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Discover Compton Hollow Conservation Area. It’s closer than you think!

CARDS MAKE THINGS

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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2013 § SPRINGFIELD, MISSOURI § NEWS-LEADER.COM § A GANNETT COMPANY

GOVERNMENT SHUTDOWN

Financial impasse is over, for now Congress passes deal to end shutdown, raise debt limit

President Barack Obama prepares to make a statement to reporters Wednesday in the Brady Press Briefing Room at the White House. CHARLES DHARAPAK/AP

By David Espo

INSIDE

AP Special Correspondent

» Area lawmakers react: Springfield area’s House Republicans all voted against deal, but senators say it’s time to move on. 4A » Winners, losers: Plenty of both in wake of epic political fight. 5A » What’s next? Underlying causes of the stalemate remain. 5A

WASHINGTON — Up against a deadline, Congress passed and sent a waiting President Barack Obama legislation late Wednesday night to avoid a threatened national default and end the 16-day partial government shutdown, the culmination of an epic political drama that placed the U.S. economy at risk. The Senate voted first, a bipartisan 81-18 at midevening. That cleared the way for a final 285-144 vote in the Republican-controlled House about two hours later on the

through Feb. 7 or perhaps a month longer and fund the government through Jan. 15. More than 2 million federal workers would be paid — those who had remained on the job and those who had been furloughed. After the Senate approved the measure, Obama hailed the vote and said he would sign it immediately after it reached his desk. “We’ll begin reopening our government immedilegislation, which hewed strictly to ately and we can begin to lift this thetermsObamalaiddownwhenthe cloud of uncertainty from our busitwin crises erupted more than three nesses and the American people.” Later, in the House, Rep. Harold weeks ago. The legislation would permit the Treasury to borrow normally See DEAL, Page 4A

Autumn days perfect for exploring the Ozarks No need to go far to find fall foliage, colorful characters

T

Carmen Ammerman, right, dances in her living room with her daughters Shelby, left, and Ellie in 2012. The family shared their story for the News-Leader’s Children in Poverty series last year. NEWS-LEADER FILE PHOTO

he Ozarks is full of hidden treasures. On Monday, I set out to discover a few. Each year, I write about nice fall drives around the area, but this time I wanted to do something different. I decided to drive from Springfield to Branson to discover spots for enjoying fall foliage, quaint local businesses and a nice slice of pie. I visited some family-owned businesses, found photo opportunities galore and met some colorful people, too. It was one of those days where I constantly thought to myself, “I can’t believe I’ve never Ozarks Life been here.” And it was one of those days when I often reflected, “I am so grateful to live here.” The trees are not stunning yet — Monday they were just Juliana speckled with gold GOODWIN and amber — but it was still pretty. This drive may be better in the coming days. To track my entire journey would take a full day, so you may want to choose what appeals to you most or do it over several trips. Grab your camera and follow me. There are so many wonderful places to explore.

‘It was worth all the work’ Mom breaking cycle of poverty By Claudette Riley CRILEY@NEWS-LEADER.COM

The Shepherd of the Hills Hatchery public fishing access point is a beautiful spot to stop on an autumn day. JULIANA GOODWIN/NEWS-LEADER

Around Ozark From Springfield, I started south on U.S. 65. First stop was off the Evans Road exit, where I turned right and headed to the Missouri Veterans Cemetery. Cemeteries are beautiful places, especially in the fall. After a quick

WATCH Scan the QR code at left to see a video from the drive at www.News-Leader.com

FALL HIKES, DRIVES Turn to today’s Get Outdoors section, starting on Page 1C, for more fall foliage stories and tips, including a roundup of nearby places to hike, drive and visit.

See GOODWIN, Page 6A

See POVERTY, Page 6A

Index VOL. 123, NO. 290 ©2011, NEWS-LEADER

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§ TODAY 630 SUNNY § TONIGHT 430 MOSTLY CLEAR § TOMORROW 640 INCREASING CLOUDS

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Carmen Ammerman is trying to get used to having a little downtime. For the better part of the past three years, the 46-year-old single mother of two daughters has worked two part-time jobs — totaling nearly 50 hours a week — while working toward a graduate degree. It was a constant struggle to put healthy food on the table, hold onto safe housing, manage health issues and find a reliable car. Ammerman, who prizes education, kept going because she believed finishing college and finding a job would allow her to take better care of her family. “It was worth all the work, every drop of sweat,” said Ammerman, who has diabetes. “I am beginning to crawl out of a hole and it’s a very real hole of despera- Carmen tion.” Ammerman Ammerman, who grew recently took up in a family struggling to a job near make ends meet, just start- Kansas City. ed a new job after recently SUBMITTED completing a master’s de- PHOTO gree in occupational health, safety and environmental management. She is now the safety director of Universal Forest Products, a lumberyard and packaging plant just outside Kansas City.

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6A Thursday, October 17, 2013

NEWS-LEADER § News-Leader.com

Goodwin

GALLERY

Continued from Page 1A

drive through the property, I turned left at the exit. This was my first stunning discovery of the day: For the next 1⁄2 mile or so, the road meandered under a canopy of trees. When the road ended I turned left and parked my car at a small bridge. It was a great spot to take photos. There were bikers and joggers nearby, also enjoying the serene spot. A gentle wind lightly jostled trees that were spotted orange, gold and green. The trees reflected on the water and I got some great shots. It was an excellent start to my day. I got back in the car and headed down U.S. 65 again. Soon I saw a billboard for Heather Hill Farms, a store I’ve always wanted to visit but never had. So I pulled off at the CC/Fremont Hills exit in Ozark. Heather Hill Farms, 5255 N. 17th St., is located behind Lambert’s Cafe. It was wonderful. Owner Heather Alder opened the store in 2002 and she sells a huge variety of unique food items — dandelion jelly, cranberry mustard, pumpkin butter, horseradish pickles — including many Missouri products. “We love our Missouri products and try to feature those,” she said. There’s Missouri moonshine, Missouri wine and beer and 175 varieties of Osceola cheese. Wine and cheese tasting is free. I had no idea that Wind & Willow products are made in Mount Vernon. I love that brand, a variety of dips, cheese balls and more. For dessert, there’s a tiramisu cheese ball mix and a white chocolate amaretto cheesecake that are delicious. Alder also carries a huge line of canned Amish products from Ohio. She can put together cheese trays and gift baskets. If you plan to entertain this season, Heather Hill Farms is a good place to find unique dips to serve. I’ll be back to do a little Christmas shopping. (Call 417-581-7665.)

Poverty Continued from Page 1A

“I love my job so much. It really is what I was meant to do,” she said. “But I don’t know what to do with myself in the evenings because I’m used to working two jobs, raising my kids and going to school.” Ammerman will return to Springfield today to participate in “The 50 Percent: Poverty in our Community” panel discussion at the Library Center. It starts at 6 p.m. She has told her story before. Ammerman and her daughters — Shelby, 19, and Ellie, 12 — were profiled in the News-Leader’s Children in Poverty series, part of the Every Child project. It ran in September 2012. Mark Struckhoff, executive director of the Council of Churches of the Ozarks, will moderate the panel and believes Ammerman’s experiences can be eye-opening. “She can speak with authority about living in poverty,” he said. Ammerman and her daughters have lived most of their lives in northwest Springfield. Eager to break the cycle of poverty she saw growing up, Ammerman worked, got married and waited to have children until her mid-20s. Money had been tight but when Ammerman’s marriage of 14 years fell apart about seven years ago, the lack of financial resources was overwhelming. Even with child support, she struggled to find a job that paid enough to keep a roof over her daughters’ heads. She went back to college but finished a bachelor’s degree right as the economy was faltering

Online: See more photos with this story at News-Leader.com

FALL COLOR REPORTS » The Missouri Department of Conservation offers a fall color update at http://mdc.mo.gov/ discover-nature/outdoorrecreation/driving-tours/fallcolors; » Find a free fall color app at http://mdc.mo.gov/mobile/ mobile-apps/mo-fall-colors » For information on Arkansas color, call 1-800-NATURAL.

This photo was taken off a bridge less than a mile past the Missouri Veterans Cemetery. Take the Evans Road exit at U.S. 65 and follow signs for the cemetery. When the road ends, park to the left. JULIANA GOODWIN/NEWS-LEADER

ANOTHER SHORT BRANSON DRIVE The day after I wrote this story, I had to drop my sister-in-law at the Branson airport, and that was a pretty drive, too. It’s only a few miles past Branson near the Hollister exit (there’s a sign and the exit is on the left side). It’s a pretty drive with a slow speed limit, so you have time to enjoy it. There were hardly any other cars on the road, so I was able to pull off to take photos. If you make a Branson trip, I recommend adding that drive. It will take about 25-30 minutes round trip from Branson.

I know my readers love pie, so out of devotion to them (and not for my own gluttony), I took the next Ozark exit and stopped at Rosie Jo’s, 915 W. Jackson St., for a slice. I’ve heard the restaurant has great pie, so I sampled the blueberry (which had a thick double crust and sweet, delicious blueberries) and chocolate cream. They were both good.

Around Branson My day was flying by, so I continued to Branson. I got off at the Ozark Mountain Highroad exit, which is listed by the U.S. Parks Department as a scenic route, and it is beautiful. The Highroad is Missouri 465, which begins 5 miles north of Branson and travels 7 miles to Missouri 76. Luckily, it wasn’t busy so I was able to pull over and take pictures. (However, it’s not that easy to do, so this is more for enjoying the drive). From 76, I took Missouri 165, which was recommended on DiscoverBran-

WANT TO GO? What: “The 50 Percent: Poverty in Our Community" Where: Library Center auditorium, 4653 S. Campbell Ave. When: 6-8 p.m. today Who: Other panelists include Mark Struckhoff, executive director of the Council of Churches of the Ozarks; John Bentley, a physician who has worked extensively with lowincome families; Annie Busch, a community volunteer and school board member; and Kevin Huffman, principal of the high-poverty Robberson Community School. Cost: Free, but registration is required and limited to 75 participants per session. Free soup dinner by The Branch Bistro & Catering. Information: Call 417-8820714 to register; visit thelibrary.org

and jobs in her career field were either consolidating or evaporating. Unwilling to give up, she enrolled in graduate school and kept going. “I’m an excellent candidate to talk for some people who live in poverty because I was born with a set of skills — a will,” she said. “But, I could have easily been defeated.” Earlier this year, despite the demands of work and college, she secured an internship with the city of Springfield. It was unpaid but provided critical experience in areas such as the household chemical collection center and educational outreach about safety. “Mostly I learned where there’s a will, there’s a way,” she said. As she neared the end of graduate school and the internship, she started applying for jobs in the Springfield area. The phone didn’t ring, so she looked elsewhere in Missouri. The job she recently

son.com. I quickly stopped to eat at Danna’s Bar-B-Que & Burger, 963 Missouri 165 (it was packed). For years, I’ve heard people rave about this place so I decided to give it a try. The menu is fairly extensive. I love barbecue but tried the Danna Burger, which is a burger topped with pulled pork and barbecue sauce. The burger was fantastic, just one of those old-fashioned big, beefy burgers. The french fries were excellent: hot, salty and crispy. The restaurant is family owned and has been open since 2001. It now has multiple locations. (Call 417334-2706.) Next, I stopped at the the Dewey Short Visitor Center, 4500 Missouri 165. The center has an observation deck which is a good place to take photos of Table Rock Lake, the dam and fall foliage. Unfortunately, it was closed due to the government shutdown. If it reopens before you go for your drive, it’s worth a stop. started in Harrisonville is just 50 miles from relatives in Gladstone, a suburb of Kansas City. Ammerman is staying there and commuting until she can save enough to get her own place. The toughest transition came with moving her youngest daughter, Ellie, to a new middle school. A year ago, the now seventh-grader convinced her mom to allow her to transfer to Pipkin Middle School — even though it was farther away and they didn’t have reliable transportation at the time — because Ellie wanted to participate in the academically rigorous International Baccalaureate Middle Years program. Ammerman said Ellie loved Pipkin and moving to a new school in Gladstone has been difficult. “She is sad because she misses her friends,” she said. “Moving at all is sort of a traumatic thing for Ellie. I do everything I can do make things stable.” As soon as Ammerman is able to afford a house or apartment, she hopes her oldest daughter will transfer to a college in the Kansas City area. Shelby Ammerman, a 2011 graduate of Hillcrest High, is still living and working in Springfield. The teen is enrolled at Ozarks Technical Community College, where she is doing well and “making all A’s,” she said. Ammerman said despite attempts to shield her daughters from some of the difficulties she faced, it was nearly impossible to hide the stress when you have to “choose between milk and medicine.” “It’s a real thing, and there are people who struggle with it every day,” she said. “...It’s a gnawing, grinding thing.”

The inside of Danna’s Bar-B-Que & Burger Shop in Branson. The restaurant is usually busy. JULIANA GOODWIN/NEWS-LEADER

Nearby, off Missouri 165, is the Shepherd of the Hills Hatchery, 483 Hatchery Road. Even though I’ve been to the hatchery, I decided to pop over to the public fishing access point. It was awesome. Fly fishermen were lined up in the water, flicking their lines back and forth. A few caught trout, which were scooped up in a net and then released. Spectators snapped photos. Trout jumped out of the water. All of this took place by a shore lined with trees that were a patchwork of color. It was beautiful. “This is probably one of my favorite places to come,” said Carlton Cole of Springfield. “I come whenever I get a chance.” After the fishing access, I decided to try some-

thing different. Missouri 165 intersects with Missouri 265, so I took Missouri 265 and discovered Lindwedel Winery, 3158 Missouri 265, a familyowned business in Branson. It’s perched on a hill and has a gorgeous wraparound deck overlooking Branson and the everchanging fall foliage. This is a perfect place to spend a few hours on an autumn afternoon. You can buy a glass or bottle of wine and sit outside to enjoy it. Steve and Kim Lindwedel opened the winery in 2007. Their son-in-law is the wine-maker; daughter Lauren runs the tasting room. They don’t offer tours but do have free wine tasting. Since I was driving, I can’t tell you much about

the wine, personally, though I did sample the robust, wonderful Norton. Most of their wines are sweet, as that is what’s popular with visitors, said Lauren. I also tried a small sample of one of the best sellers, the Table Rock White, which was like a Missouri Moscato. I bought a bottle to take home with me. Lindwedel has free live music from 2 to 5 p.m. on Sundays through October. Lindwedel is open Thursday-Monday. Call 417-3380256. Before I started back to Springfield, I decide to swing by historic downtown Branson for a slice of pie at the Branson Cafe, 120 W. Main St. (417-3343021.) The cafe has been in the same location since 1910 and one of the waitresses, Joyce, has been there for more than 50 years. The restaurant was originally called the Giles Cafe, which was the last name of the first owners. I met Linda Bracy, a boisterous woman with a hearty laugh who doesn’t know a stranger. She’s the cook and makes food from scratch, she says with pride. The restaurant is known for its country fried steak, pork tenderloin and homemade desserts. On this day, there was quite a selection of pie: banana cream (Linda’s favorite), lemon cream, chocolate, raisin, pecan, pumpkin, apple and more. Bracy has worked at the restaurant for nine years; her mother-in-law worked there from 1935 to 1945. Her mother-in-law, Opal Walker, is featured in a historic black and white photo on the wall. Bracy has her own collection of historic photos including a picture of the first owners and the original menu where a “fried premium ham” sandwich cost 15 cents. “There’s a lot of history here. I love every bit of it. I am proud of it,” Bracy said. Bracy’s gregarious personality made me smile. It’s nice to meet someone who takes pride in their work and their workplace. It was the perfect end to my beautiful day driving in the Ozarks.


NEWS LEADER Thursday October 17, 2013 News-Leader.com

OZARKS

1B

To report a news tip, call 417-836-1199 or email webeditor@news-leader.com

Charge dropped in probe of teen’s death Balbirnie remains in state prison News-Leader Staff

Anthony Balbirnie is no longer charged criminally with dumping the body of a Greene County teenage runaway. A felony charge of abandonment of a corpse was filed about one year ago after evidence developed, authorities say, that Balbirnie was seen with Khighla

Parks,15, alive and then with her body, wrapping it and putting it in his trunk. No explanation for the dismissal of the charge has been given by authorities. However, Balbirnie, 48, remains in state prison on a probation violation filed in connection with previous crimes, and the state attorney general’s office

confirmed the investigation into the death of Parks continues. “We’re assisting the local prosecutors in Benton, Dallas and Polk counties,” said Anthony Nanci Gonder, a Balbirnie spokeswoman for Attorney General Chris Koster. In July, the governor appointed Koster’s office to help probe

Parks’ death. Balbirnie, 48, has a criminal history more than three decades long. He was released on probation on drug charges by a Greene County Khighla judge just weeks Parks before the death of Parks. The state revoked his probation after prosecutors filed the abandonment charge

against him. No one has been charged in connection with the death itself, and authorities have not commented on whether they believe they know how Parks died. Investigators also are not sure whether Parks died in Dallas County, where she was allegedly seen in Buffalo at a house with Balbirnie, or in Greene County or Benton County, acSee PARKS, Page 2B

Nominate someone who’s made a difference News-Leader Staff

Applications are being accepted through Monday for the 2013 Humanitarian Award to honor a southwest Missouri resident for service that contributes to the betterment of his or her community. This year will mark the 24th annual Humanitarian Award, which was founded by longtime Community Foundation of the Ozarks supporter Jewell Thompson Schweitzer. The deadline for nominations is 5 p.m. Monday. Nominations can be submitted online at http://www.formstack.com/forms/ CFO-humanitarian2013. Nominations also may be emailed or mailed to Judy Galbraith with the Springfield Area Chamber of Commerce at judy@springfieldchamber.com; or Springfield Area Chamber of Commerce, 2013 Humanitarian Award, P.O. Box 1687, Springfield, MO 65801. The criteria for the award describe a humanitarian as “an individual who has the courage to take decisive action, the wisdom to face aggressive challenges, and the willingness to sacrifice to affect these causes that have a long-term impact on the betterment of the community.” The award is designed to recognize a living person; posthumous nominations are not accepted. More information about the criteria is available at www.cfozarks.org/ humanitarian/. The nominations will be evaluated by an independent committee of three members of the clergy and three community leaders under the direction of the Springfield Area Chamber of Commerce. This year’s luncheon to honor the 2013 Humanitarian will take place at noon Dec. 5 at the Doubletree Hotel. Recent honorees include the 2012 Humanitarian, Randy Russell, who was recognized for his volunteer service to the arts and support for arts in education, and Greene County Associate Commissioner Roseann Bentley, who was recognized in 2011 for her long record of community service and philanthropy in education, government and civic leadership. In 2010, Doug Pitt was honored for creating Care to Learn, a program to provide basic needs for schoolchildren, and his other projects to help people in need in the Ozarks and around the world. The winner receives a $3,000 cash award, which he or she has traditionally donated to a favorite charity.

Ice rink goes

PINK for breast cancer

News-Leader Staff

For the third year, the east rink at Mediacom Ice Park has been painted pink to raise awareness of breast cancer. A crew of about 15 began the process of painting the ice late Tuesday night and worked into early Wednesday morning. The overnight process included shaving 3/4 of an inch of ice from the rink, then hand-misting a special paint onto the remaining ice. Once dry, the painted ice is misted with water for a protective coating before the rink is flooded to rebuild the top 3/4 of an inch. The Missouri State Ice Bears also will appear in pink jerseys that will be auctioned off after they play Friday and Saturday nights. The proceeds from the auction will go to the Breast Cancer Foundation of the Ozarks.

WATCH Using a specialized mister, Miguel Franco, a manager at the Mediacom Ice Park, paints the ice rink pink to raise awareness for breast cancer early Wednesday morning. NATHAN PAPES/NEWS-LEADER

Scan the QR code to watch a behind-the-scenes video on turning an ice rink pink

Above, Miguel Franco works to paint the Mediacom Ice Park’s rink pink. The overnight process included misting a special paint onto the ice. NATHAN PAPES NEWS-LEADER

Police cite 9 women in massage, escort services sting They allegedly had no license By Jess Rollins JROLLINS@NEWS-LEADER.COM

SL-0000337666

Springfield police say they handed out19 citations Monday after an undercover police operation found nine women running massage or escort services without a license. Officers with the Community Services Section researched online classi-

fied websites and responded to advertisements for the specific services. In each case, police spokeswoman Lisa Cox said, an officer arrived at the home or motel room, agreed on a service with a woman, then identified himself as an officer. The officer would ask to see a license. The city of Springfield has licensing requirements for massage therapists, and the state of Missouri has re-

quirements for escort services. Cox said nine women were cited for operating without a license at eight different locations. Some women were also cited for drug activity revealed during the undercover operation. No one was arrested, Cox said. Cox added some women told police they were unaware that they needed a license to provide massage or escort services.

THE LOCATIONS Police allegedly found women providing massage or escort services without a license at eight locations: » 1117 W. Division St. » 2647 N. Kansas Expressway » 3811 W. Chestnut Expressway » 2931 W. Page St. » 1315 E. Webster St. » 3114 N. Kentwood Ave. » 1923 E. Kearney St. » 815 N. Glenstone Ave.

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SECTION C | THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2013

GO

Banner hunting season ahead More than a million deer live in Missouri forests and fields, and state conservation officials say this might be the year that hunters harvest close to 300,000 of them. As fall deepens, hunting/fishing writer Ken White gives us a look at hunting prospects for various Missouri game animals on Page 2C.

News-Leader.com/Outdoors

OUTDOORS ONLINE

GALLERIES: Find lots of reader and staff photos VIDEOS: Learn more with a selection of video reports RESOURCES: What to do, where to go in the Ozarks

A forest trail winds its way toward the edge of an open tallgrass field at Compton Hollow Conservation Area. WES JOHNSON/NEWS-LEADER

On the cusp of

Several of the Compton Hollow trails are lined with brilliant hues of red and orange — but watch out. These bright leaves are poison ivy. WES JOHNSON NEWS-LEADER

Little-known Compton Hollow a pleasant place to explore — and close to Springfield

Wes JOHNSON

T

he name has a nice Ozarks ring to it, though I can honestly say I’d never heard of Compton Hollow Conservation Area until this past weekend. But with the sun finally

breaking through the clouds Sunday morning, we loaded up the backpack, grabbed our hiking pal Peanut and headed out to explore this 840-acre wildlife area that’s literally in Springfield’s back yard. Located just 20 miles east of

Springfield — or about 9 miles west of Marshfield — Compton Hollow is named for the eastwest valley that runs along the south edge of the land. It got its start as a conservation area with See COMPTON, Page 4C

WATCH Scan this code to see a video about the Compton Hollow trails.

MORE PHOTOS View a gallery of photos, and a map of Compton Hollow Conservation Area at www.news-leader.com.

Mountain lion spotted on private land west of Eminence News-Leader Staff

SHANNON

COUNTY

The Missouri Department of Conservation has confirmed the sighting of a mountain lion on private land in Shannon County approximately nine miles west of Eminence. The confirmation is based on a trail camera photo taken Sept. 29. The name of the landowner and the property location are not being released at the request of the landowner. According to MDC’s Mountain Lion Response Team, mountain-lion sightings have been occasionally confirmed in Missouri and likely will continue. Evi-

confirmed evidence of a breeding population in Missouri. Jeff Beringer, an MDCt biologist studying mountain lions, chairs the MDC Mountain Lion Response Team. He feels comfortable saying that Missouri does not have a permanent, selfsustainingbreedingpopulation of mountain lionstoday. “All the evidence indicates that we have a few inA motion-sensing camera captured this image of a dividuals wandering into mountain lion at 6:33 p.m. on Sept. 29 near Eminence. Missourifromstatesthatdo Evidence indicates that mountain lions spotted in Missouri have established populaare from other states and are passing through in search of tions.” However, he notes, mates and territory. “The recent uptick in sightMDC ings may be a hint of things dence indicates these Missouri that are passing to come.” The Mountain Lion Remountain lions are from through in search of mates other states to the west of or territory. MDC has no sponse Team members

agree that Missouri could see a female enter the state in coming years. “Nebraska went from having no confirmed mountain lions to a breeding population in ten years,” Beringer said. This happened because Nebraska lies near the Black Hills, which appears to be a source of dispersing mountain lions. Nebraska’s northwest corner has good habitat for cats, including rugged hills and a suitable mix of woods and prairie, making it easy for nearby females to move into it. Although we typically don’t see female mountain lions traveling long distances to find new habitat, we could eventually see a distant

female disperse into our state. Mountain lions used to benativetoMissouri,butafter 1927 none were seen — until 1994, when conclusive physical evidence proved they are reappearing in Missouri. Mountain lions are naturally shy of humans and generally pose little danger to people, even in states with thriving breeding populations. Although mountain lions are protected by law, Missouri’s Wildlife Code allows people to protect themselves and their property if they are threatened. For more information, visit mdc.mo.gov and search “mountain lion.”


2C Thursday, October 17, 2013

NEWS-LEADER § News-Leader.com

[ HOOK AND BULLET ]

Northern shoveler ducks take flight. The outlook for duck hunting is better than it has been for several years. MISSOURI DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION

A PROMISING HARVEST

Outlook great for hunters of turkey, deer, duck

ith the leaves falling, temperatures cooling down, footballs filling the air, and the St. Louis Cardinals working to get into the World Series, hunters are preparing for another good season. As we move through Ken WHITE October, the prospects are looking good for most species of wildlife. I remember not too long ago that many people thought hunting would be limited to a few private areas because of the changing landscapes and human pressure. Yet today many species, including deer and turkey, are more numerous than they were 50 years ago. “Missouri deer hunters have a big herd of whitetails,” said Bob Martin of Camdenton. “For several reasons the success rate has been high, 2013 should be no exception. We are in the good old days of deer hunting. Archers, rifle and muzzleloaders are finding hunting good for the past several seasons. It’s hard to believe today that not too many years ago we didn’t have enough deer in the state to warrant hunting.” Here’s a rundown of what hunters might expect this fall: » Deer — Every year prior to the season opener many hunters think it can’t get any better than it was the season before. However, it does and for the past several seasons, Missouri whitetail hunters have broken the record in numbers of ani-

W

KEY HUNTING DATES » Deer: Archery now open thru Nov. 15 and Nov.27 thru Jan. 15 Early Youth Nov. 2 –3 Regular firearm Nov. 16 – Nov. 26 Anterless Nov. 27 thru Dec.8 Alternative methods Dec. 21 thru Dec.31 Late Youth Jan. 4-5 » Quail: Youth weekend Oct 26-27 Regular statewide Nov. 1 thru Jan.15 » Rabbit: Now open thru Feb. 15 » Squirrel: Now open thru Feb. 15 » Turkey: Archery now open thru Nov.15 and Nov. 27 thru Jan.15 Firearms now open thru Oct. 31 » Waterfowl: Youth weekend hunt North Zone Oct. 19-20 Middle Zone Oct. 26-27 South Zone Nov. 23-24 » Ducks North Zone Oct. 26 thru Dec. 26 Middle Zone Nov.2 thru Dec.31 South Zone Nov. 28 thru Jan. 26

mals harvested. Last deer season hunters took more than 200,000 bucks and does. “We have a lot of deer in the state that provide a lot of hunting opportunities for the hunters,” said Lonnie Hansen, biologist for the Missouri Conservation Department. “I never thought we would see the day when we would approach harvesting 300,000 deer, but it’s very possible we can hit that number.” With a herd of more than a million animals, only bad weather might prevent a record season. Bowhunters, whose season on deer and turkey opened Sept. 15, report seeing lots of deer while watching from their tree stands. Don Nelson of Harrisonville said he counted 14 different deer that came within 50 yards of his tree stand last Saturday in the rain. » Turkey — The fall season got underway for firearm turkey hunters, with the entire month of October open. There are about 100,000 fewer hunters in the fall firearm season than in the spring, but hunters still take lots

of birds in the fall when both hens and toms are legal and a hunter may take the limit of two birds the same day. Good turkey populations may be found all across the state. Missouri has one of the largest populations of eastern wild turkeys in the nation. » Quail — The popular bobwhite is cause for concern for hunters as the annual summer survey by the Conservation Department showed the lowest number of quail since the survey started in 1983. There are some parts of the state that should be fairly decent hunting. Habitat loss is the main reason the numbers are down. » Rabbit — The rabbit population in the state is higher than for the past few seasons, although they will never reach the high numbers of the ’60s when the annual harvest was over 2 million animals. Last year hunters took fewer than a halfmillion cottontails. Wildlife biologists say that much of the lower harvest numbers is due to the change in hunters habits. More hunters are going after deer and tur-

A young deer peeks out of the woods to watch a turkey hunter pass by. KEN WHITE » Canada Geese Nov. 28 thru Jan. 31 » White Fronted Nov. 29 thru Jan. 31 » Light Geese Oct. 26 thru Jan. 31 » Woodcock Now open thru Nov. 28

key. The rabbits are still out there, but the hunters aren’t. » Pheasant — The northern boundaries for hunting Missouri pheasants have expanded to I-70, giving hunters more opportunities to hunt this popular bird. Surveys conducted earlier this summer showed the bird’s numbers were up. Of course, there are a lot fewer Missouri pheasant hunters than in the popular states of the Dakotas or Kansas. Harold Simms, a pheasant hunter from Warrensburg, said, “I have hunted pheasants for several years in Missouri and usually combine quail hunting along with pheasant hunting. Over the years I think the CRP has helped bring up the number of birds and with the larger hunting area, I’m really looking forward to a good season in the state.” » Waterfowl — Missouri waterfowl hunters are hoping that cold fronts up north move the birds into the state as the season opens. Hunters are looking for a repeat of 2003 when a cold front moved ducks into Mis-

souri and was then followed by mild weather that held the birds in the state, resulting in a record number of birds taken. The outlook for duck hunting is much better than it has been for several years. Good rains helped the nesting success up north and a good flight of birds heading our way this fall looks great for the hunters, with most species’ numbers up substantially. Everything is coming up roses for the area duck hunters. With continued help from the weather, this could be a duck season to remember. Most years are somewhere between fair to very good, but this year everything looks very promising. Good opportunities await Missouri goose hunters also. The goose population that migrates through the state had a very good nesting year and will send more birds south this season. As usual, weather will play a major role in a hunter’s success, but the birds should be here. » Squirrel — Hunting for both gray and fox

bushytails has been excellent again for Missouri hunters. The population of squirrels is high and with a decent crop of acorns and nuts this fall, hunting should be excellent. Although the number of squirrel hunters is down, the number of squirrels is up in most sections of the state. Ron Larson, of Springfield, has been hunting squirrels since June. “I don’t think I have seen as many squirrels in the Missouri woods as I have this year and the best hunting is just starting,” he said. » Snipe-rail-woodcock — Not many hunters go after these small migratory birds, but they furnish some good hunting for those who take the time to pursue them. The population of all three game birds is similar to last season. Hunters aren’t the only ones enjoying October. Anglers are also finding it a good time to catch fish. Nixa angler Jim Dawson is a veteran lunker hunter at Bennett Spring. “October is my favorite month for catching trout at the park,” he said. “I use tiny jigs and roostertail with 4-pound-test line. I have taken more large trout during October than any other month. It’s a great time to be outdoors.” Martin went on to say that October is moving too fast. “This is my favorite month of the year, but it has a habit of not lasting long enough for all the things I want to do. I will still hit Bennett for winter fishing when the catch-and-release fishing starts.” The regular trout season at the state trout parks closes on Oct. 31. All in all, fall 2013 looks like it will be a winner for the hunter and anglers. Ken White writes about hunting and fishing for the NewsLeader. Contact him at kdwhite7@windstream.net.

