and crafts, food and vendors. Sa, 10/17, 1-10pm. Chico City Plaza, downtown Chico.

Theater FUNNY GIRL: See Thursday. Thu-Sa, 7:30pm, Su, 2pm through 11/1. $15-20. Chico Theater Company, 166-F Eaton Rd., (530) 894-3282, www.chicotheatercompany.com.

FREE LISTINGS! Post your event for free online at www.newsreview.com/calendar, or email the CN&R calendar assistant at cnrcalendar@newsreview.com. Deadline for print listings is one week prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

DECADE OF DECADENCE Surrealist art/fashion collective Chikoko came screaming out of the ether 10 years ago, and the ladies are celebrating a decade of blowing minds in our little berg with their latest production, titled simply “X.” This year’s extravaganza will feature the usual catwalking and funky live performances, as well as a mini Chikoko museum curated by MONCA. It all goes down Saturday, Oct. 17, at the Silver Dollar Fairgrounds.

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501 Main St. Chico • 1080 Humboldt Ave., Chico Art 3RD FLOOR ART GALLERY: Over The Garden Wall, new work by Christian Davila and Margaret Ramey. Through 10/26. Bell Memorial Union, West Second St. Chico State.

B-SO SPACE: Intermediate/Advanced Life

Drawing, class exhibition. Through 10/16. Free. Ayres 107, Chico State, (530) 898-5331.

BUTTE COLLEGE ART GALLERY: The Edge of Night, black and white photographs by Jason Tannen, inspired by the dark world of film noir. Through 10/22, 4-6pm. 3536 Butte Campus Dr. in Oroville, (530) 895-2208.

CHICO ART CENTER: Open Studios Art Tour, Chico Art Center’s annual tour of local art studios takes place the weekends of Oct. 17-18 and Oct. 24-25, and over the course of the whole month of October the center will host a group show featuring the tour’s artists. Contact gallery for art-walk map. Through 10/31. 450 Orange St., (530) 895-8726, www.chicoart center.com.

ELLIS ART & ENGINEERING SUPPLIES: New

Landscape Paintings by Lea Gadbois, series of Impressionist landscape paintings by local artist Lea Gadbois. Through 10/31, 9am-9pm. 122 Broadway St., (530) 891-0335, www.ellis hasit.com.

GREAT NORTHERN COFFEE: Jesse Smith Art Show, sketches of historical Chico and California landmarks and buildings. Through 10/31. 434 Orange St., (530) 895-8726.

JANET TURNER PRINT MUSEUM: Containing Spirit: The Vessel, prints from the Turner Collection accompanied by pottery work by the late Jack Windsor. Through 10/24. Chico State, (530) 8984476, www.theturner.org.

SALLY DIMAS ART GALLERY: Hanging Out, artists Betty Benson’s birds and K.W. Moore Sr.’s bridges. Ongoing. 493 East Ave., (530) 345-3063.

UNIVERSITY ART GALLERY: Art Exhibit: In Process, October 19th-October 23rd (9am-5pm).

Now Serving Breakfast Weekdays • Open Daily 5:30am–7pm • Free Wi-Fi with purchase • 530.332.9645 • hasbeanscoffee.com Reception: Thursday, October 22 from 5-7 p.m. M, 10/19, 9am-5pm. Free and open to the public. Trinity Hall Chico State, (530) 898-5864.

Museums CHICO CREEK NATURE CENTER: Banding by Day

and Night, a close look at birds in hand with incredible detail. Ongoing. $2-$4. 1968 E. Eighth St., (530) 891-4671, www.bidwellpark.org.

CHICO MUSEUM: Mik cupu Dy: This is Our Home,

Here We Remain, presented from the perspective of the Mechoopda people, focusing on the tribe’s heritage and history and using the four seasons to delineate periods of happiness, success and tragedy. Ongoing. 141 Salem St., (530) 891-4336, www.chicomuseum.org.

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GATEWAY SCIENCE MUSEUM: Modern Farming -

Land, Water, People, and Science, explore North State agriculture. Patterns of The Land, a display of quiet and pastoral agriculture images of the Sacramento Valley. Masters of the Night, hands-on exhibit exploring bats through photos, models and interactive pieces. 625 Esplanade, www.csuchico.edu/ gateway.

MONCA POP UP MUSEUM: MONCA Pop Up show, Museum of Northern California Art’s latest pop up show featuring a look how how communities enage with autism, blindness and the physically & mentally challenged Through 10/31, 12-6pm. Free. Contact Pat Macias (530) 891-4304, trudyduisenberg@yahoo.com, www.monca.org/events for details on this exhibit. 215 Main St., (530) 343-8980.

PARADISE DEPOT MUSEUM: A railroad and logging museum in Paradise. Ongoing, 7-9pm. 5570 Black Olive Dr. in Paradise, (530) 877-1919.

PATRICK RANCH MUSEUM: Autumn Fest: Pumpkin patch, hay rides, children’s activities, almond exhibit, Glenwood House tours. Through 10/25, 9am-4pm. $5. Patrick Ranch Museum, 10381 Midway, (530) 342-4359.

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MUSIC Dave Rawlings and Gillian Welch. PHOTO BY HENRY DILTZ

Ghosts in the machine

Preview:

Dave Rawlings and crew keep sounds of old Nashville alive

TNashville Rawlings Machine album, Obsolete, might seem he title of the new Dave

like a commentary on country music old and by new and what Alan Sculley qualifies as Nashville music these days. After Dave Rawlings all, the band’s Machine performs Tuesday, Oct. 20, traditional folk/ 7:30 p.m., at Paradise bluegrass-based Performing Arts brand of country Center. could be considTickets: $32.50/ advance; $35/door ered an endan(Ticketmaster outlets, gered species or by phone: in today’s slick 800-745-3000) pop-rock/newcountry era. But Paradise Performing Arts Center Rawlings, who 777 Nunneley Road, is also known as Paradise the songwriting 872-8454 partner and guitarist for Gillian Welch, said he wasn’t making any kind of serious statement with the album title, noting that any views on his sound and current music are a very small part of a title with multiple meanings. “I like the way the word ‘obsolete’ rings with the word ‘machine’” he said in a recent phone interview as he prepared to hit the road for a tour that will be making a stop at the Paradise Performing Arts Center on Tuesday (Oct. 20). “That’s a big part of it for me,” he added. “The phrase ‘Nashville obsolete’ came into our world because [Welch and I] have this basement at the recording studio that we own. We’re always talk-

ing about, ‘We should have a store there that sold things that nobody needed anymore and we should call it Nashville Obsolete. And we’ll sell Beta tapes and typewriter ribbons, buggy whips and retaining clips for EMT plate reverb.’ So much of the recording gear we work on, so many of the microphones, the audio tape, it’s all obsolete. “And it’s a little bit poking fun at ourselves for being around for so long,” Rawlings added. “We kind of feel like we’re from Nashville and we’re obsolete.” And despite being only seven tracks long, Nashville Obsolete is full and musically rich. It opens with a bit of a stylistic change-up in “The Weekend.” Though still largely acoustic, it has a popleaning vocal melody, complete with a “whoa-whoa-whoa” bit. “Short Haired Woman Blues” follows, and echoes a bit of “The House of the Rising Sun” before strings enter the picture and give the song a lovely melodic dimension. Other songs, such as “The Trip” (a Bob Dylan-esque track that clocks in at an epic 10:56), “Candy,” “The Last Pharoah” and “Pilgrim (You Can’t Go Home)” are more austere and faithful to the group’s old-time folk tradition. The Dave Rawlings Machine started to take shape a couple of years or so before the 2009 release of its debut album, A Friend of a Friend, after Rawlings and Welch began to like the way his voice had taken on a softer tone when he sang

lead on songs that seemed better suited to a male vocal. He and Welch decided it would be awkward to try to mix a segment where Rawlings took center stage during Welch’s solo shows. Fans were coming, after all, to hear Welch sing. So, the idea of forming the Machine as its own entity took shape. The presence of Welch as both a co-writer with Rawlings and as a musician in the Machine points to the fact that Rawlings doesn’t see a big difference between the music in the Machine repertoire and their solo work. In the end, both of the duo’s projects are an extension of the kind of songs Rawlings and Welch have written since they met as students at Berklee College of Music in Boston about 25 years ago. Joining Rawlings and Welch for the tour are the core musicians who played on the new album— bassist Paul Kowert (of the Punch Brothers), guitarist/backing vocalist Willie Watson (formerly of Old Crow Medicine Show) and fiddle player Brittany Haas. And for the live shows, everyone’s material is brought to the stage. “All of the Machine shows, we play some Gillian songs,” Rawlings said. “When Willie Watson is out there, he has usually done a number or two as well. And we’ll have those two Machine albums, and then there’s a vast library of shared folk and traditional material that we all kind of know. A lot of that stuff ends up working itself into the shows.” □

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CN&R

53


NIGHTLIFE

THURSDAY 10/15—WEDNESDAY 10/21

THERE WILL BE BLOOD ZODIAC DEATH VALLEY Friday, Oct. 16 Maltese Bar & Tap Room SEE FRIDAY

OPEN MIC: Singers, poets

15THURSDAY

FISTER: St. Louis-based doom metal. Plus locals Teeth (crazy metal), Shadow Limb (heavy) and Panther Surprise (psych-grunge). Th, 10/15, 7:30pm. 1078 Gallery, 820 Broadway, (530) 343-1973, www.1078gallery.org.

