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See NEWSLINES, page 9

Chico’s News & Entertainment Weekly

Volume 37, Issue 26

Thursday, February 20, 2014


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Vol. 37, Issue 26 • February 20, 2014

OPINION Editorial. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Guest Comment. . . . . . . . . . . . . Second & Flume . . . . . . . . . . . . . Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Remember the trees The Arbor Day Foundation’s Tree City USA designation may

Well-rested, thanks to Obamacare HForstory about Obamacare. the last few years, our nation has heard mostly horror ere’s something you rarely hear: a good news

stories and warnings of impending doom about what’s officially called the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Even the nickname Obamacare originally began as a derogatory term, though the president has since stated that he likes the name. There has been so much propaganda from far-right opponents over the law: “Obamacare will put us all under socialism, install government ‘death panels,’ skyrocket health-care rates and kick most of us off our plans!” they by Vic Cantu screamed. Well, I’m here to say I’ve had a lifeimproving experience with it. In January, The author is a I joined the 3 million-plus Americans longtime Chico resident and a CN&R who now have at least basic coverage. contributor. And my cost? Only $1 a month! Before Obamacare, such a plan would have cost me close to $300 a month! The plan has given me great peace of mind. Prior to signing up, other than the three years when I received minimal coverage as a student at Chico State, I hadn’t had medical insurance for more than 20 years. I was one of those tens of 4 CN&R February 20, 2014

millions of working, taxpaying Americans who fell through the cracks. During those two long decades I was afraid to go to the doctor, and I was plagued by the nagging fear that should I ever had any serious illness, accident or disease, I would be wiped out financially. Worse still, I’d purchased my first home, a modest condo, a few years ago and knew that I was one major, medically related event away from having it flushed down the drain. With the help of local insurance agent Bruce Jenkins, I recently signed up for “the Bronze plan,” which is similar to what many know as “catastrophic coverage.” That is, I have to pay the first $6,500 of total medical bills per year, but anything above that is covered. God forbid if I ever got cancer or had a severe injury requiring weeks in the hospital and hundreds of thousands of dollars of treatments, but the most I would need to pay is that $6,500. Plus, I get free preventive checkups, immunizations, counseling and screenings. Now I can sleep much better. If you don’t have medical coverage, look into Obamacare. See a certified Affordable Care Act adviser or check out the state’s healthinsurance exchange through the Affordable Care Act, Covered California, at www.cov eredca.com. Ω

not seem hugely important, but it is a point of pride for Chico and most certainly has buoyed the community’s appreciation for the 28,000-plus city trees. According to the national nonprofit organization, the Tree City program has many benefits, including providing cities with the opportunity to educate the community on the value of the urban forest. Additionally, its standards help establish the framework for municipalities to manage their tree inventories. As you’ll read in Newslines this week (see “Tree City snafu,” by Ken Smith, page 9), city of Chico officials forgot to apply for the annual recognition—in what would be the city’s 30th year as an official Tree City. Whoops. Meanwhile, Oroville, a Tree City for 34 consecutive years, has its designation in hand. Chico officials are currently working on rectifying that oversight and maintaining the longstanding honor. They are confident that, despite the loss of a tree crew—a casualty of recent sweeping budget cuts—the city will qualify for the designation. However, this blunder underscores the scant resources dedicated to an attribute that many residents would argue is one of the top reasons Chico is such a beautiful and livable city. Indeed, the former four-employee tree crew was axed in favor of contracting out tree maintenance to outside firms, the city’s former urban-forest manager retired and has not been replaced, and a draft version of the city’s Urban Forest Management Plan is sitting on a shelf awaiting adoption. City officials cannot rest on their laurels when it comes to maintaining the urban forest. The canopy may not be immediately imperiled, but over time, without the careful consideration the trees have seen for many decades, it most certainly will suffer. When the city’s economic outlook improves, reinstating positions that maintain the trees should be a top priority. Ω

A dangerous intersection Last week, a bicyclist attempting to cross the intersection of

East First and Oleander avenues was struck by a vehicle (see “The path not taken,” Newslines, page 8). That cyclist was transported to Enloe Medical Center and survived, but the incident immediately reminded us of 20-yearold Janee Nickerson’s tragic death in November of last year at the same location. For pedestrians and cyclists traveling in all directions, that intersection—part of a recommended route on the Chico Bike Map—is difficult to cross during times of heavy traffic. Visibility is poor and motorists often drive faster than the 35 mph speed limit. East First Avenue is a neighborhood street in a historic region of the city, but due to traffic circulation, it is treated by motorists as a main thoroughfare. Years ago, the city installed temporary curb extensions at the site to help pedestrians cross the road. The curbs narrowed the distance they would travel, forced motorists to check their speeds, and provided better visibility in a region where parked vehicles would otherwise block the view. That safety measure proved unpopular, however, with residents of East Sacramento Avenue, since the traffic configuration rerouted B-Line buses down their typically quiet street of gentrified homes. The curbs were removed about two months after being installed. Given Nickerson’s tragic death and the recent close call, we urge the city to take another look at possible traffic-mitigation measures at the intersection of East First and Oleander avenues. A solution might not be obvious or easy, but making the region safe for pedestrians and bicyclists is well worth the effort and expenditure. Ω


Send email to chicoletters @ newsreview.com

SECOND & FLUME by Melissa Daugherty melissad@newsreview.com

Slaughter As you’ll read in this week’s cover story, I left the office last Tuesday morning on what was a tough reporting assignment. I interviewed a mobile butcher, and to do so, I watched him kill a sheep. It was a little unnerving. And a lot surreal. When I volunteered to write this story for our annual Business issue, I sort of figured I wouldn’t watch the, you know, dying part. I don’t know why I’d put that option in my head. Never before had I looked away while reporting a story. I mean, description is a large part of the gig. I’d recently given up eating meat, but that wasn’t the problem. (Actually, strictly speaking, I’m not a vegetarian. I eat seafood.) The issue is that, like most people who’ve eaten meat most of their lives, my experience with cooking and eating animals has been heading to the grocery store and picking up meat after it’s been carved from a carcass. The thought of watching the actual slaughtering process made me nervous. But when I got to the small farm in Durham, I immediately decided I needed to see it: where meat comes from and what it is. Sure, I already knew. But it’s another thing to actually watch it go from animal to meat. Indeed, one moment a lamb was standing in a barn. And 15 minutes later, its legs, head and organs were gone, and it was hanging from metal hooks. One of the images I’ll never forget is watching steam rise from the sheep’s still-warm flesh as a winch peeled off its skin during this chilly morning. I also won’t forget the moment when George Westbrook, owner of the mobile-slaughtering rig, reached down and gently patted the animal as it bled out. Despite the fact that the sheep didn’t appear to suffer, it wasn’t easy to watch. At least for me. In fact, it took me days to wrap my head around it all. CN&R contributing photographer Melanie MacTavish was there, too, to chronicle the morning by camera. As you’ll see from her photos on pages 20 and 21, she was a pro. Most of what she captured is too graphic for publication in a community newspaper, but I felt it was important to show part of the process. So, if you’re squeamish, consider yourself forewarned. Melanie happens to have an appreciation for the macabre and seemed to process the whole thing easier than me. She, too, described the assignment as surreal, when I asked her about it later. “It was like an anatomy lesson on a beautiful farm in the fresh air,” she said. I expect to get some letters to the editor about the story or the photos. Perhaps the hardest picture to look at is the one taken just seconds before the sheep was stunned by the bolt gun. But that’s the reality, folks. That animal is now hanging in a meat locker, and will soon be on a plate. If you can’t stomach this story, you ought to stick to the salad bar.

Melissa Daugherty is editor of the CN&R

California nightmare Re “The big squeeze” (Cover feature, by Alastair Bland, Feb. 13): Facts: 1) 75 percent to 80 percent of California water is used in agriculture. 2) The vast majority of California produce is exported. 3) California exports far more produce than it imports. 4) California water is exported worldwide in food. Conclusion: 1) California’s water problems are caused by 7 billion people in a one world economy with infinite money and finite resources. 2) Any water savings by individuals and business will be sucked up by agriculture immediately. 3) California’s water problem will never end. Reality: Even if the heavens open up from now through the end of April, which is highly improbable, California will see only a temporary reprieve, because its water problem is rooted in the New World Order’s Brave New World. There will be a mass exodus from California. California will suffer a huge depression. California will become third-world. Dream: The government will save California. Nightmare: The government will enslave California.

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‘Don’t sign it’ Re “Medi-pot rules finalized, maybe” (Downstroke, Feb. 13): How about the Board of Supervisors meeting last Tuesday (Feb. 11)? The pot traders, users, buyers, growers, etc. were their usual rude, rowdy, selfish selves— shouting down others who do not agree with them. How about the diatribe from Supervisor Steve Lambert? The board is supposed to be neutral, not favoring one side over the other. Not so with Lambert. Now we all know where he stands, and his favoritism is repulsive, especially when the “board” is supposed to be the caretaker of the whole county. Thank you, Andrew Merkel, for mentioning my name. I take it as a compliment. By the way, has anyone read the initiative that’s going around? It’s just as confusing as the one last year. If you don’t understand it, don’t sign it—the same with the pro-pot petition. We are in a severe drought right now. If the farmers don’t have enough water for their crops to feed us, and we are all trying to conserve water, then why should the large legal pot growers get to use it all up? BONNIE MASARIK Yankee Hill

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LETTERS continued on page 6 February 20, 2014

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continued from page 5

Please don’t sign the marijuana referendum petition—it stinks! It benefits only the for-profit growers. They are using paid signaturegatherers. It will freeze the amended ordinance and we’ll see a repeat of 2013’s Green Rush, with the accompanying crime wave, environmental damage, ruined neighborhoods and rogue Mad Max outlaw growers. The amended ordinance lets anyone complain and provides for hardship cases to ensure patients can grow what they need. Everyone suffers alike—pot lovers, pot haters, patients, or the ambivalent—when crime skyrockets, when land gets ruined, when wildlife gets poisoned, when the air stinks, when ugly fences go up, when our county becomes a Green Ghetto. The ordinance limits grows to 150 square feet instead of 99 plants, which is worth hundreds of thousands of dollars. The referendum stinks. Please see www.bsane.org for more info. CHRIS SOMMERS Bangor

All about Dan Re “Missing Dan Nguyen-Tan” (Second & Flume, by Melissa Daugherty, Feb. 13): Recently, I visited with old friend and former Chico City Councilman Dan Nguyen-Tan, in San Francisco. I saw both his studio in the South of Market and his neighborhood—the recently gentrified Divisidero area. Not yet 40, unassuming Dan has been a powerful supportive force in launching the Public Bikes Co.—“Public” in that it contributes to the bike and “pedestrian-friendly-ization” of the public spaces of San Francisco. Dan is heavily involved with the SF Bike Coalition, which has 13,000 paid members. He and others have fought local battles to install more dedicated bike paths on the streets—thus inviting many more to ride the streets in safety. What impresses me most about Dan, then and now, is his desire to be a “civil servant” in an age where the meaning of that phrase has been virtually lost. As a Chico council member, he gave of his time, energy and expertise (as a Harvard graduate in business economics) and sought to see his vision of a growing sense of community become a reality for our town—just by virtue of good city planning. Dan is a caring and generous person besides being a passionate and savvy politician. I am glad to call him my friend. ELIZABETH DEVEREAUX Chico

Re “Missing Dan Nguyen-Tan” (Second & Flume, by Melissa Daugherty, Feb. 13) and “Mismanagement here, too” (Letters, Feb. 13): I hate to use clichés, but Dan Nguyen-Tan was a “breath of fresh air” compared to what our City Council was used to. Nguyen-Tan was progressive and wasn’t polluted by the old guard’s pressure. It was interesting to note a letter commenting about how City Manager Brian Nakamura dismissed people to clean up the disaster they created. It required someone from the outside, without the personal affiliations, to come in with fresh perspectives. The letter then compared the situation to Chico Unified School District’s mess. Right on! I think that Leslie Elena Thompson hit it perfectly with the need to [seek outside help]. Five older women sit on the CUSD Board of Trustees. Not good. You cannot expect people without children in the system to be effective. It would be like having a City Council of out-of-towners. Five students would run our district better than five grandparents. Additionally, on all boards, we are better off with one-term limits. Board members and City Council members: Do what you know you should, instead of worrying about re-election or alienating groups. Our goal shouldn’t be a token one young person. Let’s get a majority and reap the results! TAM HAMMERSLY Chico

Editor’s note: Not all of the members of the school board are grandmothers.

Respect wildlife Re “Coyote killings under review” (Newslines, by Allan Stellar, Feb. 13): Like dog fighting, wildlifekilling contests are not a sport and they are not a cultural right; they are simply animal abuse for human entertainment. I often hear these events justified by participants and ranchers who claim that the killing of predators protects livestock. However, study after study has shown that the killing of coyotes does nothing to lower livestock predation. In fact, it may actually increase coyote problems by splintering packs and leaving adolescents orphaned and desperate. Experts have long understood that hunting coyotes also increases their numbers. My husband and I raise hundreds of cattle that calve in pastures with coyote packs with

no problems, despite the fact that we use no lethal means to protect our livestock. Stable coyote populations keep lands healthier by controlling rodents. This helps prevent the spread of diseases, as well as lowering the need for rodenticides, which have been causing widespread secondary poisonings of raptors and other animals all the way up the food chain. Killing contests are about the wanton waste of wildlife by a few backward-thinking individuals. It is time for California to show the rest of this country that in this state, wildlife is to be treated with respect, not served up for target practice and buried in a pit. KELI HENDRICKS Petaluma

No thanks, LAFCo Re “Annexation back on the table” (Newslines, by Robert Speer, Feb. 6): Why is LAFCo in such a big hurry to annex Stewart Avenue into the city of Chico? How do they think we will benefit from this? We will not be getting any city services. In fact, the only thing that will be different is a utility tax we will be paying. Oh, wait a minute! We will be able to participate in city elections! The fact that one parcel on this street wanted to be in the city determines the fate of 54 other parcels. This is the type of politics I want to stay away from! We have been receiving all of our services from the county and have been more than satisfied for many, many years. I also take issue with comments made by LAFCo’s Executive Officer Stephen Lucas about Stewart Avenue being a “disadvantaged unincorporated community” that would benefit from being in the city. Are you kidding me? If we felt disadvantaged by living here, we would have moved years ago, Mr. Lucas! You have a unique talent for using propaganda to sway things the way you think they should go. The financial situation that Chico is facing right now should be a lesson on wasteful spending of city funds. Leave Stewart Avenue alone. MARTINE STILLWELL Chico

More letters online:

We’ve got too many letters for this space. Please go to www.newsreview.com/chico for additional readers’ comments on past CN&R articles.


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Left: Amanda Brooke waits to cross the intersection of East First and Oleander avenues on her bicycle. PHOTO BY MELANIE MACTAVISH

BEYOND JEFFERSON

Proponents of a state initiative that would divide California into six states got the goahead from the Secretary of State’s Office Feb. 18 to start gathering voter signatures to qualify it for the November general election. If approved by voters, the U.S. Congress would have to agree as well. The measure, according to a press release, would assign each county to a new state, “unless county voters approve reassignment to [a] different new state and [the] second state approves. Establishes commission to settle California’s financial affairs after division; upon failure to resolve, each new state would retain assets within its boundaries and would receive proportionate distribution of California’s debts based on population.” It would also allow counties to refuse to provide state-mandated programs and services without sufficient funding and would give counties the authority to “make and enforce all laws governing local affairs.”

MORE TROUBLE FOR LOCAL MUSICIAN

Local musician and operator of Chico School of Rock Breazid “Sid” Lewis is back in the news. According to a press release from the Butte County Sheriff’s Office, Lewis was arrested Feb. 18 on a warrant for allegedly masturbating in front of a 17-year-old girl, who was a former student at the School of Rock and was getting paid to do house work for him. While doing some house work, the press release says, the girl looked up and saw “Lewis masturbating and staring at her. The victim looked away and when she looked back, he was still masturbating, clearly visible.” One year ago, Lewis was arrested on charges of corporal injury to a spouse and assault with a firearm. He’s pleaded not guilty to both charges and is set to go to trial May 5.

FIGHTING THE COUNTY

In reaction to the Butte County Board of Supervisors’ Feb. 11 adoption of a more restrictive medical-marijuana ordinance, pro-pot growers are gathering signatures for a referendum that would force the board to either drop the ordinance or put it to a vote. The referendum effort comes from a group called the Butte County Citizens Against Irresponsible Government. Proponents have until March to gather signatures of 10 percent of the registered county voters, which equates to about 7,600. If they succeed, the county’s ordinance, which was set to go into effect March 11, will be suspended for 30 days while the signatures are verified; if they are, the board must then decide whether to drop it or put the ordinance on the June ballot.

8 CN&R February 20, 2014

Below: This ashy-white “ghost bike” honoring Janee Nickerson, who was struck and killed by a motorist while riding her bike near the intersection of First and Oleander avenues late last year, has since been removed. PHOTO BY HOWARD HARDEE

The path not taken Cycling accidents remind of abandoned plans to calm traffic at busy intersection

ORazy Tufnell was riding her bicycle south along Oleander Avenue—one of Chico’s most

n the afternoon of Feb. 11, 39-year-old

well-traveled bike routes—and attempted to cross the intersection at East First Avenue. by Howard After Tufnell stopped at the Hardee intersection, she misjudged the speed of oncoming traffic, Chico howardh@ newsreview.com Police Sgt. Cesar Sandoval said during a recent phone interview. Tufnell pulled into the intersection and was struck by a westbound car driven by 20-year-old Amber English, whose attempt to stop left skid marks on the pavement. Tufnell was treated for minor injuries at Enloe Medical Center and released; the police report determined her to be at fault. The accident took place mere feet from where 20-year-old Butte College student Janee Nickerson was fatally injured by a vehicle as she rode her bicycle along East First Avenue last Nov. 1. At the time, the death of Chico Velo Chico State nursing student connection: Go to www.chico Kristina Chesterman—who was velo.org to learn hit by an allegedly drunken drivmore about Chico er on the night of Sept. 22 as she Velo Cycling Club, was biking home on Nord including its Avenue, and died at Enloe Medadvocacy programs and ical Center days later—was still information on fresh in the community’s collecbicycle safety. tive consciousness. The two

tragedies prompted outcry from cyclingsafety advocates who urged improvements to Chico’s biking infrastructure, particularly for more separated bike lanes along busy thoroughfares. So, in light of the second serious cycling accident at East First and Oleander avenues in recent memory, the question arises: Is the intersection dangerous? An abandoned city effort to mitigate traffic there several years ago suggests it is. Oleander is a recommended

route listed in the Chico Bike Map, connecting the downtown area to the bike path that begins near Eleventh Avenue and the State Route 99 Corridor Bikeway Project via mostly quiet residential streets. The trickiest crossing point along the route for cyclists is unquestionably the intersection of East First and Oleander, though it may not appear that way to those unfamiliar with the area. “It’s a more dangerous intersection than it seems to be,” said Janine Rood, executive director of Chico Velo Cycling Club. “It seems like it’s a quiet street with houses, but it’s actually an arterial road with a bike-route crossing, which makes it more dangerous than people think. “When you cross East Avenue— that’s a big, busy street—you know you’d better be careful,” she continued. “[First and Oleander] seems more benign, but that isn’t necessarily so.”

Nani Teves lives in the Avenues neighborhood and regularly rides her bicycle across the intersection at Oleander and East First with her young children. During a recent interview, Teves explained how, prior to crossing, she tells her kids to stay well back from the roadway as she creeps into the intersection in order to see past the cars parked along East First. Teves also noted that the crossing is particularly well traveled by Chico Junior High School students whom she has often seen “leap-frog” around passing vehicles. Given the poor visibility, fast traffic and high ratio of “teenagers who aren’t thinking straight,” she said, the intersection is a dangerous one in need of improvement. The city of Chico apparently

agreed as recently as December 2009, when it installed temporary rubber curb extensions at the intersection of East First and Oleander avenues and West First and Magnolia avenues. Former City Traffic Engineer Brian Mickelson explained to the CN&R at the time that the extensions served to narrow the crossing distances for pedestrians, slow vehicle traffic and allow pedestrians and motorists to see each other when their views would otherwise be blocked by parked vehicles. The extensions were recommended by the Chico Avenues Neighborhood Association as part of the Avenues Neighborhood Improvement


Plan, which was adopted by the City Council in April 2008. Installing the extensions achieved the desired traffic-calming effects, but also had an unforeseen consequence: Because vehicles could no longer turn left off of East First onto Oleander, bus routes were diverted to East Sacramento Avenue, a residential side street lined with historic homes. Homeowners along East Sacramento were unenthusiastic about the heavy bus traffic, and following a multitude of complaints, the Internal Affairs Committee decided to remove the extensions about two months after they were installed, and the traffic-calming project was abandoned. Some locals believe that both recent cycling accidents at East First and Oleander might have been avoided had the extensions remained in place. Teves said that Nickerson’s accident, in particular, “really affected me because it seemed very preventable.” Following Nickerson’s death, Teves began “doing some research with the idea that I would approach the City Council with some data, so they might revisit the idea of traffic-calming at [First and Oleander],” she said. “The sticking point for me is that the city thought [the extensions] were a great idea; they were going to fund it, until those few neighbors said they didn’t want it.” From the time Matt Johnson, currently the city’s senior development engineer, was hired as a traffic engineer in 1999, “there was always some discussion about that intersection,” he said during a phone interview. Having spent about a year collecting data on the intersection in 2000, Johnson maintains that whether or not the intersection is truly dangerous is “debatable.” “When you or I say something is ‘safe’ or ‘unsafe,’ to some degree that’s perception,” he said, adding that, when accounting for the thousands of cars that safely drive through the intersection every day, the rate of accidents is actually quite low. And while the city is well aware of the intersection’s faults, he said, addressing them isn’t necessarily a top priority. “There’s only so much money we have to spend on roads,” Johnson said. “Whether we like it or not, we have to develop some level of criteria. It’s important we use our limited resources to correct the most glaring problems.” After Johnson and his colleagues compiled their report and presented it to the Internal Affairs Committee in 2000, the panel determined there “was nothing to be done for [East] First and Oleander,” he recalled, suggesting not much has changed in well over a decade. “The city wants solutions; they want happy citizens,” he said. “Believe me, if there was a solution for First and Oleander that actually made people happy, the city would be all over it.” Ω

Tree City snafu Chico nearly misses out on 30th year of urban-forest laurels arlier this month, the city of Oroville announced its recognition as Esecutive a Tree City USA by the Arbor Day Foundation for the 34th conyear. Meanwhile in Chico, which would be celebrating its

30th year with the same designation, nobody had remembered to fill out the online application. “An unfortunate side effect of the hits the city has taken in the last year is that we’ve lost a lot of institutional memory,” said Dan Efseaff, Chico’s parks and natural resources manager. “This is something that Denice [Britton, the city’s former urban-forest manager] would have had on her calendar and she’d have done like clockwork, but now we’re kind of picking up the pieces and figuring out what we’ve forgotten.” The “hits” Efseaff referred to were last year’s mass layoffs of city employees, which in June included the axing of Chico’s four-employee tree crew. A month after the crew was cut, Britton resigned from her still-unfilled position, with the ensuing turmoil leaving the future of Chico’s urban forest uncertain. In order to be named a Tree City, communities must meet four criteria outlined by the Arbor Day Foundation, which partners with the USDA Forest Service and the National Association of State Foresters for the program: They must have a tree board or department; a tree ordinance; an annual budget allocation of $2 per resident; and an official Arbor Day celebration and proclamation. Efseaff said he’s certain Chico still meets the requirements, and that the application is now moving forward, despite the fact that the city’s 2013-14 budget warned that cutting the tree crew could impact that status. “This year is Chico’s 30th year as a Tree City USA,” the document reads. “The City has a rich heritage of planting and caring for its trees. So staff will continue to hunt for grants to plant trees. But we can expect that the reduced investment will mean a lapse in recognition as a Tree City.” The application for Tree City recertification in 2014 was technically due to the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection’s state urban forester by Dec. 31, 2013. Efseaff said the Arbor Day Foundation and that department are working with him to ensure the status won’t lapse. “[T]he city has been in contact with us and is in the process of rectifying,” John Melvin, a state urban forester, confirmed via email. Chico has a three-person Tree Committee—a subset of the Bidwell Park and Playground Commission—as well as a tree ordinance. Efseaff said plans to celebrate Arbor Day—observed the last Friday of April and this year falling on April 25—are in the works. As for the budgetary component, the Arbor Day Foundation rec-

This sign that greets those coming into Chico on Highway 32 could lose its accuracy if the city doesn’t get recognized by the state for its urban-forest vitality. PHOTO BY KEN SMITH

ognizes Chico’s population at 87,500. Efseaff said that, despite cuts, city spending on trees far surpasses the required $175,000. “We spend a great deal more than that,” he explained. “The whole program, which includes some landscape maintenance but is mostly concerned with trees, is about three-quarters of a million dollars.” Without a dedicated manager, Efseaff is the man most

responsible for the health of Chico’s urban forest, which numbers more than 28,000 trees. “Anytime you have fewer resources, it makes things more challenging, but we’re adjusting,” he said. “We have some staff doing the actual work and some staff managing contracts with tree contractors.” Since cutting the tree crew, the city has contracted with two companies for most of the work: Placentia-based George Salinas Tree Care for removals, and local company Petersen Tree Care for emergency services. There are also three city employees—including certified arborist David Bettencourt—who do some general maintenance with assistance from workers in other departments. “It’s not the same as having a tree crew that’s working day in and day out, but we do have some tree workers,” Efseaff said. “We’ve managed to keep the largest emergencies from being a problem, but some people have expressed frustration [about lack of services],” he said. “For example, piles of branches are a lower priority when you don’t have the resources. Jobs like that, which might have taken us a day or two to get to in the past, could now take four weeks.” Though a fledgling citizen tree program—in which residents could receive saplings and education on how to plant and care for them—was abandoned when Britton’s departure left no one to manage it, Efseaff said a project in which community organizations are responsible for certain city trees is being developed. Stop NSA snooping The city has also started to auction removal In light of recent—and ongoing—revelations about the rights for trees with commercial value, such as extent of the National Security Agency’s gathering of black walnuts. Efseaff said two trees have been Americans’ personal information from the Web, Internet removed this way since last July, netting the city security is a growing concern. Internet-activist organimore than $20,000. zation Electronic Frontier Foundation has released a list of Chico remains committed to its canopy, he 10 easy security measures at eff.org. Here are some said, and to maintaining its Tree City USA stahighlights: tus, describing the requirements as “pretty modest, common-sense criteria.” • Use an end-to-end encryption program, such as Off-the-Record (OTR) “It’s an important program because it helps messaging, and encourage your friends to do the same. Encrypt your people recognize that a lot of work goes into hard drive as well. maintaining the city’s urban forest,” he said.

SIFT|ER

• Use strong passwords, and change them often. • Keep extra-sensitive info safe by keeping it on an encrypted external hard drive, or a secondary computer you don’t connect to the Internet.