MDC auction not affected by federal government shutdown Missouri Department of Conservation

SALEM — The Missouri Department of Conservation will hold a public auction of various used vehicles and equipment on Sat-

urday, as planned. Conservation Department officials report receiving several inquiries about whether the auction would be affected by the continuing shutdown of federal government opera-

tions. Since the Conservation Department is a state agency, its activities are unaffected by the federal shutdown. The sale will begin at 10 a.m. at the Conservation Department’s Mainte-

nance Center at 1715 Hwy 32 West in Salem. Doors will open at 7:30 a.m. The auction will include dozens of vehicles, along with ATVs, trailers, boats, and other equipment. Pre-registration is from

10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday, the day before the auction. Registration the day of the sale begins at 7:30 a.m. Those interested can also view auction items from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday at the Salem Maintenance Cen-

ter. For a list of auction items and procedures, visit mdc.mo.gov/node/5585. A complete lot listing and terms of the sale will be available at the registration desk the day of the auction.


NEWS-LEADER § News-Leader.com

Thursday, October 17, 2013

This Weekend

three-mile walk, 9 a.m., registration at 8 a.m. Oct. 26, Jordan Valley Park, 635 E. Trafficway St. Register: 800-227-2345; 417-881-4668; MakingStridesswmo.org

Greater Ozarks Audubon Society Program: Honduran Naturalist, Robert Gallardo, 6:30 p.m. today, Springfield Conservation Nature Center, 4601 S. Nature Center Way. Gallardo will present a program on the flora, fauna and landscapes of Honduras. Free; refreshments provided. Bob Ball; email: bobrubyb@gmail.com

Persimmon Day 5K Run and Fun Walk, 8 a.m. Oct. 26, Sparta Middle School, 217 Division St. Call Dan Leyland: 417-581-2258. Register: actnowracing.com Third annual Pumpkin Dash 5k Run/Walk, 7:30 a.m. Oct. 26, Republic Aquatic Center, 711 E. Miller Road. Entry fee and registration: 417-299-5533

Nixa XLT Lights On After School 5K, 7:15 a.m. Friday, Inman Intermediate School, 1300 N. Nicholas Road. Packet pickup is 5-7 p.m. today at the Faught Administration Center, 301 S. Main St. Entry fee: $20 today; $25 race day. 417-724-3872

Table Rock Zombie 5K, 4 p.m. Oct. 26, to benefit St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Table Rock State Park, 5272 Missouri 165, Branson. There is a silent auction before and after the race. dancebransonschool ofthearts.com

Bear Tracks 5K Walk/Run, 7 a.m. Saturday, Plaster Student Union, 1110 E. Madison St., campus of MSU. Entry fee: $20. 417-836-4064 Blood Hill Run, 8K, 7:30 a.m. and 1-Mile Fun Run, 7:40 a.m. Saturday, Wilson’s Creek National Battlefield, 6424 W. Farm Road 182, Republic. 8K entry fee: $50; Fun run entry fee: $10, $5 for ages 12 and younger. Packet pickup is noon-6 p.m. Friday at Ridge Runner Sports. Race day shuttle parking is 6-7 a.m. at Republic High School. If the government shutdown continues and Wilson’s Creek Battlefield is closed Saturday, the run will be rescheduled to a date in Nov. Refunds will be given to anyone who is unable to attend on the alternate date. Contact: Wilson’s Creek National Battlefield Foundation: 417-864-3041; email: info@wilsonscreek.com; http://wilsonscreek.com/ bloodyhillrun Civil War Lantern Light Tour, 7 p.m., Saturday and Oct. 26, Smallin Civil War Cave, 3575 N. Smallin Road, Ozark. Admission: $29.95. 417-551-4545; smallincave.com Effective Wingshooting for the Hunter, 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday, Andy Dalton Shooting Range and Outdoor Education Center, 4897 N. Farm Road 61, just south of U.S. 160, Ash Grove. 417-742-4361; email: Mike.Brooks@mdc.mo.gov Family Treasure Hunting, 1-3 p.m. Saturday, Springfield Conservation Nature Center, 4601 S. Nature Center Way. Learn basic GPS use, then carpool to Lake Springfield. GPS units provided. Ages 8 and older with adult mentor. Free; registration required. 417-888-4237 Halloween Hustle 5K (formerly the Kitchen Run), 8 a.m. Saturday, City Utilities of Springfield Main Office, 301 E. Central St. Info: Pat Dierking: 417-831-8630; email: pat.dierking@cityutilities.net Second annual Monster Dash, a zombie-themed 5K obstacle course, 1 p.m. Saturday, Ritter Springs Park, 3683 W. Farm Road 92. Participants may register as a zombie or a runner; spectators welcome. Music, snacks and prizes. Register: monsterdashspringfield.com; facebook.com/monsterdashspfd Nature Art With A Chinese Brushstroke, 1-2 p.m., 2:15-3:15 p.m. or 3:30-4:30 p.m. Saturday, Springfield Conservation Nature Center, 4601 S. Nature Center Way. Ages 8 and older. The 3:30 p.m. class is for ages 15 and older. Free; registration required. 417-888-4237

3C

Twilight Thriller, 6:30 p.m. Oct. 26, Joplin’s Frisco Greenway South Trail head, 955 E. North St. Features 10K-, 5K- and one-mile distances. Registration deadline: Oct. 25. starlitrunningco@gmail.com

Avoid zombies during the Table Rock Zombie 5K run on Oct. 26. The event will aid St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. NEWS-LEADER FILE PHOTO

Zombies show their best running form The running trails at Table Rock State Park will be riddled with the staggering corpses of the undead as runners work to stay alive for 3.11 miles during the Table Rock Zombie 5K run at 4 p.m. Oct. 26, to benefit St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. There is a silent auction before and after the race. dancebransonschoolofthearts.com. 18 and older and registration fee required. 417-337-3535

GO! BEST BETS

Test your GPS skills at Lake Springfield. NEWS-LEADER FILE PHOTO

SUBMIT YOUR EVENT Send your outdoors event to bpalmer@news-leader.com for the calendar. Outdoor Treasure Hunting: Geocaching Basics, 9-11 a.m. Saturday, Springfield Conservation Nature Center, 4601 S. Nature Center Way. Learn basic GPS use, and then carpool to Lake Springfield. GPS units provided. Ages 18 and older. Free; registration required. 417-888-4237 Public Auction presented by the Missouri Department of Conservation, 10 a.m. Saturday, doors open at 7:30 a.m., Salem Maintenance Center, 1715 Missouri 32 West. Auction will include dozens of vehicles, along with ATVs, trailers, boats, outboard motors, mowers, generators, blowers, pumps and other equipment. Pre-registration is 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Friday and 7:30 a.m. Saturday. For a list of auction items and procedures, go online to mdc.mo.gov/node/5585. Info: 573-522-4115, ext. 3362 Pumpkin Run, 9 a.m. Saturday, Joplin’s McClelland Park. Features one-mile and five-mile distances and benefits United Way of Southwest Missouri. Registration closes today. joplinroadrunners.com

The Ozark Chapter American Rhododendron Society Fall 2013 Meeting, 10 a.m.-noon Saturday, Springfield Botanical Center, 2400 S. Scenic Ave. Program: Dow Whiting on the Azalea Garden. Tour of the gardens will follow. Visitors are welcome. Info: 573-226-1335 Canoeing & Water Safety Clinics, 1-4 p.m. Sunday, James River Water Trail’s Southwood Access on Lake Springfield. All ages; 15 and younger with an adult. Learn basic canoeing skills and open water safety. Fee: $35 canoe, 2-4 people. 417-833-8647; parkboard.org

Coming Up Driving tour, Poosey Conservation area, noon-4 p.m. Oct. 20 near Chillicothe. A gravel road from Pike’s Lake leads up hills and down hollows, near the Panther’s Den and through the woods. Autumn color and conservation traditions will be celebrated along that winding route during the 27th annual Poosey Conservation Area Fall Driving Tour. Motorists will be

able to drive through the historic and scenic area once known as the community of Poosey. The route uses a trail not normally open to vehicles. Roads are graded but hills and dips will prompt slow going and four-wheel-drive or high-clearance vehicles are recommended. Poosey Conservation area is northwest of Chillicothe and reached via Missouri 190 and Route A. Online at http://on.mo.gov/GNTgA3 . Call 660-646-6122. Camp Ritter Family Group Camping, Oct. 25-27, Ritter Springs Park, 3683 W. Farm Road 92. Includes bat and cave activities, canoeing or kayaking, catch and release fishing, Dutch oven lunch, night hikes and more. Registration due Friday. All ages. Fee: $10 a person or $25 for a group of 3-4; free for ages 6 and younger. 417-833-8647; parkboard.org The Colorectal Rundie 5K Run/Walk, 8 a.m. Oct. 26, CoxHealth Meyer Center, 3545 S. National Ave. Entry fee: $20, $45 family; event day entry fee is $25 and $60. 417-269-7037

Use GPS to find hidden treasure Outdoor Treasure Hunting: Geocaching Basics will be from 9-11 a.m. Saturday at Springfield Conservation Nature Center, 4601 S. Nature Center Way. Learn basic GPS use, and then carpool to Lake Springfield to try what you’ve learned. GPS units provided. Ages 18 and older. Free, but registration required. 417888-4237

barbecue and program. All ages. Free; registration required. 417-888-4237 Dutch Oven Cooking Clinic, 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Oct. 26, Ritter Springs Park, 3683 W. Farm Road 92. Learn the basics of Dutch oven cooking. Ages 11 and older (15 years and younger with adult). Registration due Saturday. Fee: $15; $25 for two. 417-833-8647; parkboard.org Geocaching Clinic, 1:30-3:30 p.m. Oct. 26, Ritter Springs Park, 3683 W. Farm Road 92. Learn the hands-on adventure of geocaching. Registration required by 5 p.m. Tuesday. Fee: $5. 417-833-8647; parkboard.org Hike and Float for families, 1-4 p.m. Oct. 26, Springfield Conservation Nature Center, 4601 S. Nature Center Way. Hike two miles on the nature center and Ozark Greenways trails, and then float back to the nature center on Lake Springfield. Ages 12 and older with an adult mentor. Free; registration required. 417-888-4237 Fifth annual Making Strides Against Breast Cancer

Conservation TEEN Club: Reunion, 6-8 p.m. Oct. 26, Springfield Conservation Nature Center, 4601 S. Nature Center Way. If you have ever attended a Conservation TEEN Club event, you and your family are invited to an anniversary reunion

2013 Zombie Rock4Kids Run, presented by Bass Pro Fitness Festival, 10:30 a.m. Oct. 26, registration opens at 9:15 a.m., Rutledge-Wilson Farm Park, 3825 W. Farm Road 146. Entry fee: $18 Info: fitness.basspro.com; email: fitness@basspro.com Zombie Run to benefit The Randy Coldin Corporation for Disabled Children, 1-7 p.m. Oct. 27, Spirit of 76 Park, 400 N. Main St., Mount Vernon. Tickets: $10 advance, $13 day of event; tickets for ages 12 and younger: $5 advance, $8 day of run; free for ages 4 and younger. 417-440-8414 Gondwanaland! 6 p.m. Nov. 1, Nov. 8; Discover the native flora and fauna of Gondwanaland, the Earth’s southern supercontinent more than 100 million years ago. Includes an entertaining slide and discussion program by Peter Longley. Free for all ages. Call 891-1515 Natural Wonders of Lost Hill 9 a.m. on Nov. 2, A guided walk in Lost Hill Natural Resource Park, including: cave and karst features, fossils, glades and cactus, losing streams, the “Cozy Cave Clubhouse” and Leave No Trace trail ethic. Registration required by 5 p.m. the Tues. before. Ages 7 and up. Free. 833-8647 Hunter Safety Certification Nov. 8-9, Dec. 6-7, Jan 10-12; times: 6-9:30 p.m. Fridays, 8:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturdays. Required for all potential hunters. Participants should have good reading skills and be self-motivated. Must attend both days of the course. Registration required one week in advance at www.mdc.mo.gov or (417) 833-8647. Watershed Center In Valley Water Mill Park. Ages 11 and up; Free Winter Outdoor Safety & Preparedness 7 p.m. on Nov. 9, Dec. 7 and Jan. 11. Prepare for being stranded in your car or home in a winter storm, learn what to do if lost in a remote location or if you fall into cold water. Registration required by 5 p.m. the Tues. before. Watershed Center In Valley Water Mill Park 833-8647 Ages 9 and up; Free. WEHRENBERG THEATERS - 4005 South Ave - Springfield, MO 417-890-8457 OR 1-800-Fandango x2406

FIND US ON FACEBOOK! FOR TICKETS & TIMES VISIT WWW.WEHRENBERG.COM

SHOWTIMES ARE FOR: THURSDAY 10/17

Ruby-crowned kinglet (Regulus calendula) Rubycrowned kinglets are smaller than most birds seen in the state.

Missouri Department of Conservation

Ruby-crowned kinglet ( Regulus calendula) Claim to fame: Hummingbirds may have the reputation of being Missouri’s smallest bird, but rubycrowned kinglets have the distinction of being Missouri’s “other” tiny bird. Ruby-crowned kinglets aren’t as small as hummingbirds, but they’re smaller than practically all other birds you’ll commonly find in the state. Ruby-crowned kinglets are primarily seasonal residents of Missouri: They are seen in this region most frequently in winter and early spring when they migrate here from their northern nesting grounds. Species status: Populations appear to be holding steady in most parts of the bird’s range. First discovered: The first scientific description was written by the famed naturalist Carl Linnaeus in 1766. Family matters: Rubycrowned kinglets belong to the bird family Regulidae, a collection of seven species often referred to as the

MISSOURI DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION

“crests” or the Old World warblers. Length: 10 cm Diet: The bulk of a rubycrowned kinglet’s diet consists of small insects and berries. They sometimes hover over a branch while feeding. Weight: five to 10 grams Distinguishing characteristics: Olive-gray in color with a dusky breast. Males have a small reddish patch on their heads (hence the bird’s name) which is most visible when the birds are in spring courtship. They can make several calls. One is an chattering-type song composed of several

northern U.S. After courthigh, thin “tsee” notes ship and mating, the followed by descending female builds the nest, “tew” notes and ended which is located in a conifer with warbled three-note tree and is made out of phrases. Other times their moss, lichen, leaves and call is reminiscent of the spider webs. The female phrase, “chubby, chubby lays five to 11 eggs in the cheeks, chubby, chubby nest and incubates them cheeks.” The call is a scoldfor approximately 12 days. ing, “je-ditt.” The young fledge in about Life span: probably three 12 days. Both the male and to six years female tend to the offHabitat: Ruby-crowned spring while they are in the kinglets prefer coniferous nest and shortly after fledgforests in summer and ing. In the fall, rubydeciduous forests and crowned kinglets migrate thickets in winter. to their winter range, Life cycle: The breeding season begins in late spring which extends from Misand extends into summer in souri south to the Gulf of Mexico. Canada and parts of the

MACHETE KILLS (R) (130 400) 750 1020 CAPTAIN PHILLIPS (PG-13) (110 405) 730 1025 GRAVITY IN REALD 3D (PG-13) (125 350 530) 720 755 940 1015 GRAVITY (PG-13) (100 PM 315 PM) RUNNER RUNNER (R) (145 410) 740 1010 CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS 2 IN REAL D 3D (PG) (320 PM) CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS 2 (PG) (105 PM) 705 PM DON JON (R) (115 325) 725 955 RUSH (R) (200 445) 735 1030 PRISONERS (R) (150 PM 505 PM) 1000 PM INSIDIOUS: CHAPTER 2 (PG-13) (210 450) 800 1040 RIDDICK (R) (155 430) 710 1005 WE'RE THE MILLERS (R) (120 440) 805 1035 THE WOLVERINE (PG-13) (140 435) 745 1045 DESPICABLE ME 2 (PG) (135 PM 410 PM) 655 PM CARRIE - THURSDAY (R) 1000 PM ESCAPE PLAN - THURSDAY (R) 1000 PM SL-0000339988

GRAVITY: AN IMAX 3D EXPERIENCE (PG13) 12:00 2:30 5:00 7:45 10:15 CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS 2 2D (PG) 12:20 2:55 5:15 7:35 10:00 CAPTAIN PHILLIPS (PG13) 11:15 12:45 3:45 6:40 7:20 9:35 10:15 CARRIE (R) 10:00 RUSH (R) 11:05 1:50 4:35 7:25 10:10 PRISONERS (R) 11:25 2:50 6:30 9:45 GRACE UNPLUGGED (PG) 11:45 2:10 4:40 7:05 CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS 2 3D (PG) 11:20 1:55 4:15 METALLICA: THROUGH THE NEVER 3D (R) 7:10 GRAVITY 2D (PG13) 1:30 6:45 GRAVITY 3D (PG13) 11:00 4:00 9:15 MACHETE KILLS (R) 11:30 2:00 4:30 7:30 10:05 THE FAMILY (R) 2:10 4:45 RUNNER, RUNNER (R) 12:10 2:40 4:55 7:15 9:35 ESCAPE PLAN (R) 10:00 SL-0000340116

■● CARRIE (R) 10:00 PM ■● ESCAPE PLAN (R) 10:00 PM ■● I’M IN LOVE WITH A CHURCH GIRL (PG) 8:00 PM ■● MACHETE KILLS (DLP) R 11:35 2:10 4:45 7:20 10:10 ■● CAPTAIN PHILLIPS (DLP) PG-13 12:00 12:40 3:10 3:50 6:20 7:00 9:25 10:05 ■● GRAVITY 3D (DLP) PG-13 12:00 1:00 2:30 3:30 5:00 6:05 7:30 8:30 10:00 ■● GRAVITY (DLP) PG-13 11:30 1:50 4:15 6:45 9:15 ■● RUNNER RUNNER (DLP) R 12:00 2:25 4:50 7:15 9:45 ■● GRACE UNPLUGGED (DLP) PG 11:30 1:55 4:20 6:50 9:20 DON JON (DLP) R 12:10 2:30 4:50 7:10 RUSH (DLP) R 1:10 4:05 7:00 10:00 CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS 2 3D (DLP) PG 1:40 4:05 6:30 CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS 2 (DLP) PG 12:10 2:35 5:00 7:25 9:50 PRISONERS (DLP) R 11:30 2:50 6:20 9:40 INSIDIOUS CHAPTER 2 (DLP) PG-13 11:45 2:20 4:55 7:30 10:05 LEE DANIELS’ THE BUTLER (DLP) PG-13 11:40 2:40 WE’RE THE MILLERS (DLP) R 11:40 2:15 4:55 7:35 10:15 ■=NO PASSES ●=NO VIPS AFTER 6PM DLP=DIGITAL PROJECTION SL-0000340034


4C Thursday, October 17, 2013

NEWS-LEADER § News-Leader.com

Compton/Hiking trails east of Springfield prove popular with horse riders Continued from Page 1C

the purchase of 240 acres in 1965, but has expanded in size through the years. Despite being close to several communities, it feels fairly isolated once you enter the 5.5 miles of linked gravel and natural surface trails. As we geared up, a friendly horseback rider advised us to get a free map of the trails from a kiosk on the edge of the gravel parking lot. “You can get turned around in there pretty easy,” he cautioned.

Poison ivy first to turn color Unlike some hikes I’ve been on, this terrain is fairly easy, with no cliffs to scale or slippery river stones to cross. About 750 acres are hardwood forest, with the balance open grassland, a couple small dryland glades and several small ponds that provide water sources for deer, turkey, bobcats, rabbits and other denizens of the Ozarks forest. My wife, Dayle, and I work our way down a grassy trail, and the weekend cool front that squeezed out a bit of rain has left pools of water along our path. Everything smells fresh and clean — the dust washed away by the drizzle and cool temperatures offering a hint of what’s to come. I sense we are on the cusp of a riotous explosion of fall color that will transform this forest in about a week. There already are splashes of color — cranberry hues aglow in the sumac bushes, the hints of orange and red among maple leaves. The sun seems to have ignited golds and reds along the edges of our trail, but a quick look revealed a corridor of “leaves of three.” Poison ivy. My knees are still itching from a close encounter with that plant during a hike to Richland Creek in Arkansas a week ago. I’m better prepared today, with long pants and the realization that poison ivy transforms from deep, waxy green into rainbow hues at the first hint of cold. If touched it’ll still make you itch like crazy, long after the colors fade and there’s nothing but dry, brown vegetable matter laying about. I find the trails easy to follow, with triangular signs reminding all who enter that this is more than just a hiking trail. Bicyclists are cautioned to yield to walkers, and both must give way to horseback riders, like the three who are about to intersect our path. “I’ve been riding these trails for the last 18 years on this same horse,” says Lucia Reid, aboard her fine-looking and gentlemannered Appaloosa Cloud Dancer. “I brought my friends up for just a good day, for a good ride.” I mention that I’m surprised so few people know about Compton Hollow, but Reed isn’t. “It’s ’cause we don’t tell people!” she says, with a grin.

Forest thinned for wildlife Judging by the profusion of horseshoe prints on the trails, Compton Hollow must be pretty well-known among horse people. A quick read of our hiking map reveals it’s also a good place to hunt deer, turkeys and small game, in season, and to pitch a tent wherever you like — although there are no amenities like potable water or restrooms. They don’t call it primitive camping for nothing. We hike on, and I notice large numbers of trees seem to have been cut down and left laying on the ground, creating sun-dappled openings in the dense forest. I can’t imagine anyone is allowed to log the trees in here, and I’m about to spout my own theory about what has hap-

A small pond reflects the first hints of fall color in the trees at Compton Hollow Conservation Area. The terrain on the trails is fairly easy to travel. WES JOHNSON/NEWS-LEADER

ABOUT COMPTON HOLLOW CONSERVATION AREA

Lucia Reid, aboard her Appaloosa horse Cloud Dancer, brought two friends for a day of riding at Compton Hollow. Lucia said she and Cloud Dancer have explored the trails for the past 18 years.

Recent rains helped coax a new generation of mushrooms to emerge from the forest floor at Compton Hollow Conservation Area.

WES JOHNSON/NEWS-LEADER

WES JOHNSON/NEWS-LEADER

Splashes of color brighten one of the hiking trails at Compton Hollow. WES JOHNSON/NEWS-LEADER

Located 20 miles east of Springfield and 9 miles west of Marshfield, the 840-acre Compton Hollow Conservation Area is most easily reached by taking the Northview exit south off I-44. Travel 5 miles south on Route B, then a mile east on Compton Hollow Road. Compton Hollow has three parking areas, but no water or restrooms. Free trail maps are available at parking areas. The property features 5.5 miles of multi-use trails (horseback, bike, hike) and a 14-station archery range. The trails are closed during fall firearms deer season (Nov. 16-26) and spring turkey season. Primitive camping is allowed.

across a brilliant red one, likely the poisonous Amanita muscaria. We appreciate its blood-red hue and leave it alone.

Smelling wildlife — in 3-D No doubt the sunny day is why Compton Hollow is alive with horseback riders — and seemingly bereft of wildlife. We know the critters are in here but likely taking cover as horse hooves and creaking saddles pass by. But our dog Peanut suddenly catches a whiff of a tantalizing smell wafting Someone with a chainsaw carved this odd marker — After surviving the long summer, a pipevine swallowtail — its left across our path and digs hard against her harness or perhaps a forest chair — deep within the forest wing tattered and torn — clings to the forest floor, possibly its to get her teeth into its trails at Compton Hollow Conservation Area. final resting spot before fall’s first frost. source. She puts new WES JOHNSON/NEWS-LEADER WES JOHNSON/NEWS-LEADER meaning into the word “frantic” as the smell, whatever it is, causes her to tangle her long tether around two trees, a bush and beneath a downed log. I often wonder what it’s like for a dog to hike in the woods with its owners. There’s temptation at every turn from the apparently intoxicating scent of a deer or armadillo or squirrel or snake hanging in the air or lying invisibly across moist soil. How amazing it must be to smell in 3-D. Two hours into our hike, we pull out the map and find an intersecting trail that will bring us back to our parking lot exit. Peanut never did find what she so exuberantly set out to catch. Compton Hollow Conservation Area offers three gravel parking lots, with free maps showing the network of trails. But we found a new WES JOHNSON/NEWS-LEADER place to explore — just a pened when we walk past a food and homes for wild- are not allowed.” We might ing deeper into the forest. short drive from home and happen across an intrigu- Here, thanks to the rain, well worth the effort to Conservation Department life.” Makes sense, and ing sinkhole on this prop- we find a profusion of find it. sign that explains it all. “Healthy woods pro- seems smart. I have to erty, but sailors and scuba mushrooms pushing up vide healthy wildlife” the laugh, however, as I read divers are going to be through moisture-laden Send your Outdoors ideas, tips sign deep in the forest an- deeper into my trail map hard-pressed to find those forest duff. Most seem to or feedback to reporter/ nounces. “These trees and learn that “swimming, kinds of recreational ex- be cream-colored cones columnist Wes Johnson at launching themselves up- wjohnson@news-leader.com; were thinned to improve scuba diving, water skiing, ploits in this forest. We hang a left and hike ward in painstaking slow or call 836-1243. Find Wes also the health and growth of sailboarding, skateboardthe woods, providing more ing, caving and rappelling up a narrow dirt trail lead- motion. But we stumble at Facebook.com/Wes.outdoors.