AARON RICH & FRIENDS: Country music round-robin. Third and First Th of every month, 9pm. Free. Crazy Horse Saloon, 303 Main St., (530) 894-5408.

THE BLOODTYPES: Th, 10/15, 8pm. $7. Monstros Pizza & Subs, 628 W. Sacramento Ave., (530) 345-7672.

CHICO JAZZ COLLECTIVE: Thursday jazz.

and musicians welcome. Th, 7-10pm. Has Beans Internet Cafe & Galleria, 501 Main St., (530) 8943033, www.has beans.com.

JOHN SEID, LARRY PETERSON, BOB LITTELL: Playing an eclectic mix of music. Th, 10/15, 6:30-9:30pm. Grana, 198 E.

Second St., (530) 809-2304.

ME AND JULIO: Weekly live salsa, calypso,

Th, 8-11pm. Free. The DownLo, 319 Main St., (530) 892-2473.

Hawaiian Afro-Cuban music. Th, 6:30pm. Farm Star Pizza, 2359 Esplanade, (530) 343-2056, www.farm starpizza.com.

16FRIDAY

BASSMINT: A weekly electronic dance party with a rotating cast of local and regional DJs. Check with venue for details. F, 9:30pm. Peking Chinese Restaurant, 243 W. Second St., (530) 895-3888.

FRIDAY MORNING JAZZ: A weekly morning jazz appointment with experimental

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JORMA KAUKONEN

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Solo Performance

“What he played did as much to form my music as writing those songs”. -Jackson Browne SHOW 7:30

“Though he’s ensured his place in the rock firmament as a member of both Jefferson Airplane and its bluesy offshoot, Hot Tuna, guitarist Jorma Kaukonen continues to embrace his role as a musical journeyman.” — Goldmine SHOW 7:30 (DOORS 6:30)

(DOORS 6:30)

SAT. OCT. 24

SHOOK TWINS

“I love the harmonies, the dreamlike songs that seem somehow permeated by the American Folk tradition, without actually being part of it. – Neil Gaiman, New York Times – Best-Selling Author

THURS. NOV. 5

TALL HEIGHTS

The duo’s harmony-heavy indie folk has taken Tall Heights from the marketplaces of Massachusetts to stages across the country. They’ve toured America and earned a spot on the same folk family tree as Simon & Garfunkel and Bon Iver.

SUN. NOV. 15 - TWO SHOWS!

SHOW 7:30 (DOORS 6:30)

Ticket Outlets: Chico Paper Co., Diamond W Western Wear, Herreid Music, The Music Connection. For more information 530 345-8136 • www.chicotickets.com 54

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If you’re looking for some mid-October thrills, follow the trail of fake blood to Monstros Pizza and Subs on Thursday, Oct. 15, to check out Portland-based new wave punk act The Bloodtypes. The band members—who dress like medical personnel and leave a wake of sanguine fluid wherever they go—will play with locals Severance Package, The Miscreants and The Empty Gate.

local troupe Bogg. F, 11am. Free. Café Coda, 265 Humboldt Ave., (530) 5669476, www.cafecoda.com.

HARLOWE & GREEN HILLS ALONE: An early evening show at the Maltese with a couple of Portland-based crews joined by local singer/songwriters Pat Hull and Zach Zeller. F, 10/16, 4:30pm. $7. Maltese Bar & Tap Room, 1600 Park Ave., (530) 343-4915.

IRISH-MUSIC HAPPY HOUR: A Chico tradition: Friday night happy hour with traditional Irish music by the Pub Scouts. F, 4pm. $1. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St., (530) 343-7718.

JOHN SEID, LARRY PETERSON, ERIC PETER: Live music. F, 10/16, 7-10pm. Two-Twenty Restaurant/Lounge, 220 W. Fourth St., (530) 895-1515, http://twotwentyrestaurant.com.

THIRST, THE RED BLUE JEANS, AND BRAD PETERSEN & FRIENDS: Live music. F, 10/16, 8pm. The Tackle Box Bar & Grill,

379 East Park Ave., (530) 345-7499, http://tackleboxchico.com.

ZODIAC DEATH VALLEY: Second show of the night at Maltese with sych-rock from San Francisco. Plus, Viking Skate Country (local noise-pop), Noise-ATron (Seattle experimental, noise-rock


NIGHTLIFE

THIS WEEK: FIND MORE ENTERTAINMENT AND SPECIAL EVENTS ON PAGE 48

19MONDAY

YOUR M.O.M. COMEDY NIGHT: Weekly open

FISTER

Thursday, Oct. 15 1078 Gallery SEE THURSDAY

mic comedy with 20 open slots. Signups at 8pm. M, 9pm through 8/29. No cover. Maltese Bar & Tap Room, 1600 Park Ave., (530) 343-4915.

20TUESDAY

BLUES NIGHT: Live blues music from local WESTBOUND 50: Live country.

Sa, 10/17, 9pm. Free. Rolling Hills Casino, 2655 Barham Ave. in Corning, (530) 528-3500, www.rollinghillscasino.com.

duo) and E.E. (local electronic/experimental). F, 10/16, 9pm. $7. Maltese Bar & Tap Room, 1600 Park Ave., (530) 3434915.

17SATURDAY

Casino Brewing Co., 3 Alverda Dr. in

THE KITES: Original and classic pop rock with Tom Blodget, Shawn Lavin and Zach Cowan. Sa, 10/17, 7-9pm. No cover. Wine Time, 26 Lost Dutchman Dr., (530) 345-1982, www.winetimechico.com.

JOHN SEID AND LARRY PETERSON: Live

music. Su, 10/18, 6-9pm. 5th Street Steakhouse, 345 W. Fifth St., (530) 8916328, www.5thstreetsteakhouse.com.

MUSIC SHOWCASE: An open mic hosted

BLACKOUT BETTY: High-energy rock. Sa, 10/17, 8:30pm. Free. Feather Falls

18SUNDAY

Oroville, (530) 533-3885, www.feather fallscasino.com/brewing-co.

by local country musicians Rich and Kendall. Sa, 5-9pm. Free. Scotty’s Landing, 12609 River Rd., (530) 7102020.

EMAIL YOUR LISTINGS TO

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musicians. Tu. Italian Garden, 6929 Skyway in Paradise, (530) 876-9988, www.myspace.com/theitaliangarden.

WEEKLY JAZZ: Carey Robinson and friends play an eclectic mix of jazz standards. W, 6:30-8:30pm. Farm Star Pizza, 2359 Esplanade, (530) 343-2056, www.farmstarpizza.com.

BARROOM BRASS BAND

Tubaluba may hail from Seattle, but its spiritual homeland is the streets of New Orleans. The band is equal parts circus and second line and is sure to get folks shaking and grooving when it swings through The DownLo on Wednesday, Oct. 21.

21WEDNESDAY

FULL HOUSE BLUES JAM WITH THE GROWLERS: Open sign ups. W, 10/21,

7:30pm. Feather Falls Casino Brewing Co., 3 Alverda Dr. in Oroville, (530) 5333885, www.featherfallscasino.com/ brewing-co.

PIANO NIGHT: Live piano music. W. Italian Garden, 6929 Skyway in Paradise, (530) 876-9988, wwwmyspace.com/theitaliangarden.

TUBALUBA: W, 10/21, 8:30pm. Free. The DownLo, 319 Main St., (530) 892-2473.

