Issuu on Google+

Judged as Wisconsin’s

Section A

VILAS COUNTY

NEWS-REVIEW

Wisconsin Newspaper Association 2012 Large Weekly Division

EAGLE RIVER, WI 54521 • (715) 479-4421 • vcnewsreview.com

VOL. 127, NO. 48

$1.25

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 13, 2013

Pines faces referendum next Tuesday District seeks $2.7 million to cover projected shortfall ___________ BY GARY RIDDERBUSCH NEWS-REVIEW EDITOR

___________

Northland Pines School District (NPSD) voters will be asked to approve two referendum questions to exceed the state-imposed revenue limits next Tuesday, Feb. 19, according to District Administrator Mike Richie. The first question will ask for approval to exceed the revenue limit by $2.7 million for each of the following three school years, while the second question will ask for $240,000 for the 2013-’14 school year only to construct new walls for fire safety in the K-8 building in Eagle River. Richie said the dollar amounts weren’t combined because the firewalls are a one-time expenditure. Concerning the request for $2.7 million to exceed the revenue limit, Richie said the school district has been frugal with

BACK TO ITS ROOTS — The eighth annual Labatt Blue/ USA Hockey Pond Hockey National Championships were held on Dollar Lake Friday through Sunday, attracting a record 342 teams for four-on-four hockey. Some of the scenes from Dollar Lake included: above, a skater moving in on the net; right, volunteers Todd Budde and Yukon Jack keeping score; and below, a winner hoisting a championship cup. —STAFF PHOTOS

its spending. “This referendum is $360,000 less than the last operational referendum which was conducted in 2009 and stretched to cover four school years,” he said. “That money expired on June 30, 2012, and was removed from the tax levy. As a result of that, taxpayers saw an 18% decrease in the 2012-’13 school district levy.” Richie said that due to the state imposed revenue limits and limited state and federal aid for the NPSD, the average budget shortfall for the upcoming referendum threeyear period is $3.06 million. “Even with a passed referendum, the district will still need to reduce its budget or make up the projected shortfall by $1.08 million over the To PINES, Pg. 3A

Three Lakes chair faces challengers ___________ BY ANTHONY DREW NEWS-REVIEW ASST. EDITOR

___________

Three Lakes voters will narrow a three-candidate field in a primary race for town chairman set next Tuesday, Feb. 19. Incumbent Chairman Don Sidlowski will be challenged by Stella Westfall and Bill Slizewski. Election polls will be open from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. at the Three Lakes Community Building. The top two vote earners will advance to the spring election Tuesday, April 2. The following is a brief biographical sketch and statement from each candidate. Don Sidlowski, 56, has served as Three Lakes Chair-

man sice 2009 and as a Three Lakes Plan Commission member since 2010. He and his wife, Ginny, have lived in Three Lakes for nine years. Sidlowski previously lived in east Tennessee and is a native of Chicago, Ill. Sidlowski has served in various committees, boards and organizations, including the Oneida County Comprehensive Plan Oversight Committee since 2009; Wisconsin Public Service Commission LinkWISCONSIN Region 2 Management Team since 2010; Oneida County Economic Development Corporation Board of Directors since To PRIMARY, Pg. 2A

Vilas eyes wider snowmobile trails ___________ BY KEN ANDERSON NEWS CORRESPONDENT

___________

While there is agreement wider snowmobile trails would improve safety, there is no consensus on who should pay for it. That was the discussion at the Vilas County Forestry and Land Committee meeting last week. Committee Chairman Ralph Sitzberger told other supervisors it was time for the Forestry Department, along with Parks and Recreation, to start spending money to make trails wider. “They are too narrow, on some trails with a groomer or logging truck, to have a snowmobile pass safely,” said

Sitzberger. “If we have to spend money, we should spend county money. Sooner or later we have to designate when a logger can harvest and not goof up the snowmobile trails; they’re too important. “I would like our committee to set the wheels in motion to get our trails better and work with the loggers,” he said. The issue came to light during a county logging operation where the operator had to level a woods roadbed due to it being rutted and having To TRAILS, Pg. 2A

INSIDE THIS ISSUE Ramesh to play for Badgers n Northland Pines standout football player Austin Ramesh signed with Wisconsin. Pg. 13A

IDEAL CONDITIONS — Sled dog teams from across the Midwest competed in the Three Bear Sled Dog Races in Land O’ Lakes Saturday and Sunday. Diane Gagliano of Phelps raced her four-

dog team on a near-perfect trail in Land O’ Lakes Saturday. See more photos of the Three Bear Sled Dog Races on Page 3A. —Staff Photo By GARY RIDDERBUSCH


2A

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 13, 2013

VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS

WEATHER CORNER

NEWS

Note: Precipitation amounts are recorded at 8 a.m. for the previous 24 hours.

LAST SEVEN DAYS Hi Lo Prec. Wed., Feb. 6.............25 –6 .5"S Thurs., Feb. 7...........22 –6 2.3"S Fri., Feb. 8................22 –3 None Sat., Feb. 9 ..............32 –2 None Sun., Feb. 10 ...........33 22 None Mon., Feb. 11..........31 31 4.5"S Tues., Feb. 12 ..........26 16 1.7"S

ONE YEAR AGO Hi Mon., Feb. 6 ..............35 Tues., Feb. 7 ..............20 Wed., Feb. 8 ..............27 Thurs, Feb. 9 .............22 Fri., Feb. 10 ...............12 Sat., Feb. 11 ................8 Sun., Feb. 12 .............28

Lo 17 13 –1 –1 8 0 –2

Prec. None Tr.S None None 1.5"S None None

LAST YEAR

The average daily high at this time last year for the next seven days was 34, while the average overnight low was 11. There was snow on five days measuring one inch.

COMPARISON

Days precipitation recorded since Jan. 1, 2013, 21 days; 2012, 17 days. Average high of past 30 days, 2013, 20; 2012, 26. Average low of past 30 days, 2013, 0; 2012, 5.

SNOW CONDITIONS

With more than 8 inches ’’11-’12 ’12-’13 of snow the past week 38 54 and 16 inches on the Snowy days Inches to date 45.14 38.5 ground, snowmobile and Ground cover 12" 16" cross-country ski trails are in the best condition of the winter season. CHAMPIONS — The San Francisco Treat Team won the Women’s Bronze division at the Labatt Blue USA Hockey Pond Hockey National Championships. The team was one of four teams from

STREAMS AND LAKES

Anglers are still driving 4-wheel-drive vehicles on the lakes, but slush may start to be a problem in some areas due to 8 inches of snow the past week.

OUTLOOK

Wednesday will be mostly cloudy with snow showers late, with a high of 33 and a low of 15. Thursday snow is likely with nearly two inches expected, with a high of 30 and a low of 23. Friday should be partly sunny with a few flurries possible and colder, with a high of 15 and a low of zero. Saturday is expected to be partly sunny and cold, with a high of 10 and a low of –6. Sunday look for increasing clouds and scattered flurries, with a high of 20 and a low of –4.

(PORTIONS OF THE WEATHER CORNER ARE THROUGH THE COURTESY OF KEVIN BREWSTER, EAGLE RIVER and NEWSWATCH 12 METEOROLOGIST.)

Primary: 2010; Governor’s Northwoods Economic Development Summit speaker from 2011-’12; Oneida County Technology Committee since 2012; chairman of Town Action Group from 2007-’09; Three Eagle Trail Foundation; Three Lakes Lions Club since SIDLOWSKI 2006; and Three Lakes Lions Foundation. A graduate of Carl Sandburg High School in Orland Park, Ill., Sidlowski went on to earn an undergraduate degree from Bradley University and a graduate degree from the University of Houston. Sidlowski’s statement: “For four years I’ve lead the effort to bring our 20-year plan to life, a road map based on extensive input from our citizens and businesses. You said we needed jobs, a more diverse economy, stable taxes, affordable housing, business growth, increased school enrollment. “I heard you. We’ve made progress towards each. We obtained $1.25 million in grants to defray costs. We built a technology infrastructure that enables us to recruit businesses and families to relocate here, and it’s working. “I’m running again to continue building and strengthening our community. Together, we can accomplish more. Three Lakes’ well-being is my No. 1 priority.” Stella Westfall, 52, owns and manages an insurance agency specializing in town insurance programs throughout the area. She and her husband, Brent, have four children and have lived in Three Lakes fulltime for the past 12 years, although WESTFALL they have had ties to the area for 21 years. Westfall lived previously in Hatley. Westfall has been a Three Lakes Budget and Finance Committee member since July 2009, and has served as chairman since 2011. She’s also been a Three Lakes Planning Commissioner since 2011. She worked as a substitute teacher at Three Lakes School

FROM PAGE 1A District from 2001-’06. As a part of her involvement with the Wisconsin Towns Association, Westfall attends county and district meetings where representatives from the state legislature and neighboring town boards gather to discuss and share information regarding town issues. Westfall earned a Bachelor of Science degree in business administration from UWStevens Point, with an emphasis in insurance and finance and a minor in economics. Westfall’s statement: “It’s been a heartfelt and sincere decision to run for the office of town chairman as I feel it’s important to do my part to help. With my business and personal background, I have identified areas where I can be of service. “We have such a diverse wealth of knowledge and ideas in this community and this is something we should embrace and benefit from. “It is critical that the town run efficiently with absolute transparency, communication and accountability. I learned at an early age that in order to earn respect, you have to give respect. I’m here to listen.” Bill Slizewski, 66, retired after serving as Three Lakes Chief of Police for 34 years. He had previously served in the U.S. Armed Forces and has three children. Slizewski had training at a police department management school and was trained in law SLIZEWSKI enforcement and public safety at Fox Valley Technical Institute. Slizewski’s statement: “Some of the goals of my campaign are to address any roadblocks that our local businesses are experiencing. We need to keep our small businesses alive in this town, evaluate the current financial status and research effective ways in which the town can reduce unnecessary spending. “As town chairman, I will make an obligation to be available to speak with any Three Lakes citizen who expresses concerns and do my best to resolve their issues. “I may not have all the answers, but I feel I can make a difference that will make our community a better place in which to live, work and raise a family.”

the San Francisco area in the tournament. Team members included, from left, Sandra Todd, Linda Kallenberger, Sarah Burgundey and Madelene Oldham. —STAFF PHOTO

Vilas: 16-foot-wide trails proposed

FROM PAGE 1A

a severe angle, thereby creating bare ground on a portion of a snowmobile trail. Committee member Sig Hjemvick agreed all sides had to cooperate in management of the 40,000-acre county forest. “The weather affects us all, loggers and snowmobilers, and sometimes we go head to head, but need to work together,” Hjemvick said. “I would hate to regulate loggers more than just on weather. We can be smart about it and work together and, if not, we’re really dumb.” County Parks and Recreation Administrator Dale Mayo agreed that cooperation is needed. “If we know there will be a timber sale, we can get the trees harvested to pay for widening the trail,” said Mayo. Forest Administrator Larry Stevens said there were other issues to consider. “There are a lot of issues here on who is responsible and we need to get the facts on the table first,” Stevens said. “If this is a safety issue, why are we saying logging is responsible? Parts of trails are on private lands and we can’t widen them.” Sitzberger said when timber contracts are let, they could specify widening the access if it includes part of a snowmobile trail. But logger Mitch Ives, who bids on county forest logging jobs, suggested otherwise. “I’m paying the county money; you make money from me,” Ives started out saying. “I will not give up tens of thousands of dollars to make a road wider than what I need just for snowmobiling.” Ives pointed out with the checkerboard pattern of land ownership, snowmobile trails would end up with some segments 16 feet wide and other segments 8 feet wide, thereby making them more dangerous. Mayo said the Department of Natural Resources (DNR) on the Northern Highland American Legion State Forest widens trails at no cost to the club and uses DNR bulldozers to level trails. “We can dig in our heels and fight each other, but we need to come up with a solution,” Hjemvick said. “Logging is important to us, snowmobiling is important to us and tourism has a bigger impact on us than logging.” Ives said they already have limitations written into logging contracts. “If you mandate it, the cost of sales will go down and you’ll end up with a segmented trail,” he said. “Contracts already indicated when and where we can cut and not cut, such things as frozen ground and oak wilt.” The committee directed staff to work on the different parts of the issue, taking into account logging and snowmobiling, and report back to the panel. Other business In other action, the committee approved the sale of a six-acre parcel of tax delinquent land in the town of

Winchester with a bid of $4,960 from Arlene Kellett. It had an appraised value of $7,550. It was reported three sites on the county forest totaling 42 acres will have 36,000 trees plant next spring. The

successful bidder was Superior Forestry Service for $2,413. Assistant Forest Administrator John Gagnon indicated the county received $25,020 in timber sale revenue for January. The committee approved a

county board resolution to apply for a $19,100 sustainable forestry grant for forest inventory surveys. The panel also heard a report on work to improve the pier at Eagle Lake Park by Collins Excavating for $7,500.

Thank You

THIS MUCH EVENT

Nothing says “thank you” quite like

20

% off almost anything*

Saturday, Feb. 16

See your Helpful Hardware Folks at:

Nelson’s

• Easy to Find • Professional Service • Free Parking

715-479-4496 606 E. Wall St. Eagle River

VISA, MASTERCARD AND DISCOVER WELCOMED AT PARTICIPATING ACE STORES.

OUR WINTER STORE HOURS Mon.-Fri. 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.


VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 13, 2013

3A

NEWS

School sets $2.34 million vote Tuesday Three Lakes plan would cover 5 years ___________ BY GARY RIDDERBUSCH NEWS-REVIEW EDITOR

___________

OFF TO THE RACES — The annual Three Bear Sled Dog Races were held in Land O’ Lakes Saturday and Sunday. Some of the scenes included: above, Lymon Wolske of Wrenshall, Minn., leaving the starting chute; right, Rachel Colbath of New Hampshire loving up her dog, Mr. Ed.; and below, Jacob Biggs of Thunder Bay, Ontario, following his dogs in the skijoring competition. —Staff Photos By GARY RIDDERBUSCH

Pines: district seeks firewalls in K-8 school FROM PAGE 1A next three years,” said Richie. Richie said some of the $2.7 million will be used to update technology infrastructure and students technology needs across the school district. The district administrator said once a district begins an operational referendum cycle, it must continue as long as the state has the same school funding formula. He said allowable spending was based off a formula that dates back to 1992. “At the end of each threeor-four year cycle, the previous referendum dollars must be removed from the budget and a new referendum may be placed on the ballot, asking for the revenues for the next three or four years,” said Richie. Richie said Northland Pines has had a declining enrollment, which reduces the available revenues. In addition, he said the school district covers more than 500 square miles, which increases transportation costs. At the same time, the district is operating four schools, including elementary schools in Land O’ Lakes and St. Germain. “We have to operate those outlying schools due to the size of our district,” said Richie. “For example, from the Eagle River campus to the northwest corner of the district, it is 50 miles. That’s what makes it more expensive.” As fixed costs and expenses continue to increase and revenues and state funding continue to decline, Richie said the NPSD will have a projected average budget shortfall of more than $3 million per year. Richie said the school dis-

trict has been able to reduce costs, including implementing HSA/HRA health insurance, requiring employees to pay 12% of their insurance benefit and half of their Wisconsin retirement, reduced postretirement benefits for certified staff and are alligning high school and middle school bell schedules next year so staff can be shared in the two schools. “We’ve also become a district of choice, as more students are open-enrolled in the district than are leaving, said Richie. “In 2002, only 18 students open-enrolled into the district and today 81 students open-enrolled in.” Richie estimated the tax impact of the $2.7 million referendum would be approximately $82 for a property valued at $100,000. The NPSD is one of the lowest taxing K-12 districts in the state, according to the Wisconsin Taxpayers Alliance (WISTAX). A WISTAX report showed that Northland Pines’ rate for the 2012-’13 school year is $5.10 per $1,000 of assessed value, the seventh lowest out of the 367 K-12 districts in the state. Second question Richie said the fire safety measures have been recommended by the Eagle River Area Fire Department, but he noted student and staff safety are not at risk. “The additional walls will prevent fire and smoke damage to the building in the event of a fire and will allow more time for fire departments to fight and control any fire,” said Richie. Richie said the additional fire barriers will be designed to contain fire and any smoke

to zones within the K-8 building, thereby limiting the damage and shorten the time the building would not be useable following a fire. Patrick Weber, fire chief for the Eagle River Area Fire Department, is asking NPSD voters to support the two referendum questions next Tuesday. “The second question is very important,” said Weber. “If it is passed, the K-8 school would have smoke and fire walls constructed in it before the start of the new school year. In the event of a fire, the building would be spared widespread smoke damage due to compartmented space.” Weber said the Eagle River Area Fire Department has gone to the school board many times over the past 15 years, asking to have this done but have always come up short on the funding end. “The K-8 building was built to the codes of the time in 1994,” said Weber. “The Durrant Group, an outside entity, VILAS COUNTY

NEWS-REVIEW Published weekly by Eagle River Publications Inc. Eagle River, WI 54521 vcnewsreview.com Consolidation of the Vilas County News, the Eagle River Review and The Three Lakes News Publication #659480 Member of the Wisconsin Newspaper Association and the National Newspaper Association

Entered as periodical mail matter at the post office, Eagle River, WI 54521, under an act of March 3, 1879. Published every Wednesday. Subscription price for a year: Vilas and Oneida counties only, $50; rest of Wisconsin, $57; out of state, $68. Mail subscription to Vilas County NewsReview, P.O. Box 1929, Eagle River, WI 54521. Payable in advance. POSTMASTER: Send address changes, form 3579, to Vilas County News-Review, P.O. Box 1929, Eagle River, WI 54521, phone (715) 479-4421, fax (715) 479-6242.

conducted a fire protection study in 2008 and concurred with the concerns of the fire department. It is to be noted that the addition of the barriers would expressly protect the physical structure from extensive damage.” Weber said human safety has not been, nor is now, a concern. “All measures and procedures are intact to ensure the efficient evacuation of students,” said Weber. Richie said the tax implication of the $240,000 in additional revenue for the one year would be approximately $7 for a property valued at $100,000. Polls across the district will be open from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. Complete voting information for the NPSDw referendum is available at npsd.k12.wi.us.

DR A EGER

The Three Lakes School Board and district officials will ask voters to approve a referendum next Tuesday, Feb. 19, to exceed the stateimposed revenue limit by $2.34 million each of the next five years. District Administrator George Karling said the total includes the previous referendum amount of $1.51 million and adds an additional $827,654 for each of the next five years. Karling said the referendum increases have remained consistent over the past nine years. “It is important to note that the referendum of 2006 increased the previous amount of $633,000 by slightly more than 50% to $964,066,” said Karling. “The referendum of 2009 also increased by slightly more than 50% to $1.52 million and this referendum will also increase by slightly more than 50% to $2.34 million.” Karling said some of the proposed increase is due to district auditors recommending an increase in the fund balance to approximately $2.32 million. “That would save the district money on interest by reducing our cash flow by borrowing, which is currently at $3.1 million per year,” said Karling. “Without this increase, we will not be able to borrow enough to meet our cash flow needs in the next five years.” Karling said the board decided to forward a five-year referendum rather than a three-year referendum to save the district money. “Every time you go to referendum, it costs the district money, both in costs related to holding the referendum and preparation for the referendum by district administration,” said Karling. “In addition, we’ve been doing this a long time and are very comfortable with our projections out to five years.” Karling said the referendum to exceed the state-mandated revenue limit is necessary due to a declining enrollment and the loss of state and federal funding. “Our loss of state and federal aid since 1999 has been more than $600,000 and our loss of levy revenue based on enrollment has been about $2.3 million, resulting in a total loss of revenue of nearly $3 million,” said Karling. While the revenues have declined, Karling said the school board and administration have cut costs. Some examples include: reduced staff by 18.75 positions since 1999; changed insurance carriers from WEA to Security Health Plan at a savings of about $250,000 per year; revised and eliminated bus routes saving about $75,000 per year; installed retrofit efficient lighting, electric motors and controls in all buildings saving $70,000 a year; and reduced CESA-purchased ser-

vices from $195,000 to $47,500 (past 15 years). For property owners, the $2.34 million referendum would increase taxes $58 for a home valued at $100,000. Karling noted the Three Lakes School District is the fifth lowest taxing K-12 district in the state for 2012-’13 at $4.94 per $1,000 of assessed value, according to a report by the Wisconsin Taxpayers Alliance. Karling said following the approval of the referendum Feb. 19, the school district portion of the tax rate would be $5.52 per $1,000 of property value and likely would still be among the 10 lowest taxing K12 districts in the state. “District residents paid less school taxes in 2012 than they did in 2010 and they will still pay less in 2013 than in 2010 if this referendum passes,” said Karling. The district administrator said taxes continue to decline in the Three Lakes School District. For example, in 2003-’04, property owners paid $1,526 in taxes on a $200,000 home. Karling said with the new referendum dollars included, the tax on a $200,000 home next year would be $1,106. Performing well Karling said Three Lakes School District students continue to perform well academically, including improvement on the ACT test which saw an average composite score of 23.9 from the 2011-’12 senior class. “Our ACT scores have been on the rise since 2002-’03, when our average composite score was 21.5,” said Karling. “Last year, Three Lakes seniors taking the ACT led all 18 schools in the CESA 9 district with a composite of 23.9.” Karling said the Three Lakes School District is also a district of choice when it comes to open enrollment. “Given a choice, people seek out the Three Lakes School District,” he said. “In 2012-’13, there are 68 students incoming and 52 students outgoing.” While Karling expects the referendum to pass based on past voting results, he said the district can’t operate at a deficit. “At some point, the district could be annexed to neighboring districts and I predict school tax bills would be much higher,” said Karling. For example, Karling said the mill rate at Three Lakes would be $5.52 per $1,000 of property value if the referendum is passed. He said if the district dissolved and students went to Northland Pines, the tax rate would likely be about $5.99. He said, if Three Lakes students went to Rhinelander, the mill rate would be $10.29. “The bottom line is if the referendum passes, property owners will keep lower taxes and we keep the kids in Three Lakes and Sugar Camp,” said Karling.

C H I RO P R A C T I C C L I N I C

Located at 5105 Highway 70 West, Eagle River

Are you going through menopause and experiencing uncomfortable symptoms such as hot flashes? Chiropractic care can have a very important role in women’s health, including during menopause. During menopause women may feel an increase in anxiety, depression, hot flashes, back or joint pain, irritability, headaches and fatigue. Having misalignments of the spine, hip or pelvic area can greatly increase the severity of these symptoms as it will constrict blood flow and can also cause pinched nerves. Regular chiropractic adjustments can help repair a damaged nervous system which can directly influence the success of a woman’s complex hormonal system, stress response and immune health. Let us here at Draeger Chiropractic help ease you into your new cycle of life. Call and make an appointment today and don’t forget to ask about our supplements that can help reduce your uncomfortable hot flashes. Mon. 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Tues. 6 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Wed. 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Thurs. 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Fri. 6 to 11 a.m.

(715) 479-5995


4A

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 13, 2013

VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS

OBITUARIES

NEWS

Lonnie R. Moss

Republicans meet for annual dinner

Lonnie R. Moss of Eagle River died Jan. 26, 2013 at Our Home K Care Inc. in Lac du Flambeau. He was 65. Mr. Moss was born in Kokomo, Ind. Nov. 9, 1947, the son of William and Jeanette (David) Moss. Moss served in the Indiana National Guard, and graduated from Butler University of Indianapolis. His hobbies included rid-

ing his Harley-Davidson, reading, bicycling and canoeing. Moss was preceded in death by his parents. Survivors include two brothers, Larry (Beth) of Greenfield, Ind. and Kevin (Lucinda) of Greentown, Ind. Private services were held. Condolences may be expressed at gaffneybusha.com.

Linda K. Short Linda K. Short of Eagle River died Tuesday, Jan 29, 2013. A celebration of life service will be held Saturday,

Feb. 16 at 11 a.m. at St. Mary of the Snows Anglican Church with the Rev. James Fosdick officiating. Visitation will be held one hour prior to the church service.

Alma Francis Valcq A l m a Francis Valcq, 87, formerly a resident of St. Germain and Wausaukee, Wis., passed from this life into her eternal VALCQ home on Friday, Jan. 18, 2013, at Seasons of Life Hospice in Woodruff, Wis. She was born Feb. 16, 1925, in Racine, Wis., to Fred and Theresa (Gold) Oberbuchler. She graduated from Rufus King High School in Milwaukee, Wis., and later during World War II, worked for the Air Transport Command in Washington, D.C., as a topsecret cryptographer. In 1945, Alma and Wilbur Goller were united in marriage in Milwaukee, where they raised their two children, Sharon and James. They divorced in 1960, and in 1967, she married Kenneth Valcq. Alma and Kenneth were longtime residents of Wausaukee, where their home on the hill had the landmark white fence that could always be seen from Highway 141. They owned and ran Kenny’s Log Inn Restaurant and Bar during the summer and fall, and became snowbirds in

Gulf Shores, Ala., during the cold winters for many years. Throughout her life Alma enjoyed golf, world travel and a good game of bridge with great friends. She is survived by her children, Sharon Goller of Eagle River and James (Laurel) Goller of Weeki Wachee, Fla.; stepchildren, Dennis (Elena) Valcq of Amhurst, Denice (Ken) Hollender of Littlefield, Ariz., Steven Valcq of Orange Springs, Fla., and Bonnie French of Lompoc, Calif.; grandchildren, Kimberly (Kurt) Hoffmann, Scott Campbell, Heather Koziatek, David Goller, Michael Goller and Jamie Goller; greatgrandchildren, Danielle Hoffmann, Leah Pucek, Lindy Hoffmann, Jacob Campbell and Taylor Campbell; greatgreat-grandson, Jeremiah Westberg; and many other dear family and friends. She was preceded in death by her husband; parents; brother, Frank; and sister, Marie. She will be dearly missed by family and friends. She will be laid to rest in St. Germain, Wis. Mid-Wisconsin Cremation Society is assisting the family. John J. Buettgen Funeral Home, 948 Grand Ave., Schofield, WI 54476, (715) 359-2828. PAID OBITUARY

1338

Taxpayers can file online for free: IRS The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) recently issued a reminder to taxpayers that they can file online for free at irs.gov. Free File offers brandname tax software to people who earned $57,000 or less last year, which is 70% of all taxpayers. For those who earned more, there are free online fillable forms. Both options allow people to file returns electronically and use direct deposit, which is the fastest way to get refunds, according to the IRS. The nation’s leading tax software companies have partnered with the IRS to make their products available for free through irs.gov. Each company sets its own eligibility criteria, generally based on income, state residency, age, military service or eligibility for the Earned Income Tax Credit. There is also a software option that is available in Spanish for people who earned $30,000 or less. “Free File does the hard work for you,” said an IRS spokesperson. “The software asks questions; you provide the answers. It picks the right forms, does the math and

helps you find all the tax benefits for which you are eligible.” All participating Free File partners have been vetted and use the latest in security technology. Some Free File software providers also offer state tax returns for free or for a fee. Free File Fillable Forms is the electronic version of IRS paper forms. It’s meant for people experienced and comfortable preparing their own returns on paper. It does not support state tax returns. Some Free File software products also are available in select free tax preparation sites operated by Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) and Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE). Taxpayers can use VITA or TCE computers to access Free File and prepare their own state and federal returns with a trained and certified volunteer on stand-by to help and efile. To find a participating site, visit irs.gov and search for “VITA.” More than 36 million people have used Free File since it began in 2003. To explore all the options, visit irs.gov/ freefile.

PUBLIC MEETINGS Eagle River Common Council — Tuesday, Feb. 12, 6 p.m., City Hall. Agenda: Application for Community Development Block Grant and rerouting of West Riverview Street. Lincoln Town Board — Tuesday, Feb. 12, 6:30 p.m., Lincoln Town Hall. Agenda: Reports. Plum Lake Town Board — Tuesday, 12, 6:30 p.m., Sayner Town Hall. Agenda: Establish a town board policy for attending meetings via remote access. Vilas County Finance & Budget Committee — Wednesday, Feb. 13, 9 a.m., courthouse. Agenda: 2014 budget process.

SOAR Charter School Board — Wednesday, Feb. 13, 9 a.m., Land O’ Lakes Elementary School. Agenda: Administrator’s report. Vilas County Commission on Aging — Monday, Feb. 18, 9 a.m., Commission on Aging/ADRC Building. Agenda: Reports.

to

Wisconsin’s

North Woods North of the Tension Line

One hundred fifty members of the Vilas County Republican Party recently met at the Whitetail Inn in St. Germain, for their annual Lincoln Reagan Dinner. The dinner is an annual event bringing together members of the Vilas County Republican Party with political leaders from the area and around the state. Honored guests included U.S. Rep. Sean Duffy, Wisconsin’s 7th District; Rep. Rob Swearingen, Wisconsin State Assembly-34th District; Sen. Tom Tiffany, Wisconsin 12th District; James Maillette, executive vice president of Wisconsin Family Association; James Miller, district chairman of the GOP, and Benji Backer chairman for Fox Valley Turning Point USA and State Director for Turning Point USA in Wisconsin. Backer, a 15-year-old freshman at Appleton North High School, was the keynote speaker at the event. “My message to students is that they should get active, get involved in politics and when they are voting age, they can cast their votes and make a difference in the way America is moving,” said Backer. Swearingen, a businessman from Rhinelander, was recently elected to the Wisconsin Assembly. “Today is the first month anniversary of my being in the legislature. It is a daily learning experience with classes and orientation to learn about all of the resources that are available to legislators throughout the state,” said Swearingen. Also in attendance was Representative Duffy, who

U.S. Rep. Sean Duffy, noting his logging roots, spoke to the assembled guests about his work in Washington, D.C. “I am committed to my family and traditional family values so I moved from

has been in the U.S. House of Representatives for two years. “If Republicans feel a little disheartened by the last

Social Security offers new online services Michael J. Astrue, commissioner of Social Security, announced the agency is expanding the services available with a my Social Security account, a personalized online account that people can use beginning in their working years and continuing throughout the time they receive Social Security benefits. More than 60 million Social Security beneficiaries and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) recipients can now access their benefit verification letter, payment history and earnings record instantly using their online account. Social Security beneficiaries also can change their address and start or change direct deposit information online. “We are making it even easier for people to do their business with us from the comfort of their home, office or library,” Astrue said. “I encourage people of all ages to take advantage of our award-winning online services and check out the new features available through an online my Social Security account.” Social Security beneficiaries and SSI recipients with a my Social Security account can go online and get an official benefit verification letter instantly. The benefit verification letter serves as proof of income to secure loans, mortgages and other housing, and state or local benefits. Additionally, people use the letter to prove current Medicare health insurance coverage, retirement or disability status and age. People can print or save a customized letter. Social Security processed nearly nine million requests for benefit verification letters

in the past year. This new online service allows people to conduct business with Social Security without having to visit an office or make a phone call, and very often wait for a letter to arrive in the mail. It also will reduce the time spent by employees completing these requests and free them to focus on other workloads. People age 18 and older can sign up for an account at s o c i a l s e c u r i t y. g o v / m y a c count. Once there, they must be able to provide information and answer questionsabout themselves. After completing the secure verification process, people can create a my Social Security account with a user name and password to access their information. People age 18 and older who are not receiving benefits can sign up for a my Social Security account to get a personalized online Social Security statement. The online statement provides eligible workers with secure and convenient access to their Social Security earnings and benefit information, and estimates of future benefits they can use to plan for their retirement. In addition, the portal also includes links to information about other online services, such as applications for retirement, disability and Medicare. “Given our significantly reduced funding, we have to find innovative ways to continue to meet the needs of the American people without compromising service,” said Astrue. “These new enhancements will allow us to provide faster service to more people in more places.” For more information, go to socialsecurity.gov/myaccount.

Hayward to Wausau because the airport is there and it is easier for me to get to come home and see my wife and family,” said Duffy. —Photo By Wally Geist

national election, I tell them of how bright our future government will be if we all exercise personal responsibility. If

we do, it will influence the kind of America we are going to leave for our children,” said Duffy.

Gaffney-Busha Funeral Home Alpha Crematory & Chapel Tom & Joe Busha, Barry Wallis, Funeral Directors www.gaffney-busha.com 715-479-4777 Locally owned and operated since 1908

VILAS COUNTY’S ONLY CREMATORY Traditional Services • Prearrangements • Cremation • Monuments

NOTICE OF REFERENDUM Northland Pines School District February 19, 2013 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that at an election to be held in the Northland Pines School District on February 19, 2013, the following question will be submitted to a vote of the people. The question will appear on the ballot as follows: Shall the Northland Pines School District be authorized to exceed state revenue limits on a non-recurring basis by $240,000.00 to construct additions to existing walls and to construct new walls for fire safety purposes? YES

NO

If a majority of the voting electorate votes “yes”, the District would be authorized to exceed state revenue limits on a non-recurring basis by $240,000.00 to construct additions to existing walls and to construct new walls for fire safety purposes. If a majority of the voting electorate votes “no”, or an equal number of voters vote “yes” and “no”, the District would not be authorized to exceed state revenue limits on a non-recurring basis by $240,000.00 to construct additions to existing walls and to construct new walls for fire safety purposes. EXPLANATION The effect of a “yes” vote would be to authorize the School District to exceed state revenue limits on a non-recurring basis by $240,000.00 to construct additions to existing walls and to construct new walls for fire safety purposes. The effect of a “no” vote would be to deny the School District the authority to exceed state revenue limits on a non-recurring basis by $240,000.00 to construct additions to existing walls and to construct new walls for fire safety purposes. Done in the Northland Pines School District on February 13, 2013. /s/ John Sarama _____________________________________ 2288

WNAXLP

School District Clerk Northland Pines School District

Lakeland Monuments, LLC St. Germain, Wis.

Bob & Peggy Ausloos

Quality memorials from people who care 715-542-3548 Office 920-420-4520 Mobile rausloos48@gmail.com

ANTIQUES WANTED PAYING CASH FOR THE FOLLOWING: Crocks, jugs, earthenware bowls & pitchers; art pottery, Roseville, Hull, etc.; cookie jars; hand-decorated china; glassware before WWII; patchwork quilts & fancywork; Oriental rugs; picture frames; clocks, watches & fobs; jewelry; oil lamps; elec. lamps w/glass shades; old advertising items, signs, posters, containers, boxes, mixing bowls, etc., especially from Eagle River; coin-operated machines, slots, peanut, etc.; shotguns, rifles & handguns; hunting knives; wooden duck & fish decoys; old tackle boxes & lures; rods, reels & creels; glass minnow traps; old tools; toys of all kinds, trains, trucks, tractors, tin wind-ups, games, dolls, etc.; enamelware, especially bright colors; old photos of interiors & outdoor activities; all magazines before WWII; postcards (pre-1920); coin & stamp collections; old wood carvings of animals, etc. Check with me before you sell.

Call Jim at (715) 479-1459 4946


VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 13, 2013

NEWS

POLICE REPORT Vilas County Sheriff A total of 261 complaints were entered by Vilas County Sheriff ’s Department dispatchers last week. In addition to those with sufficient detail to report below, a review shows at least 20 vehicle accidents, eight requests for an ambulance, two animal problems, five requests for agency assistance, one attempt to locate, five burglar alarms, one burglary, 14 requests for citizen assistance, one report of criminal damage to property, one report of domestic violence, one abandoned vehicle, eight reports of hazardous conditions, two juvenile problems/runaways, one harassment complaint, two disturbances, six reports of suspicious circumstances, five thefts, seven traffic violations, four fires, three hit-and-runs, one report of trespassing, three welfare checks, 11 911 hang-ups, five reports of operating while intoxicated, two snowmobile violations and three drug problems.

GROOMER SHOW — Dave Walker welcomed guests to the 16th annual Groomer Show in St. Germain, Feb. 6. Groomer drags, tractors, rollers and other equipment were on display from 14

vendors. Equipment on display included smaller versions of the snowmobile trail groomers. —Photo By Wally Geist

Vilas County Court report

Rhinelander man fined $2,944, gets 9 months’ jail for fifth OWI A 62-year-old Rhinelander man who was found guilty of fifth-offense operating while intoxicated had his sentence withheld and he was placed on probation for 36 months, in Vilas County Circuit Court last week. Terry A. Jako also was found guilty of attempting to flee or elude a traffic officer. A charge of operating with a prohibited alcohol concentration was dismissed. Circuit Judge Neal A. Nielsen III said conditions of Jako’s probation include a fine of $2,944, and nine months in the Vilas County Jail with work-release privileges. The judge said $1,000 of Jako’s bond would be applied to the fine. Jako was arrested Sept. 5, 2012, in Lac du Flambeau after he was pursued by a traffic officer for having a broken driver-side tail lamp on his vehicle. According to the complaint, the officer witnessed Jako’s vehicle cross the centerline approximately five times within a quarter mile and then Jako travelled at speeds approaching 80 mph to elude the officer. He finally was arrested with a preliminary breath test of 0.218%. Judge Nielsen said other conditions of Jako’s probation include: driver’s license revoked for 36 months; ignition interlocken device for 36 months; not to possess or consume intoxicants; no taverns or liquor stores; alcohol and other drug assessment and any treatment deemed necessary by the agent; and continue follow through with AA. On the fleeing conviction, Jako was given another 30 days in the county jail with

work release. He will receive credit for four days served in jail. In other felony cases, Ramon D. Pineiro, 36, of Goldbar, charged with two counts of maintaining a drug trafficking place in the town of Lincoln and Arbor Vitae had a jury trial rescheduled for June 19-20. Pineiro also is charged with two counts of possession with intent to deliver marijuana and two counts of criminal damage to property. Also charged in the case were James J. Lacson, 34, of Eagle River, and Kevin A. Shumake, 40, of Arbor Vitae. According to the complaint, Pineiro and the other defendants had a marijuana grow operation at 2715 Whiskey Trail Road in the town of Lincoln from June 2010 to June 2011 and another at 1399 S. Farming Road in the town of Arbor Vitae from April 15, 2011, to Feb. 7, 2012. While executing a search warrant at the Lincoln residence, officers found about 160 marijuana plants in various rooms turned into growing chambers. In addition, an electrical box had apparently been jumped to reduce the electrical bill. At the Arbor Vitae residence, officers found 67 live marijuana plants and 40 to 60 marijuana root bulbs. Shumake, who faces the same charges as Pineiro, is scheduled for a jury trial May 8, 9 and 10. Lacson has been charged with one count each of maintaining a drug trafficking place and possession with intent to deliver, and one county of criminal damage to property. Lacson’s next court date has not been

January traffic deaths above average, says DOT Forty people died in 39 traffic crashes in Wisconsin during January, according to preliminary statistics from the Wisconsin Department of Transportation (DOT). Traffic deaths last month were four fewer than January 2012 and three more than the five-year average for the month of January. Traffic fatalities in January included 31 drivers, four passengers and four pedestrians. The role of one fatality has not yet been determined. The safest January in terms of traffic fatalities occurred in 2010 with 20 deaths, while the deadliest January was in 1964 with 82 fatalities. “Traffic deaths last year increased about 6% from the previous year,” said State Patrol Major Sandra Huxtable, director of the WisDOT Bureau of Transportation Safety. “As we begin 2013, the Wisconsin DOT and our traffic safety partners are com-

mitted to reversing that tragic trend,” she said. “Preventing traffic fatalities and injuries is a critical priority in the Wisconsin DOT’s Mobility, Accountability, Preservation, Safety and Service performance improvement program.” A proven way to help prevent crashes is for drivers to pay strict attention to traffic and road conditions, according to Huxtable. “If you use a cell phone, eat a meal, or search for items inside your vehicle while driving, you’re increasing your risk of a crash,” she said. Eliminating distractions while driving is even more critical this time of year, she added. “Snow, ice, sleet, fog and other inclement weather reduces your visibility and your vehicle’s traction,” said Huxtable. “If you don’t pay attention to your driving, you’re much more likely to cause a crash or fail to avoid one.”

5A

scheduled. Kevin L. Diver, 18, of Lac du Flambeau, charged with three counts of first-degree child sexual assault, contact with a child under 13, pleaded not guilty by mental disease or defect and the court ordered an examination to determine Diver’s criminal responsibility in the case. A pretrial conference was set for April 9 at 9:30 a.m. According to the complaint, Diver allegedly sexually assaulted the same child twice in 2007 or 2008 and again in the fall of 2011. The child is now eight years old. Joseph D. Lussier, 21, of Lac du Flambeau, charged with possession of a firearm by a felon, had a preliminary hearing adjourned to Feb. 11. Lussier, who was previously convicted of a felony in 2008, is alleged to have carried a .22-caliber revolver pistol Oct. 12, 2012, in Lac du Flambeau. Arlene M. Poupart, 42, of Lac du Flambeau, charged with manufacturing or delivery of marijuana, possession with intent to deliver marijuana, and one count of possession of drug paraphernalia, had a status hearing set for Feb. 18 at 1 p.m. According to the complaint, Poupart and Thomas J. Wilde, 54, of Lac du Flambeau allegedly

operating a marijuana grow at their residence at 1895 County Highway D in Lac du Flambeau. They were arrested following a search warrant at the residence Sept. 9, 2011, when officers found 21 marijuana plants indoors and 18 plants outdoors. Wilde also will appear for a status hearing on the same three charges Feb. 18 at 1 p.m. He also is charged with escape Sept. 9, 2011. According to the complaint, following his arrest he was transported to Howard Young Medical Center in Woodruff with a suspected heart problem. He later escaped from the hospital with an IV still in his arm. He later was arrested and taken to the Vilas County Jail. James J. Callas, 53, of Lac du Flambeau, charged with manufacturing or delivery of a prescription drug, possession of drug paraphernalia, possession of marijuana, possession of cocaine and misdemeanor bail jumping, had a jury trial set for May 16 at 8:30 a.m. According to the complaint, Callas sold two prescription pills in a controlled purchase for $100 Feb. 12, 2012, in Lac du Flambeau. A search warrant at his residence led to the possession charges.

At least 11 calls were referred to the Eagle River Police Department and there were at least 19 informational or procedural entries. In the past week, at least 15 people were booked at the Vilas County Jail, including five for disorderly conduct, two for operating while intoxicated, four for probation violation, two for failure to pay and one for operating after

revocation. During the week, the inmate population ranged from 55 to 60. As of Feb. 11, there were 60 inmates. Sunday, Feb. 10 - 12:50 a.m. - A one-vehicle accident was reported on Eagle Waters Road near Golf View Road in the town of Washington involving Sharon A. Duffy of Eagle River. Saturday, Feb. 9 - 12:07 a.m. - A one-vehicle accident was reported on Highway G near Boot Lake Road in the town of Cloverland involving Ashlee S. Harman of St. Germain. Friday, Feb. 8 - 11:45 a.m. - A one-vehicle accident was reported on Highway K near Highway E in Conover involving Patrick D. Rumchak of Phelps. Three Lakes Police This police department reported one 911 hang-up, one hit-and-run, one vehicle accident, one animal at large, one instance of counterfeiting, one threat, one hazard, one welfare check, one house check, one informational report, one mental commitment, one instance of resisting arrest, one instance of operating while intoxicated, one paper service, four snowmobile violations, three suspicious circumstances, one theft, three traffic stops, two instances of trespassing and two vehicles in a ditch.

Fire destroys home in town of Plum Lake A seasonal residence on Highway K in the town of Plum Lake was declared a complete loss after it started on fire last Thursday, according to the Vilas County Sheriff’s Department. A sheriff’s deputy received a report of the fire at 8186 Highway K at approximately 4 p.m. The home was unoccupied at the time of the fire, according to authorities.

The cause of the fire remains under investigation at this time. Responding to the scene were the Plum Lake Fire Department, Plum Lake Ambulance Service, Boulder Junction Fire Department, St. Germain Fire Department, Vilas County Emergency Government, Vilas County Highway Department, Wisconsin Public Service and Vilas County Sheriff’s Office.