NEWS-LEADER § News-Leader.com

Thursday, October 17, 2013

5C

[ I LOVE ]

Early autumn sparks redesign of Mother Nature’s landscape SHARE YOUR ENTHUSIASM

I linger in a comfy lawn chair in the cool morning shade and gaze up at an To me, there’s nothing Love the Ozarks outdoors? eternal blue sky, now void of quieter than an early-auSubmit a short letter or essay tumn morning in the about a favorite experience or clouds and the universe’s Ozarks. place to Outdoors editor Sony other offerings, save for a glaring September sun. And Songbirds, now elusive Hocklander, shocklander@ I wonder: What will become yet seemingly content, News-Leader.com (subject: of this battered, confused lessen their summer symOutdoors). Photos are world and of our lives which phonies as they rest up encouraged. were once, in years past, from summer’s ruthless safely calm and predictable, oven. Even the old willow familiar and comfortable as tree stands in silence, sway- soon turns distant, muted a pair of well-worn slippers? — as if questioning the ing its slender tentacles in We wore them innocently, unknown yet to come. gentle fashion, sweeping happily, with little concern For now begins the the ground as if housefor what lay ahead in the redesigning of Mother cleaning for fall’s arrival. new century. All we held Nature’s landscape as she Shouldering a heavy chooses a familiar wardclose was our faith that load of summer elegance, robe of altered colors and everything would turn out the lone maple tree rebegins to paint a more OK and the belief that our mains languid and still — perhaps in reverence to the somber scene, a landscape dreams of living happily ever after would remain changing seasons. Its fasci- of homespun patchworks across fields and hillsides: protected and someday nating artistry of emerald come true. leaves remains motionless soft russets and reds, rich ambers and auburns ... with But then life’s reality as well. In tune with the coming a few glistening rain show- got in the way, interrupted ers thrown in for refreshour childhoods as we wanchill, the cadenced chirping relief. dered into an adult world ing of persistent crickets

By Jan Stewart-Bass

and became cautious of life and of our surroundings, perhaps even guarded — as if challenged by our own changing seasons. The summers of our childhoods are now only faint remembrances of bicycles and backyard picnics, of Kool-Aid stands and rickety treehouses tucked precariously on elm limbs. We roamed the neighborhood, stayed out past dark, slept in late. And feared little, if anything. We have changed with the seasons. Yet, with courage and belief, we still have hope that everything will turn out OK. And we still carry a few dreams in the protected places of our hearts. Jan Stewart-Basswas born in Springfield and returned to live here again after being away for 42 years.

Maple leaves begin their transition into fall. WES JOHNSON/NEWS-LEADER

Try these Ozarks spots for great fall color Compiled by Juliana Goodwin JLGOODWIN@NEWS-LEADER.COM

Whether you stay in the city or take a weekend trip, there are plenty of places to enjoy fall color. Here are some favorites. Colorful spots in Springfield

» Rountree and Delaware neighborhoods » Maple Park Cemetery, 300 W. Grand St. » Greenlawn Cemetery, 3506 N. National Ave. » Nathanael Greene Park, 2400 S. Scenic Ave. » Lake Springfield, 2312 S. Kissick Road. » Phelps Grove Park, 800-1200 E. Bennett St. » Grant Beach Park, Grant Avenue and Lynn Street » Sequiota Park, 3500 S. Lone Pine Ave. » Wilson’s Creek National Battlefield, Greene County ZZ and Farm Road 182 near Republic. » Springfield Conservation Nature Center, 4600 S. Chrisman Road Take a longer drive

» Little Sac Woods, 10 miles north of Springfield on Missouri 13; go 3 miles west on Route BB, then south on Farm Road 115. » Busiek State Forest and Wildlife Area in Christian County; Busiek is on U.S. 65, 18 miles south of Springfield. » Missouri 76 between Cassville and Cape Fair — a hilly drive through Mark Twain Forest. » Fellows Lake north of Springfield. » Greenway trails — particularly the Sac River Trail and the South Creek Greenway trail west of

Battlefield Road » Dogwood Canyon Nature Park, 2038 W. Missouri 86, Lampe (approximately 25 miles west of Branson) Get out of town: Eureka Springs

The drive to Eureka Springs is scenic, but once you get there, you will find breathtaking views. Try: » The Christ of the

Ozarks Statue, atop Magnetic Mountain » The view from the fourth-floor balcony of the Crescent Hotel, 75 Prospect Ave. » Inspiration Point on 16311 Highway 62 overlooking the White River Valley, 7 miles north of Eureka Springs » Thorncrown Chapel, a glass chapel in the woods

Fall colors are on display at Maple Park Cemetery in 2012. It is one of several spots in Springfield to enjoy the beauty of autumn. NEWS-LEADER FILE PHOTOS

[ NEW GEAR ]

What makes a leaf turn red, purple or yellow in fall?

Audubon Birdhouse Book: Building, Placing and Maintaining Great Homes for Great Birds Produced in association with the National Audubon Society, ‘Audubon Birdhouse Book’ explains how to build and place functional DIY bird homes that are safe and appropriate for more than 20 classic North American species, from wrens to raptors. Each of the easy-to-build boxes and shelves within is accompanied by cut lists, specially created line diagrams, and step-by-step photography, making the projects accessible to those with even the most rudimentary woodworking skills. The book is available on Amazon.com, Barnes & Noble.com and independent bookstores. Paperback, $18.49.

ow that we’re midway through the month of October, many people’s thoughts are turning to fall color. As usual, predicting how good this year’s fall color will be is a huge guessing game with more than one viable answer. It’s probably easier to explain what’s happening than to try to predict it. For starters, a major component of the fall color recipe is the type of weather we have in September and early October. During this time, warm, sunny days followed by cool nights at this time of year are ideal for the production of anthocyanins, the pigments responsible for the reds and purples in leaves. In trees with acidic sap, reds will predominate while blues and purples prevail in alkaline sap conditions. Yellow leaves, mean-

N

while, are the result of other pigments called carotenoids. Most of the year, these pigments Francis covSKALICKY are ered by a greater amount of green chlorophyll. In fall, the chlorophyll breaks down, the green color disappears and the yellows become more visible. Just as weather in September and early October is critical to the formation of leaf color, weather in middle and late October helps determine how long we get to enjoy fall color. That’s because part of the autumn leaf-drop process trees go through is the abscission zone development that occurs be-

FALL COLOR APP

leaves are nearing the breaking-off point, fall The Missouri Department of color is a drawn-out affair Conservation offers a free fall that lasts for several color application for smart weeks. If we have a heavy phones and other mobile rain, strong winds or devices. Download MO Fall some other type of stormy Color for Android and Apple event that drops a large devices at mdc.mo.gov/mobile. amount of leaves, our fall color will be a much shorter experience. tween a leaf’s stem and So, while this article the branch it’s attached to. has used a lot of words to Basically, this process consists of a hardening of tell you very little about cells in the leaf’s stem and what kind of color we can expect to see this fall, one a similar cell-hardening process that takes place in thing can be said with certainty: Regardless of the branch. As the two what the state-wide fall sides of the leaf-branch color predictions are, get connection harden, an out and enjoy the autumn abscission zone — also beauty because you’ll be known as a fracture zone — develops in the middle. able to find spots that are absolutely gorgeous. As both sides harden, the leaf-branch connection continues to get more Francis Skalicky is the media brittle until the leaf even- specialist for the Missouri tually breaks free and Department of Conservation’s falls to the ground. Southwest Region. For more If we have mild weath- information about conservation er during the period when issues, call 417-895-6880.


WEEKEND

food i music i events i movies

10.17.2013

NEWS LEADER

Two chances to celebrate all things wine on Saturday

FOOD

ART

MOVIES

Sit down for a meal at Mama Jean’s 4

Evangel faculty, alumni display their work 14

‘Fifth Estate’ good, but ignores big question 18

Is Laser Cataract Surgery Right for You? Dr. William Chism

JOIN US TO LEARN MORE:

      Lunch included, space is limited. RSVP to 417-820-9393

mercy.net/eyes


2 Weekend 10.17.2013

NEWS LEADER NEWS-LEADER.COM §

table of contents

GO!

MOVIES

event: Pets and Pumpkins Animals and their owners can have fun on Commercial Street 3

opening: See what’s playing “Carrie� and “Escape Plan� are among this week’s new releases 18

THE GUIDE

INDEX

spotlight: Campbell’s Maze Daze Corn maze, pumpkin patch and hayrides part of the fun in Clever 8

Food Review ...... 4 The Guide.......... 8 Night Life...........12

ONLINE NOW GALLERIES: View reader NLL photo galleries to see pets, kids, events and more. Add pics ONLINEE at News-Leader.com/YourPhotos. FACES IN THE CROWD: See who showed up at events around the Ozarks at News-Leader.com/faces. HEY, MOM!: A quick way to stay in touch for the busy mom at heymom.News-Leader.com.

Wine will be flowing freely in Springfield on Saturday. SUBMITTED PHOTO

Enjoy the finer things THIS WEEK’S COVER STORY: Raise a glass at either of two wine festivals in Springfield on Saturday. 6

ALWAYS THERE: Post and view listings for upcoming events in the area at News-Leader.com/calendar. See our archive to find a new restaurant at News-Leader.com/weekend.

Movie reviews ....... 18 Movie listings ........ 18 New on DVD ......... 19

WHO DID IT?

GET IN WEEKEND

Editor Laura Johnson weekend@ news-leader.com Listings Barbara Palmer 836-1184 Designer Aaron Hartje Writers Camille Dautrich Ed Peaco Katie Tonarely Advertising 836-1133

All submissions must include the name of the event, location, telephone number for publication, date, time, cost (specify if it is free), sponsoring group and a brief description. Also, let us know if your event is accessible to the disabled or is interpreted for the deaf. We must receive your information at least one week before publication. We do not accept submissions over the phone, but they may be sent by fax to 837-1381 or by e-mail to Weekend@News-Leader.com. Mail items to: Weekend Calendar, News-Leader, 651 Boonville Ave., Springfield, MO 65806. For information, call Weekend Editor Laura Johnson at 836-1241. Unfortunately, Weekend cannot guarantee publication.

       

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NEWS LEADER § NEWS-LEADER.COM

GO! best bets

10.17.2013 Weekend

event: Pets and Pumpkins

HERE ARE THE CAN’T-MISS IDEAS AND EVENTS TO GET YOU STARTED ON YOUR WEEKEND.

Jasmine, with her owner Charlie (winners of the musical chairs game) at a previous Pets and Pumpkins event on Commercial Street. PHOTO COURTESY LOUISE STANLEY

Pets and Pumpkins promises fun for animals, kids — and adults WANT TO GO?

By Ed Peaco FOR THE NEWS-LEADER

Here’s an event where animals upstage people, where kids and pets pay admission and adults get in free. Pets and Pumpkins gives pets and their families a chance to congregate for an afternoon of fun, noon-5 p.m. Saturday on Commercial Street. Two blocks of the street — from Robberson to Campbell avenues — will be blocked off for a carnival of games, activities and a parade. Pets and humans wear costumes and promenade past spectators, many of whom set up lawn chairs to enjoy the fun in comfort. “It’s amazing what people come up with for costumes for themselves, their kids and their animals,” said event coordinator Connie Rhoades. Past get-ups have included Little Bo Peep and her sheep, Elvis Presley, and an

What: Pets and Pumpkins When: Noon-5 p.m. Saturday Where: Commercial Street between Robberson and Campbell avenues Admission: $2 for pets and children ages 2-16; adults free Information: 417-830-8121, connie@tamepetmag.com

Little Bo Peep and one of her sheep, from Pets and Pumpkins. SUBMITTED PHOTO

ancient Egypt theme with a dog wrapped up like a mummy. Lineup for the parade will start around 3 p.m., and trophies in various categories will be

awarded near the close of 5 p.m., Rhoades said. Proceeds go to shelters and animal-rescue efforts. Activities for children will include face painting, inflatables, a cake walk, marshmallow roasting and trick-or-treating among vendors and some shops. For pets, there’s a paw stamping booth and hot-dog bobbing for dogs. Rhoades, editor-in-chief for Tame Pet magazine, said she and See PETS, PUMPKINS, Page 15

Country music superstar Keith Urban will headline a show at JQH Arena on Sunday night. SUBMITTED PHOTO

on stage: Keith Urban Keith Urban, one of the biggest names in country music, will take the stage at JQH Arena on Sunday as part of his “Light the Fuse Tour 2013.” The American Idol judge and four-time Grammy Award winner will be joined by opening acts Little Big Town and Dustin Lynch. Tickets are $65 and can be purchased at the JQH box office, by calling 417-836-7678 or 888-476-7849, or visiting missouristatetix.com.

music: Tribute to Johnny Mullins Come hear music and stories celebrating the legacy of songwriter Johnny Mullins at 7 p.m. Friday at the Library Center, 4653 S. Campbell Ave. Johnny’s daughter and wife, Melinda and Peggy Mullins, will be joined by musician Bo Brown and KSMU’s Mike Smith. The free event is open to all ages.

Melinda Mullins SUBMITTED PHOTO

3


4 Weekend 10.17.2013

NEWS LEADER NEWS-LEADER.COM §

WANT A FREE MEAL? Nominate a favorite entree from an area restaurant. We’ll select the best and arrange a visit for a reader (without close ties to staff or owners) and a reviewer to dine unannounced and compare impressions. Contact Laura Johnson at 836-1241 or email ljohnson2@news-leader.com.

We give you a reason to...

on our

Dine dime Much more than a store By Katie Tonarely

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Reader Crystal Eastburn enjoys shopping at Mama Jean’s Natural Market, but now that the business has more locations and a larger deli area, she’s started appreciating her favorite store in a new way, too.

Crystal Eastburn

CRYSTAL’S TAKE When the newest Mama Jean’s location on East Sunshine Street opened, Crystal went to the grand opening, naturally. “I didn’t realize how big it was until we came to the grand opening,” she says. And one of the things that drew her in was the large deli area with ample seating. As a busy mom of two, a student and a self-employed business owner, Crystal knows what it’s like to be in a hurry. “This is what I do instead of fast food,” she says. If she has more time, she can order a panini sandwich from the deli, but usually she goes to the deli case to see what has been pre-packaged that she can grab quickly. “You can get a pretty good variety of stuff most days,” Crystal says. Or, she can get the salad bar or hot prepared items. “They always have something new, something I haven’t seen before.” Today, we decide to share a Charo Panini ($7.99) and chicken salad ($4.40) from the prepared deli area. The Charo Panini has turkey, pepper jack cheese, red onion, tomato,

Age: 36 Occupation: Student, selfemployed Dish nominated: Charo Panini Quote: “It’s one of my favorite places. I love the whole store.”

CHEW ON THIS

The Charo Panini at Mama Jean’s is large enough to share. JESS HEUGEL/ FOR THE NEWS-LEADER

spinach, roasted red pepper spread and sriracha on honey oat bread. “It’s got some spice to it — a kick,” Crystal says. She likes to get the panini sandwiches when she has more time to sit and enjoy a lunch. The spicy panini pairs well with the coolness of the chicken salad. Crystal no-

tices that it’s made with Vegenaise instead of the traditional mayonnaise. One of the things Crystal loves about the deli items is that all of the ingredients are listed on the packaging. She enjoys trying to re-create some of her favorites at home. To drink, Crystal orders

What: Mama Jean’s Deli Address: 3350 E. Sunshine St. Phone: 417-429-1800 Cuisine: Deli Hours: 8 a.m.-7 p.m. Monday-Saturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday Price range: under $10; many deli items are purchased by the pound Accepts: Cash, all major credit cards Reservations: not necessary Services: takeout, some catering Parking: private lot Seating capacity: 50 Family friendly: kids’ menu, high chairs, booster seats Wheelchair accessible: yes Alcohol: no Smoking: no

the Mama Load smoothie ($6.21), which has coconut water, strawberry, blueberry, mango, pineapple, banana, cacao, maca, flax

ON THE WEB: TO READ PREVIOUS REVIEWS, GO TO NEWS-LEADER.COM


NEWS LEADER § NEWS-LEADER.COM

10.17.2013 Weekend

too. So, anything made with quinoa flakes is going to be a hit with me. It looks and tastes like a muffin, so it’s not a dessert in the traditional sense. The quinoa flakes give it more of an intense texture — more than I’d get from typical wheat flour.

public Road location. Christina’s mom, Diane Todd, makes most of the baked goods, and she specializes in vegan and gluten-free options. Christina says the magic cookies are a Mama Jean’s favorite, and they sell out quickly. Years ago, most people

thought of Mama Jean’s as a simple natural foods market, yet with the addition of new stores and larger deli space, even those who typically wouldn’t set foot into a natural market can find some delicious — and, yes, healthy — meal options.

THE DISH, THE RESTAURANT

Interior of Mama Jean’s. JESS HEUGEL/ FOR THE NEWS-LEADER

Exterior of Mama Jean’s. JESS HEUGEL/ FOR THE NEWS-LEADER

oil, bee pollen, spirulina, cinnamon, honey and sea salt. “I was pleasantly surprised,” she says of the flavor. “It’s got the good-foryou-stuff hidden away.” She can’t even taste the bee pollen and flax oil, though she knows they’re in there. For dessert, Crystal has pumpkin cake with cinnamon cream cheese icing ($1.99), which she says has a great buttery flavor, and though it has coconut flakes in it, something that usually bothers her, she doesn’t notice them at all.

KATIE’S TAKE Like Crystal, I enjoy Mama Jean’s. It’s always a fun place to shop, though I hadn’t visited the new East Sunshine location yet. I knew Mama Jean’s had a

deli, but when I enter the Sunshine location, I realize it truly is a restaurant — just one that’s nestled in a natural market. I’m quite surprised at all of the choices. If I lived or worked near the East Sunshine location, I would be hitting up the Mama Jean’s deli instead of fast food, too. Vegans, vegetarians and those with food allergies and sensitivities would all find something at the deli, especially since everything is labeled. The panini is large enough for us to share. I love the spice, and the honey oat bread that comes from Breadsmith is one of my favorite flavors the local bakery offers. Sometimes I find that sriracha adds too much spice to dishes, but the Charo Pani-

ni has a subtle spice that doesn’t take away from the flavor. The chicken salad is basic, but it’s still quite tasty. I would not have known the chicken salad was made with Vegenaise instead of mayonnaise if Crystal hadn’t mentioned it. For my smoothie, I order the New Moon ($4.78), which has almond milk, almond butter, banana, cacao nibs, cacao powder, maca, cinnamon and agave. I’m a huge fan of both almond milk and almond butter — I go through both at an insane rate at home — so I know I’m going to love this smoothie. And I do, of course. The cacao adds a subtle chocolate flavor, and the almond butter isn’t as sweet as peanut butter and makes it more savory. I realize that I’m probably eating my day’s worth of calories in this smoothie, but I’m not going to dwell on it. After all, these are all healthy things, right? For dessert, I choose a quinoa breakfast cake ($3.99). Quinoa has experienced a huge popularity boost over the last few years, and I have to admit that I love the stuff. I love it so much that I’ll often eat it for breakfast at home,

Christina Rey, kitchen manager at the East Sunshine location, says she’s been excited about how well the deli has been received since the new location opened on April 25. All three stores correspond with each other and work to accommodate several types of diets: vegan, vegetarian, paleo, gluten-free — all are welcome at Mama Jean’s. “We’re trying to work with customers and trying to bring to the table what they wish for, and it’s going over really well,” Rey says. In the grab-and-go case, the salads are made and packaged every day. “It’s a nice way to eat fast food without the fast food bellyache,” she says. “It’s goodfor-you fast food.” As for what some may consider slightly higher prices than typical fast food, Rey says a lot of people aren’t used to shopping naturally. “The way I look at it is that you’re eventually going to save money in the long run,” she says. “Our deli is very reasonable as far as what you’re getting.” The paninis are made with local Breadsmith bread, though the deli does offer a gluten-free option. When I tell Christina that I had the New Moon smoothie, she says that next time I have to try it with a shot of espresso. “Oh, it’s so good,” she says. I can imagine — I’m envisioning a healthy frappe. I’ll take it. Christina also says the deli has great juices. “They’re so refreshing and a great way to get your vegetables in for the day.” Mama Jean’s baked goods come out of the Re-

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6 Weekend 10.17.2013

NEWS LEADER NEWS-LEADER.COM §

cover: Springfield wine festivals

EAT, DRINK AND CELEBRATE

Wine and splendor to flood Springfield at two festivals By Ed Peaco FOR THE NEWS-LEADER

ore wine! And beer. And cocktails. And culinary delights. This Saturday, two epicurean splurges beckon the thirsty, the hungry and those who prefer to be happy. Each for a good cause, of course. The 26th annual Wine and Food Celebration will take place at the White River Conference Center next to the Wonders of Wildlife museum, 2 p.m.to 5 p.m., to benefit children’s programming on Ozarks Public Television. For the event’s silver anniversary, organizers expanded the offerings and moved to the conference center; the format will be the same this year. The start-up Salute! Downtown Wine Fest will unfold noon-8 p.m. on Park Central Square, benefiting the Gillioz Theatre. As wine flows at this affair, so will a funand-games atmosphere, with live music, live art and grape stomping.

M

Wine and Food Celebration The festival has taken steps to cater to emerging trends in tastes, adding craft beers several years ago and cocktails last year. These features build on the already ambitious

Local wine lovers have their choice of two events on Saturday to have fun — and help a good cause at the same time. NEWS-LEADER FILE PHOTO

provisions of hundreds of wines and numerous nibbles from local restaurants, making this event all encompassing, said Brad Feuerbacher, director of operations at Brown Derby International Wine Center. Another popular innovation from last year will remain: $25 advance tickets, a significant savings over the door price

of $40. The celebration started in 1987 after Brown Derby owner Ron Junge saw a similar event in Napa-area wine country. The Springfield festival rode the 1990s wine boom, and organizers have recognized new trends of increasing interest and sophistication in other areas. “What we’ve seen in

the last several years is that wine has continued to evolve, but there’s been this cocktail culture that’s really come about — and artisanal spirits. And the same thing has happened in the craft beer industry,” Feuerbacher said. “You have this whole culture that wants to try and seek out new and different things.” These enhancements

are crucial to fundraising, said Andy Kuntz, co-owner of Andy’s Frozen Custard Inc. and a longtime supporter of the event. “Last year, we made more money than we’ve ever made,” he said. On one hand, the event is a worthy cause. “But on the flip side, to get people to buy in, you have to have a fun event,” he said. OPT spends about

$600,000 on children’s programming, OPT spokeswoman Hannah Wingo said, and Kuntz said the event typically fills 10-15 percent of that need. Among the food providers, Kuntz said he was considering root beer floats or small sundaes. Mike Jalili and family members who own Touch and Flame have been


NEWS LEADER § NEWS-LEADER.COM

10.17.2013 Weekend

supporting the event since 1997, during the days of Bijan’s. Late last week, he wasn’t sure what food Flame would bring to the celebration, but he had some preliminary thoughts about Touch: dates with goat cheese wrapped with jalapeño bacon, shrimp and grits, and a s’mores bar. One craft brewery that wasn’t yet operating for last year’s celebration will have a table this year. White River Brewing Co. will present its flagship beers: Table Rock Red Ale, Copper Creek IPA, White Creek Wit and Tavern Creek Tripel. Other beers also were being considered. In its first eight months of existence, White River’s beer output increased from a total of 20 barrels for the first two months to current monthly production verging on 80 barrels, brewery representative Elonzo King said.

WANT TO GO? WINE AND FOOD CELEBRATION » 2 p.m.-5 p.m. Saturday » White River Conference Center, 600 W. Sunshine St. » Admission: $25 in advance, $40 at the door. Advance tickets are available at Brown Derby International Wine Center, Springfield Andy’s Frozen Custard locations or at optv.org/wineandfood » Information: optv.org/ wineandfood or 417-8368894

In addition to having a good time, attendees at both wine festivals in Springfield Saturday will help raise money for a good cause. SUBMITTED PHOTOS

SALUTE! DOWNTOWN WINE FEST » Noon-8 p.m. Saturday » Park Central Square » Admission: free; buy tickets to sample wines » Information: 417-6930827

SCHEDULE FOR PERFORMERS

Downtown Wine Fest English Management, having held several beeroriented festivals on the square, is branching out into wine while maintaining the festive outdoor vibe. “We thought, no one’s given it a go on the wine side,” said Laura Head, spokeswoman for English Management, which owns numerous local restaurants and manages the Gillioz. The Downtown Wine Fest is aimed at attracting a different group of people who may not have taken part in other types of festivals on the square, she said. “A lot of people enjoy wine but don’t necessarily need an upscale environment to enjoy wine,” she said. The downtown festival will borrow a feature that’s popular at fall festivals at wineries: grape stomping. The stomping starts with refurbished wine barrels cut in half into a buck-

7

This costumed figure is the “live” part of this live table, a recent trend in food and drink service, OPT spokeswoman Hannah Wingo says. The table of cocktail samples was provided by Diageo and Smirnoff, one of the sponsors at last year’s event, she says. SUBMITTED PHOTO

A sampling of some of the wines available at the Wine and Food Celebration. OZARKS PUBLIC BROADCASTING

Music Noon-1:30 p.m.: Nate Fredrick 2 p.m.-3:30 p.m. Tyler Stokes of Delta Sol Revival 4 p.m.-5:30 p.m.: Bella Donna 6 p.m.-8 p.m.: Plaid Dragon Live art Noon-3 p.m.: Meganne Rosen O’Neal 3 p.m.-6 p.m.: Gary Bedell 6 p.m.-8 p.m.: Mr. K

Left: Attendees at a previous Wine and Food Celebration receive a fresh pour. SUBMITTED PHOTO

Far left: A variety of cheeses will also be available to sample at the festivals.

et shape, she said. Next, the half-barrels are filled with donated grapes from U.S. Foods. Then willing participants take off their shoes and socks and commence stomping.

Stompers must buy chances for a raffle, and competitions will take place involving fastest stomping and most juice produced, Head said. There’s no admission

fee for the festival, but those who want to sample wines must buy tickets. To go with the wine, cheese samplings also will be available.

SUBMITTED PHOTO


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WANT TO MAKE THE GUIDE? SEE PAGE 2 FOR DETAILS ON HOW TO GET YOUR EVENT INCLUDED.