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best local winery

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War born

A portrait of two souls wounded by WWII

Pan extraordinarily (Return from the Ashes by Hubert Monteilhet), is nuanced psychodrama about survihoenix, a German film based on a French novel

vors of World War II and the Holocaust. Historical and social implications are unavoidably a big part of it, but the speby cial brilliance of this film by the Juan-Carlos esteemed Christian Petzold (Yella, Selznick Jerichow, Barbara) is in its unusually complex and sensitive characterizations. The setting is Berlin in the immediate aftermath of World War II. Nelly Lenz (an excellent Nina Hoss), returning from a concentraPhoenix tion camp and recovering from disOpens Friday, Oct. 16. figuring facial wounds, ventures out Starring Nina Hoss into the ruins of the city in search and ronald Zehrfeld. Directed by christian of remnants of her prewar life as a Petzold. Pageant singer and newlywed. theatre. rated PG-13. Plastic surgery has restored a semblance of her previous good looks, but she finds herself going unrecognized. And her fragile sense of her own identity becomes especially dramatic and aggravated when she begins looking for Johnny (Ronald Zehrfeld), the husband from whom she was separated by the war and Nazi detention. The two-person psychodrama that plays out in the movie’s film noir-like atmosphere comes to a suspenseful boiling point when Johnny fails to recognize Nelly (he believes she died in the war), but sees enough of a resemblance to think she could credibly claim to be Nelly in order to collect a family inheritance. The complexly emotional interplay of these two

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as they struggle to play out Johnny’s scheme brings forth a small but remarkable multitude of illusions, delusions, self-doubts and self-deceptions in both characters. The net result is an extraordinary dual portrait of two hard-pressed people whose contrasting selves are both wounded and wounding. □

Up in the air

4

The Walk cinemark 14, Feather river cinemas and Paradise cinema 7. rated PG.

by Juan-Carlos Selznick

The Walk tells the story of Philippe Petit’s astounding 1974 high-wire walk between the Twin Towers of the World Trade Center and treats it as as a highenergy combination of caper film, performance art and inspired daring-do. With Robert Zemeckis (Back to the Future) directing and the preternaturally pixilated Joseph GordonLevitt playing Petit, the result is a very engaging action-movie/biopic entertainment, with vivid layers of cliffhanger suspense (both physical and spiritual) that captivate even though the full story is already well-known. That story has already been told on film in James Marsh’s superb 2008 documentary, Man on Wire. Marsh’s film, like The Walk, is based on Petit’s memoir, To Reach the Clouds, and it remains the more essential of the two. But Zemeckis’ film does surpass Marsh’s in one crucial respect—the richly detailed attention it devotes to “the walk” itself. Some first-rate CGI is of course a big part of that, but Zemeckis and company present Petit’s great wire-walk in terms that are both spectacular and intimate, both credible and wonderful. GordonLevitt’s profoundly nimble performance is a key ingredient in all that. Ben Kingsley does some nice supporting work REEL WORLD c O N t i N U e D

O N Pa G e 5 9


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f r O m pa g e 5 6

as “Papa Rudy,” Petit’s mentor in wire-walking and public performance. Charlotte Le Bon, James Badge Dale, Clément

Sibony, César Domboy and Steve Valentine all serve well as Petit’s motley crew of volunteer aides and “co-conspirators.” □

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Opening this week Apu Trilogy: Aparajito (1956)

The Pageant continues its Cinematheque Presents repertory film series with a showing of the Apu Trilogy, three landmark works of Indian cinema that will be shown over the next three weekends. Up next, film two in the series, Aparajito. Pageant Theatre. Not rated.

Bridge of Spies

Based on real-life events, this historical thriller by Stephen Spielberg tells the story of an American lawyer (played by Tom Hanks) whom the U.S. government sent in 1962 to negotiate for the exchange of a U.S. spy pilot shot down over the Soviet Union. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

This Changes Everything

Inspired by Naomi Klein’s bestselling book of the same name, this documentary travels the world and visits communities on the front lines of environmental catastrophe to hopefully inspire radical, systematic changes that might save the planet. One night only: Tuesday, Oct. 20. Pageant Theatre. Not rated.

Crimson Peak

Guillermo del Tro (Pan’s Labyrinth, Pacific Rim) co-wrote and directed this ultimate haunted house story. Starring Mia Wasikowska, Tom Hiddleston and Jessica Chastain. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated R.

Goosebumps

R.L. Stine’s kids horror series gets the bigscreen treatment with Jack Black starring as the horror writer whose characters get inadvertently set loose on the real world. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG.

4

Phoenix

See review this issue. Pageant Theatre. Rated PG-13 —J.C.S.

The Shining (1980)

For October, the Pageant’s Late Show series will feature a different classic horror flick every week, along with classic horror trailers and a bar catered by KZFR. This week, Saturday, Oct. 17, at 10 p.m. (film starts at 11 p.m.): The Shining. Rated R. Pageant Theatre.

Woodlawn

A Christian faith-based film based on the true story of an Alabama high-school football team that turns to the teachings of Jesus to combat racial tensions in the community after desegregation in the early 1970s. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG.

Now playing Hotel Transylvania 2

All the familiar voices (Adam Sandler, Andy Samberg, Selena Gomez, etc.) from the first installment in the 3-D animated franchise are back at the hotel—which now welcomes humans—where a young half-vampire needs help summoning his inner monster. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG.

The Intern

Thanks to a program designed to bring

seniors back into the workplace, a retired widower (Robert De Niro) gets a job as an intern for a busy fashion CEO (Anne Hathaway). Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG.

4

The Martian

Botanist/astronaut Mark Watney (Matt Damon) is stranded on Mars after a hurricane of space debris forces his fellow crew members, who believe he’s been killed, to return to Earth without him. That sets up a kind of space-age Robinson Crusoe story for Watney, who must find ways to survive in a place where nothing grows, while also trying to cobble together the means of communication and travel from the scavenged remnants of technology. And the realization that Watney is still alive pushes Mission Control (and, eventually, the crew on the ship headed back to Earth) into some rapidly evolving scenarios of high-pressure risk-taking in science and technology. If that sounds overly technical, rest assured that The Martian frequently pairs its scientific seriousness with the rambunctiousness of some of its characters. The stranded Watney’s early declaration—“I’m gonna science the shit out of this!”—is emblematic of the film and its determination to put an audience-friendly spin on its science and its fiction. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated R —J.C.S.

Maze Runner: The Scorch Trials

CLASSIC ALBUMS OF THE GOLDEN AGE OF COMEDY

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aPaRajITO (THE uNvaNquISHEd) SaTuRday 3Pm, SuNday 7Pm

Located inside MCM Vintage at 260 E. 1st St. in Chico 899-8443

THE SHININg (1980) SaTuRday dOORS 10Pm / FIlm 11Pm

THIS CHaNgES EvERyTHINg TuESday 6Pm aNd 8:15Pm

Call 343-0663 or visit www.PageantChico.com

ChiCo AreA interfAith CounCil 59th annual dinner Thursday October 22 • 5 – 8:30 PM

First Christian Church • 295 E. Washington Ave., Chico 6-course vegetarian Arabic dinner by Ali Sarsour

“Violence in the Community: A time for Change, A Call for Action” led by Pastor Jim Peck, new Vision united Church of Christ Panelists: Chief Michael O’Brien, Chico Police Department, Scott Howard, KHSL TV Kelly Staley, CUSD Superintendent tiCKetS $15 Available at the door

Installment No. 2 in the film series based on James Dashner’s young-adult sci-fi novels picks up where the previous left off, with the young maze runners now tasked with maneuvering the dangerous obstacles of a desolate desert landscape of a dystopian future. Cinemark 14 and Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

Pan

A British/American fantasy/adventure flick that tells the origin story of young Peter Pan and Captain Hook. Starring Hugh Jackman, Garrett Hedlund, Rooney Mara and young Levi Miller as Pan. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG.