NOTICE OF REFERENDUM Northland Pines School District February 19, 2013 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that at an election to be held in the Northland Pines School District on February 19, 2013, the following question will be submitted to a vote of the people. The question will appear on the ballot as follows: Shall the Northland Pines School District be authorized to exceed state revenue limits on a non-recurring basis by $2,700,000.00 for the 2013-14, 2014-15, and 2015-16 school years to maintain School District programs and operations? YES

NO

If a majority of the voting electorate votes “yes”, the District would be authorized to exceed state revenue limits on a non-recurring basis by $2,700,000.00 for the 2013-14, 2014-15, and 2015-16 school years to maintain School District programs and operations. If a majority of the voting electorate votes “no”, or an equal number of voters vote “yes” and “no”, the District would not be authorized to exceed state revenue limits on a non-recurring basis by $2,700,000.00 for the 2013-14, 2014-15, and 2015-16 school years to maintain School District programs and operations. EXPLANATION The effect of a “yes” vote would be to authorize the School District to exceed state revenue limits on a non-recurring basis by $2,700,000.00 for the 2013-14, 2014-15, and 2015-16 school years to maintain School District programs and operations. The effect of a “no” vote would be to deny the School District the authority to exceed state revenue limits on a non-recurring basis by $2,700,000.00 for the 2013-14, 2014-15, and 2015-16 school years to maintain School District programs and operations.

Shop the classifieds and grab a great deal on a great deal of items!

NORTH WOODS TRADER — 715-479-4421

Done in the Northland Pines School District on February 13, 2013. /s/ John Sarama _____________________________________ 2286

WNAXLP

School District Clerk Northland Pines School District

your spot now for th e v r e s e Re 25TH ANNUAL

15,000 copies are printed and distributed to area homes, businesses, newsstands, resorts, government offices and chambers where people looking for information can find it — fast, easy. The Guide is particularly well received by real estate agents, chambers of commerce, hotels, resorts and various groups which distribute it throughout the year. Your ad will receive year-round exposure. The Guide is kept close at hand. It is used time and time again as a popular resource tool.

Don’t miss out on this fantastic advertising opportunity. Reserve your ad space now by contacting Tammy Klein, Denise Rimmer, Kurt Krueger, Mary Jo Adamovich or Marcia Heyer at (715) 479-4421, or Vilas County News-Review, P.O. Box 1929, Eagle River, WI 54521.


6A

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 13, 2013

VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS

NEWS Three Lakes School Board race

Primary set to narrow field of five candidates ___________ BY ANTHONY DREW NEWS-REVIEW ASST. EDITOR

___________

Voters in the Three Lakes School District will see a primary election for two school board seats next Tuesday, Feb. 19, as five residents have filed for candidacy. Incumbents Terry McCloskey and John Olkowski Jr. will be challenged by Kari Volk, Steve Garbowicz and Ann Ovsak. Election polls will be open from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. at the Three Lakes Community Building. The top four vote earners will advance to the spring election Tuesday, April 2. The following is a brief biographical sketch and statement from each candidate. Terry McCloskey, 74, has served on the Three Lakes School Board for the past six years. He and his wife, Mary Ann, have four children and have lived in Three Lakes MCCLOSKEY for 20 years. McCloskey, retired from the U.S. Navy, previously resided in Kirchdorf, Austria and Washington D.C. McCloskey spent seven years coaching and substitute teaching at Three Lakes School, and spent one year as president of the Institute for Learning in Retirement at Nicolet College. He recently was elected by 21 northern Wisconsin school boards to represent them on the Wisconsin Association of School Boards Board of Directors. After graduating from Antigo High School, McCloskey earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from Marquette University and a Master of Science degree from Navy Post-graduate School. McCloskey’s statement: “I spent 29 years in the US Navy and am currently on the Three Lakes/Sugar Camp School Board serving for the last six years. “Our schools are running smoothly. Tax bills have been reduced the last two years and the mill rate is one of the lowest in the state. Student achievement is high and we are at the top of regional ACT test performance and the state school performance evaluation. “School failing grades and detention rates are at an alltime low. I respectfully ask for your vote to continue the work.” John Olkowski, Jr., 68,

retired as Manager of Power Operations and Marketing from WE Energies in 2002 and is currently the owner of White Deer Wine and Spirits in Three Lakes. He and his wife, KathOLKOWSKI leen, have five children and have lived in Three Lakes full-time for the past 33 years. Olkowski previously lived in Wauwatosa with Three Lakes as a second home for 30 years. The current treasurer of the Three Lakes School Board, Olkowski was appointed in 2006 and reelected in 2007 and 2010. He previously served one term as vice-president and chairman of the Building Committee on the Breitung Township School Board in Kingsford, Mich. A 1962 graduate of Three Lakes High School, Olkowski went on to attend UW-Madison and UW-Milwaukee with studies in math, civil engineering and business administration. He also has continuing education units and professional development credits in the fields of engineering, management and marketing. Olkowski’s statement: “Our schools are the social and economic backbones of our communities. The key responsibility of the board is to assure every child, regardless of abilities or background, is provided the best education possible. Each tax dollar spent must be maximized on the direct education of the kids. “My extensive managerial experience, work ethic, commitment to excellent education, and the continued prosperity of our communities coupled with my understanding the role of a board member is to establish and monitor policy, not micro-manage or pursue personal agendas, makes me highly qualified to continue serving the district’s taxpayers, administrators, staff and students.” Kari Volk, 38, will run for her first elected position in the Three Lakes School Board race. She and her husband, Charlie, have three children and have lived in Three Lakes 13 years. VOLK Volk previously resided in Gillett. Volk graduated UW-

Stevens Point with a Bachelor of Science degree majoring in communicative disorders. She went on to obtain a Master of Science degree in speech and language pathology from UW-Stevens Point. Volk’s statement: “A great school is one of the most important assets of a community. In addition to caring about our children and their futures, I care about the community I live in. With three children attending Three Lakes, I have a vested interest in the school both as a parent and taxpayer. “Being employed in education for fifteen years, I am dedicated and value public education, keeping lines open between school and community is essential. I understand the importance of quality education and the need to accomplish more with less. The state’s school funding peaks my interest because it directly impacts our district.” Steven C. Garbowicz, 59, is a lawyer at O’Brien, Anderson, Burgy & Garbowicz, LLP and currently serves as a supervisor on the Three Lakes Town Board. He and his wife, Mari GARBOWICZ Lynn, have two children and have lived in Three Lakes for 34 years. Garbowicz previously lived in Milwaukee. Practicing municipal law for more than 34 years, Garbowicz has represented municipal governments, including counties, cities, towns and school districts. He earned a Bachelor of Science degree majoring in social studies from UWStevens Point and UWOshkosh, along with a Juris Doctor in law from Marquette University. Garbowicz’s statement: “I am a 34-year resident of Three Lakes and a candidate for the Three Lakes School District Board of Education. As an attorney specializing in municipal and school law, I have the knowledge and understanding to deal with the issues our schools are facing. I believe in giving back to my community, and want to enhance the quality of our schools. “I believe that all students have the right to an education that meets individual needs, enhances strengths, improves weaknesses and promotes self-esteem. I will strive to ensure that all children living in our district have the best possible education.”

Ann M. Ovsak, 35, is currently a clinical nurse educator with Ministry Health Care who previously served nine years as a public health nurse with the Oneida C o u n t y H e a l t h OVSAK Department. She and her husband, Don, have one child and have lived in Sugar Camp for 10 years. Wisconsin Rapids was her primary residence while she attended college. Ovsak worked with area school districts in Oneida County as a part of her role as a public nurse. She also served on a subcommittee for the Three Lakes School District to rewrite the school’s student code of conduct book. She graduated with a Bachelor of Arts degree majoring in biology from UWEau Claire, Bachelor of Science in nursing from UW-Milwaukee, and Master of Science in nursing management and leadership from Walden University. Ovsak’s statement: “I decided to run for Three Lakes Board of Education because my daughter is entering the district this year. The only agenda I have is to provide students in the district with the best possible education while being fiscally responsible to the tax payers that support the district. “Schools provide an educational experience that will set the tone of a person’s life and will help to develop a productive, educated citizen within the community. I believe my nursing experience, even temper, interest in successful public education and willingness to collaborate will make me a good candidate for school board.”

SLEDDERS ARIVE — With 16 inches of snow on the ground, snowmobilers converged on Vilas and Oneida county trails last weekend, giving a boost to the local economy. —STAFF PHOTO

Aquatic invasives among top issues As a result of its biennial survey of members and experts regarding lake-related issues, Wisconsin Lakes learned aquatic invasive species (AIS) eclipsed most other concerns in 2012. “It came as no surprise to us that AIS topped the list of challenges we face as we try to protect our precious lakes around Wisconsin,” said Wisconsin Lakes Executive Director Karen von Huene. “From polluted runoff to shoreland development, there are several issues of importance to our members,” she said. “But nearly 80% of our members focused on AIS, listing it as an area which is in dire need of addressing.” This past fall, Wisconsin Lakes offered a detailed plan for the prevention, control and reduction of AIS species on inland waters. The proposal suggests the following six key elements that would

advance the effort against aquatic invasives: — the development of a rapid response team to quickly handle new species; — strategies to prevent the spread of invasive species, stopping them from becoming “super spreaders;” — implementation of a watershed approach to stop the spread of invasives within a region instead of doing it on a lake-to-lake basis; — increased enforcement of current laws; — increased efforts to maintain projects after the initial problem is contained; and — the creation of permanent regional partnerships to foster cooperation and efficient use of funds within a region. The full proposal, which includes specific budget and funding options, is available online at wisconsinlakes.org.

THE POWER is in THE PEOPLE Eagle River Light & Water is a local not-for-profit. So while we may provide the energy that keeps Eagle River running, it’s our neighbors who really have the power. The power to use community dollars for the common good. To invest in local priorities like a stronger economy, greener alternatives and lower utility bills. And the power

Pruning trees in winter months helps reduce spread of oak wilt Winter is a good time for tree pruning, according to Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) tree health experts. Winter pruning greatly reduces the likelihood of spreading oak wilt and other tree diseases, and minimizes pruning stress on trees, experts said. “The best time to prune trees in Wisconsin isn’t in April, it’s during winter when a tree is dormant,” said Don Kissinger, DNR urban forester. “Insects and diseases that could attack an open wound on a pruned tree aren’t active in winter. And without leaves, broken, cracked or hanging limbs are easier to see and prune.” Timing is especially critical when pruning oak trees. DNR foresters recommend that people stop pruning, wounding or cutting oak trees from April through July in order to limit the spread of oak wilt. A more cautious approach limits pruning in urban areas until Oct. 1. Oak wilt is a devastating fungal disease of oaks that has been present in the state for at least 70 years. It spreads from tree to tree by either “hitchhiking” on sap-feeding beetles that are attracted to freshly

pruned or injured trees or by growing through root grafts between neighboring trees. Red oaks, which include red, pin and black oak, are particularly vulnerable to oak wilt. Once wilting symptoms appear, these trees die very quickly, often within a month. Oak wilt is found commonly in the southern two-thirds of Wisconsin. In 2012, oak wilt was confirmed for the first time in Vilas, Lincoln and Sawyer counties. The disease has not been found in Ashland, Bayfield, Calumet, Door, Douglas, Forest, Iron, Kewaunee, Manitowoc, Price, Rusk, Sheboygan, Taylor and Washburn counties. For additional information, visit dnr.wi.gov. Tips for pruning Before pruning oak trees, Kissinger suggests following these DNR pruning guidelines that will support the tree’s health: • Trees should be pruned throughout their entire life, with more attention paid during the first 10 years, every other or every third year, to foster strong structural or “scaffold” limbs. • Once proper structure is established, pruning can occur less, about every five years, to

maintain the structure and remove larger pieces of dead wood. • Pruning should not take more than 25% of the live crown of a tree while the lower third of established trunks of deciduous trees should be free of limbs. Kissinger encourages people to review the DNR pruning brochure. He offers these tips for tree pruning: • Remove limbs growing toward the ground. • Remove limbs that are crossing, rubbing, or growing parallel to one another, competing for the same space in the tree crown. • Remove limbs growing vertically or toward the interior of the tree. • Remove broken, cracked, diseased or dead limbs. • Maintain one central trunk or “leader” for as long as possible. • Never remove so many interior branches that leaves are only present at the outside edge of the tree. • Never prune a branch flush to the trunk as the large wound reduces the tree’s natural decay barrier. • The cut should begin just outside the branch bark ridge and continue at a slight outward angle.

to put our community first. With public power from Eagle River Light & Water the good we do stays right here. Because we’re here. For you.

WHY P U B L I C P OWE R . O R G

At Eagle River Light & Water, we believe affordable public power strengthens our community and helps our neighbors. That’s why, through WPPI Energy, we’re partnering with other local not-for-profit utilities to share resources and lower costs. FOR INFORMATION ON OUR ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAMS, PLEASE CALL 715.479.8121.


VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 13, 2013

7A

NEWS Campground earns Travel Green credit Forest Pond Campground, located east of Eagle River in Hiles, recently joined more that 350 other Travel Green Wisconsin certified events, attractions and destinations for its dedication to solar power and energy-saving lighting. “We’re thrilled to welcome Forest Pond Campground to the ranks of Travel Green Wisconsin,” said Tourism Secretary Stephanie Klett. “Small changes add up to create big impacts and this campground, set in the heart of the Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest, goes above and beyond to ensure Wisconsin’s natural resources are here to enjoy for generations to come.” Steve and Marlene Hodgdon, owners and operators of the Eagle River campground, have implemented a number of innovative practices, including solar-powered ground lights for roadway and entrance signs.

The real estate transactions listed below are being published at the request of many of our readers. The information is public record and reflects an index of each week’s transactions. Property transactions exceeding $10,000 recorded at the Vilas County Courthouse the past week and the transfer fee: Feb. 4, 2013 William D. Jenkins and wife to H.J. & S.M. Tennies Living Trust, prt NE NE in 11-39-10, $45 Estate of Patricia K. Ripkey to Daniel Martin McDaniel and wife, prt NW NW in 1-43-6, gov lot 1, $975 Feb. 5, 2013 Heitz Family Revocable Trust and Engstad-Heitz Revocable Trust to Theresa Aurand Nurre Living Trust, prt SE SW in 4-41-8, gov lot

Plan Commission recommends vacating River Street in city ___________ BY KEN ANDERSON NEWS CORRESPONDENT

___________

“I notified everyone on River Street,” Laux said. Plan Commission member Mary Horant reminded those at the hearing that the panel can only makes recommendations to the city council and does not make the final decision. Mayor Jeff Hyslop said,

The change was based on industry feedback and aims to encourage a wider variety of tourism businesses and organizations to consider implementing sustainable practices in their operations. In addition, the benefits of being a member have increased, according to Klett.

REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS

TIME CAPSULE — Ministry Eagle River Memorial Hospital recently opened a time capsule found in a cornerstone of its former facility, which was built in 1961 and recently torn down. Hospital staff and the community gathered (above) to view the various items, including an old newspaper (right) and a donation can (below). —Staff Photos By ANTHONY DREW

A recommendation to abandon two segments of River Street and reverse the traffic flow at Riverview Park was made by the Eagle River Plan Commission to the City Council last week after two public hearings. No one spoke against vacating River Street along the former nursing home property and in front of Kay and Junior Ludwig’s property. City Administrator Joe Laux noted that Riverstone Restaurant owners Ron and Cindy Meinholz expressed concern that vehicles may cut through their parking lot after finding the street ended in a cul-de-sac. “I told them if that happens, we can work with them to find a solution,” Laux told the commission. Property developer Mickey Noone of Oshkosh, doing business as Eagle River Acquisition Company, LLC, requested the street abandonment and was at the public hearing to answer questions. Plan Commission member Bill Doerr questioned the procedure used, saying he felt the statutes required signatures of at least one-third of the property owners within 2,600 feet to be on the petition to abandon. Laux said if he had known Doerr was going to bring the procedure up, the city attorney could have been requested to be at the meeting.

In fact, 85% of the campground is powered by solar energy. In addition, they have encouraged campers from neighboring campgrounds to use their waste management facilities to reduce RV fuels. All of the existing light bulbs have been replaced with compact fluorescent lights and the campground encourages exploring the beauty of the forest with outdoor activities, according to Klett. This year, the Department of Tourism adopted a flat fee of $95 for membership in the Travel Green Wisconsin certification.

Eagle River Acquisition Co. LLC owner Mickey Noone of Oshkosh tells the city Plan Commission he supports abandoning River Street along the former nursing home site for future development options. —Photo by Ken Anderson

“The city attorney can tell the council if proper procedure was followed.” Horant moved to recommend to the city council to grant the request to vacate portions of River Street made by Noone and Ludwig’s, provided that procedure follows municipal law. A second was made by Plan Commission member Mike Duening. Doerr moved to amend the motion by adding, “upon proper compliance with Wisconsin statutes prior to action by the city council.” His motion died for lack of a second. The commission vote to recommend the street abandonment was 4-1. The Plan Commission also recommended to the city council, following another public hearing, to reverse the traffic pattern entering and exiting Riverview Park from

the current east to west pattern to west to east. Eagle River Revitalization Program director John Seward supported the change, saying the natural flow would be that direction. Hyslop agreed with Seward, saying the intersection of Division Street would be conducive to constructing a proper entrance easily recognized by drivers. Sandwich boards A proposal to allow businesses to display sandwich boards will be refined and brought back to the Plan Commission in March after a long discussion on allowing the signs year round in downtown Eagle River. Some existing businesses already use sandwich boards and businessman Jim Holperin provided a synopsis of what other tourism com-

munities allow. “Minocqua, Three Lakes, Woodruff, Rhinelander all allow sandwich boards and all reported no problems and high acceptance,” Holperin said. “Two recreation communities, Wisconsin Dells and Bayfield, do not allow them. Our recommendation is to allow them year round in the downtown, one sign per business with no permit requirement for at least a one-year trial period.” While Plan Commission member Kim Schaffer was concerned about allowing the signs on the sidewalk during the peak summer months, Duening didn’t see it as a problem. “People are reluctant to enter a business to find out what the specials are,” Duening said. “What a great problem to have on crowed sidewalks in summer. This is a good opportunity for businesses to have one more way to get people into a business; an easy tool for business owners.” Sidewalks vary in width from 9 to 11 feet and the feeling was to leave at least 6 feet of clear space measured from the curb toward the business. Laux supported not having a permit system. Seward said the Revitalization Program is putting together some design standards to help business owners. It was suggested language be included in any sandwich board ordinance that there be a minimum-maximum height of 36 to 48 inches and a maximum width of 30 inches. A draft ordinance is expected to be looked at in March. _____________ By three methods we may learn wisdom: First, by reflection, which is noblest; second, by imitation, which is easiest; and third by experience, which is the bitterest. Confucius

6, prt NW NE in 9-41-8, gov lot 2, prt NE NE in 9-41-8, gov lot 1, $780 Feb. 6, 2013 Douglas A. Smith to Joel J. Ceille and wife et al and Charles M. Fritz and wife et al, lots 5 and 6 of Rest Lake Lodges Condominiums, lots 33, 34, 35 and 36 of plat 263 in Rest Lake, prt NE NW in 9-42-5, gov lot 2, $420 Terry L. Paul and spouse and Terry L. Casey and spouse to Michael J. Kauzlaric, lots 19 and 20 of block 3 of plat 414 in Tambling’s Addn., $252 Feb. 8, 2013 Northern Glass Co Inc. to Jefferson Maines and wife, lots 7 and 8 of block 3 of plat 400 in Plat of the NENW, $405 P.E. & K. Corteen Living Trust to Darren P. Corteen et al, lot 7 of plat 262 in Resort of the Woods Condo, $414

LOCATION AND HOURS OF POLLING LOCATIONS ABSENTEE VOTING HOURS OF CLERKS APPEAR IN ITALIC There will be an Operating Referendum Election on Tuesday, February 19, 2013, in the Northland Pines School District. All polling locations are open from 7:00 a.m. until 8:00 p.m. The following polling locations will be used for the municipalities and/or wards indicated. School District Electors Residing in:

Vote at:

Tuesday, Feb. 19, 2013 Hours:

Town of Cloverland

Cloverland Town Hall 7:00 a.m. - 8:00 p.m. 5860 Perch Lake Road Eagle River, WI 54521 *ABSENTEE VOTING - No regular hours. Please call to make an appointment if you would like to vote in person PRIOR TO February 19th - Town Clerk: Mildred Ritzer at 715-479-2392 Town of Conover

Conover Center 7:00 a.m. - 8:00 p.m. 4665 County Road K East Conover, WI 54519 *ABSENTEE VOTING - Regular hours for voting in person PRIOR TO February 19th: Monday thru Saturday - 7 a.m. - 8:30 a.m.; Tuesday thru Thursday - 12:30 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. You may vote any time after 4:00 p.m. if you call Jim Hedberg for an appointment. Town Clerk: Jim Hedberg at 715-479-8688 City of Eagle River

City Hall 7:00 a.m. - 8:00 p.m. 525 East Maple Street Eagle River, WI 54521 *ABSENTEE VOTING - Regular hours for voting in person PRIOR TO February 19th are as follows: Monday thru Friday - 8:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. or contact Clerk: Debbie Brown at 715479-8682 ext. 222 Town of Land O’Lakes

Land O’Lakes Town Hall 7:00 a.m. - 8:00 p.m. 4331 Hwy B Land O’Lakes, WI 54540 *ABSENTEE VOTING - Regular hours for voting in person PRIOR TO February 19th are as follows: Monday thru Thursday - 9:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. or contact Town Clerk: Lynn Bybee at 715-547-3255 Town of Lincoln

Lincoln Town Hall 7:00 a.m. - 8:00 p.m. 1205 Sundstein Road Eagle River, WI 54521 *ABSENTEE VOTING - Regular hours for voting in person PRIOR TO February 19th are as follows: Monday thru Friday - 9:00 a.m.- 3:00 p.m. or contact Town Clerk: Shelly Sauvola at 715-479-7000 Town of Newbold

Rustic Manor Motor Lodge 7:00 a.m. - 8:00 p.m. 6343 Highway 70 East St. Germain, WI 54558 *ABSENTEE VOTING - No regular hours. Please call to make an appointment if you would like to vote PRIOR TO February 19th - Town Clerk: Kim Gauthier at 1-715-362-1092

Town of Phelps

Land O’Lakes Town Hall 7:00 a.m. - 8:00 p.m. 4331 Highway B Land O’Lakes, WI 54540 For the citizens in Phelps who are attached to Northland Pines School District for voting purposes - you would vote at Land O’Lakes *ABSENTEE VOTING - Regular hours for voting in person PRIOR TO February 19th are Monday thru Thursday 9:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m. or contact Town Clerk: Lynn Bybee at 715-547-3255 Town of Plum Lake

Plum Lake Town Hall 7:00 a.m. - 8:00 p.m. 235 Lake Street Sayner, WI 54560 *ABSENTEE VOTING - No regular hours. Please call to make an appointment if you would like to vote PRIOR TO February 19th - Town Clerk: Sharon Brooker at 715-542-4531 or cell 715-892-7049 Town of St. Germain

St. Germain Community Center 7:00 a.m. - 8:00 p.m. 545 Highway 155 PO Box 7 St. Germain, WI 54558 *ABSENTEE VOTING - No regular hours. Please call to make an appointment if you would like to vote PRIOR TO February 19th - Town Clerk: Tom Martens at 715-542-3813

Town of Washington

Washington Town Hall 7:00 a.m. - 8:00 p.m. 2301 Town Hall Road Eagle River, WI 54521 *ABSENTEE VOTING - No regular hours. Please call to make an appointment if you would like to vote PRIOR TO February 19th - Town Clerk: Michele Sanborn at 715-479-1669 Absentee Voting • Complete the form and mail it to your municipal clerk’s office. The application must be received by the clerk no later than 5:00 PM on the Thursday before the election in order for an absentee ballot to be mailed to you. (Please note that the addresses listed above are the voting locations, town clerk mailing addresses may be different so please contact your town clerk prior to mailing absentee ballot.) • Or, request an absentee ballot in person at your municipal clerk’s office. This can be done up until 5:00 PM on the Friday before the election. • If you are not already registered, you will also need to register before voting absentee. Application for Absentee Ballot is here: http://www.co.vilas.wi.us/absentee.pdf Wisconsin Voter Registration Application is here: http://www.co.vilas.wi.us/voterapp.pdf 2347


8A

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 13, 2013

VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS

NEWS Thrift shop accepting some donations The Ministry Eagle River Memorial Hospital Thrift Shop is accepting donations of clothing, dishes, and housewares from 10 a.m. until 3 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays. Thrift shop employees remind the public not to leave donations by the door when the shop is closed, and couches, toilets, televisions and other appliances are not accepted. A full list of unacceptable donations is posted on the front door. “We always welcome donations, however our employees are older and cannot lift large items into the dumpster,” said chairperson Joan Holdmann. “Furthermore, donations are being left by the door overnight and become damaged by the snow and rain.” The building has been renovated since a vehicle collided with the building causing considerable damage. “We want to welcome the community to stop in and see the shop since the rennovation. It is much more open and accommodating,” said Holdmann. For more information, call (715) 479-2172.

NOTICE OF SPRING PRIMARY AND SAMPLE BALLOTS February 19, 2013 OFFICE OF THE VILAS COUNTY CLERK

to anyone so as to reveal how the ballot is marked.

TO THE ELECTORS OF VILAS COUNTY

If the elector spoils an optical scan ballot, he or she shall return it to an election official who shall issue another ballot in its place, but not more than three ballots shall be issued to any one elector. If the ballot has not been initialed by two inspectors or is defective in any other way, the elector shall return it to the election official, who shall issue a proper ballot in its place. After casting his or her vote, the elector shall leave the voting booth, properly deposit the ballot and promptly leave the polling place.

Notice is hereby given of a spring primary election to be held in the several wards in the County of Vilas, on the 19th day of February, 2013, at which the officers named below shall be nominated. The names of the candidates for each office, whose nominations have been certified to or filed in this office, are given under the title of the office, each in its proper column, together with the questions submitted to a vote, for a referendum, if any, in the sample ballot below. INFORMATION TO ELECTORS Upon entering the polling place, an elector shall state his or her name and address and sign the poll book before being permitted to vote. Where ballots are distributed to electors, the initials of two inspectors must appear on the ballot. Upon being permitted to vote, the elector shall retire alone to a voting booth and cast his or her ballot except that an elector who is a parent or guardian may be accompanied by the elector's minor child or minor ward. An election official may inform the elector of the proper manner for casting a vote, but the official may not in any manner advise or indicate a particular voting choice. Where optical scan voting is used, the elector shall fill in the oval or connect the arrow next to the name of the candidate of his or her choice for each office for which he or she intends to vote. To vote for a person whose name does not appear on the ballot, the elector shall write in the name of the person of his or her choice in the space provided, and fill in the oval or connect the arrow on the write-in line. On referendum questions, the elector shall fill in the oval or connect the arrow next to "yes" if in favor of the question, or the elector shall fill in the oval or connect the arrow next to "no" if opposed to the question.

While the Ministry Eagle River Memorial Hospital Thrift Shop accepts donations of clothing, shoes and housewares made during regular business hours, donations of appliances, televisions and toilets will not be accepted. A toilet was recently left outside of the thrift shop. —STAFF PHOTO

NOTICE OF ELECTION AND SAMPLE BALLOTS February 19, 2013

The elector may spoil a touch screen ballot at the voting station before the ballot is cast. After an official optical scan ballot is marked, it shall be inserted in the security sleeve so the marks do not show. After casting his or her vote, the elector shall leave the booth, insert the ballot in the voting device and discard the sleeve, or deliver the ballot to an inspector for deposit. If a central count system is used, the elector shall insert the ballot in the ballot box and discard the sleeve, or deliver the ballot to an inspector for deposit. The elector shall leave the polling place promptly. After an official touch screen ballot is cast, the elector shall leave the polling place promptly. An elector may select an individual to assist in casting his or her vote if the elector declares to the presiding official that he or she is unable to read, has difficulty reading, writing or understanding English or that due to disability is unable to cast his or her ballot. The selected individual rendering assistance may not be the elector's employer or an agent of that employer or an officer or agent of a labor organization which represents the elector. The following is a sample of the official ballots:

Where touch screen voting systems are used, the elector shall touch the screen next to the name of the candidate of his or her choice for each office for which he or she intends to vote. To vote for a person whose name does not appear on the ballot, the elector shall type in the name of the person of his or her choice in the space provided for a write-in vote. On referendum questions, the elector shall touch the screen next to "yes" if in favor of the question, or the elector shall touch the screen next to "no" if opposed to the question. The vote should not be cast in any other manner. Not more than five minutes' time shall be allowed inside a voting booth. Sample ballots or other materials to assist the elector in casting his or her vote may be taken into the booth and copied. The sample ballot shall not be shown

OFFICE OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT CLERK TO THE ELECTORS OF THE NORTHLAND PINES SCHOOL DISTRICT: Notice is hereby given of a referendum election to be held in the Northland Pines School District on the 19th day of February, 2013, at which the question identified below will be presented. The referendum question to be submitted to appears in the sample ballot below. INFORMATION TO ELECTORS Upon entering the polling place, an elector shall give his or her name and address before being permitted to vote. Where ballots are distributed to electors, the initials of two inspectors must appear on the ballot. Upon being permitted to vote, the elector shall retire alone to a voting booth and cast his or her ballot except that an elector who is a parent or guardian may be accompanied by the elector’s minor child or minor ward. An election official may inform the elector of the proper manner for casting a vote, but the official may not in any manner advise or indicate a particular voting choice. On referendum questions, the elector shall make a cross (X) in the square or depress the lever or button at the right of “yes” if in favor of the question, or the elector shall make a cross (X) in the square or depress the lever or button at the right of “no” if opposed to the question. Where marksense voting is used on referendum questions, the elector shall fill in the oval or connect the arrow next to “yes” if in favor of the question, or the elector shall fill in the oval or connect the arrow next to “no” if opposed to the question. The vote should not be cast in any other manner. If the elector spoils a ballot, he or she shall return it to an election official who shall issue another ballot in its place, but not more than three ballots shall be issued to any one elector. If the ballot has not been initialed by two inspectors or is defective in any other way, the elector shall return it to the election official, who shall issue a proper ballot in its place. Not more than five minutes’ time shall be allowed inside a voting booth or machine. Unofficial ballots or a memorandum to assist the elector in casting his or her vote may be taken into the booth and copied. The sample ballot shall not be shown to anyone so as to reveal how the ballot is marked. After an official paper ballot is marked, it shall be folded so the inside marks do not show, but so the printed endorsements and inspectors’ initials on the outside do show. The elector shall leave the booth, deposit the ballot in the ballot box, or deliver the ballot to an inspector for deposit, and shall leave the polling place promptly. After an official marksense ballot is marked, it shall be inserted in the security sleeve so the marks do not show. After casting his or her vote, the elector shall leave the booth, insert the ballot in the voting device and discard the sleeve, or deliver the ballot to an inspector for deposit. If a central count system is used, the elector shall insert the ballot in the ballot box and discard the sleeve, or deliver the ballot to an inspector for deposit. The elector shall leave the polling place promptly. An elector may select an individual to assist in casting his or her vote if the elector declares to the presiding official that he or she is unable to read, has difficulty reading, writing or understanding English or that due to disability is unable to cast his or her ballot. The selected individual rendering assistance may not be the elector’s employer or an agent of that employer or an officer or agent of a labor organization which represents the elector. The following is a sample of the official ballot:

OFFICIAL REFERENDUM BALLOT NORTHLAND PINES SCHOOL DISTRICT VILAS COUNTY FEBRUARY 19, 2013 NOTICE TO ELECTORS: THIS BALLOT MAY BE INVALID UNLESS INITIALED BY 2 ELECTION INSPECTORS. IF CAST AS AN ABSENTEE BALLOT, THE BALLOT MUST BEAR THE INITIALS OF THE MUNICIPAL CLERK OR DEPUTY CLERK. To vote on a question, make a cross (X) in the square at the RIGHT of YES if in favor of the question, or make a cross (X) in the square at the RIGHT of NO if opposed to the question. REFERENDUM TO EXCEED STATE REVENUE LIMITS ON A NON-RECURRING BASIS NORTHLAND PINES SCHOOL DISTRICT Shall the Northland Pines School District be authorized to exceed state revenue limits on a non-recurring basis by $2,700,000.00 for the 2013-14, 2014-15, and 2015-16 school years to maintain School District programs and operations? YES

NO

*The form of the reverse side of the ballot is attached.

(REVERSE SIDE OF BALLOT) OFFICIAL REFERENDUM BALLOT NORTHLAND PINES SCHOOL DISTRICT VILAS COUNTY FEBRUARY 19, 2013 ___________________________________ (Insert name of municipality: city, town or village, and ward, if required.) Ballot issued by ______________________________ ______________________________ (initials of inspectors) Absentee Elector’s Ballot issued by ________________________________ (initials of city, village or town clerk or deputy clerk) Certification of Elector Assistance I certify that the within ballot was marked by me for an elector who is authorized under the law to have assistance upon request, and as directed by the elector. _______________________________ 2285

WNAXLP

(signature of assisting individual)

2283

WNAXLP

/s/ David R. Alleman, Vilas County Clerk

ONE MAN’S JUNK IS ANOTHER MAN’S TREASURE! Treasure hunters read the North Woods Trader classifieds. Call (715) 479-4421 with a classified ad for your hidden treasures.


WEDNESDAY, FEB, 13, 2013

9A

VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS

OUTDOORS DNR pushing statewide motor trolling VILAS County’s long-held disdain for motor trolling is being pushed aside by the Department of Natural Resources (DNR), as the agency is calling for a statewide vote to legalize trolling everywhere. The so-called experts claim in the pamphlet assembled for the spring fish and game hearings in April that trolling is allowed in many Wisconsin waters and surrounding states “with no known adverse effects.” That’s a pretty bold statement for an agency that has been told previously about adverse social impacts involving motor trolling on small inland waters — lakes being shared by anglers, boaters, windsurfers, waterskiers and swimmers. Even among anglers, there’s only so much room for sharing the drop-offs and other underwater structure that both traditional anglers and trollers prefer. Expect user conflicts to increase if this proposal becomes the law of the land. The agency’s statement ignores the impacts of gas and oil pollution while anglers run two-cycle outboard engines at two or three miles an hour for hours at a time. The DNR’s top reason for legalizing motor trolling is the simplification of regulations. Really? This from an agency that has implemented in recent years some of the most complicated, most confusing walleye and trout regulations in the country. I’ve heard advocates of trolling say that it’s allowed everywhere else in Wisconsin, why not here? Don’t believe it. Only 19 of the 72 counties allow trolling on all waters. Eight counties allow no

In the Outdoors By Kurt Krueger trolling and 19 counties allow trolling on just one lake. Vilas and Oneida counties harbor the largest concentration of inland lakes in Wisconsin. There is no trolling allowed in Vilas and it is only allowed on five lakes in Oneida. And there’s a reason for that. Besides the user conflict issue, opponents of motor trolling argue that the technique targets for harvest the largest muskies, walleye and trout. It allows anglers to run baits deeper and to keep them in the strike zone for much longer periods of time than conventional angling, thus targeting deep-water trophies. The DNR claims the muskie fishing community supports its plan because anglers want to trail suckers behind their boats — while also casting — without being accused of motor trolling. If that’s the case, the agency could consider making an exception to existing rules for the use of live sucker minnows. That would be a lot better than opening up every lake to motor trolling. The DNR claims its plan would “provide additional fishing opportunities for anglers who may have difficulty fishing by other methods.” The trolling advocates I know don’t have any difficulty fishing with conventional methods. They

Cruising boats and the widespread yellow planer boards used by motor trollers could become a common sight in

want to troll because it’s easier and very effective. Guides who troll don’t have to teach anglers how to fish. Casting and the detection of biting fish aren’t an issue when trolling. Besides, disabled anglers can apply for a trolling permit just like disabled hunters can apply for special status to shoot from vehicles and certain roadways. With an extension of the DNR’s thinking on the trolling issue, we should allow all hunters to shoot from vehicles or use crossbows for deer just to eliminate the need for disabled hunters to have to apply for a permit. Yet another reason for me to distrust the DNR, or possibly the political party in power. As you might know, the DNR secretary

Vilas County if the Department of Natural Resources gets its way at the spring hearings. —STAFF PHOTO

has been a puppet of the governor’s office ever since we stopped allowing the citizen-run Natural Resources Board to appoint the secretary. The current proposal would allow trolling statewide with up to three hooks, baits or lures per angler. We’re talking planer boards and wide swaths up and down the lake, hour after hour, if you get my drift. I fish a lot on the Eagle River and Three Lakes chains, and it would be user-conflict disaster on those waters. The proposed rule change will be voted on at spring fish and game hearings in every county on Monday, April 8, starting at 7 p.m. Lakefront property owners who care about maintaining the least amount of boat congestion

and user conflicts on their lakes might want to put this item on the calendar — even if you don’t fish. Those who fish have to decide whether Wisconsin should stick with conventional angling methods on the vast majority of its lakes, or whether all lakes should be open to motor trolling. I’m being told that we should allow trolling because everybody else does, and that doesn’t cut it. We’ve got unique resources and relatively small inland lakes here. They don’t need any added fishing pressure. But that’s just me, and I only get one vote come Monday, April 8. Hopefully, I won’t be alone in voting no on Question No. 6.

Sugar Camp plans annual fishing derby The Sugar Camp Snowmobile Club will host its annual Ice Fishing Derby at Pitlik’s Sand Beach Resort on Sand Lake on the Sugar Camp Chain of Lakes this Saturday, Feb. 16, from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. There is a $20 entry fee; youths age 12 and younger fish for free. Participants can

preregister Friday, Feb. 15, from 4 to 7 p.m. There will be prizes for the biggest fish overall in each category. There also will be three grand door prizes, including first prize, $1,500; second prize, $1,000; and third prize, $500. For more information, call (715) 891-1982.

Fishing with the Guides By George Langley

Lake conditions vary with additional snow The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources has reported that the 2012 deer harvest increased by 5% over the total harvest

in 2011. More than 245,000 were harvested during the traditional nine-day gun deer season. —STAFF PHOTO

Deer harvest climbs 5% statewide; archery season sets buck record With data entry near complete, hunter-supplied numbers indicate that 366,747 deer were harvested in Wisconsin for the 2012 seasons, a 5% increase from 2011, according to Department of Natural Resources (DNR) officials. This tally will again rank the state in the top five deer hunting states in the country for total harvest and continues the trend of increased deer harvest for the third consecutive year. “Good hunting conditions throughout the fall, high numbers of both hunters and deer, and an early gun opener all added up to a lot of hunter success,” said Kevin Wallenfang, DNR big game ecologist. “Like any year, we heard from hunters who had a great season and others who were disappointed, but overall harvest trends have been on the rise.” Of the grand total, 245,539 deer were harvested during the traditional nine-day November gun season and another 93,452 during the

archery season. Of the archery season total, 45,775 were bucks, making it the new record buck archery harvest of all time for Wisconsin. “It was a great year for buck harvest, especially in the farmland areas,” Wallenfang said. “Wisconsin has always been known as a great producer of trophy bucks, but this year has likely secured Wisconsin’s standing in the record books. It will be a lot of fun to attend the deer hunting shows this spring to see just what was taken.” All other combined gun seasons added an additional 27,756 deer to the total harvest. Harvest numbers are still preliminary while the archery season continues in metro units, and are in the process of being reviewed by field biologist. Also being reviewed is feedback the DNR received from hunters at deer registration stations and from the Deer Hunter Wildlife Survey. “Reports we have received from several areas of the state

have shown increasing trends in deer sightings during both the archery and firearm seasons compared with last year and the past several years,” said Brian Dhuey, DNR wildlife surveys and database manager. “We will be using harvest data along with survey responses to gauge hunter participation, effort, impres-

sions of deer numbers and satisfaction,” said Dhuey. “This, combined with statewide public meetings this spring on herd status, will allow the public to participate in the deer management process.” For more information on the preliminary deer harvest by season and deer management unit, visit dnr.wi.gov.

Whitetails Unlimited sets banquet this Saturday The North Country Chapter of Whitetails Unlimited (WTU) will host a fund-raising banquet this Saturday, Feb. 16, at Eagle Waters Resort in Eagle River. The event will feature games, raffles and a social hour to start at 5:30 p.m., followed by dinner at 7 p.m. Tickets are $30 each. Tickets will not be sold at the door. Organizers say 50% of all net proceeds will go directly back

to area conservation-related activities. The fund-raising banquet will include prizes featuring a wide array of products, including firearms, outfitter packages, hunting and outdoorrelated equipment, artwork and collectibles only available at WTU events. For ticket information, contact Mark Hartmann at (715) 479-5067 (evenings) or Kurt Andussies at (715) 891-3400.

Anglers are discovering changing lake conditions now as the snow has gotten deeper on the ice, making it more difficult to get around. This is to be expected for this time of year, but is much better than it was at this time compared to the past few years. The ice itself is quite thick, with up to 24 inches of ice on some lakes in the area. Meanwhile, the snow depth has gotten much better in the woods for cross-country skiers, snowmobilers and snowshoeing fans. In short, winter is in full bloom. Anglers are taking advantage of the longer daylight periods now that we are in the middle of February. That’s a sure sign that winter is on the wane and that some great spring fishing is just around the corner. But there is plenty of ice fishing remaining. Ice anglers didn’t get it last year because of that unusual March thaw, but the best panfishing of the ice season is not too far around the corner. Walleye fishing has remained good, especially for this time of year. Anglers normally experience a slump in February, but that hasn’t seemed to happen this year. The evening bite is consistently good this year, with anglers setting tip-ups along structure edges and getting fish nearly every evening. Shiners and sucker minnows are best. Northern action has been excellent throughout the area, with good numbers of these fish being caught daily on shiners under tip-ups set in weed areas. Recently, the action even seems to have picked up significantly. Anywhere you find weeds, you will find these predators. Panfish action has been pretty good. The bluegills are consistently hitting in weed areas on spikes or waxies. Perch also are in the weeds, but in general are a little deeper. They have been hitting wigglers very nicely for the last several weeks. Look for some of the deeper grass weeds on the larger clear lakes for good action on these fish. Crappies are hitting in the holes on the Chain very well now. With the good ice, it is easy to get to these holes at this point, so try small minnows in 20 to 25 feet of water in those holes for some great crappie action. All in all, now that we’re done with the terribly cold weather (hopefully), get out and enjoy some really good fishing. Good luck and good fishin’.