17 TODAY EVENTS

The Air and Military Museum of the Ozarks, open noon-4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, 2305 E. Kearney St. Admission is $5; $3 for ages 7-12; FREE for ages 6 and younger; FREE admission for military and patriotic holiday events throughout the year. 417-864-7997 Artist Talk with photographer Julie Blackmon, 5:30 p.m. today, Springfield Art Museum, 1111 Brookside Drive. FREE 417-837-5700; springfieldmo.gov/ art Behind The Baton, meet and greet, 5:30 p.m.; program at 6 p.m. today, Newk’s Eatery, 2639 S. Glenstone Ave. Meet Kyle Wiley Picket, new Springfield Symphony conductor and learn about upcoming concerts. FREE 417-864-6683; springfield mosymphony.org “Burma Chronicles” (Graphic Novels for Grown-ups), 6:30 p.m. today, Brentwood Branch Library, 2214 Brentwood Blvd. Adults. FREE 417-883-1974; thelibrary.org Food for Thought: A Civil Discussion on ... The 50 percent: Poverty in Our Community, 6 p.m. today, Library Center, 4653 S. Campbell Ave. Adults. Discussions will be led by experts preceded by a FREE meal of soup, bread and cheese. FREE; registration required. 417-8820714; thelibrary.org Game It!, 3-4 p.m. today, Midtown Carnegie Branch Library, 397 E. Central St. Grades 6-12. FREE 417-862-0135; thelibrary.org Greater Ozarks Audubon Society Program: Honduran Nauralist Robert Gallardo, 6:30 p.m. today, Springfield Conservation Nature Center, 4601 S. Nature Center Way. Gallardo will present a program on the

flora, fauna and landscapes of Honduras. FREE; refreshments provided. Bob Ball; email: bobrubyb@gmail.com

Greater Springfield Farmers’ Market, open 8 a.m.-noon today and Tuesday, 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday, Battlefield Mall parking lot, 2825 S. Glenstone Ave. springfieldfarmersmarket.com; email: info@springfield farmersmarket.com Homecoming Pep Rally in preparation of Saturday’s game, 7 p.m. today, Hammons Student Center, campus of MSU. FREE 417-836-6486 Science Cafe, 6-8 p.m. today, Farmer’s Gastropub, 431 S. Jefferson Ave., Suite 160. All ages interested in science and technology are welcome to attend. FREE conversation; food and drink are available for purchase. 417-862-9910; thelibrary.org

Campbell’s Maze Daze in Clever is open Friday-Sunday through Nov. 3. Activities include a 4-acre corn maze, a haunted maze, pumpkin patch, hayrides and pumpkin painting, among others. Call 417-830-0243 or email info@campbellsmazedaze.com for information. NEWS-LEADER FILE PHOTO

Teen Read Week, 5-7 p.m. today, Brentwood Branch Library, 2214 Brentwood Blvd. Experiment with some new art techniques and materials. Grades 6-12. FREE; material provided. 417-883-1974; thelibrary.org

Mills Arts and Crafts Fair, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. today (continues through Sunday), War Eagle Mills Farm, 11036 High Sky Inn Road. FREE admission; $2 parking fee. 479-789-5398; wareaglefair.com

Wine and Cheese Sampling, 6-8 p.m. today, Treasure Chest, 1942 S. Glenstone Ave. A portion of all sales will benefit Developmental Center of the Ozarks. FREE 417-823-3800

Ozark, Ark.: Yonder Mountain String Band’s Harvest Music Festival, today (continues through Saturday); Mulberry Mountain. Ticket options and info: yonderharvestfestival.com, 785-749-3434

Ozark: Friends of Christian County Library October Book Sale, noon-8 p.m. today (continues through Saturday), Christian County Library, 1005 N. 4th Ave. Cash or checks accepted. FREE admission. 417-581-2432; christiancounty.lib.mo.us

MUSIC

presented by Springfield Little Theatre, 7:30 p.m. today (continues through Sunday), the Landers Theatre, 311 E. Walnut St. Lorianne Dunn, director and choreographer; Lloyd Holt, musical director. Tickets: $15, $12 for ages 14 and younger. 417-8691334; springfieldlittletheatre.org Ozark: “Family Outings,” by Paul McCusker, 7:30 p.m. today (continues through Saturday), Stained Glass Theatre, 1996 Evangel St. Tickets: 417-581-9192; sgtheatre.com

THEATER

Strafford: Feature Films at the Library: “ParaNorman,” rated PG, 4-6 p.m. today, Strafford Branch Library, 101 S. Missouri 125. FREE 417-736-9233; thelibrary.org

“The Children’s Hour,” presented by MSU department of theater and dance, 7:30 p.m. today (continues through Sunday), Craig Hall Coger Theater, 1147 E. Grand St., campus of MSU. Tickets: $14; $12 for seniors, children and students; $8 in advance with MSU ID. Purchase tickets: 417-836-7678; 417-489-667866; missouristatetix.com; theatreanddance.missouristate. edu. Info: 417-836-4644

War Eagle, Ark.: War Eagle

“Disney’s Little Mermaid Jr.,”

18 FRIDAY COMEDY

Mainstage Presents: The Jeff Show, 8 p.m. Friday; Use Your Words, 10 p.m. Friday, Skinny Improv Comedy Theatre, 308 South Ave. Admission is $12; $10 students; late show admission is pay what you will. 417-831-5233; theskinnyimprov.com

DANCE

Solefest, Contra Dance Weekend, presented by Traditional Dance and Music Society of the Ozarks, Friday (continues through Sunday); Northview Center, 301 E. Talmage St. Includes dancing and dance workshops. Fees: $10-$25 for a single dance or workshop; all-inclusive: $70 door; $50 for members and students, age 21 and younger. 417-529-4526; email: springfield contra@hotmail.org; springfield contra.org/solefest.htm Nixa: Live Band Dance, 7 p.m. Friday, Nixa Senior Center, 404 S. Main St. Cover charge. 417-7252322

EVENTS

AKC Obedience and Rally Trials, presented by the Springfield Dog Training Club, 8:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Friday (continues through Sunday), Ozark Empire Fairgrounds, 3001 N. Grant Ave. FREE admission; no pets allowed. 417-619-9658 Bears of Distinction Home-

coming Dinner and Awards Ceremony, presented by the Alumni Association, 6 p.m. Friday, University Plaza Convention Center, 333 John Q. Hammons Parkway. Cost: $30. 417836-5654 Full Moon Meditation, 6 p.m. Friday, School of Metaphysics, 1033 E. Sunshine St. Join a meditation class on compassion and discuss what it means to be compassionate. 417-831-0955; email: springfield@som.org 50th annual Hillbilly Ham & Bean Dinner, 5-7 p.m. Friday, Hillcrest Presbyterian Church, 818 E. Norton Road. Music by the Lost Hill bluegrass band. Cost: $5; $2.50 for ages 4-10; FREE for ages 3 and younger. Info: hillcrestpcs.com; hillcrestchurch@gmail.com; 417-833-1746 Hauntings and Happenings, a Springfield Historic Tour, 5:30, 7 and 8:30 p.m. Friday (continues Saturday). The shuttle will depart from the History Museum on the Square. FREE parking is available


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K1 10.17.2013 Weekend

north of the museum on Olive Street. The one-hour tour is narrated by John Sellars, executive director of the History Museum on the Square. See Springfield’s first city cemetery, the location of a mass grave from the Civil War, hear stories about haunted buildings. Tickets: $10 for adults and young adults. The Blue Bull Restaurant on the square is offering a package price for a meal and tour for an additional $10 a person. Tour reservations: 417-831-1976; seating is limited.

It should be good soup weather at Saturday’s Springfield Farmers’ Market Harvest Soup Cook Off. The fourth annual event will run 9 a.m.-noon in the Battlefield Mall parking lot. Any donation to the Greater Springfield Hunger and Relief Effort (S.H.A.R.E.) will get you a taste of soups, stews, chowders and chilis from participating restaurants and vendors. FILE PHOTO

Master Filmmaker Series: “Life of Pi,” presented by the MSU media, journalism and film department, 7 p.m. Friday, Plaster Student Union, 1110 E. Madison St. MSU alum Gloria Cohen Shomo will return to MSU to screen and discuss her work on the award-winning film “Life of Pi.” FREE Mark Biggs, 417-8364984 Moon City Faculty Reading, presented by the MSU department of English, 7 p.m. Friday, Carrington Hall, room 208, campus of MSU, 901 S. National Ave. Featured will be poetry readings from the recently published “Yonder Mountain: An Ozarks Anthology.” FREE 417836-6565 Murder Mystery Dinner, 7 p.m. Friday, Pythian Castle, 1451 E. Pythian St. Tickets: $40. 417-8651464; pythiancastle.com Schweitzer United Methodist Benefit Garage Sale, 7 a.m.-4 p.m. Friday (continues Saturday), Schweitzer UMC Outreach Center, 2701 E. Sunshine St. 417-8638866; schweitzerumc.org

tinues through Sunday), Northward Museum, 201 W. Locust St. The museum will be decorated for the holidays. Refreshments will be provided. Admission: $3; $1 for ages 6-12. 417-326-6850

N. Nicholas Road. Packet pickup is 5-7 p.m. Thursday at the Faught Administration Center, 301 S. Main St. Entry fee: $20 today; $25 race day. 417-7243872

Science Sprout Museum Day: Water, Water Everywhere!, Discovery Center, 438 St. Louis St. Includes science story times at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. and science demonstrations 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. and hands-on for each participant. General admission applies. For ages 6 and younger. 417-862-9910; discoverycenter.org

Branson:

Ozark: Friends of Christian County Library October Book Sale, noon-5 p.m. Friday, (continues Saturday), Christian County Library, 1005 N. 4th Ave. Cash or checks accepted. FREE admission. 417-581-2432; christian county.lib.mo.us

Teen Friday Nights, 6-8 p.m. Friday, Library Station, 2535 N. Kansas Expressway. Stop in for Games, crafts and special events. Grades 6-12. FREE 417-865-1340; thelibrary.org Ava: Douglas County Fair, 4-10 p.m. Friday (continues Saturday), SW 4th Ave. Admission: $5; $3 for ages 11-3, FREE for ages 2 and younger. 559-737-0193; facebook Bolivar: Memories of Christmas Past, 5-8 p.m. Friday (con-

» Branson Balloon Festival, 5 p.m. Friday (continues through Sunday), Branson RecPlex, Features tethered balloon rides beginning at sunrise Saturday and Sunday, entertainment, vendors and Balloon Glow. FREE admission. bransonballoon festival.com » Paint Party to benefit Branson Arts Council, 7 p.m. Friday, Corks2Canvas, 607 Missouri 165, Suit 6. Enjoy wine, create art to take home and sample food from area caterers. Registration fee: $30. Register online: corks event.eventbrite.com; bransonartscouncil.com or 417336-4255 Nixa: Nixa XLT Lights On After School 5K, 7:15 a.m. Friday, Inman Intermediate School, 1300

Republic: All About Autumn Craft and Vendor Show Raffles, 4-8 p.m. Friday, Republic Activities Building, 711 E Miller Road. Proceeds benefit The National Fabry Foundation. FREE admission. 417-576-4982 Willard: Boo Bash Dance with DJ and Costume Party, 7-10 p.m. Friday, Willard Recreation Center, 133 N Missouri Z. Grades 5-8. Tickets: $5. 417-742-2262; willardparks.com/ halloween-dance.html War Eagle, Ark.: War Eagle

Mills Arts and Crafts Fair, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Friday (continues through Sunday), War Eagle Mills Farm, 11036 High Sky Inn Road. FREE admission; $2 parking fee. 479-789-5398; wareaglefair.com Ozark, Ark.: Yonder Mountain String Band’s Harvest Music Festival, Friday (continues Saturday), Mulberry Mountain. Ticket options and info: www.yonderharvestfestival.com, 785-749-3434

MUSIC

Johnny Mullins: A Celebration of His Life and Music, 7 p.m. Friday, Library Center, 4653 S. Campbell Ave. Join Johnny’s daughter and wife, Melinda and Peggy Mullins, musician Bo Brown of Blackberry Winter and KSMU’s Mike Smith for an evening of music and stories celebrating the songwriter’s legacy. All ages. FREE 417-882-0714; thelibrary.org The Unbound Mic Sessions, 6:30-9 p.m. Friday, Park Central Branch Library, 128 Park Central Square. Adults. FREE 417-8311342; thelibrary.org

WildHeart In Concert, 5:30-6:30 p.m. or 7-8 p.m. Friday, Springfield Conservation Nature Center, 4601 S. Nature Center Way. All ages. FREE; registration required. 417-888-4237 Brookline: Brian Free and Assurance in concert, 7 p.m. Friday, First Baptist Church, 2044 S. Missouri MM. FREE admission, accepting donations. 417-8648521; fbcbrookline.org

THEATER

“The Children’s Hour,” presented by MSU department of theater and dance, 7:30 p.m. Friday (continues through Sunday), Craig Hall Coger Theater, 1147 E. Grand St., campus of MSU. Tickets: $14; $12 for seniors children and students; $8 in advance with MSU ID. Purchase tickets: 417-836-7678; 417-489-667866; missouristatetix.com; theatreanddance.missouristate. edu. Info: 417-836-4644 “Disney’s Little Mermaid Jr.,” presented by Springfield Little Theatre, 7:30 p.m. Friday (continues through Sunday), the Landers Theatre, 311 E. Walnut St. Lorianne Dunn, director and choreographer; Lloyd Holt, musical director. Tickets: $15, $12 for ages 14 and younger. 417-8691334; springfieldlittletheatre.org Marshfield: “Forever Plaid,” presented by Marshfield Community Theatre, 7 p.m. Friday (continues through Sunday), Marshfield Community Theatre, 420 S. Marshall St. Admission: $12; $6 youth. 417-501-5628; marshfield theatre.org/Home.html Ozark: “Family Outings,” by Paul McCusker, 7:30 p.m. Friday (continues Saturday), Stained Glass Theatre, 1996 Evangel St. Tickets: 417-581-9192; sgtheatre.com

19 SATURDAY COMEDY

Mainstage Presents: Core 6, 8 p.m. Saturday; Social Dynamite, 10 p.m. Saturday, Skinny Improv Comedy Theatre, 308 South Ave. Late show is for audiences age 18 and older. Admission is $12; $10 students; late show admission is pay what you will. 417-831-5233; theskinnyimprov.com

DANCE

Solefest, Contra Dance Weekend, presented by Traditional Dance and Music Society of the Ozarks, Saturday (continues Sunday); Northview Center, 301 E.

9

Talmage St. Includes dancing and dance workshops. Fees: $10-$25 for a single dance or workshop; all-inclusive: $70 door; $50 for members and students, age 21 and younger. 417-529-4526; email: springfieldcontra@hotmail.org; springfieldcontra.org/ solefest.htm Nixa: Live Band Dance, 7 p.m. Saturday, Nixa Senior Center, 404 S. Main St. Cover charge. 417-7252322

EVENTS

AKC Obedience and Rally Trials, presented by the Springfield Mo Dog Training Club, 8:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday (continues Sunday), Ozark Empire Fairgrounds Annex, 3001 N. Grant Ave. FREE admission; no pets allowed. 417-619-9658 Band of Bears Homecoming Parade, 9 a.m. Saturday, John Q. Hammons Parkway, 525 John Q. Hammons Parkway. Starts at the corner of John Q. Hammons Parkway and Trafficway and travels south on John Q. Hammons Parkway to Madison Street. 417-836-6486 Bear Tracks 5K Walk/Run, 7 a.m. Saturday, Plaster Student Union, 1110 E. Madison St., campus of MSU. Entry fee: $20. 417-836-4064 Eighth annual Bowling for Strikes to benefit Champion Athletes of the Ozarks, 1 p.m. Saturday, registration 12:30 p.m., Battlefield Lanes, 1127 E. Battlefield Road. Fee: $25 or $125 for a team of five. There will be door prizes and freebies. 417-890-1599; championathletes.org Bradford Park Neighborhood Block Party, 1-4 p.m. Saturday, 3424 S. Rogers Ave. The celebration will include a silent auction, games for all ages, food and music by the Geezer band. 417-882-2801 Channeling at the Castle, 8 p.m. Saturday, Pythian Castle, 1451 E. Pythian St. Tickets: $15. 417-865-1464; pythiancastle.com Creme de la Creme Masquerade Ball, presented by Safe At Home, 7-11 p.m. Saturday, The Diamond Room, 2340 W Grand St. Tickets: $50; reserved table $400. Music by Thirst N’ Howl, dancing, costume contest, cash bar, door prizes, silent auction. 417-863-7233; livesafeathome.org Cruisin’ for Cleavage third

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10 Weekend 10.17.2013

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Guide Continued from Page 9 annual Poker Run, a benefit for Breast Cancer Foundation of the Ozarks, 10:30 a.m. Saturday, registration at 9:30 a.m., Don and Sons Cycle, 4319 W. Chestnut Expressway. Entry fee: $25; $15 passenger. The ride ends at 2:30 p.m. at Cartoons Oyster Bar and Grill with food, live music and raffles. Admission to party is $8 to benefit BCFO. Info: bcfo.org Dr. Frankenstein’s Toy Box workshop, 10 a.m.-noon or 1-3 p.m. Saturday, Discovery Center, 438 St. Louis St. Make a stuffed animal. Ages 6 and older with adult. Cost: $25 plus $10 supply fee for members; $30 and $10 supply fee for nonmembers. Register at discoverycenter.org or 417-862-9910, ext. 706. Evidence of Hauntings with James River Ghost Tracker, 1-2 p.m. Saturday, Midtown Carnegie Branch Library, 397 E. Central St. All ages. FREE 417862-0135; thelibrary.org Family Treasure Hunting, 1-3 p.m. Saturday, Springfield Conservation Nature Center, 4601 S. Nature Center Way. Learn basic GPS use, then carpool to Lake Springfield and put your skills to the test. GPS units provided. Ages 8 and older with an adult mentor. FREE; registration required. 417-888-4237

Farmers Market of the Ozarks, 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday and Tuesday, 4139 S. Nature Center Way, at the new year-round multi-use pavilion at Farmers Park. 417-766-8711; email: Lane@LoveYourFarmer.com; LoveYourFarmer.com Gluten-Free Gala, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday, Hy-Vee, 1720 W. Battlefield Road. Receive ideas for a gluten-free holiday. FREE 417-881-1950 Greater Springfield Farmers’ Market, 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday (open 8 a.m.-noon Tuesday and Thursday), Battlefield Mall parking lot, 2825 S. Glenstone Ave. The fourth annual Harvest Soup Cook Off is 9 a.m.-noon Saturday. Any donation to S.H.A.R.E. gets you a spoon to sample all the soups, stews, chowders and chilies participating restaurants and market vendors. FREE 417-887-4585; springfieldfarmersmarket.com; email: info@springfield farmersmarket.com Halloween Hustle 5K (formerly the Kitchen Run), 8 a.m. Saturday, City Utilities of Springfield Main Office, 301 E. Central St. Info: Pat Dierking: 417-831-8630; email: pat.dierking@cityutilities.net Halloween Spooktacular opening day, featuring hundreds of hand-carved jack-o’lanterns, 6:30-9 p.m. Saturday (continues nightly through Oct.

31), Dickerson Park Zoo, 1401 W. Norton Road. Children ages 12 and younger will receive candy treats. Children are encouraged to wear costumes, but it is not required. Also includes Monster Mash dance party and a vintage carnival. Admission: $7 for ages 2 and older. Discounted advance tickets available midOct. at Simmons First National Bank and Springfield-area McDonald’s. 417-864-1800; dickersonparkzoo.org; parkboard.org Hauntings and Happenings, a Springfield Historic Tour, 5:30, 7 and 8:30 p.m. Saturday. The shuttle will depart from the History Museum on the Square. FREE parking is available north of the museum on Olive Street. The one-hour tour is narrated by John Sellars, executive director of the History Museum on the Square. See Springfield’s first city cemetery, the location of a mass grave from the Civil War, hear stories about haunted buildings. Tickets: $10 for adults and young adults. The Blue Bull Restaurant on the square is offering a package price for a meal and tour for an additional $10 a person. Tour reservations: 417-831-1976; seating is limited. Haunting Good Booksigning, 1-3 p.m. Saturday, Half Price Books of the Ozarks, Inc, 1950 S. Glenstone Ave. Suite O. FREE 417-889-9042; halfpricebooks ozarks.com

Christmas Open House VINTAGE SUITCASE & VERANDA TEA ROOM November 1, 2 & 3

Vintage Suitcase & Veranda Tea Room Friday 10-8 • Saturday 11-5 • Sunday 11-4 Friday Evening Dinner 5-8 • Sunday Brunch 11-4

Reservations recommended but not required 866-1145

Join us for a Christmas Tour & Open House at Hvmboldt Mansion • 847 S Scenic Saturday 9-5 • Sunday 1-4 $10 tickets may be purchased at the door or Robin’s Vintage Suitcase. Proceeds benefitting Springfield Symphony Guild and various children’s charities.

An old-fashioned box lunch will be served at the Carriage House on Saturday from 11-3 for $8.99 Please call for Reservations 866-1145 724 S. Scenic • Springfield, MO • 417.224.5300 (one block north of Hvmboldt Place) • Open Monday-Saturday 10am-5pm SL-0000336593

www.Robinsvintagesuitcase.com

Historic Greene County Courthouse Centennial Celebration: A reenactment of the 1950 original unveiling of the miniature Statue of Liberty, 1 p.m. Saturday, on the south side of the Greene County Courthouse, 940 N. Boonville Ave. Any Boy Scout or Cub Scout that was present at the original event is encouraged to attend. Info: David J. Eslick at 417-889-9332 or Dee Wampler at 417-882-9300 James River Farmers Market, 8 a.m.-noon Saturday, Remington’s Event Center, 1655 W. Republic Road. 417-887-1424 Little Acorns: Squirrel Scamper, 11-11:45 a.m. Saturday, Springfield Conservation Nature Center, 4601 S Nature Center Way. FREE 417-888-4237 MSU Homecoming Football vs. South Dakota State, 1 p.m. Saturday, Robert W. Plaster Sports Complex, 1015 E. Grand St., campus of MSU. Tickets: 417-836-5402 Second annual Monster Dash, a zombie-themed 5K obstacle course, 1 p.m. Saturday, Ritter Springs Park, 3683 W. Farm Road 92. Participants may register as either a zombie or a runner, and spectators are welcome. Also music, snacks, and prizes. Register: monsterdashspringfield.com; facebook.com/monsterdashspfd Nature Art With A Chinese Brushstroke, 1-2 p.m., 2:15-3:15 p.m. or 3:30-4:30 p.m. Saturday, Springfield Conservation Nature Center, 4601 S. Nature Center Way. Ages 8 and older. The 3:30 p.m. class is for ages 15 and older. FREE; registration required. 417-888-4237 Outdoor Treasure Hunting: Geocaching Basics, 9-11 a.m. Saturday, Springfield Conservation Nature Center, 4601 S. Nature Center Way. Learn basic GPS use, then carpool to Lake Springfield to put your skills to the test. GPS units provided. Ages 18 and older. FREE; registration required. 417-888-4237 The Ozark Chapter American Rhododendron Society Fall 2013 Meeting, 10 a.m.-noon Saturday, Springfield Botanical Center, 2400 S. Scenic Ave. Program: Dow Whiting on the Azalea Garden. A tour of the gardens will follow. Visitors are welcome. Info: 573-226-1335 Ozark Mountain Gem and Mineral Society’s 2013 Gem & Jewelry Show, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday (continues Sunday), Springfield Expo Center, 635 E. St.

Louis St. The children’s science area will include materials to take home. Admission: $5; $1 ages 5 and younger. Email: omgandms@gmail.com Ozarks Fall Garage Sale, 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday, Remington’s, 1655 W. Republic Road. A portion of the proceeds will benefit the Pregnancy Care Center. Admission: $2; FREE for ages 11 and younger. 417-8303230 Sixth annual Pets & Pumpkins Festival, noon-5 p.m. Saturday, 219 W. Commercial St. Includes marshmallow roasting, inflatables, games, food, music, treats and a walking parade/contest. Parade lineup begins at 3:15 p.m. in front of Big Momma’s Coffee and Espresso Bar. Admission: $2 for ages 2-16; $2 for pets. Admission includes participation in all activities, parade and costume contest. Adults and children birth to 1 year are admitted FREE but will need to purchase a wristband for $2 to participate in parade/costume contest. Info: Tame Pet Magazine, 417-8308121; email: connie@ tamepetmag.com The Railroad Historical Museum, Inc., open 2 to 4 p.m. Saturdays, Grant Beach Park, 1300 N. Grant Ave. FREE admission. 417-865-6829 Salute, the inaugural Downtown Wine Fest, noon-8 p.m. Saturday, Park Central Square. The festival includes wine sampling, grape stomping, live music. Proceeds benefit the Gillioz Theatre. FREE admission; must purchase tickets for wine sampling. 417-863-9491; gillioz theatre.com Saturday Afternoon at the Movies: Cary Grant Classic: “Arsenic and Old Lace,” not rated, 2 p.m. Saturday, Library Center, 4653 S. Campbell Ave. Adults. FREE 417-882-0714; thelibrary.org Schuyler Community Center Fall Fundraising Breakfast 7-9:30 a.m. Saturday, Schuyler Community Center, 3885 W. Farm Road 94. Cost: $5. 417-840-6352; facebook

way. Ages 17 and younger. FREE No appointment necessary. 417-230-5660 or 417-239-0203; abashrine.com Spa Day, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday, First Unitarian Universalist Church, 2434 E. Battlefield Road. Admission covers all services: massage, facials, reflexology, yoga and more. Admission: $40 door. Emmale Judycki, 417-8490109; email: divinelove manifested@gmail.com Tiny Tots Stay and Play, 10 a.m. Saturday, Library Center, 4653 S. Campbell Ave. Birth-age 1. FREE 417-882-0714; thelibrary.org 26th annual Wine and Food Celebration, presented by Ozarks Public Television, benefiting OPT Kids Programming, 2-5 p.m. Saturday, White River Conference Center, 600 W. Sunshine St. Sample wine, food from area restaurants, craft beer and specialty cocktails. Cost: $25 advance; $40 door. Purchase tickets at Brown Derby International Wine Center, select Brown Derby locations, and Springfield Andy’s Frozen Custard locations. Hannah Wingo, 417-836-8894; hannahwingo@missouristate.edu; or purchase tickets online: optv.org/wineandfood Ash Grove: » Effective Wingshooting for the Hunter, 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday, Andy Dalton Shooting Range and Outdoor Education Center, 4897 N. Farm Road 61, just south of U.S. 160. 417-7424361; email: Mike.Brooks@mdc.mo.gov » Homestead Days, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday (continues Sunday), Nathan Boone Homestead State Historic Site, 7850 N. Missouri V. FREE 417-751-3266; mostateparks.com/park/nathanboone-homestead-state-historicsite Ava: Douglas County Fair, 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Saturday, Douglas County Fair, SW 4th Ave. Admission: $5; $3 for ages 11-3; FREE for ages 2 and younger. 559-7370193; facebook

Schweitzer United Methodist Benefit Garage Sale, 7 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday, Schweitzer UMC Outreach Center, 2701 E. Sunshine St. 417-863-8866; schweitzerumc.org

Bolivar: Memories of Christmas Past, 1-5 p.m. Saturday (continues Sunday), Northward Museum, 201 W. Locust St. The museum will be decorated for the holidays. Refreshments will be provided. Admission: 3; $1 for ages 6-12. 417-326-6850

Shriner’s Hospital Screening for orthopedic conditions, 9 a.m.-noon Saturday, Library Station, 2535 N. Kansas Express-

Branson: Meet and Greet: Greyhound Pets of America, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday, Petco, 993 Branson Hills Parkway. Volun-


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10.17.2013 Weekend

Flutes For All Occasions “Live a Crystal Life”

teers will answer questions about retired racing greyhounds as pets and provide adoption applications. FREE admission. Info: 417-883-8156; email: drafferty350@yahoo.com Marthasville: Deutsch Country Days Living History Weekend, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday (continues Sunday); Luxenhaus Farm, 18055 Missouri O. A festival of folkways and skills of early German settlers in Missouri. Gate admission: $18; $16 for ages 62 and older and military; $8 for ages 5-15; FREE for ages 4 and younger. 636-433-5669; deutschcountrydays.org Nixa: » Fall Festival and Food Drive, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday, in front of 5 Star Antiques, Bryant Drive, U.S. 160, just north of Walmart. Features arts and crafts, festival fall food vendors, farmers mar-

ket, live music and door prizes. FREE admission with a donation of canned food items for Least of These food pantry. 417-725-8995 » Nix A Que, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday, Nixa Community Center, 701 N. Taylor Way. Includes barbecue, games, inflatables, face painting, 50/50 drawing, and live music. Serving of food begins at noon. Proceeds benefit The Least of These Food Pantry. Admission: $5. 417-7251545. To enter a team to compete for the best barbecue, email director@nixachamber.com Ozark: Friends of Christian County Library October Book Sale, 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday, Christian County Library, 1005 N. 4th Ave. Cash or checks accepted. FREE admission. 417-581-2432; christiancounty.lib.mo.us Point Lookout: College of the Ozarks Auction, 10 a.m. Sat-

urday, campus of C of O. Features vintage furniture, antique items, glass ware, tools, trucks, appliances and other estate pieces. 417-690-2204 Republic: Blood Hill Run, 8K, 7:30 a.m. and 1-Mile Fun Run, 7:40 a.m. Saturday, Wilson’s Creek National Battlefield, 6424 W. Farm Road 182, Republic. 8K entry fee: $50; Fun run entry fee: $10, $5 for ages 12 and younger. Packet pickup is noon-6 p.m. Friday at Ridge Runner Sports. Race day shuttle parking is 6-7 a.m. at Republic High School. If the government shutdown continues and Wilson’s Creek Battlefield is closed Saturday, run will be rescheduled to a date in Nov. Refunds will be given to anyone who is unable to attend on the alternate date. Contact: Wilson’s Creek National

See GUIDE, Page 13

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There will be much to see at the annual Ozark Mountain Gem and Mineral Society’s Gem & Jewelry show, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday at the Springfield Expo Center, 635 E. St. Louis St. Vendors will show off their hand-crafted jewelry, and a children’s area will help demonstrate science through rocks, minerals, gems and fossils. Admission is $5, $1 for children 5-under. NEWS-LEADER FILE PHOTO

Vera Wang Duchesse Encore $135 pair

Gifts

Vera Wang with Love $80 pair

Vera Wang Duchesse Flute $80 pair

Lismore Classic Toasting Flutes $150 pair

2704 S. Glenstone | Brentwood Center Hours: M-F 10-5:30, Sat. 10-5 (417) 881-7555 | gamblesgiftshop.com across from Battlefield Mall

11


Night Life 12 Weekend 10.17.2013

Listings are provided as a reader service. Bands or venues are responsible for calling in weekly play dates. Call Barbara Palmer on Mondays or Tuesdays at 836-1184.