4

Sicario

Sicario’s subject matter (the interagency “war on drugs” in Juárez/El Paso) is topical and grim, but director Denis Villeneuve and first-time screenwriter Taylor Sheridan give an account of it that is uncommonly rich in character and ferociously alert to moral complexities. Emily Blunt plays a tightly wound FBI agent who is enlisted to work with a task force led by an amiably gonzo government “contractor” (Josh Brolin). That puts her alongside the shady-looking Alejandro (Benicio Del Toro), a task-force participant whose motives and allegiances are one of the story’s more convoluted puzzles. Ace cinematographer Roger Deakins does great work with the story’s terrain, the desert topography as well as the social landscape. And Jóhann Johannsson’s growling electronic score is integral at every level. Sheridan’s script is at its best when it’s setting up the characters’ moral quandaries, but the dramatic overload in the later portions seems to leave the characters stranded somewhere between moral insight and emotional closure. Cinemark 14 and Feather River Cinemas. Rated R —J.C.S.

4

The Walk

FRIDAY 10/16 – WEDNESDAY 10/21 Bridge of SpieS (Digital) (PG-13) 12:30PM 3:45PM 7:00PM 10:15PM CrimSon peak (Digital) (R) 11:00AM 1:50PM 4:40PM 7:30PM 10:30PM gooSeBumpS (3D) (PG) 12:20PM 3:00PM 5:35PM 8:30PM gooSeBumpS (Digital) (PG) 11:05AM 1:45PM 4:25PM 7:05PM 9:45PM He named me malala (Digital) (PG-13) 2:10PM 7:25PM♣♠ Hotel tranSylvania 2 (3D) (PG) 12:00PM♦ 2:25PM♦♠ 4:50PM♠ Hotel tranSylvania 2 (Digital) (PG) 1:00PM 3:20PM 5:40PM 8:00PM 10:20PM intern, tHe (Digital) (PG-13) 1:10PM 4:05PM 6:55PM 10:00PM martian, tHe (3D) (PG-13) 3:50PM♥ 7:00PM♥ 8:10PM♣♠ 10:10PM♥ martian, tHe (Digital) (PG-13) 11:10AM 2:30PM 5:45PM 9:10PM martian, tHe (XD-3D) (PG-13) 12:40PM 3:50PM♠ 7:00PM♠ 10:10PM♠

maze runner: tHe SCorCH trialS (Digital) (PG-13) 12:50PM 4:00PM 7:05PM 10:15PM pan (3D) (PG) 1:40PM 7:15PM pan (Digital) (PG) 11:00AM 4:20PM 9:55PM SiCario (Digital) (R) 1:20PM 4:15PM 7:20PM 10:25PM Walk, tHe (Digital) (PG) 11:15AM 4:30PM♠ 9:50PM♠ WoodlaWn (Digital) (PG) 1:15PM 4:10PM 7:10PM 10:05PM (SpeCial SHoWing) - met opera: otello (Digital) (NR) Sat. 10/17 @ 9:55AM & Wed. 10/21 @ 6:30PM (SpeCial SHoWing) - roger WaterS tHe Wall enCore (Digital) (R) Sun. 10/18 @ 12:55PM (SpeCial SHoWing) - andre rieu’S 2015 maaStriCHt ConCert (Digital) (G) Tues. 10/20 @ 7:00PM (SpeCial SHoWing) - attaCk on titan: end of tHe World (Digital) (NR) Tues. 10/20 @ 7:30PM (SpeCial SHoWing) - BaCk to tHe future triple feature (XD-3D) (PG) Wed. 10/21 @ 4:30PM

Showtimes listed w/♦ NOT shown Sat. 10/17 or Sun. 10/18 Showtimes listed w/♣ NOT shown Tues. 10/20 Showtimes listed w/♠ NOT shown Wed. 10/21 Showtimes listed w/♥ shown Wed. 10/21 ONLY

See review this issue. Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG —J.C.S.

OctOber 15, 2015

  CN&R 

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raise your glasses Reviving the art of the toast

season, there will surely be W glasses raised above Thanksgiving ith the upcoming holiday

tables and champagne flutes in the air for the New by Year. Yet, even Matthew with traditional Craggs special occasions, not to mention among the hipsters and barflies of our speakeasies and lounges, the toast has been reduced to mere reflex. Reverently delivered poetry, clever pun-making and grand statements on the human condition have been replaced with a thoughtless “Cheers!”or a quick, “Raise a glass” and a “Hear, hear!” Some suggest that the clinking of glasses during a toast was invented in order to include sound in the drinking experience, thus satisfying all five senses. Others— mainly Klingons—believe the sloshing of liquids between clinked glasses will spread any poison from unknown assassins, assured mutual destruction. Whatever the origin, toasts have probably been around as long as alcohol and are human ritual at its best. Exemplifying and often speaking directly to the human condition, a toast makes a meal out of food. It’s what separates us from the animals. Scandinavian warriors of old drank from the emptied skull of a fallen enemy (hence the toast “skal”—pronounced “scoal”), while ancient Greeks, those

wonderful lushes, drank to the gods and anything else in their field of vision. As Rome was collapsing, the English championed the idea of drinking to one’s health with a cry of the phrase “wæs hæl,” roughly “be well.” Over nearly 1,000 years of use, this phrase evolved into “wassail” around some heavy cider drinking and visiting of one’s neighbors, and eventually became associated with Christmas, morphing into the holiday caroling we do today. When American colonists got hold of toasting, they took up where the Greeks left off, using any excuse—especially a jab at the crown—to raise a glass. At one time, toasts became associated with drunkenness and incivility so much that English toastmaster J. Roach felt the need to clean up its image with what some say is the original book on the subject, The Royal Toastmaster, published in 1791. In the book, he describes the role of the toast “as a stimulative to hilarity, and an incentive to innocent mirth, to loyal truth, to pure morality and to mutual affection.” Roach’s lofty, though inspiring, description—along with published examples of great toasts—helped revive the toast’s popularity before Americans lost interest amid the Great Depression and Prohibition. Casablanca’s (1942) “Here’s looking at you, kid,” is arguably the art’s high-water mark before the

toast fell out of favor in America, languishing for the past 80 years. Being such a great tool for communal engagement, as well as such an integral part of the history of a drinking culture that is on the rise again, the time would seem ripe for thoughtful, artful public toasts to make a comeback. Roach believed a good toast could “revive languid conversation … cool the heat of resentment, and blunt the edge of animosity.” Doesn’t that, along with a stiff drink, sound like what the world needs right now? So when the toast comes around this holiday season, let’s invite it to stay for another drink. Let us make amends for the sloppy best man and penetrate the shallow surface of barroom Instagram selfies, and speak poetically and with sincerity to thirsty brethren, united under raised glasses as citizens of the world. Let’s drink to family and friends, gathered around a table. To fallen warriors. To landing a dream job. To getting over that cheating asshole—drink up! To feeling nothing and to feeling everything. To leaving town—and never coming back. Let’s drink to the lost weekend you’ll never remember with the friends you’ll never forget. My friends are the best friends, loyal, willing and able. Now let’s get to drinking! All glasses off the table!— traditional Irish toast. □


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IN THE MIX

BECAUSE WE’RE

Outskirts of Love

THE BEST OF

Shemekia Copeland

THE BEST OF

Alligator records With Outskirts of Love, the seventh album of her career, Shemekia Copeland—the daughter of the late Johnny “The Texas Twister” Copeland—continues to forge the path she began 20 years ago when, at the age of 16, she joined her father’s band. Tough times abound in this powerhouse collection of songs. The title track describes a woman at a bus stop “in a wedding gown carrying a suitcase bound up with string/it was all she had after pawning her wedding ring.” “Cardboard Box” deals with homelessness. On “Devil’s Hand,” written by her father, she tells of playing cards with the devil: “Don’t you know you’re playing a losing hand?” “Drivin’ Out of Nashville” (“with a body in the trunk”) is a bouncy tale of retribution. But there is hope as evidenced by Jessie Mae Hemphill’s “Lord, Help the Poor and Needy.” Among her guests is Billy Gibbons, who joins her for the ZZ Top hit “Jesus Just Left Chicago.”

THE BEST

GIFT SHOP SIR! OUT OF THIS WORLD GLASS ART

CHICO VALLEY GALLERY

MUSIC

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Leaving Berlin Joseph Kanon Atria books This gripping novel is set in postwar East Berlin in 1949, at the time of the fabled airlift and increasing Cold War hostility between the Soviet Union and the United States, France and Britain. Into this volatile scene comes Alex Meier, a young Jewish writer who fled the Nazis in the early 1930s for America, where he married, had a son and wrote a best-selling novel based on his childhood. Facing deportation and the loss of his family when he refuses to cooperate with a congressional witch hunt, he strikes a deal with the CIA: Let me earn my way back into the country by spying on the East Germans and Soviets. No sooner has he arrived, however, than things start getting weird, the deaths start piling up like cordwood, and Meier finds himself in mortal danger. Leaving Berlin is brilliantly plotted, and Kanon’s atmospheric depiction of postwar Berlin is remarkable. Kanon is one of our best writers of spy thrillers, and this is one of his very best novels.