SERVICE OF:

EAGLE SPORTS

/

EAGLE RIVER GUIDES ASSOCIATION


10A

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 13, 2013

VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS

OUTDOORS

Phelps fishing tourney breaks attendance record

ALBINO BUCK — Matthew McGill recently took this photo of a nine-point albino buck, which was

witnessed roaming around in St. Germain. —Contributed Photo

Walker says deer initiatives to be included in new budget Gov. Scott Walker announced Friday that several deer management initiatives suggested in the 2012 Deer Trustee Report will be funded as part of the state budget. Walker said the initiatives will enhance Wisconsin’s rich hunting tradition and improve the partnership between hunters and the Department of Natural Resources (DNR). “Deer hunting in Wisconsin is part of our DNA. It feeds traditions and fuels a huge economic engine for the state,” said Walker. “My budget provisions create the infrastructure needed to implement the Deer Trustee Report to the fullest extent possible, ensuring Wisconsin’s standing not only as a national destination for deer hunting, but also a national leader in deer management.” In 2011, Walker commissioned Dr. James C. Kroll as the state’s whitetail deer trustee to independently and objectively evaluate Wisconsin’s deer herd management practices. The conclusions of his study, along with input from hunters and conservationists, were compiled into a series of 62 recommendations

for DNR implementation in the final Deer Trustee Report, released July 2012. Recommendations include forming a Deer Management Assistance Program (D-MAP) to improve the partnership between hunters, landowners and DNR in managing deer on private land; updating technology to gather information on land cover to better inform decisions; and adopting a more passive approach to chronic wasting disease (CWD)management where the disease exists while providing the public improved access to deer testing. Specific to these recommendations, Walker’s budget provisions include authority for the DNR to: — Develop and sustain a D-MAP, including setting a fee for services provided and establishing a D-MAP coordinator position within the DNR. — Invest in new satellite imagery technology to provide land cover data statewide to best inform decisions of deer managers and to be used for the benefit of landowner and local government partners. — Begin charging fees for antlerless deer tags in coun-

Natural Resources Board elects new officers for ’13 The seven-member Wisconsin Natural Resources Board elected new officers for 2013 at its January meeting in Madison. The board elected Preston Cole of Milwaukee as chair, Terry Hilgenberg of Shawano as vice chair and Greg Kazmierski of Pewaukee as secretary. Cole replaces Dave Clausen of Amery, who has served as chair for the last year. Hilgenberg replaces Cole, who was previously vice chair, and Kazmierski replaces Christine Thomas of Stevens Point. The Natural Resources Board sets policy for the Department of Natural Resources and exercises authority and responsibility in accordance with governing state laws. Board members are appointed to six-year terms by the governor with the advice and consent of the Wisconsin Senate. Cole is director of operations for the city of Milwaukee Department of Public Works. He is a member of the Milwaukee Green Team, where he and his colleagues seek to create a more sustainable Milwaukee through storm-water reduction practices, energy conservation programs, waste reduction initiatives, all while creating green jobs. Cole was appointed to the board in August 2007 and his term expires May 1. Hilgenberg is president of Coldwell Banker Hilgenberg Realtors® in Shawano. He has been in the real estate business since 1975 specializing in commercial real estate in Green Bay, and is a partner in Hilgenberg & Associates, Inc.,

an investment and development real estate company. Hilgenberg was appointed to the board May 1, 2011 and his term expires May 1, 2017. Kazmierski has shared his passion of the outdoors for more than 30 years through a sporting goods business in Delafield. Kazmierski grew up on a dairy farm in rural Mukwonago, which inspired his appreciation of Wisconsin’s natural resources. Kazmierski was appointed to the board May 1, 2011 and his term expires May 1, 2017. The other four members of the board are William Bruins of Waupun, a dairy farm owner; David Clausen of Amery, a veterinarian; Christine Thomas of Stevens Point, a professor of resource management at UW-Stevens Point; and Jane Wiley of Wausau, a community conservation activist.

ties with CWD, using a portion of fees to fund surveillance efforts and improve the turnaround time of and access to CWD testing. — Begin implementation for the 2013 deer season with final implementation as soon as the 2014 deer season. “This is not a report that is going to sit on a shelf and collect dust. The budget language paves the way for progress, giving DNR the tools necessary to implement the Deer Trustee Report,” said Walker. DNR has begun the initial stages of developing its system for implementation, including appointing a trustee report coordinator and establishing a set of action teams that will include conservation partners including tribal representatives, members of the public, and key department staff to define actions necessary to implement portions of the plan. “Implementation of the report is a big job and we are ready for the challenge,” said Cathy Stepp, DNR Secretary. “The report covers many aspects of deer management and will greatly change aspects of how the Department manages deer in Wisconsin. We have talented staff and dedicated partners to see implementation through.”

ALL BOOTS ON SALE Ice-Fishing Tackle Clothing Boots Electronics Rods & Reels Skis – Snowshoes Sales & Rental

The Phelps Lions Club recently held its 27th annual Great Northern Ice Fishing Tournament on Lac Vieux Desert, setting an alltime record for the number of participants with 200 registered anglers. “This was our most successful tournament in our 27-year history,” said Lions President Mike McAdams. There were contests for $100 both in the morning and afternoon for the largest fish caught in each category. Morning winners included: Ed Borske of Alvin with a 287⁄8-inch northern pike; Joe Pestka, Minoqua, 223⁄8inch walleye; Ashley Methy, Muskego, 115⁄8-inch perch; Dick Warren, Milton, 131⁄4inch crappie; and Bob Schumacher, New London, 81⁄4inch blue gill. Afternoon winners included: Tim Tillman, Three Lakes, 297⁄8-inch northern pike; Adam Gerbert, Minoqua, 22-inch walleye; Cory Dieck, Antigo, 107⁄8-inch perch; Emil Neuman, Mosinee, 131⁄4-inch crappie; and Dave Klingenmeyer, Rockton, Ill., 81⁄8-inch blue gill. After the contest, 250 anglers and registered guests received dinner at

Ashley Methy of Muskego was the morning winner in the perch division with this 115⁄8-inch fish caught on Lac Vieux Desert in Phelps. —Photo By Sharon Gifford

Stateline Restaurant in Land O’ Lakes. “The Mendham family from Sunrise Lodge, who catered the meal, were a big part in the huge success of the banquet,” said Lion’s Club member Ed Rahn. Many prizes were award-

ed during the meal, including an ice shanty, ice augers, jig poles, rifles, and beaver dam tip-ups. Lion members Dennis Konieczka and Dick Martin co-chaired the event. Event proceeds will benefit community services in Phelps.

NOTICE OF ELECTION AND SAMPLE BALLOTS February 19, 2013 OFFICE OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT CLERK TO THE ELECTORS OF THE NORTHLAND PINES SCHOOL DISTRICT: Notice is hereby given of a referendum election to be held in the Northland Pines School District on the 19th day of February, 2013, at which the question identified below will be presented. The referendum question to be submitted to appears in the sample ballot below. INFORMATION TO ELECTORS Upon entering the polling place, an elector shall give his or her name and address before being permitted to vote. Where ballots are distributed to electors, the initials of two inspectors must appear on the ballot. Upon being permitted to vote, the elector shall retire alone to a voting booth and cast his or her ballot except that an elector who is a parent or guardian may be accompanied by the elector’s minor child or minor ward. An election official may inform the elector of the proper manner for casting a vote, but the official may not in any manner advise or indicate a particular voting choice. On referendum questions, the elector shall make a cross (X) in the square or depress the lever or button at the right of “yes” if in favor of the question, or the elector shall make a cross (X) in the square or depress the lever or button at the right of “no” if opposed to the question. Where marksense voting is used on referendum questions, the elector shall fill in the oval or connect the arrow next to “yes” if in favor of the question, or the elector shall fill in the oval or connect the arrow next to “no” if opposed to the question. The vote should not be cast in any other manner. If the elector spoils a ballot, he or she shall return it to an election official who shall issue another ballot in its place, but not more than three ballots shall be issued to any one elector. If the ballot has not been initialed by two inspectors or is defective in any other way, the elector shall return it to the election official, who shall issue a proper ballot in its place. Not more than five minutes’ time shall be allowed inside a voting booth or machine. Unofficial ballots or a memorandum to assist the elector in casting his or her vote may be taken into the booth and copied. The sample ballot shall not be shown to anyone so as to reveal how the ballot is marked. After an official paper ballot is marked, it shall be folded so the inside marks do not show, but so the printed endorsements and inspectors’ initials on the outside do show. The elector shall leave the booth, deposit the ballot in the ballot box, or deliver the ballot to an inspector for deposit, and shall leave the polling place promptly. After an official marksense ballot is marked, it shall be inserted in the security sleeve so the marks do not show. After casting his or her vote, the elector shall leave the booth, insert the ballot in the voting device and discard the sleeve, or deliver the ballot to an inspector for deposit. If a central count system is used, the elector shall insert the ballot in the ballot box and discard the sleeve, or deliver the ballot to an inspector for deposit. The elector shall leave the polling place promptly. An elector may select an individual to assist in casting his or her vote if the elector declares to the presiding official that he or she is unable to read, has difficulty reading, writing or understanding English or that due to disability is unable to cast his or her ballot. The selected individual rendering assistance may not be the elector’s employer or an agent of that employer or an officer or agent of a labor organization which represents the elector. The following is a sample of the official ballot:

OFFICIAL REFERENDUM BALLOT NORTHLAND PINES SCHOOL DISTRICT VILAS COUNTY FEBRUARY 19, 2013 NOTICE TO ELECTORS: THIS BALLOT MAY BE INVALID UNLESS INITIALED BY 2 ELECTION INSPECTORS. IF CAST AS AN ABSENTEE BALLOT, THE BALLOT MUST BEAR THE INITIALS OF THE MUNICIPAL CLERK OR DEPUTY CLERK. To vote on a question, make a cross (X) in the square at the RIGHT of YES if in favor of the question, or make a cross (X) in the square at the RIGHT of NO if opposed to the question. REFERENDUM TO EXCEED STATE REVENUE LIMITS ON A NON-RECURRING BASIS NORTHLAND PINES SCHOOL DISTRICT Shall the Northland Pines School District be authorized to exceed state revenue limits on a non-recurring basis by $240,000.00 to construct additions to existing walls and to construct new walls for fire safety purposes? YES

www.eaglesportscenter.com

NO

*The form of the reverse side of the ballot is attached.

(REVERSE SIDE OF BALLOT) OFFICIAL REFERENDUM BALLOT

COME TO THE DERBY

NORTHLAND PINES SCHOOL DISTRICT VILAS COUNTY FEBRUARY 19, 2013

at PITLIK’S

SAND BEACH RESORT

___________________________________ (Insert name of municipality: city, town or village, and ward, if required.)

4833 Sand Beach Dr., Sugar Camp

Ballot issued by ______________________________ ______________________________ (initials of inspectors)

Saturday, Feb. 16 7 a.m. - 2 p.m.

For more info, call 715-891-1982

• 3 Grand Prizes • Raffle drawings at 2:30 p.m. including 1st prize, $1,500; 2nd prize, $1,000; 3rd prize, $500 • Hourly prizes • Prizes for biggest overall fish in each category • $20 entry fee • 12 and under, fish free • Preregistration on Friday 2/15 from 4-7 p.m. at Pitlik’s

SPONSORED BY SUGAR CAMP SNOWMOBILE CLUB

Absentee Elector’s Ballot issued by ________________________________ (initials of city, village or town clerk or deputy clerk) Certification of Elector Assistance I certify that the within ballot was marked by me for an elector who is authorized under the law to have assistance upon request, and as directed by the elector. _______________________________ 2287

WNAXLP

(signature of assisting individual)


WEDNESDAY, FEB. 13, 2013

11A

VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS

SPORTS

This was the scene from high above Dollar Lake Friday during the eighth annual Labatt Blue/USA Hockey Pond Hockey National

Championships on Dollar Lake. More than 300 teams competed on 28 rinks on the Dollar Lake ice. USA Hockey officials said the

Eagle River event reigns as one of the top pond hockey tournaments in the nation. —Photo By Kitty Sookochoff

Eighth national pond hockey tourney draws record 342 teams from 30 states ___________ BY GARY RIDDERBUSCH NEWS-REVIEW EDITOR

___________

The Labatt Blue USA Hockey Pond Hockey Championships on Dollar Lake in Eagle River attracted a record 342 teams last Friday through Sunday, with teams taking home “national champion” bragging rights in 18 divisions. The tournament, now in its eighth year, brought in more than 2,400 hockey players who skated on 28 rinks built on the ice of Dollar Lake just east of Eagle River. The skaters came from 30 states and Canada. During the three-day weekend, with sunny and mild weather Friday and Saturday, teams played more than 600 games, according to Ashley Bevan, senior director of adult hockey for USA Hockey. “All in all, it went very, very well,” said Bevan Sunday afternoon as teams from across the county packed their bags and headed for home before a storm moved in. “We were pleasantly surprise,” said Bevan. “We had our challenges with Mother Nature, but we worked well with her and it has been just a fantastic weekend.” About 10 days before the tournament, the North Woods had some severe weather changes, including rain, warming and then snow, creating some slush on Dollar Lake where snow had been plowed between the

rinks. “So things got challengeing with scheduling, but we changed the schedule around on the fly and guys were really patient with us and it worked out for everyone and for the best,” said Bevan. Bevan said USA Hockey could not put on such a large tournament without the help of local volunteers, including the Eagle River Area Fire Department which builds the rinks and the Eagle River Recreation Association which supplies many of the officials and scorekeepers. “We get a lot of volunteers from the Eagle River area,” said Bevan. “We couldn't do it without the fire department, all the scorekeepers, referees and everybody else.” Bevan reiterated that USA Hockey officials are happy with their decision to bring the national pond hockey tournament to Eagle River. He said the location is perfect for several reasons. “It’s really a testament to the good weather here in Eagle River and the good ice on Dollar Lake and the ice crew and the fire department that really makes those things happen,” said Bevan. He also noted the tournament continues to grow, from 281 teams last year to 342 this year. The tournament also went to four women’s divisions this year: beginner, bronze, silver and gold. One of the happiest teams

While the national pond hockey tournament attracted more than 2,400 players, hundreds of fans also show up to support their teams.

The national pond hockey tournament was held under sunny skies Friday and Saturday, drawing big crowds to Dollar Lake to watch

was the Pond Stars made up of a group of guys Chicago. They won the Intermediate 30 Plus division Sunday morning. Sal Palluto of the Pond Stars said he enjoys playing pond hockey in Eagle River. “You have to keep it here. It’s a great location. It’s a good pond, we had good weather and there’s good people in this area. The facility, everybody does a great job,” said Palluto. “Everybody seems to be pretty cool with helping out. We really like coming up here. The sevenhour drive is well worth it. We will be back next year and make a repeat out of it.” Palluto said the camaraderie of pond hockey players is what makes the event so special. “We really enjoy being around teammates, friends and all the people who are here,” said Palluto. “The place is really nice and the other players may it a great event.” Only 18 teams went home with one of the newly designed championship cups, including the Copper Country Old-Timers of Hancock, Mich., who won the Silver 30 plus Division. Ryan DeForge of Hancock was excited about the team’s win. “The team we beat in finals were runners-up four years in a row. Now we made it five. It was great,” said DeForge. “We bring four teams down from our area. Four different divisions and, as of this morning (Sunday), we had four teams all in the finals. USA Hockey puts on a great event and we will come

back next year.” Pat Weber, fire chief for the Eagle River Area Fire Department, said considering the warm weather prior to the tournament, the event went well. Due to some slush between the rinks where snow was plowed, some of the rinks had to be shortened. ‘We ended up reducing the size of some of the rinks 10 to 15 feet,” said Weber. “But overall, the ice was excellent.” Weber said the players, who come from across the country, really appreciate the

the action on the ice. Players said ice conditions were excellent during the weekend. —Staff Photo By ANTHONY DREW

work of the volunteers and community. “We got a lot of compliments from the players and I talked to businesspeople who said the players really appreciate this tournament,” said Weber. “It takes hockey back to its roots.” One women’s team came all the way from San Francisco to play in the tournament. Sandra Todd won a championship in the Women’s Bronze division. It was the third year her team played in the event. “It’s a great weekend. It’s

A total of 18 teams won championship cups at the hockey tourney. This team was one of four

fantastic,” said Todd. “The community is just amazing. The firefighters and everybody are just fantastic. Everywhere we go in town we are welcomed. We now have four teams, two girls’ and two men’s, from San Francisco. But I think we started it all.” Weber and Bevan said plans are already being put together for next year’s tournament. “It takes a lot of resources, a lot of time and energy, but it’s all worth it for this great game that we all love,” said Bevan.

teams from Hancock, Mich., that won a divison title. —Staff Photos By GARY RIDDERBUSCH


12A

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 13, 2013

VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS

SPORTS Sports Sidelines By Gary Ridderbusch

It’s time to train for 17th Journeys

Phelps senior guard Angela Grmick sent a pass to a teammate with coach Kregg Mueller and the bench looking on during last

Thursday’s definitive 38-15 win over White Lake. The Knights are 9-3 in the NLC. —Staff Photos By ANTHONY DREW

Lady Knights tied for second in NLC after pair of victories ___________ BY ANTHONY DREW NEWS-REVIEW ASST. EDITOR

___________

Picking up two Northern Lakes Conference (NLC) wins last week, the Phelps Lady Knights beat Elcho 41-40 last Tuesday and White Lake 3815 Thursday. The wins moved Phelps into a tie with Wabeno for second place in NLC standings with a 9-3 record. Crandon leads the conference at 11-1. The crucial conference match against Elcho saw the teams play almost even in the first quarter, as the Hornets took an early 11-10 lead. With the Lady Knights plagued by foul trouble in the second quarter, the Hornets expanded their lead to 23-15 going into halftime. “The first time we played Elcho back in early January was a very tough match up, as we only beat them by one point our home floor with a last-second jumper from Ashley Volkmann, and this night shaped up to be no different,” said Phelps coach Jason Pertile. The Knights came out with a huge third quarter, outscoring Elcho 14-6 to tie the game going into the final eight minutes. The conference rivals battled back and forth in the final quarter. The game came down to the last three seconds. Phelps held a one-point lead and Elcho had the ball under their basket. “We played excellent

Ashley Volkmann, a junior for the Phelps Lady Knights, battled for control of the ball against

defense those last moments of the game not allowing them to get off a clean shot,” said Pertile. “This was a big win for the Knights and it put them into a position to take control of second place.” Volkmann scored 23 points in the game for Phelps. Riley Brockman scored seven points, while Stormy Schreiber and Kendra Pietenpol scored five apiece. The Lady Knights jumped out to an early 9-2 lead after the first quarter against White Lake, but the Lakers weren’t going to go away easi-

two White Lake opponents last Thursday. She’s third in the NLC with 16.2 points per game.

ly. White Lake played Phelps nearly evenly in the second quarter, giving the Knights a halftime lead of 18-11. The third quarter was more defensive, as most possessions lasted more than a minute. “That was ok, as it really allowed us to work on offensive rhythm and timing of a lot of things that we needed to work on for our upcoming week and tournament play,” said Pertile. The fourth quarter saw the Lady Knights roll to victory

after outscoring the Lakers 38-15 after going on a 15-0 run. Phelps was scheduled to travel to Goodman-Pembine Monday, Feb. 11. They will host Three Lakes Thursday, Feb. 14, at 7:30 p.m. before hosting Wabeno Friday, Feb. 15, at 5:30 p.m. “This will be another big week of basketball for the Knights, as we can take sole possession of second place and hope that the right things happen and Crandon end up with a few more losses,” said coach Pertile.

Eagle River Falcons win two for huge Pond Hockey crowd ___________ BY GENE ADAMOVICH SPECIAL TO THE NEWS-REVIEW

___________

Hockey fans from across the nation packed the Dome last weekend as the Eagle River Falcons hosted the Calumet Wolverines and the Portage Lakes Pioneers in Great Lakes Hockey League action. It was Pond Hockey weekend and the arena was rocking as the capacity crowds cheered the Falcons on to a 95 win over the Wolverines Friday night and a 7-4 upset of the Pioneers Saturday night. The pair of wins improved their record to 7-5-1 on the season. Against Calumet, Eagle River took an early lead at 4:56 of the first period as Derek Tijan poked home the puck from the edge of the crease. Josh Calleja was credited with the assist. The complexion of the game was clear early as both teams revealed physical play from the opening period on. With 40 seconds left in the period, the Wolverines scored off a shot that Falcons goalie Lee Satran couldn’t secure, to tie it up at one apiece going into the first break. To the delight of the crowd, the intermission entertainment was a short game by some of the younger hockey participants of the Eagle River Recreation Association. Period two saw the hometown boys unload on the Wolverines, scoring four unanswered goals in a matter of six

minutes, putting some serious pressure on the visitors’ zone. Calleja with a wrist shot from 10 feet out was first, just two minutes into the period. Teddy Maillette and Cody Litvinoff teamed up for the assist. Then, Lucas Otto stuffed one in on a backhand just inside the pipe and the goalie’s pads with Neil Wallace picking up the assist at the 4:35 mark. Alex Hausworth, from alongside the net, flipped the puck off the back of the goalie’s pad and into the cage for the third score of the barrage. Helping out on the play was Alex Racino and Litvinoff. The final goal came from Calleja as he went back door, capitalizing off a perfect pass across the crease from Tijan and Brad Adamovich. Calumet then got one back, taking advantage of a two-ontwo break and going top shelf. But the host team was not through yet, as defenseman Teddy Maillette backhanded a floater from near the blue line that got by the Wolverines goaltender to light the lamp. Lucas Otto, scoring his second goal of the period, beat the defense with some nifty stick handling and went one-on-one with the goalie to give Eagle River a 7-2 lead with only six seconds left in the period. Calleja opened the final period with his third goal of the game at 5:07, nailing the upper corner glove side. Getting the assist on the play were Tijan and D.J. Drayna. Following back-to-back

goals by Calumet, the Falcons added their final goal of the game, as Racino scored their ninth and final goal unassisted while maneuvering through traffic. The Wolverines added one harmless goal with just over a minute remaining to finalize the scoring and give the Falcons the win. Satran registered 35 saves on the game. Against the third-place Portage Lakes Pioneers, who came in with a 9-2 record, the Falcons were greeted by another fan-filled Dome. Prior to the start of the game, Eagle River resident Rick Behrens invited the crowd to join him in singing the national anthem. The fans raised the rafters in a tribute to our nation. Portage Lakes silenced the crowd 6:47 into the opening period with the first goal. However, the host Falcons answered seconds later when Will Aide scored following the face-off on the Portage Lakes end. Assisting was Racino. The two teams then swapped goals again near the halfway point of the period to get back to even at two apiece. Hausworth cashed in on a rebound coming from a Racino shot for the home team. After one period of play, the score remained tied at 2-2. Eagle River’s penalty killing units staved off a fiveminute power play at the start off the second and then scored seconds after being full strength when Calleja tipped

in a rebound from a shot by Adamovich. The Falcons, working on a power play, gave up a shorthanded goal to once again knot it up at 3-3. Eagle River then capitalized on the power play when Litvinoff tipped in a shot from Mike Siergiej to put the crowd favorites back in front by one. Eagle River, trying to take the lead into the final break, surrendered another shorthanded goal with only 21 seconds on the clock. After two periods it remained even at 44. The final stanza saw both teams battle hard through 20 minutes of scoreless hockey. The host team netted the go-ahead goal at 18:03 of the period, when Litvinoff let go of a nasty wrist shot that found nothing but net and brought the fans to their feet. Calleja was on the assist. At 18:34, Adamovich outskated the defense and scored, knocking in his own rebound and giving Eagle River the first two-goal lead of the game with a minute and one-half remaining. At this point, the Wolverines pulled their goalie and the Falcons scored again, as Calleja recorded an open net goal at 19:56, clinching the win for the Falcons. Satran turned in another solid game, saving 31 shots for his fifth win of the season. The Falcons will travel to West Bend for a game with the Bombers Friday, Feb. 15. Start time is 8 p.m.

The Eagle River Area Chamber of Commerce & Visitors Center has announced the 17th annual Journeys Marathon will return to the scenic back roads of Vilas County Saturday, May 11. Now is the perfect time to start training and get signed up to participate in one of the four events, offering s something for everyone — both competitively and noncompetitively. Registration information is available at journeysmarathon.org. Presently, more than 100 runners are already entered in Journeys Marathon, voted one of the Top 5 “Best-kept Marathon Secrets” by Runners World magazine. Journeys Marathon and half-marathon are USATFcertified courses and the full marathon is a qualifier for the prestigious Boston Marathon. Events include a 26.2mile full marathon, a 13.1-mile half-marathon and power walk, and a 5-kilometer run/walk. There’s also a fun run for youths 12 years old and younger. All races are open to runners and walkers, according to race coordinator Kim Emerson of the chamber. “Journeys Marathon offers an inspirational, unique and breathtaking course, which starts with a woodland backdrop near Boulder Junction on rustic roads, while meandering through the Northern Highland-American Legion State Forest and past many scenic northern Wisconsin lakes along the way to the finish line in Riverview Park in Eagle River,” said Emerson. This event will kick off with an all-you-can-eat spaghetti dinner from 5 to 8 p.m. and race registration/packet pickup at Northland Pines High School Friday, May 10, from 5 to 9 p.m. On Saturday, May 11, the full marathon will start at 8 a.m., the half marathon and power walk will start at 9:15 a.m. and the 5-K at 10 a.m. The youth fun run will start at various times beginning at 10 a.m. and continue through 1 p.m. A postrace celebration will return Saturday evening, May 11. It’s a great time to share those success and race stories of the day with fellow racers, family and friends. “This event is a fun-filled evening designed for relaxation and camaraderie with a hot buffet dinner, musical entertainment, many door prizes and much more,” said Emerson. For more information about the Journeys or to register, contact the Eagle River Area Chamber of Commerce & Visitors Center at 1-(800) 359-6315 or visit the Journeys Marathon website at journeysmarathon.org. And remember, it's never too early to start training.

Eagles win 2; get GNC title ___________ BY GARY RIDDERBUSCH NEWS-REVIEW EDITOR

___________

The Northland Pines boys hockey team improved its overall record to 18-4 after picking up two wins last week, including a 4-2 victory over Hancock, Mich. and a 11-1 rout of Lakeland. The Eagles finished the Great Northern Conference (GNC) with a perfect 14-0 record. Pines, seeded third in the Sectional, will open Wisconsin Interscholastic Athletic Association tournament play this Thursday, Feb. 14, at 7 p.m. at the Eagle River Sports Arena Dome. The Eagles will face the winner of the sixth-seeded Mosinee and 11th-seeded Rhinelander game played on Tuesday. The Sectional semi-final will be Tuesday, Feb. 19. The other Regional bracket has seventh-seeded Pacelli co-op facing 10th-seeded Tomahawk, and the winner facing second-seeded Stevens Point. The top seed in the Sectional went to Wausau West, while the fourth-seeded sent to D.C. Everest. Those two teams also will receive a first-round bye. Pines tuned up for the tournament with a 4-2 nonconference win over Hancock on Senior Night last Thursday. “The whole team suited up to show support for their senior class,” said Pines coach Charlie DePuydt. “This was a great game to end our season and take us into the playoffs.” Neither team scored in the first period, but it was the type of game Pines needed prior to the tournament.” “It was a physical first period which is what we expected with an Upper Peninsula team coming to our barn,” said DePuydt. “They moved the puck very well, specifically in the neutral zone which was good for our boys to play against.” Pines scored three straight goals in the second period, with Austin Ramesh, Dylan Weber and Zach Kennedy finding the net. “We had Austin Ramesh back playing in the game. it’s nice to have his physical presence on the ice,” said DePuydt. “He ended up with two points in the game, back on the line

that got us started at the beginning of the year.” Hancock got two third-period goals to keep the game close, but Adam Kresl scored the game-clinching goal off a neutral zone faceoff with Hancock’s goalie pulled at the drop of the puck with 20 seconds remaining in the game. Jacob Stephan had 22 saves for Pines, while Jacob Givens had 28 saves for Hancock. The Eagles ended the undefeated GNC season with a 11-1 victory at Lakeland last Tuesday to clinch another GNC championship. Pines beat the T-Birds 7-0 earlier in the season. This time, Lakeland struck first as Jack Dern took the puck wide into the Eagles’ zone and cut hard towards the net. “We had the opportunity to knock him off the puck with a simple shoulder to his chest when he cut to the middle, but we went for the puck instead,” said DePuydt. “He cut across the front of the net, throwing a backhanded shot and beating our goalie over the glove.” The Eagles quickly bounced back just a minute later with Kennedy scoring. Pines ended up with two more goals in the period from Devin Sauvola and Leif Offerdahl, and headed into the locker room up 3-1. Pines continued to dominate play with five secondperiod goals. “Our forecheck was very quick to the puck. We separated the opposing player from the puck and we had the support their quickly to regain possession of the puck,” said DePuydt. “Our dumps into the zone were excellent all night. They didn’t just dump the puck to dump it, they dumped it to regain possession and were very diligent at getting the puck deep into the zone.” DePuydt said Pines shot the puck well knowing when to shoot to score and when to shoot for a rebound or pass. “For example, Alex Kornely had a nice shot from the point to the cross-post pad on the To EAGLES, Pg. 15A


VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 13, 2013

13A

SPORTS

Lady Jays rout White Lake 73-13, but lose 2 others ___________ BY ANTHONY DREW NEWS-REVIEW ASST. EDITOR

___________

Northland Pines senior Austin Ramesh signed a national letter of intent to play football for the University of Wisconsin Bad-

gers. Looking on during the signing were his parents, Shelly and Chad Ramesh of Land O’ Lakes. —STAFF PHOTO

Ramesh signs with Badgers Pines’ standout recruited as linebacker ___________ BY GARY RIDDERBUSCH NEWS-REVIEW EDITOR

___________

Northland Pines standout running back and linebacker Austin Ramesh signed a national letter of intent last Wednesday to play football for the Wisconsin Badgers. Ramesh, who was a fouryear starter for Northland Pines and rushed for 5,939 yards in his career, ranking him third all-time in Wisconsin, accepted a full scholarship from the Badgers. While other colleges were interested in Ramesh, including Michigan State and Nebraska, he said he always wanted to be a Badger and play in the Big Ten. “I was wavering a little bit in the beginning of the recruiting process,” admitted Ramesh. “It was a little overwhelming when I got all the attention from all the schools, but it was always the Badgers. You can’t say no. It’s my home state. They’ve won Big Ten titles and they won Rose Bowls. It was my dream come true today.” While Ramesh was recruited by former Badgers coach Bret Bielema and his

staff, Ramesh will be playing for new head coach Gary Anderson, who comes to Wisconsin from Utah State. Former coach and athletic director Barry Alvarez also played a role in keeping this year’s recruits in Wisconsin. “At first I was kind of shocked to here that Bielema was leaving,” said Ramesh. “But I talked to all my other buddies down there, all the recruits, and we all made a pact right away that we were going to stick together, and we all trusted coach Alvarez. He was real reassuring about it. I don’t think there was any question that after we met coach Anderson, he was the right man for the job.” Ramesh accepted a gray shirt scholarship, meaning he will have the first semester off next fall. He will work out in the weight room and be eligible for practices in the spring of 2014. “But that can always change,” said Ramesh. “I’m just going to work as hard as I can when I go down there this summer.” Ramesh, at 6-foot-2 and 225 pounds, said he was initially recruited as a linebacker, but he is going to

keep his options open. “There’s a couple of coaches down there who want me to play offense and there are a couple of coaches who want me to play defense. But I’ll just stay open and see what happens,” said Ramesh. Pines coach Eric Swanson said Ramesh was a key player both on offense and defense for the Eagles. “As much as he was an offensive presence with 60 touchdowns in four years, he was one heck of a defensive player as well,” said Swanson, noting his linebacker made 250 tackles in four seasons. Swanson said the Pines’ football program made big strides the last couple of years due to the leadership of Ramesh. “Austin is the ultimate team player in my opinion.” said Swanson. “He was a captain for the last two years, team MVP for three years and offensive player of the year the last two years.” The coach said younger players looked up to the star running back and learned from his work ethic in the classroom and on the field. “He always wanted to strive to get better. I think

Eagles lose first to Medford, but stay on top of standings ___________ BY GARY RIDDERBUSCH NEWS-REVIEW EDITOR

___________

The Northland Pines girls basketball team lost its first game of the season after 16 straight wins, falling to Medford 56-50 in a Great Northern Conference (GNC) game. “We still are tied for the lead in the GNC and just need to stay the course,” said Pines coach Larry Bergum. “There’s a lot of basketball left and the remainder of the year will be very exciting to watch.” The Eagles are 16-1 overall and 8-1 in conference play, tied with Medford for first place. Pines beat the Raiders by 14 points the first time around. “This loss was difficult, but the kids will remain very focused,” said Bergum. Friday night’s game at Medford came down to fouls with the Raiders shooting 26 free throws versus the Eagles shooting 12. The Raiders also shot the ball very well from the field. The frst period ended with Medford leading 13-7. Abby Alft had a 3-point basket in the first quarter to lead Pines. In the second quarter, Medford extended their lead to 24-16 going to the halftime break. “We had foul trouble early and it affected the rhythm of our game,” said Bergum. “Medford’s defense was very aggressive and forced some turnovers which gave them a spark.” Pines cut into the lead and at the end of the third quarter , but the Raiders maintained a 36-30 lead. “Lauren Lenz gave us some really good minutes off the bench and had five of her seven points in the third

quarter,” said Bergum. The fourth quarter saw both teams matching basket for basket, as each team scored 20 points in the final period. “Everytime we made a run, Medford would match us and make a run of their own,” said Bergum. “The girls kept battling and battling, but we just couldn’t get over the hump. The kids played with a lot of effort and heart.” The coach said Medford is a very tough place to play and the game had a play-off atmosphere. “Their pep band is very good and loud. Their student section and the remainder of their fans were extremely energetic and loud,” said Bergum. “The gym was packed and it was play-off atmosphere. The Raiders feed off of this and it really gave them a lift.” Pines had six girls score seven or more points, led by Elllie Zyhowski with 11. Ashley Mai had 10 points; Holly Darton eight; and Alft, Lenz and Carly Bohnen all had seven points. Bohnen also had seven rebounds and two assists, and Mai had six rebounds and two steals. Darton had two steals and two assists. Zyhowski also had 2 steals. “Big games matching up two good teams normally are decided by missed opportunities. There isn’t much room for error in a game like this,” said Bergum. “We did miss some opportunities on the offensive side. These things happen, especially in a pressure-packed game. The kids played hard and deserve a lot of credit for that. Their goals are set high and they will continue to work to achieve them.” The Eagles also played a nonconference game against

Niagara last Tuesday in Eagle River, winning 63-27. The first quarter was very even, with Pines leading 8-6. Mai hit a 3-pointer in the opening quarter. Pines exploded for 26 points in the second quarter to take command of the game. Zyhowski and Alft had six points each in the quarter, as Alft hit two 3-pointers. The Eagles held a 34-13 lead at the intermission. “Defensively in the second period we were much more aggressive, created some turnovers and were able to get some transition points,” said Bergum. The third quarter ended with Pines leading 42-21. Darton and Mai each scored four points in the quarter. The Eagles put up 21 more points in the fourth period. Mai led all scorers with 16 points. She also had six assists. Darton had 11 points, Alft 10, Bohnen eight, Zyhowski seven and Carly Ridderbusch six. “We had very balanced scoring for the team,” said Bgergum. Bohnen lead the team with 10 rebounds and two blocks. Darton and Zyhowski each had six steals. Alft and Lenz each had three assits. Rachel Hall had two points and a steal, and Molly Robinson had a blocked shot. Pines was scheduled to host Tomahawk in a GNC game on Tuesday of this week and will host Rhinelander on Senior Night this Friday, Feb. 15. Both games start at 7:30 p.m. Next Monday, Feb. 18, the Eagles will travel to Three Lakes for a nonconference game starting at 7:30 p.m. ___________ Even some disasters have a silver lining. A broken ski makes a fine splint.

that kind of rubbed off on some of the other players, by leading by example,” said Swanson. “His presence on the field alone, I believe, made the rest of our players better. And I thank him for that as well.” Swanson said Ramesh deserves everything he has accomplished to this point, including being named to the All-State first team at both the running back and linebacker positions by the Wisconsin Football Coaches Association as a senior. “Having a kid from Northland Pines going to Wisconsin on a full scholarship, it’s an honor for us and his family, and we are very happy for Austin,” said Swanson. “He’s a special football player. He worked hard for where he is at, being in the weight room or working on his skills. Austin is a special player.” Ramesh signed the national letter of intent to play football at Wisconsin with his parents, Chad and Shelly Ramesh of Land O’ Lakes, at his side. Also joining him in the ceremony were other family members, many of his coaches and teammates at Northland Pines High School.

The Three Lakes Lady Jays basketball team dominated White Lake 73-13 in a Northern Lakes Conference (NLC) game last Tuesday, but fell to Lakeland 47-35 Monday and lost to GoodmanPembine 48-39 Thursday. Three Lakes got off to a rapid start at home against White Lake, taking a 34-7 lead in the first half. The team never looked back, as it led all four quarters of the game and outscored White Lake 16-4 in the third and 23-2 in the fourth. “We dominated the game from start to finish against a much weaker Laker team,” said Three Lakes coach Michele Brown. “We had four players in double figures and all the girls saw a lot of playing time.” Peyton Radaj was the leading scorer for Three Lakes with 15 points. Erika Running had 10 points and 11 rebounds for the doubledouble. Maddie Sowinski had 11 points, six rebounds, three steals and three assists. Kiana Liebscher scored 11 points and had four steals. Lindsay Schoff had six points, five rebounds and four assists, while Lauren Sowinski had five points, seven assists and seven steals. “The girls played a complete game and were very unselfish in the win,” said Brown. In the nonconference make-up game against Lakeland, the Lady Jays found themselves down 24-9 at the end of the first half. However, refusing to give up, Three Lakes cut that lead to seven points by the end of the third quarter, as they outscored Lakeland 16-8. The Lady Jays couldn’t get any closer, though, as Lakeland was able to close the game.

“The girls played hard and I was proud of their effort to comeback,” said coach Brown. Schoff led Three Lakes with 14 points and 10 rebounds, earning a doubledouble. Emma Beavers scored six points and had 18 rebounds in the game. Three Lakes had another slow first half against Goodman-Pembine, as they trailed 28-15 heading into the locker room for halftime. The Lady Jays came out in the third quarter and cut the lead down to five after outscoring their NLC rivals 17-9. “We were able to get within three points in the fourth quarter, but couldn’t get the buckets to fall when we needed them most,” said Brown. “We could not contain their post player, Courtney Goyak, who pulled down 23 rebounds and had 28 points in their win. The girls played hard but we just didn’t have any way to stop Goyak.” Running got the third double-double of the week for Three Lakes with 10 points and 10 rebounds. Meanwhile, Radaj scored 10 points and Lauren Sowinski had six points and six assists. “I was proud of the girls’ efforts, but as I have been saying most of the season, we need to find a way to avoid having a bad quarter,” said the coach. “We find ourselves down too often and have to fight like crazy to try to get back in the game.” With four games left in the regular season, Brown said the team will work hard to prepare for WIAA Regional play, which is set to begin Feb. 26. Three Lakes is scheduled to travel to Phelps Thursday, Feb. 14, at 7 p.m. before hosting Northland Pines Monday, Feb. 18, at 7:30 p.m.

Wisconsin’s North Woods

North of the Tension Line

Girls Hockey Tourney Time…

Members of the Northland Pines girls hockey team include: front, Jenna Paez; second row from left, Claire Decker, Winter Nielsen, Paige Healy, Alex Dean, Sydney Moustakis; third row, manager Mariah Lax, manager Lexi Nelson, Natalie Decker, Katy Gwyn, Christine John, Lauren Czarapata, Jessica Roach, Cali

2013 Girls Hockey Assignments SECTIONAL #2 SECTIONALS REGIONALS Tues., Fri. or Sat., Thurs. or Fri., Feb. 19 Feb. 22 or 23 Feb. 14 or 15

Sanborn, Jessie Wilkins, Alexis Schilling, manager Robyn Yakel, Whitney Richards; fourth row, manager Madison Smith, head coach Patrick Schmidt, Joi Crass, Allison Sauvola, Kali Boldebuck, Mikala Rubo, Kali Ebert, Allyson Sima, Emily Saltenberger and assistant coach Kendra Graper. —Photo By Kitty Sookochoff

This ad brought to you by the following Northland Pines loyal hockey boosters:

Boone’s Building Supply Custom Landscaping/ Prime Choice Meat Market 19th Hole Sports Bar & Grill First National Bank Vilas County News-Review Nelson’s Ace Hardware WalkAbout Paddle & Apparel Friendship House Family Restaurant Ripco Credit Union Chances ’R Satellite – DirecTV/Hughes Internet


14A

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 13, 2013

VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS

SPORTS

Bluejays split pair in Northern Lakes

Eagles beat Watersmeet, but fall to tough Raiders ___________

___________

BY GARY RIDDERBUSCH

BY ANTHONY DREW

NEWS-REVIEW EDITOR

___________

The Northland Pines boys basketball team picked up its second victory of the season, topping Watersmeet, Mich., 59-44, in a nonconferene game last Tuesday. “This was a nice game to give everyone some playing time,” said Pines coach Ryan Clark. Pines outscored the Nimrods 33-10 in the second and fourth quarters, but Watersmeet outscored the Eagles 34-26 in the first and third quarters. “I was a little disappointed with our defensive performance in those two quarters,” said Clark. “We need to do a better job of staying focused during the game.” Watersmeet led 20-18 after one quarter, but Pines went ahead 35-25 at the half. The Nimrods closed the gap to 43-39 after three quarters, but the Eagles had a 16-4 advantage in the fourth. Pines shot the ball well from 3-point range, hitting eight of 18 for 44%. From the free-throw line, the Eagles were 15 of 16 for 94%. Cooper Kerner was a perfect 10-for-10 from the line. “We also did another nice job of sharing the basketball as we finished with 15 assists as a team,” said Clark. Jon Eichman finished with a game-high 20 points, knocking down five 3-pointers. Kerner chipped in 16 points, seven rebounds and six assists. Andrew McGill also reached double figures with 12 points. Shane Levan pulled down seven rebounds and had four assists. The Eagles also faced Medford in a Great Northern Conference (GNC) game on Senior Night Thursday. But the Raiders came out on top 86-39. Medford led 21-12 after one quarter and 45-16 at the half. Pines got outscored 4123 in the second half. Eichman finished with a team-high 16 points and Kerner chipped in 10. Clark said five seniors were honored, including Eichman, Alek Helgeson, Keith Krein, Levan and Brandon Wallace. “Jon Eichman is the best 3-point shooter I’ve coached. He holds the program record for made 3-pointers in a season with 50, and currently has 45 this season,” said Clark.

NEWS-REVIEW ASST. EDITOR

___________

The Three Lakes Bluejays split two Northern Lakes Conference (NLC) games last week, as the team defeated Florence 73-51 Monday and fell 59-39 to Laona-Wabeno Thursday. The Jays came out strong against Florence in the first quarter, asserting themselves on both sides of the ball and outscoring the Bobcats 20-11. However, Florence didn’t lay down, as the team rallied to come within four points of Three Lakes by the end of the second quarter. The Jays held a 34-30 halftime lead. “They had trouble with our trapping on the defensive end, and they did not have an answer for Patrick Levandoski in the paint area,” said Three Lakes coach Jack Wales. The Bluejays attacked Florence in the second half, outscoring them 26-11 in the third quarter and 13-10 in the fourth to take the win.

___________ NEWS-REVIEW ASST. EDITOR

___________

The Three Lakes Bluejays qualified three wrestlers for Sectionals, as the team saw good individual performances at the Regional level from Emerson Hegeman, Madison Draeger and Dalton Tietsort. Hegeman also hit a milestone at the event, earning his 100th career win with a season record of 39-4. “This is a huge feat for any wrestler and Emerson is very deserving of this title,” said Three Lakes coach Jed Lechleitner. Draeger, wrestling at 113 pounds, dominated his Regional bracket and took first place. “His championship match was against Will Micke of Elcho,” said Lechleitner. “Madison pinned Will in the second period and was winning the match 17-0 at the time.” Tietsort took second place wrestling at 132 pounds to earn his fourth trip to the Sectionals. He narrowly lost his first match against Austin Reihl of Shiocton last year when Reihl pulled ahead by one point in the final seven seconds. “Dalton has been waiting all year to wrestle Austin again, so it will be a very exciting first match,” said Lechleitner. Hegeman pinned everyone

“We lost our composure when he went out and we never recovered,” said Wales. “Although we lost the game, we showed once again that if we play calm and limit our turnovers, we can play with the best team in our division.” The coach added that Riley Liebscher played his best defensive game of the year. Kyle Queen led the Jays for scoring with eight points and seven boards. Three Lakes was scheduled to travel to White Lake for an NLC game Tuesday, Feb. 12, at 7:30 p.m. The Jays will travel to Phelps Thursday, Feb. 14, for a conference game at 5:30 p.m. before hosting Goodman-Pembine in another NLC match Friday, Feb. 15, at 7:30 p.m. The No. 3-seeded Bluejays will kick off WIAA Regional tournament play next Tuesday, Feb. 19, with a home game against the sixth-seeded Florence beginning at 7 p.m.