The Alibi Lounge, 2109 N. Glenstone Ave., 417-865-3700: Karaoke with DJ Tracy, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. today-Saturday, no cover

American Legion Post 676, 5484 W. Sunshine St., 417-882-4676: Karaoke with Dave Spencer, 6:30-10 p.m. today, no cover; Fish Fry and Dance with Lynn Howe and the Ozark Country Band, 5 p.m. Friday, cover; Dave Spencer & the Dixie Creek Band, 6-10 p.m. Sunday, cover Archie’s Lounge, 1817 E. Grand St., 417-864-4109: Open Fire, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Friday-Saturday, no

cover

Branson Tribute Theatre, 3310 W. Missouri 76, Branson, 417-2391000: Don’t Stop Believin’ — Journey Tribute Band, 8 p.m. today, Sunday and Tuesday, cover Cartoons Bar & Grill, 1614 S. Glenstone Ave., 417-849-1009: Lincoln Durham, 9 p.m. today, cover; Kellswater, 6:30 p.m. Friday, cover; Fun House, doors at 8 p.m. Friday, cover; Breast Cancer Foundation of the Ozarks Fundraiser with music by Fun House, 1-6 p.m. Sat-

NEWS LEADER NEWS-LEADER.COM § urday, cover; Springfield Music All Stars, doors at 7 p.m. Saturday, cover Challenger’s Sports Bar & Grill, 5739 S. Campbell Ave., 417-8896060: Art Bentley, 9 p.m. today, no cover Cody’s South, 1440 E. Republic Road, 417-883-0253: Soup of the Day, 7 p.m. today, no cover; Sweet Tea and Distortion, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Friday, cover; Sean Clavin & the Dirty Truth, 8 p.m.-1 a.m. Saturday, cover Crazy Hat Lounge, 2000 N. National Ave., 417-866-9212: Karaoke, 10 a.m.-1:30 a.m. Monday-Saturday; noon-midnight Sunday, no cover CreekSide Pub, 3830 S. Lone Pine Ave., 417-882-1899: Dave and Pete, 8-11 p.m. today, cover; Karaoke, 8 p.m.-midnight Friday, cover; Bella Donna, 9 p.m.-midnight Saturday, cover Dennis’ Place, 921 W. Sunshine St., 417-865-8373: Karaoke, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. today, no cover; T.J. Bebb of Nashville, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Friday; The Norman Jackson Band, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Saturday, cover; Karaoke, 9 p.m. Sunday,

Introducing an ALTERNATIVE way to smoke that makes quitting

no cover; DJ and Karaoke, 9 p.m. Wednesday, no cover Down The Hill Pub, 2916 S. Lone Pine Ave., 417-655-1222: Nate Fredrick, 8-11 p.m. Friday, no cover Dublin’s Pass Irish Pub downtown, 317 Park Central East, 417-862-7625: Cold River City, 10 p.m. Saturday, no cover; Mississippi Mojo, 9 p.m. Tuesday, no cover Dublin’s Pass Irish Pub south side, 2767 W. Republic Road, 417-8777625: Mark Barger, 9 p.m. Friday, no cover; Brenda Meyer Band, 9 p.m. Saturday, no cover The Dugout, 1218 E. Trafficway, 417-866-2255: Mask and Glove Fall Patio House Party with Beezy and Thunderman, 10 p.m. Friday, cover; Barak Hill with Goat Milk Honey, 9 p.m. Saturday, no cover Ernie Biggs, 213 South Ave., 417-865-4782: Dueling Pianos, 8 p.m.-1 a.m. Friday-Saturday, cover Frisco Tap Tavern, 504 E. Commercial St., 417-865-7432: Karaoke, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. FridaySaturday, no cover Friends Karaoke Pub, 1211B W. Battlefield Road, 417-882-1517: Karaoke, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. today, Friday, Saturday and Wednesday, no cover

Galloway Station, 1281 E. Republic Road, 417-881-9730: The Mudsharks, 9:30 p.m. Saturday, cover; Galloway Irish Jam Session, 7-9 p.m. Monday, no cover Gillioz Theatre, 325 Park Central East, 417-863-9491; gillioztheatre.com: Jars of Clay, 8 p.m. Wednesday, $15-$50 The Hangout, 1906 E. Meadowmere St., 417-862-9911: The ABS Band, 8 p.m.-midnight Friday, no cover; Black Cherry, 8 p.m.-midnight Saturday, cover JQH Arena, 685 S. John Q. Hammons Parkway, 417-836-7678, 888-476-7849; missouristatetix.com: Keith Urban with Little Big Town and Dustin Lynch, 7 p.m. Sunday, $65 Jalen’s Lounge, 1611 N. Campbell Ave., 417-862-5033: R & B Soul Music with DJ Ray, 9 p.m. Friday, cover; The Survivors Band, 8:30 p.m. Saturday, cover; NFL Live Madden Tournament, 3 p.m. Sunday, no cover; Comedy Night Open Mic with Steve Leck, 9 p.m. Monday, no cover; Karaoke, 8:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. Wednesday, no cover Jimm’s Steakhouse, 1935 S. Glenstone Ave., 417-886-5466: Carol Reinert, Harry Beckett and Jeff Gouge, 7:30-11 p.m. Friday-Saturday, no cover Jo’s Gather ‘n Place, 2931 E. Chestnut Expressway, 417-864-

7723: Karaoke with Bailey Entertainment, 7-11 p.m. Friday, no cover Just One More, U.S. 60, Republic, 417-766-3000: Big Iron, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Friday, no cover; Southern Green, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Saturday, no cover Lil Dallas Sports Bar and Grill, 701 Red Top Road, Fair Grove, 417759-9308: The Bastards, 9 p.m. Friday, no cover; Tripleshot, 9 p.m. Saturday, no cover Lindberg’s, 318 W. Commercial St., 417-868-8900: The Gardenheads, Sunset Maintenance and Modern Epic, 9 p.m. today, cover; The Electrics, 6:30 p.m. Friday, cover; Ha Ha Tonka with Onward, etc. and Sam Crain, 8 p.m. Friday, cover; Papa Green Shoes, 6:30 p.m. Saturday, cover; The Yowl with Cherokee Rifle Fight and Thee Fine Lines, 9 p.m. Saturday, cover; Super Happy Funtime Burlesque, 9 p.m. Tuesday, cover Luttrell’s Auction, 2939 W. Kearney St., 417-861-6701: Kari Garrison, Travis Scott, Mike McGee, Jerry Menown, Loyd Hicks, George Gyser, David Sowers with Randy Buckner, 6 p.m. Saturday, cover Midnight Rodeo, 1773 S. Glenstone Ave., 417-882-0309: Dance Lessons, DJ Tommy T, 7 p.m. Friday-Saturday, cover Misty’s Place, 1109 E. Commercial

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Escape the Fate will be playing at the Shrine Mosque, 601 St. Louis St., on Sunday night as part of a bill that also includes Five Finger Death Punch, Miss May I and Gemini Syndrome. Tickets are $32.50 in advance, $35 day of the show. DAVID JACKSON


NEWS LEADER § NEWS-LEADER.COM St., 417-868-8808: Karaoke, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Friday-Saturday, no cover

Two shows on Friday at Three 20’s, 3005 S. Kansas Expressway, are part of Emmalin’s Journey of Hope benefit. Young rockers The Verbing Nouns will play an all-ages show at 6 p.m., and Machine Gun Symphony will play a 21-over show at 9 p.m. There is a cover.

Mount Pleasant Winery, 3125 Green Mountain Drive, Branson, 417-336-9463: Mary Ann and Jay Daversa, 5-7 p.m. today; Bogie Bohinc & Marcus Willett, 5-7 p.m. Friday; Terry Laird, 5-7 p.m. Saturday; John Raczka, 5-7 p.m. Wednesday, no cover Mulligan’s, 2820 N. Glenstone Ave., 417-869-3900: Terry Armes, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. FridaySaturday, no cover Oak Ridge Boys Theatre, 464 Missouri 248, Branson, 866-7074100; oakridgeboystheatre.com: Sawyer Brown, 8 p.m. Saturday, $45 The Outland, 326 South Ave., 417-869-7625: Adam Faucett, Sound of the Mountain, Dead Leaves Traveling Band, 9 p.m. today, cover; Gorgeous George, The Reacharounds, Sunshine Kings, Molotov Latte, 9 p.m. Friday, cover; Badass Pterodactyls, Muzzle, Don’t Mind Dying, 9 p.m. Saturday, cover; Mascara Metal Monday Free show with Call of the Void, Timmy Meano, 9 p.m. Monday, no cover; Merr’s Comedy Workshop and Warrens Tight Boom

10.17.2013 Weekend

SUBMITTED PHOTO

Box, 9 p.m. Tuesday, no cover; Cityscapes and Skylines, Histories, 9 p.m. Wednesday, cover

Schultz & Dooley’s, 2210 W. Chesterfield Blvd., 417-885-0060: Karaoke, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. FridaySaturday, no cover

The Outland Ballroom, 324 South Ave., 417-869-7625: Benefit Show celebrating the life of Jon Blair, 9 p.m. today, cover; Bill Callahan, Circuit Des Yeux, Ryan Spillken, 9 p.m. Friday, cover; Deitra Mag Fashion Show with Randall & The Sideshow, doors at 9 p.m. Saturday, cover

Shrine Mosque, 601 St. Louis St., theshrinemosqueonline.com: 417-869-9164: Five Finger Death Punch with Escape the Fate, Miss May I and Gemini Syndrome, 7:30 p.m. Sunday, $32.50, $35 day of show; tickets available at Shrine ticket office, Kaleidoscope, Stick It In Your Ear, ticketmaster.com or 800-7453000

Pappy’s Place, 943 N. Main Ave., 417-866-8744: AKA, 3-6 p.m. Saturday, no cover; Ila and Scotty, 6-8 p.m. Monday, no cover; Chris and Corey, 6-8 p.m. Wednesday, no cover

Springfield Brewing Company, 301 S. Market Ave., 417-832-8277: 180 featuring Kristi Merideth, 8 p.m. today, no cover; John Strickler Trio, 6-9 p.m. Friday, no cover; the Ryan Talbot

Experience, 6-9 p.m. Saturday, no cover; Cindy Woolf and Mark Bilyeu, 7 p.m. Sunday, no cover; Ken Hopper, 6 p.m. Wednesday, no cover Three 20’s, 3005 S. Kansas Expressway, 417-881-1520: Emmalin’s Journey of Hope Benefit with young rockers The Verbing Nouns, 6-9 p.m. Friday, all ages; Machine Gun Symphony, 9 p.m. Friday, $10; proceeds benefit medical expenses for a young child suffering from a genetic disease; Machine Gun Symphony, 9 p.m. Saturday, cover The Under Cliff Bar and Grill, 6385 Old 71, 417-623-8382, Joplin: Stag Owens & the Stagaroos, 5:30-9:30 p.m. Saturday, no cover Wacky Jack’s Saloon, 3632 Missouri EE, Highlandville, 417-4430223: Karaoke with DJ Chris, 8:30 p.m.-midnight today; Art Bentley, 8 p.m.-midnight Friday, no cover; Karaoke, 8:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. Saturday, no cover The Woodshed, 311 S. Main St., Carthage, 417-358-2707: Red Bridge Bluegrass Band, 7:30-9 p.m. Friday, no cover

h 24nntual A

Guide Continued from Page 11 Battlefield Foundation: 417-8643041; email: info@ wilsonscreek.com; wilsonscreek.com/bloodyhillrun

mosymphony.org Springfield Symphony Pops Concert, “Fairy Tales and Legends,” 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Juanita K. Hammons Hall for the Performing Arts, 525 John Q. Hammons Parkway. Preconcert music at 7 p.m. Tickets: 417-864-6683; springfield mosymphony.org

Willard: Fall Festival, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Saturday, Willard United Methodist Church, 304 Farmer Road. Bazaar and bake sale and turkey dinner served 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Cost of dinner is $6; $3 for children. 417-742-3319

Branson: Sawyer Brown, 8 p.m. Saturday, Oak Ridge Boys Theatre, 464 Missouri 248. Tickets: $45. 866-707-4100; oakridgeboystheatre.com

War Eagle, Ark.: War Eagle Mills Arts and Crafts Fair, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday (continues Sunday); War Eagle Mills Farm, 11036 High Sky Inn Road. FREE admission; $2 parking fee. 479-789-5398; wareaglefair.com

Ozark, Ark.: Yonder Mountain String Band’s Harvest Music Festival, Saturday; Mulberry Mountain. Ticket options and info: yonderharvestfestival.com, 785-749-3434

MUSIC

Spooky Symphony, 2:30 p.m. Saturday, Juanita K. Hammons Hall for the Performing Arts, 525 John Q. Hammons Parkway. An afternoon of music filled with fairy tales and legends for families, and costume contests. Listen to the winning story of Spooky Story Contest. All ages. FREE 417-864-6683; springfield

THEATER

“The Children’s Hour,” presented by MSU department of theater and dance, 7:30 p.m. Saturday (continues Sunday), Craig Hall Coger Theater, 1147 E. Grand St., campus of MSU. Tickets: $14; $12 for seniors children and students; $8 in

See GUIDE, Page 16

Apple Butter Day

Saturday, October 19, 2013 - Ozark Mennonite School

Take U.S. 60, 2 1/5 miles east of Seymour, MO, then right on Peewee Crossing Rd 1 mile

Bring your friends and come early to experience the woodsy smell of a fire mixed with the rich scent of apples & spices. Get yourself a cup of coffee, a warm homemade cinnamon roll and enjoy some good company as we stir a batch of apple butter the old fashioned way. Opens 7:00 AM with pancake breakfast served until 8:30 Lunch 10:00 AM - 1:00 PM Choose Chicken Noodle or Chili Soup with bread and a slice of Pie or BBQ Chicken, including scalloped potatoes, baked beans, coleslaw & bread. Indoor auction at 1:00 pm - rain or shine

Come and join us for a relaxing day! What We’re Doing Train Ride through the woods, A variety of handmade items including Quilts, Furniture, Wall Art & lots more! Lots of baked goods, Homemade ice cream & so much more! SL-0000337989

13

All proceeds benefit the Ozark Mennonite School Questions? Call Lyle 417-683-8539


14 Weekend 10.17.2013

NEWS LEADER NEWS-LEADER.COM §

art: Evangel art show

Evangel faculty and alumni display work in two spaces

Fairy Tales and Legends October 19, 2013

Bach – Toccata and Fugue in D Minor Saint-Saens – Danse Macabre Gounod – Funeral March for a Marionette Humperdinck – Hansel and Gretel Prelude Grieg – In the Hall of the Mountain King Mahler – Funeral March from Symphony No. 1 Tchaikovsky – Swan Lake Suite Concert C SSponsors

Kyle Wiley Kyle WileyPickett Pickett Conductor /Music Director

Tickets: 417-836-7678 Info: springfieldmosymphony.org

SL-0000336503

Carla M. Calvin

“In Black and White,� an oil on linen by Mike Buesking, is part of an exhibit at the Barnett Art Gallery on the Evangel University campus. STAN MAPLES By Camille Dautrich FOR THE NEWS-LEADER

                !"#$%&   '" '())$"* +,-).-.+ $' /)+++)0.-).+01 $' $"2"  %%%34&&$'&53$4 6 3

While Evangel Fine Arts Professor Stan Maples was easing back into creating sculpture after a 20-year hiatus, former student Rob Bernet was also creating art, but in a very different way. He set out to produce one work of art a day for a year. The fruits of both their labors, along with those of other Evangel professors and alumni, can be seen this month, both at Evangel’s

“Tribute to Monet — Water Lilies� by Evangel University art professor Stan Maples. EVANGEL UNIVERSITY

Barnett Art Gallery and the Bellwether Gallery downtown. “We had a faculty show

last year,� said Maples, who is director of the Barnett Art Gallery, “and we’re trying to get it where it’s every

year, coordinated with homecoming.� (Evangel’s homecoming weekend was earlier this month.)


NEWS LEADER § NEWS-LEADER.COM

10.17.2013 Weekend

15

Pets, Pumpkins Continued from Page 3

Pets and Pumpkins SUBMITTED PHOTO

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a business partner worked to create the event at a time when Commercial Street was starting to show signs of renewed vitality. “We wanted to do an event that had two purposes, to bring people to Commercial Street for the first time — or back if they hadn’t been in a while — and to raise money for charities,” she said.

A watercolor by Rob Bernet is part of an exhibit at Bellwether Gallery. EVANGEL UNIVERSITY

This month’s on-campus exhibit will feature the work of faculty members Mitch Yung, ceramics and sculpture; David Bigelow, printmaking; Mike Beusking, painting; Lane Simmons, photography; and Maples’ sculptures and digital images. “Each faculty member has four to five pieces, plus 10 alumni are showing as well,” Maples said. “(The show) covers just about every base in fine art you can think of. “It’s kind of a potpourri.” Bernet’s exhibit at Bellwether will include three of his artworks from each month of this year through September, Maples said, making a total of 27 pieces on display there. His subjects vary from self-portraits to still lifes, animals and landscapes. Bernet, a 1986 graduate of Evangel, has 20 years experience as a graphic designer and art director. “As I mastered my skills in design, I started to feel the desire for a freer

formofexpression,soover the past few years I have been drawing and painting constantly,” Bernet said. “I post everything on Facebook,” he added. “There is nothing like your peers to keep you honest and working hard.” Although the exhibits are open to all and everyone is encouraged to attend, they are especially meaningful for people with an Evangel connection, Maples said. “It is a great opportunity to reconnect with each other and share artistic inspiration,” he said. “This show is always an exciting event ... because it shows the versatility of our faculty and alumni, exhibited in the artwork that is created.” The on-campus exhibit continues through Oct. 31 in the Barnett Art Gallery on the first floor of Evangel’s Barnett Fine Arts Center. Its entrance is just south of the chapel, facing Glenstone Avenue. Gallery hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday.

Bellwether Gallery, which houses Bernet’s exhibit, is in the Monarch Art Factory, 600 W. College St. Gallery hours are11a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday-Friday and noon to 4 p.m. Saturday. During the month of November, Bernet’s show will move to the Barnett Art Gallery. For more information, call 417-865-2815 or go to www.evangel.edu.

“Tippy Head” is a wood-fired stoneware piece by Mitch Yung. STAN MAPLES


16 Weekend 10.17.2013

Guide Continued from Page 13 advance with MSU ID. Purchase tickets: 417-836-7678; 417-489-667866; missouristatetix.com; theatreanddance.missouristate. edu. Info: 417-836-4644 “Disney’s Little Mermaid Jr.,” presented by Springfield Little Theatre, 10:30 a.m., 2:30 and 7:30 p.m. Saturday (continues Sunday), the Landers Theatre, 311 E. Walnut St. Lorianne Dunn, director and choreographer; Lloyd Holt, musical director. Tickets: $15, $12 for ages 14 and younger. 417-869-1334; springfieldlittletheatre.org “Playhouse!” an improvised kids show, 11:30 a.m. Saturday, The Skinny Improv, 308 South Ave. Admission: $5; FREE popcorn. 417-831-5233; theskinny improv.com Marshfield: “Forever Plaid,” 7 p.m. Saturday (continues Sunday), Marshfield Community Theatre, 420 S. Marshall St. Tickets: $12; $6 for youth. 417501-5628; marshfieldtheatre.org/ Home.html

NEWS LEADER NEWS-LEADER.COM § Ozark: “Family Outings,” by Paul McCusker, 2:30 p.m. Saturday, Stained Glass Theatre, 1996 Evangel St. Tickets: 417-5819192; sgtheatre.com

20 SUNDAY EVENTS

AKC Obedience and Rally Trials, presented by the Springfield Dog Training Club, 8:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Sunday, Ozark Empire Fairgrounds Annex, 3001 N. Grant Ave. FREE admission; no pets allowed. 417-619-9658 Lifetree Cafe, 6-7 p.m. Sunday, Brown Egg Coffee House, 607 E. Madison St. This week’s topic: “Make the Most of Your Life...A perspective that will change your life...forever.” FREE 417-838-4631 Ozark Mountain Gem and Mineral Society’s 2013 Gem & Jewelry Show, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday, Springfield Expo Center, 635 E. St. Louis St. The children’s science area will include materials to take home. Admission: $5; $1 for children. Email: omgandms@gmail.com Ash Grove: Homestead Days,

10 a.m.-4 p.m. Sunday, Nathan Boone Homestead State Historic Site, 7850 N. Missouri V. FREE 417-751-3266; mostateparks.com/ park/nathan-boone-homesteadstate-historic-site Bolivar: Memories of Christmas Past, 1-5 p.m. Sunday, Northward Museum, 201 W. Locust St. The museum will be decorated for the holidays. Refreshments will be provided. Admission: 3; $1 for ages 6-12. 417-326-6850 Branson: Branson Arts Council Tour of Homes, a fundraiser for Branson Arts Council, noon-5 p.m. Sunday, starting at Branson Mill Craft Village on Gretna Road. Tickets: $20 advance; $25 at the door. 417-336-4255, or via info@bransonartscouncil.com Marthasville: Deutsch Country Days Living History Weekend, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday, Luxenhaus Farm, 18055 Missouri O. A festival of folkways and skills of early German settlers in Missouri. Gate admission: $18; $16 for ages 62 and older and military; $8 for ages 5-15; FREE for ages 4 and younger. 636-4335669; deutschcountrydays.org

War Eagle, Ark.: War Eagle Mills Arts and Crafts Fair, presented by the Ozark Arts and Crafts Fair Association, Inc., 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Sunday, War Eagle Mills Farm, 11036 High Sky Inn Road. FREE admission; $2 parking fee. 479-789-5398; wareaglefair.com

MUSIC

First & Calvary’s Musical Offerings presents: Tim Wootton, Trumpet & Carla Wootton, piano, 2:30 p.m. Sunday, First & Calvary Presbyterian Church, 820 E. Cherry St. FREE 417-862-5068; firstandcalvary.org Five Finger Death Punch with Escape the Fate, Miss May I and Gemini Syndrome, 7:30 p.m. Sunday, Shrine Mosque, 601 St. Louis St. Tickets: $32.50; $35 day of show. Tickets available at Shrine ticket office, Kaleidoscope, Stick It In Your Ear, ticketmaster.com or 800-7453000. Info: 417-869-9164 Keith Urban with Little Big Town and Dustin Lynch, 7 p.m. Sunday, JQH Arena, 685 S. John Q. Hammons Parkway. Tickets: $65. missouristatetix.com, 417836-7678, 888-476-7849; missouristatetix.com Operazzi Night, with Jimmy Benecasa on piano, presented by Springfield Regional Opera: a Lyric Theatre Company, 5-7 p.m. Sunday, the Creamery Arts Center, 411 N. Sherman Ave. Enjoy a classical music cabaret with musical theater and jazz open mic night. If you would like to sing, bring sheet music in your key. FREE 417-863-1960; srolyrictheatre.org Springfield Chamber Chorus Concert, 7 p.m. Sunday, Immaculate Conception Church, 3555 S. Fremont Ave. FREE springfield chamberchorus.org

THEATER

“The Children’s Hour,” presented by MSU department of theater and dance, 2:30 p.m. Sunday, Craig Hall Coger Theater, 1147 E. Grand St., campus of MSU. Tickets: $14; $12 for seniors children and students; $8 in advance with MSU ID. Purchase tickets: 417-836-7678; 417-489-667866; missouristatetix.com; theatreanddance.missouristate. edu. Info: 417-836-4644

SL-0000340274

“Disney’s Little Mermaid Jr.,” presented by Springfield Little Theatre, 2:30 p.m. Sunday, the Landers Theatre, 311 E. Walnut St. Lorianne Dunn, director and choreographer; Lloyd Holt, musical director. Tickets: $15, $12

for ages 14 and younger. 417-8691334; springfieldlittletheatre.org Marshfield: “Forever Plaid,” presented by Marshfield Community Theatre, 3 p.m. Sunday, Marshfield Community Theatre, 420 S. Marshall St. Admission: $12; $6 youth. 417-501-5628; marshfieldtheatre.org/ Home.html

21 MONDAY EVENTS

Autumn Harvest Cookery with Chef Chadwick from Hy-Vee, 7 p.m. Monday, Library Center, 4653 S. Campbell Ave. Learn how to preserve herbs from your garden and receive simple fall recipes. Adults. FREE; registration required. 417-8820714; thelibrary.org Family Nutrition, 6 p.m. Monday, Jordan Valley Community Health Center, 440 E. Tampa St. FREE 417-829-4001, ext 114; habitatspringfieldmo.org Living with Diabetes, 6-7 p.m. Monday, Hy-Vee, 1720 W. Battlefield Road. FREE 417-881-1950 Monday Madness, 3:30 p.m. Monday, Midtown Carnegie Branch Library, 397 E. Central St. Stop by for games, crafts and activities. FREE Ages 2-6. 417862-0135; thelibrary.org Talk Time: Practice Your English, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Monday, Library Center, 4653 S. Campbell Ave. Adults. Community volunteers lead the informal sessions. FREE 417-882-0714; thelibrary.org

22 TUESDAY EVENTS

America’s Music: A Film History; Country and Bluegrass, 7 p.m. Tuesday, Plaster Student Union Theater, 1110 E. Madison St., campus of MSU. FREE 417836-5499 Battle School Paracord Bracelets, 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Library Center, 4653 S. Campbell Ave. Prepare for battle and the upcoming release of “Ender’s Game” by creating paracord bracelets. Materials provided. Grades 6-12. FREE 417-882-0714; thelibrary.org Farmers Market of the Ozarks, 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Tuesday and Sat-

urday, 4139 S. Nature Center Way, at the new year-round multi-use pavilion at Farmers Park. 417-766-8711; email: Lane@LoveYourFarmer.com; LoveYourFarmer.com Film screening of “A Place at the Table,” 6:30-8:30 p.m. Tuesday, Cox South, Foster Auditorium, 3801 S. National Ave. A documentary based on the lives of three families as they struggle to provide food for their loved ones. Admission is a donation of healthy shelf-stable foods. Christy Claybaker: 417-862-8962 ext. 2142; email: cclay baker@yourdowntownymca.org Friends of the Library Fall Book Sale, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Tuesday (continues through Sunday), Remington’s, 1655 W. Republic Road. FREE 417-865-6080 Greater Springfield Farmers’ Market, open 8 a.m.-noon Tuesday and Thursday, 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday, Battlefield Mall parking lot, 2825 S. Glenstone Ave. springfieldfarmersmarket .com; email: info@springfieldfarmersmarket.com

23 WEDNESDAY EVENTS

Genealogy Workshops, 9:30 a.m. Wednesday, Library Center, 4653 S. Campbell Ave. Adults. FREE 417-882-0714; thelibrary.org Friends of the Library Fall Book Sale, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Wednesday (continues through Sunday), Remington’s, 1655 W. Republic Road. FREE 417-8656080 Little Acorns: Bear Tales, 11-11:45 a.m. or 1:30-2:15 p.m. Wednesday, Springfield Conservation Nature Center, 4601 S. Nature Center Way. Ages 3-6. FREE; registration required. 417-888-4237 Succulent Society of the Ozarks, 7-8:30 p.m. Wednesday, Library Center, 4653 S. Campbell Ave. The topic will be “Growing Succulents Indoors in Pots.” FREE 417-882-9157 Tiny Tots Cooking, 3-3:45 p.m. Wednesday, Hy-Vee, 1720 W. Battlefield Road. Ages 3-4. Cost: $5. Register: 417-881-1950 Eureka Springs, Ark.: 66th annual Original Ozark Folk Festival, Wednesday (continues


NEWS LEADER § NEWS-LEADER.COM through Oct. 27. Features the Barefoot Ball, Queen’s Contest, a parade, arts and crafts, FREE music in Basin Spring Park and WoodSongs Old-Time Radio Hour in the historic Eureka Springs City Auditorium. Reserve seating: $35-$75. TheAuditorium.org; OzarkFolkFestival.com, WoodSongs.com

MUSIC

Jars of Clay, 8 p.m. Wednesday, Gillioz Theatre, 325 Park Central East. Tickets: $20-$50. 417-8639491; gillioztheatre.com

ONGOING FALL HAPPENINGS

Springfield:

» Bass Pro Shops Great Pumpkin Halloween Event: noon-5 p.m. Saturday-Sunday, Oct. 26-27 and weeknights, 5-8 p.m. Monda-Oct. 31, Bass Pro Shops Outdoor World, 1935 S. Campbell Ave. Activities include a FREE photo with life-size cutouts of Peanuts characters, coloring sheets, Halloween scavenger hunts, crafts, a Halloween costume parade and trick-or-treating 6-7 p.m. Oct. 21-31. Event schedule: basspro.com/halloween » Fall Fest at Rutledge-Wilson Farm Park, 3825 W. Farm Road 146. Fall-themed activities include a corn maze, pumpkin patch, cow train, demonstrations, performances. Hours: 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday; noon-6 p.m. Sunday, through Oct. 27. FREE; some activities have a small fee. 417-837-5949 » Haunted Trail, includes hayride to trail entrance, open 6-10 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, through Oct. 27, Rutledge-Wilson Farm Park, 3825 W. Farm Road 146. Admission is $5; ages 12 and younger must be accompanied by an adult. Pumpkin Patch and Corn Maze will be open during Haunted Trail hours. 417-837-5949; parkboard.org » Halloween Spooktacular, featuring hundreds of handcarved jack-o’-lanterns, 6:30-9 p.m. Saturday-Oct. 31, Dickerson Park Zoo, 1401 W. Norton Road. Children ages 12 and younger will receive candy treats. Children are encouraged to wear costumes, but it is not required. Also includes Monster Mash dance party and a vintage carnival. Admission: $7 for everyone age 2 and older. Discounted advance tickets available mid-October at Simmons First National Bank and Springfield-area McDonald’s. 417-864-1800; dickerson

parkzoo.org; parkboard.org » Halloween Train Rides, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday-Sunday, Oct. 26-27, 1100 N. Airport Blvd. FREE admission and parking. 417-866-6359; joplin springfieldrailway.com » Hotel of Terror, 334 N. Main St., Hours: 7-11:30 p.m. SundayThursday; 7 p.m.-1:30 a.m. FridaySaturday and Halloween. Hotel may close one hour early depending on attendance. Admission: $11 Sunday-Thursday; $13 Friday-Saturday. 417-863-9640; hotelofterror.com Branson: » McKenna’s Pumpkin Patch, open through Nov. 2, 3265 Missouri F. Hours: 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Tuesdays-Thursdays; 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Fridays-Saturdays; and 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Sundays. Admission: $6.50, $3 for 66 and older, FREE for ages 2 and younger. Group rates available. Admission includes hayride, play area, big bale hay maze, pony swings, tricycle race track, corn box, baby farm animals, slides, 2-acre corn maze, pumpkin bounce house, face painting and rubber ducky races. 417-593-3159 » Silver Dollar City’s National Harvest Festival, continues through Oct. 26, Silver Dollar City, 399 Silver Dollar City Parkway. More than 125 craftspeople and artists from across the country will demonstrate their skills including Best of Missouri juried artists and art show. Features Western stunt show, music, Texas Trick Riders. Tickets and information: 800-831-4386; silverdollarcity.com Chadwick: Chadwick Haunted Hills, 7 p.m.-midnight FridaySaturday, Oct. 25-26 and Oct. 31, Missouri 125 South. Admission is $5; FREE for ages 3 and younger. A hayride and concessions will be available. All proceeds will go to Project Graduation. 417-2994190; 417-880-6211 Clever: » Campbell’s Maze Daze, 177 Carob Road. The maze is open Friday-Sunday through Nov. 3; reservations for groups are available. Activities include a a 4-acre corn maze, a haunted maze, a pumpkin patch, hayrides, pumpkin painting, scavenger hunt, live entertainment. Ages 12 and younger must be accompanied by an adult. For specific hours, pricing and special rates: 417-830-0243; email: info@campbellsmazedaze.com

10.17.2013 Weekend » The Deadly Dungeons Haunted House, 302 S. Clarke Ave. Hours: 7 p.m. Friday-Saturday, Oct. 25-26 and Oct. 30Nov. 2. Admission: $10, ages 7 and younger FREE with paying adult. 417-743-3323. the-deadlydungeons.com Conway: Gunter Farms 11-acre Corn Maze and Pumpkin Patch. Hours: 6-9 p.m. Friday, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Saturday, 1-6 p.m. Sunday through Oct. 31. Weekdays and evening by reservation. Admission: $6, FREE for ages 2 and younger. Admission includes all games, mazes and hayride to the pumpkin patch. 417-5896845; gunterfarm.com Exeter: Exeter Corn Maze and Pumpkin Patch, with activities through Nov. 3, 20803 Farm Road 1057, Missouri MM. Hours and pricing: 417-846-3959; exetercornmaze.com Joplin: Twisted Forest, 601 Reddings Road. Hours: 7 a.m.midnight Friday-Saturday and Halloween through Nov. 2. Admission: $15. 417-208-9508; thetwistedforest.com Lebanon: Ozark Nightmares Haunted House, 22599 E. Missouri 32. Hours: 7-11 p.m. FridaySaturday and Halloween through Nov. 2. Admission: $7.50. 417-5321002; ozarknightmares.com Marshfield: Hampton’s Greenhouse, Pumpkin Patch & Corn Maze, 6817 Missouri 38 West. Hours: 6-9 p.m. Friday; 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Saturday, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Sunday through Nov. 2; special hours during holidays and group trips. Admission: $7.50; $6 for ages 3-11; FREE for ages 2 and younger; $6 for senior citizens. Activities: campfire for roasting hot dogs and marshmallows, hayrides, pumpkins, scarecrow contest, concessions, cow train, corn maze; no haunted maze. 417-859-4855; email: hamptongreenhouse@ centurylink.net Nixa: McCauley’s Haunted Woods, 7-11 p.m. Friday-Saturday, Oct. 25-26, 31, Nov. 1-2, across from 1017 E. North St. Half-mile of trails through the woods. Nightly scary movie on outdoor screen included. Admission: $13; $10 for groups of 12 or more. 417-379-4828; mccauleyshauntedwoods.com Ozark: » Civil War Lantern Light Tour, 7 p.m., Saturday and Oct. 26, Smallin Civil War Cave, 3575 N. Smallin Road. Admission: $29.95.

17

417-551-4545; smallincave.com » The OC’s Forest Fun-Tacular! 5:30-8:30 p.m. Friday-Saturday, Oct. 25-26, The Ozark Community Center, 1530 W. Jackson St. Features safe trick-or-treating, carnival games, storytelling, kid-friendly movie, concessions. Admission: Trick or Treat Forest is $4; includes safe trick-or-treating, storyteller/fire-pit, outdoor movie, plus one 50 cent carnival game ticket. 417-581-7002; ozarkmissouri.com Pleasant Hope: Haunted Forest, 8996 N. Farm Road 149.Open: Friday-Saturday, Oct. 24-26, 29-31, Nov 1-2. Hours: 7-10 p.m. weeknights, 7-10:30 p.m. Friday-Saturday. Admission: $13. 417-833-9467; hauntedforestmo.com Rolla: Haunted Mine Tours, 6-11:30 p.m. Friday-Saturday, Oct. 25-26 and 5-10 p.m. Oct. 31, Bridge School Road. Tickets: $10; $8 for ages 10 and younger; S&T students and military (both with valid IDs). Small children may visit from 5-6 p.m. Friday-Saturday and Oct. 25-26. Admission is $5. A $2 discount will be given to each

See GUIDE, Page 18

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Guide Continued from Page 17 person who brings three canned goods to be donated to the Russell House. Info: email klptg6@mst.edu; 573-341-4753 Verona: The MAiZE, 23298 Lawrence 1150. Hours: 5-8:30 p.m. Wednesday; 5-10 p.m. Friday; noon-10 p.m. Saturday through Nov. 2; field trips by appointment. Features corn maze, hayrides, haunted maze, general store, petting zoo. Proceeds benefit GRIP Boys Home of Verona. Admission: $8, $4 for ages 5-11, FREE for ages 4 and younger and veterans with ID, group rates available. gripboys home.com, themaize.com for details. Eureka Springs, Ark.: Fifth annual Voices from Eureka’s Silent City cemetery walking tours, presented by The Eureka Springs Historical Museum, 5:30 p.m., ending at 8:30 p.m.; FridaySaturday, Oct. 25-26. The living history tours feature live actors telling stories of early citizens of Eureka Springs. Tickets: $10; $5 for ages 12 and younger. Tickets may be purchased at the Chamber of Commerce, Cornerstone Banks or the museum downtown at 95 S. Main St. FREE parking and shuttle service will be provided at the former Victoria Inn parking lot, Ark. 62 East. 479253-9417; eurekaspringshistoricalmuseum.org; email: info@eurekaspringshistoricalmuseum.org

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movieguide

NEWS LEADER NEWS-LEADER.COM §

review: “The Fifth Estate”

ee 1⁄2

(out of a four-star rating)

Movies are listed below with runtime, four-star grade based on reviews from wire services, its MPAA rating, the rating, a summary and where it’s playing.

NEW IN TOWN “BLUE CAPRICE” 93 minutes • eee • R for violence • Isaiah Washington, Joey Lauren Adams, Tequan Richmond, Tim Blake Nelson • Based on the 2002 Beltway sniper attacks • Moxie Cinema “CARRIE” 99 minutes • Not reviewed • R for bloody violence • Chloë Grace Moretz, Julianne Moore, Gabriella Wilde • A retelling of the classic horror story • Springfield 11, B&B Theatres, Branson Meadows

Daniel Brühl portrays WikiLeaks associate Daniel Domscheit-Berg in a scene from “The Fifth Estate.” DREAMWORKS PICTURES

A missed opportunity brilliant film about Jeff Leaks,” Alex Gibney’s Zuckerberg and the disexhaustive, entertaining puted founding of Facetake on the subject. But Condon chooses to book. “The Fifth Estate” The story of WikiLeaks doesn’t match that film’s focus more on Assange, is fascinating; the telling ambition or execution. which is not a fatal flaw, of it in “The Fifth Estate” And what of Wikibecause Benedict Cumbersomewhat less so. Leaks? Some argue that it Bill Condon’s film traces batch plays him with an oddball intensity perfectly is a bold new developthe online organization from its roots inside Julian suitable to the subject. Yet ment in free speech. Othinstead of delving into the ers argue that it is a danAssange’s curious head to the point when WikiLeaks, moral questions WikiLeaks gerous dumping ground where everything is fair asks by its very existence, the New York Times, the game to be published for Condon gives those a Guardian of London and passing nod in a couple of the world to see. It’s a Der Spiegel in Germany fascinating question, and published, simultaneously, weak subplots. an important one, and Instead, he focuses war logs from Iraq and one that “The Fifth Esmore on Assange and his Afghanistan and 250,000 tate” gives too little attenrelationship with Daniel U.S. diplomatic cables. tion. Along the way there were Berg (Daniel Bruhl), the German computer whiz plenty of other leaks and who would go from adorlots of interpersonal draing fanboy to disillusioned “The Fifth Estate,” a Touchma, most of it stemming cynic. from Assange’s ego. stone Pictures release, is The obvious antecedPretty good stuff, as rated R for language and you can learn in “We Steal ent here is “The Social some violence. Running time: Secrets: The Story of Wiki- Network,” David Fincher’s 128 minutes By Bill Goodykoontz GANNETT CHIEF FILM CRITIC

“ESCAPE PLAN” • 116 minutes • Not reviewed • R for violence and language • Sylvester Stallone, Arnold Schwarzenegger, 50 Cent • A structural-security authority is set up and incarcerated in the world’s most secure prison. • Springfield 11, B&B Theatres, Branson Meadows “THE FIFTH ESTATE” 128 minutes • eeg • Benedict Cumberbatch, Daniel Brühl, Carice van Houten • A thriller based on real events that reveals the quest to expose the corruptions of power that turned WikiLeaks into a fiercely debated organization. • Springfield 11, B&B Theatres, Branson Meadows “I’M IN LOVE WITH A CHURCH GIRL” Not reviewed • PG Michael Madsen, Stephen Baldwin, Adrienne Bailon • A retired drug trafficker falls for a girl who is his exact opposite • Campbell 16

RETURNING

success and the opening of his musical on Broadway • Friday at Moxie Cinema “TUCKER & DALE vs EVIL” 89 minutes • Not reviewed • R for bloody horror violence • Tyler Labine, Alan Tudyk, Katrina Bowden • Two guys are attacked by a group of college kids while on vacation at a mountain cabin • 9:30 p.m. and midnight Friday and Saturday, Palace Theatre

STILL SHOWING “2 GUNS” 109 minutes • ee • R for violence • Denzel Washington, Mark Wahlberg, Paula Patton • A DEA agent and a naval intelligence officer are on the run following a botched attempt to infiltrate a drug cartel. • Palace Theatre “AUSTENLAND,” 97 minutes • eg • PG-13 for thematic content • Bret McKenzie, Georgia King, James Callis, Jane Seymour • A woman obsessed with all things Jane Austen spends her life savings to spend time at a resort that caters to like-minded women. • Moxie Cinema “CAPTAIN PHILLIPS” 134 minutes • eee • PG-13 for sustained intense sequences of menace • Tom Hanks, Barkhad Abdi, Barkhad Abdirahman • Based on the true story of the first American cargo ship to be hijacked in more than 200 years. • Campbell 16, Springfield 11, B&B Theatres, Elite Cinema III

SPECIAL

“CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS 2” 95 minutes • eee • PG for mild rude humor • Bill Hader, Anna Faris, Will Forte • Flint is forced to leave his post when he learns that his infamous machine is malfunctioning. • Campbell 16, Springfield 11, B&B Theatres, Branson Meadows

“BROADWAY IDIOT” 80 minutes • Not reviewed • Not rated • Billie Joe Armstrong, Michael Mayer, John Gallagher • The story of Green Day’s rise to fame and

“ENOUGH SAID” 91 minutes • eeeg • PG-13 for thematic content • James Gandolfini, Julia Louis-Dreyfus • A single parent begins a new romance with a

“RIDDICK” 119 minutes • ee • R for strong violence • Vin Diesel, Karl Urban, Katee Sackhoff. Riddick must fight an alien race of predators • Palace Theatre


NEWS LEADER § NEWS-LEADER.COM WHAT DO MOVIE RATINGS MEAN? Campbell 16 890-8457

G

Branson Meadows 332-2884

10.17.2013 Weekend OK for general audiences

PG

Branson’s IMAX 800-419-4832

Parental guidance suggested

PG-13

Elite Cinema III, Branson 800-419-4832

Hollywood Theaters 799-3456

Parents strongly cautioned; some material unsuitable for children younger than 13

Moxie 429-0800

Owen Drive-In, Seymour 935-2232

Chloe Moretz appears in a scene from the new remake of the classic horror film “Carrie,” which opens in theaters this week. METRO GOLDWYN MAYER PICTURES/SCREEN GEMS

client • Moxie Cinema “THE FAMILY” 111 minutes • eeg • R for violence • Robert De Niro, Michelle Pfeiffer, Dianna Agron • A mafia family is relocated to France under the witness protection program • Branson Meadows “GRACE UNPLUGGED” Not reviewed • PG for thematic elements • AJ Michalka, Kelly Thiebaud, James Denton • A Christian teen singer gets her big break and must deal with the realities of the music industry • Campbell 16, Springfield 11 “GRAVITY” 90 minutes • eeee • PG-13 for intense perilous sequences • Sandra Bullock, George Clooney, Ed Harris • A medical engineer and an astronaut must work together after an accident leaves them adrift in space. • Campbell 16, Springfield 11, B&B Theatres, Branson Meadows, Elite Cinema III and IMAX GROWN UPS 2” 101 minutes • e • PG-13 for some violence • Adam Sandler, Kevin James, Chris Rock • After moving his family back to his hometown to be with his friends and their kids, Lenny finds out that sometimes crazy follows. • Palace Theatre “THE HEAT” 117 minutes • eeg

• R for pervasive language and strong crude content • Sandra Bullock, Melissa McCarthy • A special agent is paired with a Boston cop to rein in a drug lord • Palace Theatre IMAX FILMS: “OZARKS LEGACY AND LEGENDS” • “GRAND CANYON: THE HIDDEN SECRETS” • “ROCKY MOUNTAIN EXPRESS” “FLIGHT OF THE BUTTERFLIES” • IMAX “INSIDIOUS: CHAPTER 2” • 104 minutes • eg • PG-13 for intense sequences of terror and violence • Patrick Wilson, Rose Byrne, Barbara Hershey • A haunted family attempts to uncover the mysterious childhood secret that has left them connected to the spirit world. • Campbell 16, Branson Meadows “LEE DANIELS’ THE BUTLER” 132 minutes • eeeg • PG-13 for some violence and disturbing images • Forest Whitaker, David Oyelowo, Lenny Kravitz • An African-American’s eyewitness accounts of notable events during his post as a White House butler. • Branson Meadows “MACHETE KILLS” 107 minutes • Not reviewed • R for strong bloody violence • Danny Trejo, Alexa Vega, Mel Gibson • The U.S. government recruits a killer to take down a Mexican arms

dealer • Campbell 16, Springfield 11, B&B Theatres, Branson Meadows “MONSTERS UNIVERSITY” 110 minutes • eee • G • Billy Crystal, John Goodman, Steve Buscemi • In this animated tale, Mike and Sully reflect on their college days • Palace Theatre “PERCY JACKSON: SEA OF MONSTERS” 106 minutes • eg • PG for fantasy action violence • Logan Lerman, Alexandra Daddario, Nathan Fillion • The son of Poseidon and his friends set out to stop an ancient evil from destroying their safe haven • Palace Theatre “PRISONERS” 153 minutes • eeeg • R for disturbing violent content • Hugh Jackman, Jake Gyllenhaal, Viola Davis • A father takes matters into his own hands when his daughter and her friend go missing • Campbell 16, Springfield 11, Branson Meadows “RED 2” 116 minutes • ee • PG-13 for pervasive action and violence • Bruce Willis, John Malkovich, Helen Mirren • Retired CIA agent Frank Moses reunites his team to track down a missing nuclear device • Palace Theatre “RUNNER RUNNER” • 91 min-

R

Restricted; 17 and younger admitted with parent/guardian

utes • ee • R for language and some sexual content • Ben Affleck, Justin Timberlake, Gemma Arterton • A college student must face off with a entrepreneur he thinks cheated him while playing online poker • Campbell 16, Springfield 11, B&B Theatres “RUSH” 123 minutes • eeee • R for sexual content • Daniel Brühl, Chris Hemsworth, Olivia Wilde • A re-creation of the 1970s rivalry between Formula One rivals James Hunt and Niki Lauda. • Campbell 16, Springfield 11, Elite Cinema III “THE SMURFS 2” 105 minutes • eg • PG for rude humor • Hank Azaria, Neil Patrick Harris, Jayma Mays • The Smurfs band together with their human friends to rescue Smurfette, a victim of kidnapping. • Palace Theatre “TURBO” 96 minutes • ee • PG for mild action • voices of Ryan Reynolds, Paul Giamatti, Maya Rudolph • An animated tale about a snail who achieves his dream. • Palace Theatre “WE’RE THE MILLERS” 110 minutes • eg • R for crude sexual content • Jennifer Aniston, Emma Roberts, Jason Sudeikis, Will Poulter • A pot dealer creates a fake family in order to move his product to Mexico. • Campbell 16, Branson Meadows

Ozark/Nixa 12 339-0081

NC-17 The Palace 875-6200

new dvds “PACIFIC RIM” (Blu-ray + DVD + Ultraviolet). Warner Home Video ($35.99) Rated: PG-13, intense science fiction action and violence, language The lowdown: This paean to the Japanese monster movies of the late 1950s, 1960s and ’70s was the most delightful feature of the summer. The film plays like a giant version of Rock ’Em Sock ’Em Robots. But instead of fighting each other, these robots are battling titanic creatures from the depth of the Earth. A majority of critics enjoyed the film, giving it a 72 percent rating at Rottentomatoes.com. Don’t miss: The extras include a commentary track with director Guillermo del Toro, a prologue by del Toro, and hours of behind-thescenes and making-of extras that cover every aspect of the production. Also included is a Shatterdome database and deleted scenes. Score: ★ ★ ★g “THE HEAT” (Blu-ray + DVD + Ultraviolet). Fox Home Entertainment ($39.99)

19

No children younger than 17 admitted

Springfield 11 882-7469

Rated: R, violence, language The lowdown: Sandra Bullock and Melissa McCarthy star in this action comedy about an FBI agent (Bullock) and a Boston cop (McCarthy) who team up to bring down a drug lord. Critics warmly greeted the film, giving it a 65 percent positive rating on the tomatometer. Don’t miss: Extras include deleted, alternate and extended scenes, a blooper reel and a commentary track. Score: ★ ★ ★

“SHREK THE MUSICAL” (Blu-ray + DVD + Ultraviolet). DreamWorks-Fox Home Entertainment ($29.99) Rated: Not rated The lowdown: You’ve seen the movies; now enjoy this filmed presentation of the Broadway production featuring 17 songs and loads of laughs. The story is basically the same as Shrek, the ogre, goes to rescue Fiona so he can save his swamp. Don’t miss: Extras include a featurette on bringing the story to the stage and a singalong option. Score: ★ ★ ★g

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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2013 § SPRINGFIELD, MISSOURI § NEWS-LEADER.COM § A GANNETT COMPANY

Documents: Teen killed during sex Anthony Balbirnie charged in girl’s death

By Jess Rollins JROLLINS@NEWS-LEADER.COM

More than a year after 15year-old Khighla Parks ran away from her home near Willard and was later found dead, a man long suspected of being involved in her disappearance has been accused of killing her during sex. According to the documents, Anthony Balbirnie took Parks

dangering the welfrom Greene Counfare of a child, tamty on Sept. 21, 2012, pering with to an address in physical evidence Buffalo “to engage and abandonment in asphyxiation sex of a corpse, accordwith the child.” ing to documents Balbirnie, 48, filed Monday in was charged by a Benton County special prosecutor Khighla Anthony court. with second-de- Parks Balbirnie The documents gree murder, statutory rape, child molestation, en- allege Balbirnie “inflicted seri-

ous physical injury” during the sexual crimes. One definition of second-degree murder is when someone kills another person while committing or attempting to commit a felony crime. Parks died from her supply of air being cut off, according to the documents. Afterward, prosecutors say, See CHARGED, Page 5A

Body of soldier back in Ozarks Funeral is Saturday for Joseph M. Peters, killed in Afghanistan News-Leader Staff

Terry Crocker empties walnuts into a bucket last week at Phelps Grove Park. She and her husband, Shaun Crocker, use the money they earn collecting black walnuts each year to buy Christmas presents. VALERIE MOSLEY/NEWS-LEADER

Tradition pays by the pound

A soldier killed in battle is finally home in Springfield. The body of Sgt. Joseph M. Peters arrived in Springfield on Wednesday. Peters, 24, of Springfield was a soldier in the U.S. Army serving in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. He died Oct. 6 while serving his country Joseph M. in Kandahar Province, Af- Peters ghanistan. Visitation is planned for 5-8 p.m. Friday at Greenlawn Funeral Home on East Seminole Street. A funeral service with full military honors is set for noon Saturday at Missouri Veterans Cemetery on South SouthSee SOLDIER, Page 5A

Sierra Club, CU disagree on ash risk

Ozarkers pick up extra money by collecting black walnuts

T

erry Crocker’s mother — Jearldean Shelton — was proud of her black walnut trees. Every fall, as a child, Terry would collect the green globes off the ground for her mom, spread the nuts out on the driveway and crack them open with a hammer. Her mom used the nuts to Ozarks Life make “homemade fudge and awesome fruit salads” throughout the year. But the tradition was short lived. Jearldean passed away when Terry was only 13. “Nothing ever tastes as good as mama’s cooking. She’ll have to cook for me when I get Juliana to heaven,” Terry said, on a GOODWIN crisp autumn morning, while she collected black walnuts in Phelps Grove Park. Many people in the Ozarks remember collecting — or still collect — black walnuts. Amie Breshears, a mother of three, picked the nuts with her parents. Her grandparents in Marshfield picked for years and would throw the nuts out in the driveway and run

Equipment failure Tuesday led to accidental release of fly ash By Amos Bridges ABRIDGES@NEWS-LEADER.COM

Shaun Crocker empties a bucket of walnuts into his truck. He and his wife, Terry Crocker, have been harvesting black walnuts for years from city parks and from the yards of residents who ask them to. VALERIE MOSLEY/NEWS-LEADER

WANT TO COLLECT? Black walnut season is here, and Hammons Products is paying $13 per 100 hulled pounds. Buying will continue at all locations through Nov. 4, and some locations after that. To find a hulling station and its hours, go to www.black-walnuts.com or call 1-888-4BW-NUTS.

See GOODWIN, Page 4A

MORE ONLINE » Scan the code at right to watch a video that goes with this story » See a photo gallery at News-Leader.com

City Utilities says the cloud of ash that escaped from the John Twitty Energy Center on Tuesday posed no threat to residents or the environment, but the state chapter of the Sierra Club is crying foul. The ash, a byproduct of burning coal, typically is captured by special equipment at the power plant. That equipment failed Tuesday, allowing a cloud of the powdery stuff to billow from the plant, coating cars, homes and lawns as far as three miles away. CU reported the malfunction to the Missouri Department of Natural Resources, which is expected to investigate the release. But CU spokesman Joel AlexSee ASH, Page 5A

Index VOL. 123, NO. 297 ©2011, NEWS-LEADER

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4A Thursday, October 24, 2013 K1

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A Hammons family affair Stockton company is world’s largest black walnut processor By Juliana Goodwin JLGOODWIN@NEWS-LEADER.COM

Year after year, more black walnuts are hulled in Greene County than any other county in the nation. The nuts grow wild across the Midwest. For many families, harvesting is a tradition, said Brian Hammons, president of Hammons Products. Black walnuts are a way of life for Hammons. His grandfather, Ralph Hammons, founded the company in 1946. It has become the world’s leading commercial processor of black walnuts. Ralph owned a grocery store in Stockton. After World War II, he bought a nutcracker and 100,000 pounds of nuts. “He envisioned a bigger business and an opportunity to buy black walnuts,” said Brian Hammons. At that time, Ralph packaged the nuts under the “Missouri Dandy” brand. It’s been a family affair ever since (Ralph eventually sold the grocery store, and the name changed to Hammons Products in 1991). Ralph’s son Dwain joined the business in the1950s while still in college at what is now Missouri State University and led its growth until he retired in 1999. Dwain’s son Brian is now the thirdgeneration leader, and there may be a fourth generation in the wings. “I hate to put pressure on anybody, but I do have a son who is involved in our brand: David Hammons, he’s our vice president of marketing. But again, just as my dad really wanted me to do what I wanted to do, I want him to do what he wants to do,” said Brian. The nuts are cleaned, cracked and processed at the plant in Stockton (part of the building goes back to Ralph’s days). The processed nuts are sold to grocery stores around the country. Other parts of the nut are sold, too: Hammons grinds the shells and sells the ground shell for abrasive cleaning, cosmetics, oil filtration, gun casing polishing, and more; the dark nutmeats or meal that are not fit for human consumption are sold for animal feed. Hammons Products shells more than 25 million pounds of nuts in 220 hulling

Pictured are Dwain Hammons, founder Ralph Hammons and Clarence Cavender. They were making predictions about the black walnut harvest season in the late 1950s. SUBMITTED PHOTO

This photo was taken in 1981 and features Hammons family members and employees. They are standing on top of the nut harvest. SUBMITTED PHOTO

sites in 12 states. Greene County accounts for more than 1 million pounds each year. The national demand for black walnuts, once consumed only in the Midwest, is increasing. Eventually, Brian would like to see black walnut orchards to keep up with demand and help level off big dips in supply, which happened last year. “Whenever there is drought it impacts wild trees, maybe more than orchard trees where you are able to irrigate. Still, it is an agricultural product and it is always subject to the weather,” Hammons said. “We pray a lot.”