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—Robert Speer

Descender Volume 1: Tin Stars Jeff Lemire and Dustin Nguyen Image comics When TIM-21, a young robot programmed as a child’s companion, awakens in a world where a quelled robotic uprising has resulted in the outlawing and subsequent hunting down of robotic life, TIM-21 must find his place in a universe that fears and hates his kind. In Descender, writer Jeff Lemire and artist Dustin Nguyen have created a lively update on the Pinocchio character. Lemire’s stories have traditionally taken the emotions and events of one person’s life and played them against the cosmos’ mysterious ways and Descender is no exception. In this six-issue collection, Lemire fills the universe with characters—some human, some not—exploring and exposing their humanity in both beautiful and disgusting manners. Nguyen’s art is exceptional, particularly when evoking life from TIM-21. The simple panels that open the fourth issue have TIM-21’s expressions bursting with life—creating a protagonist at odds between his hardy hardwiring and all the insecurities and vulnerabilities of a young child. Even before Lemire’s story makes it clear that TIM-21 is special, readers form a connection to him that’s all too human.

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we want to read them. The annual Fiction 59 contest is back. Submit your 59-word stories to the Chico News & Review today for the chance to have your work published in the CN&R’s annual Fiction 59 issue on Nov. 12. Online and email entries preferred. Visit www.newsreview.com/ fiction59 to submit, or email stories to fiction@newsreview.com. Please specify age and division: adults; high-school (grades 9-12); juniorhigh (grades 6-8); kids (5th grade and under). Under-18 entries, please specify age. You can also drop off or mail your entries to the Chico News & Review office at 353 E. Second St., Chico, CA, 95928. Deadline for submission is Tuesday, Oct. 27, at 5 p.m.

—Matthew Craggs OctOber 15, 2015

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ARTS DEVO by Jason Cassidy • jasonc@newsreview.com

for

best fun time with art arts dEVo isn’t playing favorites when he says

that the annual open studios art Tour is the best visual arts event of the year. You can’t really top having more than 60 local artists fill up their studios with art and invite everyone over for private art shows over the course of two weekends in October: Oct. 17-18 & 24-25, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. I am really looking forward to stops No. 7 (Jana and dave Lawton’s art House) and No. 1 (where Katharine sherman will demo painting and drawing at Chico art Center). Presented by Chico Art Center, this is the 27th edition of the epic art walk/ride/drive, and this Friday, Oct. 16, 5-7 p.m., there will be a kick-off reception at the center, where sample pieces from many participating artists are on display and where you can purchase tour guides for $10.

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who had been part of an audience of “20 or 25” in attendance at the Pageant Theatre for a recent screening of Panther Panchali, the first installment of the much-celebrated apu Trilogy by Indian director satyajit Ray. The letter suggested that we’d missed an opportunity to let people know ahead of time that the Pageant was showing the seminal film. We actually did announce the screening with a short description in last week’s issue, but the writer has a point when he says there are likely many people around here who haven’t heard of the 60-year-old film and that it’d be worthwhile to fill them in on a series “widely considered to be among the finest ever made.” Released between 1955 and 1959, the films tell the coming-of“Destroyed from Within” (detail), Jana Lawton age story of a poor Bengali boy named Apu in three parts, from boyhood (Panther Panchali, “song of the Little Road”), through adolescence (aparajito, “The Unvanquished”) to young adulthood (apur sansar, “The World of apu”). As the films made their way around the world, from India to the U.S. to Cannes, Ray picked up plenty of hardware—more than 30 international awards—and has since landed on many critics’ best-films-of-all-time lists and influenced some of the best filmmakers in the world, not the least of whom was Japanese director akira Kurosawa, who said, “Never having seen a Satyajit Ray film is like never having seen the sun or the moon.” Oh, if that’s not enough, Ravi shankar wrote and recorded the soundtracks for all three. The Pageant’s presentation of Criterion’s just-released 4K digital restoration offers a rare chance to see the films on a big screen. Film two (aparajito) shows Oct. 17, 3 p.m., and Oct. 18, 7 p.m., and film three (apur sansar) shows Oct. 24, 3 p.m., and Oct. 18, 7 p.m. And if you missed the first one, you can probably find an old version streaming online, or wait till the set is released on DVD Nov. 17.

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For the week oF october 15, 2015

by rob brezsny

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Here’s actor LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Many Bill Murray’s advice about relationships: “If you have someone that you think is The One, don’t just say, ‘OK, let’s pick a date. Let’s get married.’ Take that person and travel around the world. Buy a plane ticket for the two of you to go to places that are hard to go to and hard to get out of. And if, when you come back, you’re still in love with that person, get married at the airport.” In the coming weeks, Aries, I suggest you make comparable moves to test and deepen your own closest alliances. See what it’s like to get more seriously and deliriously intimate.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Some

firefighters use a wetter kind of water than the rest of us. It contains a small amount of biodegradable foam that makes it ten times more effective in dousing blazes. With this as your cue, I suggest you work on making your emotions “wetter” than usual. By that I mean the following: When your feelings arise, give them your reverent attention. Marvel at how mysterious they are. Be grateful for how much life force they endow you with. Whether they are relatively “negative” or “positive,” regard them as interesting revelations that provide useful information and potential opportunities for growth.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Jonathan

Strange & Mr. Norrell is a BBC TV minseries set in the early 19th century. It’s the fictional story of a lone wizard, Mr. Norrell, who seeks to revive the art of occult magic so as to accomplish practical works, like helping the English navy in its war against the French navy. Norrell is pleased to find an apprentice, Jonathan Strange, and draws up a course of study for him. Norrell tells Strange that the practice of magic is daunting, “but the study is a continual delight.” If you’re interested in taking on a similar challenge, Gemini, it’s available.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): We humans have put buttons on clothing for seven millennia. But for a long time these small knobs and disks were purely ornamental—meant to add beauty but not serve any other function. That changed in the 13th century, when our ancestors finally got around to inventing buttonholes. Buttons could then serve an additional purpose, providing a convenient way to fasten garments. I foresee the possibility of a comparable evolution in your personal life, Cancerian. You have an opening to dream up further uses for elements that have previously been one-dimensional. Brainstorm about how you might expand the value of familiar things.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): You would be wise

to rediscover and revive your primal innocence. If you can figure out how to shed a few shreds of your sophistication and a few slivers of your excess dignity, you will literally boost your intelligence. That’s why I’m inviting you to explore the kingdom of childhood, where you can encounter stimuli that will freshen and sweeten your adulthood. Your upcoming schedule could include jumping in mud puddles, attending parties with imaginary friends, having uncivilized fun with wild toys, and drinking boisterously from fountains of youth.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): While still a

young man, Virgo author Leo Tolstoy wrote that “I have not met one man who is morally as good as I am.” He lived by a strict creed. “Eat moderately” was one of his “rules of life,” along with “Walk for an hour every day.” Others were equally stern: “Go to bed no later than 10 o’clock,” “Only do one thing at a time,” and “Disallow flights of imagination unless necessary.” He did provide himself with wiggle room, however. One guideline allowed him to sleep two hours during the day. Another specified that he could visit a brothel twice a month. I’d love for you to be inspired by Tolstoy’s approach, Virgo. Now is a favorable time to revisit your own rules of life. As you refine and recommit yourself to these fundamental disciplines, be sure to give yourself enough slack.

astronomers believe that our universe began with the big bang. An inconceivably condensed speck of matter exploded, eventually expanding into thousands of billions of stars. It must have been a noisy event, right? Actually, no. Astronomers estimate that the roar of the primal eruption was just 120 decibels—less than the volume of a live rock concert. I suspect that you are also on the verge of your own personal big bang, Libra. It, too, will be relatively quiet for the amount of energy it unleashes.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): For now,

you are excused from further work on the impossible tasks that have been grinding you down. You may take a break from the unsolvable riddles and cease your exhaustive efforts. And if you would also like to distance yourself from the farcical jokes the universe has been playing, go right ahead. To help enforce this transition, I hereby authorize you to enjoy a time of feasting and frolicking, which will serve as an antidote to your baffling trials. And I hereby declare that you have been as successful at weathering these trials as you could possibly be, even if the concrete proof of that is not yet entirely visible.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