BOWLING LADIES NIGHT OUT Northland Pines senior Jon Eichman took a fade-away jump shot against Medford Thursday. —STAFF PHOTO

For his career, Eichman has 99 made 3-pointers, three away from breaking the record for most 3-pointers made in a career. “Alek Helgeson is the glue that holds our team together. He puts the team above all else,” said Clark. “He never takes a play off in practice, is extremely coachable and is always prepared for an opportunity (scored 17 points in his first career start). “Keith Krein’s attitude is what I want all players in my program to embody. He displays no sense of entitlement, never complains and eagerly does anything needed to help the team. Keith made his first career varsity start against Medford, and no one deserved it more. “Shane Levan plays with relentless energy for all 32 minutes. I don’t think there is another player on the court that plays as hard as Shane,” said Clark. Currently, Levan holds the program record for charges taken in a season with 11. This season, he has team highs in assists (55), floor burns (50) and defen-

sive deflections (41). Wallace is the team’s cocaptain, but saw limited action this year. He had surgery to repair a torn anterior cruciate ligament in early August. “His goal was to rehab as hard as possible to make it back before the basketball season ended,” said Clark. “On Feb. 4, Brandon was cleared to resume playing, exactly six months from reconstructive surgery. I can’t say it enough how impressed I am by the way he attacked this adversity.” The Eagles were scheduled to play at Tomahawk on Tuesday of this week and will play at Kingsford, Mich., this Thursday, Feb. 14, in a nonconference game. Pines will then travel to Rhinelander this Friday, Feb. 15, for the final GNC game of the season. Next Tuesday, Feb. 19, 11th-seeded Northland Pines will travel to sixth Clintonville for the first game of the WIAA Division 3 Regional playoffs starting at 7 p.m. The winner will play third-seeded Appleton Xavier Friday, Feb. 22.

Three Jays wrestlers advance to WIAA Sectional tournament BY ANTHONY DREW

“This was a big win for us at home,” said Wales. “We had just played the Bobcats at their place and had a tough six-point win. We knew we could play better against them.” Levandoski led the Jays for scoring with 27 points. Brent LaDuke added 17 points and Jordan Wales scored eight. “We also needed to send a message to Florence that they will have a hard time trying to beat us on our home court when the playoffs begin,” said the coach. The game against the Rebels was close, as the Jays battled through three deadeven quarters. The score was 33-33 heading into the final quarter. “We missed way too many open layups and shot one for 12 from the arch, giving us 27% shooting for the game,” said Wales. “We could’ve put them away and we didn’t.” The game was still tied with four minutes remaining, when Levandoski fouled out of the game.

he wrestled to win the heavyweight class. “Emerson’s first match is against Nick Emery of Amherst,” said the coach. “Emerson is really peaking at the right time and is pre-

pared for success at Sectionals.” The WIAA Sectional competition is slated to start at 10 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 16, at Shawano Community High School.

Eagle Lanes Results of 2/6/13 Team results: Harry’s Market 0, Darrell’s Dummies 7; Boones Building Supply 3, Wild Eagle Corner Store 4; Lanny’s Fireside 5, bye. High games: Stacy Schnack and Phyllis Kranz 201, Amy Olejniczak 194, Joey Tess 193. High series: Stacy Schnack 520, Susie Erickson 516, Mary Simac 516, Joyce Leander 494. High team: Boones Building Supply 1015. High series: Darrell’s Dummies 2844. STANDINGS W L Wild Eagle Corner Store ....104 36 Lanny’s Fireside ....................92 48 Darrell’s Dummies ................78 62 Harry’s Market ......................74 66 Boones Building Supply .......62 77

THURSDAY SPORTSMEN Eagle Lanes Results of 3/22/12 Team results: Timmy’s Holiday Corner 4, Daniel’s Distinctive Design 3; Wild Eagle Cornerstore 4, BBT’s 3; Sweetwater Spirits & Resort 7, Gremban’s 0; Boone’s Building Supply 5, Miller Sportsmen 2; XXX-OUTS 5, Harry’s Market 2; Leinenkugel’s 5, Club DeNoyer 2. High team game: Boone’s Building Supply 988. High team series: Boone’s Building Supply 2774. High games: Greg Maney 254, Glenn Lasowski 252, Jerry Cleary 246. High series: Greg Maney 643, Al Mayack 601, Glenn Lasowski 595. STANDINGS W XXX-OUTS.................................30 Wild Eagle Cornerstore.............29 Leinenkugel’s.............................25 Harry’s Market ..........................24 Club DeNoyer ............................23 Sweetwater Spirits & Resort ....20 Timmy’s Holiday Corner ...........20 BBT’s ..........................................19 Boone’s Building Supply ...........18 Gremban’s ..................................17 Daniel’s Distinctive Desgin.......16 Miller Sportsmen.......................11

SATURDAY YOUTH LEAGUE Eagle Lanes Results of 2/2/13 Team results: Pocket Rockers 4, Spot On 0; Picture Perfect 3, bye. High team game: Spot On 354. High team series: Picture Perfect

HOCKEY SCHEDULES 2012-’13 NORTHLAND PINES HIGH SCHOOL – BOYS Date Tues., Nov. 27 Sat., Dec. 1 Tues., Dec. 4 Thurs., Dec. 6 Tues., Dec. 11 Tues., Dec. 18 Thurs., Dec. 20 Thurs., Dec. 27 Fri., Dec. 28 Sat., Dec. 29 Thurs., Jan. 3 Sat., Jan. 5 Tues., Jan. 15 Thurs., Jan. 17 Tues., Jan. 22 Fri., Jan. 25

Sat., Jan. 26

Tues., Jan. 29 Thurs., Jan. 31 Sat., Feb. 2 Tues., Feb. 5 Thurs., Feb. 7 Tues., Feb. 12

Opponent at D.C. Everest at Stevens Point at Mosinee Tomahawk at Rhinelander Antigo at Medford Area at Rochester Tourney at Rochester Tourney Tourney at Rochester Lakeland at Waupaca at Tomahawk Rhinelander at Wausau West Tourney vs. Mosinee, Hayward, Univ. School of Milw. Tourney vs. Mosinee, Hayward, Univ. School of Milw. at Antigo Medford Area Wausau East at Lakeland Hancock WIAA Regionals

Time 7:00 PM 2:00 PM 7:00 PM 7:00 PM 7:00 PM 7:00 PM 7:00 PM TBD TBD TBD 7:00 PM 7:00 PM 7:00 PM 7:00 PM 7:00 PM

TBD

TBD 7:00 PM 7:00 PM 3:00 PM 7:00 PM 7:00 PM TBA

First National Bank Eagle River, Three Lakes, St. Germain, Phelps

Nelson’s Ace Hardware 715-479-4496

Ripco Credit Union 715-479-4491

Mid-Wisconsin Bank Eagle River

NORTHLAND PINES HIGH SCHOOL – GIRLS Date

Opponent

Fri., Nov. 16 Sat., Nov. 17 Mon., Nov. 26 Fri., Nov. 30 Mon., Dec. 3 Fri., Dec. 7 Fri., Dec. 14 Sat., Dec. 15 Sat., Dec. 22 Thurs., Dec. 27 Fri., Dec. 28 Sat., Dec. 29 Fri., Jan. 4 Mon., Jan. 7 Fri., Jan. 11 Mon., Jan. 14 Fri., Jan. 18 Mon., Jan. 21 Fri., Jan. 25

Tourney at Fond du Lac TBD Tourney at Fond du Lac TBD at Marshfield 7:00 PM at Eau Claire North TBD Medford Area 7:00 PM Lakeland 5:00 PM at Medford 7:00 PM at Sun Prairie 2:00 PM at Waupaca 2:00 PM Tourney at Monona Grove TBD Tourney at Monona Grove TBD Tourney at Monona Grove TBD at Tomahawk 7:00 PM Point/Rapids 5:30 PM Antigo/Rhinelander 7:00 PM Marshfield 7:00 PM Waupaca 7:00 PM at Lakeland 7:00 PM Tourney vs. Hayward, Arrowhead, Univ. School of Milw. 4:45 PM Tourney vs. Hayward, Arrowhead, Univ. School of Milw. Noon Tomahawk 7:00 PM at Point/Rapids 7:00 PM vs. Antigo/Rhinelander at Rhinelander Ice Arena 7:00 PM

Sat., Jan. 26

Fri., Feb. 1 Mon., Feb. 4 Fri., Feb. 8

Time

Custom Landscaping/ Prime Choice Meat Market 715-479-6762 • 715-479-4456

Terra Nova Integrated Systems Formerly Ogren Electronics 715-479-9825

Opponent Madison Blues Fond du Lac Bears West Bend Bombers at Fox Cities Ice Dogs at Mosinee Papermakers DePere Deacons Brookfield Battalion Vernon Hills Capitals Mosinee Papermakers at Fond du Lac Bears at Vernon Hills Capitals Calumet Wolverines Portage Lake Pioneers at West Bend Bombers at Brookfield Battalion Mosinee Papermakers Exhibition Game Sat., Feb. 23 at Mosinee Papermakers Exhibition Game Fri., March 1 at Portage Lake Pioneers Sat., March 2 at Calumet Wolverines Sat., March 9 Fox Cities Ice Dogs Fri., March 15 at Madison Blues Sat., March 16 at DePere Deacons

Results of 2/9/13 Team results: Spot On 4, Picture Perfect 0; Pocket Rockers 1, bye. High team game: Picture Perfect

398. High team series: Spot On 1212. High games, girls: Morgan Gurka 136. High series, girls: Morgan Gurka 369. High games, boys: Dylan Haagen 171, Joseph Pobjoy 168, Judd Klotz 153. High series, boys: Joseph Pobjoy 440, Dylan Haagen 433, Judd Klotz 412. STANDINGS W Spot On .........................................34 Picture Perfect..............................31 Pocket Rockers .............................25

HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS CALENDAR NORTHLAND PINES EAGLES Girls Varsity Basketball

Boys Varsity Basketball Thurs., Nov. 15 Tues., Nov. 27 Fri., Nov. 30 Mon., Dec. 3 Fri., Dec. 7 Tues., Dec. 11 Fri., Dec. 14 Tues., Dec. 18 Fri., Dec. 21 Fri., Dec. 28 Sat., Dec. 29 Fri., Jan. 4 Tues., Jan. 8 Fri., Jan. 11 Fri., Jan. 18 Tues., Jan. 22 Fri., Jan. 25 Tues., Jan. 29 Tues., Feb. 5 Thurs., Feb. 7 Tues., Feb. 12 Fri., Feb. 15 Tues., Feb. 19

Ashland Crandon Mosinee at Houghton at Lakeland Three Lakes Antigo Wittenberg-Birnamwood at Hayward Niagara Hurley at Medford Area Tomahawk Rhinelander at Mosinee at Kingsford Lakeland at Antigo at Watersmeet Medford Area at Tomahawk at Rhinelander WIAA Regionals

7:00 PM 7:30 PM 7:30 PM 6:20 PM 7:30 PM 7:30 PM 7:30 PM 7:30 PM 7:30 PM 6:30 PM 7:30 PM 7:30 PM 7:30 PM 7:30 PM 7:30 PM 7:00 PM 7:30 PM 7:30 PM 6:30 PM 7:30 PM 7:30 PM 7:30 PM TBA

Tues., Nov. 20 Mon., Nov. 26 Tues., Dec. 4 Fri., Dec. 7 Tues., Dec. 11 Fri., Dec. 14 Thurs., Dec. 20 Fri., Dec. 28 Fri., Jan. 4 Tues., Jan. 8 Fri., Jan. 11 Fri., Jan. 18 Mon., Jan. 21 Fri., Jan. 25 Tues., Jan. 29 Fri., Feb. 1 Tues., Feb. 5 Fri., Feb. 8 Tues., Feb. 12 Fri., Feb. 15 Mon., Feb. 18 Thurs., Feb. 21 Tues., Feb. 26

Chequamegon at Wabeno at Hurley Lakeland at Watersmeet at Antigo Ontonagon, Mich. Calumet Medford Area at Tomahawk at Rhinelander Mosinee at Ashland at Lakeland Antigo at Prentice Niagara at Medford Area Tomahawk Rhinelander at Three Lakes at Mosinee WIAA Regionals

7:30 PM 7:45 PM 7:20 PM 7:30 PM 6:30 PM 7:30 PM 6:30 PM 6:30 PM 7:30 PM 7:30 PM 7:30 PM 7:30 PM 7:15 PM 7:30 PM 7:30 PM 7:30 PM 7:30 PM 7:30 PM 7:30 PM 7:30 PM 7:30 PM 7:30 PM TBA

PHELPS KNIGHTS Girls Varsity Basketball

Boys Varsity Basketball Thurs., Nov. 15 Fri., Dec. 7 Tues., Dec. 11 Fri., Dec. 14 Mon., Dec. 17 Fri., Dec. 21 Thurs., Dec. 27 Fri., Dec. 28 Fri., Jan. 4 Tues., Jan. 8 Thurs., Jan. 10 Mon., Jan. 14 Sat., Jan. 19 Fri., Jan. 25 Tues., Jan. 29 Thurs., Feb. 1 Tues., Feb. 5 Thurs., Feb. 7 Fri., Feb. 8 Mon., Feb. 11 Tues., Feb. 12 Thurs., Feb. 14 Tues., Feb. 19

at Winter Florence at Laona Crandon Watersmeet Gresham Tournament Tournament at White Lake Elcho Goodman/Pembine at Three Lakes at Washington Island at Florence Laona at Crandon at Elcho White Lake at Watersmeet at Goodman/Pembine Winter Three Lakes Regionals

6:30 PM 5:30 PM 5:30 PM 5:30 PM 7:00 PM 7:30 PM TBD TBD 5:30 PM 5:30 PM 5:30 PM 5:30 PM 2:00 PM 5:30 PM 5:30 PM 5:30 PM 5:30 PM 5:30 PM 6:00 PM 5:30 PM 6:00 PM 5:30 PM TBA

Fri., Nov. 30 Tues., Dec. 4 Fri., Dec. 7 Tues., Dec. 11 Fri., Dec. 14 Mon., Dec. 17 Fri., Dec. 21 Thurs., Dec. 27 Fri., Dec. 28 Fri., Jan. 4 Tues., Jan. 8 Thurs., Jan. 10 Mon., Jan. 14 Fri., Jan. 18 Sat., Jan. 19 Fri., Jan. 25 Tues., Jan. 29 Fri., Feb. 1 Tues., Feb. 5 Thurs., Feb. 7 Mon., Feb. 11 Thurs., Feb. 14 Tues., Feb. 26

at Lakeland Laona Florence at Wabeno Crandon Watersmeet Gresham Tournament Tournament at White Lake Elcho Goodman/Pembine at Three Lakes at Laona Washington Island at Florence Wabeno at Crandon at Elcho White Lake at Goodman/Pembine Three Lakes Regionals

7:00 pM 7:30 PM 7:30 PM 7:30 PM 7:30 PM 5:30 PM 5:30 PM TBD TBD 7:30 PM 7:30 PM 7:30 PM 7:30 PM 7:30 PM Noon 7:30 PM 7:30 PM 7:30 PM 7:30 PM 7:30 PM 7:30 PM 7:30 PM 7:00 PM

THREE LAKES BLUEJAYS Girls Varsity Basketball

Boys Varsity Basketball

EAGLE RIVER FALCONS Date Sat., Nov. 24 Fri., Dec. 7 Sat., Dec. 8 Fri., Dec. 14 Sat., Dec. 15 Fri., Dec. 21 Sat., Dec. 22 Sat., Jan. 12 Sat., Jan. 19 Fri., Jan. 25 Sat., Jan. 26 Fri., Feb. 8 Sat., Feb. 9 Fri., Feb. 15 Sat., Feb. 16 Fri., Feb. 22

1044. High games, girls: Morgan Gurka 133. High series, girls: Morgan Gurka 376. High games, boys: Joseph Pobjoy 169, Sam Smith 158, Dylan Haagen 151. High series, boys: Jospeh Pobjoy 422, Dylan Haagen 410, Judd Klotz 375.

Time 8:00 PM 8:00 PM 8:00 PM 7:30 PM 8:00 PM 8:00 PM 8:00 PM 8:00 PM 8:00 PM 8:00 PM 8:00 PM 8:00 PM 8:00 PM 8:00 PM 8:00 PM

Thurs., Nov. 15 Tues., Nov. 20 Mon., Nov. 26 Tues., Dec. 4 Tues., Dec. 11 Thurs., Dec. 13 Thurs., Dec. 20 Fri., Dec. 21 Thurs., Dec. 27 Fri., Dec. 28 Tues., Jan. 8 Fri., Jan. 11 Mon., Jan. 14 Tues., Jan.15 Mon., Jan. 21 Thurs., Jan. 24 Mon., Jan. 28 Thurs., Jan. 31 Mon., Feb. 4 Tues., Feb. 12 Thurs., Feb. 14 Fri., Feb. 15 Tues., Feb. 19

Tomahawk Antigo Lincoln Hills at Laona-Wabeno at Northland Pines Elcho at Florence Lakeland Tournament at Lakeland Tournament at Lakeland White Lake at Goodman/Pembine Phelps Crandon Laona-Wabeno at Prentice at Crandon at Elcho Florence at White Lake at Phelps Goodman/Pembine Regionals

Sat., Dec. 1 Sat., Dec. 8 Sat., Dec. 15 Thurs., Dec. 20 Fri., Dec. 28 Sat., Dec. 29 Sat., Jan. 5 Tues., Jan. 8

at Antigo at Wabeno at Tomahawk at Rhinelander at Oshkosh Lourdes at Oshkosh Lourdes at Wittenberg-Birnamwood Wabeno

8:00 PM 8:00 PM 6:30 PM 6:30 PM 8:00 PM 8:00 PM 7:30 PM

Eliason Realty of the North

7:30 PM 7:30 PM 7:30 PM 7:30 PM 7:30 PM 7:30 PM 7:30 PM 7:30 PM 6:00 PM 6:00 PM 7:30 PM 7:30 PM 5:30 PM 7:30 PM 7:30 PM 7:30 PM 7:30 PM 7:30 PM 7:30 PM 7:30 PM 5:30 PM 7:30 PM TBD

Tues., Nov. 20 Tues., Nov. 27 Thurs., Nov. 29 Tues., Dec. 4 Thurs., Dec. 6 Tues., Dec. 11 Fri., Dec. 14 Fri., Dec. 21 Thurs., Jan. 3 Fri., Jan. 4 Thurs., Jan. 10 Mon., Jan. 14 Fri., Jan. 18 Tues., Jan. 22 Thurs., Jan. 24 Tues., Jan. 29 Fri., Feb. 1 Tues., Feb. 5 Thurs., Feb. 7 Mon., Feb. 11 Thurs., Feb. 14 Mon., Feb. 18 Tues., Feb. 26

at Crivitz at Prentice Wabeno at Tomahawk at Elcho Florence at Laona at White Lake Prentice Goodman/Pembine at Crandon Phelps at Laona Lakeland Elcho at Florence Laona White Lake at Goodman/Pembine Crandon at Phelps Northland Pines Regionals

7:30 PM 7:30 PM 7:30 PM 7:30 PM 7:30 PM 7:30 PM 7:30 PM 7:30 PM 7:30 PM 7:30 PM 7:30 PM 7:30 PM 7:30 PM 7:30 PM 7:30 PM 7:30 PM 7:30 PM 7:30 PM 7:30 PM 7:30 PM 7:30 PM 7:30 PM TBA

Three Lakes Wrestling TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD

Thurs., Jan. 10 Sat., Jan. 12 Thurs., Jan. 17 Sat., Jan. 19 Thurs., Jan. 24 Tues., Jan. 29 Fri., Feb. 1 Sat., Feb. 9

Florence at Ladysmith at Elcho at Wausau East at Crandon at Lakeland at Crandon Regionals at Crandon

TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD

Eliason Realty of the North

First National Bank

Eagle River • St. Germain

Eagle River, Three Lakes, Phelps, St. Germain

715-479-6631

Ripco Credit Union

Terra Nova Integrated Systems

Vilas County News-Review

Eagle River

Formerly Ogren Electronics

St. Germain Sport Marine

Vilas County News-Review

St. Germain

Eagle River

Nelson’s Ace Hardware

Pineview Outdoor Taxidermy

Eagle River

Three Lakes

Eagle River, St. Germain

WalkAbout Paddle & Apparel 715-479-4421

Lehner-Stephan Jewelers 715-479-4520


VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 13, 2013

YOUTH HOCKEY

SPORTS

SQUIRT A’s Results of 2/9/13 SCORE BY PERIODS Eagle River — 1-1-2 — 4 Tomahawk — 0-0-0 — 0 INDIVIDUAL SCORING First period: Riley McGee Second period: Jesse Ebert (Alex Sternhagen) Third period: Michael Paul, Riley McGee Saves: 6 (Brady Snedden) Shots on goal: 31 SCORE BY PERIODS Eagle River — 7-3-0 — 10 Tomahawk — 1-1-0 — 2 INDIVIDUAL SCORING First period: Brady Snedden (Alex Sternhagen), Riley McGee (Trevor Romatoski), Michael Paul, Michael Paul (Zach Mailette, Leo Horant), Riley McGee (Leo Horant), Riley McGee (Jesse Ebert), Alex Sternhagen (Brady Snedden) Second period: Max Brown (Jesse Ebert), Zach Mailette, Jesse Ebert (Trevor Romatoski, Max Brown) Saves: 4 (Jake Martin) Shots on goal: 33

Ryan Cirese of Phelps drove the ball down the sideline while fending off a White Lake player.

Cirese, who scored 35 points, broke 1,000 career points last week. —STAFF PHOTO

Knights defeat White Lake 56-45 in NLC basketball ___________ BY ANTHONY DREW NEWS-REVIEW ASST. EDITOR

___________

Despite struggling with foul trouble late in the game, the Phelps High School boys basketball team defeated White Lake 56-45 last Thursday. The Knights also lost 4228 to Elcho Tuesday and 6755 to Watersmeet, Mich., Friday. Phelps coach Kregg Mueller said the Northern Lakes Conference (NLC) game against White Lake was a good team win, as the Knights saw two players come off the bench to help them through late foul trouble. “We had a number of kids step up and make plays,” he said. “Ryan had the big game offensively, but it was a really good team win.” Ryan Cirese scored 35 points in the game, leading the Knights to victory. Nicholas Cirese added eight points, while Robby Doppke and Robert Rosner contributed four apiece. Phelps did a good job controlling the tempo of the NLC game against Elcho. However, a big first quarter for the Hornets saw the Knights outscored 17-5. “Elcho is tough to beat because they don’t turn the basketball over and don’t make a lot of mistakes,” said Mueller. “We didn’t shoot well

and they capitalized off of that.” Although Phelps held their own in the following quarters, they couldn’t put enough together offensively to close the gap. Ryan Cirese scored 24 points in the game for the Knights. Watersmeet shot the ball well in Phelps’ third game last week. They took a 29-19 halftime lead. Phelps came back to outscore Watersmeet 16-14 in the third quarter, but the Nimrods held it together in the fourth to take the win. “Watersmeet had a number of kids make a lot of big shots, and whenever we got the game back to within reach around six to eight points in the second half, they responded with a huge shot,” said Mueller. Ryan Cirese continued his hot scoring streak in the game with 37 points, breaking his 1,000th career point in the process. “It’s pretty impressive what he’s been able to do offensively the past two weeks, and his commitment to our program and getting better over the past four years has shown a lot this year,” said Mueller. “Scoring 1,000 points as a high school player is a great accomplishment.” Nicholas Cirese had eight

STANDINGS Results of 2/4/13 Team results: Uncle Kent’s II 6, Uncle Kent’s I 3; Oneida Village I 6, Oneida Village II 3; Club DeNoyer 6, Tiny Tap 3; Pine Isle 5, Mud Creek 4. Nine-ball run: Tom Meunch (3). Nine-ball breaks: Paula Stebbeds (1). STANDINGS W L Pine Isle ...............................87 30 Mud Creek ...........................71 46 Club DeNoyer ......................60 57 Uncle Kent’s I......................55 62 Oneida Village I ..................54 63 Uncle Kent’s II ....................49 68 Oneida Village II .................48 69 Tiny Tap...............................44 73

Top women shooters: Vicki Stuckart 3/6, Donna Mather 3/8, Rosie Obukowicz and Leigh Travis 3/9, Jan Lederhaus 2/6, Bev Ginnow 2/10, Betty Koehler 1/10, Barb Moak 1/8. Top men shooters: Larry Weinbrod 5/10, Paul Noel 5/11, Joe Petreikis and Paul Kaiser 4/7, Walt Bredeson 3/7, Mark Theisen 3/9, Ken Moak 2/8, Pete Wallner 2/9. STANDINGS W L Wildcats ............................31 17 Triple Diamonds ...........29.5 18.5 Nomads .............................28 20 Legion I..........................25.5 22.5 Oneida Village II ..............23 25 Legion A............................23 25 Village People ...................18 30 Oneida Village I ...............14 34

EAGLE RIVER DARTBALL

THREE LAKES POOL LEAGUE

NORTHWOODS NINE-BALL LEAGUE

Results of 2/6/13 Team results: Bucktale I bye, Club DeNoyer 1; Bucktale II 2, Bear’s Den 1, Eagle River Inn 2; BBT’s 1, Club 45 2. Top women shooters: Cyd Brunswick 4/12, Crystal Loppnow 4/15, Jane Klug 3/15, Greta Jackman 3/19, Audrey Flaherty 1/13, Shelly Mutka 1/21. Top men shooters: Butch Mattek 6/17, Len Johnson 5/12, Dan Newitt 4/12, John Mutka 4/21, Gary Brainard 3/9, Ron Landt, Wally Prien, Billy Wilkinson and Bob Michaels 3/16. Home runs: Lauren Riedel, Gail Newitt, Gary Brainard, Crystal Loppnow, Rich Groboski. STANDINGS W L Bucktale I ...........................24 12 Bucktale II..........................25 14 Club 45 ...............................22 17 Eagle River Inn..................22 17 Club DeNoyer.....................19 20 Bear’s Den ..........................13 23 BBT’s.....................................7 29

THREE LAKES DARTBALL Results of 2/6/13 Team results: Nomads 3, Oneida Village I 0, Village People 2, Oneida Village II 1; Triple Diamonds 2, Legion I 1; Legion A 2, Wildcats 1.

Results of 2/6/13 Team results: Jake’s Bar & Grill II 12, Legion Ravens 3; Pine Lake Pub 12, Mai Tiki Bar & Grill 3; Oneida Village 10, Jake’s Bar & Grill III 5; Briggs Bar 10, Legion Stars 5; Irish Waters II 9, Pine Isle II 6; Irish Waters I 8, Pine Isle I 7; Black Forest 8, Jake’s Bar & Grill IV 7; Jake’s Bar & Grill I 8, Bonnie’s Lakeside 7. Eight-ball runs: Steve Lawonn. Eight-ball breaks: John Kuglitsch STANDINGS W L Jake’s Bar & Grill II ......163 92 Oneida Village ................159 96 Briggs Bar ......................157 98 Bonnie’s Lakeside ..........153 102 Pine Lake Pub................141 114 Legion Stars ...................135 120 Jake’s Bar & Grill IV .....131 124 Irish Waters II................128 127 Black Forest....................124 131 Legion Ravens ................122 133 Irish Waters I .................116 139 Jake’s Bar & Grill III.....115 140 Jake’s Bar & Grill I........112 143 Pine Isle I .......................107 148 Mai Tiki Bar & Grill ........92 163 Pine Isle II........................85 170

®

American Red Cross®

15A

points in the game and Robby Doppke contributed four. The Knights were set to host Winter Tuesday, Feb. 12, at 6 p.m. They will host Three Lakes Thursday, Feb. 14, at 5:30 p.m. Phelps will start WIAA Regional play next Tuesday, Feb. 19, as the seventh-seeded Knights will travel to take on No. 2-seeded Niagara at 7 p.m.

Results of 2/10/13 SCORE BY PERIODS Eagle River — 3-2-2 — 7 Portage Lakes — 1-0-3 — 4 INDIVIDUAL SCORING First period: Zach Mailette (Brady Snedden, Cooper Cox), Michael Paul (Brady Snedden), Riley McGee (Jake Martin) Second period: Brady Snedden (Sam Garske), Brady Snedden Third period: Riley McGee (Cooper Cox, Max Brown), Michael Paul Saves: 9 (Jesse Ebert) Shots on goal: 16 SCORE BY PERIODS Eagle River — 4-2-1 — 7 Portage Lakes — 2-0-2 — 4 INDIVIDUAL SCORING First period: Jake Martin, Brady Snedden, Riley McGee, Brady Snedden (Sam Garske) Second period: Riley McGee, Jake Martin Third period: Zach Mailette Saves: 12 (Jesse Ebert) Shots on goal: 23

SQUIRT B’s Results of 2/10/13 SCORE BY PERIODS Eagle River — 2-0-1 — 3 Hayward — 1-0-2 — 3 INDIVIDUAL SCORING

First period: Cooper Fink, Emma Sima (Matthew Szafranski) Third period: Cooper Fink (Brett Nesbitt) Saves: 11 (Mitchell McCanless) Shots on goal: 23 SCORE BY PERIODS Eagle River — 2-1-1 — 4 Hayward — 0-0-1 — 1 INDIVIDUAL SCORING First period: Matthew Szafranski (Cooper Fink), J.J. Albee Second period: J.J. Albee (Emma Sima) Third period: J.J. Albee (Brett Nesbitt, Allie Kieffer) Saves: 17 (Mitchell McCanless) Shots on goal: 25

PEE WEE B’s Results of 2/10/13 SCORE BY PERIODS Eagle River — 1-2-0 — 3 Merrill A — 3-3-1 — 7 INDIVIDUAL SCORING First period: Shay Garske (David Sauvola) Second period: Eric Saltenberger (Kevin John, Adam Sima), Shay Garske Saves: 16 (Michael John) Shots on goal: 20 SCORE BY PERIODS Eagle River — 1-1-2 — 4 Merrill A — 0-2-2 — 4 INDIVIDUAL SCORING First period: Kevin John (Syrus McCormick, Eric Saltenberger) Second period: Eric Saltenberger Third period: Shay Garske, Syrus McCormick Saves: 24 (Michael John) Shots on goal: 24

BANTAM A’s Results of 2/9/13 SCORE BY PERIODS Eagle River — 2-2-5 — 9

Eagles: goalie, giving up the rebound to Sauvola on the backside behind the Lakeland players,” said DePuydt. Stephan made nine saves in the game for Pines, while Lakeland goalie Jacob Baxter

Tomahawk — 0-1-2 — 3 INDIVIDUAL SCORING First period: Ryon Ritzer (T.J. Ebert), T.J. Ebert (Cole Sanborn) Second period: Amanda Sergent (Ryon Ritzer, Cody Jantzen), T.J. Burke (Cody Jantzen) Third period: Andrew Neis (Conor Riley), Joe Mailette, Ryon Ritzer (Cody Jantzen), Conor Riley (Ryon Ritzer), T.J. Ebert Saves: 29 (Wesley Pearce) Shots on goal: 47 SCORE BY PERIODS Eagle River — 4-2-2 — 8 Tomahawk — 0-1-1 — 2 INDIVIDUAL SCORING First period: Ryon Ritzer (T.J. Ebert, Conor Riley), Joe Mailette (Cody Jantzen, Ryon Ritzer), T.J. Ebert (Sallie Spencer, Ryon Ritzer), T.J. Ebert (Ryon Ritzer) Second period: Cody Jantzen (T.J. Burke), Andrew Neis (Sallie Spencer) Third period: Jacob Czarapata (Cody Jantzen), Bobby Schilling Saves: 18 (Ethan Polich) Shots on goal: 34 Results of 2/10/13 SCORE BY PERIODS Eagle River — 1-1-0 — 2 Antigo — 1-1-0 — 2 INDIVIDUAL SCORING First period: T.J. Ebert (Carter Staege, Andrew Neis) Second period: T.J. Ebert Saves: 20 (Wesley Pearce) Shots on goal: 23 SCORE BY PERIODS Eagle River — 0-1-1 — 2 Antigo — 0-1-0 — 1 INDIVIDUAL SCORING Second period: Carter Staege (T.J. Ebert) Third period: Joe Mailette (Cole Sanborn, Carter Staege) Saves: 17 (Ethan Polich) Shots on goal: 17

FROM PAGE 12A made 31 saves. Following Pines in the GNC standings were Waupaca, Antigo and Mosinee all at 10-4, Lakeland at 5-8, Tomahawk at 4-10, Rhinelander at 1-12, and Medford at 1-13.

Boys Basketball T urney Time NORTHLAND PINES EAGLES

REGIONALS Tuesday, Feb. 19; Friday, Feb. 22; Saturday, Feb. 23 SECTIONALS Thursday, Feb. 28; Saturday, March 2 All games played at 7 p.m. unless otherwise indicated.

DIVISION 3 • SECTIONA L #2

Members of the Northland Pines boys basketball team include, front row from left, Jason Schwenn, Kevin Gauthier, Taylor Gensler, Shane Levan, Zach Kluever, A.J. Skarbek, Keith Krein; back row, Will Janklow, Alek Helgeson, Kody Godleske, Jon Eichman, Cooper Kerner and Andrew McGill. Missing from photo is Brandon Wallace. —Photo By T.J. Gaffney Photography

THREE LAKES BLUEJAYS

Members of the Three Lakes boys basketball team include, front row from left, Brent LaDuke, Hunter Mathison, Riley Liebscher and Skyler Walkowski; back row, Kirk Campbell, Quinn Luepke, Jeffery Queen, Patrick Levandoski, Andrew Vought, Jordan Wales, Derek Thorn and Gavin Maney. —Staff Photo By ANTHONY DREW

PHELPS KNIGHTS

DIVISION 5 • SECTIONA L #2

GOOD LUCK FROM THE FOLLOWING BASKETBALL BACKERS! Boone’s Building Supply Friendship House Family Restaurant 19th Hole Sports Bar & Grill Nelson’s Ace Hardware First National Bank Eagle River, Phelps, St. Germain, Three Lakes

North Twin Builders The Choo Choo Store Three Lakes Pharmacy The Phelps High School boys basketball team includes, front row from left, manager Nolan Rosner, Nathan Cirese, Cody Galek, Nicholas Cirese and Manager Taylor Huza; back row, manager Sawyer Rosner, coach Kregg Mueller, Robert Doppke, Matthew Oliver, Robert Rosner, Ryan Cirese and assistant coach Todd Riha. —Photo By Sharon Gifford

Glik’s Ripco Credit Union Vilas County News-Review


16A

VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS

MEMBER

EDITORIAL

VILAS COUNTY

NEWS-REVIEW

Eagle River Vindicator Established 1886 Eagle River Review 1890 ~ Vilas County News 1892 Publisher Editor Asst. Editor Lifestyle Editor Production Manager Asst. Production Manager Photo Technician Production Technicians

Circulation Manager Accounting Manager Advertising Consultants

KURT KRUEGER GARY RIDDERBUSCH ANTHONY DREW KATHLYN OGDEN JEAN DREW ELIZABETH BLEICHER SHARINA ADAMS CARLY RATLIFF CHARLOTTE HENNING LAURI GERLACH ELIZABETH SCHMIDT TERRY POSTO MARY JO ADAMOVICH MARCIA HEYER TAMMY KLEIN DENISE RIMMER

FIRST PLACE NATIONALLY COMMUNITY SERVICE

Published weekly by Eagle River Publications, Inc., P.O. Box 1929, 425 W. Mill St. at Eagle River, Wisconsin 54521 erpub@nnex.net vcnewsreview.com Member of the Wisconsin Newspaper Association and the National Newspaper Association

Our View Schools not to blame for ‘survival by referendum’ As the Northland Pines and Three Lakes school districts go to referendum next Tuesday in hopes of remaining financially solvent, we hope the voters remember the truth on why districts have been forced into this “survival by referendum” cycle. It is not the fault of school boards, administrators and local teachers that Pines is seeking authority to exceed state revenue caps by $2.7 million over the next three years, and Three Lakes by $2.3 million over the next five years. They are simply playing by the rules established by the Legislature.

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 13, 2013

OPINION/COMMENTARY

Tips for a romantic Valentine’s Day IF YOU ARE a romantic person by nature, you may be interested in reading a newspaper column written by Gary Slaatz, publisher of the Clark County Press of Neillsville, about 30 years ago. The column was written the week of Valentine’s Day, and I think his wife, Jane, who served as editor of the paper, may have contributed. The topic is pertinent because tomorrow is Valentine’s Day. “In case anyone should want to get into the spirit of romance,” Slaatz wrote, “I’ve made a list to make it a little easier on you. Obviously, Valentine’s Day is my most favorite holiday. Here goes. I hope it helps. “Tell the special girl in your life that compared to her, Bo Derek is only a four. (But, for heaven’s sake, don’t mention that that’s on a scale of one to three!) “Gasp with delight when she’s cleaning the hall closet. “Tell her you never believed it could be like this. (But, when you utter that endearment, please be sure you’re not reclining on the sofa in unkept underclothing while drinking a brew. That goes double for belching, too.) “Bring her a rose and take her out to dinner in the middle of the week. (That’ll surely make her suspicious.) “Take a page from this week’s The Clark County

People Make the Difference By Byron McNutt Press and roll it into a long, thin tube. Sneak up behind her while she’s cooking supper, place one end of the paper to your mouth, place the other near the back of her neck. Blow softly. “Send your mother-in-law a Valentine. “Growl when she calls you tiger. “Tell her you not only love her, you actually like her. “When anybody says your children are smart and beautiful, say they take after their mother. “Once in a while, very quietly, take out the garbage without being reminded. “Tell her she should place a classified ad in The Press and sell all those items in the attic or garage, and tell her she should keep all the money for herself. “Give her a box of candy and look deep into her eyes when you feed her the first strawberry creme. And don’t hog all the double-chocolates yourself. “Don’t apologize for getting mushy! “In all fairness,” Slaatz continued, “here’s a Valentine’s checklist for women only.

“Tell him that compared to him, Tom Selleck means nothing to you. (You’ll have to practice this one a few times to get the giggles out of your system.) “Warning! Don’t expect him to notice that you’ve cleaned the hall closet. “Tell him you never believed life could be like this. (But, as you coo these words, don’t be bending over picking up his dirty socks. This line is much more believable if it’s said without the benefit of sarcasm.) “When he brings you a rose and takes you out to dinner, tell yourself that you really deserve being pampered. (Don’t keep quizzing him about his motives.) “Take one page (but not his favorite page) from The Press, roll it into a ball, place it softly against his back and rub gently. “Send your mother-in-law a Valentine. “Purr seductively when he calls you kitten. “Tell him you not only love him, you like him. “When anybody says your children are bright and wellmannered, simply say thank you.

Legislators get the blame for tossing school districts into the referendum cycle. It was 20 years ago that they carelessly set a revenue cap of 2.1% but created a Qualified Economic Offer bargaining system that allowed salary and benefit increases of about 4.2% annually.

club supports is the North Woods Children’s Museum for their fathers and kids program; the Big Sisters and Big Brothers local chapters; the Vilas County food pantry in Eagle River and the Lakeland food pantry in Arbor Vitae; $4,000 in scholarships, two to local graduating seniors at Northland Pines and two to local college students continuing their education; and the purchase of several large pieces of playground equipment at the Sayner Town Park. Like other local Lions clubs, we also contribute to state and national Lions projects like Leader Dogs for the Blind and the Wisconsin Lions Foundation camp for children and adults with disabilities of all sorts, but our emphasis is most heavy on local projects that benefit our community and those that surround us. While giving away lots of big prizes, which we do, is great fun, it wouldn’t do much good for the projects

An unsigned and undated Justice Department white paper, obtained by NBC News, reports The New York Times, “. . . is the most detailed analysis yet to come into public view regarding the Obama legal team’s views about the lawfulness of killing, without a trial, an American citizen who executive branch officials decide is an operational leader of Al Qaeda or one of its allies.” The proviso is they must pose “an imminent threat of violent attack against the United States.” If “an informed, high-level official” of the government decides they are a threat, the paper says, and if capture is not feasible, they may be killed. There hasn’t been a huge outcry from those on the left who attacked President Bush for his doctrine of preemptive strikes against terrorists. Recall, too, the vitriol directed at Vice President Dick Cheney for defending “enhanced interrogation” techniques on suspected terrorists in order to obtain information that might prevent new attacks against Americans. The unclassified paper comes from the Justice Department’s Office of Legal Counsel, which according to the Times, provided justification for killing the radical Muslim cleric Anwar alAwlaki. Awlaki, born in New Mexico, was killed in an American drone strike in September 2011. The white paper cites a national right to selfdefense in wartime, but goes a step further. As summarized by The New York Times: “It emphasizes that the decision to kill a citizen in certain circumstances is not one in which courts should play any role, asserting that judges should not restrain the executive branch in making tactical judgments about when to use force against a senior al Qaeda leader.” Weren’t some conservatives who made the same argument during the Bush administration criticized in certain newspaper editori-

To MAINES, Pg. 17A

To THOMAS, Pg. 17A

We have witnessed the enormous effort administrators, school boards and staff have made to save money by refinancing loans, creating more efficient schools, cutting personnel, cutting programs, changing health care providers, reducing supplies, eliminating overtime and cutting back on bus runs.

More than 2,400 hockey players from 30 states converged on Eagle River last weekend for the Labatt Club USA Hockey Pond Hockey Championships, one of the best sporting events in Wisconsin. The record-setting 342 teams played more than 600 games on 28 rinks that were carved from the snow-covered ice on Dollar Lake. No other pond hockey event could compete. USA Hockey has billed the event as taking “hockey back to its roots,” and those roots are strong in Eagle River — where the first organized hockey game in Wisconsin was played. There are few rural communities in the country that would pull off such a massive and well-organized national event, but it happened here for the eighth year thanks to the Eagle River Fire Department, the Eagle River Recreation Association and Chanticleer Inn.

Behind the editorial ‘we’ Members of the Vilas County NewsReview editorial board include Publisher Kurt Krueger, Editor Gary Ridderbusch and Assistant Editor Anthony Drew.

* * * WHAT WOULD a clever politician (president) do during an economic crisis when facing staggering budget deficits and a need for additional revenues? Why not tell the lower classes and the middle classes that you are looking out for them, will protect their government assistance programs, won’t cut health-care spending, won’t raise their taxes, but will demand that the evil wealthy Americans pay their fair share? At the same time, you propose massive government spending programs. This deficit spending fuels the stock markets to record gains, making the wealthy wealthier. You then increase taxes on the wealthy a small percentage. As a result, the rich get richer. The bottom 70% of households get the advantage of record low interest rates, a continuation of generous government assistance programs and the feeling the president is on their side To McNUTT, Pg. 17A

Drone outcries a double standard

While the Qualified Economic Offer system has since been repealed and Act 10 has given districts more flexibility in deciding salary and benefits, the state tightened its per pupil spending caps significantly. That move ensures that no matter how frugal districts become, they can’t gain enough levying authority to crawl out of the current cycle.

Monster hockey event drew record 342 teams

“Tell him that the money you make from selling those items in the garage can be used for a new set of golf clubs, or new fishing gear. “When he gives you a box of candy and looks deep into your eyes, don’t spoil the mood by saying every piece of candy will go directly to your already ample hips. “Go ahead, get mushy!”

Cal Thomas

With the districts’ major budget item growing at twice the rate of the cap, it didn’t take but a decade for most districts to run out of cuts to make or funds to steal from other budget accounts. It was the Legislature, under the guise of accountability to local taxpayers, that created a cycle few districts have escaped.

School tax rates at Pines and Three Lakes currently rank in the bottom seven statewide. Voters need to know that a failed referendum would lead to dissolution, loss of local control over education, loss of community pride and identity, and likely higher taxes thru annexation to another district.

PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER SINCE 1985

Dog sled team born to race

Sled dog teams from across the Midwest and Canada converged on Land O’ Lakes Saturday and Sunday for the Three Bear Sled Dog Races. Forest Collins of Mancelona, Mich., led his four-dog team across the snowcovered race course Saturday afternoon. —Staff Photo By GARY RIDDERBUSCH

Fishing for a great cause SOMETIMES THERE are things that happen which leave you with nothing to say but, “Wow!” Last Saturday evening all I could say was, “Wow!” The occasion was the conclusion of the 11th annual Plum Lake ice fishing tourney held by the Sayner-Star Lake Lions Club, of which I am a member. The tournament has turned into our single biggest fundraising event of the year, and this year we not only broke last year’s record as our most profitable ever, we smashed the record to smithereens. All that happened with an economy that everyone has said is in the tank, and with a winter that for too long was almost snow-less, ruining things for area businesses which rely on a strong infusion of business from snowmobilers and other outdoor enthusiasts. Aside from “Wow,” I would like to say that I shouldn’t really be surprised at how well we did, not with knowing how North Woods

Trails & Tales

By Will Maines folks, residents and visitors alike, come out to support good organizations and good causes. Our 226 fishermen could have simply gone fishing just like any other day with their only cost being that of a bucket of minnows or a carton of wax worms, but instead they did what North Woods folks do so often; they supported a great cause. For me, the things that Lions do are all great causes, and I think that’s why local clubs like mine get such great support from not only participants in our events, but also from the many, many local businesses who without hesitation contribute to our success. Just as a few examples of the local causes my Lions


VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 13, 2013

OP-ED/READER OPINION Take time to develop Maines FROM PAGE 16A Three Lakes ATV plan Letter to the Editor: (This letter was presented to the Three Lakes Town Board and forwarded by the author to the newspaper to be published as a letter to the editor.) Gentlemen, Thank you for accepting comments from your fellow citizens regarding the proposal to establish ATV routes in Three Lakes. I find it difficult to understand how one could either oppose or support this proposal. Simply put, the proposal is incomplete. A lot of hard work has been done by the ATV club and I have complimented them on this effort, but there is much work to be done before it can be considered a viable proposal. However, regardless of the feasibility of the proposal and for various other reasons beyond the control of the town board, Three Lakes has become divided by the effort to quickly codify the proposal by ordinance. You possess the power to reunite this community because you are the guardians

of the process. The process of contemplation and assessment of the ATV proposal is more important than the proposal itself. The process you control must insure that the voices of everyone, whether they are in the majority or the minority, are heard and given equal consideration. The democratic processes of our Republic are, as you know, sometimes messy, slow and inefficient, and even ineffective, but they are the foundation of our liberty and the guarantor of our freedom. I would like to suggest that if you simply vote up or down on this proposal, it will fail eventually. The community cannot win with an up or down vote at this stage — one side or the other will know that the process failed them if it moves too quickly. If Three Lakes wants ATV routes (and trails to and from town), please consider taking the time to develop a comprehensive plan that can endure. Mark McCain Three Lakes

we support if we didn’t make any money, and that’s where all our loyal participants and supporting businesses come in. Let me say, as the chairman of the tournament committee, that I am overwhelmed by the level of support we get each year. Sayner and Star Lake are very small communities with few businesses, and were it not for businesses in Land O’ Lakes, Conover, Eagle River, St. Germain, Minocqua, Woodruff, Arbor Vitae and Boulder Junction helping us out as well, we could never do what we do for our area causes. We thank each and every business and individual who contributed to this year’s event with donations large and small.

I would exceed my allotted space if I tried listing them all, but I would like to especially thank sponsors who contributed major cash donations to underwrite expenses, including 70 West Body Shop and Scharf Automotive in Eagle River, Headwaters State Bank in Land O’ Lakes, the Sayner Pub and Karen and Tom Reed of Sayner. Last, but certainly not least among my many thanks would be a shout out to the three lovely ladies who campaigned for the crown of Ice Shack Queen, 2013. Last year when I dreamed up the queen election campaign which basically operates on the same premise as Chicago politics — one dollar equals one vote — I expected maybe our three candidates would raise perhaps $500 or so. Well, Karen Altamore, Kathy McCaughn and Kathy

Liebenstein blew all of us away by raising $2,200 with their campaigns. I thought that was a bar set so high it might never be cleared, but this year Karen Stecker, Amy “Pookie” Bristol and 2012 queen Karen Altamore didn’t just clear the bar but put it over the moon with their campaigns. The Lions can’t thank them enough for the tremendous job they did for us, and we wish 2013 Ice Shack Queen Amy Bristol a wonderful year-long reign. Lest you think the tourney is all about fundraising — that is a big part of it — there is a lot of fun going on during the day as well. Fish are caught, lies are told, vast quantities of food are consumed and maybe, just maybe, a few beverages are downed as well. This year’s fishing champions included Bill Pfeiffer for a

17A

301⁄2-inch northern, Les Durski for a 24-inch walleye, Bob Lass for a 123⁄4-inch perch, Gary Muench for a 131⁄2-inch crappie and Nick Durkee for a 91⁄2-inch bluegill. Though they didn’t win prizes, one angler who stayed out after the 3 p.m. deadline time caught a 40-inch northern about 3:30, while another young gaffer got a surprise when a musky of about 26 inches grabbed one of his shiners. Finally, talking about food, our winners in the Chefs on Ice cook-off were Kathy McCaughn for “FishO-Licious” walleye fillets, Greg Orlowski for “Not for Gringos” chili and Queen Amy Bristol for “Creamsicle” liquor-infused pudding shots. Thank you to all of you for supporting the Sayner-Star Lake Lions and for showing everyone how we in the north have fun in the winter. See you next year.

It’s not time to gamble with climate change Letter to the Editor: One does not have to be a greybeard to recall anticipating several weeks, as opposed to several days, of 20 below weather. Local business in our “snowmobile mecca” certainly won’t dispute the decline in revenues as winters have become consistently milder. “Big Oil” (corporations in the oil, coal and natural gas industries) has bankrolled scientific research to question the conventional wisdom of man’s role in climate change. With the sincerity of someone being waterboarded, scientist on the corporate dole have trivialized the issue with the assertion that there have always been cycles of warming and cooling. These observations are undeniable, but

McNutt FROM PAGE 16A while being quietly taxed hidden revenue enhancements. * * * HAVE YOU ever submitted a job application with a letter of recommendation from a previous employer attached? Your former boss may have encrypted the letter with office jargon. Here are a few terms I found on the Internet and their real meanings. Exceptionally well-qualified: Has committed no major blunders to date. Active socially: Drinks too

VOICES

irrelevant. The crisis is not a warming trend, but the impact that the Industrial Revolution has had on typical cycles. What could have taken tens of thousands of years may now have been observed generationally. I recently read about an oil executive who, while acknowledging climate change, is confident that mankind will adapt. He is willing to bet the farm (it’ll be desert soon anyway) on the possibility that vegetables will be grown in Greenland when currently arable soils are no longer productive. Since there will always be winners and losers, he concludes, we are supposed to simply “live with it!” InsaTo CLIMATE, Pg. 18A

much. Demonstrates qualities of leadership: Talks real loud. Quick thinking: Offers plausible excuses for errors. Takes pride in his work: Conceited. Takes advantage of every opportunity to advance: Buys drinks for the boss. Approaches difficult problems with logic: Finds someone else to do the job. Conscientious and careful: Scared silly. Keen sense of humor: Knows many dirty jokes. Career-minded: Back stabber. A very fine employee of great value to the organization: Gets to work on time.

Limited ATV routes deserve one-year test Letter to the Editor: I’d like to offer additional insight into the ATV issue being considered in Three Lakes. Currently, a tremendous amount of opinion and conjecture is being thrown around pretending to be “facts.” The only way this can be rationally evaluated is with factual information as a starting place. As a resident, I have been both concerned and skeptical for many years of the ATV sport, especially involving the potential for ATVs to do damage to the land, plus concerns over the potential for increased noise. Over those same years, I have witnessed many towns in the North Woods approach ATVs in a similar skeptical manner by choosing to allow limited access as a means of proving or disproving the claims made by those on both sides

FROM ACROSS THE HEADWATERS REGION

Compiled by Gary Ridderbusch

Question: What do you like about the pond hockey championships?

of the issue. This in plain terms is called “testing.” What I have observed is that the testing in surrounding locales has resulted in findings “facts” that have not lived up to the claims of opponents. As a result of testing, surrounding towns have chosen to greatly expand ATV access because they have found it benefits their particular town. What do they know that we don’t? Are they uniformed, uncaring folks that aren’t capable of evaluating this issue which clearly affects their own back yard? I don’t think so. Is it possible that ATVs have added economic benefit to their towns, at a time when all North Woods towns are struggling? That’s precisely what they claim. They also admit that many of their former concerns being voiced in Three Lakes today did not come to fruition in their experience. For those with short memories, these same issues were raised with the advent of snowmobiles many years ago when that sport was just growing legs. Now snowmobiling is not only embraced, it is an economic necessity that fills a season formerly devoid of tourists. The same accusations were also leveled on the Three Lakes Fire Department Shootout boat races when that began six years

Thomas FROM PAGE 16A

Rich Vlach Division 30 plus Intermediate Chicago “It brings the hockey back. It takes some of the seriousness out of it. But brings the nostalgia with it.”

Sandra Todd Division Women’s Bronze San Francisco “It’s the third year here for most of us and it’s just a great weekend. The community is just amazing.”

Ryan DeForge Division 30 plus Silver Hancock, Mich. “It’s a great time. We bring four teams down from our area. USA Hockey puts on a great event and hopefully we can come back next year.”

als, and by liberal commentators and the Hollywood elite? The white paper says that if a target poses an imminent threat to the U.S., and cannot be captured, the strike “would be conducted in a manner consistent with applicable law of war principles.” It goes on to read, “A lawful killing in self-defense is not an assassination. In the Department’s view, a lethal operation conducted against a U.S. citizen whose conduct poses an imminent threat . . . would be a legitimate act of national self-defense that would not violate the assassination ban.” The American Civil Liber-

ago. Today, what other annual event brings several thousand tourists to our town for a few days that has proven to be an economic benefit while not harming the North Woods? I think a reminder is necessary that our outdoors (woods, lakes and roads) are shared resources, not “owned” by any single faction of users. I am in favor of a one-year test by allowing limited ATV routes in Three Lakes to prove or disprove (with measurable facts, not emotion) whether the surrounding towns’ successes were real or anomaly. Such testing will put everyone’s concerns, pro or foe, in focus with empirical

data, not theoretical scare tactics employed to keep this from even being tested. Our businesses are suffering greatly and need additional revenue to survive, especially with reduced snowfall. Every weekend we witness trailers of ATVs driving right through Three Lakes, headed north to spend their vacation money elsewhere. Moreover, any suggestion that summer visitors who spend a fraction of the year here, have the same stake in the financial outcome for this town is utter nonsense. The recent threats of boycotts to our local businesses and To ROUTES, Pg. 18A

Hats off to Pines’ performers Dear Editor: After I worked at pond hockey on Friday, my wife wanted to go to the play at Northland Pines High School. I was very tired and before the play, I fell asleep. But when the orchestra started and the curtain opened, I did not blink an eye for two and one half hours. The play, “Footloose,” had a cast that was perhaps the best I have ever seen. The talent of the students was the best I have ever seen, including

plays with paid performers. I must compliment every student that performed in the play, including the stage hands, the directors, orchestra and the teachers that coached the students. I highly recommend that if you have never been to a Northland Pines performance, make sure you see the next one. My hat is off to all of the students. They should be very, very proud. Yukon Jack Eagle River

ties Union (ACLU) has been consistent with both the Bush and Obama administrations. It strongly, and wrongly in my view, criticized President Bush for his anti-terrorism policies. Reacting to the publication of the white paper, Hina Shamsi, director of the ACLU’s National Security Project, called it “a profoundly disturbing document.” “It’s hard to believe,” she added, “that it was produced in a democracy built on a system of checks and balances.” She characterized it as “. . . a stunning overreach of executive authority.” She may have a point. One that should be debated in Congress. Appropriate committees should invite or, if necessary, subpoena the person, or persons, who wrote the document. U.S. citizens

should know what kind of action constitutes “imminent threat.” At present, the government’s definition is a little cryptic. Given the way some criminal lawyers have “gamed” the U.S. court system to free hardened criminals, the president might be justified in this approach, but the larger question of how much authority he should be allowed to have in these circumstances and whether U.S. citizenship alone should be enough to guarantee due process when there is substantial evidence someone is involved in plots to kill other Americans, is a subject worthy of congressional consideration. Readers may e-mail Cal Thomas at tmseditors@tribune.com.


18A

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 13, 2013

VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS

READER OPINION

SKIJORING — The Three Bear Sled Dog Races in Land O’ Lakes featured a skijoring event.

Here, Rob Bimberg of Deerfield, Ill., left the starting chute. —STAFF PHOTO

Supports officers in schools Dear Editor: As a kid growing up on the eastside of Milwaukee, there was one person who had all the respect of all my friends and I’m sure their families and mine. His name was Eric. He was a Milwaukee beat cop. He walked the area we lived in on a daily basis. He was the one man who taught us the meaning of respect for the law. He made sure he knew all of us by our first names. He would on occasion stop by my parents home and just have a casual conversation with them. He was a great guy. I always remember my dad telling me to behave and live by the rules and if Eric ever had to bring me home, there would be hell to pay.

Eric would sometimes use a three-wheeler motorcycle in the winter and “us guys’ would lay low behind some snow bank and when he would pass by, we would throw as many snowballs at him as we could, then run like the dickens. Of course he knew who did it, but he knew we were just being kids. Besides realizing we were just kids, Eric went a long way to make sure that our neighborhood was a safe place to live. We as kids felt safe and our parents never seemed to worry about us being out all day. Eric was a big guy. He wore a motorcycle police uniform and always had his Colt revolver strapped in a polished holster. No one will ever know how much that one man influenced my life.

Against ATVs in Three Lakes Letter to the Editor: I have been a summer resident of Three Lakes for over 30 years, and a frequent visitor before then. From the beginning, I was attracted to the area by its beauty and tranquility, so different from the uproar of the city where I live. Therefore, I’ve been sickened and disgusted to find that a small, well-organized group is pushing for an ordinance to allow ATV vehicles to use town roads. I think it is a grave mistake to rush this decision

Climate:

STICK WITH THE CLASSIFIEDS in the

(715) 479-4421

FROM PAGE 17A

tiable greed cannot concern itself with devastation in its wake. Gambling with climate change could wreak havoc upon world economies. Catastrophic storms and protracted drought could lead to world war as all humanity attempts to survive the subsequent cataclysmic challenges.

Routes:

through without input from summer visitors who contribute much to the town’s taxes, institutions and businesses. These vehicles are noisy and destructive to the environment. Why would the town want to give them free reign? And if it does, how will future potential investors react when considering whether to invest here? I hope the commission will vote “no� on this ordinance. Sincerely, Lawrence E. Jarchow Three Lakes and Chicago

The reason I write this is because maybe it’s time to bring Eric back. Maybe it’s time to have that policeman in and near our schools. Maybe its time we have men on duty, showing by example, how to live by the rules and be safe. Maybe its time to have someone there that our kids could talk to and enjoy being around. An authority figure that a kid could reveal the bad guys to or maybe throw a snowball at. An authority figure who wasn’t there to preach, but be a guide, a mentor, a protector and yes, at times discipline bad behavior. As a property taxpayer, putting Eric back in the schools would cost money. I would gladly pay extra taxes to have him back. To the police and sheriff departments, please think about bringing my mentor and protector back into this community. We need him now more than ever. Tarryl L. Janik Eagle River

Is the continued profitability of Big Oil worth that risk? Where is the harm in converting to sustainable Green energy? It would be a lot easier for Big Oil to adapt, diversify, even lead the charge to Green energy than for all mankind to adapt to global warming. Terrance Moe Three Lakes

FROM PAGE 17A

their employees including our grocer voiced to them for even considering supporting such a test reveals just how selfish, irrational and uncaring certain people can be who couldn’t care less about our local businesses. They get to drive back to their suburban retail stores for the other 10

months while our businesses starve. Just like the Shootout, if ATVs flunk the test this deserves, then cancel it. But to deny a test is simply wrong. Jim Leatzow Three Lakes resident

Winchester department gets Plum Creek grant The Plum Creek Foundation recently awarded a $4,000 grant to the Winchester Fire Department to help fund the purchase of new equipment that will aid in wildland fire mitigation and prevention. The grant will help the Winchester Fire Department replace a chainsaw and purchase new protective gear. Plum Creek’s grant will be used in conjunction with matching funds of $300 from

a recent fundraising dinner provided by Thrivent Financial for Lutherans to purchase two new FCC-compliant portable radios for responders and signage for marking the new dryhydrant system. The mission of the Winchester Fire Department is to minimize the loss of life and property of residents and neighbors through education and prevention, according to firefighter Mathias Schmidt.

HELPING HANDS ROBOTIC SURGICAL SYSTEM THAT EXPANDS THE SURGEON’S CAPABILITIES AND RETURNS YOU TO DAILY ACTIVITIES FASTER.

Robot-assisted minimally invasive surgical option and        

SHORTER HOSPITAL STAY. LESS PAIN. FASTER RECOVERY.

today. tomorrow. together.

ÂŽ

Howard Young Medical Center | 240 Maple Street, Woodruff | 715.356.8000 | ministryhealth.org


VILAS COUNTY

NEWS-REVIEW EAGLE RIVER, WI 54521

Section

B

Lifestyle vcnewsreview.com

(715) 479-4421 WEDNESDAY, FEB. 13, 2013

Casino Night to aid museum The Northwoods Children’s Museum’s (NCM) first Casino Night will be held at Holiday Acres Resort in Rhinelander, from 6 to 9 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 16, with registration beginning at 5:30. Casino Night gives attendees a chance to win prizes throughout the evening with Las Vegas-style games, raffles, live and silent auctions, and all proceeds from this event go to the NCM, benefiting North Woods families. Admission includes a light dinner buffet and gambling chips that will be traded in for raffle tickets, which are turned in for a chance at prizes after the games conclude. Games offered include black jack, craps, roulette and horses, and more chips will be available if players run out. “We are excited to be able to offer a new venue,” said

Rouleen Gartner, director of the museum. “We also thought it would make for a fun Valentine’s Day night on the town. Our generous sponsors have helped get this event off the ground and we’re really excited about the possibilities.” Event sponsors include Rhinelander GM, WXPR Public Radio, Channel 12 and Peoples State Bank. Tickets for the event are $25 per person and include $5,000 in play money and a light dinner buffet. Tickets purchased before Thursday, Feb. 14, will receive an additional $1,000 in play money. Tickets can be purchased online, over the phone or at the museum located at 346 West Division St. in Eagle River. For information, call (715) 479-4623 or visit northwoodschildrensmuseum.com.

YMCA announces upcoming events Pines actors perform in lively ‘Footloose’ Northland Pines High School recently concluded three public performances for approximately 1,200 people and two school showings of the musical “Footloose.” Nearly 70 students were involved in the production. Among those were dancers Hannah Hoffmann, Victoria Sleeman and Morgan Gurka (above); Jacqueline Pruni as Ariel (right); dancers Sophia Svetnicka and Lauren Gonitzke (bottom right); Madeline Consoer as Rusty (bottom left); and Samuel Puffer as Ren and Victoria Schwenn as Urleen (below). —Staff Photos By ANTHONY DREW

The YMCA of the Northwoods in Rhinelander and Eagle River will be hosting several classes and events in February and March. The Rhinelander Y will be holding a cooking class Monday, Feb. 25, from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. on how to make delicious homemade apple strudel. Carol Bolden will share her family recipe for this sweet and savory dessert. A strudel is a type of sweet or savory layered pastry with a filling inside. Apple strudel is a traditional Viennese strudel, a popular pastry in Austria. Participants will make a strudel to take home. The class will take a short break for a light lunch that will be served along with a piece of apple strudel for dessert. The cost for the class and lunch is $15 for members and $20 for the general public. To enroll and obtain a class supply list, enroll by Thursday, Feb. 21, by calling (715) 3629622. The Y Golden Adventurers will be enjoying outdoor activities on Tuesday, Feb. 19, from 1 to 3 p.m. at Holiday Acres Resort in Rhinelander.

Those who participate may choose to cross-country ski or snowshoe the beautiful trails at the resort. This is a great opportunity for seniors. Holiday Acres will provide skis or snowshoes for $3 or participants may take their own. Instructors will be available to teach the skiing and snowshoeing basics, and a leader will be available for a more advanced group. Participants are asked to take a snack to be shared with the group. A carpool will leave the Y in Rhinelander at 12:15 p.m., for those needing transportation to Holiday Acres Resort, located at 4060 S. Shore Drive, Rhinelander. Directions can be obtained from holidayacres.com. The Golden Adventurers meet on the third Tuesday of the month to hike, ski, canoe or experience other adventures. Anyone in the community is welcome to participate in this free Y program but must RSVP to the Y Welcome Center at (715) 362-9622. For additional information about this adventure and other To YMCA, Pg. 2B

Reflections By Mary Friedel-Hunt

Buy, buy, buy You have been seeing hearts and flowers advertised since the day after Christmas. No sooner was the commercialism of that day gone, then out came the Valentines and as soon as those are gone, St. Patrick’s Day shamrocks and Easter bunnies will be filling the shelves of all the Walmarts, Walgreens and every other store. If the world of marketing, sales and media ruled the world (and it almost does) we will spend every dollar we earn on “stuff.” On the day after Thanksgiving and Dec. 26, crowds rush out to buy anything that is on sale, in case we need it the following Christmas. Mind you, I am not opposed to saving money on things we really need but so many buy every new gadget on the market and sell it in a garage sale for a dollar only a few months later. The latest television, kitchen and computer gadgets along with many other unnecessary household items will fill our closets and seldom, if ever get used. Welcome to the world of consumerism. When Bill and I sold our Colorado home we had an estate sale and whittled down the contents of a 3,000-sq.-foot home to what would fit in a 10-foot by 10-foot by 10-foot storage unit, while we traveled North America in our motor home. When we completed a two-year journey, we ended up in Wisconsin and nine years later when we moved from one house to another, it took two trucks to move our stuff. How had we accumulated so much in just six years? Now, as I begin to purge the house of unnecessary items, the pile of things I do not need grows by the day. St. Vincent de Paul and Goodwill will be glad to see me coming. Americans like their stuff. We are great at spending, not so great at saving. And with each purchase we make, we think we are buying something we need or that will bring us happiness. We are usually wrong. Most of us do not need to buy much of anything except To REFLECTIONS, Pg. 2B


2B

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 13, 2013

VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS

LIFESTYLE

Nicolet to host musical The ArtsPower National Touring Theatre will present the musical “Laura Ingalls Wilder,” Saturday, Feb. 16, at 11 a.m. at Nicolet College Theatre. The musical, geared to children in grades two through six, depicts through song and dance the story of Laura Ingalls Wilder. Follow the exciting story of young, tomboyish Laura as she and her family travel into the unsettled frontier of the late 1800s American Midwest, in search of a place they can call home. Children will feel the suspense and wonder of the perilous journey in which the Ingalls face the challenges of Indian attacks, disease, and devastating crop losses. Powered by their devotion to one another and an unwavering pioneering spirit, the Ingalls overcome all obstacles. Family bonds may be tested, but they are never broken. “ArtsPower does a wonderful job bringing literature and history to life for children,” said Nicolet Theatre Director Jim Nuttall. “Mom and dad as well as the kids will appreciate the energy, musical talent, and the uplifting message about family love that ArtsPower delivers in telling the story of Laura Ingalls Wilder.” The 55-minute show features a lush musical score with five original songs, including the memorable “Move On,” which captures the restlessness and excite-

ArtsPower will perform the musical, “Laura Ingalls Wilder,” Saturday, Feb. 16, at 11 a.m. in the Nicolet College Theatre. The musical will feature numbers including “Move On” which captures the excitment of moving West, as well as “Fishin’ ” in which Laura and Pa laugh and share tales about their favorite fishing hole. —Contributed Photo

ment of loading up the covered wagon, and “Fishin’”, a duet in which Laura and Pa laugh and share tall tales at their favorite fishing hole. Tickets are $5 for children and $7 for adults and are available in advance at nicoletlive.com.

FROM PAGE 1B applied for each additional child. For more information , call (715) 479-9500, 362-9622 or visit ymcaofthenorthwoods.org. The YMCA of the Northwoods is launching its annual Strong Kids Campaign to financially support individuals and families in need. Funds raised directly support the Y’s mission by strengthening communities by nurturing the potential of every youth and teen, improving the nation’s health and well-being and providing opportunities to give back and support neighbors. Gifts to the YMCA of the Northwoods make a direct impact to the community. Last year, financial support made it possible to subsidize over 1,000 individuals and families who otherwise could not afford a membership. To learn more about the campaign or how to support the strong kids campaign, please contact Laurie Schlitt, associate executive director at (715) 362-9622 or email lschlitt@ymcanw.org, or visit ymcaofthenorthwoods.org for more information.

Reflections: food and gas. And as for buying happiness, we all know it is not for sale anywhere. Happiness is within us. Some call it peace. Others call it fun. And still others define it by the amount of stuff they have, the trips they take or the car they drive. Oh, they love their kids, spouses and neighbors so they buy them stuff also in an effort to make them happy. I know people who have a lot of stuff and they are miserable. Their marriages are empty, their jobs stressful, and the big homes they sleep in are devoid of real connec-

FROM PAGE 1B

tion. I also know a lot of people who choose small simple houses, jobs they love, hardly any stuff and seem pretty happy and content to me. This could be the year to examine priorities and make changes we have wanted to make for a long time. We might be surprised what happens. Mary Friedel-Hunt, MA LCWS, is a freelance writer and psychotherapist in the Madison area. She can be reached at mfriedelhunt@charter.net or P.O. Box 1036, Spring Green, WI 53588.

Labor solidarity to screen documentaries on Buffalo Creek Thursday, Feb. 21, the Northwoods Labor Solidarity will show two documentaries, “Buffalo Creek Flood” and “Buffalo Creek Revisited,” from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Guild Hall located at 39 South Pelham St. in Rhinelander. On Feb. 26, 1972, a coalwaste dam owned by the Pittston Company collapsed at the head of a crowded hollow in southern West Virginia. A wall of sludge, debris and water tore through the valley below, leaving in its wake 125 dead and 4,000 homeless. The Pittston Company

A seven-day program, Northwoods Birding by Trail and Canoe, will be offered by Trees for Tomorrow from Sunday, May 26 through Saturday, June 1. Beginning and intermediate birders will enjoy spring in the North Woods during this birding adventure. Participants will explore unique habitats in search of common and rare birds, and practice birding skills while on naturalist-led hikes along the area’s finest trails. On canoe outings, birders will observe water birds and their behaviors, learn how to identify warblers, raptors, waterfowl and other species that are native to northern Wisconsin. The program will include several day trips to paddle some of the area’s remote lakes and rivers, looking for

bald eagles and loons along the way. This Trees For Tomorrow naturalist-led adventure will teach participants not only bird identification, but also area plant and animal identification. “One of the trip highlights is an evening paddle. The winds die down, sunsets are amazing, loons are swimming in the pristine water, and barred owls are calling around us,” said naturalist and program coordinator Troy Walters. In addition, participants will visit and walk on a northern quaking bog. Many equate the experience to walking on a giant waterbed. The cost for the workshop is $599 per person, for a double room, or $629 per person, for a single room, which includes lodging, meals,

à la Carte CARE

YMCA: active older adult programs contact Marilyn Duschl at (715) 362-9622. The annual father-daughter dance will be held at Eagle Waters Resort Saturday, March 16, with the theme, Candyland. The event will begin with social time and table games starting at 5:30 p.m., a Grande Marche and dinner at 6 p.m., and dancing and hula hoop contest, with prizes, from 7 to 8:30 p.m. Door prizes, and a plush animal raffle will also be featured at the event. Photography will be available throughout the night. Proceeds from the raffle will go to Eagle River YMCA Strong Kids campaign/operations. Raffle tickets are available at the event and at the YMCA prior to the event. Ticket costs are $1 for one, and $5 for six tickets. Reservations are required by Friday, March 8. Registration forms will be distributed to all Northland Pines School District students and are available at the YMCA. The cost to attend is $30 per couple for members, and $40 per couple for nonmembers. A cost of $10 or $15 will be

Road Scholar to offer birding program

maintains the disaster was an act of God. Actual footage of the flood and scenes of the ensuing devastation along with interviews with union and citizen groups and Pittston officials lead to evidence contradicting Pittston’s official position on the disaster.

Wisconsin’s

North Woods

The fun starts here…

Tickets also may be purchased by calling the box office at (715) 365-4646. For more information or to purchase tickets online, visit nicoletlive.com. For more information about the ArtsPower presentations, visit artspower.org.

Service for Seniors 7 Days a Week

In-Home Services: Specializing in dementia care, companionship, shopping, meal preparation, laundry, housekeeping, bathing, grooming and dressing, transportation options. We also do respite care, hospital sitting, post-operative assistance and more.

Services for Seniors

instruction, transportation and rental equipment. Guests will stay on site at Trees For Tomorrow in lodgestyle buildings that have comfortable bedrooms, central lounges with fireplaces and shared bath facilities. Meals are served in a historic dining hall overlooking the Eagle River Chain of Lakes. Road Scholar programs are extraordinary learning adventures for adults in their 50s and beyond. Trees For Tomorrow currently offers eight active outdoor programs. To register for the program or to receive a Road Scholar catalog, call 1-(800) 454-5768 or 1-(877) 426-8056 or visit roadscholar.org. For more information, contact Troy Walters at (715) 4796456, troy@treesfortomorrow. com or visit treesfortomorrow.com.

Member Alzheimer’s Association of Greater Wisconsin Chapter

Call Geralyn Sweet for a free consultation! (715) 337-0189 (715) 358-6792 (715) 453-5459 www.alacartecare.com

Eagle River Minocqua Tomahawk


VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 13, 2013

3B

LIFESTYLE Area banks participate in America Saves Week

Eagle River celebrates centenarian ___________

Area banks and credit unions have teamed up to celebrate America Saves Week by offering special incentives, events and education to help families save money. America Saves Week, a national event in which hundreds of groups across the country are encouraging employees, members, students and the public to reassess and improve spending and savings habits in order to build wealth, instead of contributing to their debt. “Economic conditions of recent years have provided a wake-up call for many families. They are realizing the importance of financial stability through better budgeting, spending and saving behavior,” said Corrine Michniak, executive director of Northwoods Saves. “It’s easier to weather hard times when you have a financial cushion.” Northwoods Saves is coordinating the campaign throughout Forest, Lincoln, Oneida, and Vilas counties and banks and credit unions have committed to participate. Residents can participate by opening or adding to savings accounts, or otherwise take advantage of savings opportunities. Marketing efforts are expected to reach more than 240,000 Americans during the month of February through print, radio and television. Since 2004, more than 4,000 people have enrolled as America Northwoods Savers and nearly $2.5 million have been deposited as a result of America Saves Week. Residents can take advantage of other incentives, prizes and contests as determined by each branch by visiting these participating banks and credit unions: In Eagle River, participating establishments are: BMO Harris Bank, First National Bank of Eagle River, MidWisconsin Bank, Ripco Credit Union, and River Valley Bank. Participating establishments in Minocqua/Woodruff include: BMO Harris Bank,

BY NICHOLAS FARRELL SPECIAL TO THE NEWS-REVIEW

___________

For many people who know Emerson Farrell, the mere mention of his name conjures images of a largerthan-life cowboy type who was seemingly ripped straight out of the Old West. From entertaining onlookers as a young man by shooting holes in pennies tossed carelessly over his shoulder to firing his pistol out of both windows of his car in downtown Eagle River to celebrate the birth of his son, the legendary stories of his life appear endless and paint a picture of a man who apparently lived a life that could rival any American folktale. However, behind the stories of marksmanship and ruggedness is a modest country gentleman who continues to pray daily and loves nothing more than to simply sit and visit with people. Eagle River’s newest centenarian has enjoyed a life filled with rich experiences over the past 100 years. Emerson Farrell came to the Eagle River area as a very young boy in a family of eight children. Like most at the time, his family were quite poor and had to rely upon what little work was available.

EMERSON FARRELL

Helping Emerson Farrell celebrate his 100th birthday are his grandchildren, from left, Kel-

Though Eagle River was predominantly a logging town at the time, Emerson and his brothers were able to find work caddying at a local golf course (now Lake Forest Golf Course). As a young man, he developed a fascination with and talent for shooting guns, and his gun-handling abilities became quickly known to most, including many patrons at the golf course. Emerson still recalls being handpicked by the mayor of Chicago to caddy for him and his friends due to his comfort being around guns. According to Emerson, the mayor’s top bodyguard would hand him his gun and say, “If anything happens, you know what to do, Farrell.” During the Great Depression years, he and his friends “bummed” rides on freight trains out to South Dakota where he would work through the harvest season in hopes of saving enough money to get through the winter.

lie Farrell Peters, Beau Farrell, Emerson, and Nicholas Farrell. —Contributed Photo

Emerson has to chuckle nowadays at commercials featuring “fancy mattresses,” remarking that he “used to sleep real well on a boxcar floor.” The rides back and forth between South Dakota and Wisconsin afforded him with many opportunities to meet new people with many interesting stories, an activity that Emerson enjoys greatly to this day. At a Halloween dance in 1936, Emerson met Lenore “Dolly” Croker. Through some reportedly intricate dancing that included walking on his hands (and likely a good deal of fortune), he was able to woo Dolly and married her one year later. Emerson remembers their honeymoon consisting of a ride up to the Gateway Lodge in their ’33 Chevy Coup where they split a sandwich and drank a beer. The couple would remain married for 75 years before Dolly’s passing in June 2012. They raised two children, Sherry and

Michael, and later welcomed grandchildren Kellie, Beau and Nicholas. Together they played active roles in the community, including serving for the local Historical Society and becoming owners of a jewelry shop downtown. The biography of Emerson Farrell continues to grow 100 years after his birth. He still drives into Eagle River nearly every day where he can be found enjoying a mid-morning meal a local café or picking up a few things from his favorite store. The excitement may have slowed down for him. Days of sharp shooting and trainjumping are long since passed. Horse-drawn sleighs and handwritten letters have been phased out by Smart Cars and Facebook. But despite the environmental changes, Emerson Farrell’s passion for enjoying each day of life remains unwavering. What an example for others to follow in these times.

Retired teachers set meeting in Rhinelander

Tijan’s TWELVE PINES

Rhinelander Area Retired Educators will meet Wednesday, Feb. 13, at noon at the Best Western Claridge Motor Inn on Stevens Street. Mark Maniot from Wild Instinct, a facility specializing in wildlife rehabilitation, will present the program “What we can do for the Northwoods.” All retired educators living in Rhinelander and the surrounding area are welcomed to attend the presentation. For more information or to make a reservation, contact Natalie Obey at (715) 3695582.

FULL MENU, NIGHTLY SPECIALS Feb. Treat your loved one to our Valentine’s Day Special

Nightly Tues. thru Sat. (715) 479-7182

www.bucktale.com

(2 miles on Hwy. 70 west of Eagle River)

OPEN TUES.-SAT. AT 4 P.M. SERVING FROM 4:30 P.M.

New York Strip & Crab Leg Dinner DRINK SPECIALS ALSO AVAILABLE

Sweetheart Seafood Specials

9035 Hwy. H, Eagle River

PIT STOP #43

MICHELIN • MASTERCRAFT • UNIROYAL • DUNLOP • BRIDGESTONE

Hours: Sun.-Thurs. open at 5 p.m., Fri. & Sat. open at 4 p.m.

PRIME CHOICE MEAT MARKET

AUTO REPAIR & TIRES SHOW YOU CARE Buy your sweetheart some love this Valentine’s Day! 3988 COUNTY E (500' EAST OF HWY. 45), LAND O’ LAKES, WIS.

Open Mon.-Fri. 8-5; Sat. 8 - noon

715-547-3366

OFFICIAL DEALER

• BRIDGESTONE • GENERAL • GOODRICH • MICHELIN • MASTERCRAFT

PLATTEVILLE — Megan Levande of Eagle River, graduated in Dec. 2012 from UWPlatteville, with a degree in Social Science. MICHIGAN — Evan Weber of Eagle River and William Decker of Phelps were named to the dean’s list at Northern Michigan University for the fall 2012 semester.

~ Nightly Specials ~ Dinner Menu

Famous Homemade Pizza • Ribs • Chicken • Fish

• DUNLOP • BRIDGESTONE • GENERAL • GOODRICH • GOODYEAR • MICHELIN • MASTERCRAFT

Open: Thursday thru Sunday, Feb. 7-10, 5 to 9 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 12, Thursday thru Sunday, Feb. 14-17, 5 to 9 p.m.

❤ ❤ ❤ Valentine Features Plus Full Menu

Thurs., Feb. 14 thru Sun., Feb. 17 Tuesday - GIRLS NIGHT OUT (men also welcome) 1/2 PRICE WINES, FOOD SPECIALS & PRIZE DRAWINGS Thursday - MEXICAN NIGHT & FULL MENU Friday - FISH FRY 219 N. Railroad St. (by the bridge next to the Visitors Center) Eagle River

www.riverstonerestaurant.com

715-479-4456

HANDICAP-ACCESSIBLE WEST ENTRANCE ELEVATOR

Your Hometown “Old-Fashioned” Butcher Shop

Valentine’s Day Specials STARTING FEB. 11

Steak Lovers See Here! USDA Top Choice

ON CAMPUS

Bucktale Inn

On Beautiful Catfish Lake 3635 Townline Rd., Eagle River, Wis. • 715-479-4734

CESA to offer training course Cooperative Education Service Agency 9 (CESA 9) in Tomahawk will offer substitute teacher training Monday, and Tuesday March 4 and 5. Individuals with a bachelor’s degree and who successfully complete this training are eligible to apply for a substitute teacher permit. For more information, contact Jean Hill at (715) 4532141 or visit cesa9.k12.wi.us.

“Where Good Friends Meet!”

RESTAURANT - BAR

14

MidWisconsin Bank, and Park City Credit Union. In Phelps the participating party is First National Bank of Eagle River. In St. Germain, participating banks are: BMO Harris Bank and First National Bank of Eagle River In Three Lakes, BMO Harris Bank and First National Bank of Eagle River both support America Saves Weeks. In addition to saving money for personal financial goals, individuals may be eligible to win a Penny the Pig Piggy Bank by making a deposit to a new or existing account or by filling out the confidential Northwoods Saves entry/enrollment form. Members who complete the form will receive financial tips via monthly email and quarterly newsletter by mail. In addition, Northwoods Saves is a financial education program that offers counseling services to enrolled savers. Northwoods Saves is available to present workshops at businesses and organizations for a small fee, offering a prepurchase home buyer education class designed to save prospective homeowners thousands of dollars. “We can show you how to spend less as well,” said Corrine Michniak. “If you are not using our Goodsearch toolbar, you are spending more than is necessary. Go to goodsearch.com and choose Northwoods Saves to download our customized toolbar. Every time you shop, a toolbar drop-down menu reveals a comprehensive list of coupon and discount codes without having to leave your web page. At no additional cost, a portion of your purchase is donated to Northwoods Saves and when you browse, a penny is donated to Northwoods Saves.” Northwoods Saves services are made possible, in part, by CoVantage Credit Union, the Northwoods United Way, River Valley Bank, Ripco Credit Union, Tomahawk Community Bank and Wisconsin Public Service.

Ribeye ......................... USDA Top Choice

Tenderloin ..............

Celebrate Valentine’s Day at

ON NORTH TWIN LAKE

VALENTINE’S DAY SPECIALS!

ON DUCK LAKE

1299 $ 99 21

THURSDAY THRU SATURDAY

$

LB.

LB.

SATURDAY HAM SPECIAL 1 lb. honey and brown sugar $ pit ham, 4 bakery kaiser rolls

599

(715) 479-8467

Food & Drink Specials Kitchen Is Open Late Daily/nightly specials, homemade soups, pizza, chili, broasted chicken & much more!

DJ Saturday Nights, Feb. 9 & 16 7 TVs to watch your favorite sports!

Mon.-Sat. 9 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. Closed Sundays

2010 Hwy. 45 North, Eagle River (715) 479-4872

1144 Hwy. 45 South, Eagle River

Located just north of the Derby Track

Complimentary Dessert

Surf & Turf 6-oz. Lobster & 8-oz. Filet

with all dinners

FRI., SAT. & SUN., MON. & WED. open at 11 a.m. for Lunch & Dinner ❤ THURSDAY OPEN AT 4 P.M. ❤ FOR DINNER Closed Tues.

2618 Hwy. 17, Phelps, Wis. (715) 545-2515

Celebrate Valentine’s Day

Blue Heron Supper Club & Lounge AT WILD EAGLE LODGE

______________________________________________ Com plime tions a v r e s Serving the Northwoods’ finest homemade entrées: e R heart-sh ntary ded n e m m salads, pastas, steaks, fish, seafood, pizza & kids’ menu brus aped Reco ______________________________________________ chetta Enjoy an

Fighting Heart Disease and Stroke

4443 Chain O’ Lakes Rd., Eagle River 715-337-2144 Parking available in the main lodge area by entering through the front lodge entrance

SUPPER CLUB & LOUNGE

Bar open at 4, dinner served 5-9 p.m. Tues.-Sat., closed Sun. & Mon.

evening of love songs with Patti at the piano


4B

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 13, 2013

VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS

LIFESTYLE Greenan travels to Nicaragua

Contest and prize winners at Northland Pines High School’s recent Math Week included, front row from left, Annie Fuller, Carson Cox, Mitch Hess, Katie Sparks, Stephen Chamberlain

and Walker Levan; back row, Sam Lacko, Jared Akers, Teddy Wells, Donnell Rueben, Emily Scharf, Marcus Clure and Logan Patterson. —Staff Photos By ANTHONY DREW

Northland Pines High School holds fifth annual Math Week Northland Pines High School recently concluded its fifth annual Math Week with an awards presentation in the school’s auditorium. Math Week is organized by the Northland Pines Mathematics Department (Don Czarapata, John Hayes, Katie Carey, Jacob Husing and Steve Miller). This year’s theme, “Engineering a Better Math Week,” focused on the field of engineering. Therefore, the department teamed up with the Technology Education Department (Joshua Fuller, Tim Lehman and David Justice) to put on the event, which is sponsored by several local businesses. “The intention of Math Week is to celebrate mathematics and allow students to have some fun with different mathematical topics outside of the classroom,” said Pines math instructor Steve Miller. “Generating awareness and excitement for mathematics is this week’s goal.” Through fun-oriented competition, Math Week gives students a chance to show off math skills, problem-solving skills and creativity. Students who successfully completed events earned tickets for a prize raffle at the end of the week. Prizes for Math Week were donated and funded by sponsors and included water bottles. Tshirts, three TI-Nspire color calculators, three iPad Minis and more. Math Week activities included Problems of the Day, an engineering tour, poster contest, video contest, scavenger hunt, Math Survivor and an engineering challenge. “Each day of the week started with Math Week

Three UW-Marathon County students didn’t take a break this year from their studies during the traditional month-long pause between the fall and spring semesters at UW-Marathon County. In early January, they traveled to Central America to further their knowledge of Spanish and biology, respectively, as part of the UW Colleges Study Abroad Program. On Jan. 3, Rosa Greenan, who attended Northland Pines High School, traveled to Nicaragua to participate in the 19-day Nica Mundo Spanish language-immersion program. She joined 10 students from the 12 other University of Wisconsin campuses. As part of their trip, they fully engaged in Nicaragua’s cultural traditions, family life, ecology and socio-educational progress. The UW Colleges Study Abroad Program offers programs that have challenging coursework and provide opportunities for field study, community service, language immersion, internships, independent research, organized group excursions and personal travel. “It was an unforgettable experience, and I am so glad that I had the opportunity to travel to such a beautiful county. This trip taught me so much. It showed me many new perspectives of the

ROSA GREENAN

world. I was exposed to many different experiences that have changed my life. It was a great time,” said Greenan. The UW Colleges Study abroad programs are open to all college students and community members. “I learned a lot, improved my ability to speak and understand Spanish and grew by experiencing new people, cultures and foods. This trip has inspired me to continue my Spanish education. Studying abroad was one of the greatest events in my life and I would encourage anyone to study abroad.” For more information, contact Tetyana Schneider, study abroad coordinator, at (608) 890-4611.