—KEN SMITH kens@newsreview.com

NEWSLINES continued on page 10 February 20, 2014

CN&R 9


continued from page 9

Ecological restrictions Safety concerns put a hold on activities at Chico State environmental reserve ontroversy surrounding the CChico proper use of the 4,000-acre Big Creek Ecological Reserve

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(BCCER) began at its inception a dozen years ago, when the property was acquired ago by Chico State’s Research Foundation. The purpose of the reserve, which sits off Highway 32 about 10 miles east of Chico, is to provide ecological habitat for research and preservation—it supports more than 600 plant and 140 wildlife species. But because $1.69 million of the $3.8 million in federal and state funding came from the state Wildlife Conservation Board—an arm of what was then called the Department of Fish and Game, now known as the Department of Fish and Wildlife—hunting was allowed on the land 52 days a year. Some saw that as a conflict in purposes: Was the reserve there for education, research and preservation, or was it there to provide hunters with game in the form of wild turkeys, deer and quail? Others wanted public trail access to the land against the wishes of those who believed it needed environmental protection. The seemingly conflicting uses were ironed out over time, and harmony reigned on the reserve, with research by university students and field trips by elementary school students, as well as protection of the natural resources. That was the case until last October, when a deck attached to a house that came with the property collapsed, injuring 11 people. That

incident sparked the creation of a risk management team to assess the dangers presented by the reserve as well as the university’s legal liabilities. That three-person team is made up of Katy Thoma, director of the Research Foundation, Lori Hoffman, vice president of Business and Finance, and Karla Zimmerlee, chief counsel for Chico State President Paul Zingg. A report on the matter is expected by the end of April, but in the meantime, 10 programs that have used the reserve have been canceled for the spring semester, according to a report put together by Dulcy Schroeder, a member of the Technical Advisory Committee that wrote the reserve’s original management plan. Those programs include The Outdoor Classroom, which accommodates 1,000 fourth- and fifthgraders on field trips; a weekend hiking series for families; a fundraiser called Candles in the Classroom that brought in $35,000 last year to the BCCER for student ecological projects; and another that allows staff to apply for grants and donations that reportedly brought in $150,000 last year. Schroeder, who lives in Forest Ranch close to the reserve, said she thinks the university is overreacting. “Risk management is important for a university in this litigious time but there are no representatives on this [risk management] team who can speak to education or to the environment, the two missions with which the reserve and

Elementary school students explore the Big Chico Creek Ecological Reserve during a field trip. PHOTO COURTESY OF DULCY SCHROEDER

10 CN&R February 20, 2014

university have been entrusted,� she said in an email response to questions. “Every decision made so far has been driven by liability. Education and the environment haven’t made it to the table yet.� Risk management team members Hoffman and Thoma both directed questions about the reserve and their investigation to Joe Wills, the school’s director of public affairs. He said the programs were on temporary hiatus while the risk management team looks at potential risks and liabilities. “They are in the process of assessing the operations at the reserve,� Wills said in a recent phone interview. “That includes how to conduct operations, running the reserve, funding the reserve— all the various aspects of the operation. They are due to complete the assessment no later than the end of April.� Wills said access to the reserve by students is limited to times when faculty or staff members are available to escort them. It is the same with the elementary school field trips. “We had to contact some of those planning the field trips and tell them we couldn’t schedule them this spring, but that we’ll keep in contact with them,� Wills said. “We’ll have a plan going forward later this spring.� For her part, Schroeder has her doubts about the university’s intentions. “I think that the lack of transparency and lack of logic in decisions being made are a red flag,� she said. “It leaves one asking what the real reason is for these decisions seemingly to shut down the reserve.� Scott Huber, who recently resigned as the head of outdoor education on the reserve, said he thinks the goal may be to dismantle the whole system. “Is the effort here to find another owner or buyer for the property?� he asked in a recent interview. “It just seems like it’s gone beyond reasonable risk abatement.� Wills said he had not heard of any specific talk of the university divesting itself of the property. “I suppose when you are doing an assessment, you want to look at every aspect,� he said. “But I have not heard any discussion as to why we wouldn’t want to have the reserve, but then I’m not on the committee. So I don’t know what discussions they are having.� —TOM GASCOYNE tomg@newsreview.com


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Chico Fire Department Division Chief Bill Hack addresses the need for the city to accept a $5.29 million federal grant while Division Chief Shane Lauderdale (left) and Interim Fire Chief Keith Carter look on. PHOTO BY ROBERT SPEER

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Council questions whether Fire Department grant could be dangerous and further burden city coffers look a gift horse in YButoutheatshouldn’t mouth, the old saying goes. their meeting Tuesday,

Feb. 18, members of the Chico City Council not only peered into the horse’s mouth and counted its teeth, they examined the contents of its stomach and gave it a colonoscopy, as well. Can’t be too careful, they seemed to be saying. Even a good horse can go lame. And it was indeed a good horse: a $5.29 million two-year federal grant that would create 15 new positions in the city’s stretched-tothe-max Fire Department, generate $700,000 for the depleted general fund, and require that the city put up no matching dollars. To the many firefighters in the audience and their supporters, it was a no-brainer: Take the money, and the city will be safer, they told the council. Not so fast, council members said. Yes, it’s a bunch of money, but we have questions and doubt— many of them. Some were concerned because they didn’t learn of the grant until recently and hadn’t had sufficient time to study it before the Feb. 24 acceptance deadline. They chided the department for the lack of communication while praising it for doing the hard work of obtaining the grant. They also worried about a provision that disallows any layoffs in the department during the life of the grant. As Councilman Sean Morgan explained it, should the city need to make further budget cuts, it could be forced to cut

police positions, something it doesn’t want to do. The possibility of obtaining a hardship waiver in that case struck some council members as unreliable. Finally, they worried that the grant could have unanticipated ancillary costs to the city and that the temporarily hired personnel could come before the council in two years (or four, if the grant is extended) demanding to keep their jobs. Chico received the Staffing

for Adequate Fire and Emergency Response, or SAFER, grant specifically because the Federal Emergency Management Agency recognized that its Fire Department was grievously understaffed because of the recession. It’s the largest such grant any California city received this year and the eighth-largest in the nation, as Councilwoman Ann Schwab noted. The award will allow the department to restore full service to two engine companies, Company 1 (downtown), which has been operating only half time, and Company 3 (airport), which has been mostly closed. Response times will improve and more of the city will be covered, explained Division Chief Bill Hack, who along with Interim Fire Chief Keith Carter and Division Chief Shane Lauderdale explained the grant to the council. Hack sought to allay Morgan’s fears that the grant might put the city in a budgetary box by noting that it allows nongrant positions to be vacated by attrition. Some 17

department personnel are nearing retirement age, he noted. A provision that allows the city to fill two of the 15 positions with current employees is a sweetener. It will save the city $700,000 during the two years of the grant—and more after that if the grant is renewed, as most are, Hack said. Fifteen audience members spoke on the matter, and all supported approving the grant. Two of them, Mark Ristine and Andrea Zigan, noted that the quality of fire protection greatly affects the cost of homeowner’s insurance. The better the service, the lower the rate, they said. John Kelso, head of the local firefighters’ union, pointed out that firefighters had worked hard to drum up support for the grant, even going so far as to canvass downtown businesses on their off hours. They’ll get no financial benefit, he said; they’re behind it because “they love Chico and remember the level of service we had in 2008,” before layoffs hit. Ultimately, Vice Mayor Mark Sorensen, reprising the council’s concerns about the grant, moved to approve it on condition that the department agrees to limit overtime costs and that new hires be given written notice that their positions are temporary. When the motion passed 6-1, applause broke out. The lone dissenter, Councilman Randall Stone, said he simply couldn’t vote to lock down the budget but wasn’t entirely unhappy to be on the losing side.

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CN&R 11


EARTH WATCH

GREENWAYS Chico State professor Marianne Paiva, who teaches a class called Sociology of Stress, believes that the North State is particularly susceptible to acute effects of climate change.

FLOODING COULD LAST MONTHS

Unlike drought-sticken California, the United Kingdom is experiencing severe flooding that could last for some time to come. Groundwater levels in southern England are so high as a result of months of heavy rain that “even if the rain stopped today, so much water is soaking through the soil that levels are likely to keep rising for another two months,” according to a Feb. 11 article in the UK’s Sky News. Flood risk could remain high until May, according to Andy McKenzie, a British Geological Survey groundwater scientist. Boreholes used to measure water-table height are overflowing in some areas, with nine out of 14 deemed to have “exceptionally high levels” of groundwater. Last month, the groundwater level measured at one spot in Sussex was higher than at any time in the last 179 years.

CHEMICAL AXED FROM SUBWAY SUBS

The Subway restaurant chain has decided to remove a chemical from the bread it uses to make its sandwiches. Earlier this month, after Food Babe food blogger Vani Hart garnered more than 50,000 signatures during a petition drive, Subway announced that it would cease using the plastic-based additive azodicarbonamide as an ingredient in its bread, according to ABC News. The additive, which is used to produce air pockets in the foam of yoga mats and shoe soles, has been linked to allergies, asthma and respiratory problems. “The complete conversion to have this product out of the bread will be done soon,” Subway said in a statement.

HEAT-RELATED DEATHS EXPECTED TO RISE

The foggy, rainy United Kingdom is not the first place one thinks of when thinking of warm climates, yet it is expected to have a sharp rise over the next four decades in heat-related deaths due to climate change, a study says. Annually, heat-related deaths in the UK are predicted to go up by 257 percent by the year 2050, with the elderly being most at risk, according to the UK’s Guardian newspaper. Authors of the study, published in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health, predicted that by the 2020s, if nothing changes significantly, UK heatrelated deaths will increase by 66 percent. By the 2080s, a 535 percent increase in such deaths is anticipated. “During periods of warmer weather, higher temperatures can lead to greater-thanusual stress on the body caused by heat and higher levels of air pollution, which can aggravate the symptoms of those with chronic conditions, such as cardiovascular and respiratory conditions,” said Dr. Sotiris Vardoulakis, co-author of the study. Send your eco-friendly news tips to Christine G.K. LaPado-Breglia at christinel@newsreview.com.

12 CN&R February 20, 2014

Coping with climate change

PHOTO BY CHRISTINE G.K. LAPADO-BREGLIA

A look at the psychological effects of a changing climate

by

Evan Tuchinsky

W risks high in the North State, and extreme weather events striking all over ith drought and wildfire

the country, discussion of climate change has centered on physical effects. But what about mental effects? What about impacts of environmental shifts on the psyche? That’s the focus of a growing field known as climate-change psychology. Researchers and therapists have begun delving into human cognition to determine how people react to global conditions, and what those reactions mean moving forward. “Most centrally, there’s the issue of anxiety,” said Dr. Renee Lertzman, a psychologist and adjunct faculty member at UC San Francisco. She is also part of an international organization, the Climate Psychology Alliance, devoted to “understanding human responses to climate change.” She continued: “People are becoming increasingly anxious, and therefore either activated, or paralyzed and despairing— and there’s a whole spectrum in between. What happens when people are anxious, typically and historically, is they don’t necessarily behave at their best. “I honestly feel the confrontation with the reality of what climate change impli-

cates is so profound that most of us aren’t well-equipped to deal with it, and in the environmental sector, there isn’t really adequate acknowledgement of how profound it is on an existential level.” Ripple effects could be tsunami-sized. Consider this report from the National Wildlife Federation (NWF) Climate Education Program, whose title alone is telling: “The Psychological Effects of Global Warming on the United States— And Why the U.S. Mental Health Care System is not Adequately Prepared.” Among the assessments: • “[Climate change’s] specific effect on U.S. mental health, societal well-being and productivity will increase current U.S. expenditures on mental-health services, adding to our current $300 billion annual burden.” • “The estimated 60 million Americans who currently suffer from psychological disorders … will have a harder time finding publicly funded mental-health treatment programs as these budgets shrink in favor of more basic emergency-response services and community repairs.” • “[F]irst responders will need additional education and training to handle the

Psychology of climate change:

Go to www.climatepsychologyalliance.org to learn more about the Climate Psychology Alliance.

immediate psychological trauma and symptoms of climate-disaster victims.” • “[G]lobal climate change will have destabilizing effects on economically, politically and environmentally fragile nations. … Many of these crisis zones will draw in American fighting forces. … Wars have profound psychological effects on service members, their families and friends.” Those are just some of the implications. As Lertzman explained, “We’re talking about destabilization of a lot of things we take for granted.” Locally, psychological impacts

already register. Chico therapist Silona Reyman has observed distinct reactions, which seem to vary by individual, based on how close to home climate change hits. “What I find here is if there’s a direct and clear consequence to their livelihood, people are more concerned,” she said. “Other than that—and I think this is the indirect effect—people will comment on feeling out of their natural rhythm when we have weeks and weeks and weeks of sun when it’s supposed to be raining a little. It’s kind of disconcerting; it’s not the primary issue [for my clients], but it comes up.” Reyman also sees a link between high temperature and altered moods. The NWF report cites research correlating heat waves with upswings in violence, and “just anecdotally,” Reyman said, “people will talk


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more GREENWAYS continued on page 14

UNCOMMON SENSE ‘How many slaves work for you?’ According Slaveryfootprint.org, there are 27 million people worldwide working against their will and/or under inhumane conditions to harvest the raw materials and create the products the rest of us enjoy—from the Indian children who mine mica to put the sparkle in our makeup, to the Chinese workers on the job 21 hours a day making our soccer balls. The website has created a survey to measure each person’s slavery footprint. Answer a series of questions (such as “What electronic devices you have?”) and rate your level of ethically sourced products, and the site will give you your unsettling slavery-footprint number, as well as information on what you can do to help fight slavery.

YOU’RE WELCOME, NATURE.

about feeling just agitated or unusually edgy when it’s hot, when it’s oppressive.” Marianne Paiva, a professor in Chico State’s Sociology Department, says the North State is particularly susceptible to specific, acute effects of climate change—namely the implications of water scarcity and fires. She cites as an example how area farmers have invested in drilling deeper wells for fear of losing their farms and orchards to drought. “When you’re in a place like the North State, those fears are realized much more easily and much more directly than if you live in a very urban area,” she said. “Because we have a much more visceral relationship with the environment, we’re going to see those effects more dramatically, and they’re going to affect how we live every single day.”

Cataclysms also seem more immediate. Rather than just an occasional earthquake or tornado, the North State has seen frequent wildfires, and Paiva also recalls the Glenn County flood of 1997 that strained the local levees. She was a paramedic at the time, on duty for 72 hours straight, going door to door in Hamilton City to make sure homeowners evacuated properties at risk. “There’s only so much emergency medical [and] so much emergency fire response available,” she said. “So, from that aspect, we’re going to see a lot more strain on those resources, because they are going to be the first line of defense when the natural disaster turns into a human disaster, and those people are going to be overwhelmed. … The services from those institutions are going to be strained, and the people within those institutions are going to be strained.” Clearly, climate change presents an array of challenges. “The lesson in this,” Paiva said, “is that mental-health professionals need to encourage community building and strong social ties. We need to be anticipating the scope of both the drought and possible wildfires that could wipe out towns or large neighborhoods in the area. … The effects of these things aren’t necessarily things that mentalhealth professionals would prepare their clients for; mental-health professionals would deal with the aftermath of individual psychological and community trauma.” Climate-change psychology may well provide such strategies. Ω

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CN&R 13


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IT IS A COMPLETE SENTENCE

GET ON THE FRACTIVIST BUS It is not too early to make plans to attend what is being billed as “the largest anti-fracking mobilization in our state’s history,” as Zack Malitz, the campaign manager of CREDO Action, put it in a recent email. Busloads of fractivists from all over California—Eureka, the Bay Area, the Central Valley and the Central Coast, Southern California and, notably, Chico—will descend upon the State Capitol in Sacramento on Saturday, March 15, at 1 p.m., for the huge Don’t Frack California event. Malitz had this to say about Brown’s handling of California’s water crisis as it is relates to fracking: “[E]ven as Gov. Brown urges ordinary Californians to take shorter showers and flush the toilet less frequently, he’s poised to sign off on Big Oil’s plan to massively ramp up waterintensive, planet-warming fracking for dirty oil. … “Gov. Brown can’t make it rain. Anti-fracking activist Dave Garcia is the cap- But he can stop Big Oil from fracktain for the Chico bus that will be traveling to ing California, endangering our Sacramento on March 15 to take part in the huge Don’t Frack California event at the State scarce water resources and loading the dice for more extreme Capitol. drought.” FILE PHOTO BY CHRISTINE G.K. LAPADO-BREGLIA Dave Garcia, the political chair of the Sierra Club’s Northern California Yahi chapter, is the bus captain for the Chico bus heading down to River City to let Gov. Jerry Brown know just how many Californians are against fracking in the Golden State. “This is California’s worst historic drought and we can’t devote precious water to fracking,” Garcia (pictured) wrote in an email. “We need to protect our water, air, food and soil from the contamination of toxic carcinogenic frack fluids. Join in solidarity to tell Gov. Brown, ‘Don’t frack California!’” Sign up at www.bit.ly/DFCAbuslink to be one of the 60 fractivists on the Chico bus, which will leave at 10 a.m. on March 15 from Butte College’s Chico Center, returning at 6:30 p.m. A $20 donation to help offset expenses is requested, but student scholarships are available (call Garcia at 218-5133 or email him at rangerdave@mynvw.com for details) and no one will be turned away for lack of funds as long as there is an available seat on the bus. Go to www.tinyurl.com/fractivistfb and to dontfrackcalifornia.org to learn more. CATCH UP WITH BIONEERS The Chico Women’s Club (592 E. Third St.) is hosting

Serving Butte, Glenn & Tehama Counties

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14 CN&R February 20, 2014

two evenings of filmed presentations by speakers at last October’s annual National Bioneers Conference in San Rafael. Tonight’s (Feb. 20) program features: the world-traveled performance poet duo Climbing PoeTree; Aleut elder Ilarion Merculieff, speaking on women and leadership; University of Utah faculty member Nalini Nadkarni’s “Between Earth and Sky: Trees as Silent Teachers in Strident Times”; Maya Salsedo (pictured) presenting “The Youth Food Bill of Rights”; and architect/designer/author Jason McLennan on “Living Buildings and a Regenerative World.” & PREV. On the Feb. 27 program: Phaedra Ellis-Lamkins, CEO of anti-poverty organization Green for All, will present “Motherhood and Leadership”; professional surfer Kyle Thiermann offers “Surfing for Change”; Dekila Chungyalpa, director of the World Wildlife Fund’s Sacred Earth program, presents “Faiths for Conservation: The Hope of a New Environmental Movement”; and Australian permaculture-design expert Darren Doherty weighs in with “Regrarianism: Re-booting Agriculture for the Next 10,000 Years.” Suggested donation: $2 to $5; students free. Donations will be used toward scholarships to send students to future Bioneers conferences. Call 345-6324 for more inforMaya Salsedo mation.

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530-403-3238

EMAIL YOUR GREEN HOME, GARDEN AND COMMUNITY TIPS TO CHRISTINE AT CHRISTINEL@NEWSREVIEW.COM


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What was your first ride? My first bike was purple with white tires and “flare” tinsel streaming from the handlebars- I’ll never forget it. For some reason I would only learn how from a neighbor, sorry Mom and Dad! And today? My commute has ranged from 2.5 miles currently up to a 10 mile round trip over the years. I’ve always used my bike 95% of the time to commute and around town, using the many bike-friendly paths and routes and Lower Park whenever possible. What’s the best thing about your bike? My commuter bike is unique as I have put a lot of “me” in it! It’s very comfortable and practical but still catches the eye of a fellow bicycle aficionado. I can carry everything I need for work or errands, never get stuck in traffic, and always get primo parking! What would you most like car drivers to know? I’m a cyclist who follows the rules of the road. I think most drivers respect me as a cyclist and I respect them as drivers - we are subject to the same rules. I wish drivers wouldn’t wave me through a stop sign or a light when it is clearly their turn just because I’m on a bicycle and they think they’re being nice - it actually makes things more confusing and less safe.

Why DO you ride? I ride because it makes me feel independent and strong. I’m getting exercise, saving money, and fostering a less car-centric community all at the same time! The bicycle is an embodiment of Sustainability which is the foundation of how I live my life both personally and professionally. Mandi McKay Assistant Sustainability Coordinator, Sierra Nevada Brewery

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CN&R 15


THE PULSE

HEALTHLINES

POT PUSH IN CONGRESS

Members of Congress, including six representatives from California, are making a push for President Obama to remove marijuana from the federal government’s list of most dangerous drugs. Obama said in an interview with New Yorker magazine last month that he doesn’t consider marijuana any more harmful that alcohol, according to SFGate.com. But during a Jan. 31 interview with CNN, he said that possibly removing marijuana from Schedule 1, the federal government’s strictest prohibition of narcotics, was “a job for Congress.” However, the Controlled Substances Act allows the attorney general—a presidential appointee—to remove a drug from Schedule 1 if it has legitimate medical uses. As such, 18 members of Congress signed a letter to Obama on Feb. 12 that recommended moving marijuana to Schedule 3, which would authorize medical prescriptions and allow for legal marijuana businesses to deduct expenses from their taxes.

Elimination obsession How trendy elimination diets can spiral into disordered eating by

FEWER WITHOUT HEALTH INSURANCE

The rate of uninsured Americans has hit a fiveyear low, though it remains unclear whether implementation of the federal Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act is responsible. A Gallup poll, which surveyed 19,000 adults between Jan. 2 and Feb. 10, found that an estimated 16 percent of Americans remain uninsured, the lowest rate since 2009, according to California Healthline. Compared to the last quarter of 2013, the rate of people enrolled in Medicaid has risen from 6.6 percent to 7.4 percent, while the rate of workers insured through their employers decreased by two percentage points, to 43.5 percent, in the same time period. Gallup noted that any effect the ACA will have on uninsured rates might not be evident for several more months, as open enrollment for 2014 doesn’t end until March 31.

DON’T ANGER THE CAT!

Being bitten by a cat, while less likely than being bitten by a dog, poses a greater risk of infection, a study finds. A three-year retrospective study published in The Journal of Hand Surgery looked at the records of 193 people who came to Mayo Clinic Hospital with cat bites to the hand, according to The New York Times. The researchers found that, unlike dog bites—which can tear skin and break bones, but tend to leave open puncture wounds that are easy to disinfect—cat bites can inject bacteria deep into hard-to-reach tendons and bones. Of the 154 cat-bite victims who were treated with oral antibiotics as outpatients, 21 of them were eventually hospitalized, with complications including abscesses, loss of joint mobility and nerve involvement. The most common cause of infection was an aggressive bacterium, Pasteurella multocida, which is found in the mouths of roughly 90 percent of healthy cats. Send your health-related news tips to Howard Hardee at howardh@newsreview.com.

16 CN&R February 20, 2014

Howard Hardee howardh@newsreview.com

F Recovery Center of California in Sacramento—a facility specializing in eatingor the staff at the Eating

disorder treatment—assessing a patient who is suffering from an eating disorder often involves separating fact from fabrication. For instance, many patients will insist they’ve adopted a harmfully restrictive diet due to a gluten sensitivity or intolerance, said Director Jennifer Lombardi during a recent phone interview. “But then we find out they’ve never been tested [for gluten sensitivity], that they’re using that as an excuse to justify their eating behaviors,” she said. As diets that categorically omit certain food groups—such as the Paleo, glutenfree, raw, vegan and lacto-ovo diets— become increasingly popular, Lombardi’s staff has seen a mirroring trend: patients whose extreme approach to dieting becomes an unhealthy—or even deadly— obsession. Such behavior was first noted in 1997 by Steven Bratman, medical director for Integrative Medicine and Educational Programs at Prima Healthcare in Ohio, who coined the term orthorexia nervosa. “It’s not anorexia, it’s not bulimia, but it is disordered eating, nonetheless, and it can have very dire medical complications that go along with it,” Lombardi said. While orthorexia has not been officially listed in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, a widely accepted standard in the mental-health industry, Lombardi explained that many in her field view orthorexia as a parallel disorder to anorexia. But there’s a clear distinction between the two: While those suffering from anorexia focus mainly on quantity of food consumed, those with

orthorexia focus on quality. “What I see is that they start out dieting in a purist mindset—they want to eat right, want to eat healthy, don’t want to put anything into their body that is impure,” she said. “What happens is that it spirals down, they continue to get more and more restrictive, and the end result is a loss of a significant amount of weight and or having medical complications.” Lombardi believes that, just as a single glass of wine might trigger an individual biochemically predisposed to alcoholism, beginning an elimination diet can serve as a gateway for someone predisposed to disordered eating. “They get hooked,” she said. “When they start eliminating foods and engaging in intensive exercise, it becomes very difficult for them to stop.” Curiously, Lombardi has noted that orthorexia does not go hand in hand with body-image distortion the way it does with anorexia. In fact, many orthorexia patients express embarrassment at their emaciated physical appearance, “but can’t

Jennifer Lombardi, director of the Eating Recovery Center of California, is an anorexia survivor and orthorexia-awareness advocate. PHOTO COURTESY OF THE EATING RECOVERY CENTER OF CALIFORNIA

stop their restrictive eating pattern, all because they can’t let go of the purist perspective on food intake.” The key to successful treatment, she said, is breaking the pattern. In order for the patient to recover and regain a healthy relationship with food, they must abandon their rigid dietary approach and “learn to eat intuitively again.” Lombardi should know. She began

struggling with body image at age 11, dabbling in taking diet pills and compulsively exercising. By the time she turned 17, she had full-blown anorexia, beginning a fiveyear struggle with the disorder that nearly killed her. As a young girl, Lombardi recalled, HEALTHLINES continued on page 18

APPOINTMENT FOOT MAINTENANCE 101 Feather River Hospital’s popular monthly Dinner with a Doctor series continues on Thursday, Feb. 27, at First Assembly of God (955 Elliot Road in Paradise) beginning at 6 p.m. This month, Dr. Robert Victor will lecture on maintaining healthy feet. Dinner is $12, but the lecture is free. Space is limited; call 876-7154 to make a reservation.


Taking life back from hip and knee pain When the pain you are experiencing in your hips or knees severely restricts your ability to walk or perform simple activities, it may be time to talk to an orthopedic surgeon and consider a joint replacement procedure. Mobility is a vital part of life and Feather River Hospital’s award winning Joint Replacement Center of Excellence is seeing to it that patients get back to the life they know and love faster. This includes patients who would consider themselves too young for a replacement. Feather River Hospital surgeons use unique, advanced techniques that require smaller incisions and damage less muscle tissue. These techniques allow faster recovery and a shorter hospital stay. Because surgeons are part of a skilled care team that provides a consistently high level of treatment from pre-op through recovery, patients are able to be active again more quickly. The care team comprised of surgeons, nurses, therapists and even dieticians also focuses on the patient experience and the benefit of compassionate, patient-focused care in promoting healing. This approach has helped the program to reach a level of excellence recognized by awards such as a 5-Star Rating in Total Knee Replacements from Healthgrades. Feather River Hospital is also a Blue Distinction Center+ for Hip and Knee Replacements. “Blue Distinction Centers

set themselves apart by adhering to best practices in patient safety and surgical care and producing consistently strong outcomes with fewer complications,” says Marcus Thygeson, M.D., senior vice president and chief health officer at Blue Shield of California. The Joint Replacement Center of Excellence offers an innovative, proactive approach to care for total knee and total hip replacement patients utilizing pre-operative learning classes and group therapy. When recovering in the hospital, patients recover as a group – exercising, enjoying various activities, and providing support and encouragement to each other. Total joint replacement patients average a hospital stay of only one to three days. Most patients are putting weight on their new joint later in the same day that they have their surgery. For patients who once suffered from joint pain, being able to hike, golf, play with their children or even ride a motorcycle again greatly improves their lives. Feather River Hospital’s joint replacement program is helping them to achieve these excellent outcomes as fast as possible. For more information about the Feather River Hospital Joint Replacement Center of Excellence call (530) 876-7243 or visit www.frhosp.org. To learn more about Blue Distinction Centers for Specialty Care®, please visit www.bcbs.com or contact your Local Plan.

5 9 7 4 P e n t z R o a d Pa R a d i s e , C a 9 5 9 6 9 / ( 5 3 0 ) 8 7 7 - 9 3 6 1 / w w w. f R h o s P. o R g

February 20, 2014

CN&R 17


HEALTHLINES

23rd Annual

Repertory Dance Concert 2014

Keeping Dance Alive! Fri., March 7 7:30 p.m.

Sat., March 8 2:00 p.m.