Goodwin Continued from Page 1A

them over with the car. Sometimes, Breshears, who lives in Warsaw now, used money from the nuts for Christmas gifts. “I remember being in the Bolivar Walmart with my dad and going through and picking a little kitchen sink thing with a stove on top. We got plastic food that went with it. That is a neat memory. I remember thinking it was the greatest day of my life because we had money and we had helped pick up walnuts,” Breshears said. Every October, the nuts rain down on city parks, farms and neighborhoods. Some people find the nuts a nuisance; some collect enough for their holiday baking; others see them as an opportunity. “It’s like money that grows on trees,” said Shaun Crocker, Terry’s husband, who collects black walnuts with her. “This looks like a Shaun good year.” Crocker

Money for Christmas This is supposed to be a good harvest, and Stockton-based Hammons Products — the world’s leading commercial processor of the nuts — is paying $13 per 100 hulled pounds. The busiest Greene County hulling station is located at the Ozark Empire Fairgrounds North Gate (there are more black walnuts hulled in Greene County than any county in the nation). Already this year, the Crockers have collected more than 5,200 pounds. They are so well known that when they approach the hulling station, the “huller” starts writing the check, said Terry. In their worst year, they made $400; in their best, they pulled in $1,400. For 2013, they’ve surpassed last year’s earnings, Terry but 2012 was a bad year. Crocker They work through the wind and rain because that’s when the black walnuts get knocked off the trees. And if they don’t collect, then other harvesters will. They start at the city parks, which are first come, first served, said Shaun. “If I see someone picking nuts over here, it’s common courtesy to go over there,” said Shaun, after he dumped another bucket of nuts in the back of his pickup truck. The heavier the load, the more the tires sink down. As the season goes on, the price paid for the nuts can drop, so it’s best to get in as early as possible, the Crockers said. Brian Hammons, president of Hammons Products, said the price is not expected to change any time soon. “So people who pick up this weekend

Terry Crocker uses a Nut Wizard, a special tool, to collect walnuts at Phelps Grove Park. As a child, she picked up the nuts by hand and cracked them open with a hammer. VALERIE MOSLEY/NEWS-LEADER

should be pleased. I’d still encourage folks to get them in as soon as they can after they’re picked up — that’s when they’re the best quality and weight,” he said. “... I think this week will be the peak time for harvesting, and next week will be strong too.” While the Crockers started off collecting in parks, over the years, they’ve cultivated clients. Realtors will call when there’s a house for sale and the nuts are falling in the yard; lawn services ask them to collect nuts before a mowing job; elderly people who are afraid of tripping on the nuts ask for help; and random people stop them, too. “I had a gal the other day who said, ‘You have to come get my nuts.’ People just want someone to haul them off,” said Shaun. Shaun and Terry count on the annual harvest to buy Christmas gifts for their three children, seven grandchildren and one great-grandchild. “There wouldn’t be Christmas in our home without it. We’re on a fixed income and the government doesn’t give us more for Christmas,” said Terry. “This is the only time we get extra income.” While both of them collected black walnuts when they were children, the Crockers started collecting together nearly a decade ago, after Terry had a heart attack. She weighed 220 pounds. Both obese at that time, they started walking constantly and getting outdoors. They saw this as a way to keep fit in addition to earning extra money. “We get a lot of good exercise doing this,” she said. They use a Nut Wizard — a contraption that resembles a broom with a round wire net — and sweep it along the grass. The nuts roll up into the Wizard as the Crockers move across the lawn. They’ve come to know the parks around Springfield and venture out to other cities, too. At Phelps Grove Park on this morning, they end at the “money tree,” which was full of nuts, said Shaun. One year, they made a killing on this tree, which is why they call it the money tree. But this year, it’s holding on to a lot of its nuts. Still, they manage to fill a couple of buckets before moving on. They’ll be back.

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NEWS LEADER Thursday October 24, 2013

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Officer tells of alcohol, meth, kids Mom accused of endangering daughters By Jess Rollins JROLLINS@NEWS-LEADER.COM

When he was dispatched to a rental property early Tuesday, Springfield narcotics officer Chris Rasmussen had already worked about 100 meth labs. An anonymous tipster said several people were manufacturing meth in the vacant house on Mount Vernon Street. Two young girls were there, too. Officers had already arrested nine people by the time Rasmussen arrived. He and another officer donned

protective gear and entered the house where the girls, ages 4 and 6, had just been removed. What they found and what they were told provide a peephole into a dangerous problem facing Missouri children that police in Springfield have been highlighting for years. The house was “very dirty,” Rasmussen noted in court documents. He could smell a strong chemical odor — like that of a meth lab — piercing his respirator mask. On the first floor, he noticed a crib. On the floor next to the crib was a mostly empty can of Enfamil powdered baby formula.

Inside the crib, the documents say, was an opened cold pack. After six years in the narcotics section, Rasmussen has learned that meth cooks often use ammonium nitrate found in cold packs. In a large room on the second floor, the officer said he found several 2liter bottles and rubber tubing. Used coffee filters were on top of a dresser, along with unused syringes and plastic bags filled with an unknown clear liquid, the documents say. Many items were peppered with a granular blue residue. Rasmussen said he used a field kit to test the stuff — positive for methamphetamine, he noted. He opened another bag to test the

contents, but smoke began to roll out. He backed off and had all of the suspected meth-making material safely removed from the house. Then Rasmussen went to the Greene County Jail, where the nine people found in the home were being held. The young girls had been taken to stay with their grandmother. Rasmussen wrote in court documents what he said he learned at the jail. Ronald Hubbard, a 44-year-old homeless man, told the officer that he had been staying at the house — without permission — for a few days. Hubbard said that on Monday afternoon, he was asked by Megan CaldSee REPORT, Page 2B

Ronald Hubbard

Megan Caldwell

Man charged with assault, home burglary Witness tells police she threw knife at intruder’s head By Stephen Herzog SHERZOG@NEWS-LEADER.COM

Police say a Springfield man broke into a home late Monday evening looking for a woman and assaulted people there. Tyler A. Cockrum, 22, was arrested just after midnight Tuesday after inhabitants of the West Florida Street home restrained him following the incident, police said. According to a probable cause statement, those inside the home and neighbors heard Cockrum outside threatening to “kill everyone inside.” Police say Cockrum broke part of the door and tried to squeeze through the opening. One witness told police she threw a knife at Cockrum’s head while he was partially through the door, causing his head to bleed. According to the statement, a resident of the home told police her door started to break, so she retreated to her bedroom. She said she heard people yelling, then saw Cock-

ent stores at departm ITTED PHOTO s u la C ta g San . SUBM ren visitin as exhibit ne of child a museum Christm o is th e k hs li t for Photograp r’s are being sough e e H s a ch su

Haul out photos of downtown Santa visits for exhibit News-Leader Staff

T

County health officials report hike in flu cases Local residents urged to get vaccinated fort continues today. The mobile clinics will not be open to the public, The Springfield-Greene but the coalition believes County Health Department this effort will lessen the efsaw an increase in flu cases fects of seasonal flu at this week, with 12 con- large, according to the release. Last year the rolling firmed cases. The health department is flu clinics administered about 150 shots, urging citizens to the release get immunized ONLINE said. now. Information For more The Flu Cocan be found on the information on alition is a longdepartment’s immunizations, go website. to News-Leader.com standing partnership that inIn a news re- or http://health. cludes Coxlease, the health springfieldmo.gov/ Health, the department said flu. Greene County the Springfield Flu Immunization Coalition is Medical Society, Jordan organizing a “rolling flu Valley Community Health clinic” that will administer Center, Mercy Springfield, flu vaccine to employees of Ozarks Community Hospirestaurants and hotels tal and the Springfieldalong Glenstone Avenue, Greene County Health Deone of the most highly con- partment, as well the nurscentrated commercial ing colleges associated with streets in the city. The ef- both Cox and Mercy. By Jess Rollins

JROLLINS@NEWS-LEADER.COM

The History M us in holiday phot eum on the Square is intere sted os like this. SU BMITTED PHOT O

he History Museum on the Square is soliciting old photos taken with Santa at Heer’s or other department stores that once were in downtown Springfield for an upcoming exhibit. Anyone with photos is encouraged to email or bring them to the museum before Nov. 15, according to a news release.

rum try to enter her bedroom with a large knife. Police say the knife broke when Cockrum tried to stab the door. Tyler A. Police say Cockrum Cockrum punched two men who tried to intervene before several people were able to hold Cockrum to the floor until police arrived. According to the probable cause statement, Cockrum refused to talk to police about the break-in after his arrest. He said he didn’t remember anything because he was drunk, according to the statement. Witnesses told police that Cockrum was looking for an ex-girlfriend because she was at the home with another man, according to the statement. Prosecutors requested a $25,000 bond for Cockrum, citing a history of failing to appear for court dates. Prosecutors say Cockrum has a prior conviction for possession of a controlled substance. Cockrum has been charged with burglary, unlawful use of a weapon and misdemeanor assault.

The photos will be displayed in the museum from Thanksgiving until New Year’s Day. “There are already three dozen in the archives from the ’50s and ’60s, and we would like to be able to display at least two hundred images for Christmas time in the exhibit,” Executive

Director John Sellars said in the release. Digital photos sent by email should be scanned at 300 dpi or above and sent to john@history museumonthesquare.org. Appointments can be made to scan photos at the museum office by calling 417-831-1976.

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SECTION C | THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2013

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Youth versus experience A fishing trip for walleye and white bass at Stockton Lake turned into a battle for the ages, with two young whippersnappers getting a lesson in angling skills from their fathers. Hunting/fishing writer Ken White explains who won on Page 2C.

News-Leader.com/Outdoors

OUTDOORS ONLINE

GALLERIES: Find lots of reader and staff photos VIDEOS: Learn more with a selection of video reports RESOURCES: What to do, where to go in the Ozarks

Jason Bogema, with son Noah in front, paddles a quiet stretch of the James River Water Trail on a sunny fall afternoon last week. WES JOHNSON/NEWS-LEADER

Water trail journey I ’ve zoomed across the U.S. 65 bridge over the James River/Lake Springfield many times, often catching glimpses of paddlers slicing quiet wakes across the calm water below. Two weeks ago, as the sun dipped below the trees and evening chill set in, I obWes served two kayJOHNSON akers paddling through curtains of mist rising from water that was slowly yielding its share of summer

Nearby 6-mile river path offers escape from pace of city life

WATCH Scan this code to see a video about paddling the James River Water Trail

GALLERY The Iron Bridge crosses the James River where it meets and becomes Lake Springfield. WES JOHNSON/NEWS-LEADER Left: Turtles soak up sun against a backdrop of leaves turned red by a recent evening chill. WES JOHNSON/NEWS-LEADER

See JOHNSON, Page 5C

See more photos of the James River Water Trail at www.newsleader.com

[ I LOVE ]

First-time trek reveals the beauty, risks of Arkansas trails

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photograph can attempt to capture the beauty of Arkansas’ hillsides decorated with the colors of autumn. But as I stood on the rugged platform of Hawksbill Crag, I knew a picture wouldn’t Katie capture all LAMB of the senses that are brought to life. Although I have fished the Buffalo and White rivers, I had yet to enjoy some of the more wellknown trails in the Natural State. That changed on Saturday when I hiked the Whitaker Point and

A group prepares for a photo on Hawksbill Crag in Arkansas. KATIE LAMB/NEWS-LEADER

Lost Valley trails near Ponca, Ark. After parking alongside a dirt road that was lined with the vehicles of others who also wanted to enjoy the weather — and

the first weekend after the government shutdown — we began our walk toward Hawksbill Crag on the Whitaker Point Trail. The cool air was an

immediate reminder that autumn had arrived, and the high temperature barely crept into the lower 60s. The sun occasionally shone through the tree canopy, accentuating the oranges and reds of leaves that were slowly beginning to change. The trail was softened by a thin layer of leaves that had already fallen, and orange triangles guided the three-mile hike that ends where it begins. People of all ages can enjoy the trail, but be warned that the uphill climb back is a bit more challenging than the downhill hike toward the crag. There are a few stopping points along the way that give a glimpse into

the vastness of the area. But those do not compare to the moment when you first lay eyes on the Hawksbill Crag. The jagged rock is famous for being photographed during the peak of each season — and for good reason. Besides the beauty it is surrounded by, there is an ideal opening for a photographer to easily snap a picture of the crag and those who venture onto it. When I reached the opening, a group of nearly 20 people were gathered on the crag. One man set a timer on a camera that was stationed on a tripod, and he quickly made his way back into the frame. Once the group was done, I walked onto the

SHARE YOUR ENTHUSIASM Love the Ozarks outdoors? Submit a short letter or essay about a favorite experience or place to Outdoors editor Sony Hocklander, shocklander@ News-Leader.com (subject: Outdoors). Photos are encouraged.

MORE PHOTOS View a gallery of photos from Katie Lamb’s hike at www.news-leader.com

crag for the first time. Normally, I am terrified of heights. But as I sat a See LAMB, Page 4C


2C Thursday, October 24, 2013

NEWS-LEADER § News-Leader.com

[ HOOK AND BULLET ] Luke Jarman hands Brad White some of the white bass and walleye caught last Thursday at Stockton Lake. KEN WHITE

An angling duel for the ages “Youngsters” can’t keep up with “old guys” during trip to Stockton Lake

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inally, son Brad and I hit the water last Thursday at Stockton Lake in search of white bass and walleye. We had been talking about making the trip for some time. The clincher came after hearing that fishing guides Les Jarman and his son, Luke, had Ken catchWHITE been ing both whites and walleye. After talking with Les, who had caught both species the day before, we set out to duplicate his success. At the dock at Orleans Trail Marina, Luke and Les had their boats in the water ready to go. Les said, “It’s going to be a contest between the old guys and the youngsters.” Brad got into the bass boat with Luke while I climbed into the boat with Les, and we set out to find the fish. On one of his first casts, Les boated a Kentucky bass on a top-water lure, an encouraging sign of things to come. From that point on, the prospects went from encouraging to discouraging as both whites and

Les Jarman holds one of the big white bass caught last Thursday on Stockton Lake. KEN WHITE

walleye refused to hit our lures. For the next 15 minutes it turned out to be a boat ride until Les hooked a big white followed by several others. “To catch the big whites you will have to catch a lot of small ones,”

Les said. We felt that we were going to trounce our sons. Then the catching slowed down for a while. During the next hour, the fish eluded us, so we checked with the boys who had just boated a keeper wall-

with the walleye. The action picked up when we hit a cove where the shad were thick. Both Les and I started catching lots of whites by using spoons and rattletraps. Almost every trip to Stockton I catch a drum, and that day was no exception. Using a small Kastmaster spoon, a fish hit the lure and it felt like a good white but turned out to be a 12-inch drum. A half hour later, both boats headed back to the dock to compare successes. With the one walleye and six whites, the oldtimers had it over the boys, who had caught lots of fish but only had one keeper walleye to show for their efforts. A bonus during our Most anglers know white bass trip: Several about how good the white largemouth bass like bass fishing in the spring this one. KEN WHITE can be as the fish make their spawning runs up eye. tributaries to the big imLes turned his boat poundments, but you can around to hit a favorite cove when he felt a tug on catch white bass through the year. his line and said, “It’s a Starting this month, walleye.” the whites are working on After a brief fight, he pulled in a 17-inch walleye schools of shad, and when to add to the whites in the you find them, the action is fast and furious. live well. Branson anglers Ted We were curious about Morris and Dave Fisher how Brad and Luke were hit Bull Shoals Lake last doing, so we headed for week searching for white their boat. The boys had managed to catch several bass. It didn’t take long to undersize fish including a find them. Maneuvering 5-inch smallmouth, along their boat into a cove near

Badger (Taxidea taxus) Missouri Department of Conservation

Claim to fame: In Missouri, badgers have become one of the symbols of prairie habitat. Although not often seen because of their secretive nature and relatively scattered population, badgers can be found over much of the state — including the Ozarks. Badgers are known for their digging ability and ferocity when cornered. Though few are trapped here, badgers are included in Missouri’s fur-bearer trapping season and are considered a game animal in this state. (See the Wildlife Code of Missouri for details.) Species status: Badgers were probably never

MISSOURI DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION

abundant in Missouri, but there’s little doubt a reduction of prairie habitat has further thinned this animal’s sparse numbers in the state. Badgers are extending their range to the east because of diminishing forested areas that have created more open habitat for the animal. Discovered: The first scientific description of badgers was written by German naturalist Johann Christian Daniel von

Schreber in 1777. Family matters: Badgers belong to the mammal family Mustelidae, which means they are close relatives of skunks and otters. Length: 23 to 35 inches Diet: Badgers are carnivores; the most common food items being small mammals. Weight: 13 pounds to 30 pounds Distinguishing characteristics: The badger is a heavy-bodied, mediumsized mammal with a broad head, a short, thick neck, short legs and a short, bushy tail. The general color is gray with a slight yellowish cast. The brown face is marked with a white stripe reaching from near the nose to the crown of the head and sometimes onto the neck

and back. Paired white areas extend from around the mouth onto the cheeks and inside the ears and a prominent vertical black bar or “badge” occurs in front of each ear. Life span: 13 to 15 years in captivity; likely much shorter in the wild Habitat: Throughout most of their North American range, badgers prefer open country. Life cycle: Mating takes place in August or September and is followed by a delay in development of offspring. A single annual litter is born in March or April and usually consists of two or three young. The young’s eyes open at 4 to 6 weeks of age. Weaning occurs when young are about half grown.

the dock, Morris tied on a white jig while Fisher put on a Rooster Tail, and the action started as a school of feeding whites appeared within 30 yards from them. Using ultralight gear, the action was fast and lasted until they had caught 16 fish, all in the 3-pound range. “I have always caught my largest whites in Bull Shoals,” Morris said. “One spring I was fishing in Swan Creek and caught six fish that weighed more than 3 pounds each as well as several in the 4-pound range. There have been many times when I have caught my limit in a half hour. “Today, while we were setting up, a school of whites boiled the water as they were chasing shad near the surface,” Morris continued. “We grabbed our rods, and we both had a fish on the first cast. That’s how good the fishing was, but it isn’t always that easy. If you find a school of fish, the catching can be great. Fishing for white bass on Bull Shoals can really be good in October and November.” Ken White writes about hunting and fishing for the NewsLeader. Contact him at kdwhite7@windstream.net.

Volunteers needed for Frisco trail cleanup Nov. 2 News-Leader Staff

Ozark Greenways is looking for volunteers to help spruce up a portion of the Frisco Highline Trail on Nov. 2. After a morning of cleanup, Ozark Greenways will provide a free lunch to those who helped. Volunteers are encouraged to bring heavy rakes, limb pruners, handsaws, trimmers, chainsaws, work gloves and drinking water. The cleanup includes general pruning and clearing, as well as bridge maintenance on the Wishart and Highline trail bridges. Volunteers should meet at 9 a.m. the Wishart trail head, at mile marker 24, and the clean-

up will last until noon. Volunteers are encouraged to call Ozark Greenways before the event at 417-864-2014, or email terry@ozarkgreenways. org. Directions: Take U.S. 13 to Missouri 215. Go left (west) on Missouri 215 for five miles to Morrisville. As you come into town, pass the school and then watch for county Route 111. Take Route 111 north out of Morrisville about two miles. You will go under one of the trail bridges. Where the road Ts, turn left onto county Route 514, and follow the road about two miles to the Wishart trail head. Watch for the signs. See a map at www. ozarkgreenway.org.


NEWS-LEADER § News-Leader.com

Thursday, October 24, 2013

This weekend Camp Ritter Family Group Camping, Friday-Sunday, Ritter Springs Park, 3683 W. Farm Road 92. Includes bat and cave activities, canoeing or kayaking, catch and release fishing, Dutch oven lunch, night hikes and more. Registration required. All ages. Fee: $10 a person or $25 for a group of 3-4; free for ages 6 and younger. 417-833-8647; parkboard.org Civil War Lantern Light Tour, 7 p.m., Saturday, Nov. 2, 9, 16, 23, 30, Smallin Civil War Cave, 3575 N. Smallin Road, Ozark. Admission: 417-551-4545; smallincave .com The Colorectal Rundie 5K Run/Walk, 8 a.m. Saturday, CoxHealth Meyer Center, 3545 S. National Ave. Entry fee: $20, $45 family; event day entry fee is $25 and $60. 417-269-7037 Conservation TEEN Club: Reunion, 6-8 p.m. Saturday, Springfield Conservation Nature Center, 4601 S. Nature Center Way. If you have ever attended a Conservation TEEN Club event, you and your family are invited to an anniversary reunion barbecue and program. All ages. Free; registration required. 417-888-4237 Geocaching Clinic, 1:303:30 p.m. Saturday, Ritter Springs Park, 3683 W. Farm Road 92. Learn the hands-on adventure of geocaching. Registration required by 5 p.m. Tuesday. Fee: $5. 417833-8647; parkboard.org Hike and Float for families, 1-4 p.m. Saturday, Springfield Conservation Nature Center, 4601 S. Nature Center Way. Hike two miles on the nature center and Ozark Greenways trails, then float back to the nature center on Lake Springfield. Ages 12 and older with an adult mentor. Free; registration required. 417-8884237 Fifth annual Making Strides Against Breast Cancer three-mile walk, 9 a.m., registration at 8 a.m. Saturday, Jordan Valley Park, 635 E. Trafficway St. Register: 800-227-2345; 417-8814668; Making Stridesswmo.org Persimmon Day 5K Run and Fun Walk, 8 a.m. Saturday, Sparta Middle School, 217 Division St. Call Dan Leyland: 417-581-2258. Register: actnowracing.com Third annual Pumpkin Dash 5k Run/Walk, 7:30 a.m. Saturday, Republic Aquatic Center, 711 E. Miller Road. Entry fee and registration: 417-299-5533 Table Rock Zombie 5K, 4 p.m. Saturday, to benefit St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Table Rock State Park, 5272 Missouri 165, Branson. There is a silent

register: actnowracing.com Creating Nature Art, 1011:30 a.m. and 1-2:30 p.m. Nov. 9, Springfield Conservation Nature Center, 4601 S. Nature Center Way. Art instructor Janel Bagby will assist children in creating nature-inspired art. Ages 5-7. Free. 417-888-4237

Hike and float for families Saturday is forecast to be sunny and cool, perfect for a hike at the Springfield Conservation Nature Center, 4601 S. Nature Center Way. Hike two miles on the nature center trails and Ozark Greenways trails, then float back to the nature center on Lake Springfield. Free for ages 12 and older with an adult mentor. Hours are 1-4 p.m., and registration is required. 417-8884237

GO!

Dash After Dark 5K, 6 p.m. Nov. 9, registration and activities begin at 4:30 p.m., MSU Army ROTC tent across from the Robert W. Plaster Sports Complex, campus of MSU. The course will be accented by fluorescent colors. Music by Luna Jamboree begins at 5 p.m.; food and beverages. Entry fee: $35-40; $45 day of race. 417-836-5791; dashafter dark.com; facebook.com/ dashafterdark

BEST BETS

Deer Rifle Sight-In Days Get ready for firearms deer season by sighting in your rifle 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Nov. 1-15 at the Andy Dalton Range near Ash Grove. Normal range rules and fees apply. 417-742-4361; email: DaltonRange @mdc.mo.gov

GANNETT FILE PHOTO

Hiking Club, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Nov. 9, Springfield Conservation Nature Center, 4601 S. Nature Center Way. Enjoy a hike through the Mark Twain National Forest with Volunteer Naturalist Mike Mihalik. Meet at the nature center and carpool. Ages 18 and older. Free; registration required. 417-888-4237 Third annual St. Joseph the Worker Running on Faith 5K and 1-Mile Run, 8:30 a.m. Nov. 9, 1796 N. Missouri NN, Ozark. Advance entry fee: $20; $15 for ages 12 and younger; $25 and $20 day of race. 417529-8144; email: jennycollins1034@yahoo.com; register: actnowracing.com NEWS-LEADER FILE PHOTO

SUBMIT YOUR EVENT Send your outdoors event to bpalmer@news-leader.com for the calendar.

auction before and after the race. dancebransonschool ofthearts.com Twilight Thriller, 6:30 p.m. Saturday, Joplin’s Frisco Greenway South Trail head, 955 E. North St. Features 10K-, 5K- and one-mile distances. Registration deadline: Friday. starlitrunning co@gmail.com 2013 Zombie Rock4Kids Run, presented by Bass Pro Fitness Festival, 10:30 a.m. Saturday, registration opens at 9:15 a.m., Rutledge-Wilson Farm Park, 3825 W. Farm Road 146. Entry fee: $18 Info: fitness.basspro.com; email: fitness@basspro.com Zombie Run to benefit The Randy Coldin Corporation for Disabled Children, 1-7 p.m. Sunday, Spirit of 76 Park, 400 N. Main St., Mount Vernon. Tickets: $10 advance, $13 day of event; tickets for ages 12 and younger: $5 advance, $8 day of run; free for ages 4 and younger. 417-440-8414

Coming up Deer Rifle Sight-In Days, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Nov. 1-15, Andy Dalton Range, Ash Grove. Hunters can use the range facilities for sighting in their deer rifles. Normal range rules and fees apply. 417-742-4361; email: Dalton Range@mdc.mo.gov Gondwanaland! 6 p.m. Nov. 1, Nov. 8, Springfield Botanical Center, 2400 S. Scenic Ave. Discover the native flora and fauna of Gondwanaland, the Earth’s southern supercontinent more than 100 million years ago. Includes slide and discussion program by Peter Longley. Free for all ages. 417-891-1515; parkboard.org Bass Pro Shops Camo Fun Run, 10 a.m. Nov. 2, Bass Pro Shops, 1935 S. Campbell Ave. Information: 417-891-5214; email: fitness@basspro.com Natural Wonders of Lost Hill 9 a.m. Nov. 2, Lost Hill Park, 4705 N. Farm Road 151.

A guided walk including: cave and karst features, fossils, glades and cactus, losing streams and Leave No Trace trail ethic. Registration required by 5 p.m. Tuesday. Ages 7 and up. Free. 417833-8647; parkboard.org

Nature And The Arts: These Ozarks Hills — An Evening With Marideth Sisco, 7-8 p.m. Nov. 8, Springfield Conservation Nature Center, 4601 S. Nature Center Way. Singer, storyteller, and folklorist Marideth Sisco will present a program centered around the Ozarks landscape. Ages 15 and older. Free; registration required. 417-8884237

Bass Pro Shops Maynard Cohick Half Marathon, Mercy Marathon Relay and Bass Pro Conservation Marathon, 7 a.m., The News-Leader 5K, 7:30 a.m. Nov. 3, Bass Pro Shops, 1935 Hunter Safety CertificaS. Campbell Ave. Registion Nov. 8-9, Dec. 6-7, Jan tration and info: 417-89110-12; times: 6-9:30 p.m. 5214; email: fitness@bass Fridays, 8:30 a.m.-6 p.m. pro.com; fitness.basspro.com Saturdays, Watershed Center in Valley Water Mill Park, Hunters Education Class2450 E. Valley Water Mill es, 6-10 p.m. Nov. 4-6, Bass Road. Required for all poPro Shops, 1935 S. Campbell tential hunters. Participants Ave. Free. For ages 11 and should have good reading older. register at basspro skills and be self-motivated. .com Must attend both days of Little Acorns: Wonderful the course. Ages 11 and up; Whitetales, 11-11:45 a.m. or Free; registration required 1:30-2:15 p.m. Nov. 7, Spring- one week in advance: field Conservation Nature mdc.mo.gov or 417-833Center, 4601 S. Nature Cen8647. ter Way. Stop by the nature Run To The Lights 5K, 10 center for some antlerp.m. Nov. 8, Silver Dollar related antics and learn City, 399 Silver Dollar City some of the wonders of the Parkway, Branson. Register: whitetails. Ages 3-6. Free; 417-334-0131; email: cinregistration required. 417da@thecaringpeople.org; 888-4237.

I

who will be doing the hunting. It’s the adult’s responsibility to see that his or her younger hunting companion is following safe, legal and ethical procedures. Most of the time, novice hunters will do what they’re told to do, so it’s up to adults to inform them about proper hunting procedures and, later, Ducks, geese and coots are the legal quarry. GETTY IMAGES when the kids are accompanying the adults during fowl season.) Missouri permit to hunt Each year, much of the the regular waterfowl small game or are exseason, to set good exstate’s youth hunting empt. amples with personal Ducks, geese and coots attention in autumn is focused on the two youth- hunting practices. are the legal quarry. The More information can only segments of the daily limit for each spebe found at your nearest cies is the same as during firearms deer season. Missouri Department of This year, the dates of the regular waterfowl those are Nov. 2 and 3 and Conservation office or in seasons. free hunting booklets on Jan. 4 and 5. Shooting hours are a deer and waterfowl huntThe attention these half hour before sunrise ing at most hunting perhunting events get is to sunset. mit vendor locations. well-deserved because It’s hoped that by giv(Missouri’s youth-only ing young hunters a head Missouri’s youth-only seasons for quail and start on adult hunters (the deer hunting opportunities are great ways to get pheasant are also SatMiddle Zone opens Nov. urday and Sunday. The young people involved in 2), it will increase the youth-only pheasant seaoutdoor pursuits. chances of having a posison only applies to the However, if the intive hunting experience. state’s North pheasant It’s also hoped this will terest of your favorite zone.) young hunter leans more be an opportunity for Information about toward the pursuit of adult mentors to introwaterfowl than whitetails, youth hunting also can be duce and reinforce variit’s time to limber up your found at www.missouri ous aspects of firearms conservation.org. safety and hunting ethics. favorite shotgun and make hunting plans. (It should be noted there It’s also hoped this will Francis Skalicky is media will also be a South Zone introduce and reinforce youth waterfowl hunting specialist for the Missouri various aspects of fireopportunity Nov. 23 and Department of Conservation’s arms safety and hunting 24, which precedes the Southwest Region. For more ethics. It’s important to Nov. 28 opening of the information about conservaregular South Zone water- emphasize it’s the kids tion issues, call 417-895-6880.