Pines students, faculty take the Polar Plunge

The school’s math and technology department teachers, along with Math Week sponsors, congratulated grand-prize winner Annie Fuller. The group included, front row from left, Don Czarapata, Josh Fuller, David Justice and John Hayes; back row, Jacob Husing, Katie Hayes of

announcements, including that day’s activities, contest winners and facts about different engineering marvels,” said Miller. The announcements were brought to the student body by Spencer Gander and Dylan Weber. Additionally, many classes throughout the school participated in the daily classroom competition problem, according to Miller. “This basically was a race to see which class could be the first to determine the answer to the problem and, therefore, win a treat for the class,” he said. More than 65 students participated in this year’s events, submitting roughly 470 entries for the various contests. “With this year’s addition

Arrow Gift Shop, Rob Dixon of Ripco Credit Union, Darren Rubo of CornerStone Custom Builders, Katie Carey, Steve Miller, Annie Fuller, Alan Alby of Eagle Waste and Recycling, Lori Collins of SonicNet Inc., Jake Weinand of Mid-Wisconsin Bank and Tim Lehman.

of the engineering challenge put on by the Technology Education Department, the event continues to grow each year,” said Miller. In the engineering challenge, students competed in pairs or individually to construct objects that could accomplish a specific task given minimal supplies. In the contest, the team of Mitch Hess and Steven Vogel tied for first place with the team of Dylan Weber and Spencer Gander. In the other four major events, the following firstplace awardees included: Annie Fuller in the poster contest, Mitch Hess in the scavenger hunt, Logan Patterson in Math Survivor, and Teddy Wells in the video contest. Nine hundred twenty-

eight tickets were earned for this year’s prize raffle compared to approximately 500 last year. With 66 tickets earned, Annie Fuller took home one of the iPad Minis for earning the most tickets. Students winning math Tshirts and water bottles in the prize raffle were Vaun Prigge, Marcus Clure, Arianna Will, Emily Scharf, Teddy Wells, Nic Satran, Walker Levan, Sam Lacko, Jack Sarama, Molly Robinson, Maria Wait, Katie Sparks, Spencer Gander, Jon Konz and Dillan Schneider. Stephen Chamberlain, Donnell Rueben and Dylan Weber won the TI-Nspire graphing calculators, while Carson Cox and Mitch Hess won the two remaining iPad Minis.

The Northland Pines School District (NPSD) community is participating in the 2013 Polar Plunge to benefit the Special Olympics. Staff, students, community members and community partners can contribute pledges to the Soaring Eagles team featuring Principal Jim Brewer and Dean of Students Josh Tilley for the Northland Pines High School. They will be participating in the annual Toss the Boss Event and will be taking the plunge Friday, Feb. 22, at Sunny Vale Lake in Wausau. The Northland Pines School District continues its supportive role through the participation in the Toss the Boss Polar Plunge. Statewide, money raised through the Polar Plunge for Special Olympics Wisconsin continues to support sports for 10,000 athletes in Wisconsin. In addition, Northland Pines High School: Project UNIFY will participate in this event to support Special Olympics called the Plunge-aPalooza. Middle and high school students across the state collect funds toward their team’s pledges. NPHS: Project UNIFY Team leader and teacher Emily Rhode will be jumping along with ten Project UNIFY students, staff, and parents.

Cash donations for Brewer or Tilley can be sent to the high school and cash donations for Project UNIFY can be sent to Rhode at 2803 Pickeral Point Lane, Eagle River, WI 54521. All checks must be made payable to Special Olympics Wisconsin. Of the total amount raised by all team members, 25% will directly support Northern Access Special Olympics, a local agency.

In Loving Memory of

Chad Jolin 02/01/89 to 02/12/04 Chad is sadly missed by all who knew him. He is forever in our thoughts and prayers. The love he left us will continue to guide us. Thank you to all our family and friends for their endless love and support.

Marty, Lisa, Nick and Karenna Jolin

Thank You! To everyone who has been there for us during our recent medical situation, whether it be to say a prayer for us, call with a cheery greeting, send a card, bring food, send flowers, candy, etc., come to see us — thanks! Everyone has been extremely supportive and we are truly appreciative. 2343

STUDENT AWARDS — January Students of the Month at Northland Pines Middle School were from left, Laura Garling, seventh grade; Tyler

Hunt, sixth grade; and Mariah Miller, eighth grade. —Contributed Photo

Rivers to™the People

Sincerely ~ Sally and Jim Ayers

Chad, Doesn’t seem real, the years are now nine Since you were here, and things were fine Life has taken many twists and turns I’ve had my fill of tears and burns We are given just one heart Whole and pure at the start Mine was broken and put on a shelf I’m ready to heal and love myself The sites are set down that road How to live, I won’t be told There’s work left on earth to do Until my time to come join you I promise to do my very best To love openly through my quest Things have changed in our family life Always a mother, no longer a wife Nick had an awesome football season Hard work and dedication the reason He and the Titans went to the semi-finals Dad and I were lucky to travel the miles We shared in the history Nick has made The memories and pride will not fade As for Karenna, oh what should I say That girl amazes me more day by day Focused and driven to say the least Working and studying like a beast Her heart shines as bright as the sun She should slow down and have some fun I’m still close with many of your friends Marriages and babies the fun never ends People still remember your smile I’d like to have that in my life file To be remembered for something good Not for the things they think I should When each day is over and done I look to the stars with pride my son I send my love straight to the sky Catching those wings that soar so high Thanks for the signs that keep me alive They give me the strength to survive.

All my love, Mom 2274


VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 13, 2013

5B

The Almanac February W T F S S M T

MOTHERS OF PRESCHOOLERS — Meets the second and fourth Wed. of each month from 9-11:30 a.m. at Prince of Peace Lutheran Church. Call Lisann Snedden, (715) 479-1946.

EAGLE RIVER AMERICAN LEGION — Post 114 meets the first Mon. of each month at 6 p.m. in Eagle River. Call (715) 479-3983 or (715) 4770581.

MUSIC BOOSTERS — The Northland Pines Music Boosters meets the second Thurs. of each month during the school year. Call Forrest Mann, (715) 479-4473, ext. 0802.

EAGLE RIVER CHAPTER OF THE ORDER OF THE EASTERN STAR — Meets the first Tues. of every month at 7:30 p.m.at 610 E. Division St. Call (715) 479-8646.

MUSKIES INC. — The Headwaters Chapter meets the first Wed. of most months at Eagle River Inn & Resort. Call to confirm. Call Scott, (715) 8916133.

EAGLE RIVER HISTORICAL SOCIETY — Meets the last Mon. of each month at 1 p.m. at 519 Sheridan St. Call (715) 479-2396.

NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS — Keep It Simple meets Thurs. at 6 p.m. at First Congregational United Church of Christ. Call (866) 310-9077.

EAGLE RIVER MASONIC LODGE — Meets at 7 p.m. the second Tues. of each month at 610 E. Division St. Call (715) 479-8646.

NEW-YOU-CLUB — Meets Thurs. at 8:45 a.m. at Headwaters State Bank in Land O’ Lakes. Call Elsie Conant, (715) 547-6015.

Meetings

EAGLE RIVER VFW AND AUXILIARY — Joint meeting the fourth Thurs. of the month at 6:30 p.m. at 624 W. Pine St.

AL-ANON — Meets Wed. from 6:30-8 p.m. in the lobby conference room at Eagle River Memorial Hospital. Call (715) 628-0023.

GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS — Meets Wed. at 7 p.m. at Lac Vieux Desert Transfer Station Road in Watersmeet, Mich.

NORTHWOODS ASSOCIATION FOR THE EDUCATION OF YOUNG CHILDREN — Training sessions are held the third Mon. of each month from 68:30 p.m. Sessions will be credited toward continuing-education hours for child-care providers. Call 1-(800) 4705833 or (715) 479-0337.

Recreation

the first and third Wed. of each month at Ely Memorial Church in Land O’ Lakes from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Call Dean Karlovich at (715) 891-3771.

BADGER BRIDGE — Meets Mon. from 1-4 p.m. at Kalmar Senior Center. Reservations not required. Partner provided if needed. Call (715) 362-8933.

FIRST AID/CPR CLASSES — The American Red Cross offers various first aid, CPR and AED classes in Rhinelander. Call (715) 362-5456.

DUPLICATE BRIDGE — Meets Mon. at 1 p.m., Thurs. at 6:30 p.m., at First Congregational United Church of Christ in Eagle River. Call (715) 5463021.

GED PREPARATION — Classes are available at Nicolet Learning Center, Olson Memorial Library, Eagle River, Mon., Wed. and Thurs. from 4 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Tues. from 4 to 8 p.m. Call (715) 365-4455 or 1-(800) 544-3039.

NORTHWOODS CHILDREN’S MUSEUM — Hands-on educational exhibits and programs. Fun for all ages. Prime ages 1-10. Call (715) 479-4623 or visit northwoodschildrensmuseum.com. NORTHWOODS SINGERS — Meets Tues. at 6:30 p.m. at First Congregational United Church of Christ in Eagle River. New singers welcome. Call Barb Nehring, (715) 547-3333. OLSON MEMORIAL LIBRARY — Children’s Story Hour meets Wed. from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. at the library at 203 N. Main St. in Eagle River. Call (715) 479-8070. OUTDOOR WOMEN’S GROUP — Activities are held the first Sun. of each month. Call Norma Yaeger, (715) 4771984. SCRAPBOOK CLUB — Meets the last Tues. of each month. Call Cathy, (715) 479-3164.

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS — Closed meetings Mon. and Fri. at 7:30 p.m., First Congregational United Church of Christ in Eagle River; closed step meetings Sun., 2 p.m., Land O’ Lakes Town Hall (rear entrance). Turning Point Group meetings Tues., 7:30 p.m., Community Church annex, Hwy. K; 7:30 p.m., St. Theresa Church in Three Lakes; and Sat. 10 a.m. at Holy Family Church in Woodruff. Closed meetings at St. Germain Community United Church of Christ Thurs. at 7 p.m. and in the Newbold Town Hall Wed. Call (715) 367-7920. Open meetings at the Spiritual Center in Watersmeet, Mich., Mon. at 1 p.m., and Tues. at 7 p.m., closed meeting Friday at 2 p.m. Call (715) 545-2769. northwoodsaa.org.

WATER AEROBICS — Classes at Lake Forest Resort Tues. and Thurs. from 8:30-9:30 a.m. Call (715) 4793251.

ASSAULT SURVIVORS — Tri County Council on Domestic Violence and Assault’s sexual assault survivor’s support group meets Tues. Call Elizabeth, (715) 362-6841.

WOODCARVERS — Northwoods Woodcarvers meets Wed. at 1 p.m. at Kalmar Center in Eagle River. All are welcome. Call John Modjewski, (715) 479-6093.

BOOK CLUB — Olson Library Book Club meets the first Thurs. of each month (except July, Aug. and Dec.) from 7-8:30 p.m. Call (715) 479-8070.

YMCA — The YMCA Pines Fitness Center is open for adults and youths grade six and older Mon.-Thurs., 5:30 a.m.-9 p.m.; Fri., 5:30 a.m.-7 p.m.; Sat., 7 a.m.-1 p.m.; and Sun., noon-4 p.m. Monthly, weekly and daily memberships available. Call (715) 479-9500.

Events COMMUNITY DINNERS — Northwoods SHARE offers free community dinners the first and third Tues. of each month at Lincoln Town Hall in Eagle River. Doors open at 4 p.m., dinner at 5:30 p.m. Call Donna Goeddaeus, (715) 479-8244. HELP offers free community dinners

EAGLE RIVER GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY — Meets the fourth Thurs. of each month at 7 p.m. in the Northland Pines High School library. Call Sharon Rogers, (715) 889-3157.

BOY SCOUTS — Boy Scout Troop 601 meets Tues. in Eagle River at 6 p.m. Call Kay Tulppo, (715) 479-7409. CELEBRATE RECOVERY® — Presented by Birchwood Community Church. Meets Thurs. at 6 p.m. at 115 Division St., Eagle River. (715) 8911946. CHRISTIAN COALITION — Meets the last Tues. of each month at 7 p.m. at Donna’s Cafe in Eagle River. Call Jeff Hyslop, (715) 479-4066. DIABETES SUPPORT GROUP — Meets the first Wed. of each month from 10-11 a.m. in the lower level of the Land O’ Lakes library. Call Mery Krause, (906) 544-2554. DOLL CLUB — The Enchanted Doll Club meets the third Sat. of each

GRIEF SUPPORT — A Time to Mourn, open to any adult who has suffered a loss, meets the second Thurs. of each month from 1-2:30 p.m. at Lakeland Senior Center in Woodruff. Call Connie DeBels, (715) 356-8805. GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP — Side By Side, open to everyone, meets the third Thurs. of each month at 1 p.m. at St. Peter’s Catholic Church. Call (715) 479-8704. HUMANE SOCIETY OF VILAS COUNTY — Meets the first Tues. of each month at 5 p.m. at the Vilas County Animal Shelter. JAYCEES — The Eagle River Area Jaycees meets the second Tues. of each month at 6:30 p.m. Call Michelle, (715) 617-6384 or Cheryl, (715) 6170265. KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS — Knights of Columbus meets the first Wed. of each month at 7 p.m. in Eagle River. Call (715) 479-4476. KNITTING CLUB — Northwoods Knitters and Purlers meets the fourth Mon. of each month at the Woodruff Town Hall. Call Carol Clauser, (715) 4538055. LAKELAND ART LEAGUE — New members and visitors welcome. Call Arlene, (715) 272-1168. LIONS CLUB — The Eagle River Lions Club meets the second and fourth Wed. of each month at 6:30 p.m. Call (715) 479-2666. LIONS CLUB — The Three Lakes Lions Club meets the first Mon. of each month at 6:30 p.m. at Oneida Village Inn. Call (715) 546-3493. MEMORY LOSS SUPPORT GROUP — Meets the fourth Tues. of each month at 1 p.m. at the Medical Arts Building. Diane Bluthardt, facilitator. Call (715) 362-7779 or (715) 4793625.

Marlene’s Mercantile opens Consignment shop owner, Marlene Bauman, announces the opening of Marlene’s Mercantile in Eagle River. The consignment shop offers previously owned furniture, home goods, namebrand clothing and accessories. The store also carries brand-new items purchased from businesses that have previously closed and will carry new vintage memorabilia in the future. The store is located in Eagle River in the business plaza on the corner of Railroad Street and McKinley Boulevard, at 701 Railroad St. Unit E. The store hours are Wednesdays through Fridays 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., and Saturdays 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The business opened in mid-December, and a grand opening celebration is scheduled for Thursday, Feb. 14 and Friday, Feb. 15. Refreshments, sales, treats and giveaways will be included at the event. Bauman was born and raised in Oshkosh, moved to Sugar Camp in 1991, and she now resides in Eagle River. “I’ve always loved Eagle River and am proud to own a business in this community. I look forward to reconnecting with the people I’ve met here while working for the chamber,” said Bauman. “My career has always been in sales and customer service. I worked for the Eagle River Area Chamber of Commerce, as a sales rep for a food service company and owned and operated a kitchen-supply store in Rhinelander.” In addition, Bauman has two children, Hunter and Brooke Matthison, who attend Three Lakes High

MILITARY SUPPORT GROUP — All Things Military meets the second Mon. of each month at 7 p.m. at Olson Memorial Library. Family members and friends of military personnel are welcome. Call Scott Jensen, (715) 4793631.

EASY EAGLES — Meets every other Tues. at 11:30 a.m. at Riverstone Restaurant & Tavern. Call Charlie Eggers, (715) 479-1799.

13 14 15 16 17 18 19

MAHJONGG — American mahjongg is played Mon. at 10 a.m. at the Eagle River Golf Course clubhouse. Reservations not required. New players welcome. Email molly@mollya.com.

month at 1 p.m. at Olson Memorial Library. Call Judy Wainwright, (715) 479-7132.

NORTHWOODS NEEDLEWORKERS — Meets the second Wed. of each month from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. at Cloverland Town Hall. Call (715) 479-7850, (715) 477-2579 or (715) 545-2664. NORTHWOODS PATRIOTS — Meets the second Tues. of each month at 6:30 p.m. at Eagle River Inn and Resort. Call Shirley Kufeldt, (715) 479-9187. QUILTERS — Cranberry Country Quilters Inc. meets the third Mon. of each month at 9:30 a.m. at Prince of Peace Lutheran Church. New members welcome. Call (715) 479-4302. QUILTERS — Eagle River Kreative Quilters meet the second and fourth Mon. of each month at Olson Memorial Library. ROTARY CLUB — The Eagle River Rotary Club meets Mon. at noon at Eagle River Inn. Visiting Rotarians are welcome. THREE LAKES CENTER FOR THE ARTS IN THE NORTHWOODS — Meets Fri. at 9 a.m. at the arts center. Call Marie Moore, (715) 546-2299. THREE LAKES GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY — Meets the fourth Mon. of each month at 1 p.m. at Demmer Library. Call Nancy Brewster, (715) 546-3391. TOASTMASTERS — Northwoods Toastmasters meets the second Thurs. of each month at 7 p.m. at Olson Memorial Library. Call Tom, (715) 5468032.

“I just received prom dresses in for sale and teenagers should bring clothes in to sell and earn extra money,” said Bauman. Those interested in consignment may bring in clean, smoke-free, stain-free clothing. In particular need are hunting and fishing items for the men’s department, such as fishing poles, lures, hunting clothing and tools. For more information, call (715) 617-1624.

VILAS COUNTY MASTER GARDENERS — Meets the second Thurs. of each month at 6 p.m. at Prince of Peace Lutheran Church. Call Shirley Egan, (715) 479-8820. VILAS FOOD PANTRY — Open Wed. from 8:30-10 a.m. and the first and third Tues. of each month from 3:305:15 p.m. in Eagle River. Call Richard, (715) 479-7524 or Jerry, (715) 4771165. WRITERS GROUP — The Writer’s Voice meets the second and fourth Wed. of each month from 6-8 p.m. at Olson Memorial Library. Call Karin, (715) 479-5232. WEIGHT WATCHERS — Meets Tues. at 5:30 p.m in Eagle River. Call 1-(800) 651-6000.

MATERNAL AND CHILD HEALTH HOT LINE: Mothers in need of health and nutrition information, financial aid or advocacy can contact the hot line 24 hours a day at 1-(800) 722-2295. mchhotlines.org. MOMS IN MOTION CLASS — Free classes for pregnant women or new mothers Tues. and Thurs. from 6-7:30 p.m. at Saint Mary’s Hospital in Rhinelander. Call (715) 369-6522.

ACT NOW — Open to physically challenged people in wheelchairs. Call Alvin Weso, (715) 478-5120.

NARCONON — Provides answers to drug addiction, free assessment, evaluation and referral services. Call 1-(800) 468-6933. stopaddiction.com.

ADVANCE HEALTH-CARE PLANNING WORKSHOPS — Meets first and third Fri. of each month at the Medical Arts Building. Call (715) 479-0375. ALZHEIMER’S SUPPORT GROUP — Meets at Lillian Kerr Nursing Care & Rehabilitation Center in Phelps. Call Laura Javenkowski, (715) 545-2589.

CANCER SUPPORT GROUP — Meets the second Thurs. of each month at 10 a.m. at James Beck Cancer Center at Ministry Saint Mary’s Hospital in Rhinelander. Call (715) 361-2027. DAYBREAK ADULT CENTER — Provides relief to caregivers who have elder-

Amvets seeks new members

Trees For Tomorrow Seasonal Naturalist Sierra Jockisch will give a free presentation on American landscape as she views the country from the seat of her bicycle, Wednesday, Feb. 20, at 6:30 p.m. in the Education Hall at Trees For Tomorrow in Eagle River. This presentation will show and describe some of the United States’ bioregions as observed from a bicycle, as well as recount the adventures of fulfilling Bike & Build’s mission to Pedal for Affordable Housing. The 4,000-mile journey, completed with the nonprofit Bike & Build, also doubled as research for her college senior project. The event is sponsored by Nordmarka Cross-Country Ski Club, which sponsors two public programs each winter. For more information, contact Troy Walters at (715) 4796456 or troy@treesfortomorrow.com.

KIDS IN NEED — Confidential 24-hour hot line, 1-(800) 622-9120, to teens and their families. Call Mary Gadzalinski at Community Mental Health Services, (715) 369-2994.

Health

TRI-COUNTY COUNCIL ON DOMESTIC VIOLENCE AND SEXUAL ASSAULT — Support groups for domestic violence and sexual assault meet weekly. Call (715) 479-2912, (715) 362-6841 or 1-(800) 236-1222. VFW MEETING — Eagle River Post

ly persons living with them. Activities include social events, outings, noon meal and snacks. Meets Thurs. from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. at Prince of Peace Lutheran Church. Call (715) 617-0584.

NORTHWOODS MS SUPPORT GROUP — Meets the third Tues. of each month at 2 p.m. at Grace Foursquare Church in Rhinelander. Call Janet Carlstedt, (715) 545-2245.

NORTHWOODS ALZHEIMER’S SUPPORT GROUP — Meets the first Thurs. of each month at 1:30 p..m. at One Penny Place in Woodruff. Call Joan Hauer, (715) 892-0053 or (715) 356-6540.

Jockisch to give presentation on bioregions

School. “My children are the center of my life and I enjoy watching them participate in sports and watching them grow.” The consignment shop features a new and frequently updated inventory. Items that don’t sell within a certain amount of time, will be donated or returned to the consignor in order to keep the store fresh with interesting and different items.

8637 meets the fourth Thurs. of each month. Joint meeting with Auxiliary at 6:30 p.m.; regular meeting at 7 p.m. Call (715) 479-8810.

TOPS WI 87 — Meets Thurs. at Eagle River City Hall. Weigh-in from 5-5:25 p.m., meeting follows. All are welcome. Call Holly Schmucki, (715) 479-5426.

Amvets Post 8400 welcomes all veterans who have served in the U.S. Armed Forces abroad, in the United States, in the Reserves and National Guard to join its growing post. Amvets Post 8400 meets every third Tuesday of the month at the VFW Post building located on Highway B in Land O’ Lakes. For more information, call (715) 545-3137 or 891-5631; or stop at the VFW Post which is open Wednesdays through Saturdays at 4 p.m.

Marlene Bauman has opened Marlene’s Mercantile in the business plaza at the corner of Railroad Street and McKinley Boulevard in Eagler River. —Contributed Photo

Smokey Bear visits Land O’ Lakes. —STAFF PHOTO

NORTHWOODS AREA PARKINSON’S DISEASE SUPPORT GROUP — Meets the second Tues. of each month at 10 a.m. at Ascension Lutheran Church in Minocqua. Call Denny Leith, (715) 3582207. SEXUAL ASSAULT SUPPORT GROUP — Sponsored by Tri-County Council on Domestic Violence & Sexual Assault. Meets Mon. from 4:30-6 p.m. in Rhinelander; Thurs., 2-3:30 p.m. in Rhinelander; Thurs., 5:30-6:45 p.m. in Minocqua. Call (715) 362-6841 Mon.-Fri. from 8 a.m.-4 p.m. SURVIVORS OF SUICIDE SUPPORT GROUP — Meets the third Thurs. of each month from 5-7 p.m. at Trig’s RiverWalk Center in Rhinelander. Meetings are free and open to the public. Call Sue Mackowski, (715) 275-5399 or Tina Werres, (715) 499-3002.

Woodruff/Minocqua, WI 600 1st Ave. (Hwy. 47) 715-358-2510

Put your Wedding Announcement in the Vilas County News-Review & The Three Lakes News Wedding announcement forms can be obtained from the Vilas County News-Review office or can be printed off our website @ www.vcnewsreview.com. NEWLYWEDS…

Please notify us of your address and you will get the newspaper for 6 months FREE! VILAS COUNTY

NEWS-REVIEW P.O. Box 1929, Eagle River, WI 54521 Ph.: 715-479-4421 Fax: 715-479-6242 E-mail: erpub@nnex.net Website: www.vcnewsreview.com


6B

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 13, 2013

VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS

LIFESTYLE BACKWARD GLANCES Doll Club sets Feb. 16 meeting The Enchanted Doll Club of the Northwoods will hold its monthly meeting on Saturday, Feb. 16, at 1 p.m. in the Olson Memorial Library. The meeting will open with a business meeting, and Elma Knuth of Ewan, Mich. will present a program on costuming antique and modern dolls. Knuth will demonstrate the cartridge pleating stitch used in sewing authentic antique dresses for dolls. She has won ribbons for costuming different kinds of antique dolls. She plans to bring several of the dolls to illustrate the variety of sewing techniques she uses. Judy Wainwright of Eagle River was the speaker at the last meeting, where she presented a program on the Lee Middleton Doll Co. Lee Middleton was the first doll artist to sculpt baby dolls out of vinyl in 1981. Her baby dolls became so popular that Belpre, Ohio, where her factory was located was called “The Baby Doll Capital of the World.” Her baby dolls were often sold in nurseries, retail stores and were so realistic that they were often mistaken for real babies. For more information about the program or the doll club, contact Bonnie Margitan at (715) 356-6889 or Judy Wainwright at 479-7132.

One Year Ago St. Germain began efforts to implement a Neighborhood Watch . . . The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) took over management of the state’s gray wolf population . . . The Eagle River City Council decided to include the construction of sidewalks in the Silver Lake Road reconstruction project.

Five Years Ago The Vilas County Forestry and Land Committee introduced a proposal to buy property on Highway G in Eagle River for a park complex with soccer and baseball fields . . . The Warning Gallery, an addition to the Snowmobile Hall of Fame in St. Germain, opened . . . The Northland Pines cheer team won the state championship.

Judy Wainwright of Eagle River holds “Heaven Sent,” one of the realistic baby dolls manufactured by the Lee Middleton Doll Company. The doll is designed to be what doll lovers call “a thumb sucker.” —Contributed Photo

Olson library sets February events The Story Hour for Wednesday, Feb. 13, will be First Books for Kids, featurings “Who Loves the Little Lamb?” by Lezlie Evans, “Huggy Kissy” by Leslie Patricelle, and “Will You Be My Valenswine?” by Teresa Bateman. Story hour will include songs, finger plays and a valentine’s craft. All preschool children are welcome, accompanied by an adult. February is Black History Month. The library has several books available about famous African-Americans and African-American folk tales, including a story about the trickster Anansi. February also commemorates Abraham Lincoln’s and George Washington’s birthdays. The library has many books of all reading levels about these two American leaders. The children’s department is featuring a station where anyone can create a valentine for a serviceperson. These valentines will be given to the Veterans of Foreign Wars to be sent to area servicepersons or given to the veterans at the veterans’ hospital in Iron Mountain, Mich. Information is available in the children’s department about the Great Backyard Bird Count. This annual event

More Than A Meal Café Senior Nutrition Meals Serving at noon Sponsored by Vilas County Commission on Aging

Reservations or cancellations need to be called in 24 hours in advance between 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. Call Jennie Johnson at (715) 891-1221. Meals are served Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays and Fridays at The American Legion, located at 530 Hwy. 45 S. Bus service upon request. Home-delivered meals are available based on eligibility. While there is no set fee for a meal, the suggested donation is $4 per meal. No one will be denied service because of inability to contribute.

Compiled by Carly Ratliff

will take place from Friday, Feb. 15 through Monday, Feb. 18, all over the U.S. and Canada. Children are welcome to participate. Participants will watch their feeders or yards for at least 15 minutes each day and write down the total number of each kind of bird seen during each observance, and create a report for each day. Report sheets are available on the shelves by the bulletin board in the children’s department. More information can be found at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology site or at eBird.com. Chinese New Year celebrations began Sunday, Feb. 10, and will run for 15 days. Children are welcome to create a Chinese lantern or make a red good luck envelope. Supplies will be available through Monday, Feb. 25. There is still plenty of time for children in grades three through 10 to pick up the materials to participate in the Milwaukee Bucks Reading

Program. Students who read at least 500 pages between Jan. 2 and Wednesday Feb. 27 will earn a free ticket to a Bucks game either on Sunday, March 17, or Sunday, March 24, at the Bradley Center in Milwaukee. All children who earn a ticket and attend a game will get a free Bucks Tshirt and the chance to shoot a free throw after the game. A parent or adult must accompany the reader and siblings also may attend. Discounts are available for the persons who accompany the reader. Forms also are available at area elementary and high school libraries. Saturday, Feb. 2, was Take Your Child to the Library Day. Displays of Wisconsin authors, displays of new books, a children’s book trivia contest, a know-your-fairytales-andnursery-rhymes contest and a make your own I Went to the Library doorknob hangers craft. The displays will continue through February.

10 Years Ago Mary Jo Berner donated the former WERL/WRJO radio station property to the Humane Society of Vilas County . . . Vilas County received a $55,000 grant to update 911-call center equipment to better serve cellphone users . . . More than 600 people attended the 20th annual Stump Dump Pageant. 15 Years Ago The building boom across the North Woods continued into its eighth consecutive year . . . 55 sled-dog teams competed in the 10th annual Headwaters Classic . . . Three Lakes School District Administrator George Karling received the Fair Aid Coalition Distinguished Service Award.

for people of all ages, of any diagnosis, provided in the place they call home. While the majority of hospice care occurs in private homes, Ministry's team also supplements the care provided by the residential staff at nursing homes, assisted living facilities and other community-based residences. Medicare, Medicaid and most private insurance companies provide some funding for this comprehensive care, but many who need it are underinsured or uninsured. As part of their mission, Ministry provides this important end-of-life care to anyone who is medically eligible, regardless of their ability to pay.

20 Years Ago The first re-enactment of the first snowmobile derby was held on Dollar Lake . . . Two homes and two businesses were destroyed by separate fires in the space of a week across the North Woods . . . Vilas County had to replace $11,000 in snowmobile trail signs after a rash of thefts. 30 Years Ag Northland Pines School Board voted to drop wrestling as an offered high school sport . . . St. Germain Chamber of Commerce initiated a fish preservation and stocking program . . . 35 snowmobile racers were set to appear in the 400-lap Pro Enduro race. 40 Years Ago A film crew shot promotional movies of John Deere snowmobiles in the Land O’ Lakes area . . . A Land O’ Lakes woman pleaded not guilty to manslaughter in the shooting death of her husband.

Grief support set Thursday A free support group is available for adults who are grieving a loss. The group, called Side by Side, is co-sponsored by St. Peter the Fisherman parish and Ministry Home Care. It is free to attend and open to anyone. The group meets on the third Thursday of each month, and the next meeting scheduled for Thursday, Feb. 21, at 1 p.m. at St. Peter the Fisherman parish, located at 5001 Highway G in Eagle River. For more information, call St. Peter’s at (715) 479-8704.

Dart tournament planned Falk to hold to benefit hospice program book signing The third annual Chicago Style Dart Tournament, On Target for Quality of Life, will be held Saturday, Feb. 23, at Bucketheads Sports Bar & Grill, located at 46 N. Brown Street in Rhinelander, to raise funds for Ministry Home Care's hospice program. Registration will begin at 11:30 a.m. and the tournament will begin at noon. The tournament will feature a women's doubles and luck of the draw tournament, men's doubles and luck of the draw, as well as open luck of the draw to follow. Cost is $6 per person, per tournament, of which $1 of every fee will be donated to hospice. In addition, there will be a raffle with prizes donated by local businesses. All raffle proceeds are donated to Ministry Home Care’s hospice program. Hospice is end-of-life care

This photograph of Brandner’s Store, now Chain O’ Lakes Cyclery in Eagle River, was contributed by Marv Elliott of Eagle River.

A u t h o r, Connie J. Falk will hold a Valentines’ Day book s i g n i n g T h u r s d a y, Feb. 14, from 11 a.m. until 2 p.m., at Eagle River FALK Roasters, located at 339 W. Pine St. in Eagle River. Those attending will have the opportunity to meet Falk and have her sign a copy of, “Goldstars and Daydreams” and her new release “Moonbeams and Mysteries.”

50 Years Ago The Eagle River City Council proposed to move the library to the basement of city hall . . . A public easement opened Nine Lake to public recreation for the first time. 60 Years Ago The cost of admission at the Vilas Theatre was 60 cents . . . With temperatures in the mid-20s, the first robins returned to the North Woods. 70 Years Ago Two men were arrested near Trout Lake for poaching deer invorder to supplement their meat rations . . . Students at Phelps High School sold enough war stamps and bonds to have a military Jeep visit the school. 80 Years Ago A proposal to consolidate Vilas, Oneida, Forest, Florence and Price counties caused controversy . . . Temperatures across the North Woods remained in the sub-zero range for the second consecutive week.

EAGLE RIVER DUPLICATE BRIDGE

Kalmar Senior Dining

Results of 2/4/13

Serving at noon Sponsored by SERVE

Kalmar Senior Dining is available at the Kalmar Senior Community Center at 1011 N. Railroad St. and is open to all persons older than 55. Meals are served Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays and are prepared on site. Meal cost is $5, reservations are required. Reservations must be made 24 hours in advance, between 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. Call (715) 479-2633.

First place:Bill Murphy and Flo Erickson. Second place: Terry McCloskey and June Harrison. Third place: Bob and Mary Ellen Peterman. Results of 2/7/13

First place: Terry McCloskey and Kaye McCardle. Second place (tie): Joy Holperin and Jim Moon, Sally Kemp and Vickie Brown, Bob and Mary Ellen Peterman Duplicate bridge is played every Monday at 12:30 p.m. and every Thursday at 6:30 p.m. in the basement of First Congregational United Church of Christ, located at the corner of First and Division streets. The public is welcome. For more information, call (715) 546-3021.

TUESDAY, FEB. 19 Ham Hash browns Mixed vegetables Roll Pudding

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 20 Pork chop Scalloped potatoes Peas Biscuit Apple dessert

BADGER BRIDGE IN EAGLE RIVER Results of 2/4/13

North-South, first place: Marge and Jerry Baerenwald East-West, first place: Merilyn Penn and Ed Stoever. Second place: Andrea Matthews and Gayla Neumeister.

THURSDAY, FEB. 21 Turkey Mashed potatoes w/gravy Corn Roll Cobbler All meals include lowfat milk and coffee. Bus available upon request.

School Meals

Bridge is played every Monday from 1 to 4 p.m. at the Kalmar Senior Center in Eagle River and is open to the public. For information, call Ed Stoever, club manager, at (715) 362-8933.

We serve education every day™

NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the official public test of the automatic tabulating equipment to be used in the Feb. 19, 2013, Primary Election in the Town of Cloverland will be conducted at 2819 E. Hunter Lake Rd., Eagle River, on Friday, Feb. 15, 2013, at 10:00 a.m.

For more information, contact Trisha Schultz at (715) 493-7119 or Melissa Houg at 361-2263.

Millie  Ritzer, Town Clerk

2284

TUESDAY, FEB. 19 Beef-chop suey Brown rice Stir-fry vegetables Egg roll w/sweet-and-sour sauce Mandarin oranges Fortune cookie

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 20 Breaded-pork cutlet Baked sweet potato Salad Whole-grain roll Rosy applesauce

s t D n a e y d i Sale s e r P Feb. 15, 16 & 17 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Phone Orders Welcome

THURSDAY, FEB. 21 Herbed-baked chicken Scalloped potatoes Asparagus Raisin bread Fruit pie

FRIDAY, FEB. 22 Baked macaroni & cheese Tropical-fruit salad Vegetable juice Whole-wheat bread 7-layer bar All meals include 1% milk and coffee. Bus service is available upon request.

50%-70% OFF Select Items Fri. 10-4, Sat. 10-4, Sun. 10-3

2965 Main St. Sayner, WI 715-542-2884 2959 Main St., Sayner, WI 715-542-2101

3019 Main St., Sayner, WI 54560 Ph/Fax: (715) 542-3031

25% OFF Storewide Up to 70% OFF

www.RusticRiverDecor.com

sale excludes antiques & Da Vinci items

Clearance Items

OPEN PRESIDENTS WEEKEND

Going-Out-of-Business Sale

50% OFF Storewide except Clear View Transparencies

25% OFF Storewide Select Items up to 50% OFF

Clothing Never Before On Sale!

2933 Main St., Sayner, WI 715-542-4363


VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS

WALLY GEIST (715) 892-3545

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 13, 2013

ST. GERMAIN/SAYNER

7B

wally.geist@yahoo.com 8122 MELODY DR. E., ST. GERMAIN, WI 54558

Library to hold Hobo Dinner The Friends of the Plum Lake Library will be hosting a Hobo Dinner Saturday, Feb. 16, from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. at the Sayner Community Building. The menu includes homemade hobo stew, coleslaw, pickles, bread, brownies and a beverage. Tickets for the dinner are $7.50 for adults or $8 at the door and $4.50 for children ages 12 and younger or $5 at the door. Tickets are available at the library. The event will include door prizes and a raffle.

For more information, contact the library at (715) 5422020. The Plum Lake Woman’s Club will hold their Challenge Block Contest People’s Choice judging from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. at the Hobo Dinner. First-, second- and thirdplace winners will be announced at the dinner. People’s Choice judging is open to everyone. After the judging, the blocks will be made into the 2013 quilt to be raffled off at the Christmas Fest scheduled for Saturday, Nov. 16.

Prime-Time Dining Prime-Time Dining is available at the St. Germain senior nutrition site located at Fibber’s Restaurant, 8679 Big St. Germain Drive. Meals are served Mondays, Fridays and Saturdays at noon. Home-delivered meals are available based on eligibility.

Firefighters supporting the Hot Reads program by driving and chaperoning kindergarten through fifth-graders are, front row from left, Chad Bacon, John Wichner (Plum Lake Volunteer

Fire Department); and back row, Phil Kohout, Tim Clark, Glenn Svetnike and John Vojta. —Photo By Wally Geist

Hot Reads Program rewards reading Fifteen St. Germain Elementary School students and two chaperones were taken to a pizza lunch at Knockers in St. Germain by six volunteer firefighters from St. Germain and Plum Lake Fire Departments Wednesday, Feb. 6. Participating students are all leading Hot Reads

winners from October, November and December. Hot reads is a unique local program created by Fire Chief Tim Clark and his wife to encourage reading while the students are not at school. The program is an example of role models setting examples for the children as

Cami Cox, Sierra Anderson, Owen Will. Third-graders were Mason Thomas, Austin Kellner, Sami Huelskamp. Fourth-graders invited to the event were Colby Kruse, Vera Hrdlicka, Amberleigh Pederson and fifth-graders included Conor Marek, Gunnar Schiffmann and Sam Johnson.

firefighters and sheriff ’s deputies take part in reading to the students in school on a monthly basis. Students at lunch were: kindergartners Zander Broomfield, Jeremy Hensen, Dakota Derepkowski. Firstgraders included Rheanna Eron, Asher Peters, Evelyn Wirth. Second-graders were

While there is no set fee for a meal, donations will be accepted. No one will be denied service because of inability to contribute. The suggested donation is $4. For reservations, contact Verdelle Mauthe, site manager, 24 hours in advance, at (715) 542-2951.

FRIDAY, FEB. 15

SATURDAY, FEB. 16

Crispy-golden shrimp Twice-baked potato Coleslaw Rye bread Pumpkin bar

Beef-taco salad Tapioca

MONDAY, FEB. 18 Shaved-barbecued prime rib on a kaiser roll Melon Chocolate cake

All meals served with bread or roll, margarine and low-fat milk.

Program distributes valentines for vets

Rick Lovdal of Sayner Mobil presents a check from the Exxon Mobil’s Educational Alliance Grant to Gayle Daniel, principal of St. Germain Elementary School, Feb. 7. The grant money is to be used for math and science programs at the school. —Photo By Wally Geist

St. Germain Elementary receives two grants Two grants of $500 each were presented to St. Germain Elementary School Feb. 7. The $1,000 total is provided by Exxon Mobil to schools within a service station’s community and are to be used for science and math. One check was presented by Rick Lovdal from Sayner Mobil who nominated the school for the second year in a row and won grants both years. “I nominated the school because my daughter, Maya, attended here and I highly respect the dedicated staff and curriculum,” said Lovdal “The grant’s subtitle is ‘Filling up youthful minds.’ It provides funds for the school to add equipment or books to help round out its science and math curriculum,” added Lovdal. The second check was presented by David Weber on behalf of the Little Saint Fuel Express station in St. Germain.

“My father, Bruce, filled out the nomination papers because his grandchildren attend this school. He realizes how important math and science skills are in today’s world,” said Weber. “Any way we can advance our school is important.” Principal Gayle Daniel explained that the grant money would go toward helping the school meet common core standards. “Next year the full math and science standards will be implemented and we will use these additional books to enrich our math and science students,” said Daniel. Both Lovdal and Weber were required to write short essays about their local school and fill out application forms to enable Exxon Mobil to provide the grant through their distributors. Sayner Mobil’s distributor is Riiser Energy of Wausau and U.S. Venture Inc. of Appleton distributes fuel to the Little Saint Fuel Express.

Barb Petner of Sauk Village, Ill., is no stranger to the St. Germain Women’s Service Club. Women’s Club Secretary Bonnie Kegley pointed the club in Petner’s direction for a valentine’s service project three years ago. “Barb’s home is fondly known as Valentine Central. She has been collecting and distributing valentines for veterans’ hospitals and veterans’ nursing homes throughout the United States,” said Kegley. Petner also is known to scouting troops, civic and service organizations, school children, church groups which support her mission by providing her with signed and personalized valentines for the veterans. “The valentines can be store bought, as are the ones the women’s service club is collecting or homemade,” said Kegley. “Barb also shares with groups providing cards some of the thank you letters and notes of appreciation she receives from the hospital and nursing home social workers.” Petner’s Facebook page notes that more than 3,500 cards have been received since the beginning of the year.

Bonnie Kegley deposits a Valentine’s Day card into the Valentines for Vets container at the St. Germain Women’s Club meeting at the Community Center Jan. 15. Cards are forwarded to

Barb Petner, Sauk Village, Ill, who distributes them to veterans hospitals and nursing homes around the United States. —Photo By Wally Geist

PUBLIC NOTICES _____________ (Three Weeks, 2/6-2/20/13) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT VILAS COUNTY — PROBATE — Order Setting Deadline for Filing a Claim (Formal Administration) Case No. 13PR06 IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF William John Grigus Jr. A petition for formal administration was filed. THE COURT FINDS: 1. The decedent, with date of birth May 9, 1947 and date of death Dec. 21, 2012, was domiciled in Vilas County, State of Wisconsin, with a mailing address of 1388 Ace Lane, Eagle River, WI 54521. 2. All interested persons waived notice. THE COURT ORDERS: 1. The deadline for filing a claim against the decedent’s estate is May 17, 2013. 2. A claim must be filed at the Vilas County Courthouse, Eagle River, Wisconsin, Probate Branch. BY THE COURT: /s/ Dawn Halverson Circuit Court Commissioner 1/28/13

John L. O’Brien P.O. Box 639 Eagle River, WI 54521 (715) 479-6444 Bar No. 1007902 2746

_____________

(Three Weeks, 2/13-2/27/13) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT, VILAS COUNTY — PROBATE — Notice to Creditors (Informal Administration) Case No. 12PR22A IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF EUGENE R. LANDRATH PLEASE TAKE NOTICE: 1. An application for informal administration was filed. 2. The decedent, with date of birth May 21, 1942 and date of death February 28, 2012, was domiciled in Vilas County, State of Wisconsin, with a mailing address of 3018 Juniper Trail, Sayner, WI 54560. 3. All interested persons waived notice. 4. The deadline for filing a claim against the decedent’s estate is May 31, 2013. 5. A claim may be filed at the Vilas

NOTICE

TOWN OF WASHINGTON The public test of the automatic tabulating equipment to be used in the Feb. 19, 2013, Spring Primary Election in the town of Washington, will be conducted at 4:45 p.m., on Thursday, Feb. 14, 2013, at the Washington Town Hall, 2301 Town Hall Rd., Eagle River, WI 54521. Michele Sanborn, Clerk Town of Washington 2270

County Courthouse, 330 Court Street, Eagle River, WI 54521, Wisconsin, Probate Branch. /s/Dawn Halverson Probate Registrar 2/6/2013 Ashley L. Hawley, Esq. Jackman Law Firm, LLC

P.O. Box 1205 Wausau, WI 54402-1205 (715) 298-9445 Bar No. 1077258 3574

WNAXLP

TOWN OF PLUM LAKE NOTICE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to Wisconsin Statutes Sec. 5.84, the public test of all voting equipment to be used at the PRIMARY ELECTION on Feb. 19, 2013, in the town of Plum Lake will be conducted in the Town Hall, 8755 Lake Street, Sayner, Wis., at 2:00 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 15, 2013. 2266

Sharon Brooker Clerk/Treasurer

TOWN OF PLUM LAKE NOTICE OF ELECTION For Primary Election LOCATION AND HOURS OF POLLING PLACE At the Primary Election to be held on Feb. 19, 2013, in the town of Plum Lake, the polling place location for Wards 1 & 2 will be the Town Hall at 8755 Lake Street in Sayner. The polling place will be open at 7:00 a.m. and will close at 8:00 p.m. If you have any questions concerning your polling place, please contact the municipal clerk, Sharon Brooker, P.O. Box 280, Sayner, WI 54560, or by phoning 715-542-4531. All polling places are accessible to elderly and disabled voters.