Chico Community Ballet in a special presentation of

Peter and the Wolf

THINK FREE.

continued from page 16

she was anxious and high-strung much of the time, and as she got older, became increasingly concerned with how she was perceived by others. That emotional hard-wiring, combined with a chaotic family dynamic that often felt out of control, led her to focus on an aspect of her life she believed she could manage—her weight and physical appearance. Though she declined to get specific about how much weight she lost, she said that “as a professional in the field and knowing what I know now, I’m very fortunate to be alive. ... If I had walked into our treatment center now, I would need 24-hour care. It was really that intense. “I survived that, and I’m very fortunate, because not everyone does.” A turning point for Lombardi came when she realized that her eating disorder would eventually interfere with her plans of raising a family. “Not only was I putting the possibility of having a family at risk, I was [also] putting the possibility of me having any healthy relationships at risk, because the relationship I gave the most energy and attention to was the one I had with my eating disorder,” she said. Though the road to recovery was “winding and bumpy,” Lombardi’s struggle with anorexia has been in the rear-view mirror for 20 years. She attributes her success to a strong network of support: “[I had] people who were willing to be brutally honest with me and not mince words about how much danger I was in,” she said. “It’s critical that people have a support system of people not afraid to stand up to the eating disorder.”

A week for awareness:

National Eating Disorder Awareness Week is Feb. 23 to March 1. Go to www.nedawareness.org to learn more. For more information on orthorexia and the research of Steven Bratman, go to www.orthorexia.com. To seek help for an eating disorder, call the Eating Recovery Center of California in Sacramento at (916) 574-1000.

Given the shame and secre-

tiveness associated with eating disorders in general, it’s difficult to gauge their prevalence in certain geographic areas or among age groups, and Chico State’s campus is no exception, said Stephanie Chervinko, a psychologist with the university’s Counseling and Wellness Center. “There’s a lot more of it going on than there are people at a point where they’re ready to come in and seek help,” she said. “It’s really hard for people with eating disorders to admit that they have a problem.” Indeed, the very root of many eating disorders—a desire for control—can be a roadblock to seeking treatment. As Chervinko explained, to ask for help is to admit “that this is something they no longer have control over.” More than anything, both Chervinko and Lombardi emphasized that eating disorders, regardless of how they were triggered or how deeply engrained they’ve become, are treatable. “Whether you’re 12 or 65, it’s possible to recover,” Lombardi said, “but the only way to get better is to let the people in your life support you and be willing to take the risk of doing something different.” Ω

WEEKLY DOSE A glass at dawn

Presented by

Laxson Auditorium CSU, Chico $14-$18 University Box Office

898-6333

www.chicoperformances.com 18 CN&R February 20, 2014

Derek Ralston photo

The human body is about 70 percent water, so obviously drinking water is important. But having a tall glass of H2O first thing in the morning—prior to eating—has a host of health benefits, including: • Renewing cells: Drinking water upon awakening increases the production rate of new blood and muscle cells. • Losing weight: Drinking chilled water, particularly, speeds up the body’s metabolism. • Purifying the colon: By drinking water before eating, you’re cleansing your colon and aiding nutrient absorption.

Source: www.newhealthguide.org


5

YEARS IN YEARS ININ BUSINESS YEARS BUSINESS BUSINESS

Green Green Green

PAULA’S PHOTOART

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Green Crystena hemingway and Lorna hiLLman YEARS IN BUSINESS YEARS IN BUSINESS YEARS IN

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“Every picture tells a story”

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A letter from the owners. MONTHS IN MONTHS IN BUSINESS

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“Happy Birthday to us!!!

What a beautiful adventure these past 5 years have been, and we are looking forward to next 5! Be sure to come to our BirthDay Party...details coming soon! Three Sixty Ecotique has never been so good! Our racks are full of all the name brands your big hearts desire thanks to our bi-weekly shopping trips to metropolitan cities and beyond....we leave local thrifting to you! We LOVE what we do and it brings us pure pleasure to share it with you Chico! Here’s a few little details about us personally:

genuinely care about our customers satisfaction. Here are a few more things that we LOVE: colours, trees, flowers, patterns, textures, friends, love, freckles, music, dancing, vintage clothes, semi-precious stones, smoothies, travels, smiles, and hugs.” In Love, Crystena and Lorna

We are...Friends, mothers, ambitious followers of our hearts. We thrive on creativity and together are a perfect balance in business. We have big dreams and we know that dreams come true. We value integrity and

Since 2009, Paula Schultz (owner of Paula’s Photoart) has enjoyed transforming everyday photographs into her own unique style of photoart. Paula’s artistic and edgy style creates images that reflect her view of the world. She encourages people to envision the world beyond what reality presents and what the camera captures. Paula’s distinctive style allows her to tell a story with each picture. Paula’s images of dramatic blackand-white cloud-shrouded skies, daring aerial maneuvers, breathtaking vistas, and colorful dance performers have been enjoyed by people all over the world. She specializes in personal photo shoots, business advertising photo shoots, special occasions, community events and festivals. Paula’s Photoart has won awards and has been published in: Cowboys

511 main st. / ChiCo 342-8752 / threesixtyeCotique.Com

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YEARS IN BUSINESS

Local

and Indians Magazine, Outdoor California Magazine, Sun Dial Film Festival, The Snow Goose Festival, California State Parks Foundation, The Aviation Historian (UK), Indian Country Today (NY), Seecalifornia. com, and the popular “Bidwell Mansion puzzle”.

PaulasPhotoart.smugmug.com PaulasPhotoart@gmail.com

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carolyn andGreen Green brian kanabrocki

harold & Green catherine park

YEARS IN BUSINESS

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Since 1974 husband MONTHS IN and MONTHSwife, IN BUSINESS BUSINESS Harold and Catherine Park, have been working side-by-side serving three generations of customers in their unique Asian imports store. What has now become Chico’s very own Downtown Chinatown, House of Rice offers a unique blend of Asian food, clothing, home décor, jewelry, herbal remedies and so much more. House of Rice also has the largest selection of teas and sake in town. Perhaps some of the most striking items in the shop are the pieces of Oriental art and Harold’s very own photography. Both are as beautiful as they are intriguing.

MONTHS IN

BUSINESS

LOCAL

LOCAL

such a plethora of options it is nice to know that these kind, thoughtful and well educated owners can help you make the right decision for what you are looking for. Stop in and discover the wonders of Chico’s Downtown Chinatown!

If you have any questions during your shopping excursion to House of Rice, Catherine and Harold are more than happy to assist you. They can tell you anything you need to know about everything in the store. With

338 broadway / (530)893-1794 / chico mon-sat 10am-5:30pm

MONTHS IN

BUSINESS

The Handle Bar, now open for 14 months, has become of the MONTHS INone MONTHS IN go-to BUSINESS BUSINESS spots in Chico for a casual atmosphere and world class beer. The popular Chico hangout has quickly established itself as one of the leading players in the craft beer scene, combining outstanding, unique pub fare and a rotating selection of the finest craft beers. They are passionate about the beer they select for their taps and, even more critical, about the service that guests receive while at The Handle Bar. That focus has paid off; guests continue to return looking for new brews to explore and last Fall they were rewarded with their first “Best of Chico” award; Best Watering Hole for Townies. “We couldn’t have asked for a better compliment and it’s all been incredibly rewarding.” said Carolyn.

and finding new brews to share with our guests is what drives us.” remarked Brian. So, if you have a passion for craft beer, and would like to try something new, check out The Handle Bar; a “Chico Casual” atmosphere where you can meet for lunch or after work. Great Beer. Good Friends. Much Laughter.

“We love the social aspect and creativity in the craft beer world

2070 e 20th st #160 / ChiCo 894-beer (2337) / www.faCebook.Com/handlebarChiCo February 20, 2014

CN&R 19


Un-easy

jobs

The faces behind five cringe-inducing businesses

S

ome people work in fields that aren’t for the squeamish, but the services they provide are often important and necessary to our everyday way of life. In the CN&R’s special Business issue, you’ll be introduced to several local businesspeople whose professions appear to have a disconcerting aspect to them. They include a mobile butcher, a funeral director, a porta-potty maven, an exterminator and a woman whose specialty is giving colonics. These folks gave the CN&R behind-the-scenes access, speaking candidly about their work, which, depending on your perspective, may not be so unsettling after all. You decide.

20 CN&R February 20, 2014

Butcher with a Mobile slaughter operator takes

B

everly Chandler surprised herself seven months ago when she began assisting her brother-in-law, George Westbrook, owner of George’s Mobile Slaughtering and Custom Butchering, with his business out in the field. “It didn’t bother me in the slightest,” she said, referring to the duo’s work slaughtering farm animals. Interestingly, that wasn’t the case for Westbrook, who said it took him quite a while to adjust from the job of cutting meat in a butcher shop to the front-end job of actually taking the life of animals raised for consumption. That was 13 years ago, and based on Westbrook’s work today, it’s clear he remains respectful of livestock. Last Tuesday morning (Feb. 11), Westbrook’s schedule had him in a bucolic Durham neighborhood of gentleman farms. Here, a customer hired him to slaughter three spring lambs that were closing in on being a year old. “The job I am providing will be a humane job,” he said, just before going into a barn for a wether, a castrated male sheep. Slaughtering an animal is not for the faint of heart. However, as Westbrook said, the sheep did not appear to suffer. As he held the wether, Chandler rendered it unconscious by carefully positioning a bolt gun to its head and pulling the trigger. The stunned animal fell to the ground, and moments later Westbrook used a butchering knife to make a deep

slit at its throat. The sheep made no sound throughout the process, although its legs, due to its nervous system, did flail for a short time. Westbrook reached down and patted the animal as it bled out, just as one would do to a pet dog lying on the ground. “I’m always sure to give thanks to my animals,” he later said about that interaction with the sheep. “It makes me feel a little bit better about what I do.” When the animal was still, Westbrook used the knife to skin its hocks—the elbow region of the back legs—where he placed large hooks connected to a hoist mounted to his rig, a Chevy truck with a boxed-in cargo area used to hold carcasses. The sheep was pulled up off the ground and Westbrook and Chandler then set to work on eviscerating— removing the organs—and skinning it. All told, the process took about 15 minutes. As he later explained, hogs take him about 20 minutes, while cattle (which are shot with a .22 rifle) take about 40 minutes. The 32-year-old Westbrook got into

the butchering business somewhat by happenstance. He’d been a student in environmental studies at Feather River College in Quincy, hoping to go to work for the U.S. Forest Service, when a dearth of jobs led him to work as a butcher. He learned his craft while working in Cottonwood, his hometown, for Bowman Meat Co. After a couple of years, he decided to


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butte 2-1-1 YEARS IN BUSINESS

Community Resource Helpline

pride in offering a humane service open up his own shop, George’s Custom Meat Co. in Quincy, and the mobile operation helped him to bring in more business. There, in addition to cutting meat of domestic animals, he also butchers big game—an estimated 300 to 400 deer, elk, antelope and bear each year. Because Westbrook’s own shop is so far from many of his customers, he delivers to their meat cutters of choice—businesses all over the North State or further. The next day, in fact, he was heading to Reno, Nev. On this day, the carcass of the wether and of two other sheep from the Durham farm would be dropped off in Oroville at Foothill Meat Co., where they would be aged for about 10 days and then cut and wrapped for the customer’s personal consumption. As Westbrook explained, he’s an exempt butcher, meaning the animals he works with are not intended for resale. During his outing Tuesday morning, Westbrook pointed to the grassy areas the sheep had eaten down, noting that livestock on small farms like this one are fed well and raised free of hormones.

Localhas 15 years’ Below, left to right: George Westbrook worth of butchering experience. He and his assistant, Beverly Chandler, use a bolt gun during the slaughter process. Westbrook finishes his work slaughtering a wether. The duo then drop off the animals at a butcher shop. PHOTOS BY MELANIE MACTAVISH

Green

LOCALpeople “I just appreciate Meet the who raise their animals meat man: right,” Westbrook said. For more info, He said that animals search for George’s Custom killed at their home are Meat Co. on under much less stress than Facebook or call they would be at an unfa283-3726. miliar slaughterhouse, and because of that, he insists the meat is a better quality. “The meat, I believe, is more tender,” he said. “A happier animal is more flavorful.” Westbrook said some of his customers stay inside their homes during his work. That was true on this day. When asked if anyone has had a last-minute change of heart about employing his services, he acknowledged that it does occasionally happen. “Every once in a while the person can’t take it and they end up keeping the animal as a pet, which is fine with us,” Westbrook said. But there are also many who want to be present at those end moments. “A lot of people like to be there for their animals to make them feel more comfortable,” he said. “Most people grow up this way—raising the animals [for food]. It’s the way of the farm life knowing you’re going to take one life to feed many others.” —Melissa Daugherty melissad@newsreview.com

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Help starts here,BUSINESS with one simBUSINESS ple phone call! 2-1-1 is your new 24 hour helpline that connects you to free and low-cost services available in your community. 2-1-1 is an easy-to-remember number that helps people navigate through a sometimes confusing maze of information and agencies. 2-1-1 helps people assess their needs, discover options, and links them directly to the local resources that can help. Whether you are a student, part of a working family, an older adult, a single parent, or someone just trying to make ends meet during tough times, Butte 2-1-1 wants to help you connect to the services you need.

When you call 2-1-1, a Butte Information Specialist helps you find resources such as food, housing, job training, family support, recreational activities, tax preparation assistance, transportation, support groups, substance abuse treatment, health insurance, medical care, and more. Calling 2-1-1 is free, confidential, and multilingual. You can also connect with 2-1-1 by texting your zip code to 898211. One simple number, one easy way to find help!

Phone: 2-1-1 / helPCentral.org butte211.org

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michael thomas YEARS IN BUSINESS

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“Meet meMONTHS at Tres!” These are IN MONTHS IN BUSINESS BUSINESS four words that ensure a good time. Whether you’re meeting to eat, drink, or both you will not be disappointed. An excellent staff combined with consistently good, fair priced food ensure every visit is top notch. Their long bar has long been a favorite place to meet, and their margaritas are consistently voted “Best of Chico” by CN&R readers. (Try the avocado margarita). You can sample from the 120 premium tequilas beautifully displayed behind the bar. Sit at the taco bar to watch as the chef prepare some of the restaurants most popular dishes. The outdoor patio gives you a front row seat to watch the vibrent downtown Chico.

The restaurant is a great destination for a family night out, to celebrate a special occasion, hang out with the guys or the girls, or anything in between! Gift cards are available and make great gifts. And now Tres has a Loyalty club. Join them on Facebook for regular specials for their loyal patrons. For 26 years, Tres Hombres has been one of Chico’s premier restaurants.

1st & Broadway / downtown ChiCo 342-0425 February 20, 2014

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Thank you Chico for INSweetwater MONTHS MONTHS IN BUSINESS BUSINESS Day Spa’s Great Success After only being open since November of 2012 you designated Sweetwater Day Spa to be the Patricia Thatcher are the motherLOCAL town’s favorite. They want to give daughter team, along with supportive a huge thank you to the people of husband’s Justin Allison and Don Chico and to their outstanding staff Thatcher, that provide quality serfor making them CNR’s 2013 Best of vices and customer attention only Chico - Day Spa. found in a weekend get away spa. No membership is required here to expeAs a result of this success and with rience Chico’s Best! the New Year came a new business...a new member to their family. Sweetwater Day Spa acquired Cloud 9 Day Spa in December of 2013. Many of you are familiar with Cloud 9 located inside popular fitness center, Chico Sports Club. They have already made some recognizable changes to Cloud 9 by adding some “Sweetwater” touches to their sister spa. Both Sweetwater and Cloud 9 are a local family owned and operated day spa. Christan Allison and

sweetwater / 1031 village lane / ChiCo / 894.7722 / www.sweetwaterChiCo.Com Cloud 9 / 260 Cohassett rd ste 190 / 343.4999 / www.Cloud9inChiCo.Com

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practicing for 24 years, and love the chance to get to know my wonderful patients! I love seeing the dental changes in my patients, but also love watching the changes a beautiful smile can make in their lives!”

BUSINESS BUSINESS orthodontics

–Dr. B. Scott Hood Dr. B. Scott Hood has proudly served the people and families of Chico since 1992 with efficient orthodontic treatments and gentle care. His practice has a familyfriendly atmosphere with the highest quality services for all ages. Dr. Hood’s practice offers braces for children, teens and adults as well as Invisalign® clear aligners, Invisalign Teen™ and the Damon® System. Dr. Hood and his talented staff have the experience and knowledge needed to provide a

WOMEN’S RESOURCE CLINIC

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truly gentle and comfortable visit, every time! Come in and visit them for a complimentary consultation. Dr. Hood will sit with you to talk about your plans for treatment and which services best fit your needs. Contact either their Chico or Paradise orthodontic office today!

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2755 ESPLANADE / ChiCo / 343.7021 5657 CLARK RD #5 / PARADiSE / 877.4951 WWW.hooDoRTho.CoM

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For the past Robin MONTHS31 IN years MONTHS IN Trenda hasBUSINESS been a BUSINESS local building contractor in Chico specializing in custom homes and remodeling. From the beginning, he was drawn to understanding strategies and methods of improving the environmental impact and livability of the homes he was building. Now, green building has become one of the fastest growing segments in the construction industry. “Invested, artistic, and strategic”, are three words to describe Robin. His specialty is listening to clients objectives, such as implementing energy-efficient design and materials to build innovative sustainable homes from the ground up. He utilizes a variety of strategies such as Straw Bale, Structural Insulated Panels (SIPs),

Advanced Framing, Solar Electric LOCAL and water, zero V.O.C. finishes, recycled materials, super efficient mechanical systems and more. His approach views the entire home as a system that works in concert. Robin continually educates himself on the latest green designs and technologies by working with architects, attending conferences, and reading and researching (a lot). Contact Robin to begin your project towards a greener home.

(530)342-8267 / ChiCo ChiCogreenbuilders@att.net / Ca liCense #462797 22 CN&R February 20, 2014

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For the past 17 INyears the MONTHS MONTHS IN BUSINESS BUSINESS Women’s Resource Clinic has been the hands and feet of Jesus ministering to over 19,000 hurting women in the community who either found themselves in an unplanned pregnancy or are hurting from the choice they made by having an abortion. In 1998 they began the Post Abortion Recovery Group at the Clinic. Since that time 114 women have gone through their Post Abortion Recovery Group classes where they have received healing through God’s love and forgiveness.

Brenda Dowdin, Executive Director

The Women’s Resource Clinic is a Christian ministry dedicated to helping women who find themselves in an unplanned pregnancy. All of the services that are provided at the clinic are free and include: pregnancy tests and verifications, ultrasound imaging for their cli-

Women’s Resource

ents, 24-hour hotline, education on pregnancy, adoption, the risks of abortion, a post abortion recovery support group for women and men, clothing and furnishings for babies and the Earn While You Learn Parenting Program which helps educate mothers and fathers in the community to be good parents.

Clinic

115 West second Ave. / chico, cA 95926 530-897-6101 / 24hr hotline 530-897-6100


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From theMONTHS young ofIN13, IN age MONTHS BUSINESS BUSINESS Kirk Bengtson found a rewarding challenge to create jewelry. His father was a dentist and sparked Kirk’s interest in design when he introduce him to lost wax casting. Kirk loves the magic of casting and still finds fulfillment in the technical skills of carving waxes, finishing or setting diamonds, and creatively designing aesthetically pleasing pieces. Kirk apprenticed with the Venice Lapidary Guild where he cleaned and carved waxes. He opened Kirk’s Jewelry in 1973 after graduating from Chico State University. Kirk’s Jewelry first opened for business in an intimate second floor space on West 3rd Street in Chico. As reputation and clientele grew, so did the need for more display and studio space. The stu-

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dios and gallery relocated to the corner of 3rd and Salem in downtown Chico where it stands today. Entering the gallery, you’ll find a beautiful mahogany showroom filled with exquisite designs using only the finest of gems and diamonds. Kirk’s Jewelry has a reputation for integrity of design and workmanship, and for personalized service to its clients!

246 WEST 3RD STREET / CHICO 891–0880 / WWW.KIRKSJEWELRY.COM

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Floral & Gift

804 Broadway / at the junction / chico / 342-4788

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He has over 40 years experience in the business and specializes in leather jackets and motorcycle gear for both men and women. If you can’t find exactly what you want, he can special order it for you, as he works with a wide variety of suppliers. Alan makes most of his hats, belts and Indian

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LOCAL LOCAL Browse their website at www.

Christian & Johnson Flowers and Gifts has been serving the Chico community for over a century! Started in 1907 by Annie Bidwell’s gardener, it carries the names of its second owners, Senator Ray Johnson and his wife, Lorraine (Christian) Johnson. Christian & Johnson has a strong tradition of quality and creative floral design, and they offer a wide variety of beautiful and unique gifts and décor.

ChristianAndJohnson.com, or stop by their showroom on Vallombrosa Avenue, next to Morning Thunder and T. Bar. The crew at C&J says THANK YOU, CHICO for over a century of business!

Owner Melissa Heringer and her Design Staff have many years of experience in floral design. They love fresh, gorgeous flowers, and they appreciate their wonderful customers!

250 vallombrosa ave / ChiCo 530 891-1881 / www.Christianandjohnson.Com

artifact reproductions found in the store, and many of the wallets, slippers and purses. Swords and knives for collectors and reenactors are also available. Alan also offers quality leather hides and supplies for craftersmen.

MARKTHAUPHOTOGRAPHY.COM

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Alan Meigs’ business born MONTHS IN MONTHS was IN BUSINESS of youthfulBUSINESS creativity. He made things from scraps of leather left behind when his father, an avid sportsman, repaired his outdoor equipment. He first realized the value of this hobby when a friend saw a pair of expensive knee-high moccasins in a store window. She couldn’t afford them, so Alan made her a pair! After a stint in the service, where he continued to refine his craft, Alan opened Iron Mountain Leather.

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“Waldorf” or “Anthroposophic” education began in post-war Germany as a response to the industrial revolution. Blue Oak School, which is a tuition free, public Waldorf school, opened in 2001, here in Chico. Teacher Susan Whittlesey, an aide, a part-time director, and a charter council, were in place to support the education of twelve Kindergarden students at a part-time church facility. Today, Blue Oak School has a student population of over 390, and serves the local community with full availability for students from Kindergarden through eighth grade!

Blue Oak class, will graduate from high school with a love of learning, a great degree of emotional intelligence, and an ability to think critically and creatively as a direct result to their Waldorf foundation in education. Blue Oak is committed to nourishing and educating the whole child, based on the natural developmental model. The Waldorf curriculum is an inspirational and disciplined approach that infuses learning with enthusiasm, creativity and significance.

In 2014, the Kindergarden students who were in that original

450 W EAST AVE / CHICO 530-879-7483 / WWW.BLUEOAKCHARTERSCHOOL.ORG February 20, 2014

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Rachel Thayne MONTHSoriginally IN MONTHS INintendBUSINESS BUSINESS ed her Esthetics training to be just a temporary thing. “It was an interesting field to me, and to be perfectly honest, I wanted to get the professional discounts,” she said. But then she fell in love with the business. “I love that I can help people feel better about themselves.” Busy Body Waxing focuses on two specialties: waxing and eyelash extensions. With high quality, hard wax and a fast but thorough approach – even Brazilian waxes take only fifteen minutes – Busy Body Waxing gives its clients the best possible experience at a very affordable price.

LOCAL lives,” she said of her business. “It makes it easy to focus on others instead of yourself.” Call Busy Body Waxing today to schedule your eyelash extension or fifteen-minute waxing appointment!

Owner, Derek Parsons MONTHS IN MONTHS started IN BUSINESS Tattoo BUSINESS working at Victory in 2001. In 2012, he bought the business from previous owner Kip Delaney, who he still considers to be a good friend and source of knowledge. Parsons has a passion for the history and tradition of tattooing. “I got into tattooing and being tattooed because the historical, traditional tattoo imagery really spoke to me,” he said. “I still think a rose with a dagger through it is the coolest tattoo.” His work at Victory Tattoo reflects that love of tradition, as well as a commitment to bringing the best of new technology in the form of better pigments and upgraded equipment.

170 RIO LINDO AVE / CHICO / 530.521.6211 WWW.BBWAXING.COM

1818 mangrove ave / ChiCo 896-1818 / www.viCtorytattoo.Com

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Owners Owned and operated by husband and wife team Craig and Michele Tolman, Bling on 3rd is a new designer jewelry boutique located in downtown Chico. Offering custom designs and fullservice repairs, their mission is to serve each customer with honesty, integrity and trust. Craig has been a jeweler for over 28 years. He attended the Sacramento Valley Institute of Jewelry training on the GI bill. In the early 80’s, after finishing school, he was lucky enough to meet and apprentice for Pete Mundy here in Chico. That is why they closed their store in Nevada to come to Chico.

Craig’s designsLOCAL include one-of-akind wedding bands, high quality diamondLOCAL rings and unique precious stone necklaces. Michele also hand picks fashion pieces incorporating the latest trends. There’s beautiful jewelry for every age and occasion, all at great prices. Stop by and visit Bling on 3rd - where fine jewelry meets fun fashion!

530.892.2000 / 240 Main Street, #180 / ChiCo FaCebook/blingon3rd / tolManjewelerS@gMail.CoM 24 CN&R February 20, 2014

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Tattoo works with their customers to make sure they’re comfortable, and that their tattoo experience fits their budget and time contsraints. The people of Chico have paid that commitment back to them by once again voting Victory Tattoo Best in Chico in 2013.

Parsons and Victory Tattoo’s two other artists, “2 Buck” Chuck Byfield and Max Scott, offer their customers the best – and safest – tattoo experience possible. Victory

Thayne has worked hard to master her skill set, and she’s proud to share it with her customers. “You learn a lot about other people’s

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The boys from Jersey opened Chico Celestino’s in 1997 and brought the recipe for REAL N.Y. Pizza with them. Made with only the finest ingredients ensure a tasty consistent pizza. Hand tossed and baked to perfection makes Celestino’s a favorite with students and budget conscious downtown patrons. Voted BEST Pizza by CN&R readers 8 years in a row. “It’s the thin crust, homemade sauce and fresh cheese that makes the pizza so good” says Celestino. “If it’s not a great cheese pizza to start, any topping you put on it won’t make it better” chimes in Enzo. Pick it up, fold it, and eat it…that’s the N.Y. way.

fresh salads, caesar/slice combo, Chicken Parmigiana hot sandwichs. Homemade Lasagna. Calzones...and of course Spaghetti with Meatballs. Open every day from 10:30am to 10pm. 101 Salem St. across from the Bear.

Other favorites include the

101 salem st / 530 896-1234


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LOCAL Owner of local pest-controlLOCAL business digs creepy-crawlies LOCAL

hane Graves, a 37-year-old Paradise resident approaching 17 years of experience in pest control, isn’t made the slightest bit squeamish by cockroaches, rats or black widows. During a recent interview, the owner and sole employee of Graves Pest Control—opened for business just last month—even expressed admiration of his adversaries, particularly those of the insect variety. “I’ve always been into insects and nature,” he said. “Yes, I do kill them and control them for people, but there’s a reason they’re here: They’re part of the ecosystem. You have to respect the bug.” But, largely due to a nasty experience early in his career, Graves draws the line at entering close, dark places on his hands and knees. On a sweltering midsummer day during Graves’ second year working for a local pestcontrol company, duty called for him to crawl underneath a building on The Esplanade to eradicate a particularly resilient flea infestation. Graves—wearing two layers of clothes, gloves, a mask and glasses—was already sweating when he entered the crawl Local space. Local “As I’m crawling, I’m getting fleas in my ears, fleas in my nose, fleas in my eyes,” he recalled. “Luckily, the mask was over my mouth, or else I would have been swallowing fleas.” Graves was unaware that the crawl space’s dirt surface gradually rose toward the building overhead, the space closing in tighter as he inched along. At the end of his crawl, where the dirt met the bottom of the building, he got stuck.