One afternoon in September, I was hiking along a familiar path in the woods. As I passed my favorite grandmother oak, I spied a thick, 6-foot-long snake loitering on the trail in front of me. In hundreds of previous visits, I had never before seen a creature bigger than a mouse. The serpent’s tail was hidden in the brush, but its head looked more like a harmless gopher snake’s than a dangerous rattler’s. I took the opportunity to sing it three songs. It stayed for the duration, then slipped away after I finished. What a great omen! The next day, I made a tough but liberating decision to leave behind a good part of my life so as to focus more fully on a great part. With or without a snake sighting, Sagittarius, I foresee a comparable breakthrough for you sometime soon.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

Canadian author Margaret Atwood has finished a new manuscript. It’s called Scribbler Moon. But it won’t be published as a book until the year 2114. Until then, it will be kept secret, along with the texts of many other writers who are creating work for a “Future Library.” The project’s director is conceptual artist Katie Paterson, who sees it as a response to George Orwell’s question, “How could you communicate with the future?” With this as your inspiration, Capricorn, try this exercise: Compose five messages you would you like to deliver to the person you will be in 2025.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Every

hour of your life, millions of new cells are born to replace old cells that are dying. That’s why many parts of your body are composed of an entirely different collection of cells than they were years ago. If you are 35, for example, you have replaced your skeleton three times. Congratulations! Your creativity is spectacular, as is your ability to transform yourself. Normally these instinctual talents aren’t nearly as available to you in your efforts to recreate and transform your psyche, but they are now. In the coming months, you will have extraordinary power to revamp and rejuvenate everything about yourself, not just your physical organism.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): The coming

weeks will NOT be a favorable time to seek out allies you don’t even like that much or adventures that provide thrills you have felt a thousand times before. But the near future will be an excellent time to go on a quest for your personal version of the Holy Grail, a magic carpet, the key to the kingdom or an answer to the sphinx’s riddle. In other words, Pisces, I advise you to channel your yearning toward experiences that steep your heart with a sense of wonder. Don’t bother with anything that degrades, disappoints or desensitizes you.

www.RealAstrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888.

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FICTIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CALIFORNIA ORGANIC FLOWERS LLC at 2044 Oakway Chico, CA 95973. CALIFORNIA ORGANIC FLOWERS LLC 2044 Oakway Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: MARC A KESSLER, OWNER Dated: August 26, 2015 FBN Number: 2015-0001076 Published: September 24, October 1,8,15, 2015

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ASIAN HEALTHCARE ASSOCIATION at 254 E. 1st St Chico, CA 95928. MICHAEL TURK 430 Nottingham Dr Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: MICHAEL TURK Dated: September 3, 2015 FBN Number: 2015-0001111 Published: September 24, October 1,8,15, 2015

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as SIMHA YOGA at 175 Falcons Pointe Dr Chico, CA 95928. JULIA KASZA 175 Falcons Pointe Dr Chico, CA 95928.

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as TACOS CORTES at 1530 Park Ave Chico, CA 95928. ROBBIN MAREE PARKS 3261 Nord Ave Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ROBBIN M PARKS Dated: September 2, 2015 FBN Number: 2015-0001106 Published: September 24, October 1,8,15, 2015

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CHICO PHOTOGRAPHY at 225 Main Street Ste B Chico, CA 95928. SEAN Y CHEN 1583 Borman Way Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: SEAN Y. CHEN Dated: August 28, 2015 FBN Number: 2015-0001092 Published: September 24, October 1,8,15, 2015

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ADDISON MOUNTAIN PRODUCTS at 18056 Deer Creek Highway Forest Ranch, CA 95942. KURTIS LON SALVAGNO 18171 Deer Creek Highway Forest Ranch, CA 95942. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: KURTIS SALVAGNO Dated: August 27, 2015 FBN Number: 2015-0001083 Published: September 24, October 1,8,15, 2015

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as FINNEGAN’S JUG at 1084 E. 1st Ave Chico, CA 95926. FADI ABDULMASIH 424 Windhim Way Chico, CA 95973. RITA ABDULMASIH 424 Windhim Way Chico, CA

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95973. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: FRANK Dated: September 10, 2015 FBN Number: 2015-0001137 Published: October 1,8,15,22, 2015

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as GNARLY DELI at 2 Hunter Ct. Chico, CA 95928. NICKLAS STILES 2 Hunter Ct. Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: NICK STILES Dated: September 10, 2015 FBN Number: 2015-0001138 Published: October 1,8,15,22, 2015

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as SERENE PROFESSIONAL CLEANING SERVICES at 287 E 12th Street Chico, CA 95928. ALEXIS MARIE GARRETT 287 E 12th Street Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ALEXIS GARRETT Dated: September 18, 2015 FBN Number: 2015-0001177 Published: October 1,8,15,22, 2015

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as GAMER 2 GAMER at 930 Ivy Street Chico, CA 95928. WHITMAN R.A.D. BURKE 930 Ivy Street Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: WHITMAN BURKE Dated: September 10, 2015 FBN Number: 2015-0001139 Published: October 1,8,15,22, 2015

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as AMERICAN BUSINESS SERVICE at 83 Artesia Drive Chico, CA 95973-5611 LINDA L STARK, TRUSTEE OF THE STARK FAMILY TRUST 17 La Bella Court Chico, CA 95973.

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RANDALL C. STARK, TRUSTEE OF THE STARK FAMILY TRUST 17 La Bella Court Chico, CA 95973-8222 This business is conducted by a Trust Signed: RANDALL C. STARK Dated: September 18, 2015 FBN Number: 2015-0001175 Published: October 1,8,15,22, 2015

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as TABLE GAME SOLUTIONS at 3975 Hildale Avenue, Oroville, CA 95966. KEVIN FEUERSTEIN 3975 Hildale Avenue, Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: KEVIN FEUERSTEIN Dated: September 14, 2015 FBN Number: 2015-0001155 Published: October 1,8,15,22, 2015

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as TINA’S MINI MART at 1350 Longfellow Ave Chico, CA 95926. TINAPREET OIL INC 905 Plumas Ave Plumes Lake, CA 95961. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: CHARANJIV SINGH Dated: August 31, 2015 FBN Number: 2015-0001094 Published: October 1,8,15,22, 2015

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as HANDYMAN JACK’S at 1955 Modoc Drive Chico, CA 95928. JOHN RAY MEAD 1955 Modoc Drive Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JOHN MEAD Dated: September 18, 2015 FBN Number: 2015-0001172 Published: October 1,8,15,22, 2015

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as AB FLOOR SERVICES at 48 Quista Dr Chico, CA 95926. AMY BRECHEISEN 48 Quista Dr Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: AMY BRECHEISEN Dated: October 2, 2015 FBN Number: 2015-0001239 Published: October 8,15,22,29, 2015

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as JUNIOR’S TREE SERVICE at 24952 Laurie Ln Los Molinos, CA 96055. CYNTHIA S RUVALCABA 25952 Laurie Ln Los Molinos, CA 96055. JOSE MANUEL RUVALCABA SR 24952 Laurie Ln Los Molinos, CA 96055. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: CYNTHIA RUVALCABA Dated: September 29, 2015 FBN Number: 2015-0001220 Published: October 8,15,22,29, 2015

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as HASHI ASIAN TO GO at 1600 Mangrove #175 Chico, CA 95926. FORCELLA ITALIAN BISTRO INC 26 Porchlight Chico, CA 95973. AARON JOHNSON 26 Porchlight Chico, CA 95973. JON MEYER 23 Highland Cir Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: JON MEYER, OWNER Dated: September 29, 2015 FBN Number: 2015-0001219 Published: October 8,15,22,29, 2015

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as HAPPY GARDEN RESTAURANT at 7188 Skyway Paradise, CA 95969. CHUN SHENG CHU 7188 Skyway Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: CHU CHUN SHENG Dated: September 22, 2015 FBN Number: 2015-0001189 Published: October 8,15,22,29, 2015

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as MTL CONTRACTING at 3557 Bridle Lane Chico, CA 95973. STEVE BLADORN 3557 Bridle Ln Chico, CA 95973. JAMIE TURNER 9137 Midway Durham, CA 95938. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: JAMIE TURNER Dated: September 3, 2015 FBN Number: 2015-0001110 Published: October 8,15,22,29, 2015