NOTICE

2265

Sharon Brooker, Clerk/Treasurer

Notice is hereby given that the official public test of the automatic tabulating equipment to be used at the FEB. 19, 2013 ELECTION in the city of Eagle River will be conducted at City Hall, 525 E. Maple St., Eagle River, Wis., AT 1:30 P.M. ON THURSDAY, FEB. 14, 2013. 2272

David Weber, representing the Little St. Fuel Express, St. Germain’s Mobil fuel provider, presents Principal Gayle Daniel a check for $500 from Exxon Mobil’s Educational Alliance Program. The grant program requires the school to use the money for math and science programs. —Photo By Wally Geist

Debra A. Brown, WCMC/CMC/CMTW Clerk-Treasurer

Rivers to the People™

Call one of our friendly “ad-visors” and put the Classifieds to work for you! Vilas County News-Review • North Woods Trader (715) 479-4421


8B

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 13, 2013

VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS

NOTICE OF SPRING PRIMARY AND SAMPLE BALLOTS (S. 120.06 (8) (c), Wis. Stats.) OFFICE OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT OF THREE LAKES CLERK TO THE ELECTORS OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT OF THREE LAKES Notice is hereby given of a spring primary election to be held on Tuesday, February 19, 2013, at which the persons named below shall be nominated. The names of the candidates for the School Board, whose nominations have been certified to or filed in this office, are as follows: Terry McCloskey John Olkowski Jr. Kari Volk Steven C. Garbowicz Ann M. Ovsak

EXHIBIT B NOTICE OF REFERENDUM SCHOOL DISTRICT OF THREE LAKES FEBRUARY 19, 2013 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that at an election to be held in the School District of Three Lakes on February 19, 2013, the following proposed Resolution of the School Board will be submitted to a vote of the people: “RESOLUTION AUTHORIZING THE SCHOOL DISTRICT BUDGET TO EXCEED REVENUE LIMIT BY $2,345,123 PER YEAR FOR FIVE YEARS FOR NON-RECURRING PURPOSES BE IT RESOLVED by the School Board of the School District of Three Lakes, Forest and Oneida Counties, Wisconsin that the revenues included in the School District budget be authorized to exceed the revenue limit specified in Section 121.91, Wisconsin Statutes, by $2,345,123 per year for five years beginning with the 2013-2014 school year and ending with the 2017-2018 school year, for non-recurring purposes consisting of ongoing operational expenses and increasing the District’s fund balance. Adopted and recorded October 23, 2012.” The question will appear on the ballot as follows: “Shall the School District of Three Lakes, Forest and Oneida Counties, Wisconsin be authorized to exceed the revenue limit specified in Section 121.91, Wisconsin Statutes, by $2,345,123 per year for five years beginning with the 2013-2014 school year and ending with the 2017-2018 school year, for non-recurring purposes consisting of ongoing operational expenses and increasing the District’s fund balance?” EXPLANATORY STATEMENT AND EFFECT OF VOTE

INFORMATION TO ELECTORS Upon entering the polling place, an elector shall state his or her name and address and sign the poll book before being permitted to vote. Where ballots are distributed to electors, the initials of two inspectors must appear on the ballot. Upon being permitted to vote, the elector shall retire alone to a voting booth and cast his or her ballot except that an elector who is a parent or guardian may be accompanied by the elector’s minor child or minor ward. An election official may inform the elector of the proper manner for casting a vote, but the official may not in any manner advise or indicate a particular voting choice. At the spring primary election, where paper ballots are used, the elector shall make a cross (X) in the square next to the name of the candidate of his or her choice for each office for which he or she intends to vote. To vote for a person whose name does not appear on the ballot, the elector shall write in the name of the person of his or her choice in the space provided for a write-in vote. Where optical scan voting is used, the elector shall fill in the oval or connect the arrow next to the name of the candidate of his or her choice for each office for which he or she intends to vote. To vote for a person whose name does not appear on the ballot, the elector shall write in the name of the person of his or her choice in the space provided, and fill in the oval or connect the arrow on the write-in line. Where touch screen voting systems are used, the elector shall touch the screen next to the name of the candidate of his or her choice for each office for which he or she intends to vote. To vote for a person whose name does not appear on the ballot, the elector shall type in the name of the person of his or her choice in the space provided for a write-in vote. The vote should not be cast in any other manner. Not more than five minutes' time shall be allowed inside a voting booth. Sample ballots or other materials to assist the elector in casting his or her vote may be taken into the booth and copied. The sample ballot shall not be shown to anyone so as to reveal how the ballot is marked. If the elector spoils a paper or optical scan ballot, he or she shall return it to an election official who shall issue another ballot in its place, but not more than three ballots shall be issued to any one elector. If the ballot has not been initialed by two inspectors or is defective in any other way, the elector shall return it to the election official, who shall issue a proper ballot in its place. After casting his or her vote, the elector shall leave the voting booth, properly deposit the ballot and promptly leave the polling place. The elector may spoil a touch screen ballot at the voting station before the ballot is cast. After an official paper ballot is marked, it shall be folded so the inside marks do not show, but so the printed endorsements and inspectors' initials on the outside do show. The elector shall leave the booth, deposit the ballot in the ballot box, or deliver the ballot to an inspector for deposit, and shall leave the polling place promptly. After an official optical scan ballot is marked, it shall be inserted in the security sleeve so the marks do not show. After casting his or her vote, the elector shall leave the booth, insert the ballot in the voting device and discard the sleeve, or deliver the ballot to an inspector for deposit. If a central count system is used, the elector shall insert the ballot in the ballot box and discard the sleeve, or deliver the ballot to an inspector for deposit. The elector shall leave the polling place promptly.

The referendum election ballot will ask District electors to vote “yes” or “no” on the referendum election question as set forth above. A “yes” vote on the question is in favor of said Resolution and is a vote to authorize the School District of Three Lakes budget to exceed the revenue limit specified in Section 121.91, Wisconsin Statutes, by $2,345,123 per year for five years beginning with the 2013-2014 school year and ending with the 2017-2018 school year, for non-recurring purposes consisting of ongoing operational expenses and increasing the District’s fund balance. A “no” vote on the question is opposed to said Resolution and is a vote to deny the School District of Three Lakes budget the authority to exceed the revenue limit specified in Section 121.91, Wisconsin Statutes, by $2,345,123 per year for five years beginning with the 2013-2014 school year and ending with the 2017-2018 school year, for non-recurring purposes consisting of ongoing operational expenses and increasing the District’s fund balance. In the event a majority of the electors voting vote “Yes” on the question, the District will be authorized to exceed the revenue limit specified in Section 121.91, Wisconsin Statutes, by $2,345,123 per year for five years beginning with the 2013-2014 school year and ending with the 2017-2018 school year, for non-recurring purposes consisting of ongoing operational expenses and increasing the District’s fund balance; if a majority vote “No” on the question set forth above, the District will not be so authorized. LOCATION AND HOURS OF POLLING PLACES At the election to be held on February 19, 2013 in the School District of Three Lakes the following polling place locations will be used for the municipalities indicated: School District Electors Residing in: Town of Three Lakes Town of Sugar Camp Town of Monico Town of Piehl Town of Hiles Town of Stella

ALL POLLING PLACES WILL BE OPENING AT 7:00 A.M. AND WILL CLOSE AT 8:00 P.M. If you have any questions concerning your polling place, contact the municipal clerk at the address below. Name of Municipal Clerks with mailing addresses and phone numbers: Municipality Three Lakes

Clerk/Address Sue Harris PO Box 565 Three Lakes WI 54562

Phone Number 715-546-3316

Sugar Camp

John Bigley 4537 Cty Hwy D Rhinelander WI 54501

715-272-1525

Monico

Barbara Henderson 2678 Hwy 45 North Rhinelander WI 54501

715-487-4023

Piehl

Renae Wilson-Galligan 1710 Hwy C Rhinelander WI 54501

715-369-4939

Hiles

Cathleen Votis 9156 N Main Street Hiles WI 54511

715-649-3680

Stella

Jean Fish 3709 Rasmussen Road Rhinelander WI 54501

715-369-1895

After an official touch screen ballot is cast, the elector shall leave the polling place promptly. An elector may select an individual to assist in casting his or her vote if the elector declares to the presiding official that he or she is unable to read, has difficulty reading, writing or understanding English or that due to disability is unable to cast his or her ballot. The selected individual rendering assistance may not be the elector's employer or an agent of that employer or an officer or agent of a labor organization which represents the elector. Electors will vote in their regular polling places. Polls will be open at 7:00 AM and close at 8:00 PM. Dated this 1st day of February, 2013. Tom Rulseh, Clerk School District of Three Lakes

SAMPLE OF OFFICIAL SCHOOL BOARD BALLOT SAMPLE - Front

Vote at: Three Lakes Community Building Sugar Camp Town Hall Monico Town Hall Piehl Town Hall Hiles Town Hall Stella Town Hall

All polling places are accessible to elderly and disabled voters. INFORMATION TO ELECTORS

OFFICIAL SCHOOL BOARD BALLOT PRIMARY THREE LAKES SCHOOL DISTRICT ONEIDA AND FOREST COUNTIES, WISCONSIN NOTICE TO ELECTORS: THIS BALLOT MAY BE INVALID UNLESS INITIALED BY 2 ELECTION INSPECTORS. IF CAST AS AN ABSENTEE BALLOT, THE BALLOT MUST BEAR THE INITIALS OF THE MUNICIPAL CLERK OR DEPUTY CLERK. To vote for a candidate whose name is printed on the ballot, make a cross (X) in the square at the RIGHT of the name of the candidate for who you desire to vote. To vote for a person whose name does not appear on the ballot, write the name in the blank space provided for that purpose. SCHOOL BOARD MEMBER VOTE FOR NOT MORE THAN TWO

Upon entering the polling place, an elector shall state his or her name and address before being permitted to vote. If an elector is not registered to vote, an elector may register to vote at the polling place serving his or her residence if the elector presents proof of identification in a form specified by law unless the elector is exempted from this requirement, and, if the document presented does not constitute proof of residence, the elector provides proof of residence. Where ballots are distributed to electors, the initials of two inspectors must appear on the ballot. Upon being permitted to vote, the elector shall retire alone to a voting booth and cast his or her ballot except that an elector who is a parent or guardian may be accompanied by the elector’s minor child or minor ward. An election official may inform the elector of the proper manner for casting a vote, but the official may not in any manner advise or indicate a particular voting choice. On referenda questions, where paper ballots are used, the elector shall make a cross (X) in the square at the right of “yes” if in favor of the question, or the elector shall make a cross (X) in the square at the right of “no” if opposed to the question. On referenda questions, where optical scan voting systems are used, the elector shall fill in the oval or connect the arrow next to “yes” if in favor of the question, or the elector shall fill in the oval or connect the arrow next to “no” if opposed to the question. On referenda questions, where touch screen voting systems are used, the elector shall depress the button next to “yes” if in favor of the question, or the elector shall depress the button next to “no” if opposed to the question.

KARI VOLK

The vote should not be cast in any other manner. If the elector spoils a paper or optical scan ballot, he or she shall return it to an election official who shall issue another ballot in its place, but not more than three ballots shall be issued to any one elector. If the ballot has not been initialed by two inspectors or is defective in any other way, the elector shall return it to the election official, who shall issue a proper ballot in its place. The elector may spoil a touch screen ballot at the voting station, but not more than three ballots shall be issued to any one elector. Not more than five minutes’ time shall be allowed inside a voting booth. Sample ballots or other materials to assist the elector in casting his or her vote may be taken into the booth and copied. The sample ballot shall not be shown to anyone so as to reveal how the ballot is marked.

STEVEN C. GARBOWICZ

After casting his or her vote, the elector shall leave the voting booth, properly deposit the ballot and promptly leave the polling place.

ANN M. OVSAK

After an official paper ballot is marked, it shall be folded so the inside marks do not show, but so the printed endorsements and inspectors’ initials on the outside do show. The elector shall then deposit his or her folded ballot in the proper ballot box, or deliver the ballot to an inspector for deposit.

TERRY McCLOSKEY JOHN OLKOWSKI, JR.

After an official optical scan ballot is marked, it shall be inserted in the security sleeve so the marks do not show. The elector shall then insert the ballot in the voting device and discard the sleeve, or deliver the ballot to an inspector for deposit. If a central count system is used, the elector shall insert the ballot in the ballot box and discard the sleeve, or deliver the ballot to an inspector for deposit.

_______________________________________ _______________________________________

After an official touch screen ballot is marked, the elector shall leave the polling place promptly.

SAMPLE - Back

An elector may select an individual to assist in casting his or her vote if the elector declares to the presiding official the he or she is unable to read, has difficulty reading, writing or understanding English or that due to disability is unable to cast his or her ballot. The selected individual rendering assistance may not be the elector’s employer or an agent of that employer or an officer or agent of a labor organization which represents the elector.

OFFICIAL SCHOOL BOARD BALLOT PRIMARY ELECTION THREE LAKES SCHOOL DISTRICT February 19, 2013

The following is a sample of the official ballot: OFFICIAL REFERENDUM BALLOT February 19, 2013

FOR

NOTICE TO ELECTORS: THIS BALLOT MAY BE INVALID UNLESS INITIALED BY TWO (2) ELECTION INSPECTORS. IF CAST AS AN ABSENTEE BALLOT, THE BALLOT MUST BEAR THE INITIALS OF THE MUNICIPAL CLERK OR DEPUTY CLERK.

Ward _______ Town of ________________________________ __________________________________________________

If you desire to vote on the question, make a cross (X) in the square at the RIGHT of “YES” if in favor of the question or make a cross (X) in the square at the RIGHT of “NO” if opposed to the question. __________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________

Ballot issued by __________________________________________________ __________________________________________________ Initials of Inspector

Shall the School District of Three Lakes, Forest and Oneida Counties, Wisconsin be authorized to exceed the revenue limit specified in Section 121.91, Wisconsin Statutes, by $2,345,123 per year for five years beginning with the 2013-2014 school year and ending with the 2017-2018 school year, for non-recurring purposes consisting of ongoing operational expenses and increasing the District’s fund balance?

____________________________________________________ Absent Elector’s Ballot issued by _________________________________________________ Municipal Clerk

YES

__________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________ Persons with questions regarding the referendum election should contact George J. Karling, District Administrator.

____________________________________________________ Certification of Elector Assistance I certify that the within ballot was marked by me for an elector, who is authorized under the law to have assistance upon request, and as directed by the elector. _________________________________________________ Signature of assisting Individual 2269

NO

WNAXLP

2278

Done in the School District of Three Lakes on February 13, 2013 Tom R. Rulseh District Clerk

STICK WITH THE CLASSIFIEDS in the (715) 479-4421


VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 13, 2013

THREE LAKES

JAN HINTZ (715) 546-2712 jehintz@hotmail.com

1144 MEDICINE LAKE LODGE RD., THREE LAKES, WI 54562

Legion plans dinner, Auxiliary fundraiser The Three Lakes American Legion will hold a beef pot roast dinner Saturday, Feb. 23, from 5 to 6:30 p.m. The dinner will cost $8 and include beef pot roast with all the trimmings, coffee and dessert. The Scott Kane Duo will perform music beginning at 7 p.m. Funds will be raised for the auxiliary’s Children and Youth Program by selling gifts from the treasure chest. To donate items for the

treasure chest, individuals may take wrapped items worth at least $1 and drop them off at the American Legion any time prior to the dinner. For dinner reservations, call (715) 546-3431 after noon. Tickets also are available at the American Legion. The next business meeting of the American Legion Post 431 and Auxiliary will be held Tuesday, March 5, at 7 p.m. Coffee and dessert will be provided.

Women’s club plans Shack Happy lunch The Three Lakes Women’s Club will hold its annual Shack Happy Luncheon at Oneida Village Inn Wednesday, Feb 20. A social will begin at 11 a.m. followed by lunch at noon. The lunch will cost $15, with a choice of either Chicken Supreme (chicken with tomato, asparagus and Swiss cheese on an English muffin, topped with Hollandaise sauce) or stuffed haddock. Following tradition, there will be a steal the gift game after lunch. Those who would like to take part should take a “white elephant” gift for the

Three Lakes Senior Citizen Nutrition Menu Reservations and cancellations must be made 24 hours in advance. Phone Angela Kottwitz, site manager, at (715) 490-2798.

THURSDAY, FEB. 14 Roast beef Boiled potatoes w/gravy Broccoli Whole-grain roll Dessert

RE-ELECT John Olkowski

Three Lakes School Board

Tuesday, Feb. 19 Authorized and paid for by John Olkowski

MONDAY, FEB. 18 Sausage Red beans & rice Biscuit Diced peaches Dessert

TUESDAY, FEB. 19 Beef chop suey Brown rice Stir-fry vegetables Egg roll w/sweet-and-sour sauce Mandarin Oranges Fortune cookie

game. Participants also may wear a hat they have decorated. For reservations, call Sarah Ewing at (715) 5468124 by Feb. 15.

LOCATION AND HOURS OF POLLING PLACE TOWN OF THREE LAKES For the Spring Primary Election, Tuesday, Feb. 19, 2013, in the town of Three Lakes, the following polling place location will be used for all wards: Three Lakes Community Building 6965 West School Street Three Lakes, Wis. THE POLLING PLACE WILL OPEN AT 7:00 A.M. AND WILL CLOSE AT 8:00 P.M. The polling place is accessible to elderly and disabled voters. 2264

RE-ELECT TERRY MCCLOSKEY Three Lakes School Board • Born and raised in Antigo. Married with 4 children and 7 grandchildren. Lives in Three Lakes with wife, Mary Ann. • Graduated from Antigo High School, Marquette University (BA) and U.S. Naval Postgraduate School (MS). • 291⁄2 years in the Navy. Holds 24 military decorations including Bronze Star & Legion of Merit. Commanded 1,100 officers and men in Vietnam; Chief of Staff, Commander Area ASW Forces. • Three Lakes Junior High football coach (4 years), assistant Bluejays football coach (2 years), substitute teacher (7 years). • Three Lakes School Board (6 years). • Past President of the Institute for Learning in Retirement, Nicolet College. • Retired Meteorologist, WJFW, Channel 12. • Elected Wisconsin Associaton of School Boards, Board of Directors, representing 21 Northern AUTHORIZED AND PAID FOR BY TERRY MCCLOSKEY Wisconsin School Districts.

Common Misconceptions Regarding ATVs 1. ATVs are noisy — Today’s ATVs are regulated to a very quiet decible level by state standards. 2. ATVs are polluters — Today’s ATVs are regulated to very low emission levels set forth by the EPA. 3. Permitting ATVs on a town road would present insurance issues — Towns are covered by their recreational immunity clause.

NOTICE OF PRIMARY ELECTION AND SAMPLE BALLOTS FEBRUARY 19, 2013 OFFICE OF THE TOWN OF THREE LAKES CLERK TO THE ELECTORS OF TOWN OF THREE LAKES: Notice is hereby given of a Spring Primary Election to be held in the Town of Three Lakes Oneida County on the 19th day of February, 2013, at which the nominees for the offices named below shall be chosen. The names of the candidates for each office, whose nominations have been certified to or filed in this office, are given under the title of the office under the appropriate party or other designation, each in its proper column, together with the questions submitted to a vote, if any, in the sample ballot below. INFORMATION TO ELECTORS Upon entering the polling place, an elector shall state his or her name and address and sign the poll book before being permitted to vote. Where ballots are distributed to electors, the initials of two inspectors must appear on the ballot. Upon being permitted to vote, the elector shall retire alone to a voting booth and cast his or her ballot except that an elector who is a parent or guardian may be accompanied by the elector’s minor child or minor ward. An election official may inform the elector of the proper manner for casting a vote, but the official may not in any manner advise or indicate a particular voting choice. Where optical scan voting is used, the elector shall connect the arrow next to the party of his or her choice. The elector shall then connect the arrow next to the name of the candidate of his or her choice for each office for which he or she intends to vote under the party of his or her choice. To vote for a person whose name does not appear on the ballot, the elector shall write in the name of the person of his or her choice in the space provided for a write-in vote, and connect the arrow on the write-in line. Where touch screen voting systems are used, the elector shall touch the screen next to the party of his or her choice. The elector shall then touch the screen next to the name of the candidate of his or her choice for each office for which he or she intends to vote. To vote for a person whose name does not appear on the ballot, the elector shall type in the name of the person of his or her choice in the space provided for a write-in vote. The vote should not be cast in any other manner. If an elector spoils an optical scan ballot, he or she shall return it to an election official who shall issue another ballot in its place, but not more than three ballots shall be issued to any one elector. If the ballot has not been initialed by two inspectors or is defective in any other way, the elector shall return it to the election official, who shall issue a proper ballot in its place. The elector may spoil a touch screen ballot at the voting station before the ballot is cast. Not more than five minutes’ time shall be allowed inside a voting booth. Sample ballots or other materials to assist the elector in marking his or her vote may be taken into the booth and copied. The sample ballot shall not be shown to anyone so as to reveal how the ballot is marked. After casting his or her vote, the elector shall leave the voting booth and properly deposit the ballot. After an official optical scan ballot is marked, it shall be inserted in the security sleeve so the marks do not show. The elector shall then insert the ballot in the voting device and discard the sleeve, or deliver the ballot to an inspector for deposit. If a central count system is used, the elector shall insert the ballot in the ballot box and discard the sleeve, or deliver the ballot to an inspector for deposit. The elector shall leave the polling place promptly. After an official touch screen ballot is marked, the elector shall leave the polling place promptly. An elector may select an individual to assist in casting his or her vote if the elector declares to the presiding official that he or she is unable to read, has difficulty reading, writing or understanding English, or that due to disability is unable to cast his or her ballot. The selected individual rendering assistance may not be the elector’s employer or an agent of that employer or an officer or agent of a labor organization which represents the elector. The following is a sample of the official ballots: /s/ Susan L. Harris Town Clerk

4. ATVs are a burden on the local police department — ATV clubs have the Trail Ambassador Program which will help selfpolice the ATV Route and Trail System. Oneida County has two Recreational Officers to assist in this. 5. ATVs are dangerous — 16 people died ATVing in 2011. Of those 16, only two were wearing helmets and were safety certified. 23 people died boating in 2011. 10 people died snowmobiling in 2011. 85 people died while motorcycling in 2011. There are over 300,000 registered ATVs in the state of Wisconsin. There are 210,000 registered snowmobiles in the state of Wisconsin.

Be Informed

9B

Be Safe

Wear a Helmet!

For more info, see us at www.threelakesnicoletatvclub.com or like us on Facebook For more info, call (715) 891-2928 or (715) 546-2196

2267


10B

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 13, 2013

VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS

LAND O’ LAKES

JILL JAMES (715) 547-3930

jilliebabes@yahoo.com

4540 EVERGREEN DR., LAND O’ LAKES, WI 54540

CRAFT SALE— As part of the sled dog races held in Land O’ Lakes, a craft sale was held at Land O’ Lakes Elementary School. Selling handmade clothing and silk flower arrangements were from left, Sheryll Venturella and Barbra Bartmann of Eagle River. At right, Brownie Troop 7056 manned concessions selling baked goods, chili and more. Participating were from left, Maleea Eggleston, Sammy Mukenschbal and Taylor Hoffmann. —Photos By Jill James

Land O’ Lakes Senior Dining Meals for seniors 60 and older are available Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays at Gateway Lodge, 4103 Hwy. B. Meals are served at 11:30 a.m. Home-delivered meals are available based on eligibility. While there is no set fee for a meal, donations will be accepted. No one will be denied service because of inability to pay. Suggested donation is $4. For reservations, contact Anna Moore, site manager, 24 hours in advance at (715) 547-6076.

(One Week, 2/13/13) Regular Board Meeting Wednesday, November 7, 2012 The regular meeting of the Board of Education was called to order by Judith Manzelmann at nine-o-eight a.m. (9:08 a.m.) on Wednesday, November 7, 2012 at the Land O’ Lakes Elementary School in room 204. The Pledge of Allegiance was recited. Present were Board members: Judith Manzelmann, Jessica Chuckel, Jennifer Payne, Mary Anna Thornton, and Phillip Epping. Quorum was established. Also present were Mike Richie, District Administrator for NPSD, Scott Foster, Principal, Holly McCormack, NPSD Board member, Karen Margelofsky, Special Relations, Paula Hillmann, Consultant, and Beth Hayner, Recording Secretary. There was one citizen in attendance. Open Meeting Verification – Mike Richie stated that the meeting had been duly called with meeting notices posted at the following locations: 1. The Northland Pines High School and Middle School in Eagle River 2. The Northland Pines Elementary Schools in Eagle River, Land O’ Lakes and St. Germain 3. The Vilas County Courthouse – Eagle River 4. The Eagle River City Hall 5. Additional notice has been given: I. The Vilas County News Review-Eagle River II. WERL/WRJO Radio Station-Eagle River III. The Rhinelander Daily News-Rhinelander IV. WHDG Radio Station-Rhinelander Approval of Agenda – MOTION by Jessica Chuckel that the Board approves the agenda as presented and leaves the order to the discretion of the Chair. Second by Jennifer Payne. Voice vote 5-0. Motion carried. Election of Officers – MOTION by Jessica Chuckel that the Board approves the election of Judith Manzelmann, as President, Jessica Chuckel, as Vice President, Jennifer Payne, as Clerk, and Phillip Epping, as Treasurer. Second by Mary Anna Thornton. Voice vote 5-0. Motion carried. Oath of Officers – Judith Manzelmann issued Oath of Officers to all members. Public participation – There were no citizen comments. Minutes of Past Meetings - There were no past meeting minutes to approve. Administrative Report – Scott Foster reported on the following topics: 1. The posting for a teacher and board participation in the hiring procedure. 2. Madison Conference Agenda included in Board packet. 3. Appleton Conference Agenda included in Board packet. 4. Enrollment inquiries have started. 5. Report cards and what to expect. Discussion/Action items: Payment of bills: There are no bills to pay Determine terms for Board member officers: MOTION by Jennifer Payne that the Board approves a 3 year appointment to the Board of Education to Judith Manzelmann and Mary Anna Thornton, a 2 year appointment to Jessica Chuckel and Jennifer Payne, and a 1 year appointment to Phillip Epping. Second by Jessica Chuckel. Voice vote 5-0. Motion carried. Contract between S.O.A.R. and the NPSD: The Board discussed setting up a work session to develop a contract with NPSD. A work session was set for November 16, 2012, 9:00 a.m. at the Land O’ Lakes Elementary School, Room 204. Staffing: Scott Foster discussed the posting of a teacher. No action taken. Communication with NPSD Board of Education: The Board discussed the need for a Board member to attend the regular board meetings of NPSD and vice versa. Jennifer Payne volunteered to attend NPSD meetings. No action taken. Advanced Learning Resources Presentation: MOTION by Phillip Epping that the Board accepts the proposal and approves the Agreement between S.O.A.R. and Paula Hillmann, Consultant. Second by Judith Manzelmann. Voice vote 5-0. Motion carried. Adjournment: MOTION by Jessica Chuckel that the Board adjourns. Second by Phillip Epping. Voice vote 5-0. Motion carried. Meeting adjourned at 10:50 a.m. 2273

_____________

(Three Weeks, 1/30-2/13/13) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT VILAS COUNTY Case No. 12 CV 126 ____________________________________ OneWest Bank, FSB,

Plaintiff, vs. ESTATE OF DIANA S. GEIS, et al., Defendant(s). ____________________________________ NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE ____________________________________

Meatloaf Mashed potatoes Green beans Cake

PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on September 26, 2012 in the amount of $306,406.94 the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: February 28, 2013 at 02:00 PM TERMS: By bidding at the sheriff sale, prospective buyer is consenting to be bound by the following terms: 1.) 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2.) Sold "as is" and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3.) Plaintiff opens bidding on the property, either in person or via fax and as recited by the sheriff department in the event that no opening bid is offered, plaintiff retains the right to request the sale be declared as invalid as the sale is fatally defective. PLACE: at 330 Court Street, Eagle River, Wisconsin 54521 DESCRIPTION: Parcel 1: A parcel of land being a part of Government Lot 4, Section 17, Township 40 North, Range 11 East, Washington Township, Vilas County, Wisconsin and being more particularly described as follows: Commencing at the meander corner marking the intersection of the South line of said Government Lot 4 and the East shore of Carpenter Lake, a brass cap iron pipe; thence North 30°42' West along the shore of said lake a distance of 128.33 feet to an iron pipe; thence North 40° West along said lake shore a distance of 128.33 feet to an iron pipe, the place of beginning; thence North 43°25' West along said shore a distance of 128.33 feet to an iron pipe; thence North 50°30' East a distance of 360.00 feet to an iron pipe; thence South 39°29' East a distance of 240.0 feet to an iron pipe; thence South 68°12' West a distance of 368.96 feet to an iron pipe, the place of beginning. Including all lands lying between the meander line and the waters edge. Parcel 2: A parcel of land being a part of Government Lot 4, Section 17, Township 40 North, Range 11 East, Washington Township, Vilas County, Wisconsin and being more particularly described as follows: Commencing at meander corner at the intersection of the South line of said Government Lot 4 and the East shore of Carpenter Lake, marked by a 2" brass capped iron pipe in place; thence meandering along said shore North 37°38`00" West, 383.33 feet (385 feet along the shore of record) to an iron pipe; thence leaving said meanderline and along the Northwesterly line of the lands described in Volume 509 Records, page 167, North 50°23'47" East, 355.07 feet (North 50°30' East, 360.0 feet of record) to an iron pipe, the place of beginning; thence continuing North 50°23'47" East, 200.00 feet to an iron pipe; thence South 39°40'39" East, 242.48 feet to an iron pipe; thence South 51°08'00" West, 200.00 feet to an iron pipe; thence along the Northeasterly line of said lands described in Volume 509 Records, page 167, North 39°40'56" West, 239.91 feet (South 39°29' East, 240.00 feet of record) to the place of beginning. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 3061 North Carpenter Lake Road, Eagle River, WI 54521 TAX KEY NO.: 26-2225 & 26-2227-01 Dated this 16th day of January, 2013. /S/ Sheriff Frank Tomlanovich Vilas County Sheriff Dustin A. McMahon Blommer Peterman, S.C. State Bar No. 1086857 165 Bishops Way, Suite 100 Brookfield, WI 53005 262-790-5719 Please go to www.blommerpeterman. com to obtain the bid for this sale. Blommer Peterman, S.C. is the creditor's attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. 1994

Beef stew Banana Apple pie

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 27 Liver and onions Parsleyed potatoes Corn Apple Cookies

DEEP SNOW — Youngsters attending the Three Bear Sled Dog Races in Land O’ Lakes Saturday trudged through deep snow near the playground at the town hall. —STAFF PHOTO

CONOVER

WINTER FROLIC— The Conover Lions Club recently held the 54th annual Winter Frolic. More than 75 children attended the event, which included sled races and raffles. The Conover Sno-Buddies Snowmobile Club trail groomer assisted by towing children to the top of the sledding hill. First-place winners of the sled

_____________

THURSDAY, FEB. 21

TUESDAY, FEB. 26

JANET GARLING (715) 479-9265

PUBLIC MEETINGS

All meals served with fat-free milk, coffee, bread or rolls and margarine.

janetgarling @yahoo.com

races were awarded gold medals. Winners, beginning with preschool, were Gage Hacker, Ruth Ann Hacker, Zane Miller, Shawn Miller, Sammi Mukenschnabl, Maddie Indermuehle, Parker Trollan, Austin Burmeister and Tristen Pusich. —Contributed Photo

_____________

(Three Weeks, 2/13-2/27/13) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT VILAS COUNTY

CIVIL DIVISION Case No. 12 CV 192 Classification Code: 30404 ____________________________________ United States of America acting through Rural Housing Service (RHS), Successor in Interest to Farmers Home Administration, 4949 Kirschling Court, Stevens Point, WI 54481, Plaintiff, vs. Jennifer A. Wagner as Special Administrator for The Estate of Joann E. Erdman P.O. Box 871 320 South Second Street Eagle River, WI 54521, Jennifer A. Wagner P.O. Box 871 320 South Second Street Eagle River, WI 54521,

Defendant(s). ____________________________________ NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE ____________________________________

By virtue of and pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-captioned action on October 19, 2012, I will sell at public auction at the Vilas County Courthouse, 330 Court Street in the City of Eagle River, Wisconsin, on March 7, 2013 at 2:00 p.m., all of the following described mortgaged premises, to-wit: Lot 1 and the East ½ of Lot fourteen (14), in Block Nine (9) of the ORIGINAL PLAT of the Village (now City) of Eagle River, Wisconsin, according to the recorded Plat thereof, said Plat being a part of the Northwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter in Section Thirty-three (33), Township Forty (40 North), Range Ten (10) East, Vilas County, Wisconsin, as the same appears of record in Volume 1 of Plats, Page 5. PIN: PL9-1 PROPERTY ADDRESS: 320 SOUTH 2ND STREET, EAGLE RIVER, WISCONSIN 54521 TERMS OF SALE: Cash DOWN PAYMENT: 10% of amount of bid by certified check payable to Clerk of Court at time of Sale. BALANCE DUE: Within ten (10) days after Confirmation of Sale Hearing to be held March 22, 2013 at 8:45 a.m., payable to Clerk of Court. Dated at Vilas County, Wisconsin this 6th day of February, 2013. /s/ Frank Tomlanovich Sheriff of Vilas County, Wisconsin Drafted by: Heywood, Cari & Anderson, S.C. Attorney for Plaintiff, Samuel R. Cari 816 Dominion Dr., Suite 100 PO Box 125 Hudson, WI 54016 (715) 386-5551 Heywood, Cari & Anderson, S.C. is the creditor’s law firm and is attempting to collect a debt for the creditor. Any information the debtor provides to Heywood, Cari & Anderson, S.C. will be used for that purpose. 2260

_____________

(Three Weeks, 2/13-2/27/13) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT VILAS COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION Case No. 11 CV 218 Case Code No. 30404 ____________________________________ DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS INDENTURE TRUSTEE, FOR NEW CENTURY HOME EQUITY LOAN TRUST 2004-4 Plaintiff, vs. GEORGE JUDGE A/K/A GEORGE H. JUDGE III; KRISTINA JUDGE A/K/A KRISTINA M. JUDGE; ARCHER BANK; CURRENT OCCUPANTS OF 10560 CAMPO FIESTA LANE, BOULDER JUNCTION, WI 54512; Defendant(s). ____________________________________ NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE ____________________________________ PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on May 8, 2012, in the amount of $235,430.95, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: March 14, 2013 at 2:00 pm TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax from the proceeds of the sale upon confirmation of the court. PLACE: IN THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE VILAS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 330 COURT STREET, EAGLE RIVER, WI 54521 Property description: A PARCEL OF LAND IN THE SE 1/4 OF THE NW 1/4 AND IN GOVERNMENT LOT 1, SECTION 32, TOWNSHIP 42 NORTH, RANGE 7 EAST. TOWN OF BOULDER JUNCTION, VILAS COUNTY, WISCONSIN, BEING THE 2.08 ACRE PARCEL SHOWN ON A SURVEY BY STUART L. FOLTZ OF MINOCQUA, WISCONSIN DATED 12/6/91 AND LAST REVISED 5/1/98 MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCING AT THE MEANDER CORNER WHERE THE WEST LINE OF SECTION 32 INTERSECTS THE NORTH SHORE OF TROUT LAKE, MARKED BY A WISCONSIN CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT BRASS CAPPED 2” IRON PIPE; THENCE S 55 DEGREES 47' 50” E, 1071.03 FEET ALONG THE LAKE TO A 1 1/4” IRON PIPE; THENCE LEAVING THE LAKE, N 12 DEGREES 37' 48” E, 277.47 FEET TO A 5” SQUARE CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE N 79 DEGREES 46' 08” E. 575.11 FEET TO A 1” IRON PIPE; THENCE N 2 DEGREES 26' 18” E, 102.55 FEET TO THE PLACE OF BEGINNING, MARKED BY A 1” IRON PIPE ON THE WEST BOUNDARY OF OUTLOT 1 RECORDED IN VOLUME 752 M/R, PAGE 280; THENCE ALONG THE BOUNDARY OF PARCEL 1B RECORDED IN VOLUME 752 M/R, PAGE 280 S 79 DEGREES 37' 47” W, 261.03 FEET TO A 1' IRON PIPE; N 5 DEGREES 36' 27” E., 191.79 FEET TO A 1” IRON PIPE; N 13 DEGREES 43' 28” E, 156.39 FEET TO A 1” IRON PIPE; N 49 DEGREES 31' 07” E 104.87 FEET TO A 1” IRON PIPE AND NORTH 77 DEGREES 32' 05” E, 141.28 FEET TO A 1” IRON PIPE ON THE WEST BOUNDARY OF THE AFOREMENTIONED OUTLET 1; THENCE S 2 DEGREES 26' 18” W, 394.74 FEET ALONG THE WEST BOUNDARY OF OUTLOT 1 TO THE PLACE OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO A PERPETUAL EASEMENT FOR PUBLIC UTILITIES. TOGETHER WITH AN UNDIVIDED 1/5TH INTEREST IN OUTLOT -1- AS FOLLOWS: A PARCEL OF LAND IN THE SE 1/4 OF THE NW 1/4 AND IN GOVERNMENT LOT 2, SECTION 32, TOWNSHIP 42 NORTH, RANGE 7 EAST, TOWN OF BOULDER JUNCTION, VILAS COUNTY, WISCONSIN, MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCING AT THE MEANDER CORNER WHERE THE WEST LINE OF SECTION 32 INTERSECTS THE NORTH SHORE OF TROUT LAKE, MARKED BY A WISCONSIN CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT BRASS-CAPPED 2” IRON PIPE; THENCE S 55 DEGREES 47' 50” E, 1071.03 FEET ALONG THE LAKE TO A 1-1/4” IRON PIPE ON THE EAST BOUNDARY OF THAT PARCEL OF LAND RECORDED IN VOLUME 491 M/R, PAGE 312; THENCE ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARY OF SAID PARCEL OF LAND RECORDED IN VOLUME 491 M/R, PAGE 312; N 12 DEGREES 37' 48” E, 277.47 FEET TO A 5” SQUARE CONCRETE MONUMENT; N 54 DEGREES 36' 48” W, 114.95 FEET TO A 5” SQUARE CONCRETE MONUMENT; N 24 DEGREES 41' 43” E, 683.22 FEET TO A 5” SQUARE CONCRETE MONUMENT; N52 DEGREES 23' 40” E., 346.43 FEET TO A 4” SQUARE CONCRETE MONUMENT; AND S89 06' 02” E., 50.00 FEET TO THE PLACE OF BEGINNING MARKED BY A 2” BY 3” CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE CONTINUING ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARY OF SAID PARCEL OF LAND RECORDED IN THE VOLUME 491 M/R PAGE 312, N 2 DEGREES 10' 18” E, 109.90 FEET TO A POINT ON THE NORTH LINE OF THE SE 1/4 OF THE NE 1/4 WITNESSED BY A 3” SQUARE CONCRETE MONUMENT BEARING N 02 DEGREES E, 0.18 FEET; THENCE S 89 DEGREES 03' 29” E, 150.02 FEET ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF THE SE 1/4 OF THE NW 1/4 TO A 1-1/4” IRON PIPE; THENCE S 2 DEGREES 26' 18” W., 1304.34 FEET TO A 1” IRON PIPE: THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY, NORTHWESTERLY AND NORTHEASTERLY 219.33 FEET ALONG THE ARC OF A CUL DE SAC CONCAVE NORTHEASTERLY WITH A RADIUS OF 50.00 FEET, THE CHORD OF WHICH BEARS N 51 DEGREES 53' 36” W, 81.24 FEET TO A 1” IRON PIPE; THENCE N 2 DEGREES 26' 18” E., 848.14 FEET TO A 1” IRON PIPE; THENCE S 77 DEGREES 32' 05” W, 6.08 FEET TO A 1” IRON PIPE; THENCE N 12 DEGREES 45' 46” W, 75.49 FEET TO A 1” IRON PIPE; THENCE N 4 DEGREES 20' 46” W, 136.07 FEET TO A 1” IRON PIPE; THENCE N 5 DEGREES 15' 32” E, 61.89 FEET TO A 1” IRON PIPE; THENCE N 0 DEGREES 28' 44” W, 35.06 FEET TO A 1” IRON PIPE; THENCE S 81 DEGREES 35' 16” W, 43.75 FEET TO THE PLACE OF BEGINNING.