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“I had a panic attack and bumped my head,” he said. “I had to sit there for five minutes and do some breathing techniques so I didn’t lose it. When I got out, I told [my boss], ‘I can’t do that anymore.’” Got pests? Call Graves Pest Control Appearing very at 961-2847 or send an much relieved, email to gravespest Graves explained control@reagan.com. that the power sprayer he now uses has a range of about 30 feet, making nightmarish crawls underneath bug-infested buildings no longer necessary. For Graves, a husband and father of three children—including twins with special needs—the decision to open his own pestcontrol business was made with his family in mind. The longtime amateur cook briefly considered going back to school to pursue a career in the culinary arts, but ultimately decided he could best support his children by staying in the field he knew best, even if it involves battling creepy-crawlies on a daily basis. “If you want to go anywhere, having your own business is where it’s at,” Graves said, adding that, despite the inherent risk of launching a business, he’s found the challenge tremendously rewarding thus far. “I was nervous at first, but having my own business is exactly where I want to be.” —Howard Hardee howardh@newsreview.com

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LOCAL Shane Graves spent 16 years with a local pestcontrol company before launching his own business, Graves Pest Control, last month. PHOTO BY HOWARD HARDEE

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As Chico’s oldestMONTHS local IN nursery, MONTHSThe IN Plant BUSINESS Barn has served theBUSINESS community for over three decades. Something surprising and delightful can always be found at the Plant Barn whether it’s inside the hundred year old barn, the 16,000+ sq. feet of greenhouses, or anywhere else on the two acres of botanical bliss. Owners, Denise Kelly and Rolf Weidhofer, have been making some amazing changes over the last few years. They have created a new event space, a classroom area, expanded the gift shop and created charm in and around every corner. The Plant Barn is well known for having one of a kind and unique offerings as well as an extensive array of annuals, perennials, seasonal vegetables and fruits. The gift shop is filled with new treasures every week. Cut flower bouquets are offered seasonally and custom planted containers can be special ordered.

Phillip whom add up to almost 250 years of horticultural expertise. Come talk to the Flower Floozies 7 days a week for inspiration and whimsy. Never grow up and keep having fun!

Most of what The Plant Barn carries is grown onsite guided by the expertise of Sally Greenwood who has worked her magic in these greenhouses for almost 30 years. She is joined by the rest of the amazing employees Nancy, Paula, Rebecca, Karol, and

406 entler ave / (530) 345-3121 / chico www.theplantbarn.com

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Now celebrating 21 years, Franky’s was originally built with “family” in mind. Nick Andrew and Kevin Riley started Franky’s back in1992 with the concept of a casual and friendly “Cheers” type atmosphere in a restaurant setting. When Nick was young and still living at home his mother would make spaghetti every Friday night. Today Franky’s still uses the family recipe for their delicious meat sauce. Franky’s offers a diverse wine selection and a full bar that is unrivaled in the North State. Franky’s bartenders are renowned for their knowledge of cocktail preparation and offer a dizzying variety of martinis for those that like their drinks, “Up,” “Over,” “Neat” or whatever your preference may be.

Franky’s is the perfect choice for dates, business lunches, family dinners, birthdays, or whatever the occasion may be! Get together and enjoy friends, family and fine food and drink at Franky’s. A little bit of Italy, hidden right here in Chico!

The menu offers a variety of freshmade pasta, caesar salad, fresh-tossed pizzas and so much more. With deals for students and families too, there is always a meal to satisfy everyone at Franky’s.

more JOBS continued on page 26

506 ivy st / open mon-sat at 11:30am, sun at 4pm take-out: 898-9947 reservations: 898-9948 www.frankyschico.com February 20, 2014

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Serving delicious Chinese food in Butte County since 1912, Tong Fong Low has become a popular, familyfriendly, locally owned and operated restaurant in Oroville. Just five years ago, Tong Fong Low opened a second location in Chico and it has quickly become a local favorite. Flavorful dishes and generous portions can always be found at Tong Fong Low, but this restaurant is more than just great food. The fast and friendly staff make you feel right at home. Don’t be surprised if they get to know you on a first name basis!

Tong Fong Low’s family members would also like to express much gratitude to their patrons for voting Tong Fong Low the “Best Restaurant in Oroville” for the past 5 years and “Best Asian Restaurant” for the past 3 years. Happy dining and good health to you!

Now celebrating over 100 years in business, the Tong Fong Low family is sincerely grateful to the community for it’s continued support.

chico / 2072 e. 20th st #100 / (530)898-1388 oroville / 2051 robinson st. / (530)533-1488 www.tongfonglow.com

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rape crisis Green intervention & prevention YEARS IN BUSINESS

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BUSINESS The next time you’re BUSINESS in a room with 6 people, think about this:

1 in 3 teens experience sexual or physical abuse or threats from a boyfriend or girlfriend in one year. 1 in 4 women and 1 in 6 men were sexually abused before the age of 18. 1 in 5 men have experienced some form of sexual victimization in their lives. 1 in 3 women will be raped or beaten in her lifetime. Why should you care?

They’re the person you share your dreams with, the people in your church group, your teenager’s best friend, the guy on your soccer team, the friend you meet for coffee, your daughter or son. The silence and shame must end! Since 1974, Rape Crisis Intervention & Prevention has been shedding light on this darkness. They are there to listen. Tell everyone you know: No. It is a complete sentence.

These are not numbers. They’re your mothers, grandmothers, fathers, grandfathers, brothers, sisters, aunts, uncles, cousins, girlfriends, boyfriends, co-workers, extended family, next-door neighbors, friends and children.

530.342.rape (24-hour hotline) www.rapecrisis.org 26 CN&R February 20, 2014

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arc Brusie has a distinct calmness about him as he speaks slowly and thoughtfully while answering questions about what it is like to own and operate a business that not only deals with death, but also actually relies on it to stay afloat. He is sitting in an office of the Brusie Funeral Home, which has occupied the same building, located at Broadway and Seventh streets in downtown Chico, for the past 72 years. The building itself is more than 125 years old and has housed a funeral home for the past 110 years. Brusie’s grandfather and grandmother, Warren Pope and Helen Brusie, bought into the business in 1941 and took it over the following year. The interior of the building is quiet and simply decorated with flower-print carpeting and antique furniture. There is an open box of tissues sitting on one of the pews in the funeral room and another in the adjoining waiting room. While somber, perhaps, the inside atmosphere is More info: more comforting than Learn more about depressing. Brusie Funeral Home at While Brusie has carwww.brusiefh.com ried on the family busior call 342-5642. ness, he said doing so was his choice after attending both Butte College and Chico State and dabbling in other professions, including road construction. “My parents never encouraged me to come into the business or discouraged me,” the 46-year-old Brusie explained. “It was the same with my sister Amy, who is also in the business. We grew up always knowing that if we would like to work in the business, that it would be available, but that they weren’t

Marc Brusie tried his hand at other professions before deciding to run the family business. PHOTO BY TOM GASCOYNE

expecting it.” Brusie’s wife, Janice, whom he married in 1995, is the business’ chief financial officer. They have two children, ages 16 and 18, and put no pressure on them to take over when the time comes. He said the job of running a business that deals with death on a daily basis is not as difficult as an outsider might think. “When people come here, they don’t come here for counseling,” he explained. “They don’t come here to discuss with me their grief. Although they are grieving, they are not here for me to take care of that. They handle the grief within their family, or maybe with their minister—people they are very close to.” He said the funeral home’s job is providing a service that involves timing, logistics, phone calls to vendors and services. “We have that expertise on who to talk to, what to ask for, how to get those things done and in place with services such as the cemetery, the grave digger, the grave liner and the casket. “I think the public’s perception is that there is a lot of crying, a lot of grief and that it must be very difficult for us to deal with. It is tragic when young people pass away— those get to you,” he said. “But on the whole, we are working hard to get a lot done so there is a meaningful funeral for that family.” —Tom Gascoyne tomg@newsreview.com

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Clean King by DeHart owner, Michael DeHart, has been serving the Chico area for the past 31 years - specializing in carpet cleaning, upholstery, rugs and janitorial. What better way to celebrate than expanding the business into a corporation, and creating a new dynamic partnership with his son, Trevor DeHart. a local Chicoan, Trevor grew up learning the cleaning trade from the best teacher possible (his dad). Together, Michael and Trevor, have created an efficient team that combines wisdom from experience with youthful innovation.

For free estimates on residential or commercial needs, give Clean King by DeHart, inc. a call today! 345-9907

CLEAN KING by D♥

They are excited with what the future holds and are dedicated to serving Butte County.

ChiCo 345-9907 • Cleankingbydehart.Com YEARS IN

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Sin of Cortez has become a true Chico hotspot over the past 15 years. The chill vibe and the dedication to fresh, delicious food and stellar coffee is what has created this breakfast and lunch joint’s appeal. The Sin of Cortez concept is simple: there should be a really great place to have breakfast. By blending the creative and operational forces behind the cafe with a “never settle for second best” philosophy, Sin of Cortez has done just that.

“We are proud of our commitment to the environment and offer products and services geared toward energy efficiency.” With goals of complete customer satisfaction, and the health and well-being of their North State Community, the Earls are on the road to success.

343-0330 / earlsplumbing.net

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The Earls believe that by looking at how they conduct business from their customer’s point of view, they can provide the absolute best plumbing experience. A live operator answers the phone 24/7 and appointments are scheduled in a two hour window, 92% of their customers receive same day service, all their technicians wear booties to protect your home, and a complete written quote is given before any work begins.

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“Plumbers are late (if they even show up at all!) It seems they charge you whatever they feel like, and if there is an issue with the work performed, good luck getting them back out!” This was the image that the Earls set out to change when they opened in the fall of 1998.

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LOCAL The patrons at Sin of Cortez can expect to up their standards. “There are a ton of places that will serve you food from a can. You deserve better.”

Sin’s portfolio is centered around tasty entrees, fresh quality ingredients and whimisical presentations. The breakfast and lunch menus were originally created by chef Isabel Cruz. Everything served at Sin of Cortez is made in-house. The salsa is fresh. The bread is baked fresh. The beans are cooked fresh. If they had the room they would probably raise their own beef!

2290 esplanade / ChiCo 879-9200 / www.sinofCortez.Com

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Rancho Llano Seco was incorporated in 1861 and has a deep history of balancing agriculture, livestock husbandry and conservation. In its 6th generation of land stewardship, the family continues to explore Llano Seco’s richness through its natural heritage breed pork, beef and heirloom beans. Farming on the Rancho encourages symbiosis between cultivated fields, untouched waterways, and carefully managed wilderness corridors. Together with conservation groups and US Fish & Wildlife, Llano Seco promotes biodiversity that echoes the past and yet marks a clear path for the future.

Photo credit: Matt Salvo / California Bountiful

was a difficult task aided by friends in the restaurant industry, and now Llano Seco can be found on the menus of the Bay Area’s most prestigious restaurants such as Chez Panisse and Zuni Cafe, as well as throughout the fine city of Chico.

Charlie Thieriot rejuvenated the pork production five years ago when he decided to leave the newspaper world and come home. Charlie has grown the business into a proud example of responsible, humane family farming. Launching the brand

www.llanoseco.com February 20, 2014

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The soothing aromas and “Blossoms of Essence” from Lavender Ranch will return a moment of tranquility and balance to one’s busy world.

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Locally owned and operated 5th Street Steakhouse opened in August 2000, featuring U.S.D.A. prime cuts of beef, fresh seafood, a full service bar, and an extensive wine list. The owners and staff pride themselves in providing consistent and excellent personal service along with the finest quality food.

REaL Blossoms, REaL Purity, REaL Essence.

“Let the sweet scent of lavender take you to a time and place where flowers and herbs grow simply in nature. Enjoy the simple pleasures you deserve!”

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Morning Sun Martial Arts’ dedication to a family-oriented and encouraging environment started with owner Marianne Eberhardt’s own journey from martial-arts Mom to Master. After participating in classes with her young son, she was hooked for life and now shares her more than 21 years of experience, with a focus on quality instruction and personal attention to her students. Offering training to all ages and levels of skill, Morning Sun Martial Arts has something for everyone - from selfdefense to Taekwon-Do and Hapkido. It’s a true family setting, where Marianne personally participates in every class and helps students learn the virtues of the martial arts while growing as people and accomplishing their goals of self betterment. They even offer a fully equipped gym for the students and families.

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Marianne prides herself on the positive and encouraging environment she’s created and loves to see the happiness people experience when they reach their goals through the martial arts. She is fond of saying, “It is never too late to become what you might have been.”

135 WEST EIGHTH AVE. #A / CHICO / 530-342-5833 WWW.MORNINGSUNMA.COM / MORNINGSUNMA@ATT.NET 28 CN&R February 20, 2014

Everyone at 5th Street Steakhouse looks forward to serving you soon!

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5th Street Steakhouse to be the ideal fit for your event.

345 west 5th street / (530)891-6328 / chico www.5thstreetsteakhouse.com

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General Manager Angela Gauoette & Chef Michael Hall

5th Street Steakhouse also offers a banquet room which is attached to the main dining room area, but provides a private section for any special event. This beautiful facility is perfect for birthdays, wedding rehearsal dinners, anniversaries, religious celebrations, graduations, fundraisers, holiday parties, and private meetings. With an array of menu options and an extensive wine list, you are sure to find

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This passion for quality food, top-notch service and a lively atmosphere has made 5th Street Steakhouse a memorable and cherished landmark of the Chico community as well as a Best of Chico Living Legend 9 years running.

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Corner of hwy 99 and w. rio bonito road / biggs, Ca 530.868.5151 / www.lavendarranCh.Com YEARS IN BUSINESS

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Home of Lavender Ranch has been locally owned and operated since 1865. While they welcome innovations, they maintain respect for a long held history of tradition. The line of products produced at the Lavender Ranch contains the highest quality ingredients, which are grown and distilled on the ranch. This allows them to provide exemplary high quality control standards resulting in certification by the local university, CSUC, of the high blossom count guarantee listed in every package.

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“We’re here when you need us.” Valley Oak Veterinary Center is open 24/7, including weekends and holidays, for emergency and critical care. With highlytrained specialists, advanced diagnostics, and state of the art equipment, Valley Oak Veterinary Center is well qualified to care for your pets. Valley Oak Veterinary Center specialists are Board Certified in internal medicine, surgery, and canine/feline practice. Their services also include a rehabilitation center and acupuncture. This high quality service is matched by Valley Oak Veterinary Center’s commitment to value. They offer free dental health evaluations, Wellcare plans with monthly payments and weekly low-cost spay/neuter and vaccine clinics. Their pharmaceuticals are

similarly affordable, with flea/tick/ heartworm/chronic medications often priced lower than PetMeds and big box retailers. Free introductory puppy classes with puppy health advice and obedience training is also available. Valley Oak Veterinary Center knows your pets are important to you, and that’s why being available when you need them and providing quality, affordable care is so important to them.

530.342.PETS (7387) 2480 Dr. MLK Jr ParKway (nExT To CoSTCo) VaLLEyoaKVETErinaryCEnTEr.CoM


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North State radiology

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LOCAL Teresa Larson feels honored and blessed to be able to help so many wonderful people in buying and selling their homes. She enjoys meeting new people and making connections with past clients, many of whom have become friends. For Teresa, the greatest joy is being able to help people. The real-estate market has improved this past year and homes are selling, so Teresa is very happy to have “ridden through the storm” and is looking forward to continuing the upward momentum. Teresa was awarded the title of Realtor of the Year for 2013 by her peers for her continued support of the Chico community. She also received her second Century 21 Double Centurion award, a prestigious honor within the company. Both are a testament to her mission of providing quality service

with great care to her clients. Teresa is passionate, honest and hard-working, and she truly loves every day. The other loves of her life are Rick, her wonderful children and their spouses and her adorable grandson. She would like to thank her family, friends, co-workers, clients and peers for their continued support.

Jeffries Lydon

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Scot Woolley CEO/Executive Director tant to remain up to date. “Our radiologists live and work in this community and we have established solid relationships with local healthcare providers,” explains Scot. “This helps make it possible to ensure that our goal of Excellence in Imaging is achieved for each and every patient.”

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Everyone at Casino 99 in Chico would like to thank the community and its patrons for making the dream of opening a local, fullservice casino, restaurant and bar a reality. Casino 99 combines a friendly, relaxed atmosphere with the fun and excitement of table-game action. Whether you’re an experienced card player or a beginner, there’s fun for everyone at Casino 99. We’re talking daily poker tournaments, live-action Pure 21.5 Blackjack, three-card poker, baccarat, no-limit Texas hold ‘em, and, coming soon: Pai Gow poker. Adding to the fun are nine high-definition TV screens to catch all of your favorite sporting events. Hungry? No problem. Angie’s Café serves up the tastiest breakfast, lunch and dinner in town. Top off all the fun with

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North State Radiology is locally owned and operated and is the parent company of North State Imaging, North Valley Advanced Imaging, and North State Interventional Radiology. For over 60 years, North State Radiology has provided comprehensive diagnostic medical imaging to the community by constantly investing in new technologies, cutting edge equipment, and skilled technologists. Their on-site board certified physicians also provide radiology services to local hospitals and clinics, making them an integral part of the medical community. Scot Woolley joined the group in August 2013 as its new CEO and Executive Director and has been working hard to meet the future challenges facing radiology and healthcare at large. The field of medical imaging is constantly growing and improving and it is impor-

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ANGELA HARRIS

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Serving the North State for over 60 years

1101 El MontE AvE / ChiCo / 530 899-5925 www.ChiColistings.CoM / ChiConAtiv@Aol.CoM YEARS IN BUSINESS

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a thirst-quenching, locally made craft brew or glass of wine. Get out of the house and into the fun at Casino 99 in Chico.

Must be 21. Please gamble responsibly. Call 1-800-GAMBLER

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Butte View Olive Co. and Stella Cadente, two wildly popular olive oil labels that serve cooks across the nation, are produced right here in Oroville by Lewis Johnson and his family.

excellent – just one more reason why these olive oils are “Gold” and “Best of Class” medal winners.

It all began in 1935, when Johnson’s grandfather first began farming the 150 acres of olive trees that they still have today. In 1999 Johnson produced the first bottle of Butte View olive oil after three years of fine-tuning his process.

Available in Chico at Maisie Jane’s, Made in Chico, and S&S Produce, in Oroville at Collins & Denny Market, Wagon Wheel Market, and in Paradise at Noble Orchard in 250ml and 500ml bottles.

Mr. Johnson welcomes you to come experience California sunshine in a bottle!

Today, Butte View produces a wide variety of extra virgin olive oils infused with flavors including: jalapeño, garlic, basil, lemon, lime, blood orange and rosemary. These pure, light and delicate hand crafted oils provide wonderful aromas and distinctive accents to any dish making them truly unique and

GEGA#003663,003664

175 E. 20TH STREET / CHICO 892-2282 / WWW.CASINO99CHICO.COM

2950 Louis ave / oroviLLe 530 534-8320 / www.butteview.com February 20, 2014

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James Farrant started off by purchasing studio equipment and taking pictures at home. He quickly outgrew the space available in the garage so he decided to get his own studio downtown (located above Naked Lounge). He then realized the opportunity he had to share his studio and his ideas with other photographers in the area by renting out the studio he created, called Shutter Lab. James has always had a passion for being creative and sharing his ideas with others. It was not until he actually took an art class that he realized he could turn that passion into a lifestyle. After doing digital painting on Adobe Photoshop for many years James became interested in the world of photography.

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Opening Shutter Lab was the natural way James found to share his passion with the community and to provide a space for experienced and beginning photographers to collaborate and learn together.

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Since then, they pride themselves in providing custom made, handcrafted, affordable cabinets, using the latest design technology, state of the art equipment, and highly trained employees to handcraft fine cabinetry. The philosophy and mantra that “nothing comes easy...as long as you put the customer, and your quality first, you will succeed and thrive.”

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Rani and Monty Bhogal relocated to Chico 12 years ago looking for a more peaceful place to call home. Upon their arrival, they purchased the Shell station and convenience store on Forest Avenue. The store offers many options for people on the go, from snacks, sodas and beer to a quick and easy drive-through car wash. Because Rani’s love of cooking ranks as highly as her desire to make her guests happy, they thought it was a perfect idea to open a sandwich shop inside the station. They wanted to be able to offer fresh food that was also fast and delicious. Enter Port of Subs, where “We slice it fresh because sliced fresh is better!™” Rani and her team at Port of Subs create mouth-watering, delicious products with the highest quality ingredients;18 cold sandwich favorites, grillers, salads, wraps, party subs and party trays. There are also gluten-free options! The bread is baked fresh daily, as are the desserts. For

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your convenience, pull up to the Port of Subs drive-up window and pick up your subs. Sliced fresh catering is also available for every occasion.

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Baywood Real Estate was established in Chico in 1962. From 1999 to just last year, Baywood Real Estate operated by franchise agreement as Prudential California Realty. Now, Peter says he is thrilled to be helping introduce Baywood Real Estate to a whole new generation of clients. Staying current in the art of the real estate transaction is Peter’s passion. He can help you complete the sale or purchase of your property paperless or the traditional way. His service always includes extensive market evaluation and property preparation. Get the advantage of Peter’s passion for real estate and years of experience in the Chico market. “Information is free. Wisdom is priceless”

“We slice it fresh because sliced fresh is better!™”

2036 FOREST AVE / CHICO / (530) 895-1780 30 CN&R February 20, 2014

Through it all, Scott and Sam still retain that personal touch, doing the estimating and having hands on contact with their customers. It allows them the opportunity to “better understand them and provide a high quality product that will most satisfy them.”

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has allowed them to grow. The business is now home to a large 25,000 sq. ft. state-of-the-art manufacturing facility on the outskirts of Chico.

11128 Midway Ste a / ChiCo P: 530-893-8774 / toll free: 866-558-0855 www.oakridgeCabinetS.CoM

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In 1981, Scott Bechhold and Sam MacNeill were working in the construction industry and had the opportunity to provide cabinets for new homes. Because of the high demand, Scott and Sam partnered and began building cabinets in the barn on Scott’s parents property in Durham. Thus, Oak Ridge Cabinets was born!

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www.chicoshutterlab.com / james.darkonic@gmail.com 530 906 6168 / 120 west 2nd st. suite # 4 chico, ca BUSINESS YEARS IN BUSINESS

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140 e 4th st / downtown chico / 530-680-1900 peter@chicohomes.com / www.chicohomes.com


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s the title of a classic children’s book states, everyone poops. But not every one has the inclination—not to mention the stomach—to help others rid their bowels of fecal matter. Maxine LeClerc does. She is a colon therapist, certified by the International Association for Colon Hydrotherapy (I-ACT). LeClerc lives in Oroville and has practiced colon cleansing in Chico for the past 14 years. It’s a late-in-life career for LeClerc, who’s 75 and still going strong. She worked for years as a legal secretary, then in her 50s worked as a clerk at Zucchini & Vine. “I never dreamed I would ever do something like this,” LeClerc said. “But I had cancer about 15 years ago, and after I went through the traditional treatments of surgery and radiation, ILocal had no control of my bowels. I tried many different things, and a friend suggested I try colonics. … After my first one, I realized this is something I needed to do for the rest of my life.” She also felt a calling to help others, so LeClerc got trained and certified, bought a colon-cleansing machine and opened an office. “I love it,” she said. “I have fabulous clients and meet beautiful people. … It’s great helping people have quality of life. It’s fun teaching people they don’t have to suffer with gas or bloating or constipation or diarrhea—or just plain not feeling good.” LeClerc uses a “closed system” that keeps the material contained so “you Where to go: don’t smell anyMaxine LeClerc practices thing,” she said. colon cleansing in her Chico office at 13 Williamsburg The process typiLane. For appointments and cally takes 30 to additional information, check 40 minutes, but www.coloncleansingfor energy.com or call 566-9419. there’s no rush on the call of nature. After the client relaxes on his/her back, LeClerc gently inserts a speculum connected to two tubes: one that introduces warm, filtered water at

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Repetition Industries is a multifacMONTHS IN MONTHS in IN event eted business that specializes BUSINESS BUSINESS planning, merchandise, show/event promotions, band booking and band management. With all of the combined experience of their staff, they can offer their customers more than just one thing. In June 2012, touring musician Nick Harris and his team opened the doors to Repetition Industries, a business designed to assist hardworking bands and musicians book shows and create merchandise. In addition to their work with bands, Repetition Industries offers event planning. They can supply the bar, the bartender, the alcohol, the catering, the entertainment, photo booths, photographers, bands and DJ’s. They can be the event planners for your wedding, your baby shower, your graduation party or any other important event. Repetition Industries can even take it a step further. With

its own in-house merchandising company, Repetition Industries can also offer personalized party favors for your special event. “We take a lot of pride in making our customers happy. It is not only our job to satisfy customers, it is our passion.”

223 W. 21ST ST #3 / CHICO 680-4550 / REPETITION.IND@GMAIL.COM

14 YEARS IN BUSINESS

Maxine LeClerc, a 75-year-old local certified colon therapist, acknowledges that her line of work is not for the squeamish. PHOTO BY HOWARD HARDEE

very low pressure; one that carries away the material that flows down via gravity. The second tube runs straight to a sewer hook-up. It’s transparent, so the client can see what’s removed. How many clients look? “Everybody does,” LeClerc said. “Most of the people, when they first come, say, ‘Yuck, I can’t do this!’—but after one secLOCAL ond, it’s like, ‘I can’t believe I said that; it’s nothing like I imagined.’” LeClerc acclimated quickly, too. Perhaps because she started with family and friends, colon-cleansing never stirred a recoil reaction. “I’m not a squeamish person,” she said. “[After] you have four kids, you’re not a squeamish person anymore.” LeClerc’s office occupies the ground floor of a building that also houses a massage therapist and an acupuncturist. The three share clients. “It’s a healthy thing to do,” she said of colon hydrotherapy. “You go and have the plaque removed from your teeth once or twice a year; why not have the plaque removed out of your colon?”

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With a main stage inside and a second stage on the outdoor patio, there’s always something exciting happening at LaSalles. From cover bands and local musicians to touring bands and 80’s night every Saturday, there’s an event for anyone who wants to dance and enjoys music at LaSalles. For the past 14 years owners, Kevin Riley, Nick Andrew and Mike Wear have made it a priority to “throw a party every night” for their patrons. Most days you can find a healthy mix of college students and older adults enjoying music on the patio and later the same day dancing the night away inside. “We enjoy providing a fun and exciting spot for all walks of life,” said Andrew.

Not only does LaSalles provide a great venue for live music and dancing, but it also has pools tables in their newly renamed Whiskey Room. Andrew said it best, “If you want to have a great night out, come play with us!”

—Evan Tuchinsky

more JOBS continued on page 32

229 Broadway / ChiCo 893-1891 / www.lasallesBar.Com February 20, 2014

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ADELE JOHNSON Realtor

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Johnny on the Spot has been providing relief for Butte County residents for more than 15 years

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Adele Johnson has been a well-known girls softball and field hockey coach for many years in Chico, and has finally found the time to convert her coaching, people and technical skills to her lifelong love of real estate. Having invested in homes and land since she was 27 years old, Adele has found real estate to be a great investment in her future. She loves passing on that technical knowledge and experience to her clients. Baywood Real Estate is one of the oldest, most respected brokerages in Chico, and Adele has chosen the great knowledge and experience of that agency to support her new career of “getting people home!”

Whether you are looking for a retirement condo, a brand new “turn-key” home, an investment rental or a 5-acre ranchette, Adele can help you with the dog, the kids, the horse and the cow! Plus,she can drive a tractor and an iPad! As a coach, Adele’s favorite quote has been: “The harder you work, the luckier you get!”

180 E 4TH ST #120 / CHICO 530-570-9777

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Bakers Birkenstock has MONTHS IN MONTHS IN been BUSINESS BUSINESS a place to find comfortable and stylish shoes since 1976. Celeste Baker has since taken over the family owned business, but her parents still work a few days a week. Celeste said she enjoys both meeting new people and picking out which new products to feature in the store each season. Located in the heart of downtown Chico, Bakers Birkenstock carries a wide selection of shoes, socks and accessories. They may be known for the classic Birkenstock, but their selection includes much more. “We strive to bring in fresh, new, unknown brands before anyone else has them,” Celeste said.