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BLUE OAK LIVESCAN AND NOTARY at 2279 Fern Ave Chico, CA 95926. KATIE LYN CARMICHAEL-BUELL 2279 Fern Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: KATE CARMICHAEL-BUELL Dated: September 28, 2015 FBN Number: 2015-0001214 Published: October 8,15,22,29, 2015

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as GOLDEN FEATHER MARKETPLACE at 751 W Oro Dam Blvd Oroville, CA 95965. RIVER MARKETPLACE, LLC 8924 E Pinnacle Peak Rd G5-670 Scottsdale, AZ 85255. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: CHERYL L. MENDEZ, MANAGER Dated: August 27, 2015 FBN Number: 2015-0001078 Published: October 8,15,22,29, 2015

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doing business as THE MONOGRAM SHOPPE, UNIFORMS-TUXEDOS AND MORE, INC. at 189 E 9th Ave Chico, CA 95926. UNIFORMS, TUXEDOS AND MORE, INC. 189 E 9th Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: THOMAS DELOREY Dated: September 23, 2015 FBN Number: 2015-0001193 Published: October 8,15,22,29, 2015 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as EARTHSHED SOLUTIONS at 283 Kelly Ridge Road Orovill, CA. EARTHSHED SOLUTIONS INC 283 Kelly Ridge Road. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: HEATHER GRAY, SECRETARY Dated: September 25, 2015 FBN Number: 2015-0001208 Published: October 8,15,22,29, 2015

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as JAMES SCHAEFFER INTERNATIONAL, POINTE INTERNATIONAL at 236 Estate Drive Chico, CA 95928. ISAAC J SCHAEFFER 236 Estates Drive Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ISAAC J. SCHAEFFER Dated: August 28, 2015 FBN Number: 2015-0001093 Published: October 8,15,22,29, 2015

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as OLD CHICO IRON at 2280 Ivy St Suite 160 Chico, CA 95928. TIM BUCKNER 1072 Sarah Ave Chico, CA 95926. GRANT STEPHENS 960 E. 16th St Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: GRANT STEPHENS Dated: September 14, 2015 FBN Number: 2015-0001152 Published: October 15,22,29, November 5, 2015 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as GARY SHORT AND ASSOCIATES at 4130 East Ave Chico, CA 95973. ANNETTE SHORT 3 Roxbury Ct Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ANNETTE SHORT Dated: September 30, 2015 FBN Number: 2015-0001231 Published: October 15,22,29, November 5, 2015

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as RIDE PUBLISHING at 3805 Addys Ln Oroville, CA 95965. GARY MIDDLETON 3805 Addys Ln Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: GARY MIDDLETON Dated: October 2, 2015 FBN Number: 2015-0001237

this Legal Notice continues

Published: October 15,22,29, November 5, 2015

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following persons have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name ECONOMY FOREIGN CAR PARTS at 1375 Longfellow Ave Chico, CA 95926. CYNTHIA L RODRIGUES 266 Mill Creek Dr Chico, CA 95973. ANTHONY E RODRIGUES 266 Mill Creek Drive Chico, CA 95973. This business was conducted by A Married Couple. Signed: CYNTHIA RODRIGUES Dated: October 5, 2015 FBN Number: 2009-0001239 Published: October 15,22,29, November 5, 2015

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PERSONAL HEALTH REFLECTIONS at 6084 Mason Ct Magalia, CA 95954. KARREN EVELYN TURNER 6084 Mason Ct Magalia, CA 95954. Signed: KARREN TURNER Dated: October 9, 2015 FBN Number: 2015-0001262 Published: October 15,22,29, November 5, 2015

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as HELPING HANDS PAYEE SERVICES at 6114 Broyles Rd Chico, CA 95973. HELPING HANDS PAYEE SERVICES 6114 Broyles Rd Chico, CA 95973. Signed: REID DORN, PRESIDENT Dated: October 9, 2015 FBN Number: 2015-0001263 Published: October 15,22,29, November 5, 2015

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as OPEROSE COFFEE AND TEA HOUSE at 3312 Esplanade Chico, CA 95973. PRAIRIE YANA FRANCIA 10 Keystone Ct Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: PRAIRIE Y. FRANCIA Dated: September 14, 2015 FBN Number: 2015-0001157 Published: October 15,22,29, November 5, 2015

NOTICES NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE AARON G. ISBELL, aka AARON ISBELL, aka AARON GENE ISBELL To all heirs and beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: AARON G. ISBELL, aka AARON ISBELL, aka AARON GENE ISBELL A Petition for Probate has been filed by: HEIDI E. ISBELL in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate

this Legal Notice continues

requests that: HEIDI E. ISBELL be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The Petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: October 20, 2015 Time: 9:00a.m. Dept: C-18 Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal repre-­ sentative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or per-­ sonal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and le-­ gal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: RAUL J. LECLERC P.O. Drawer 111 Oroville, CA 95965 (530) 533-5661 Case Number: PR41609 Dated: September 23, 2015 Published: October 1,8,15, 2015

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE DARLENE G. BACON aka DARLENE GAIL BACON To all heirs and beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: DARLENE G. BACON aka DARLENE GAIL BACON A Petition for Probate has been filed by: MICHAEL T. BACON in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: MICHAEL T. BACON be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent.

this Legal Notice continues

The Petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: November 3, 2015 Time: 9:00a.m. Dept: Probate Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal repre-­ sentative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or per-­ sonal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and le-­ gal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: NICOLE R. PLOTTEL 3120 Cohasset Rd., Ste 10 Chico, CA 95973 (530) 893-2882 Case Number: PR41623 Dated: September 30, 2015 Published: October 8,15,22, 2015

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE ROBERT JAMES WILKERSON, SR. To all heirs and beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: ROBERT JAMES WILKERSON, SR., ROBERT WILKERSON, SR., ROBERT WILKERSON A Petition for Probate has been filed by: LINDA A. BRYANT in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: LINDA A. BRYANT be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The Petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration

this Legal Notice continues

of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: December 1, 2015 Time: 9:00a.m. Dept: TBA Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal repre-­ sentative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or per-­ sonal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and le-­ gal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Petitioner: LINDA A. BRYANT 230 Atascoctia Rd, #1111 Humble TX 77396 Case Number: PR41616 Dated: October 5, 2015 Published: October 15,22,29, 2015 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner BAO YANG filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: BAO YANG Proposed name: KARI BAO YANG THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing.

this Legal Notice continues

NOTICE OF HEARING Date: November 13, 2015 Time: 9:00am Dept: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: STEPHEN E. BENSON Dated: September 25, 2015 Case Number: 164638 Published: October 1,8,15,22, 2015

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner NORMA ARACELI RAMIREZ filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: NORMA ARACELI RAMIREZ Proposed name: NORMA ARACELI SANTAROSA THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: November 20, 2015 Time: 9:00am Dept: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: MICHAEL P. CANDELA Dated: September 29, 2015 Case Number: 164944 Published: October 8,15,22,29, 2015

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner MARK AND AMY WOODSON filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: ALEXANDRA JULIEANNE WOODSON Proposed name: ALEXANDRA JEANETTE WOODSON THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: December 11, 2015 Time: 9:00am Dept: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: STEPHEN E. BENSON Dated: October 6, 2015 Case Number: 164670 Published: October 15,22,29, November 5, 2015


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5350 Skyway, Paradise october 15, 2015

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Ronnie Owen (530) 571-7720

Ron Matz (530) 518-1583

Kim Finlan (530) 894-4507

Kathy Kelly (530) 899-5939

Emmett Jacobi (530) 899-5996

Effie Khaki (530) 899-5915

Amy Bean (530) 894-4551

Alice Zeissler (530) 899-5955

Mendi Powell Admin Assistant Dustin Cheatham (530) 894-4523 Katherine Ossokine (530) 899-5917 Rita Dane (530) 894-4515

Dennis Louber (530) 571-7795 Justin Jewett (530) 899-5959

Joyce Turner (530) 571-7719 Oakley McElhinny (530) 571-7712

Paul Champlin (530) 571-7714

Johnny Klinger (530) 571-7722 Norm Atkin (530) 571-7787

Christie Hicks (530) 899-4585

Ashley Wallace Admin Assistant

Yvonne Carroll Office Manager (530) 899-5916

Shelinda Bryant Assistant Manager (530) 571-7725 Chris Martinez (530) 894-4522

Doug Love Sales Manager (530) 345-6618 Nate Smith (530) 899-5912

Michele Bridgeford (530) 894-4533

John Spain (530) 899-5933

John Wallace (530) 894-4514

Carolyn Fejes (530) 966-4457

Carol Roniss (530) 894-4516

Dan Jacuzzi Broker/Owner (530) 345-6618

ChiCo’s #1 offiC

Open Houses & Listings are online at: www.century21JeffriesLydon.com 2748 San Jose Street OPEN Floor Plan 3 Bd 1.5 Ba remodeled ba fresh paint. 1800 sq.ft.