SUBJECT TO AN EASEMENT FOR THE EXISTING RIGHT-OF-WAY FOR CAMPO FIESTA LANE ACROSS THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE PARCEL HEREIN DESCRIBED, AND TO A PERPETUAL EASEMENT FOR PUBLIC UTILITIES. SUBJECT TO AN EASEMENT FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS BY THE SHORTEST POSSIBLE ROUTE FROM LOT 1A, OVER LOT 1B TO OUTLOT 1 SAID EASEMENT TO BE 40 FEET WIDE. Tax Key No.: GL1-4 Property Address: 10560 Campo Fiesta Lane, Boulder Junction, Wisconsin 54512 Johnson, Blumberg & Associates, LLC is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. 2261

_____________

(Three Weeks, 2/6-2/20/13) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT VILAS COUNTY Case No. 12-CV-188, Code No. 30404 Foreclosure of Mortgage Dollar Amount Greater Than $5,000.00 Code No. 30405, Real Estate ____________________________________ WELLS FARGO BANK N.A., as Trustee, for Asset Backed Securities Corporation Home Equity Loan Trust 2001-HE3, Asset Backed Pass-Through Certificates Series 2001-HE3 c/o by Homeward Residential, Inc., its attorney-in-fact, Plaintiff, vs. JOHN J. VEATCH, JR. and CAROLYN C. VEATCH, husband and wife, and ARCADY INVESTORS LIMITED PARTNERSHIP, Defendants. ____________________________________ NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE ____________________________________ PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on December 4, 2012, in the amount of $161,603.69, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows:. TIME: March 7, 2013 at 2:00 o’clock p.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or certified funds at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax. PLACE: Vilas County Courthouse, located at 330 Court Street, Eagle River, Wisconsin. DESCRIPTION: Situated in Town of Washington, County of Vilas, State of Wisconsin, to wit: A parcel of land in Government Lot 4, Section 31, Township 40 North, Range 11 East, and being more particularly described as follows: (Fernwood) Commencing at the West ¼ corner of Section 31, Township 40 North, Range 11 East, an iron pipe; thence N.56 degree 20 ‘E, a distance of 1932. 7 feet to an iron pipe; thence S. 87 degree 27'E, a distance of 60.20 feet to a concrete monument; thence N.36 degree 06'E, a distance of 116.2 feet to an iron pipe; thence N.45 degree 28'E a distance of 20.28 feet to an iron pipe; thence S.49 degree 52'E a distance of 31.5 feet to an iron pipe; thence N.39 degree 24'E a distance of 79.84 feet to an iron pipe; thence N. 26 degree 43'W a distance of 37.95 feet to an iron pipe, thence N 54 degree 09'E a distance of 158.45 feet; thence N. 56 degree 26'E a distance of 83.1 feet to an iron pipe, the place of beginning; thence S 30 degree 30'E a distance of 147.63 feet to an iron pipe on the Westerly shore of Cranberry Lake; thence N 69 degree 11'E along the shore of said lake a distance of 101.28 feet to an iron pipe; thence N.30 degree 30'W a distance of 170.0 feet to an iron pipe, said line being the South boundary line of Lot 16 of the recorded Plat of EVERETTS RESORT; thence S. 56 degree 26'W a distance of 100.0 feet to an iron pipe, the place of beginning. Also described as Lot 17 of the recorded Plat of EVERETTS RESORT. Together with an easement or a right to the use of existing road-ways, paths and sidewalks as a means of entrance and exit from the lands herein conveyed: also right to the use of existing rights of way for utility service such as telephone, water, sewer and electric service to serve the lands herein conveyed. Lake privileges are also granted to the grantees, their heirs and assigns, on both Catfish and Cranberry Lakes, and the right to use an existing easement to each of said lakes following a pathway to existing piers now situated on each of said lakes and known as "Everett Resort Piers." Subject to Municipal and Zoning Ordinances and Recorded Easement Public Utilities: Recorded Building Restrictions: easements, rights of way, reservations, exceptions and restrictions of record. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 1325 Everett Road, City of Eagle River. TAX KEY NO.: 026-3030 Frank Tomlanovich Sheriff of Vilas County, WI O’DESS AND ASSOCIATES, S.C. Attorneys for Plaintiff 1414 Underwood Avenue, Suite 403 Wauwatosa, WI 53213 (414) 727-1591 O’Dess and Associates, S.C., is attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If you have previously received a Chapter 7 Discharge in Bankruptcy, this correspondence should not be construed as an attempt to collect a debt. 2748

_____________

(Three Weeks, 2/13-2/27/13) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT VILAS COUNTY Case No. 11 CV 254 Case Code: 30404 Hon. Neal A. Nielsen III ____________________________________ U.S. Bank National Association ND, Plaintiff, vs. Brandon Michael Coffey, Defendant(s). ____________________________________ NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE ____________________________________ PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on the 4th day of December, 2012, the Sheriff of Vilas County will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: DATE/TIME: March 7, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. TERMS: 10% of successful bid must be paid to the Sheriff at sale in cash or by certified check. Balance due within 10 days of court approval. Purchaser is responsible for payment of all transfer taxes and recording fees. Sale is AS IS in all respects. PLACE: Front Steps of the Vilas County Courthouse 330 Court Street, Eagle River, WI 54521 DESCRIPTION: Lot 4 of Certified Survey Map #2917 recorded in Vol. 10 Certified Surveys, page 100 being a replat of ALL of Lot 2 of Certified Survey Map #610 in Vol. 3 Certified Surveys, page 3, ALL of Lot 3, PART of Lot 4 of Certified Survey Map #611 in Vol. 3 Certified Surveys, page 6, and PART of Goverment Lots 2 & 3 in Section 27, Township 41 North, Range 8 East, Township of Plum Lake, Vilas County, Wisconsin. Together with a non-exclusive easement for ingress and egress over Outlot A of Certified Survey Map #2917 recorded in Vol. 10 Certified Surveys, page 100 and over the 30 foot Access Easement to Hanson Road over existing drive. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 8168 Autumn Lane, Sayner, WI. /s/ Frank Tomlanovich Sheriff of Vilas County, Wisconsin Stein & Moore, P.A. Attorneys for Plaintiff 332 Minnesota St., Suite W-1650 St. Paul, MN 55101 (651) 224-9683 2259

_____________

(One Week, 2/13/13) State of Wisconsin, Forest County Circuit Court CASE # 13-SC-19 To: Jacob W. Ison (last known address: 826 Bloom Rd, Eagle River, WI 54521) You are hereby notified that you are being sued by the CoVantage Credit Union in Small Claims Court, Forest County Courthouse, 200 E. Madison St, Crandon, WI, for a Replevin Judgment of the following collateral: 2005 GMC SIERRA 1500 PICKUP V8 VIN: 1GTEK19B85E113456 A hearing will be held at 9:30 a.m.. on the 5th day of March 2013. If you do not appear; a judgment may be given to the person suing you. A copy of the Summons and Complaint has been attempted to be served to you at your last known address listed above. Dated this the 8th day of February CoVantage Credit Union, Plaintiff Stacey Hofmann, Plaintiffs Agent 2275

WNAXLP


VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS

SHARON GIFFORD (715) 545-4008

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 13, 2013

PHELPS

11B

2462 ST. LOUIS RD., PHELPS, WI 54554

sharoneg@frontier.com

Sleigh Rides

Any size group!

Great family fun!

MONTH OF FEBRUARY 10 am - 11w/20 pm people each 3 horse-drawn sleighs Enjoy scenic, beautiful wooded trails with a halfway point bonfire, hot chocolate! Wagon Rides, Special Occasions, Business Gatherings, Special Events, Appearances

Rocking W Stable Pleasure Island Road • Eagle River, WI 54521

(715) 617-6779 northwoodsattractions.com Call for more information or reservations.

WINTER CARNIVAL — The Phelps community recently held its ninth annual Winter Carnival at the school. The event was sponsored by the Community Relations Committee and included a chili and dessert cook-off, inflatables, games and music (right). The band Horizon of the Great Lakes Naval Academy performed in the small gymnasium (above). All events were open to the public and there was no charge for admission. The event was funded by the Rural Education Achievement Program. —Photos By Sharon Gifford

School Meals We serve education every day™

ATTENTION MAIL SUBSCRIBERS

DID YOUR NEWSPAPER ARRIVE LATE? If so, fill out this coupon and give it to your postmaster to let him know that a problem exists.*

Women’s club plans meeting The Phelps Women’s Club will hold a meeting Monday, Feb. 18, beginning at 1 p.m. at the Phelps firehall. Members and guests are

ELEANOR ELLIS PUBLIC LIBRARY PHELPS, WI 54554

The Phelps Public Library will host a movie afternoon Wednesday, Feb. 13, at 2 p.m. showing “Fairfield Road” starring Jesse Metcalfe and Derek Mcgrath, rated NR. Admission is free, and popcorn and coffee will be served. The public is welcome to attend. The library recently added the following new release movies to its collection: “You May Not Kiss the Bride,” “Here Comes the Boom,” “So Undercover,” “Flight,” “Alex Cross,” “Thor — Legend of

Phelps Senior Dining

welcome to attend.

Your Name and Address (tape your mail label here):

Holiday Lodge Restaurant

For more information, call Sharon Gifford at (715) 5454008.

the Magical Hammer,” “Hotel Transylvania” and “Cold Light of Day.” The library recently added the following documentaries to its collection: “Lee and Grant — Generals of the Civil War” and “Victory at Sea.” Students in third through 10th grade who are participating in the Milwaukee Bucks Library Reading Challenge 2013 must report their final scores to the library by Wednesday, Feb. 27. For more information, call (715) 545-2887 or visit phelps.wislib.org. Library hours are Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Wednesdays from 2 to 6 p.m.; and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to noon.

BANKRUPTCY CREDIT CARD DEBT, MEDICAL BILLS, DEBTS RESULTING FROM A LOST JOB OR FAILED BUSINESS? Chapter 7 Bankruptcy may be your answer for relief from financial problems. Phone us for a free initial consultation.

CIRILLI LAW OFFICES, S.C. 116 E. Davenport St., P.O. Box 159, Rhinelander, WI 54501-0159 Phone: (715) 369-3443 Toll-Free: 1-(888) 844-3443

MONDAY, FEB. 18 Boiled dinner w/pork Salad Whole-wheat roll Peaches Pumpkin pie

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 20 Liver & onions Baked potato Green beans

The Classifieds Attract Buyers. Place an ad in the North Woods Trader classifieds! 715-479-4421

Date Received _____________________________ Signed ___________________________________ *POSTMASTER — This information is provided to our mail subscribers as a convenience for reporting newspapers which are being delivered late. The Vilas County News-Review and The Three Lakes News are published weekly by Eagle River Publications at 425 West Mill Street, Eagle River, WI 54521-1929. USPS 659480 paid at Eagle River, WI 54521. Subscription rates are $50 per year in Vilas-Oneida counties; $57 per year elsewhere in Wisconsin; $68 per year out of Wisconsin. Send address changes to: News-Review, P.O. Box 1929, Eagle River, WI 54521-1929.

FRIDAY, FEB. 22 Herbed sole fillet Baked tater tots Broccoli & cauliflower Pears Peanut-butter cookie

SPRING PRIMARY ELECTION PHELPS SCHOOL CHILD DEVELOPMENT DAYS FOR NEW KINDERGARTEN STUDENTS AND PK-4 REGISTRATION

FEBRUARY 19, 2013

NOTICE OF POLLING HOURS & LOCATIONS VILAS COUNTY

Town of Arbor Vitae Mary Reuland, Clerk

Town Hall

10675 Big Arbor Vitae Dr. 715-356-3120

Town of Boulder Junction Lois Smith, Clerk

Community Center

5386 Park St. (Hwy M) 715-385-2220

Town of Cloverland Mildred Ritzer, Clerk

Town Hall

5860 Perch Lake Rd. 715-479-2392

Town of Conover James Hedberg, Clerk

Town Hall

4665 Co. Highway K 715-479-8688

Town of Lac du Flambeau Nancy Edwards, Clerk

Town Hall

109 Old Abe Rd. 715-588-3358

Town of Land O’ Lakes Lynn Bybee, Clerk

Town Hall

4331 Highway B 715-547-3255

Town of Lincoln Shelly Sauvola, Clerk

Town Hall

1205 Sundstein Rd. 715-479-7000

Town of Manitowish Waters Susan Patterson, Clerk

Town Hall

4 Airport Rd. 715-543-8400

Town of Phelps Marjorie Hiller, Clerk

Fire Hall

4499 Town Hall Rd. 715-545-2270

Tuesday, Feb. 26, 2013, 6 p.m. Phelps Fire Station

Town of Plum Lake Sharon Brooker, Clerk

Town Hall

8755 Lake St. 715-542-4531

The Town Board is looking at different ways to fund the promotion and marketing of Phelps. We would like to explore the possibility of implementing a room tax as an option to provide funding for these efforts. The key word here is . . . “Explore.”

Town of Presque Isle Lorine Walters, Clerk

Town Hall

8306 School Loop Rd. (Hwy B) 715-686-2725

Town of St. Germain Thomas Martens, Clerk

Community Center

545 Highway 155 715-542-3813

We would like to invite you to a “Listening Session” on Tuesday, Feb. 26, 2013, at 6 p.m., at the Phelps Fire Station, 4499 Town Hall Road, Phelps, WI 54554, to get your perspective on room tax. Could this be implemented in a way that significantly benefits your business, other businesses and the community as a whole? Those of you in business have marketing strengths and knowledge that could be helpful. Would you consider getting involved to assist in management of these funds and creating an overall plan if this was implemented?

Town of Washington Michele Sanborn, Clerk

Town Hall

2301 Town Hall Rd. (near Hwy. 17) 715-479-1669

Town of Winchester Ruth Allis, Clerk

Town Hall

10363 Co. Highway W 715-686-2123

City of Eagle River Debbie Brown, Clerk

City Hall

525 E Maple St. 715-479-8682

The School District of Phelps has scheduled Child Development Day for new kindergarten students and 4K registration for Friday, Feb. 15, 2013. Kindergarten students must be 5 years old before Sept. 1, 2013, and 4-Year-Old Kindergarten students need to be 4 years old before Sept. 1, 2013. Parents should bring a birth certificate, immunization record and Social Security card. If you have not received a letter from the Phelps School District with a screening date and time, please call the school at (715) 545-2724. 2271

PUBLIC HEARING

2346

_________________________________________

Whole-wheat roll Mandarin oranges Brownie

“Listening Session” on Room Tax

Send résumé and application by March 1, 2013, to: School District of Phelps, Dr. Delnice Hill, 4451 Old School Road, Phelps, WI 54554. Position will be open until filled.

_________________________________________

Meals for seniors (60+) are served Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays at noon. Suggested donation is $4. Make reservations 24 hours in advance to Sandy Mutter at (715) 545-2452 between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. Home-delivered meals available, based on eligibility.

SCHOOL DISTRICT OF PHELPS CUSTODIAN POSITION OPEN The School District of Phelps is now taking applications for a full-time position of custodian/maintenance for daytime and evening work. Person will be responsible for cleaning, floor care, maintenance of school building, equipment and HVAC. Applicant must have good communication skills, computer skills, troubleshooting skills and be self-motivated.

_________________________________________

Sponsored by Vilas County Commission on Aging

[Our office is a debt-relief agency that helps people file bankruptcy for relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code]

The School District of Phelps is an equal opportunity employer.

This Edition of the Vilas County News-Review/Three Lakes News (Vol. 127, No. 48) Dated Wednesday, Feb. 13, 2013 was mailed at the Post Office at Eagle River, WI 54521 on Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2013.

On behalf of the entire Town Board and the Phelps Chamber of Commerce, I ask that you please attend this “Listening Session” and help us explore whether room tax could be a benefit. 2268

/s/ Marjorie Hiller, Clerk/Treasurer

POLLING HOURS AT ALL LOCATIONS ARE: 7:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M. 2282

ALL POLLING PLACES ARE ACCESSIBLE TO ELDERLY AND DISABLED VOTERS


12B

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 13, 2013

VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS

PUBLIC NOTICES _____________ (Three Weeks, 1/30-2/13/13) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT VILAS COUNTY Case No. 12-CV-128 Case Code 30404 (Foreclosure of Mortgage) ____________________________________ PARK CITY CREDIT UNION,

Plaintiff, vs. BRENDAN J. DEVLIN MARSHFIELD CLINIC -andHARLEY-DAVIDSON CREDIT CORP., Defendants. ____________________________________ NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE ____________________________________ By virtue of and pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above entitled action on the 14th day of August, 2012, the Sheriff of Vilas County will sell at public auction on the front steps of the Vilas County Courthouse located at 330 Court Street, Eagle River, Wisconsin, in said County, on: February 21st, 2013 at 2:00 p.m., all of the following described mortgaged premises, to wit: Lot Thirty-four (34) of the Plat of WILLIE’S HEIGHTS, being a Subdivision of all of the Northwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter and part of Government Lot Five, Section Eleven, Township Forty North, Range Six East of the Fourth Principal Meridian, Arbor Vitae Township, Vilas County, Wisconsin, as recorded in Volume 9 Plats, page 22. Together with an undivided 1/39th interest in and to, and together with right of ingress and egress over and across Outlot 1 (Willie’s Court), Outlot 2 (Hunter’s Court), and Outlot 3 (Poplar Drive and Poplar Court) as shown on the recorded Plat of WILLIE’S HEIGHTS. TAX KEY NO. 002-371 PROPERTY ADDRESS: 11377 Hunter Court, Arbor Vitae, WI 54568 TERMS OF SALE: Cash DOWN PAYMENT DUE IMMEDIATELY FOLLOWING SALE: Ten percent (10%) of amount bid by certified check or cash; balance to be paid following confirmation as provided for by law. Sale hereunder is subject to all delinquent and unpaid real estate taxes and any and all other legal liens and encumbrances which affect the property described above; this sale is also subject to the rights of tenants, if any. The property shall be sold in its present condition, “as is.” Any transfer tax required shall be paid by the successful bidder. Dated at Eagle River, Vilas County, Wisconsin, this 5th day of December, 2012. /s/ Frank Tomlanovich Sheriff of Vilas County, Wisconsin John H. Priebe PRIEBE LAW OFFICE State Bar No. 1003481 P. O. Box 1399 Rhinelander, WI 54501 715-365-3232 Plaintiff’s Attorney Priebe Law Office is a law firm/debt collector representing a creditor in the collection of a debt that you owe to said creditor. We are attempting to collect such debt and any information obtained from you will be used for that purpose. 1996

_____________

(Three Weeks, 1/30-2/13/13) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT VILAS COUNTY Case No. 12 CV 75 ____________________________________ Ocwen Loan Servicing, LLC as servicer for Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee for Long Beach Mortgage Loan Trust 2004-1, Asset-Backed Certificates, Series 2004-1, Plaintiff, vs. RYAN BREWER, et al., Defendant(s). ____________________________________ NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE ____________________________________ PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on June 29, 2012 in the amount of $66,253.70 the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: February 28, 2013 at 02:00 PM TERMS: By bidding at the sheriff sale, prospective buyer is consenting to be bound by the following terms: 1.) 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2.) Sold "as is" and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3.) Plaintiff opens bidding on the property, either in person or via fax and as recited by the sheriff department in the event that no opening bid is offered, plaintiff retains the right to request the sale be declared as invalid as the sale is fatally defective. PLACE: at 330 Court Street, Eagle River, Wisconsin 54521 DESCRIPTION: Lot 2 in Block 4 of the ORIGINAL PLAT of the village (now city) of Eagle River, according to the recorded plat thereof, said plat being of the NW 1/4 of the NE 1/4, section 33, township 40 North, Range 10 East, city of Eagle, Vilas County, Wisconsin. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 312 South 3rd Street, Eagle River, WI 54521 TAX KEY NO.: 221-682 Dated this 12th day of January, 2013. /S/ Sheriff Frank Tomlanovich Vilas County Sheriff Dustin A. McMahon Blommer Peterman, S.C. State Bar No. 1086857 165 Bishops Way, Suite 100 Brookfield, WI 53005 262-790-5719 Please go to www.blommerpeterman. com to obtain the bid for this sale. Blommer Peterman, S.C. is the creditor's attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. 1995

_____________

(Three Weeks, 2/13-2/27/13) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT VILAS COUNTY Case No. 11 CV 390 Case Code: 30404 ____________________________________ WELLS FARGO BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATE HOLDERS OF FIRST FRANKLIN MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2004-FF6, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-FF6, Plaintiff, vs. DALLAS R. ALBAUGH; CALLA F. ALBAUGH; CITY OF EAGLE RIVER; EAGLE RIVER MEMORIAL HOSPITAL, INC.; Defendant(s). ____________________________________ NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE ____________________________________ PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on July 10, 2012, in the amount of $90,844.49, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: March 14, 2013 at 2:00 pm TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax from the proceeds of the sale upon confirmation of the court. PLACE: IN THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE VILAS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 330 COURT STREET, EAGLE RIVER, WI 54521 Property description: A PIECE OR PARCEL IN OUTLOT 7 OF COUNTY CLERKS' PLAT OF GOVERNMENT LOTS 4 AND 5, SECTION 28-40-10 EAST, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF OUTLOT 6 AS PLACE OF BEGINNING; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY 60 FEET ALONG ILLINOIS STREET; THENCE SOUTH PARALLEL WITH OUTLOT 6, 120 FEET; THENCE EASTERLY 60 FEET; THENCE NORTHERLY TO PLACE OF BEGINNING, 120 FEET. Tax Key No.: 221-72-01 Property Address: 206 Illinois St, Eagle River, Wisconsin 54521 Johnson, Blumberg & Associates, LLC is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. 2262

_____________

(Three Weeks, 2/6-2/20/13) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT VILAS COUNTY — PROBATE — Order Setting Deadline for Filing a Claim (Formal Administration) Case No. 13 PR 03 IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF DORELLE ANN DEGOES-PFISTER. A petition for formal administration was filed. THE COURT FINDS: 

LATE CLASSIFIEDS

Classifieds published here are those received too late for our Trader deadline, which is 10 a.m. Thursday. 1. The decendent, with date of birth Dec. 24, 1936 and date of death Dec. 21, 2012 was domiciled in Vilas County, State of Wisconsin, with a mailing address of 3339 North Carpenter Lake Road, Eagle River, WI 54521. 2. All interested persons waived notice. THE COURT ORDERS: 1. The deadline for filing a claim against the decedent’s estate is May 17, 2013. 2. A claim must be filed at the Vilas County Courthouse, Eagle River, WI, Probate Branch. BY THE COURT: /s/ Dawn Halverson Circuit Court Commissioner January 29, 2013 John L. O’Brien P.O. Box 639 Eagle River, WI 54521 (715) 479-6444 Bar No. 1007902 2252

_____________

(Three Weeks, 2/6-2/20/13) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT WAUSHARA COUNTY Case No. 12-CV-232 Code: 30101/C1 ____________________________________ Karen S. Kvidera W5425 Apache Avenue Wild Rose, WI 54984, vs. STEVEN W. ROEHLING 4556 CTH-P Rhinelander, WI 54501,

Plaintiff,

Defendant. ____________________________________ SUMMONS ____________________________________

THE STATE OF WISCONSIN, To each person named above as a Defendant: You are hereby notified that the Plaintiff named above has filed a lawsuit or other legal action against you. Within 40 days after February 6, 2013, you must respond with a written demand for a copy of the Complaint. The demand must be sent or delivered to the Court, whose address is Clerk of Circuit Court, Waushara County Courthouse, 209 St. Marie Street, P. O. Box 507, Wautoma, Wisconsin, 54982-0507, and to Brenda K. Sunby, Habush Habush & Rottier S.C.®, Plaintiff's attorneys, 3100 Eagle Avenue, P. O. Box 1987, Wausau, Wisconsin, 544021987. You may have an attorney help or represent you. If you do not demand a copy of the Complaint within 40 days, the Court may grant judgment against you for the award of money or other legal action requested in the Complaint, and you may lose your right to object to anything that is or may be incorrect in the Complaint. A judgment may be enforced as provided by law. A judgment awarding money may become a lien against any real estate you own now or in the future and may also be enforced by garnishment or seizure of property. Dated this 1st day of February, 2013. HABUSH HABUSH & ROTTIER S.C.® Attorneys for Plaintiff Brenda K. Sunby (1032465) Theresa B. Laughlin (1022315) 3100 Eagle Avenue P. O. Box 1987 Wausau, WI 54402-1987 (715) 842-4444 2258

-----------------------------------------------EAGLE RIVER PROPERTIES, EAGLE RIVER, WI, EHO. Applications being taken for 2-bdrm. units. Rent $540-$619 a month. References, credit and criminal background checks required. Contact (715) 479-9688 or (218) 628-0311. 1708-tfcL -----------------------------------------------CABIN FOR RENT: 2 bdrms., utilities, snowplowing & garbage pickup included. On Upper Buckatabon Lake, Conover. $650/month. Call (715) 891-1388. 4995-tfcL -----------------------------------------------COME ENJOY the beautiful North Woods at our vacation rental properties. Conveniently located by the snowmobile trails! For availability and details call (715) 479-5424. 3c4999-50 -----------------------------------------------FOR RENT: Eagle River 2-bdrm. house on the chain/stove and refrigerator included within walking distance from shopping district. $550 per month plus utilities and security deposit. No pets. Phone (715) 4797218 between 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. 2p4998-49 --------------------------------------------------HELP WANTED: BOOKKEEPER/ RECEPTIONIST, knowledge of Excel necessary, for busy dental office. Year-round, 4 days a week. Some benefits. Energetic self-starter. Please send résumé to P.O. Box 1075, Eagle River, WI 54521. 4997-tfcL --------------------------------------------------FOR SALE: 2002 Polaris Edge X 600. Cover, nice condition, low miles, best offer. (715) 479-4706. 1p-4992-48 -----------------------------------------------HELP WANTED — JOB TRAINER: Part-time position (15-35 hours per week) for an individual to assist adults with disabilities in preparing for and maintaining community employment. Flexible schedule; possible evening and weekend work. Valid driver’s license and vehicle required. Send letter of interest and résumé by Feb. 22, 2013, to Administrative Assistant, Headwaters, Inc., P.O. Box 618, Rhinelander, WI 54501. EOE. 1c-4993-48

-----------------------------------------------BEEF SALE: Winter Warm-Up Sale, Futility Farms — quarters & halves on sale for $3.10 per lb., including all basic processing. Thru March. Call Beverly. (715) 447-5720. 1p-4994-48 -----------------------------------------------TRIUMPH HANDYMAN SERVICES: All aspects of handyman services; painting, staining, drywall, wallpapering, paneling. Also carpentry & remodeling, misc. repairs including siding or decks, any hauling needs, major yard cleanup, etc. Pay nothing til work is complete. References. Quality expert work at an affordable price. (715) 892-7091. 2p-4996-49L

CAXCA

POSITION AVAILABLE NEWCAP, Inc.

SCHOOL BUS DRIVERS WANTED IN THE NORTHLAND PINES SCHOOL DISTRICT AREA

Excellent part-time employment in the area. Will train the right person. Call (715) 479-2565 and speak with Greg or Sue.

_____________

(Two Weeks, 2/13-2/20/13) Publish for the two weeks of February 13, 2013 and February 20, 2013 Vilas County Zoning & Planning Committee Public Hearing Notice Date: Monday. March 11, 2013. Time: Immediately Following the 9:00 AM Scheduled Public Hearing Location: Vilas County Courthouse Conference Rooms #2&3 330 Court St. Eagle River, WI 54521 Public Hearing Description An application for Conditional Use #22013 submitted by James Galloway, agent for Vilas County, to erect a 110 foot tall wireless radio communications tower for emergency services use. The property is zoned All Purpose (AP) and is located behind the Vilas County Highway Department at 10718 E STH 70 in SW¼, NW¼, Section 30, Town 40 North, Range 7 East, Town of Arbor Vitae, Vilas County, Wisconsin and known by Vilas County Computer Parcel #2-2713. An on-site may be conducted at the Committee’s discretion, with the public hearing to follow at the Vilas County Courthouse. A copy of the application is on file in the Vilas County Zoning Office. Dated at Eagle River this 8th day of February, 2013. Dawn M. Schmidt, Zoning Administrator For: Zoning and Planning Committee If you have special needs, or require special accommodations, please call (715) 479-3620 or write: 330 Court Street, Courthouse, Eagle River, WI 54521. LEGAL NOTICE 2280

_____________

(Three Weeks, 2/6-2/20/13) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT, VILAS COUNTY — PROBATE — Notice to Creditors (Informal Administration) Case No. 13PR04 IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF MARCELLA E. MALOUF PLEASE TAKE NOTICE: 1. An application for informal administration was filed. 2. The decedent, with date of birth Jan. 11, 1924 and date of death Oct. 10, 2008, was domiciled in Vilas County, State of Wisconsin, with a mailing address of 667 Alder Lake Rd., Manitowish Waters, WI 54545. 3. All interested persons waived notice. 4. The deadline for filing a claim against the decedent’s estate is May 17, 2013. 5. A claim may be filed at the Vilas County Courthouse, Eagle River, Wisconsin Probate Branch. /s/ Dawn R. Halverson Probate Registrar 1/28/2013 Nancy Malouf 206 County Road W Manitowish Waters, WI 54545 (715) 543-2784 2255

WNAXLP

Reproductive healthcare RN needed to provide family planning services in our Florence, Crandon and St. Germain offices (rotating schedule). Candidate to provide professional nursing services, including family planning education, reproductive health screening, STD testing and treatment, and the provision of contraceptives. Willing to train the right candidate. Hourly wage is negotiable, plus monthly production bonuses and excellent insurance benefits. Position includes over 4 weeks’ paid vacation, 14 paid holidays, continuing education, and reimbursement for licenses, certifications and liability insurance.

APPLICATION DEADLINE IS FEB. 28, NOON NEWCAP, Inc. is an Equal Opportunity Employer providing human/social services to low-income clientele. NEWCAP is headquartered in Oconto, WI. 2726

ELECTRICAL ENGINEER Qualifications: BSEE

18

Design/Build HELP WANTED •Carpenters by Visner Inc. •Painters Send résumé to Box 1057 Eagle River, WI 54521

Registered Nurse

Email résumé to: Jenny Seefeldt, HR Director jennyseefeldt@newcap.org

_____________

(Three Weeks, 2/13-2/27/13) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT VILAS COUNTY — PROBATE — Order Setting Time to Hear Petition for Administration and Deadline for Filing Claims (Formal Administration) Case No. 13 PR 07 IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF MARION PILLSBURY, deceased. A petition for formal administration was filed. THE COURT FINDS: The decedent, with date of birth April 25, 1932 and date of death July 18, 2012 was domiciled in Vilas County, State of Wisconsin, with a mailing address of 3695 Schroeder Road, Phelps, WI 54554. THE COURT ORDERS: 1. The petition be heard at the Vilas County Courthouse, Eagle River, Wisconsin, before Circuit Court Judge Hon. Neal Nielsen III, on March 5, 2013 at 9:45 a.m. You do not need to appear unless you object. The petition may be granted if there is no objection. 2. The deadline for filing a claim against the decedent’s estate is May 24, 2013. 3. A claim may be filed at the Vilas County Courthouse, Eagle River, Wisconsin, Probate Branch. 4. Heirship will be determined at the hearing on petition for final judgment. 5. Publication of this notice is notice to any persons whose names or addresses are unknown. If you require reasonable accommodations due to a disability to participate in the court process, please call (715) 4793642 at least 10 working days prior to the scheduled court date. Please note that the court does not provide transportation. BY THE COURT: /s/ Dawn R. Halverson Circuit Court Commissioner 2/8/2013 Atty. Colyn E. Carter P.O. Box 1088 Eagle River, WI 54521 (715) 479-4488 Bar No. 1008534 2281

Rough/Frame Carpenters Wanted — We are seeking full-time carpenters (as employees) who not only have superior technical skills, but also are incredibly professional, focused, clean working and quality oriented. Ideal candidates would have proven experience and be able to lead crews in building extensively custom premier homes. Transportation and customary tools required. We offer great wages, health insurance, 401(k) and other benefits commensurate with experience. Send résumé in confidence to Benson Builders LLC P.O. Box 267, Land O’ Lakes, WI 54540 or to info@bensonbuildersllc.com

Experience: A minimum of 4 years is preferred. Design of AC and DC power and control circuits in conformance to industry codes and standards (eg. NEC, UL508A). Troubleshooting of these circuits. The interpretation and development of engineering documentation including drawings, specifications and bills of material. The use of document control procedures. CAD experience with Autodesk® products preferred. Must be able to work on a team to meet project objectives in a manufacturing setting and support achievement of these objectives with: • Good oral and written communications skills • The ability to collaborate with other team members. • A level of technical knowledge and experience that will allow the candidate to work independently as required. • Competitive compensation & benefit package

or e-mail production@design buildbyvisner.com

Please visit our website www.northstarsteelfab.com download the application and send it along with your résumé to eng@northstarsteelfab.com

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES WITH VILAS COUNTY VETERANS SERVICE OFFICER

Avanti Health & Rehab Center is now accepting applications for the following positions CNAs  Variable Hours & Shifts FREE State-approved Certified Nursing Aide course will be offered this spring. Please let us know if you are interested. Call 715-356-6016, or email us at: dianep@avantihs.com for more information.

Avanti Health & Rehabilitation Center

Application materials and position descriptions may be obtained from the County website, www.co.vilas.wi.us. Application materials should be returned no later than 4 p.m. on March 1, 2013 to: Vilas County Human Resources, 330 Court Street, Eagle River, WI 54521, jakahl@co.vilas.wi.us, fax: 715-479-3750.

9969 Old Hwy. 70 Road, Minocqua, WI 54548

A Division of Avanti Health Systems FAMILY OWNED & OPERATED

We are seeking a Veteran’s Service Officer, to advise and advocate for veterans, their families and survivors in regard to benefits, programs, grants and loans provided for by the U.S. Veterans Administration, the State of WI Department of Veterans Affairs or county mandates. The VSO also provides information and referral to local legal, medical, economic, social and historical resources & to federal, state and county agencies to the general public and to the veteran and their family ensuring confidentiality. The top rate of pay for this position is $41,248/year (subject to 6month introductory rate of 95%), plus excellent benefits. Must be able to understand and interpret U.S. Veterans Administration rules and regulations, State of Wisconsin Department of Veterans Affairs rules and regulations, and have a working knowledge of Federal and State assistance programs. Qualified candidates must be a veteran as set forth in section Wis. Stat. § 45.43(1)(a), must be knowledgeable about agencies and institutions and local resources providing benefits and services to veterans, and must successfully pass a Civil Service Test. This position will be elected by the County Board at their March 19, 2013 meeting.

EOE

Vilas County is an equal opportunity employer. 2263


VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 13, 2013

PUBLIC NOTICES _____________ (Six Weeks, 1/16-2/20/13) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT VILAS COUNTY Case No. 11-CV-381 Code No. 30404 Foreclosure of Mortgage Dollar Amount Greater Than $5,000.00 ____________________________________ JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, successor in interest by purchase from the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation as Receiver for Washington Mutual Bank, f/k/a Washington Mutual Bank, FA, Plaintiff, vs. FLORIAN J. GUSKI LIVING TRUST NO. 1 c/o Florian J. Guski, as Trustee; and FLORIAN J. GUSKI and JANE DOE, unknown spouse of Florian J. Guski; and NORTHWEST BANK OF ROCKFORD; and BMO HARRIS BANK, N.A. f/k/a Harris, N.A., as the assignee of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation as the receiver for Amcore Bank, N.A., and RIVERSIDE COMMUNITY BANK, Defendants. ____________________________________ NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE ____________________________________ PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on February 16, 2012, in the amount of $239,006.79, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows:. TIME: March 7, 2013 at 2:00 o’clock p.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or certified funds at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax. PLACE: Vilas County Courthouse, located at 330 Court Street, Eagle River, Wisconsin. DESCRIPTION: A parcel of land in Government Lot (1) in Section Seventeen (17), in Township Forty (40) North, Range Five (5) East of the Fourth Principal Meridian, Lac du Flambeau Township, Vilas County, Wisconsin, being Parcel B shown on Map No. 95-03 by Wilderness Surveying Inc., dated February 13, 1995, more particularly described as follows: Commencing at the corner common to Section 8, 9 16 and 17, marked by a G.L.O. brass capped iron pipe; thence South 89̊ 46’ 00” West for a distance of 1322.48 feet to the Northwest corner of Government Lot 1, being the East 16th corner; thence South 00̊ 41’ 55” East for distance of 1570.69 feet along the West line of Government Lot 1 to the Meander corner, marked by a well point near the northerly shore of Crawling Stone Lake; thence meandering along the lake South 86̊ 34’ 15” East for a distance of 25.07 feet to the place of beginning, marked by an iron pipe; thence continuing along the lake South 86̊ 34’ 15” East for a distance of 200.52 feet to an iron pipe; thence North 00̊ 41’ 55” West for a distance of 316.38 feet to an iron pipe; thence South 89̊ 16’ 09” West for a distance of 200.0 feet to an iron pipe; thence South 00̊ 41’ 55” East for a distance of 301.83 feet to the place of beginning. The above lateral lot lines extend to the shore of Crawling Stone Lake, inclusive the land lying between the lakeshore baseline and the water’s edge. AND A parcel of land in Government Lot One (1) Section Seventeen (17) in Township Forty (40) North, Range Five (5) East, Lac Du Flambeau Township Vilas County, Wisconsin, being the “Deed Overlap Area” shown on Map No. 95-03 by Wilderness Surveying, Inc., dated February 13, 1995 more particularly described as follows: Commencing at the corner common to Section 8, Section 9, Section 16 and Section 17 marked by a G.L.O. brass capped iron pipe; thence South 89̊ 46’ 00” West for a distance of 1322.48 feet to the Northwest corner of Government Lot 1, being the East 16th Corner; thence South 00̊ 41’ 55” East for a distance of 1203.52 feet along the West line of Government Lot 1 to the place of beginning, being at an intersection with the Southerly right of way of Rohrbacher Lane; thence along said Southerly right of way line of Rohrbacher Lane, along a curve to the right, having a radius of 865.93 feet and an arc length of 153.29 feet, being subtended by a chord of South 78̊ 05’ 16” East for a distance of 153.09 feet; thence continuing along said Southerly right of way line South 73̊ 00’ 58” East for a distance of 79.35 feet; thence South 00̊ 41’ 55” East for a distance of 9.49 feet to an iron pipe; thence South 89̊ 16’ 09’ West for a distance of 225.0 feet to an iron pipe on the West line of Government Lot 1; thence along said West line of Government Lot 1 North 00̊ 41’ 55” West for a distance of 67.15 feet to the place of beginning. PROPERTY ADDRESS:2147 Rohrbacher Lane, Town of Lac du Flambeau. TAX KEY NO.: 10-1110 Frank Tomlanovich Sheriff of Vilas County, WI O’DESS AND ASSOCIATES, S.C. Attorneys for Plaintiff 1414 Underwood Avenue, Suite 403 Wauwatosa, WI 53213 (414) 727-1591 O’Dess and Associates, S.C., is attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If you have previously received a Chapter 7 Discharge in Bankruptcy, this correspondence should not be construed as an attempt to collect a debt. 1980

_____________

(Three Weeks, 2/6-2/20/13) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT VILAS COUNTY Case No. 12-CV-189 ____________________________________ Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. Gregg A Gimse, Ann L. Gimse, Marshfield Clinic and M&I Marshall & Ilsley Bank a/k/a BMO Harris Bank, National Association, Defendants. ____________________________________ NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE ____________________________________ PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on September 7, 2012 in the amount of $80,616.08 the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: March 14, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. TERMS: Pursuant to said judgment, 10% of the successful bid must be paid to the sheriff at the sale in cash, cashier's check or certified funds, payable to the clerk of courts (personal checks cannot and will not be accepted). The balance of the successful bid must be paid to the clerk of courts in cash, cashier's check or certified funds no later than ten days after the court's confirmation of the sale or else the 10% down payment is forfeited to the plaintiff. The property is sold 'as is' and subject to all liens and encumbrances. PLACE: On the front steps of the Vilas County Courthouse, Eagle River DESCRIPTION: A parcel of land being a part of Government Lot One (1), Section One (1), Township Forty (40) North, Range Ten (10) East, Town of Washington, Vilas County, Wisconsin, and being more particularly described as follows: Commencing at the Northeast corner of said Section 1 being marked by a G.L.O. Monument, thence S 0°22’32” W 1322.81 feet along the East line of said Section 1 to a railroad spike in the pavement of the Town Road marking the Northeast corner of said Gov’t Lot 1 of said Section 1, thence N 86°37’61” W 748.69 feet (N 86°23’ W 749.3 feet of record) along the North line of said Gov’t Lot 1 as established by others to an iron pipe and also being the place of beginning, thence S 0°10’37” W 155.27 feet (S 0°13’ W 158.0 feet of record) to an iron pipe on the Northerly R/W line of the platted road known as Shangri-La Road, thence along said Northerly R/W line; S 75°47’18” W 257.13 feet (257.4 feet of record) to an iron pipe and S 45°25’51” W 111.08 feet (S 44°05’ W 111.5 feet of record) to an iron pipe, thence leaving said R/W line N 33°12’57” W 395.37 feet (N 33°01’ W 395.2 feet of record) to an iron pipe on the North line of said Gov’t. Lot 1 as established by others, thence S 86°23’19” E 546.55 feet (S 86°23’ E 546.4 feet of record) along the North line of said Gov’t Lot 1 as established by others back to the place of beginning. Subject to the Town Road Right-Of-Way. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 3642 Shangri La Rd Eagle River, WI 54521-8862 DATED: January 7, 2013 Gray & Associates, L.L.P. Attorneys for Plaintiff 16345 West Glendale Drive New Berlin, WI 53151-2841 (414) 224-8404 Please go to www.gray-law.com to obtain the bid for this sale. Gray & Associates, L.L.P. is attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If you have previously received a discharge

in a chapter 7 bankruptcy case, this communication should not be construed as an attempt to hold you personally liable for the debt. 2749

_____________

(Three Weesk, 2/6-2/20/13) NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Case No. 11CV62 STATE OF WISCONSIN – CIRCUIT COURT – CIVIL DIVISION – VILAS COUNTY Tri City National Bank, Plaintiff v. Vaughn K. Epperson, et al., Defendants. Please Take Notice that by virtue of a Judgment of Foreclosure entered on the 22nd day of August, 2012 in the amount of $127,822.80, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: 28th day of February, 2013 at 2:00 o’clock p.m. on the front steps of the Vilas County Courthouse, 330 Court Street, Eagle River, Wisconsin 54521: A parcel of land located in the Southwest Quarter of the Northwest Quarter (SW-NW) and Government Lot Seven (7), in Section Thirteen (13), Township Fortythree (43) North, Range Seven (7) East, Vilas County, Wisconsin, described as follows: Commencing at the Northwest corner of the Southwest Quarter of the Northwest Quarter (SW-NW) of said Section Thirteen (13); thence South 88º 06’ 16” East, 883.0 feet to the Place of Beginning; then South 88º 06’ 16” East, 484.15 feet to the Northeast Corner of said Southwest Quarter of the Northwest Quarter (SW-NW); thence, South 2º 14’ 14” West, 12.15 feet to a meander corner; thence South 86º 27’ East, 129.1 feet; thence South 70º 29’ East, 97.9 feet; thence South 42º 30’ East, 53.1 feet; thence South 81º 58’ West, 63.2 feet; thence South 46º 44’ West, 175.1 feet; thence South 24º 34’ East, 218.0 feet; thence South 25º 54’ East, 103.8 feet; thence South 41º 04’ East, 121.5 feet; thence North 67º 42’ East, 79.1 feet; thence South 59º 00’ East, 163.4 feet; thence South 10º 26’ West, 64.2 feet; South 59º 08’ West, 84.9 feet; thence South 42º 29’ West, 164.1 feet; thence South 44º 04’ West, 219.8 feet; South 33º 42’ West, 134.8 feet; thence North 73º 31’ West, 67.1 feet; thence North 65º 04’ West, 170.2 feet; thence North 47º 57’ West, 88.9 feet; thence North 71º 52’ West, 260.4 feet; thence North 23º 46’ West, 163.2 feet; thence North 62º 35’ East, 201.0 feet; thence North 79º 41’ East, 148.9 feet; thence North 25º 12’ East, 183.3 feet; thence North 37º 38’ West, 157.1 feet; thence North 36º 00’ West, 191.2 feet; thence North 34º 00’ West, 273.9 feet to the Place of Beginning. Including the land lying between the

meander line and the shoreline of Dunn Lake. Tax Parcel No. 7-7&G7-5 Computer No. 022-1474 Town of Presque Isle TERMS: 1. Pursuant to said judgment, 10% of successful bid must be paid to sheriff at sale in cash, cashier’s check or certified funds, payable to the clerk of courts (personal checks cannot and will not be accepted). The balance of the successful bid must be paid to the clerk of courts in cash, cashier’s check or certified funds no later than ten days after the court’s confirmation of the sale or else the 10% down payment is forfeited to the plaintiff. 2. Property sold “as is” subject to all legal encumbrances. Dated at Eagle River, Wisconsin, January __, 2013. FRANK TOMLANOVICH Sheriff of Vilas County, WI DAVIS & KUELTHAU, S.C. Attorneys for Plaintiff, 111 E. Kilbourn Ave., Suite 1400 Milwaukee, WI 53202 2747

11-16

_____________

(Two Weeks, 2/13-2/20/13) Publish for the two weeks of February 13, 2013 and February 20, 2013 Vilas County Zoning & Planning Committee Public Hearing Notice Date: Monday, March 11, 2013. Time: 9:00 AM Location:  Vilas County Courthouse Conference Rooms #2&3 330 Court St. Eagle River, WI 54521 Public Hearing Description An application for Conditional Use #12013 submitted by Lance Wirth, owner, to convert a model home and office building to a single family dwelling. The property is zoned Community Business (CB) and is located at 8070 Winkle Rd in Part of Government Lot 3, Section 34, Town 40 North, Range 8 East, Town of St. Germain, Vilas County, Wisconsin and known by Vilas County Computer Parcel #24-2194. An on-site may be conducted at the Committee’s discretion, with the public hearing to follow at the Vilas County Courthouse. A copy of the application is on file in the Vilas County Zoning Office. Dated at Eagle River this 8th day of February, 2013. Dawn M. Schmidt, Zoning Administrator For: Zoning and Planning Committee If you have special needs, or require special accommodations, please call (715) 479-3620 or write: 330 Court Street, Courthouse, Eagle River, WI 54521. LEGAL NOTICE. 2279

WNAXLP

Rivers to thePeople™

13B


14B

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 13, 2013

VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS


All Around Newspaper Photography - Feb. 13, 2013