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fter two summers spent cleaning portable toilets for her father’s business in high school, Rachel Bartlett was certain she’d had enough of dealing with other people’s crap. Alas, that was not meant to be the case. After graduation Bartlett spent a few years at Butte College, but found she still had no idea what she wanted to do as a career. Then she enrolled in a business class that partly focused on entrepreneurial pursuits, which helped her realize the profit potential of the trade she’d formerly pooh-poohed. “Everybody has to go,” Bartlett said, “and that’s never going to change. “Even though I didn’t like it in high school, I figured some people have a real problem doing this kind of work, but I didn’t mind it that much. It’s a tough service to provide, but one that literally everyone needs.” This realization led Bartlett to take a big gamble. The young woman sold her most valued possession—a beloved 1978 red, convertible Volkswagen Beetle—and used the funds to purchase two portable toilets and put a down payment on a truck equipped to pump waste. After she’d decided to take the plunge, she was struck one day with the perfect name for her business. “I was just driving and ‘Johnny on the Spot’ popped into my head,” said Bartlett, who doesn’t

shy away from talking— Porta-potty connection: and joking—about the Go to dirtier aspects of her prowww.johnnyonthe fession. “I thought it was spotchico.com funny and original, but or call 893-5687 now if you look on the for more information about Internet, you see they Johnny on the Spot have [unaffiliated] ‘Johnportable toilets. ny on the Spots’ all over the country.” Thus Chico’s Johnny on the Spot was born in 1998. In the years since, Bartlett’s rental fleet of portable potties—or “johnnies,” as she prefers to call them—has grown to more than 400 units. The facilities range from minimalist blue units to “elegant” white wedding johnnies and spacious models that comply with the requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act. The business also rents handwashing stations and holding tanks, and Bartlett has upgraded many of her units to include solar lighting. Depending on amenities, portable toilets range from $600 to $3,000 apiece. Johnny on the Spot is the premier portapotty purveyor in Butte County, providing relief for most of Butte County’s big events, including the California Nut Festival, the Chico Air Show and the Downtown Chico Business Association’s Taste of Chico event. The business’ ubiquitous units can also be spotted at construction and other work sites, as well as sporting, civic and private events.

LATRINE continued on page 37

“You don’t always know what’s going to sell,” Celeste said, but Bakers Birkenstock is successful because they’re not afraid to try new things and because they have fun doing it. “Comfort never looked so good.”

As a business, Bakers Birkenstock prides itself not only on its selection, but on its service.

Rachel Bartlett realized her (literally) crappy high-school summer job had unlimited supplyand-demand potential. PHOTO BY KEN SMITH

Clark road / Paradise / 530.872.0812 downtown ChiCo / 530.345.4880 32 CN&R February 20, 2014


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TWO MEN AND A TRUCK® Chico owners Justin and Danielle Moore first had the idea to own and operate a franchise while at a burger joint in Michigan. While discussing their future Danielle noticed TWO MEN AND A TRUCK® in the parking lot and it sparked an idea. They began to research TWO MEN AND A TRUCK® and how to become franchise owners and six short months later Justin and Danielle were opening their first franchise in Chico. “After researching TWO MEN AND A TRUCK® we were truly impressed with the services provided” says owner Justin Moore “we loved the idea of a full service moving company who truly cares, customizing the services

provided to fit the customer’s needs.” Justin and Danielle are excited to have developed an operation which not only they are proud of, but Northern California can be proud of as well.

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Although Yoga Center of Chico has been open for only four months, it has been years in the making. Tom Hess and Rex Stromness have more than 40 years of experience teaching yoga—Tom in the Iyengar style and Rex in the Ashtanga/ Vinyasa style. They knew Chico would benefit from an enduring, dedicated yoga studio. They found the perfect location in the Camellia Courtyard next to Chico Creek and T. Tea Bar & Fusion Cafe. Dedicated to the union of “body, mind and community,” their vision is unfolding beautifully. You’ll find a full schedule of yoga classes at all levels, as well as other events including dance, sound healing, meditation, restor-

3851 MORROW LANE STE 9 / CHICO 895-8871 / WWW.TWOMENANDATRUCK.COM

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Everyone is encouraged to come and experience high-quality yoga in a beautiful, welcoming space. Please check the website for classes and workshops.

250 Vallombrosa #150 / Next to t-bar (530) 342-0100 / yogaceNterofchico.com

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ative yoga and specialty workshops. The first of many music concerts will be held on Friday, Feb. 21, when MaMuse collaborates with the poet Jesua—and on Sunday, Feb. 23, the music of Peia and her ensemble will be featured.

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Show Love Thrift BUSINESS BUSINESS

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Scott and Marcia Bauer believe in the coffee at It’s A Grind, and that belief made them feel passionate about opening a location here in Chico. LOCAL It’s A Grind is famous for their high-quality Arabica coffee beans, which they micro-roast. This process ensures fresh, smooth flavorful coffee. It’s A Grind offers specialty, traditional espresso, iced, blended coffee drinks, tea, tea-based drinks, sandwiches, bagels, muffins, scones and other bakery items. It’s A Grind stays on top of the ever-changing trends in coffee, and takes pride that every cup is fresh and every shot is at the perfect time.

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and Marcia. Scott and Marcia pride themselves on the customer service at It’s A Grind. “We work until the job is done. Doesn’t matter what time of day or how many days a week,” they said. “Treat your customer the way you would want to be treated.”

The key to It’s A Grind success is the local ownership and personal involvement of Scott

6 W. EATON ROAD / CHICO 530-332-9250 / FACEBOOK.COM/ITSAGRINDCHICO

If you ask her yourself, Terri Blessing will tell you that Show Love Thrift almost never happened. It took a little bit of luck, being at the right place at the right time and some encouragement from her son, Adam. Now, nearly in its third year, Show Love Thrift is making the community of Chico brighter one smile at a time. Terri and Adam believe that this world presents an opportunity for people to help improve the lives of others and that is exactly what they are doing. Show Love Thrift is frequently donating clothing to shelters and accepting clothing vouchers so they can continue to help those who need it most.

Along with helping the community and those who are in need, Show Love Thrift offers its customers great prices, a unique selection and daily specials. Just one trip to Show Love Thrift and you will feel the kind, loving and positive attitude that will keep you coming back.

show l❤ ve thrift

1405 PARK AVE. / CHICO (530) 892-9198 / WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/SHOWLOVETHRIFT February 20, 2014

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Bob at 15!

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Working hard has built Bob the premier auto body shop/paint center around – Concours Elite. Treating people right has made Concours Elite the most respected shop in Northern California. And giving back to the community is chronicled by his participation in the Noon Exchange Club, the Chico Chamber of Commerce, and his never ending dedication to fundraising for local charities.

YEARS IN BUSINESS

Owners LOCAL vice. It is important to the appearance and safety of your vehicle to choose a shop which has both the LOCAL equipment and on-going training to properly repair your vehicle. For 31 years Bob has given his customers the finest quality repairs available. Bob has now added to his mantra... “You never let anybody down when you provide Quality With a Personal Touch”.

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The concept of “take-n-bake” pizza was invented by Papa Murphy’s in 1981. Today, Papa Murphy’s continues to focus on what makes their pizza great: their commitment to fresh. Fresh dough. Fresh made. Fresh baked. Every Papa Murphy’s pizza is made to order. Scott and Marcia encourage everyone to try their new pan crust pizza, which they both describe as “incredible.”

CHICO

34 CN&R February 20, 2014

The quality of the food at Broadway Heights matches the quality of the view. Bread, pizza dough, sauces and soups are made from from scratch. Local produce is delivered daily to give their fresh baked focaccia sandwiches, and the rest of their menu items, that extra touch of fresh flavor.

today. Over the years, they’ve hired great people, like general manager Johnny, a beer aficionado who has brought an eclectic selection of import beers to join the menu. The mix of enjoyable staff and delicious food is what drives Broadway Heights’ customers to tell their friends, “You have to go there.” You can taste the love!

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Scott and Marcia Bauer MONTHS IN MONTHS IN started BUSINESS BUSINESS at the bottom and worked their way up to owning five Papa Murphy’s franchises in the area including: three in Chico, one in Oroville, and one in Paradise. Their success is in part due to their dedication to providing a stellar product and a high level of customer service to their customers.

CHICO

MONTHS IN MONTHS IN Paul and Shannon bought BUSINESSLavery BUSINESS Jasco’s in 2002, and gave it its current name of Broadway Heights in 2003. Perched at the top of the beautiful and historic Phoenix Building, Broadway Heights is the perfect place to get a bird’s-eye view of downtown Chico.

Green YEARS IN Green ChuCk pulliam BUSINESS YEARS IN Green BUSINESS YEARS IN kasey pulliam-reynolds BUSINESS nathan pulliam Owners BUSINESS BUSINESS

Green YEARS IN SCOTT & MARCIA BAUER BUSINESS BUSINESS

1305 MANGROVE AVE 2485 NOTRE DAME 530-345-6403 BLVD 530-898-1560

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300 BROADWAY ST. / CHICO 530.899.8075 / WWW.BROADWAYHEIGHTSCHICO.COM

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Paul and Shannon brought years of restaurant and business experience to Broadway Heights, and they’ve combined that experience with a homey vibe to make Broadway Heights the business it is

2267 THE ESPLANADE, SUITE D / CHICO 891-0234 / CONCOURSELITE.COM

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PAUL AND SHANNON LAVERY

Choosing the right auto repair facility is an important decision that often comes at a stressful time. Unfortunately not all repair facilities offer the same level of ser-

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From Bob Fitzgeralds’ humble beginnings building hand made IN to MONTHS IN surf boards in MONTHS Hawaii ownBUSINESS BUSINESS ing the finest auto body shop in Northern California, Bob’s mantra has never changed. Work hard, treat people with respect, and give back to the community.

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CHICO

LOCAL LOCAL

LOCAL Papa Murphy’s is also known locally for their participation in fundraisers. “We are blessed to have loyal customers,” Scott and Marcia said. “We love helping give back to a community that supports us through schools and churches.”

14 W EATON RD 530-343-3993

Love at 425°.

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IN says MONTHS “We make ourMONTHS own,” it INall BUSINESS BUSINESS for this Chico institution! Begun in 1938 when Leonard C. Shubert left Montana, at age 54, to find a location in California for an ice cream shop. His nephew, Charles Pulliam, Sr., joined him three years later and then bought the business in 1951. Charles Pulliam, Jr., joined him in the business after his Army service while deciding what he wanted to do for a living. He soon realized that he would continue on the family tradition at Shubert’s, one generation teaching the next. The Pulliam family is still making ice cream, rolling out candies and dipping chocolates in the same building in downtown Chico.

products. Everything at Shubert’s is still hand made with local, pure ingredients: the butter, cream, honey and nuts are delivered weekly from familyowned farms surrounding Chico. And that’s what Shubert’s is really all about, distinctive homemade taste. Come into the shop and sample a bit of Chico history!

This unbroken connection to Chico’s history and to traditional entrepreneurship is reflected in the family’s dedication to maintaining the highest standard of quality in their

OROVILLE

1751 ORO DAM BLVD 530-538-8454

PARADISE

6026 CLARK RD 530-872-8998

178 E. 7th strEEt / (530)342-7163 / chico www.shubErts.com / mon-fri 9:30am-10pm / sat-sun 11am-10pm


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DR. DEBORAH PENNER DC

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sandi bauman YEARS IN BUSINESS

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Hippocrates said, “Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food.”

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Sandi Bauman has been the Top Chico Listing Agent since 2010. This is quite an accomplishment considering there are about 400 Realtors in Chico. What started as a young woman’s fascination of the jobs performed by agents she encountered soon turned into her passion for helping others navigate the real estate market. That was nearly a decade ago. Sandi’s dedication to putting smiles on client’s faces has led to the success of Chico Homes Real Estate Sales Inc.

What Sandi is most proud of is the members of her team, and the specific skill set each brings to the table. Her team has worked very hard to refine systems and communication, which has translated to competent, friendly service and top performing results that keep clients smiling.

She never tires of learning new skills, especially when they improve the experience for her client, whether they are selling or purchasing the home of their dreams.

26 Local

Group Detox starts Monday, February 24th at 6pm. Please phone the office for more info.

360 E. 1ST STREET / CHICO / 342.8464 CHICOCREEKWELLNESS.COM / FACEBOOK.COM/CHICOCREEKWELLNESS

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steve catterall YEARS IN BUSINESS

Having reconnected with her well established family roots in the industry over 30 years ago, Deborah’s passion for holistic healing led her home to Chico, opening her practice in 1988.

available. By delving deeper and unraveling the root cause of a problem, she empowers you with the knowledge to understand how your nutrition is so intricately connected with your body. This preventative approach is the best insurance you have in maintaining optimal health for years to come.

Deborah’s holistic approach is widely acknowledged as the safest, least invasive and most sustainable form of healthcare treatment

2751 California park dr ste 200 / ChiCo ChiCohomesearCh.net / 530-864-5407

YEARS IN BUSINESS

Dr Deborah Penner and the team at the Chico Creek Wellness live and breathe this philosophy. With their extensive experience in the field of Chiropractic Treatment in conjunction with Wholefood Medicine, Certified Massage and Physio Therapies, they are the first point of call for people suffering from painful inflammation, looking to detox and lose weight, or striving to improve their health.

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AMANDA LEVERONI BUSINESS

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Olde Gold Estate Jewelry is a MONTHS IN MONTHS IN family owned business that will celBUSINESS BUSINESS ebrate it’s 26th year in April. As a member of the National Association of Jewelry Appraisers and an accredited Gemologist Steve is a true professional in every sense of the word. But Steve is quick to give credit to his wife Lisa for all her support and to their dedicated staff who love the day to day interaction with their customers. Olde Gold is not your typical jewelry store. They are truly a onestop shop when it comes to jewelry. You’ll find new & estate jewelry, jewelry repair, appraisal, jewelry design, and they even buy gold. Browse the store and you will find very unique jewelry not found anywhere else. When asked about his success, Steve told us, “If you treat people right, with integrity, they will come back”. Steve has sold wedding

LOCAL LOCAL

LOCAL rings to the children of parents that bought their wedding rings from him in the past. Find them on Facebook.

Olde Gold

Estate Jewelry

225 main street / GarDen WaLK maLL / ChiCo 891-4610 / www.oldegold.com

It all began in 1984 a love of BUSINESSwith BUSINESS great food and her Italian in laws. MONTHS IN MONTHS IN BUSINESS Amanda Leveroni startedBUSINESS Bacio Ravioli and Pasta out of her little shop, selling to local stores and restaurants. Customers started asking for ravioli at their parties and she discovered a love for catering. Her food was delicious, the service impeccable, and the presentation was always something to talk about. Fast forward 30 years and Bacio is a name synonymous with consistent quality and professional service. It’s a reputation that she’s extremely proud of and she says she owes it all to her team of dedicated, hardworking employees.

to different people. Whatever this definition means to you, Organic, Gluten-Free, Vegan, Vegetarian (or just in love with really good, comforting food) she is happy to be making a difference.

Bacio To-Go at 19th and Park Ave. is the current chapter in her success story. Having a retail location for great food has been more rewarding than she would have ever imagined. “Eat Right Now” is their byline and she says it means different things

1903 PARK AVE / CHICO 345–7787 / BACIOCATERING.COM February 20, 2014

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For two decades, Eighth & Main has provided Chico with great, unique merchandise from our past. With nearly 30,000 square feet and over 65 vendors from all over the North State, the store is one of the largest in the West. With so many different vendors scouring the countryside for treasures, you are sure to find artifacts from your favorite era, from Victorian to mid-century modernism. A visit here always brings back memories and nostalgia from a bygone era.

produces an antique and design show at the Patrick Ranch on LOCAL May 10th, Mother’s Day weekend. Shopping at Eighth & Main is a great way to support local business people while recycling and re-purposing items for your own, eclectic style. Visit Eighth & Main Antiques and see why they have been voted “Best Of Chico” 10 years in a row!

After suffering a devastating fire and a bad economy, the store has come back strong and continues to operate a second store on Park Ave (Chico Antique Center) and

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Alexandra Kriz, owner of Hair MONTHS IN MONTHS IN of BUSINESS BUSINESS the Dog, finds business to be a lot like grooming a cat: it’s risky, difficult, and most people don’t want to mess with it. “That cat may be purring one moment, then clawing you to pieces the next. Fortunately, I have quick reflexes and a high pain tolerance. I have persevered through many unexpected attacks, accomplished beautiful products, and even developed a friendship with the cat,” said Kriz. Kriz’s clients become her friends too. “I feel joy witnessing my client’s ‘children’ grow up and sadness watching a muzzle fade to gray. Everyday, I wake up and get ready for work knowing I’m doing exactly what I want to do rather than something I have to do. I have gone through major trials during my six years, but the people, both my amaz-

ing coworkers and clients, have not only stuck with me, they helped me build a successful life,” said Kriz. Kriz is thankful to have loyal clients, a love of animals, a staff of friends, and a slight case of OCD and perfectionism which she also believes are the secrets to her success.

752 MANGROVE AVE (INSIDE TRAILBLAZER) / CHICO 530-966-7626 36 CN&R February 20, 2014

For the past MONTHS six years, Paul IN MONTHS IN Fink BUSINESS BUSINESS has been adding a little sparkle and excitement to Chicoans’ love lives. As the owner of Playtime 4 You, Chico’s only full adult novelty store, he provides a comfortable space for locals to shop. Paul received his AA from College of the Siskiyous and his BS at Full Sale in Florida. He moved to Chico and worked in radio and television for several years before taking his father’s advice and opening his own adult store. Playtime 4 You is now the go-to spot for lingerie, sex toys and movies, and locals appreciate the north Chico store’s knowledgeable, friendly staff and safe shopping environment.

Pride and the Keep Chico Weird Talent Show and regularly contributes to organizations including libraries, the Butte County Sheriff’s Search and Rescue Team and Women’s Health Specialists. At the end of the day, Paul lives by his store’s motto: “Work hard. Play harder.”

Paul takes great pride in his business, but he’s also dedicated to giving back to the Chico community. He’s made a commitment to sponsoring local events such as Chico

745 Main Street / ChiCo 530.893.5534

YEARS IN YEARS ININ BUSINESS YEARS BUSINESS BUSINESS

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2961 hwy 32, unit #29 / chico 530.895.8463 / playtime4you.com


“PLAIN AND SIMPLE;

LATRINE continued from page 32

it works”

When I decided to open Home Ec I knew creating a smart marketing plan would be one of the keys to success. I chose to run a campaign in the CN&R and it was definitely effective! The massive readership, along with the amazing distribution points, really helped me get the word out about my store. I truly appreciated how easy it was to work with the CN&R staff too. The team listened to what I needed and helped me put together a fun, creative and effective campaign. Hands down, the work I have done with the CN&R has been the best marketing decision. I will continue to work with them to promote my store because it works!

–christianne belles Anywhere people gather, and inevitably need relief, Bartlett’s commodes likely are nearby. Bartlett credits much of Johnny on the Spot’s success to the community it serves: “It’s a great place to do business in for a lot of reasons,” she said. “There are always a lot of fun events going on, and the people here really care about and like to do business with other small, local companies.” Bartlett said she often gives special prices to the city of Chico, and she also donates units to charity and other events.

Two of Johnny of the Spot’s ubiquitous porta-potties are found on Saturdays at Second and Flume streets during the farmers’ market at that location.

oWNER of HomE EC

PHOTO BY MELISSA DAUGHERTY

Bartlett said the worst part of the job is emptying the truck’s tank at the county’s Neal Road Recycling and Waste Facility, where most of Butte County’s other septic waste is also deposited. Until this point in the interview, Bartlett had managed to avoid harsher language in favor of friendly euphemisms, but faltered when it came to describing the site: “It’s … These days, Bartlett leaves most of well … um, basically,” she stumbled, strugthe dirty work to her crew of five employees, gling for the right words, but said she’s never hesitant to before blurting out: “A shit “get back on the truck” and lake! Yup—it’s basically a get her hands dirty. lake made of shit.” She briefly outlined a typiAs for other industry cal day of working with perils, Bartlett admitted waste: she’s seen some funny A technician arrives in a porta-potty poetry over the truck at a site where Johnny years, but doesn’t find on the Spot units are located other vandalism amusing. and pumps the contents of “You’d be amazed what each toilet into a large holding people want to do to toitank mounted on the vehicle. lets,” she said, shaking her And it’s not just human waste head. “They try to blow that people drop in toilets, them up and everything Bartlett said, noting she’s else,” she said. “Just last found everything from used week, someone burned one —Rachel Bartlett needles to wallets in the johnof our construction-site toinies. Short-term (weddings, lets to the ground.” special events) rental units are Bartlett noted that with loaded on the truck, but many an endless supply of of the locations—such as job sites—feature human waste, and an equally eternal demand longer-term rentals, in which case the for relief, the portable-toilet biz is a booming portable restrooms are cleaned and resupindustry, complete with its own trade publiplied on-site. cations (e.g., Pumper Magazine and PRO The units are loaded on a truck and Monthly, the acronym representing Portable returned to the company’s Cohasset Road Restroom Operator). There are even large yard, where they’re cleaned by another conventions—Bartlett said she attended her employee. Then they’re moved to the other first “toilet show” last year, in San Diego. side of the yard, where they stand in long —Ken Smith rows ready for action, like soldiers waiting to kens@newsreview.com march.

“Everybody has to go, and that’s never going to change.”

“We love supporting a locally owned paper...” Chico News and Review was one of the first places that we started advertising when we opened almost two years ago. We got immediate response from even the smallest sized ad, and continue to get calls regularly. That’s the main reason to advertise in this paper. However, having grown up in Chico, owner and acupuncturist Olivia Peters-Lazaro, L.Ac. knows that the weekly CN&R is not only a source of news, but is also a source of information about most things going on in Chico and surrounding areas. We love supporting a locally owned paper that is really a hub of our town: it supports community involvement, the arts, news, and it is a great way for us to reach all the folks that benefit from using Chico Community Acupuncture. -OLIVIA PETERS-LAZARO OWNER OF CHICO COMMUNITY ACUPUNCTURE

February 20, 2014

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Arts & Culture The Writing Exchange instructor Scott Bailey in the halls of Butte County Juvenile Hall.

Voice to the voiceless The Writing Exchange helps heal and inspire juvenile hall students

THIS WEEK 20

THURS

Art Receptions PUSHING BOUNDARIES-EXPANDING HORIZONS: A juror’s talk (in

Oabout a dozen students at Table Mountain School took a break from their ne recent rainy morning,

daily English class routine to read passages from a short packet story and titled “The Writing photo by Exchange.” The highKen Smith school-age students, both kens@ male and female, each newsreview.com politely volunteered to read sections, with the group pausing between some to engage in discussion led by instructor Scott Bailey. There were some laughs over particular turns of phrase, and after one story a girl announced, “I can relate to that.” For the most part, it seemed like a classroom that could be found at any area high school. But rather than looking out their windows and seeing falling rain, the Table Mountain students could see only the white walls of Eagle Pod, the housing unit at Butte County Juvenile Hall in Oroville where they are currently incarcerated. And what these young students were reading and writing was distinctly different than the subject matter of your average high-school composition class: harrowing first-person snapshots of abuse, addiction, homelessness, loss and heartbreak. Many of the stories detail young people’s descent to rock bottom, hope for redemption, and frustration at their past failures. The Writing Exchange is the brainchild of Bailey, who serves as a special-education instructor for Table Mountain. Bailey said he was inspired to start the program through his long association with the Long Beach-based Freedom Writers Foundation, a nonprofit organization founded by Erin Gruwell in 1997 to 38 CN&R February 20, 2014

inspire underprivileged and at-risk youth through writing. Each month, Bailey collects submissions from the students, and selections are chosen to be published anonymously on The Writing Exchange webpage at www.writeyourtruth.blogspot.com. Initially, the exchange was just between the Butte County facility’s three housing units (called Condor and Falcon pods, in addition to Eagle), but now includes juvenile halls in Fresno and Sacramento counties and, most recently, Lassen County. The site also collects artwork, with that component overseen by Macy Joachim, a fellow Table Mountain instructor. Bailey explained that the pieces are published anonymously to allow the students to be completely open and honest. He’s been overseeing and witnessing the many benefits of The Writing Exchange since 2006. “It gives them a chance to vent, and to purge some of those difficult experiences in their lives,” he said. “They really get a kick out of the fact that it’s published and that other people in other juvenile halls get to read it.”

Words from Table Mountain School: Whispering Walls Lost, looking at these delusional brick walls Regardless of how hard I try I continue to return Stuck in this room Treacherous, deep down inside Unable to blossom and show my full potential. The darkest place at night, walls of ice Insecure thoughts swiftly enter my mind The affectionate yet dirty white walls Whisper to me as I sleep Blue doors of insecurity The tense bolt clicks and I’m alone.

Bailey also said it helps the incarcerated youth connect with others when they read about shared experiences, and process why they are incarcerated and what they would like to do differently when they are freed. It also gives them valuable writing skills, which The Writing Exchange contributors have used to make a splash on the local literary scene: For several years running, Table Mountain students have placed in the CN&R’s annual Fiction 59 and Poetry 99 contests. “We started having a pizza party for any pod that had a winner,” Bailey said. “Last year, we took three of the six slots for high-school-age submissions [in Fiction 59]—one from each pod—so everyone got pizza. “It’s also a nice switch for them to write fiction, because when they write for the exchange they pour their personal experiences and pain into it, so fiction can be fun and teaches them more about writing.” The program fits perfectly with the juvenile hall’s educational component, which is designed to ensure that time spent in the hall isn’t lost altogether. The program is always expanding and improving, and last year—for the first time—produced enough graduates to garner a special ceremony, complete with cake and family visitors. For some of the students at Table Mountain, The Writing Exchange is a rare bright spot in the face of bleak circumstances, a fact that sank in with Bailey’s words as we left the classroom. “Some of those kids will be out of here in a week, and some of them will be here for a very long time,” he said. “A few could be tried as adults and spend the rest of their lives incarcerated.” Ω

Rowland–Taylor Recital Hall) followed by a reception at both exhibit locales—The Turner Museum and the University Art Gallery (100 Trinity Hall). Th, 2/20, 5:30pm. The Janet Turner Print Museum, Chico State, (530) 898-4476, www.theturner.org.

Theater THE FUN IN FUNERAL: Set during the days of the dot-com explosion, this comedy follows a group of young urbanites and their scheme to make money with performance-art showings at funerals. Th-Sa, 7:30pm; Su, 2pm. $15. Birdcage Theatre, 1740 Bird St. in Oroville, (530) 533-2473, www.birdcagetheatre.net.

GIDION’S KNOT: A devastated mother confronts the teacher she

blames for her son’s suicide. Th-Sa, 7:30pm through 2/23. $10 Thursdays $12 advance $15 at door. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St., (530) 895-3749, www.blueroomtheatre.com.

THE GRADUATE: The classic American comedy will be staged as a live radio broadcast by American radio-theater company, L.A. Theater Works. Th, 2/20, 7:30pm. $18-$30. Laxson Auditorium, Chico State, (530) 898-6333, www.chicoperformances.com.

PUSHING BOUNDARIESEXPANDING HORIZONS RECEPTION Thursday, Feb. 20 The Janet Turner Print Museum SEE THURSDAY, ART RECEPTIONS


FINE ARTS

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1078 GALLERY: Jacob and the Angel, figurative painter and art instructor Sal Casa showcases new work. Through 3/1. 820 Broadway, (530) 343-1973, www.1078gallery.org.

Music

AVENUE 9 GALLERY: P.S. We Love You, original

CARLOS NUÑEZ: Carlos Nuñez is one of Spain’s

works in various media by 18 Avenue 9 Guild artists in celebration of the gallery’s 10th anniversary. Through 3/1. 180 E. Ninth Ave., (530) 879-1821, www.avenue9gallery.com.

most recognizable musicians and a major force behind the bagpipes’ resurrection in popular Celtic/Latin music today. Su, 2/23, 7:30pm. $15-$25. Laxson Auditorium, Chico State, (530) 898-6333, www.chicoperfor mances.com.

CHICO ART CENTER: Art Building Community:

JUDY COLLINS: American folk singing/songwriting legend Judy Collins. Stephen Holden opens.