College Area, 2 bd/2 ba fresh paint & pest cert. $250,000 2 bd/1 ba 900 sq ft large back yard $179,000 Fixer upper, 1100 sq ft 3 bd/2 ba 2 car garage $160,000

$268,750

Steve Kasprzyk (Kas-per-zik)

CALL FOR INFO. Making Your Dream Home a Reality

(530) 518–4850

(530) 828-2902

ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico

$540,000.00 $474,500.00 $465,000.00 $452,500.00 $445,000.00 $435,000.00 $425,000.00 $414,500.00 $381,000.00 $375,000.00 $372,500.00

3/ 2.5 4/ 3.5 4/ 3 4/ 3 4/ 2.5 4/ 2.5 3/ 2 3/ 2 3/ 2 3/ 2 3/ 2

70  

CN&R 

october 15, 2015

$299,000

SQ. FT. 2433 2808 2356 2172 2426 2364 2315 2150 1904 1865 1668

JIM AGUILAR

JOYCE TURNER

571–7719 • joyce_turner@ymail.com

Homes Sold Last Week 15 Temperance Way 12 Phendx Dr 13 Blackstone Ct 125 Emerald Lake Ct 5 Lanai Ct 99 Chico Canyon Rd 2010 Durango Way 1640 Palm Ave 430 Middle Creek Ct 164 Estates Dr 485 Sandy Cove Dr

L A N D

2600 Cohasset Road 1.4 acres. Property is zoned for commercial and residential. Possible owner financing or joint venture.

SMILES ALWAYS

Paul Champlin

YOU DON’T HAVE TO SPELL IT OUT FOR ME TO SELL IT!

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Opening doors, making your dreams a reality. I can help, call me today!

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(530) 519-4714 · www.JimsChicoHomes.com

Sponsored by Century 21 Jeffries Lydon ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

44 Moraga Dr 144 Gooselake Cir 149 Degarmo Dr 2220 Cherry Glenn Ct 1151 E 8th St 1178 Hill View Way 1930 Preservation Oak Dr 218 Mission Serra Ter 659 Vallombrosa Ln 2889 Lovell Ave 1081 Filbert Ave

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico

$372,000.00 $369,000.00 $350,000.00 $330,000.00 $325,500.00 $325,000.00 $319,000.00 $295,000.00 $295,000.00 $278,000.00 $276,000.00

4/ 2 3/ 2 3/ 2 3/ 2 3/ 2.5 2/ 1 3/ 2 3/ 2.5 3/ 1.5 4/ 2 3/ 1.5

SQ. FT. 2394 2025 1911 1833 2031 1253 1707 1734 1416 1917 2276


$91,500.00 2 bedroom, 1dbath, ground floor condo with solside yard bonus 1859 sq ft home forsol $239,000.00!!! Lovely 3 bed, 2 d bath, family room, plus living room & amazing backyard. Updated Ranchette Locateddin North Chico large lot, plenty of room to build a shopsol or swimming pool. $244,000.00 CALIFORNIA PARK,sol locateddon a cul de sac close to the lake $293,000 Adorable home in the Avenues 3/2, 2 car garage sold $239,000.00 Picture perfect w/ remodeled dkitchen 3/2.5, 2 car garage, 1346 sq ft,sol $250,000.00

KIMBERLEY TONGE | (530) 518-5508

Mountain Cabin $105,000 Doe Mill home with Studio

$339,900

ding 4 bed 2 bath $275,000 Chico pen

3/2 - $229,000 pending Chico

Alice Zeissler | 530.518.1872

Teresa Larson (530)899-5925 www.ChicoListings.com chiconativ@aol.com

Custom 4 bd/5ba 5,009 sq ft, 1.21 ac, pool, extras! $950,000 West side, 3bd/3ba, 2,901 sqft .29ac $425,000 Gated community, lovely 2,531 sq ft with VIEW! $435,000 g $330,000 dinacs Pinnacle buildingpen lot, 2.03 gft. $275,000 dinsq Near park 3bd/2ba, 1,502 pen

Camdena Conner (530) 894-4511

Brandon Siewert (530) 894-4581

Michael Prezioso (530) 894-4528

Jim Aguilar (530) 899-5927

Jennifer Stelle (530) 894-4503 Michael Clifford (530) 571-7715

Traci Cooper (530) 899-5937

Jeff Condon (530) 894-4582 Mark Reaman (530) 899-5962 Steve Kasprzyk (530) 899-5932

Marc Shapiro (530) 899-5951 Sherry Landis (530) 899-5922

Forest Ranch 5 bed 3 bath price to sale - $219,900

Teresa Larson (530) 899-5925

Brandi Laffins (530) 899-5920

Brad Azevedo (530) 571-7711

Layne Diestel (530) 894-4502 Sherrie O'Hearn (530) 571-7718

Gee Singh (530) 899-5957

Heather DeLuca (530) 899-5949

Bob Sereda (530) 899-7400

Becky Williams (530) 899-5936 Laura Willman (530) 899-5963 Shane Collins (530) 571-7716

Garrett French (530) 571-7790

Kristin Wilson Ford (530) 899-5934 Sandy Stoner (530) 899-5950

Sandra Grill (530) 894-4529

Kimberley Tonge (530) 899-5964

Erin Schmidt (530) 894-4583

Frank Condon (530) 899-5945

Anita Miller (530) 899-5923

Annie Foster (530) 345-6618

Ce for a reason

Brand nEw Rent to own, lease option, owner carry. 55+ manufactured homes located in desirable park. 2 bed/2 bth, 871 sq ft – 990 sq ft. Additional space offered with extended patios. $99,000-$105,000 If you are thinking of buying or selling your home, Call Teresa.

The following houses were sold in Butte County by real estate agents or private parties during the week of September 28, 2015 – October 2, 2015. The housing prices are based on the stated documentary transfer tax of the parcel and may not necessarily reflect the actual sale price of the home. ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

2627 Monterey St

Chico

$265,000.00

3/ 1.5

SQ. FT. 1379

1276 Parque Dr

Chico

$220,000.00

2/ 1

SQ. FT.

1181 Metalmark Way

Chico

$265,000.00

3/ 2

1471

3051 Snowbird Dr

Chico

$210,000.00

2/ 2

972

50 Lacewing Ct

Chico

$254,000.00

3/ 2

1471

7 Valley Lake

Chico

$205,000.00

2/ 2

1300

750 Henshaw Ave

Chico

$250,000.00

3/ 3

2549

1643 Normal Ave

Chico

$185,000.00

2/ 1

658

7 Whitewood Way

Chico

$248,000.00

3/ 2.5

1483

967 Normal Ave

Chico

$167,500.00

2/ 1

1428

1270

44 Glenshire Ln

Chico

$244,000.00

3/ 2.5

1324

1124 Broadway St

Chico

$165,000.00

3/ 1.5

1469

269 E 3rd St

Chico

$240,000.00

2/ 2

1356

20 Wrangler Ct

Chico

$125,000.00

2/ 1

1027

3312 Sierra Springs Dr

Chico

$240,000.00

3/ 2

1346

148 W 16th St

Chico

$111,000.00

3/ 2

1395

1630 E Lassen Ave

Chico

$234,000.00

3/ 2

1231

2964 Cherokee Rd

Oroville

$244,000.00

2/ 2

1584

28 El Cerrito Dr

Chico

$232,000.00

3/ 2

1116

5368 Breezewood Dr

Paradise

$539,000.00

4/ 3.5

3301

6 Parkhurst St

Chico

$230,500.00

3/ 1

1130

179 Valley Ridge Dr

Paradise

$355,000.00

2/ 2.5

2175

october 15, 2015

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CRISP INSIDE AND OUT

© 2015 COORS BREWING CO., GOLDEN, CO

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