Su, 2/23, 7:30pm. $32. Paradise Performing

THE GRADUATE Thursday, Feb. 20 Laxson Auditorium

SEE THURSDAY, THEATER

Theater THE FUN IN FUNERAL:See Thursday. Birdcage Theatre, 1740 Bird St. in Oroville, (530) 5332473, www.birdcagetheatre.net.

GIDION’S KNOT: See Thursday. Thursdays $12

Poetry/Literature AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Local author Jodi Foster presents her book Forgotten Burial. Th, 2/20, 7pm. Lyon Books, 135 Main St., (530) 891-3338,

www.lyonbooks.com.

CHICO POETRYSLAM: An open poetry slam and a workshop featuring Jason Bayani. Th, 2/20, 6pm. Free. Butte College Chico Center, 2320 Forest Ave. CHC 109, (530) 895-1352.

POETRY READING: Poetry from a variety of local

wordsmiths. Th, 2/20, 6:30pm. The Bookstore, 118 Main St.

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Art Receptions ART BUILDING COMMUNITY: FROM THE DEPOT TO THE VETERANS BUILDING.: In honor of the proposed monCA Museum in the Chico Veterans Memorial Hall, CAC hosts an exhibition of monCA artworks and historical photographs and artifacts related to its future home. F, 2/21, 5-7pm. Chico Art Center, 450 Orange St., (530) 895-8726, www.chicoartcenter.com.

advance $15 at door. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St., (530) 895-3749, www.blueroom theatre.com.

22

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Special Events MUSICAL CHAIRS: A fundraiser for The North State Symphony with a chair art auction party, appetizers and live music by Mood Swing. Sa, 2/22, 7pm. $20. Habitat Lab, 199 E. 13th St., (530) 898-6692, www.northstate symphony.com.

Theater THE FUN IN FUNERAL: See Thursday. Birdcage Theatre, 1740 Bird St. in Oroville, (530) 5332473, www.birdcagetheatre.net.

GIDION’S KNOT: See Thursday. Thursdays $12 advance $15 at door. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St., (530) 895-3749, www.blueroom theatre.com.

Arts Center, 777 Nunneley Rd. in Paradise, (530) 872-8454, www.paradiseperformingarts.com.

CHICO PAPER CO.: Infused metal photographs,

Theater THE FUN IN FUNERAL:See Thursday. Birdcage Theatre, 1740 Bird St. in Oroville, (530) 5332473, www.birdcagetheatre.net.

SHE LOVES ME AUDITIONS: See Satuday. Center for the Arts, 1475 East Ave., (530) 899-2692.

Arts, 1475 East Ave., (530) 899-2692.

metal-infused prints by Larry Leigh. California Rivers, Jake Early’s latest series. Mariam Pakbaz, drawings and paintings by the recent Chico State graduate. 345 Broadway, (530) 891-0900, www.chico papercompany.com.

HEALING ART GALLERY: Machelle Conn, mixedmedia work by Northern California artist. Gallery highlights works of those touched by cancer. Through 4/17. 265 Cohasset Rd. inside Enloe Cancer Center, (530) 332-3856.

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JAMES SNIDLE FINE ARTS & APPRAISALS:

Recent Paintings, Jerry Frost’s new oil paintings provide a visual journey across the large canvases. 254 E. Fourth St., (530) 343-2930, www.jamessnidlefinearts.com.

Music BIRDS OF CHICAGO: A Chicago, Ill.-based Americana/folk/soul duo, plus local favorites The Railflowers. W, 2/26, 7:30pm. $20. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St., (530) 3452739.

J BOOG: Reggae artist from Compton, plus hip-

hop/soul from Los Rakas. W, 2/26, 8pm. $18. El Rey Theatre, 230 W. Second St., (530) 892-1838.

THE MANHATTAN TRANSFER: Jazz, pop, and vocal harmonies from the Grammy award winning music group. W, 2/26, 7:30pm. $22-$37. Laxson Auditorium, Chico State, (530) 898-6333, www.chicoperformances.com.

SHE LOVES ME AUDITIONS: California Regional

Theatre hosts auditions for She Loves Me. Sa, 2/22, 2-5pm, Su, 2/23, 2-5pm. Center for the

From the Depot to the Veterans Building., an exhibition for the Museum of Northern California Art (monCA) that focuses on Chico people, places and buildings in anticipation for their permanent move to the Veterans Memorial Hall. Opens 2/21. 450 Orange St., (530) 895-8726, www.chicoart center.com.

MANAS ARTSPACE & GALLERY: Everything Blue, mixed-media group show featuring works inspired by the color blue. Through 3/7. 1441C Park Ave., (530) 588-5183.

NAKED LOUNGE TEA AND COFFEEHOUSE: VUL-

TURUS, new series of B&W medium-format photographs by Kyle Forrest Burns. Through 3/12. Gallery hours are Open daily. 118 W. Second St., (530) 895-0676.

SALLY DIMAS ART GALLERY: The Way of the

New Year, original art by local makers, plus J. Daniel Walker’s holocaust memorial painting. Through 2/28. 493 East Ave., (530) 345-3063.

The joint exhibition with the University Art Gallery surveys new and innovative “must sees” in the print world. Through 2/22. Chico State, (530) 898-4476, www.theturner.org.

UNIVERSITY ART GALLERY: Pushing

Boundaries—Expanding Horizons, the 10th Janet Turner National Print Competition. This joint exhibition with the Turner surveys new and innovative “must sees” in the print world. Through 2/22. Trinity Hall, Chico State, (530) 898-5864.

UPPER CRUST BAKERY & EATERY: World

Photography and Paintings, Ayse Taskiran’s nature, architecture and street scenes from Turkey, Greece and California. Through 3/2. 130 Main St., (530) 895-3866.

Call for Artists ART AT THE MATADOR: ChiVAA invites artists to apply for booths at the 4th annual Art at the Matador: A Living Gallery event taking place May 9-10. For more information visit website. Ongoing. Opens 2/20. www.Chi VAA.org.

Museums CHICO CREEK NATURE CENTER: Banding by Day and Night, a close look at birds in hand with incredible detail. Ongoing. 1968 E. Eighth St., (530) 891-4671, www.bidwellpark.org.

CHICO MUSEUM: Reverie: Interpretations of

Nature, new abstract paintings by Dennis Leon. Through 3/31. 141 Salem St., (530) 8914336.

GATEWAY SCIENCE MUSEUM: Explore Evolution, investigate evolutionary principles in organisms ranging from smallest to the largest, with interactive exhibits giving the viewer an opportunity to experience how scientists conduct research on evolution. Ongoing. 625 Esplanade, www.csuchico.edu/ gateway.

VALENE L. SMITH MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY: Into The Blue: Maritime Navigation and the Archeology of Shipwrecks, featuring artifacts recovered from the Frolic shipwreck and the story behind the ship’s history. TuSa through 7/24. Meriam Library Complex, Chico State.

THE JANET TURNER PRINT MUSEUM: Pushing

for more Music, see NIGHTLIFE on page 42

Boundaries—Expanding Horizons, the 10th Janet Turner National Print Competition.

Music THE LOLOS ALBUM RELEASE: The local indie-

rock/pop group release their new album Xoxo, joined by friends French Reform and BandMaster Ruckus, plus a liquid light show by Bill DeBlonk. F, 2/21, 8pm. $5. 1078 Gallery, 820 Broadway, (530) 343-1973, www.1078 gallery.org.

BIRDS OF CHICAGO Wednesday, Feb. 26 Sierra Nevada Big Room SEE WEDNESDAY, MUSIC

MAMUSE: Local folk faves release their newest

album, Take Heart, a collaboration with Jeshua. F, 2/21, 7pm. $10. Yoga Center of Chico, 250 Vallombrosa Ave., Ste. 150, (530) 342-0100.

Take a seat FREE LISTINGS! Post your event for free online at www.newsreview.com/calendar. Once posted, your CN&R calendar listing will also be considered for print. Print listings are also free, but subject to space limitations. Deadline for print listings is one week prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

Like art? Like music? Like sitting down? If you count at least one of those things among your passions, then the Habitat Lab is the place to be Saturday, Feb. 22, for Musical Chairs: An Art Project and Fundraiser for the North State Symphony. A number of local artists have transformed EDITOR’S PICK ordinary chairs—most of which were surplus items formerly used by the Chico State Art Department—into works of art. Eventgoers can purchase or sponsor each chair, and proceeds will go to the North State Symphony.

February 20, 2014

CMYK

CN&R 39


RECYCLE THIS PAPER.

BULLETIN BOARD Community AFRICAN DANCE CLASS: A workout set to the sounds and rhythms of West Africa. Call for info. M, 6pm. $10. Chico Grange Hall, 2775 Old Nord Ave., (530) 321-5607.

AFRO-CARIBBEAN DANCE: Dances of Cuba, Haiti,

Brazil and West Africa with live drumming. Tu, 5:30pm. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St., (530) 345-6324.

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS: Regularly scheduled

meeting. Every other Tu, 9am through 12/9. Board of Supervisors Chambers, 25 County Center Dr. in Oroville, (530) 538-7631, www.buttecounty.net.

CHICO FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY BOOK SALE: Chico Friends of the Library weekly book sale. Sa, 9:15-11:30am. Butte County Library, Chico Branch, 1108 Sherman Ave., (530) 891-2762, www.buttecounty.net/bclibrary.

RIPE OLIVE DAY Friday, Feb. 21 Ehmann Home

SEE COMMUNITY

DANCE SANCTUARY WAVE: Bring a water bottle, drop your mind, find your feet and free your spirit. Call for more info. Tu, 6:30-8:30pm. $10. Call for details, (530) 891-6524.

DANCING FREEDOM: A weekly open dance with

the elements. F, 6-8pm. $6-$12 sliding scale. Subud Hall, 574 E. 12th St., (530) 532-1989.

DAY HIKE & BUFFET LUNCH: Meet at Five-Mile parking lot for a flat hike in Upper Bidwell Park followed by a buffet lunch at Priya Indian Cuisine. Bring water. Sa, 2/22, 9am. Five-Mile Picnic Area, Upper Bidwell Park, (530) 343-1904.

EVENING DANCE JAM: A weekly meditative dance session. F, 7:15pm. $10. Yoga Center of Chico, 250 Vallombrosa Ave., Ste. 150, (530) 342-0100.

FANCY FEET DANCE: Beginning to experienced dancers welcome to work on the foxtrot, waltz, swing and more to a live band. Tu, 7:30pm. $5-$7. Chico Area Recreation District (CARD), 545 Vallombrosa Ave., (530) 895-4015, www.chicorec.com.

FARMERS’ MARKET: CHAPMAN: A year-round Certified Farmers’ Market serving as a community forum for healthful-lifestyle promotion and education. F, 2-5:30pm. Chapman Mulberry Community Center, 1010 Cleveland Ave., (530) 624-8844, www.cchaos.org.

Free. Paradise Lutheran Church, 780 Luther Dr. in Paradise, 872-7085.

SEED SAVING SERIES: The second of six workshops. This week: Transplanting cool season crops with Redwood seeds. Sa, 2/22, 2-4pm. Chico Grange Hall, 2775 Old Nord Ave., (530) 895-1976.

SOUL SHAKE DANCE CHURCH: Drop your mind, find your feet and free your spirit at this DJ dance wave to a range of musical styles. No previous dance experience necessary. Su, 10am-noon. $8-$15 sliding scale. Dorothy Johnson Center, 775 E. 16th St., (530) 891-6524, www.chicorec.com.

SOUNDS OF THE VALLEY CHORUS: Women singers welcome to sing in four-part harmony barbershop style. Call for more info. W, 7pm. Marigold Elementary School, 2446 Marigold Ave., (530) 343-5183.

SQUARE-DANCE CLUB: Square-dancing classes for beginners and advanced-level dancers. Call for more info. Th, 7-10pm. Veterans Memorial Hall, 6550 Skyway in Paradise, (530) 872-1962.

TRADITIONAL WEST-AFRICAN DANCE: All levels of

drummers and dancers welcome. W, 5:307pm. $10. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St.,

(808) 757-0076.

FARMERS’ MARKET: SATURDAY: Chico’s weekly

YOU’RE WELCOME, NATURE.

community gathering, with fresh produce, crafts, baked goods and more. Sa, 7:30am1pm. Municipal Parking Lot No. 1, Second & Wall streets.

40 CN&R February 20, 2014

FREE HEALTH CLINIC: Free services for minor medical ailments. Call for more info. Su, 14pm. Free. Shalom Free Clinic, 1190 E. First Ave., (530) 518-8300, www.shalomfree clinic.org.

HAPPY HEALING: Experience a variety of healing modalities. F, 7pm. 100th Monkey Café & Books, 642 W. Fifth St.

INFINITE RHYTHMS ECSTATIC DANCE: A shoefree, food-free, drug-free, smoke-free dance

for you and yours with DJ Clay. Th, 7:309:30pm through 5/8. $10. Yoga Center of Chico, 250 Vallombrosa Ave., Ste. 150, (530) 342-0100.

INTERNATIONAL FOLK DANCING: All levels wel-

come. No partner needed. F, 2/21, 8pm. $2. Chico Creek Nature Center, 1968 E. Eighth St., (530) 891-4671, www.bidwellpark.org.

For Kids NATURE DETECTIVES PRESCHOOL PROGRAM: Explore footprints, rocks, use magnifying glasses, meet an animal up close and make a craft to take home. Th, 2/20, 3-4pm. $12. Chico Creek Nature Center, 1968 E. Eighth St., (530) 891-4671, www.bidwellpark.org.

Volunteer BIDWELL PARK VOLUNTEERS: Help the park by volunteering for trash pick-up, invasive-plant removal, trail maintenance, site restoration, water-quality testing and more. Check Friends of Bidwell Park website for dates and locations. Ongoing. Bidwell Park, www.friends ofbidwellpark.org.

PATRICK RANCH VOLUNTEERS: There are multiple volunteer opportunities available at the museum. Call or email for more info. Ongoing. Patrick Ranch Museum, 10381 Midway, (530) 514-3903.

PARADISE FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY BOOK SALE: Used book sale. Sa, 10am-3pm. Butte County Library, Paradise Branch, 5922 Clark Rd. in Paradise, (530) 872-6320, www.butte county.net/bclibrary/Paradise.htm.

RIPE OLIVE DAY: Honoring past workers at the Ehmann Olive Company with a buffet of dishes made with olives. Tours available and Ehmann Olive’s for sale. F, 2/21, 11:30am. Free. Ehmann Home, 1480 Lincoln St. in Oroville, www.buttecountyhistoricalsociety.org.

SAMARITAN FREE CLINIC: This clinic offers free basic medical care and mental-health counseling. Call for more information. Su, 2-4pm.

MORE ONLINE Additional listings for local meetings, support groups, classes, yoga, meditation and more can be found online at www.newsreview.com/chico/local/calendar.


IN THE MIX

$5.00 off

MassagE

The Satanist Behemoth Metal Blade Satan has been a longtime ally of metal, but in many cases it goes only as deep as bloody farm animals, fiery pentagrams and fey promises of eternal damnation. On Behemoth’s 10th album, The Satanist, the Polish band’s dark overlord Adam “Nergal” Darski grapples with evil from the point of view of someone who’s actually read some verses. But more compelling is the fact that this is the band’s first record since Nergal was diagnosed with leukemia in 2010 (a successful bone marrow transplant led to his recovery). Needless to say, the deep gaze into mortality makes The Satanist all the more heavy. Musically, it’s a brilliantly varied record. Dynamics are given serious thought. Horns and otherworldly synthesizers find their places in the calamity. And the album’s pristine production and—dare I say—sense of melody threaten to push extreme metal into new realms (and a wider audience). Simply put: The Satanist destroys on every level, and in every circle of Hell. And we’re all going.

MUSIC

touch of china

2261 St. George Ln., Ste. G

(Behind Best Western Heritage Inn and Kmart)

530.966.4019 Open 7 days

—Mark Lore

Hyperbole and a Half Allie Brosh Touchstone One of the more interesting books I’ve read recently might appear to be nothing more than just a glorified picture/comic book. But when you flip through the pages of Allie Brosh’s autobiographical Hyperbole and a Half (an extension of her blog of the same name), it’s clearly more than that. Beyond the whimsical illustrations, selfdeprecating humor and color-coded pages for different chapters, Brosh is very frank about her history with depression. During a brutally honest interview on NPR, she described her crippling depression as a period during which she felt detached and numb, and actually outlined the way she was thinking of taking her own life. Brosh also makes us laugh, with tales about her dogs, her childhood obsession with sugar and her fear of spiders. She obviously has range. She’s a mature and powerful, and—above all—funny writer with a lot to share. Largely on the strength of her fantastic, hilarious and immensely popular blog, in 2013 Brosh was included in Advertising Age magazine’s Creative 50, a list of the most influential and creative figures in entertainment, publishing and more. It’s likely the first of many honors in what will hopefully be a long career.

THINK

FREE.

BOOK

—Sean Murphy

Bravely Default Silicon Studio/Square Enix Nintendo Originally conceived as a sequel to Final Fantasy: The 4 Heroes of Light, Bravely Default is a wonderful game in its own right. Well written and beautiful, it’s also insanely fun. The plot follows Tiz, who, after his village is destroyed, teams up with a girl called Agnès who is attempting to save the Wind Crystal, which has been consumed by darkness. Joining them on their quest are an amnesiac who calls himself Ringabel, and Edea, a young female knight. Alongside the main quest is a minigame in which you can help rebuild Tiz’s village, as well as perform other miniquests to gather classes that your characters use to learn new skills. They provide fun distractions from the twists of the primary adventure. Though the end of the game runs a bit tedious, the battle system is fun, the characters are engaging, and I found myself caring deeply for the world and its inhabitants. The music is amazing and the art is fantastic, each character well realized and every town beautifully rendered. To get the full effect, stand still for a moment every time you enter a town as it zooms out to give you a stunning view of the world you are tasked with saving.

GAME

—Sara M. Casale

February 20, 2014

CN&R 41


NIGHTLIFE

THURSDAY 2/20—WEDNESDAY 2|26 YOU.MAY.DIE.IN.THE.DESERT.: Three-piece

ROOTS DOWN STEW COOK-OFF Sunday, Feb. 23 The DownLo SEE SUNDAY

20THURSDAY AARON RICH & FRIENDS: Country music round-robin. Third and First Th of every month, 9pm. Free. Crazy Horse Saloon, 303 Main St., (530) 894-5408.

AES FUNDRAISER: Audio Engineering Society hosts a fundraiser with live funk/soul from Wordsauce and altrock by Dear Misguided. Th, 2/20, 8pm. $10. 1078 Gallery, 820 Broadway, (530) 343-1973, www.1078gallery.org.

CHICO JAZZ COLLECTIVE: Thursday jazz.

Th, 8-11pm. Free. The DownLo, 319 Main St., (530) 892-2473.

CHICO UNPLUGGED: An open-mic series showcasing local acoustic singer/songwriters in an intimate setting. Top performers will be given a chance to record their music. Presented by Chico State’s SOTA Productions. Th, 2/20, 7-9pm. Free. Woodstock’s Pizza, 166 E. Second St., (530) 893-1500.

instrumental band from Seattle, Wash., plus S.F.-based crew Commissure with locals Surrounded by Giants and Cities. Th, 2/20, 8pm. $5. Café Coda, 265 Humboldt Ave., (530) 566-9476, www.cafecoda.com.

21FRIDAY

Mark “Porkchop” Holder. Th, 2/20, 710pm. Café Flo, 365 E. Sixth St., (530)

514-8888, www.liveatflo.weebly.com.

JOHN SEID DUO: John Seid and Larry Peterson play an eclectic mix of The Beatles, blues and standards. Th, 69pm. Opens 2/20. Grana, 198 E. Second St., (530) 809-2304.

MUSIC ON THE PATIO: Acoustic

Americana with Steve Johnson. Th, 2/20, 6-9pm. LaSalles, 229 Broadway, (530) 893-1891.

OPEN MIC: Singers, poets and musicians welcome. Th, 7-10pm. Has Beans Internet Cafe & Galleria, 501 Main St., (530) 894-3033, www.hasbeans.com.

OPEN MIKEFULL: Open mic night to share your music, poetry, comedy, or other talents in a 10-minute slot. First and Third Th of every month, 7pm. $1. Paradise Grange Hall, 5704 Chapel Dr. in Paradise, (530) 873-1370.

IRISH-MUSIC HAPPY HOUR: A Chico tradition: Friday-night happy hour with a traditional Irish music session by the Pub Scouts. F, 4pm. $1. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St., (530) 343-7718.

THE LOLOS ALBUM RELEASE: The local

BASSMINT: A (mostly) weekly electronic DELTA BLUES: Featuring musical styling of

2/21, 7-10pm. Café Flo, 365 E. Sixth St., (530) 514-8888, www.liveatflo.we ebly.com.

dance party with a rotating cast of local and regional DJs. Check with venue for details. F, 9:30pm. Peeking Chinese Restaurant, 243 W. Second St., (530) 895-3888.

CHRIS GARDNER BAND: Country/ rock

from Roseville. F, 2/21, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino Brewing Co., 3 Alverda Dr. in Oroville, (530) 533-3885, www.featherfallscasino.com/ brewing-co.

COCKTAIL MENU RELEASE PARTY: Maltese Bar & Tap Room, 1600 Park Ave., (530) 343-4915.

THE DEAF PILOTS: Support local music

with rockers The Deaf Pilots. F, 2/21, 9pm. $5. Maltese Bar & Tap Room, 1600 Park Ave., (530) 343-4915.

DJ MAC MORRIS VS. DJ DAVID AARON: DJ

on DJ action. F, 2/21, 9pm. LaSalles, 229 Broadway, (530) 893-1891.

FUNDRAISER EVENT: A fundraiser for the Butte Creek Volunteer Fire Department with local canyon music. F,

indie-rock/pop group release their new album Xoxo , joined by friends French Reform and BandMaster Ruckus, plus a liquid light show by Bill DeBlonk. F, 2/21, 8pm. $5. 1078 Gallery, 820 Broadway, (530) 343-1973, www.1078gallery.org.

MAMUSE: Local folk faves release their

newest album, Take Heart, a collaboration with Jeshua. F, 2/21, 7pm. $10. Yoga Center of Chico, 250 Vallombrosa Ave., Ste. 150, (530) 342-0100.

MONKEY MUSIC SHOWCASE: Spotlighting local acoustic singer/songwriters and musicians. F, 7:30pm. 100th Monkey Café & Books, 642 W. Fifth St.

NORTHERN TRADITIONZ: Local country

rockers take the stage. F, 2/21, 8pm. $4. Tackle Box Bar & Grill, 375 E. Park Ave., (530) 345-7499.

OPEN MIC: All singer/songwriters wel-

come. F, 6-9pm. Opens 2/21. LaSalles, 229 Broadway, (530) 893-1891.

SWAMP ZEN: Jam-rock from friends Swamp Zen, plus local super group Electric Canyon Convergence (releas-

ing their second CD). F, 2/21, 9pm. Lost on Main, 319 Main St., (530) 891-1853.

Flo, 365 E. Sixth St., (530) 514-8888, www.liveatflo.weebly.com.

LOSE YOUR ILLUSION: A tribute to Guns N’

22SATURDAY ’80S NIGHT: Wear your best ’80s attire and dance the night away with special guests Flock Of 80z. Sa, 2/22, 8pm. LaSalles, 229 Broadway, (530) 893-1891.

BLUEGRASS JAM: Lucy Smith hosts. All

Roses. Sa, 2/22, 9pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino Brewing Co., 3 Alverda Dr. in Oroville, (530) 533-3885, www.feather fallscasino.com/brewing-co.

MOSSY CREEK: Roots/Americana/blue-

grass from local instrumentalists. Sa,

2/22, 8pm. $5. Café Coda, 265

Humboldt Ave., (530) 566-9476, www.cafecoda.com.

levels welcome. Sa, 2/22, 1-4pm. Café

MEET THE MIXOLOGIST

Scott Barwick is somewhat of a renaissance man, with his fingers in multitudinous music, art and other projects around town. One of his latest infatuations is with the fine art of mixology or, as we laymen call it, making kickass cocktails. He’s been working on a fancy new cocktail menu for the Maltese Bar & Tap Room, which will be released this Friday, Feb. 21. Bogg provides the soundtrack to the celebration, and we encourage everyone to try something new next time you’re down at the ’Teze.

80’s Night - Feb 22nd with special guest

FREE! FOUNTAIN DRINK

With purchase of MARINATED TRI-TIP or MARINATED GRILLED CHICKEN Entrees. 11am - 2pm.

at: playing

Expires 02/27/14.

NOW OPEN! COME VISIT OUR NEWEST LOCATION 995 Nord Ave • Chico 592.3605 • bulldogtaqueria.com (across from Safeway on Nord)

42 CN&R February 20, 2014


NIGHTLIFE

THIS WEEK: FIND MORE ENTERTAINMENT AND SPECIAL EVENTS ON PAGE 38 psychedelic pop from two local bands.

Sa, 2/22, 9pm. $5. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St., (530) 343-7718.

TIM HOWARD: Merle Haggard’s bandmate of 15 years, Tim Howard, visits Flo with local Brad Peterson . Sa, 2/22, 7pm. Café Flo, 365 E. Sixth St., (530) 514-8888, www.liveatflo.weebly.com.

TWO CD-RELEASE PARTIES: THE LOLOS & MAMUSE

23SUNDAY

Friday, Feb. 21 1078 Gallery & Yoga Center of Chico

CARLOS NUÑEZ: Carlos Nuñez is one of

SEE FRIDAY

Spain’s most recognizable musicians and a major force behind the bagpipes’ resurrection in popular Celtic/Latin music today. Su, 2/23, 7:30pm. $15-$25. Laxson Auditorium, Chico State, (530) 898-6333, www.chicoperformances.com.

JUDY COLLINS: American folk singing/songwriting legend Judy Collins. Stephen Holden opens. Su, 2/23, 7:30pm. $32. Paradise Performing Arts Center, 777 Nunnelly Rd. in Paradise, (530) 872-8454, www.par adiseperformingarts.com.

MUSIC SHOWCASE: An open mic hosted by local country musicians Rich and Kendall. Sa, 5-9pm. Free. Scotty’s Landing, 12609 River Rd., (530) 7102020.

OCEANOGRAPHY: Oceanography is the alter-ego of Oakland-based singer/songwriter Brian Kelly. Joining him are buddies Donald Beaman and the Spirit Molecules, and local duo

ROOTS DOWN STEW COOK-OFF: Eye Of

Bunnymilk.. Sa, 2/22, 9pm. $5. Maltese Bar & Tap Room, 1600 Park Ave., (530) 343-4915.

Jade Presents a stew cook-off. $1 for a tasting cup, 1 vote per cup. Su, 2/23, 15pm. The DownLo, 319 Main St., (530) 892-2473.

THE SLOW POISONER: Sa, 2/22, 8pm. $5. Monstros Pizza & Subs, 628 W. Sacramento Ave., (530) 345-7672.

T. MILLS: Riverside rapper comes to

Chico on his All I Wanna Do tour. Su, 2/23, 8pm. $15. El Rey Theatre, 230 West Second St., (530) 892-1838.

SURROGATE + GENTELMAN’S COUP: Intelligent pop/rock, plus vintage/

J BOOG: Reggae artist from Compton,

24MONDAY

METAL NIGHT IN THE WHISKEY ROOM:

With DJ Loomis. W, 2/26, 8pm-1am. LaSalles, 229 Broadway, (530) 893-1891.

plus hip-hop/soul from Los Rakas. W, 2/26, 8pm. $18. El Rey Theatre, 230 W. Second St., (530) 892-1838.

JAZZ HAPPY HOUR: Live jazz happy hour

with the Carey Robinson Trio. M, 2/24, 5-7pm. Free. Café Flo, 365 E. Sixth St., (530) 514-8888, www.liveatflo.we ebly.com.

OPEN MIC: Open-mic night with Aaron

alt-rock duo visit. W, 2/26, 8pm. $10.67 In Advance. Senator Theatre, 517 Main St., (530) 898-1497, www.jmaxproduc tions.net.

country, Tin Pan Alley, jazz and more. W, 7-9pm. Free. VIP Ultra Lounge, 191 E. Second St.

THE MANHATTAN TRANSFER: Jazz, pop,

25TUESDAY

MIDDLE CLASS RUT: Popular Sacramento

LAURIE DANA: Soul, light rock, blues,

OPEN MIC: An all-ages open mic for musicians, poets, comedians, storytellers and dancers. W, 7pm. Free. 100th Monkey Café & Books, 642 W. Fifth St.

and vocal harmonies from the Grammy award winning music group. W, 2/26, 7:30pm. $22-$37. Laxson Auditorium, Chico State, (530) 8986333, www.chicoperformances.com.

and friends. Tu, 2/25, 7-10pm. Café Flo, 365 E. Sixth St., (530) 514-8888, www.liveatflo.weebly.com.

SHIGEMI & FRIENDS: Live jazz with keyboardist Shigemi Minetaka and rotating accompaniment. Tu, 6:308:30pm. Free. Farm Star Pizza, 2359 Esplanade, (530) 343-2056, www.farm starpizza.com.

26WEDNESDAY BIRDS OF CHICAGO: A Chicago, Ill.-based Americana/folk/soul duo, plus local favorites The Railflowers. W, 2/26, 7:30pm. $20. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St., (530) 345-2739, www.sierranevada.com/bigroom.

HALLOWEEN IN FEBRUARY

Things are gonna get dark Saturday night, Feb. 22, at Monstros Pizza & Subs as The Slow Poisoner—a surrealistic one-man band from San Francisco—slithers his way into town. Also, bringing the aural doom and dismay are locals SS Frank and Deadwolf Ruggs, with the decidedly more chipper Jorge Jonze on hand to lighten things up ... but just a little bit.

FLO SESSIONS: Flo’s weekly local music showcase with Sid Lewis. W, 2/26, 710pm. Café Flo, 365 E. Sixth St., (530)

514-8888, www.liveatflo.weebly.com.

THEY'LL TAKE YOUR POT-O-GOLD IF YOU GET A DUI

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hie lly, Big Bopper, Ritc Tribute to Buddy Ho

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Full House Blues Jam with Special Guests Chris Gardner Band High Energy Country Lose Your Illusion Tribute to Guns ‘n Roses Sunday Funnies with Tim Bedore ($10) Paperback Writer Tribute to the Beatles Reunion Hits of the 70s Cheap Lick Tribute to Cheap Trick Antsy McClain & The Trailer Park Troubadours ($10) Karaoke Rockstarz Sing with a Live Band

Must be 21 or older. $5 cover charge. Shows start at 9:30pm, Blues Jam and Karaoke start at 8pm. Brewery VIP suites $100 - Luxury seating for up to 10 guests. Includes private server, pizza and beer. ASK ABOUT PARTY PACKAGES - DELUXE LODGE ROOM, FOOD DISCOUNT + FREE SLOT PLAY!

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February 20, 2014

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Liberty Cab

CN&R 43


random awesomeness

Modern Home Accessories | Vintage Inspired Designs

FINAL WEEK

System reboot

WALKING THE CAMINO: SIX WAYS TO SANTIAGO THURS 4PM & 6PM; FRI 6PM; SAT 4PM & 6PM; SUN 4PM; MON-THURS 8PM (1/24-27)

More heart, less blood in decent RoboCop remake

OPENS FRIDAY 92% ON ROTTEN TOMATOES JUDI DENCH

Tthrown at us lately. Endless Love and About Last Night both got redos just in time for Valentine’s Day. here’s a slew of 1980s remakes getting

PHILOMENA

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home, gifts & random awesomeness

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abouT lasT NighT (Digital) (R) 12:10PM 2:35PM 5:00PM 7:25PM 9:50PM ENDlEss lovE (Digital) (PG-13) 12:05PM 2:35PM 5:05PM 7:35PM FrozEN (2013) (Digital) (PG) 11:20AM 2:05PM 4:40PM 7:15PM 9:50PM lEgo (3D) (PG)12:45PM 3:15PM 5:45PM 8:15PM lEgo (Digital) (PG) 11:30AM 2:00PM 4:30PM 7:00PM 9:30PM loNE survivor (Digital) (R) 11:00AM 1:50PM 4:40PM 7:30PM 10:25PM

NuT Job, ThE (Digital) (PG) 12:00PM 2:10PM 4:25PM PoMPEii (3D) (PG-13) 3:00PM 8:00PM 10:30PM PoMPEii (Digital) (PG-13) 12:30PM 5:30PM riDE aloNg (Digital) (PG-13) 12:30PM 2:55PM 5:20PM 7:45PM 10:10PM robocoP (2014) (Digital) (PG-13) 11:05AM 12:25PM 1:55PM 3:15PM 4:40PM 6:05PM 7:30PM 8:55PM 10:20PM ThaT awKwarD MoMENT (Digital) (R) 7:10PM 9:40PM wiNTEr’s TalE (Digital) (PG-13) 11:05AM 1:50PM 4:35PM 7:20PM 10:05PM

MoNuMENTs MEN (Digital) (PG-13) 11:00AM 1:45PM 4:30PM 7:15PM 10:00PM

RoboCop

THE GRADUATE Live Radio Theatre (2/20)

CARLOS NUÑEZ

Power Packed Celtic Music (2/23)

Half man, half gun.

THE MANHATTAN TRANSFER Jazz/Pop Superstars (2/26)

KEEPING DANCE ALIVE!

Eclectic Dance Concert (3/7 & 8) JUST ADDED!

LEWIS BLACK Comedian (3/8)

CHAMBER ORCHESTRA KREMLIN

1

Poor

2

Fair

3

Dynamic String Orchestra (3/11)

Good

All shows at Laxson Auditorium California State University, Chico (530) 898-6333

Very Good

WWW.CHICOPERFORMANCES.COM 44 CN&R February 20, 2014

3 Starring Joel Kinnaman, Gary Oldman, Michael Keaton and Abbie Cornish. Directed by José Padilha. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

friday 2/21 – wednesday 2/26 3 Days To Kill (Digital) (PG-13) 11:25AM 2:10PM 4:55PM 7:40PM 10:25PM

On that very same day, a day of candy and heartshaped cards, MGM released an updated date movie of a very different sort— by Bob Grimm Paul Verhoeven’s 1987 ultraviolent satiric masterpiece, RoboCop. The idea to reboot RoboCop has been kicking around for years. The last installment of the previous franchise, the remarkably awful RoboCop 3, came out more than 20 years ago. The reins were eventually given to Brazilian director José Padilha (Elite Squad), who received a mandate to produce a PG-13 RoboCop (as opposed to the hard-R original) so that more money could be made. After a tumultuous production, we have the result.

kingpin. Murphy, with the permission of his wife (Abbie Cornish), has his life saved by being placed into an armored endoskeleton with the purpose of making him a law-enforcement superhero. In the original, after Murphy (well played by Peter Weller) is brought back to life, he starts his crusade against crime not really knowing who he is, with his memories suppressed. He eventually figures out his identity and solves his own murder. The new film drastically diverts from the original, having its Murphy freak out upon waking up as a robot, fully cognizant of who he is. It’s only when his emotional stability comes into question that his doctor (Gary Oldman) decides to mess with his brain and shoot him full of dopamine, turning him into a robot zombie. I heard about this twist in advance, and I didn’t like the sound of it. Alas, the idea of a man knowing full well that he has been turned into a cyborg is a relatively scintillating cinematic topic, and it’s handled well. Murphy’s wife and kid play a bigger part in this story,

4

5

Excellent

And that result? Not that bad … not bad at all. Padilha and writer Joshua Zetumer wisely go for something very different this time out. While the update is as subversive, and perhaps satirical when it comes to its presentation of the media, it has a little more heart and emotion than the nasty original. Now, normally I’d cry foul at this sort of thing, because I loved my RoboCop bloody, but the strong cast and a visually sound presentation make for a movie that is, at the least, worth watching even if it pales in comparison to Verhoeven’s insane incarnation. Joel Kinnaman steps into the role of Alex Murphy, a Detroit cop in the year 2028 who gets himself blown up after causing too much trouble for a criminal

and that turns out to be fine. Michael Keaton represents the evil corporation that creates RoboCop. His Raymond Sellars is evil in a more understated way than Ronny Cox’s Dick Jones from the ’87 film, but he’s just as sinister. And Jackie Earle Haley gets one of his most funny roles ever as a militaristic policeman, while Samuel L. Jackson gets to scream as a sensationalistic talk-show host. The movie also contains some clever winks to the source material, including an army of ED-209s—the cumbersome war machine that fell down the stairs squealing in the original—and a nod to the design of the first RoboCop suit before Keaton’s character switches it to a sleek black model. In the end, the remake rewrites the original in a way that won’t piss off its legions of fans. One hundred years from now, if anybody is watching RoboCop movies, I imagine the Verhoeven film will still be the one most in favor. The new one amounts to a decent enough curio, but it won’t be a classic. Ω


it’s time to

Reviewers: Craig Blamer, Bob Grimm and Juan-Carlos Selznick.

Opening this week 3 Days to Kill

Director McG (Charlie’s Angels, Terminator Salvation) helms this action thriller about a dying Secret Service agent (Kevin Costner) who reluctantly comes out of retirement to do “one last job” in exchange for a potentially lifesaving drug. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

Pompeii

A disaster flick set in the year A.D. 79, with a slave-turned-gladiator trying to save his true love from the clutches of a politician’s son as Mount Vesuvius begins to erupt around them. Directed by Paul W.S. Anderson (Resident Evil). Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

Re-opening this week Philomena

Stephen Frears (The Queen, High Fidelity) directs this based-on-real-events story about a British journalist (Steve Coogan) who helps a woman (Judi Dench) find out what happened to the son she was forced to give up for adoption 50 years earlier. Four Oscar nominations, including Best Picture, Best Screenplay and Best Actress. Pageant Theatre. Rated PG.

Now playing About Last Night

The Brat Pack-era flick (based on a David Mamet play) gets an update, with the cast of Kevin Hart, Michael Ealy, Regina Hall and Joy Bryant taking over the roles of young lovers struggling with the transition from onenight stands to committed relationships. Cinemark 14 and Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

Endless Love

The 1981 film (starring a young Brooke Shields) gets cleaned up for a tween treatment with a couple of young Brits (Alex Pettyfer and Gabriella Wilde) taking over as the star-crossed lovers. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

Frozen

The new Disney computer-animated feature is an adaptation of Hans Christian Andersen’s fairytale, The Snow Queen. In the film, a young princess embarks on an epic journey to find her sister—the Snow Queen— whose magical powers have buried the kingdom in a never-ending winter. Cinemark 14. Rated PG.

The LEGO Movie

A computer-animated adaptation of the iconic kids’ toy pits a team of LEGOs led by an ordinary construction-worker minifigure (voiced by Chris Pratt) against an evil tyrant (Will Farrell) who wants to glue everything in the universe together. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG.

Lone Survivor

Peter Berg (Friday Night Lights) directs this true story about a failed Navy SEALS mission to capture a Taliban leader in Afghanistan in 2005. Starring Mark Wahlberg. Cinemark 14. Rated R.

3

The Monuments Men

The good news: The Monuments Men is based on a fascinating episode in the history of World War II; it’s agreeably entertaining; and it has a big, attractive cast. The bad news: The film’s version of history feels too much like movie-friendly fiction, and the cast members mostly play versions of themselves, with only the bare minimum of links to the historical figures on whom they are based. Based on the actual exploits of U.S. Army specialists charged with recovering stolen treasures of European art in the late stages of World War II, the film follows a handful of characters through a mildly suspenseful adventure that is part secret mission, part cultural commando raid, and part rambunctious caper. There are nods to serious, painful history here, but the script (by George Clooney, who also stars and directs, and Grant Heslov) often seems little more than a spinoff of the Ocean’s Eleven cycle, with Clooney’s version of the Rat Pack (Bill Murray, John Goodman, Matt Damon, etc.) working variations on caper-movie riffs made suitable to the particular circumstances of this tale. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13 —J.C.S.

The Nut Job

An animated feature about a park squirrel who teams up with a city rat and plans to rob the goods from a nut store in order to help his park mates with their winter stash. Starring the voices of Will Arnett, Brendan Fraser and Katherine Heigl. Cinemark 14. Rated PG.

Ride Along

An action-comedy directed by Tim Story (Barbershop) about a small-time security guard (Kevin Hart) who goes on a ride-along with his fiancée’s brother, an Atlanta cop (Ice Cube), in an effort to prove himself worthy to marry his sister (Tika Sumpter). Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13.

3

DisCoVeR CHiCo

A FREE Guide for Visitors and Locals, too. ThE nEwEsT EDiTion is coMinG soon!

RoboCop

See review this issue. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13 —B.G.

That Awkward Moment

A rom-com about three best buds (played by Zac Efron, Miles Teller and Michael B. Jordan) who are struggling with relationships and commitment. Cinemark 14. Rated R.

3

Walking the Camino: Six Ways to Santiago

Lydia Smith’s good-natured documentary follows a half-dozen folk taking the traditional pilgrimage, on foot, to Santiago de Compostela in northern Spain. Smith’s approach may seem a little reminiscent of reality TV (the trials and tribulations of six lively, spirited people on a 500-mile hike), but with lots of soulfulness and none of the lowbrow sensationalism. The net result is a charmingly lyrical travelogue, with bucolic landscapes, beguiling character sketches, and a quietly poetic sense of the spirituality of long-distance walking. Note: Director Smith will be on hand during screenings on Sunday, Feb. 16, to discusss her film. Pageant Theatre. Not rated —J.C.S.

Advertising in Discover Chico will enrich the stay of visitors to Butte County by directing them to the best places to shop, eat and stay. Most importantly, it can help them find you and your business. To be a part of the next Discover Chico, call your Chico News & Review advertising representative today.

Winter’s Tale

Colin Farrell stars in this supernatural drama as an early 20th-century thief who falls for a young sick woman (Jessica Brown Findlay), and travels across time to try and save her and to save himself from an evil crime boss (Russell Crowe). Based on Mark Helprin’s fantasy novel of the same name. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

Publication Date: March 21 Call your News & Review advertising representative today, (530) 894-2300 February 20, 2014

CN&R 45


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Guy Davis sets the stage for the True Blues program at Laxson Auditorium. PHOTO BY KYLE DELMAR

Trio of bluesmen get to the roots of American music

“Pthing is all about,” Guy Davis said from the Laxson Auditorium stage. “So I say, [affecting a proeople ask me what this ‘True Blues’

fessorial voice] ‘Well, do you mean that in the existential or the Presbyterian sense?’” Though Davis’ retort garnered the by intended laughs, there’s a deeper Ken Smith wisdom to his answer. “True Blues”—the title of the tour that kens@ newsreview.com brought Davis and fellow bluesmen Corey Harris and Alvin Youngblood Hart through town last Thursday REVIEW: (Feb. 13) evening—means a lot of True Blues: things to a lot of different people, History of the and arguing with fans who have difBlues, Thursday, ferent interpretations of where the Feb. 13, at Laxson Auditorium. form begins and ends ultimately leads nowhere. Davis and company instead used music and stories about the people who pioneered the blues to share their particularly informed idea of what true blues is. Considering Davis’ commentary fell within a set that consisted of a song written by a dude named Bumble Bee Slim and a tribute to harmonica legend Sonny Terry—who began recording in the 1930s—it’s apparent where their opinions lie. Each of the performers played separate half-hour sets before combining forces for the finale. Each also brought his own distinct flare to the form, and punctuated each song with personal and historical commentary. The tour is part of a multimedia project that Harris organized, focusing on modern performers whose style is deeply rooted in traditional blues; the performances are intended as an extension of the True Blues CD released on Telarc Records last year and an upcoming DVD of the same name (scheduled for June 1 on Concord Records). Davis kicked the night off, his set including the aforementioned highlights as well as a rendition of “That’s No Way to Get Along,” which he joked he

learned from a preacher, referring to Reverend Robert Wilkins, a 1920s- and ’30s-era Delta bluesman. He also explained the song is better known nowadays as The Rolling Stones’ “Prodigal Son.” Hart played next, his commentary leaning toward the more personal side. Prefacing one of his own songs, for example, he told a story about the friendship he’d struck up with late St. Louis blues legend Henry Townsend (“In my opinion, he blows Robert Johnson out of the water,” Hart said) when Townsend was 90. He explained Townsend first recorded at age 19 in 1929. “People think these songs were written and played by old men, but that wasn’t the case,” Hart explained. “It just took until they were old men for people to realize what they were playing back when they were young men.” Hart’s set included a cover of Skip James’ “Illinois Blues.” Harris also paid tribute to James with “Devil Got My Woman.” Illustrating how traditional blues can be just as relevant today, Harris also played one of his own songs that sounded as if it could well have been written 70 years ago—“Fulton Blues,” an homage to his neighborhood in Richmond, Va. The performers’ separate sets complemented each other well, and set the stage for the finale. All three came out to play together, trading verses on standards like “Little Red Rooster” and “Hoochie Coochie Man,” both written by Willie Dixon but made better known by Howlin’ Wolf and Muddy Waters, respectively. Though the performances were excellent, they were sometimes hampered by sound problems. This was most severe during Davis’ set, as he was sometimes accompanied by an offstage bass that sounded spongy, undefined and overpoweringly loud. The sound problems resurfaced later in the night, as Harris’ vocals were at times screaming above the rest of the mix. Considering the evening’s relatively simple setup (mostly just one voice and one guitar), it seems these glitches could easily have been avoided. Ω February 20, 2014

CN&R 47


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THINGS ARE GETTING MEDIEVAL, FOR REAL THIS TIME When it comes to

end-of-the-world prophecies, a Viking Apocalypse sounds like one of the more badass ways to close up shop on Earth as we know it. And, it turns out that the foretold end times are actually upon us and our final day as a planet will be this Saturday, Feb. 22. Apparently, last November, the JORVIK Viking Centre of York, England, sent out the Norse god Heimdallr to sound the Gjallarhorn (or “yelling horn”) and set in motion the 100 days leading up to Ragnarök, a battle royale between the gods during which the sun and moon will be devoured by wolves and the Earth will be consumed by water in anticipation of new, better days. The modern Vikings’ reasons as to why the world is ending this particular year Blow that yelling horn! include the apparent Ice Age PHOTO COURTESY OF JORVIK VIKING CENTRE that is nigh and the fact that some giant oarfish (or was it Jormungand, the Midgard serpent?!) washed ashore here in California last year. Perhaps more importantly, though, is the fact that, according to the center’s online calendar of events, the date happens to coincide with the final night of their 2014 Viking Festival, which doesn’t bode well for the kids who’ve signed up for the Have-a-go Sword Combat battle-skills workshop on the 23rd. “Great Oden’s raven!” indeed!

MOVING ON In the event that we Nor Cal warriors are able to survive the battle, there are a lot of interesting music festivals we can look forward to during the new age, or at least over the next few months: • CAMMIES: The Chico Area Music Awards are coming a little early this year. The 12 genre showcases will happen April 3-5 at various venues around town, and the finale is going down April 13 at the Chico Women’s Club. The CN&R’s selection committee members are finishing up picking their faves, and we’ll be announcing the nominees in the paper and online on Thursday, Feb. 27. Go like the CAMMIES at www.facebook.com/chicocammies to get all the updates. • Nor-Cal Jazz Festival: The inaugural festival takes place over two days, April 26 at Redding’s Old City Hall, and April 27, at the Sierra Nevada Big Room. There are a ton of amazing artists scheduled, including Grammy-nominated pianist Mark Levine and local faves Bogg (who recently had some musical equipment stolen, and are holding a benefit next Thursday, Feb. 27, at Café Coda). Visit www.norcaljazz festival.com for more info. •New name for Concow fest: The organizers of the annual Wild Mountain Faire are changing the name of their annual summer music fest to Sacred Movement. The “healing and arts festival” will take place at the Lake Concow Campground June 27-28, and proceeds will go toward a community center being built on the grounds. Visit www.facebook.com/sacredmovementmusicfestival for details.

354 E. 3rd St

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A Benefit for KZFR 90.1 FM 48 CN&R February 20, 2014

•Funk in the forest: Groove-minded buddies Spencer “DJ Spenny” Rouse and Bob “Bustolini’s” Backstrom are putting on a two-day funk fest in Belden, called For the Funk of It!, Aug. 15-16. Scheduled acts include Moksha, Tracorum, Mojo Green, among others. Find “For the Funk of It!” on Facebook for more deets.

DEVOtion It’s a time of mourning in the

DEVO world this week as Devo guitarist/ keyboardist Bob Casale died suddenly of heart failure on Feb. 17. He was 61. Casale, along with his brother, bassist Gerald Casale, was one of the founding members of the band and he’s the second member of the influential art-rock band to die in less than a year. Longtime drummer Alan Myers died of stomach cancer on June 24, 2013. RIP Bob Casale.


February 20, 2014

CN&R 49


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New bulldog on the block Popular Oroville taqueria opens Chico location

F particularly difficult to do. I have my standbys, and one thing I love about them is that each place

inding good Mexican food in Chico is not

offers something just a little bit different from the others. So, while I crave enchiladas from one restaurant, I order only shrimp tacos from my favorite taco by truck and it’s nachos all the way at Meredith Graham spot No. 3. And if satisfying my various meredithg@ Mexican food cravings is like getnewsreview.com ting a fix, I think I just found my new taquito dealer. Bulldog Taqueria is the new kid in town, but it’s building on a strong foundation. The restaurant, ★★★★ on Nord Avenue across the street from Safeway, is bright and welBulldog coming, its menu vast and invitTaqueria 995 Nord Ave. ing. But despite being open mere 592-3605 months, it’s clear the locally www.bulldog owned eatery has its act together. taqueria.com That’s because Bulldog got its start in Oroville, inside La EsmerHours: alda Market, where it’s built a Sun.-Wed., strong following of hungry cus8 a.m.-12 a.m.; tomers. Thurs., 8 a.m.-12 a.m.; For my first visit to Bulldog Fri.-Sat., No. 2, I wanted to try something 8 a.m.-2 a.m. basic that I could compare to other experiences around town. So, I ordered the burrito bowl with chicken ($5.99) and drooled over ★★★★★ the rest of the menu while I waited, EPIC already planning my next attack. ★★★★ The burrito bowl was delicious. AUTHORITATIVE Generous portions of shredded ★★★ chicken and rice and beans were APPEALING complemented by onion, cilantro, ★★ tomato and sour cream. Altogether, HAS MOMENTS the meal packed a lot of flavor and ★ the chicken was, simply put, aweFLAWED

50 CN&R February 20, 2014

some. A super-fine shred can leave meat dry, but this was done perfectly. In general, what excites me most about Bulldog’s menu is that so many items are offered à la carte, meaning I can try a little bit of this, a little bit of that. The meat selection is also traditional and varied, with lengua (beef tongue) and cabeza (beef head) offered alongside chicken, fish, beef and birria (goat). For my second taste, I decided to try three à la carte tacos ($1.50, $1.75 for fish): fried fish, cabeza and birria. And, to mix it up a little, I ordered a chicken taquito as well ($2.50 à la carte). Generally, I’m pretty adventurous when it comes to trying different foods. For some reason, however, I have shied away from cabeza until now. I’m also not sure I had ever tried goat before. I don’t know what I was expecting, but the goat taco rocked. The meat was moist and tender, almost like a beef brisket, and a slight gaminess was a welcome flavor. The cabeza wasn’t my cup of tea as much, but it definitely wasn’t anything to be scared of. More tender than most beef, the head meat was also a little fattier. But the best thing I’ve tried on the Bulldog menu thus far is the chicken taquito. Piled high with guacamole and sour cream (I opted to have my salsa on the side), the à la carte taquito was a small meal in itself. My first bite was delightful, with the perfect crunch of the tortilla offering a nice textural counterpart to the soft chicken filling and condiments on top. This taquito was so good, a craving started to develop, sending me back days later for another fix. The taqueria also has a large and comfortable dining room, clean and sleekly designed, with high ceilings and large windows. A sort of room within a room offers sports fans a spot to catch the game on three big-screen TVs. And the service was cheerful, fast and friendly. All in all, I was impressed by Chico’s newest Mexican restaurant. As I rotate among my favorite spots, I know where I’ll be going when my birria or taquito cravings kick in. Ω


Find Us Online At:

www.chico.newsreview.com

BUTTE COUNTY LIVING Open House Guide | Home Sales Listings | Featured Home of the Week

LOVE’S REAL ESTATE Understatement

H

ere in California sellers of real estate are obligated to disclose everything from cat dander to noisy neighbors. In fact, we have some of the toughest disclosure laws in the nation. Not so in other states. Just ask Janet Milliken, who moved from California to Pennsylvania and bought a house unaware a murder-suicide had taken place on the property a year before.

Free Real Estate Listings Find Us Online At:

Pennsylvania is a few thousand miles from California, but apparently it is light years away in the world of disclosure. In California, death on a property is a disclosure no-brainer. All sellers here are required by law to disclose any death on a property within the last three years.

www.chico.newsreview.com

RECYCLE

Janet’s Pennsylvania seller faced no such requirement.

THIS PAPER.

If Janet had bought her house in California, and the seller hid the fact of a murder-suicide, that seller would be a dead-bang loser in a lawsuit. Janet would undoubtedly have all her money back and more. Not surprisingly, soon after Janet moved into her new home in Pennsylvania a neighbor asked, “So you heard about what happened in your house, right?”

YOU’RE WELCOME, NATURE.

After Janet learned the truth, she struggled with what to say to her kids or whether to even tell them at all. Then the kids had friends over to visit, and those friends broke the news. “Janet’s kids were very upset and disturbed,” said Janet’s attorney. “Her family was already dealing with the death of her husband, the kids’ father.” Can a seller in Pennsylvania really get away with such nondisclosure? Janet asked the question via a lawsuit against the seller and their Realtor. The seller had purchased the home less than a year before selling it to Janet, knowing the former owner had shot and killed his wife and then himself in the master bedroom. The trial judge ruled in favor of the seller, and Janet has appealed to the state supreme court. Janet’s attorney said, “Physical defects in a house can be fixed. Something like this never goes away.” The attorney added that sellers should be required to disclose troubling events, “at least for a period of time.” That’s an understatement.

DOUG LOVE is Sales Manager at Century 21 Jeffries Lydon Email escrowgo@aol.com or call 530.680.0817

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CN&R 51


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Sat. 11-1, 2-4 & Sun. 11-1, 2-4 81 Chico Canyon Rd (X St: Bruce Rd) 5 Bd / 4 Ba, 3376 Sq.Ft. $528,000 Anita Miller 321-1174 Sandy Stoner 514-5555 Frankie Dean 717-3884 Kimberley Tonge 518-5508

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1271 Virage Ln (X St: Arch Way) 3 Bd / 2 Baroom, 1,972 Sq. Ft. $310,000 Justin Jewett 518-4089

Sat. 11-1, 2-4 & Sun. 2-4 10 Smith Bros (X St: W 6th Ave) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1762 Sq.Ft. $279,900 Jerry Bode 518-8466 Steve Kasprzyk 518-4850

885 Lorinda Ln (X St: Cohasset Rd) 3 Bd / 1 Baroom 1,288 Sq. Ft. $239,400 Alice Zeissler 518-1872

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2050 Springfield #155 2 Bd / 2 Barooms, 1,404 Sq. Ft. $88,500 Alice Zeissler 518-1872

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Prices are rising and rates are still low.

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KIMBERLEY TONGE | (530) 518-5508

Alice Zeissler | 530.518.1872

JOYCE TURNER

571–7719 • joyce_turner@ymail.com

The following houses were sold in Butte County by real estate agents or private parties during the week of February 3, 2014 – February 7, 2014. The housing prices are based on the stated documentary transfer tax of the parcel and may not necessarily reflect the actual sale price of the home. TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

SQ. FT.

ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

SQ. FT.

6118 Dana Cir

ADDRESS

Magalia

$176,000

3/ 2

1633

1611 Conners Ct

Paradise

$220,000

3/ 2

2164

14726 Colter Way

Magalia

$127,500

2/ 2

1161

14718 Colter Way

Magalia

$127,500

2/ 2

1320

6633 Dolores Dr

Paradise

$201,500

2/ 2

1698

15 Stringtown Rd

Oroville

$220,000

3/ 2

1325

4101 Hildale Ave

Oroville

$190,000

3/ 2

1404

5664 Clara Ln

Paradise

$160,000

4/ 2

1939

36 Las Plumas Way

Oroville

$160,000

3/ 2

1730

66 Orchardcrest Dr

Oroville

$133,000

3/ 2

1629

6256 Azalea Ln

Paradise

$150,000

2/ 1

986

52 CN&R February 20, 2014


Print ads start at $6/wk. www.newsreview.com or (530) 894-2300 ext. 5 Phone hours: M-F 8am-5pm. All ads post online same day. Deadlines for print: Line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Adult line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Display ad deadline: Friday 2pm

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Wanted Older Guitars! Martin, Fender, Gibson. Also older Fender amps. Top dollar pay. 916-966-1900 Record your own album on CD at a quality home studio. Call Steve 530-824-8540

SHARE LARGE HOME 1 block from Esplanade. Enjoy large bdrm, large pvt bath (tub & shower) living room, storage, ramp access. Share util w/ prof owner @ other end of house. Large fenced yard. Pet OK. $350/mo w/ 2nd bdrm $450/mo. Ideal for single parent and child. 530-566-1010

PROBLEMS with the IRS or State Taxes? Settle for a fraction of what you owe! Free face to face consultations with offices in your area. Call 888-608-3016

Notice of caution to our Readers! Whenever doing business by telephone or email proceed with caution when cash or credit is required in advance of services.

PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. 866-413-6293. Void in Illinois/New Mexico/Indiana (AAN CAN) Huge Moving Sale Quality items, antiques, house-­ hold goods, books, clothes, everything must go! Sat 2/22 8am-2pm 712 Northgraves Ave Chico

1983 Full-sized Chevy Blazer.All original. Most factory options. Very well kept condition. $6000. 530-895-8171 1970 MGB Classic Convertible Restored, pristine condition. All records. $8,995.00. 530-345-9373 Days or Evenings. CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com (AAN CAN)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as KELLER WILLIAMS REALTY CHICO AREA, KW COMMERCIAL NORTH STATE at 1196 E. Lassen Ave Suite 130 Chico, CA 95973. BCHM CORPORATION 1196 E. Lassen Avenue Suite 130 Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: JOANNE MADLUNG, CEO Dated: January 9, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000055 Published: January 30, February 6,13,20, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as TRUCKARONI at 1049 Cherry St Chico, CA 95928. ROBERT BUSICK 776 E 6th St Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ROBERT BUSICK Dated: January 17, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000114 Published: January 30, February 6,13,20, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as YUROK D AND P, YUROK DESIGNS AND PHOTOGRAPHY JOLENE A SMITH 656 East Avenue, Unit B Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JOLENE SMITH Dated: January 17, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000121 Published: January 30, February 6,13,20, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as FIRE LITIGATION CONSULTING, PARADISE SAILBAGS at 82 Lariat Loop Oroville, CA 95966. DANNY K NICHOLS 82 lariat Loop oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: DANNY K. NICHOLS Dated: January 23, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000146 Published: January 30, February 6,13,20, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BLISS NAIL AND SPA at 23 Forest Ave Suite 100 Chico, CA 95928. MANG LEPHAM 472 Entler Ave Chico, CA 95928. Signed: MANG LEPHAM Dated: January 24, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000156 Published: January 30, February 6,13,20, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as WIZZA TRANSPORT at 355 E Lassen Ave #16 Chico, CA 95973. FAROOQ IQBAL 355 E Lassen Ave #16 Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: FAROOQ IQBAL Dated: January 28, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000174 Published: February 6,13,20,27, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as ORCHARD HOSPITAL FOUNDATION at 240 Spruce Street Gridley, CA 95948. BIGGS-GRIDLEY MEMORIAL HOSPITAL FOUNDATION 240 Spruce Street Gridley, CA 95948. SHEILA CASSIE ENNES 830 Vermont St Gridley, CA 95948. LISA WEDLN VAN DE HEY 153 E Gridley Rd Gridley, CA 95948. This business is conducted by an Unincorporated Association. Signed: SHEILA ENNES Dated: January 21, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000126 Published: February 6,13,20,27, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as AWAKE LASH STUDIO at 1 Williamsburg Lane #D Chico, CA 95926. DOUGLAS A L SMITH 1027 N Railroad Ave Susanville, CA 96130. JIMI STURGEON-SMITH 1027 N Railroad Ave Susanville, CA 96130. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: JIMI STURGEONSMITH Dated: January 21, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000131 Published: February 6,13,20,27, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as FOR THE FUNK OF IT PRODUCTIONS at 1675 Carol Ave Chico, CA 95928. SPENCER ROUSE 1675 Carol Ave Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: SPENCER ROUSE Dated: December 31, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0001633 Published: February 6,13,20,27, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as GMB LANDSCAPE ENTERPRISES at 4 Tilden Lane Chico, CA 95928. MICHELLE SAMANIEGO 4 Tilden Lane Chico, CA 95928. SAM SAMANIEGO 4 Tilden Lane Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: SAM SAMANIEGO Dated: January 27, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000169 Published: February 6,13,20,27, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as KING OF BEASTS at 720 W. 2nd Ave, Apt G Chico, CA 95926. CALEB J OTT 720 W. 2nd Ave, Apt G Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: CALEB J OTT Dated: January 6, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000020 Published: February 6,13,20,27, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BUTTE NATURAL DISTRIBUTING at 6244 Pentz Rd Paradise, CA 95969. RICHARD LEWIS CSER 6244 Pentz Rd Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: RICHARD L. CSER Dated: January 2, 2014 FBN Number; 2014-0000005 Published: February 6,13,20,27, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as LEKKER TOYS at 2990 HWY 32, Suite 400 Chico, CA 95973. ELEMENTAL CASTINGS LLC 2990 Hwy 32, Suite 400 Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: TOM MONCADA, C.O.O. Dated: January 30, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000186 Published: February 6,13,20,27, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as JB CONSULTING, JGB CONSULTING at 333 Crater Lake Dr Chico, CA 95973. JOSEPH G BACH 333 Crater Lake Dr Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JOSEPH G. BACH Dated: January 6, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000019 Published: February 6,13,20,27, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as COWLICKS HAIR COMPANY at 166 Cohasset Rd #7 Chico, CA 95926. ROBYN L JOHNSON 9068 Stanford Lane Durham, CA 95938. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ROBYN JOHNSON Dated: January 23, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000144 Published: February 6,13,20,27, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF WITHDRAWAL The following person has withdrawn as partner from the partnership operating under: SATORI COLOR AND HAIR DESIGN at 1224 Mangrove Ave #44 Chico, CA 95926. JUDITH CHARLENE LOREN-GRACE 3181 Eagle Lake Ct Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: JUDITH C. LOREN Dated: February 3, 2014 FBN Number: 2007-0001410 Published: February 6,13,20,27, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as RED BANKS WRITING AND PRODUCTIONS at 1884 Hooker Oak Ave Chico, CA 95926. JOSEPH RAYMOND JR ASNAULT 1884 Hooker Oak Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JOE ASNAULT Dated: January 6, 2013 FBN Number: 2014-0000029 Published: February 13,20,27, March 6, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CASEY’S NATURAL at 498 E 8th Ave Chico, CA 95926. SEAN CASEY APLANALP 498 E 8th Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: S. CASEY APLANALP Dated: February 3, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000194 Published: February 13,20,27, March 6, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as KP TUTORING at 546 West 9th Street Chico, CA 95927. KEVIN PARSONS 546 West 9th Street Chico, CA 95927. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: KEVIN PARSONS Dated: January 17, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000118 Published: February 13,20,27, March 6, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as MOORE LANDSCAPE MANAGEMENT, SPRINKLER PRO at 819 Black Walnut Way Chico, CA 95973. CINDI R MOORE 819 Black Walnut Way Chico, CA 95973. DAVID L MOORE 819 Black Walnut Way Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: DAVID L. MOORE Dated: February 4, 2014 FBN number: 2014-0000206 Published: February 13,20,27, March 6, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BLUETEAM, BLUETEAM REAL ESTATE, BLUETEAM REALTY, BLUETEAM REALTY GROUP, THE BLUETEAM at 7020 Skyway Paradise, CA 95969. BLUE TEAM REALTY INC 7020 Skyway Paradise, CA 95969.

this Legal Notice continues

This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: TROY DAVIS Dated: January 27, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000171 Published: February 13,20,27, March 6, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following persons have abandoned the use of the fictitious business names: BLUE TEAM, THE BLUE TEAM, BLUE TEAM REALTY, BLUE TEAM REALTY GROUP, BLUE TEAM REAL ESTATE at 7020 Skyway Paradise, CA 95969. CYNTHIA G HASKETT 1326 Deodara Way Paradise, CA 95969. TROY J DAVIS 3184 Cherokee Rd Oroville, CA 95965. This business was conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: TROY DAVIS Dated: January 27, 2014 FBN Number: 2013-0001264 Published: February 13,20,27, March 6, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as RESCUE UNITED at 406 Vilas Road Chico, CA 95973. JOHN MARETTI 406 Vilas Road Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JOHN MARETTI Dated: February 3, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000193 Published: February 13,20,27, March 6, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as SATORI COLOR AND HAIR DESIGN at 627 Broadway Street #120 Chico, CA 95928 DANA BROOKE HOWES 525 Countryside Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: DANA HOWES Dated: February 10, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000235 Published: February 13,20,27, March 6,2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ROOTS AND LEAVES APOTHECARY at 15984 Wagon Road Forest Ranch, CA 95942. RONA MIKOLAJCZAK 15984 Wagon Road Forest Ranch, CA 95942. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: RONA MIKOLAJCZAK Dated: February 12, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000255 Published: February 20,27, March 6,13, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as REVOLUTION POND LANDSCAPE GARDEN at 536 W 12th Ave Chico, CA 95926. JOEL C RAINEY 536 W 12th Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JOEL C. RAINEY Dated: February 13, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000263 Published: February 20,27, March 6,13, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ECOCAB at 2236 Christopher Ln Chico, CA 95926. BRYAN GABBARD 2236 Christopher Ln Chico, CA

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95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: BRYAN GABBARD Dated: January 17, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000119 Published: February 20,27, March 6,13, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CHICO TRUCK AND RV at 5 Three Sevens Lane Chico, CA 95973. CHICO TRUCK AND RV INC 5 Three Sevens Lane Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: NANCI ALLEN, SECRETARY Dated: January 24, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000157 Published: February 20,27, March 6,13, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT the following person is doing business as NON STOP MOTION STUDIO at 8 Creekwood Ct Chico, CA 95926. MARK KEITH PULLYBLANK 8 Creekwood Ct Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: MARK PULLYBLANK Dated: January 31, 2014 FBN Number; 2014-0000192 Published: February 20,27, March 6,13, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as KIRKWOOD ASSOCIATES at 2057 Hooker Oak Ave. Chico, CA 95926. GALE ALVISTUR 2057 Hooker Oak Ave Chico, CA 95926. VICTOR ALVISTUR 2057 Hooker Oak Ave Chico, 95926. NANNETTE CARTER 2372 England Street Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: VICTOR ALVISTUR Dated: February 4, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000208 Published: February 20,27, March 6,13, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as SUSHI KING at 2190 Esplanade Chico, CA 95926. WONDERFUL NATIONWIDE INC 1401 Melody Road Olivehurst, CA 95961. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: RIE MITSUNARI, MANAGER Dated: February 10, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000236 Published: February 20,27, March 6,13, 2014

NOTICES CITATION FOR PUBLICATION UNDER WELFARE AND INSTITUTIONS CODE SECTION 294 To (names of persons to be notified, if known, including names on birth certificate): JASON HOLMES and anyone claiming to be a parent of (child’s name): EH born on (date): November 16, 2004 at (name of hospital or other place of birth and city and state): OROVILLE HOSPITAL

classifieds

CONTINUED ON 54

February 20, 2014

CN&R 53


OROVILLE CALIFORNIA A hearing will be held on Date: April 8, 2014 Time: 8:30 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA Located at: Superior Court Of California County of Butte 1 Court Street Oroville, CA 95965 At the hearing the court will consider the recommendations of the social worker or probation officer. The Social worker or probation officer will recommend that your child be freed from your legal custody so that the child may be adopted. If the court follows the recommendation, all your parental rights to the child will be terminated. You are required to be present at the hearing, to present evidence, and you have the right to be represented by an attorney. If you do not have an attorney and cannot afford one, the court will appoint an attor-­ ney for you. If the court terminated your pa-­ rental rights, the order may be final. The court will proceed with this hearing whether or not you are present. Signed: S. THOMPSON Dated: January 30, 2014 Case Number: J-36671 Published: February 13,20,27, March 6, 2014

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE WILLIAM R. HARPER, SR To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: WILLIAM R HARPER, SR A Petition for Probate has been filed by: SAUDA AARIF in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. THE Petition for Probate requests that: SAUDA AARIF be appointed as

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personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The PETITION requests the decedent’s wills and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representa-­ tive to take many actions with-­ out obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consent-­ ed to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A Hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: April 3, 2014 Time: 9:00a.m. Dept: TBA Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 655 Oleander Ave Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal repre-­ sentative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in

this Legal Notice continues

section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or per-­ sonal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and le-­ gal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Case Number: PR40931 Petitioner: Sauda Aarif 3033 Greenville St Oroville, CA 95966 Published: February 13,20,27, 2014

NOTICE TO CREDITORS SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA BUTTE COUNTY Case Number: PR-40929 (PROBATE CODE SECTION 19050) In re: THE JUNE E. ROTHE-BARNESON REVOCABLE FAMILY TRUST CREATED FEBRUARY 22, 1999 BY JUNE E. ROTHE-BARNESON, DECEDENT NOTICE IS HEREBY given to the creditors and contingent creditors of the above-named decedent that all persons hav-­ ing claims against the decedent are required to file then with the Superior Court, at 655 Oleander Avenue, Chico, California, and mail or deliver a copy to JOHN L. BARNESON, III, AND JEAN LAVERE PONCIANO as co-trustees of the trust dated

this Legal Notice continues

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February 22, 1991, of which the Decedent was the settlor, c/o Richard S. Matson, Attorney at Law, 1342 The Esplande, Suite A, Chico, California 95926, within the later of 4 months after February 6, 2014, or, if notice is mailed or personally delivered to you, 60 days after the date this notice is mailed or presonally delivered to you, or you must petition to file a late claim as provided in Probate Code Section 19103. A claim form may be obtained from the court clerk. For your protection, you are encouraged to file your claim by certified mail, with re-­ turn receipt requested. Dated: January 31, 2014 Richard S. Matson, Attorney for John L. Barneson, III, and Jean LaVere Ponciano, Co-Trustees Published: February 6,13,20, 2014

NOTICE OF LIEN SALE Pursuant to CA Business Code 21700, in lieu of rents due. The unit numbers and names and contents are: Unit 081CC: Leigh Ann Brizendine: Misc items, boxes, etc. (6x10) Unit 242SS: Taylor Forwalter: Misc items, boxes, etc. (6x10) Unit 247SS: Donald Vassalo: Misc items, boxes, etc. (6x12) Unit 319CC1: Michael Maurice: Misc items, boxes, etc. (5x7) Unit 476CC: Aaron T Seamons: Misc items, boxes, etc. (5x6) Contents to be sold to the highest bidder on: March 1, 2014 Beginning at 12:00pm Sale to be held at: 65 Heritage Lane Chico, CA 95926. Published: February 20,27, 2014

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner RACHEL KERRY CRIBB filed a petition with this court for a decree changing petitioner’s name as follows: Present name: RACHEL KERRY CRIBB Proposed name: RAY KEELAN CRIBB THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition should not be granted NOTICE OF HEARING Date: February 26, 2014 Time: 8:30 A.M. Dept.: TBA The address of the court is: 655 Oleander Ave Chico, CA 95926. Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: January 9, 2014 Case Number: 161196 Published: January 30, February 6,13,20, 2014

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner JUSTINE MARIE LAWRENCE filed a petition with this court for

this Legal Notice continues

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filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: PEYTON DONEVON PAIVA Proposed name: PEYTON DONEVON FERM THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objec-­ tion that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: March 19, 2014 Time: 8:30am Dept: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: F. CLARK SUEYRES Dated: January 23, 2014 Case Number: 161256 Published: February 6,13,20,27, 2014

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner PATRICIA JEAN O’BRIEN filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: PATRICIA JEAN O’BRIEN Proposed name: PADDY O’BRIEN THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objec-­ tion that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: March 26, 2014 Time: 8:30am Dept: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: SANDRA L. MCLEAN Dated: January 27, 2014 Case Number: 161291 Published: February 6,13,20,27, 2014

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner EDWARD VERN THOMAS filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: EDWARD VERN THOMAS Proposed name: EDWARD THOMAS MCDO-­ NALD THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objec-­ tion that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: April 2, 2014 Time: 8:30am Dept: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: SANDRA L. MCLEAN Dated: February 4, 2014 Case Number: 161318 Published: February 13,20,27, March 6, 2014

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ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner VAN WYATT filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: VAN WYATT Proposed name: LARRY EUGENE PIXLER THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objec-­ tion that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and

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must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: March 26, 2014 Time: 8:30am Dept: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: SANDRA L. MCLEAN Dated: February 3, 2014 Case Number: 161323 Published: February 13,20,27, March 6, 2014

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ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner JOAN FERM

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a decree changing names as follows: Present name: JUSTINE MARIE LAWRENCE Proposed name: JUSTINE MARIE LEWIS-LAWRENCE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objec-­ tion that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: March 12, 2014 Time: 8:30am Dept: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: STEPHEN E. BENSON Dated: January 24, 2014 Case Number: 161293 Published: February 6,13,20,27, 2014

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ARIES (March 21-April 19): A

woman from New Mexico wrote to tell me that after reading my horoscopes for three years in the Santa Fe Reporter, she had decided to stop. “I changed my beliefs,” she said. “I no longer resonate with your philosophy.” On the one hand, I was sad that I had lost a reader. On the other hand, I admired her for being able to transform her beliefs, and also for taking practical action to enforce her shift in perspective. That’s the kind of purposeful metamorphosis I recommend for you, Aries. What ideas are you ready to shed? What theories no longer explain the nature of life to your satisfaction? Be ruthless in cutting away the thoughts that no longer work for you.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): In Arthurian legend, Camelot was the castle where King Arthur held court and ruled his kingdom. It housed the Round Table, where Arthur’s knights congregated for important events. Until recently, I had always imagined that the table was relatively small, and the number of knights few. But then, I discovered that several old stories say there was enough room for 150 knights. It wasn’t an exclusive, elitist group. I suspect you will experience a similar evolution, Taurus. You may be wishing you could become part of a certain circle but assume it’s too exclusive or selective to welcome you as a member. I suspect it’s more receptive and inclusive than you think. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): The

renowned Lakota medicine man Sitting Bull (1831-1890) wasn’t born with that name. For the first years of his life, he was known as Jumping Badger. His father renamed him when he was a teenager after he demonstrated exceptional courage in battle. I’d like to see you consider a similar transition in the coming months, Gemini. You’re due to add some gravitas to your approach. The tides of destiny are calling you to move more deliberately and take greater care with the details. Are you willing to experiment with being solid and stable? The more willing you are to assume added responsibility, the more interesting that responsibility is likely to be.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): The English

noun “offing” refers to the farthest reach of the ocean that is still visible as you stand on the beach. It’s a good symbol for something that is at a distance from you and yet still within view. I suggest that you take a long thoughtful look at the metaphorical offing that’s visible from where you stand. You’ll be wise to identify what’s looming for you in the future so you can start working to ensure you will get the best possible version of it.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): A large plaster

Buddha statue was housed at a modest temple in Bangkok, Thailand, from 1935 to 1955. No one knew its age or origins. In May of 1955, workers were struggling to move the heavy 10-foot icon to a new building on the temple grounds when it accidentally broke free of the ropes that secured it. As it hit the ground, a chunk of plaster fell off, revealing a sheen of gold beneath. Religious leaders authorized the removal of the remaining plaster surface. Hidden inside was a solidgold Buddha that is today worth $250 million. Research later revealed that the plaster had been applied by 18th-century monks to prevent the statue from being looted. I foresee a comparable sequence unfolding in the coming weeks for you, Leo. What will it take to free a valuable resource that’s concealed within a cheap veneer?

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Holistic-

health teacher Deepak Chopra suggests that we all periodically make this statement: “Every decision I make is a choice between a grievance and a miracle. I relinquish all regrets, grievances, and resentments, and choose the miracle.” Is that too New Age for you, Virgo? I hope you can drop any prejudices you might have about it and simply make it your own. It’s the precise formula you need to spin this week’s events in the

Sound healer

by Rob Brezsny right direction¡ªworking for you rather than against you.

story and photo by

Shannon Rooney

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): In the savan-

nas of Africa, water holes are crucial for life. During the rainy season, there are enough to go around for every animal species to drink and bathe in comfortably. But the dry season shrinks the size and number of the water holes. The impala may have to share with the hippopotamus, the giraffe with the warthog. Let’s use this as a metaphor to speculate about your future. I’m guessing that the dry season will soon be arriving in your part of the world. The water holes may dwindle. But that could ultimately prove to be a lucky development, because it will bring you into contact with interesting life-forms you might not have otherwise met. Unexpected new alliances could emerge.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): In his book The Storytelling Animal: How Stories Make Us Human, literary scholar Jonathan Gottschall muses on the crucial role that imagination plays in our lives. “[The] average daydream is about fourteen seconds long and [we] have about two thousand of them per day,” he says. “In other words, we spend about half of our waking hours¡ªone-third of our lives on earth¡ªspinning fantasies.” I bring this to your attention, Scorpio, because you are entering a phase when your daydreams can serve you well. They’re more likely than usual to be creative, productive and useful. Monitor them closely. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

The Russian composer Dmitri Shostakovich wrote his Eighth Symphony in a mere two months during the summer of 1943. He worked on it in an old henhouse on a former chicken farm. The location helped relax him, allowing him to work with extra intensity. I wish you could find a retreat like that for yourself sometime soon, Sagittarius. I think you would benefit from going off by yourself to a sanctuary and having some nice long talks with your ancestors, the spirits of nature and your deepest self. If that’s not practical right now, what would be the next best thing you could do?

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Is

there one simple thing you could do to bring a bit more freedom into your life? An elegant rebellion against an oppressive circumstance? A compassionate breakaway from a poignant encumbrance? A flash of unpredictable behavior that would help you escape a puzzling compromise? I’m not talking about a huge, dramatic move that would completely sever you from all of your burdens and limitations. I’m imagining a small step you could take to get a taste of spaciousness and a hint of greater fluidity. That’s your assignment in the coming week.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): There

are 15,074 lakes in Wisconsin, but more than 9,000 of them have never been officially named. That’s strange to me. In my view, everything is worthy of the love that is bestowed by giving it a name. I have named every tree and bush in my yard, as well as each egret that frequents the creek flowing by my house. I understand that in the Findhorn community in northern Scotland, people even give names to their cars and toasters and washing machines. According to researchers in the U.K., cows that have names are happier: They produce more milk. Your assignment, Aquarius, is to name at least some of the unnamed things in your world. It’s an excellent time to cultivate a closer, warmer personal relationship with absolutely everything.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): From 2010

to 2012, Eric Garcetti worked as an actor on the TV cop shows The Closer and its spin-off series Major Crimes. He played the mayor of Los Angeles. Then, in 2013, he ran for the office of L.A.’s mayor in real life and won. It was a spectacular example of Kurt Vonnegut’s suggestion that we tend to become what we pretend to be. Your assignment, Pisces, is to make good use of this principle. I invite you to experiment with pretending to be the person you would like to turn into.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

Bonnie Eskie uses sound to help people transform. A licensed psychotherapist who moved to Chico from Santa Cruz eight months ago, Eskie recently started Mother Song, a weekly singing therapy group for families with babies. Along with traditional psychotherapy, Eskie uses a variety of modalities to assist people on their healing journeys, including qigong, laughter yoga, EFT (Emotional Freedom Techniques), massage therapy and Sound Body Energetics. She’s especially focused on that last one, and uses various musical instruments in addition to voice, including a gong, a singing bowl, tuning forks, drums and many others. Contact her at Bonnie Eskie@gmail.com.

15 MINUTES

BREZSNY’S

For the week of February 20, 2014

What does singing do for you? It’s kind of a spiritual path for me—my dharma. I just love singing in sacred circles and singing heart songs. Our voice is an instrument!

What made you look beyond traditional psychotherapy? From the time I turned 16, and even before, I just thought so out of the box. I started exploring so many modalities, including eastern modalities. All of these experiences I bring into my healing practice. I have come more and more to see myself as a healer and spiritual guide, and I just happen to be trained in psychotherapy.

How do you help people? I’m not looking for the quick fix or to manage symptoms. I’m looking to help people have a transformational experience and step into a

whole new way of being. I want to help people become emotionally well.

How do you incorporate qigong? Part of qigong is a whole study around not only the movements that you use to shift your own energy, but also there are the six healing sounds. It’s a whole system you can do with colors and movements, and I bring that all into Sound Body Energetics.

What’s an example of how sound can heal? Humming, toning, and singing simple familiar melodies can help and heal the brain. The brain gets rewired into a state of deep relaxation very quickly [with these practices].

Do you have an example of someone helped by sound? While working at a mental-health center, there was … a Vietnam vet; he was freaking out. I started bringing my singing bowl with me, and I asked him if he would like to try something a little different. I took out my bowl and used it, with singing, and he sat there and just started crying. I did maybe a 20-minute session with him, and he said “That’s the closest thing I’ve ever experienced [to] feeling God.”

FROM THE EDGE

by Anthony Peyton Porter anthonypeytonporter@comcast.net

Eckie My mother, Eckie, was born in 1909, fourth child of Morris and Mamie McCants. She was a lucky child, born with light skin and straight hair, two distinct advantages in Mobile, Ala. Eckie graduated from high school in 1927, and somewhere I’ve got her diploma to prove it. It’s huge, like Janice’s mother’s diploma from the Chillicothe Business College. A diploma in those days was a big deal socially and physically, swirly and impressive. I was a mama’s boy. I denied it strenuously, especially to myself. There was nothing to be gained by admitting to being doted upon. It was decidedly unmanly, and a lot of what looked like being showered with attention was harassment and criticism, and I was emotionally retarded. It seems like I should be wise by now, but actually I’m barely grown up. I knew that people thought things about my mother that they didn’t express. “Oh, Eckie,” an old friend would say resignedly to one of her judgments. When I went back to the old neighborhood to tell some of the old timers that she had died, Rose Jones almost told me the truth, then thought better of it and let that sleeping dog lie. There’s nobody else now who would

know what she was like to another adult. My made-up story that fits the facts as I see them is that Eckie Ursula Porter, born Eckie May McCants and still called Eckie May by a few people in spite of Eckie Ursula’s disapproval, was pretty hot stuff way back in the day. I’ve seen a picture of her with her brother and a couple of other young guys, and another where she’s perched on the front fender of a swoopy 1930-ish coupé that suggests she was enjoying her beauty, and she had plenty to enjoy. The straight-laced-mother role she came to adopt was only a role. The strain must have been mighty. I loved my mother and hardly ever wanted to be around her. Just after I met Janice, I took her to Chicago to meet my family and friends. We dropped our things at the friend’s house where we were staying and drove over to my mother’s. As we walked up the front steps, my aunt, who lived upstairs, opened her door, and we said hello as I rang my mother’s bell. My mother came to her door livid because Janice and I had seen my aunt first and not her. We went inside her apartment, and within minutes Janice was in tears over the way my mother and I didn’t get along. Two years later, my mother came to live with us. February 20, 2014

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