Trail Trivia, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Nov. 9, Springfield Conservation Nature Center, 4601 S. Nature Center Way. Spend a few of hours hiking and testing your nature knowledge. All ages. Free; no registration needed. 417888-4237 Winter Outdoor Safety & Preparedness 7 p.m. Nov. 9, Dec. 7 and Jan. 11, Watershed Center in Valley Water Mill Park, 2450 E. Valley Water Mill Road. Prepare for being stranded in your car or home in a winter storm, learn what to do if lost in a remote location or if you fall into cold water. Registration required by 5 p.m. Nov. 5. Free. Ages 9 and older. 417833-8647; parkboard.org Fundamentals of Photography, presented by MSU Outreach, 6-8 p.m. Nov. 11, 13, 18 and 20, Jim D. Morris Center, 901 S. National Ave. Cost: $49. This course will help the student learn the functions of their cameras (film or digital) and how to make better use of composition, lenses, lighting, software, flash units, and other equipment including tips and techniques for capturing photographs that stand out from the everyday snapshot image. Cost: $49. 417836-8974; NoncreditOut reach@missouristate.edu WEHRENBERG THEATERS

Youths’ waterfowl hunting days Saturday, Sunday f you like to spice up your meals with wild game and you have a young hunting enthusiast in the family, you may be in luck: Young hunters will have a chance to put duck meat on their parents’ dinFrancis ner tables SKALICKY in the near future. Missouri’s youth-only waterfowl hunting days in the state’s Middle Waterfowl Zone are Saturday and Sunday. To take part, participants must be age 15 or younger. They must be accompanied by an adult age 18 or older who is not allowed to hunt waterfowl, but he or she can participate in other open seasons. No permits are required for youth hunters. If the youth possesses a valid hunter education certificate card, the accompanying adult does not need a permit or hunter education certification. If the youth is not hunter education certified, the accompanying adult must be hunter-education certified unless born before Jan. 1, 1967, and possess a

3C

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WORLD RIFFTRAX LIVE: NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD (NR) 700 PM FIFTH ESTATE (R) (120 420) 725 1030 ESCAPE PLAN (R) (125 430) 735 1020 CARRIE (R) (155 455) 720 955 MACHETE KILLS (R) (135 425) 750 1035 CAPTAIN PHILLIPS (PG-13) (110 405) 730 1025 GRAVITY IN REALD 3D (PG-13) (200 450 530) 710 755 940 1015 GRAVITY (PG-13) (100 PM 315 PM) RUNNER RUNNER (R) (440 PM) 1045 PM CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS 2 IN REAL D 3D (PG) (105 PM) CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS 2 (PG) (320 PM) 705 PM 945 PM DON JON (R) (150 PM) PRISONERS (R) (1255 PM) 700 PM INSIDIOUS: CHAPTER 2 (PG-13) (145 445) 715 1000 WE'RE THE MILLERS (R) (130 415) 745 1040 THE WOLVERINE (PG-13) (140 PM 435 PM) DESPICABLE ME 2 (PG) (115 410) 655 930 JACKASS PRESENTS: BAD GRANDPA - THURSDAY (R) 900 PM THE COUNSELOR - THURSDAY (R) SL-0000340512 1000 PM

GRAVITY: AN IMAX 3D EXPERIENCE (PG13) 12:00 2:30 5:00 7:50 10:25 GRAVITY 2D (PG13) 1:30 6:50 GRAVITY 3D (PG13) 11:10 4:00 9:25 CARRIE (R) 11:50 1:55 2:45 5:05 7:00 7:45 10:05 JACKASS PRESENTS BAD GRANDPA (R) 9:00 GRACE UNPLUGGED (PG) 2:00 RUNNER, RUNNER (R) 11:45 4:25 RUSH (R) 11:10 4:15 9:30 MACHETE KILLS (R) 11:05 1:35 4:20 7:10 CAPTAIN PHILLIPS (PG13) 12:40 1:45 3:45 4:45 6:40 7:40 9:40 CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS 2 2D (PG) 11:25 4:55 9:35 PRISONERS (R) 11:15 CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS 2 3D (PG) 2:35 7:15 THE COUNSELOR (R) 10:00 ESCAPE PLAN (R) 11:30 2:10 4:50 7:35 10:15 THE FIFTH ESTATE (R) 11:00 1:50 4:40 7:30 10:20 SL-0000340806

■ THE COUNSELOR (R) 10:00 PM ■ JACKASS: BAD GRANDPA (R) 9:00 PM 10:00 PM ■● CARRIE (R) 11:55 1:15 2:25 3:55 4:55 6:25 7:25 9:00 10:00 ■● THE FIFTH ESTATE (R) 12:40 3:40 6:45 9:50 ■● I’M IN LOVE WITH A CHURCH GIRL (PG) 1:00 3:50 6:40 9:30 ■● MACHETE KILLS (DLP) R 4:00 10:10 ■● CAPTAIN PHILLIPS (DLP) PG-13 12:00 12:40 3:10 3:50 6:20 7:00 9:25 GRAVITY 3D (DLP) PG-13 12:00 2:30 5:00 6:05 7:30 10:00 GRAVITY (DLP) PG-13 11:30 1:50 4:15 6:45 9:15 RUNNER RUNNER (DLP) R 3:40 9:10 GRACE UNPLUGGED (DLP) PG 12:00 2:30 5:00 RUSH (DLP) R 12:45 6:15 CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS 2 3D (DLP) PG 1:00 3:25 CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS 2 (DLP) PG 12:10 2:35 5:00 7:25 9:50 PRISONERS (DLP) R 12:35 6:40 DON JON (DLP) R 10:15 INSIDIOUS CHAPTER 2 (DLP) PG-13 7:30 10:05 WE’RE THE MILLERS (DLP) R 11:40 2:15 4:55 7:35 ■=NO PASSES ●=NO VIPS AFTER 6PM DLP=DIGITAL PROJECTION SL-0000340811


4C Thursday, October 24, 2013

NEWS-LEADER § News-Leader.com

Lamb/Outside Eden Falls Cave, a child warns that a giant lizard will kill me Continued from Page 1C

few feet from the edge and absorbed the view, I felt a refreshing sense of calmness and enjoyed the cool breeze mixed with the warm sunshine. I walked onto a nearby crag that gave me the opportunity to capture a view that isn’t as frequently photographed. Although the view showed the immensity of Hawksbill Crag, it almost appeared small compared to the dense forest that stood below. The large group continued to take photos, and several others arrived a short time later. My hiking partner and I made our way back to the dirt road — that is steep enough to be a scary climb or descent in a small sedan — and drove a few miles to our next destination. Lost Valley is the most popular trail maintained by the Buffalo National River park service in Arkansas. Dozens of families were hiking on Saturday, erasing any signs that the park had been closed during the government shutdown just days before. For about the first half mile, the trail is an easy walk on level ground. Then the rocky climb begins — but it’s worth it. Almost every group seemed to have a designated photographer. Many gathered at Natural Bridge, where a stream trickled into a small pond. Rocks served as steps as we climbed toward Eden Falls. Although the waterfall didn’t have much, well, water falling, it was still a beautiful sight. Surrounded by cliffs and trees that seemed to jet out from the

Trees seem to grow out of rocks near Eden Falls in Lost Valley. KATIE LAMB/NEWS-LEADER

Above: Hawksbill Crag in Arkansas is a popular tourist attraction. KATIE LAMB/NEWS-LEADER

Left: Natural Bridge is a main attraction on the Lost Valley trail in Arkansas. KATIE LAMB/NEWS-LEADER

Right: Flat rocks provide a stairway to Eden Falls and Cave along the Lost Valley trail in Arkansas. KATIE LAMB/ SPRINGFIELD NEWS-LEADER

rocks, it was a major focus of those who wanted to capture the elegance of nature in a photograph. And just when I thought Icouldn’tclimbanyfarther, we reached Eden Falls Cave. A family, most of them holding flashlights, was

leaving the cave as we entered. It was then that a boy, probably about 5 years old with bright red hair, told me about the giant lizard living inside. “There’s blood in there,” he warned. “But you’ll be OK if you have a flashlight.”

I told him I didn’t have one. His response was simple: “The lizard is going to kill you then.” I stayed near the cave’s entranceandsnappedafew more photos with the excuse that I didn’t want to get my shoes wet. As we descended, peo-

ple frequently asked how much farther they would have to climb to reach the cave. It was comforting to know I wasn’t the only one who felt out of shape that day. When I got home that evening, I immediately browsed the pictures that

documented the trip. Although I question their ability to express what it’s like to see Arkansas during autumn, they still serve as a way for me to relive how it felt, if only for a moment. Katie Lamb is an intern at the News-Leader.

Careful processing can reduce spread of CWD in deer By Jim Low Missouri Department of Conservation

Hunters are important partners in the Missouri Department of Conservation’s effort to slow the spread of chronic wasting disease (CWD), and agency officials urge hunters to take simple precautions when processing deer. Althoughthereisnoevidence that CWD can affect humans or domestic animals, it is always fatal to members of the deer family. It is caused by abnormal proteins, called prions, which can remain infective for years after an infected deer dies. Deer can become infected if they are exposed to soil containing CWD prions. Prions can get into soil when infected deer or deer parts decompose on the soil surface. Because many hunters process their own deer, they are key players in slowing the

Anglers, boaters beware of lower water on Lake Taneycomo News-Leader Staff

The Army Corps of Engineers, Little Rock District will repair the Table Rock Powerhouse water release system on Nov. 4, requiring Lake Taneycomo to be lowered 5 feet to elevation 696.5. Dock owners should monitor lake levels and adjust boat docks as the lake is lowered and returned to its normal pool elevation. Powersite Dam will begin hydropower releases Monday to slowly draw down Lake Taneycomo from elevation 701to elevation 696.5. On Nov. 4, Powersite Dam will conduct supplemental spillway releases with hydropower releases to lower and maintain Lake Taneycomo at elevation 696.5. Once the repairs are complete, the lake will begin rising back to its normal pool elevation. For information call the Table Rock Project Office at 501-340-1950.

A white-tailed deer showing symptoms of chronic wasting disease is shown in this undated file photo provided by the Colorado Division of Wildlife. ASSOCIATED PRESS

spread of CWD. “One way that CWD can spread is by the transportation and improper disposal of carcass parts by hunters,” says Conservation Department Resource Scientist Jason Sumners. “CWD prions are concentratedinthespinalcolumn, brain and other non-edible

C & C

parts of deer that hunters normally discard. It’s important for hunters to knowthatmovingdeercarcasses from one part of the state to another runs the risk of spreading CWD.” CWD has been found in captive and free-ranging deer in Macon County. The Conservation Department has established a CWD Containment Zone in Adair, Chariton, Linn, Macon,RandolphandSullivan counties and has taken measures to confine the disease to this area. Sumners says he is confident that hunters will do everything they can to avoid spreading CWD if they understand how important proper carcass disposal is. “No one has more at stake in this effort than hunters do,” he says.

through bones, the spine or brain when processing deer carcasses. If they hunt somewhere other than home, they need to bring knives and containers so they can remove meat from bones and leave behind potentially infectious material. If hunters must transport whole carcasses, then they need to send non-edible carcass parts to stateapproved landfills, where they will be properly buried. This can be accomplished by double bagging the carcass remains and sending them through municipal trash collection. If this is impractical, bury the carcass deep enough that scavengers can’t dig it up. Preparing antlered deer for taxidermy requires different precautions. Taxidermists use arProcessing deer tificial head forms to crerequires caution ate mounts, so there is no Sumners says hunters reason to keep skulls, should avoid cutting which can carry prions.

When removing the cape from the carcass, also skin the head. Use a power saw to remove the antlers, along with a small portion of the skull that joins them. Clean the inside of the skull plate with chlorine bleach before leaving the area where the deer was killed. Many hunters prefer to make their own “European” mounts, where antlers are left on deer skulls and mounted without hide. Cleaning intact skulls usually includes boiling. This is not hot enough to deactivate prions, so tissuestobediscardedshould be soaked for approximately one hour in a 50 percent bleach mixture to minimize any potential for those materials to be infectious. Sumners also encourages hunters who harvest deer within the containment zone to donate tissue samples for the CWD monitoring program the Con-

servation Department started in 2002. The Wildlife Code of Missouri requires hunters who harvest deer, elk or moose out of state and bring the animal with the spinal column or head attached into Missouri to call toll free, 877-853-5665, and report the animal’s entry within 24 hours. They also must take the carcass to a licensed meat processor or taxidermist within 72 hours of entry. This is designed to prevent introducing CWD into new areasofMissourifromother states. Hunters transporting deer through Missouri en route to other states do not need to call the number. Details about these measures are listed in the 2013 Fall Deer & Turkey Hunting Regulations and Informationbooklet,availableatMDCoffices,where hunting permits are sold and at mdc.mo.gov/node/ 3656.

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NEWS-LEADER § News-Leader.com

Thursday, October 24, 2013

5C

Johnson/Lake Springfield was created when James River was dammed Continued from Page 1C

heat. The scene was captivating. Why had I never taken the time to explore this waterway literally on the edge of town? Established in 2006, the James River Water Trail winds its way between the Lake Springfield Boathouse and Joe Crighton Canoe Access six miles upriver on Farm Road 183. On a sunny Thursday afternoon, with leaves just beginning to cast off their chlorophyll green, I tossed the kayak in the back of the truck and headed out to see what this water trail was all about. I put in at the Southwood Canoe Access point, adjacent to the rumbling and noisy U.S. 65 bridge over Lake Springfield. There’s a stiff breeze blowing from the southeast, and the wind energy ripples the surface. With wind at my back, my kayak slips effortlessly beneath the steel highway bridge and paddling is effortless. If it’s still blowing this hard when I head back, I’ll burn more than a few calories trying to paddle into it. Aside from the cat’spaws on the surface, I detect no current even though Lake Springfield is actually a river that was dammed to provide cooling water for the local power plant. Water still flows, albeit slowly, and spills over the dam as the James River continues its long sojourn to Table Rock Lake. Around a sweeping bend in the lake — or river — the historic Iron Bridge slowly comes into view. A couple of runners jog across it and wave at me. I sense we three appreciate the joy of being outside on a beautiful workday afternoon — instead of being tied to a phone at the office. Beneath the iron beams I spot an odd accretion affixed to the bridge’s underbelly. Rows of long, mud tubes create a strange pattern against the iron, looking much like stacked rows of hollow hot dogs. Too thin for swallow nests. I conclude this is the handiwork of industrious mud dauber wasps. Late-afternoon sunlight streaming from the west illuminates a shoal of trees on the waterway’s eastern bank. Golds and yellows interlace with layers of green, their multi-hued colors shimmering in the water. Through my camera’s lens I zero in on another unusual sight. Against a backdrop of leaves turned red by the previous evening’s chill, I observe a large turtle — and a tiny one near that one’s tail — both stretched out on a floating log and absorbing the last remnants of afternoon heat. It’s clear that autumn has now outpaced summer, though these turtles aren’t yet ready to surrender their last warm spot and dive into the mud for a long winter sleep. Ahead, the lake — now narrower and more riverlike — carries a layer of fallen leaves on its surface, as far as I can see. My kayak nudges them aside, leaving a long swath of open water in its wake. As I paddle farther upstream, I see a brightred tandem canoe coming my way, a father and son on a pleasant afternoon fishing trip — their first on this section of the James. “We’re just out here floating, taking a day off and doing a little fishing — doing some father-son time. We’re just having a good time,” says Jason Bogema, with son Noah in front. “This is wonderful. Something we love, being out here. It’s something you can get to within just a couple of minutes, then have a good time and be able to get back in before

Above: Fall leaves slowly roll downriver after dropping from trees along the edge of the James River. WES JOHNSON/NEWS-LEADER

Left: Rows of hollow mud dauber nests cling to the iron beams beneath the Iron Bridge across the James River. WES JOHNSON/NEWS-LEADER

Below left: Southwood Canoe Access adjacent to U.S. 65 is one of several put-in points along the James River Water Trail. WES JOHNSON/NEWS-LEADER

ABOUT THE JAMES RIVER WATER TRAIL “The 6-mile James River Water Trail designation began in 2006, as part of a nationwide initiative to draw attention and educate the public about the importance of our waterways, by calling out specific floatable rivers as “water trails” or “blueways.” You travel these trail routes by boat instead of on foot or by bike. With the beautiful James River running right through Springfield, it’s a perfect place to highlight. We’re lucky to have it right here — not many communities have this right in their backyard. Not only is it a fun and convenient place to float, it’s also an example of the need to protect the quality of our watersheds, which feed our water supply. The water trail concept focuses on inviting the public out to experience and enjoy the river for themselves. Once people see how great it is, they’ll tend to be more likely to behave in ways that help, not harm, our waterways in general. Also — if you don’t have your own boat, the seasonal canoe and kayak rental at Lake Springfield is very convenient and fun!”

Left: Brilliant hues of fall color reflect in the water’s surface in a quiet stretch of the James River. WES JOHNSON/NEWS-LEADER

Below: Life finds a way. Tiny tree sprouts cling to life atop a log floating in the James River.

— Lori Tack, Ozark Greenways

Rentals available The water trail is a six-mile route on the James River from Joe Crighton Access to Lake Springfield marina. Canoes and kayaks can be rented spring to autumn at Lake Springfield Park Boathouse, North Shore Access. Call Springfield-Greene County Parks at 417-891-1550. A map of the water trail is available online at http://www.ozarkgreenways.org/pdfs/JRWaterTrail Brochure.pdf

WES JOHNSON/NEWS-LEADER

dark without any worries.” They haven’t caught any fish, but neither Jason nor Noah seem to mind. They paddle onward toward the setting sun. I’m curious about what lies farther upstream and boost my paddle strokes to make some time. The din of cars and trucks begins to fade, but the sound never quite goes away, and it’s a reminder that this is, after all, an urban water trail. The mechanized sounds, how-

ever, slowly give way to chirps, twitters, peeps and caws of birds hanging out in the tree canopy lining the river. Nature’s singers are so much more pleasant to hear. I’m about three quarters of the way up the water trail, and the stillness of Lake Springfield has given way to the steady flow of the James River. Here, it takes some effort to paddle upstream, though I’m able to make progress by occasionally shoving my pad-

dle into the bottom and pushing ahead. But around a sharp turn I see where the early September floods have reshaped the riverbed and squeezed the entire James River into a narrow corridor perhaps 12 feet across. The force of water is too much, so I paddle to the edge of a gravel bar for a break. It’s clear I can’t go much farther, at least not by paddling, so I pull my kayak ashore and do a little reconnoitering by foot.

The gravel bar is filled with freshwater clam shells, hopefully a good indication that those creatures are still alive and well and perhaps only there because they were uprooted during the big flood. There’s even more astonishing evidence of that flood’s power. Wedged 6 feet up in the fork of a tree, I observe the foot-thick trunk of another tree jammed there by the force of rushing water. I wouldn’t want to be on the James when it’s

flexing its powerful muscles. After a quick appleand-granola bar break, I note the sun settling below the tree line and figure I’d better get moving back downstream before darkness obscures my river path. I dip my paddle and let the current take me away. Send your Outdoors ideas, tips or feedback to reporter/ columnist Wes Johnson at wjohnson@news-leader.com; or call 836-1243. Find Wes also at Facebook.com/Wes.outdoors.


WEEKEND

food i music i events i movies

10.24.2013

NEWS LEADER

“Thriller on C-Street” brings zombie pageantry to historic district

FOOD

ART

MOVIES

Spring Creek defies tearoom stereotypes 4

Stone County art studios open for Saturday tour 12

“Carrie” revamp a pale imitation of horror classic 18


2 Weekend 10.24.2013

table of contents

NEWS LEADER NEWS-LEADER.COM §

EVENT

MOVIES

spotlight: Eating local Food Day events celebrate eating real food, grown locally 3

special: Who you gonna call? “Ghostbusters� plays at the Gillioz for Mother’s Friday Flicks series 18

THE GUIDE

INDEX

things to do: Take your pick No big plans this weekend? See the Guide for lots of fun fall events 8

Food Review ...... 4 The Guide.......... 8 Night life............11

ONLINE NOW GALLERIES: View reader NLL photo galleries to see pets, kids, events and more. Add pics ONLINEE at News-Leader.com/YourPhotos. FACES IN THE CROWD: See who showed up at events around the Ozarks at News-Leader.com/faces. Andy Walls performs at Thriller on C-Street 2012. IMAGINATIONAL

Zombies will find you on C-Street THIS WEEK’S COVER STORY: Free street performances Saturday are inspired by Michael Jackson’s “Thriller.� 6

Christmas Open House VINTAGE SUITCASE & VERANDA TEA ROOM November 1, 2 & 3

Vintage Suitcase & Veranda Tea Room Friday 10-8 • Saturday 10-5 • Sunday 11-4 • Friday Evening Dinner 5-8 • Sunday Brunch 11-4

HEY, MOM!: A quick way to stay in touch for the busy mom at heymom.News-Leader.com. ALWAYS THERE: Post and view listings for upcoming events in the area at News-Leader.com/calendar. See our archive to find a new restaurant at News-Leader.com/weekend.

Movie review......... 18 Movie listings ........ 18 New on DVD ......... 19

WHO DID IT?

GET IN WEEKEND

Editor Laura Johnson weekend@ news-leader.com Listings Barbara Palmer 836-1184 Designer Aaron Hartje Writers Camille Dautrich Ed Peaco Katie Tonarely Advertising 836-1133

All submissions must include the name of the event, location, telephone number for publication, date, time, cost (specify if it is free), sponsoring group and a brief description. Also, let us know if your event is accessible to the disabled or is interpreted for the deaf. We must receive your information at least one week before publication. We do not accept submissions over the phone, but they may be sent by fax to 837-1381 or by e-mail to Weekend@News-Leader.com. Mail items to: Weekend Calendar, News-Leader, 651 Boonville Ave., Springfield, MO 65806. For information, call Weekend Editor Laura Johnson at 836-1241. Unfortunately, Weekend cannot guarantee publication.

   

     & ' ( )    

        

Reservations recommended but not required 866-1145

Join us for a Christmas Tour & Open House at Hvmboldt Mansion • 847 S Scenic Saturday 9-5 • Sunday 1-4 $10 tickets may be purchased at the door or Robin’s Vintage Suitcase. Proceeds benefitting Springfield Symphony Guild and various children’s charities.

An old-fashioned box lunch will be served at the Carriage House on Saturday from 11-3 for $8.99 Please call for Reservations 866-1145 724 S. Scenic • Springfield, MO • 417.224.5300 (one block north of Hvmboldt Place) Open Monday-Saturday 10am-5pm SL-0000336599

www.Robinsvintagesuitcase.com

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GO! best bets

10.24.2013 Weekend

event: Food Day Harvest Party, film screenings

3

HERE ARE THE CAN’T-MISS IDEAS AND EVENTS TO GET YOU STARTED ON YOUR WEEKEND.

The party on Saturday evening at Farmers Park will honor local farmers and businesses and give visitors a chance to learn about local food. SUBMITTED PHOTO

Events celebrate real, local food WANT TO GO?

By Ed Peaco FOR THE NEWS-LEADER

Today is Food Day, nationally and in Springfield, but local organizers have made Food Day a four-month campaign of food education culminating in a Healthy Food Drive, film screenings today and a Harvest Party on Saturday at Farmers Park. The educational program encourages people to make informed decisions about what they eat, to eat real and to eat local, said Christy Claybaker of the Healthy Living Alliance, a sponsor in the campaign. “Essentially, it’s about educating about real food — food that’s grown in gardens or that comes from real animals — and trying to stay away from boxed foods with tons of ingredients that you can’t pronounce. And supporting the local economy, local farmers,” Claybaker said. The educational campaign has put forth several key benefits of real and local food: » Deterring disease and obesity by setting aside drinks

HARVEST PARTY When: 5 p.m.-9 p.m. Saturday Where: Farmers Park, 4139 S. Nature Center Way Information: fooddaycelebration .org

The Food Day campaign touts the benefits of eating locally grown produce. SUBMITTED PHOTO

heavy in sugar, sodium-laden packaged foods and mass-produced fatty meat products. » Enhancing well-being by favoring fruits, vegetables, whole grains and locally produced meats. » Saving money by eating for better health. » Keeping money in the local economy by supporting local

“A PLACE AT THE TABLE” SCREENINGS » Drury University: 6:30 p.m. today at Lay Hall Auditorium, 900 N. Benton Ave. » Pickwick House: At 6 p.m. today, tour the Local Sprouts Kitchen at Homegrown Food Hub, 607 S. Pickwick Ave. At 6:30 p.m., view the film at 611 S. Pickwick Ave. RSVP required, scurrao@your downtownymca.org

farmers and producers.

SOLVING HUNGER The film “A Place at the Table” addresses hunger by examining the lives of three people struggling to find enough to eat. It provides solutions that would See FOOD DAY, Page 17

The Antique Festival of the Ozarks brings all different types of antiques to the fairgrounds this weekend. NEWS-LEADER FILE PHOTO

event: Find a piece of the past at show If you enjoy shopping for antiques, find time this weekend to visit the Antique Festival of the Ozarks. The show features dealers from around the Midwest selling everything from dolls and glassware to furniture and architectural salvage. The show is 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday and 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday in the E-Plex West at the Ozark Empire Fairgrounds, 3001 N. Grant Ave. Admission is $5 for adults (but bring the ad on Page 16 to get a $1 discount). Parking is free. For more information, call 417-833-2660 or visit www.heritageeventcompany.com/

movie: “Rocky Horror” at Gillioz Catch the cult classic “Rocky Horror Picture Show” with the Rocky Horror House Band at 8 p.m. Saturday (doors at 6:30 p.m.) at the historic Gillioz Theatre, 325 Park Central East. Tickets are $12 in advance or $15 at the door. “Interaction kits” and cocktails will be available for purchase.

AP FILE


4 Weekend 10.24.2013

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Spring Creek Tea Room

Put aside preconceptions about lunch at a tearoom

Wayne Rice Age: 57 Occupation: Blacksmith at Silver Dollar City Dish nominated: Soup of the Day and House Salad Quote: “If you leave hungry, it’s your own fault.�

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What: Spring Creek Tea Room Address: 107 S. 3rd St., Ozark Phone: 417-582-1331 Cuisine: Tearoom Hours: 10:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday Price range: $3.25-$7.45 Accepts: Cash, all major credit cards, checks Reservations: accepted for parties of five adults or more Services: takeout, cakes and desserts to go with 7-10 days advance notice Parking: on-site Seating capacity: 90 Family friendly: kids’ menu, high chairs, booster seats Wheelchair accessible: yes Alcohol: no Smoking: no

WANT A FREE MEAL?

                                     

   

       

   

Nominate a favorite entree from an area restaurant. We’ll select the best and arrange a visit for a reader (without close ties to staff or owners) and a reviewer to dine unannounced and compare impressions. Contact Laura Johnson at 836-1241 or email ljohnson2@news-leader.com.

Reader Wayne Rice likes to order the house salad with a cup of soup — it changes daily — at Spring Creek Tea Room in Ozark. JESS HEUGEL/FOR THE NEWS-LEADER

Spring Creek packs the house, doesn’t skimp By Katie Tonarely

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FOR THE NEWS-LEADER

Check out your guide to Ozarks dining at dining.News-Leader.com

Though he works in Branson as a blacksmith for Silver Dollar City, reader Wayne Rice lives in Ozark and patronizes local restaurants as much as he can. The Spring Creek Tea Room has been one of his favorites for as long as it’s been around, mostly because of its delicious, fresh food and amazing desserts. Wait a minute ... a manly man like the blacksmith of Silver Dollar City is recommending a tearoom? This we have to see.

WAYNE’S TAKE Tearooms often get the rap that they cater to older women in colorful hats, but Wayne says everyone can enjoy the Spring Creek Tea Room. The food may be traditional tearoom fare, but it’s more than enough to fill any belly. His wife, JaDonna, has a standing reservation on Fridays with several of her friends, and during January, February and the

early part of March, when Silver Dollar City is closed, Wayne joins them, too. The building also houses an antique shop. “I kinda wander around and look at stuff,� Wayne says. “It changes all the time.� Wayne grew up just around the corner from the building, and he would visit what was then a convenience store all the time. It’s been interesting for him to see it evolve over the years. We decide to have an early lunch at 11 to try to beat the crowd, but it isn’t any use. The place is al-

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10.24.2013 Weekend

Spring Creek Tea Room can attract a crowd for lunch. JESS HEUGEL/FOR THE NEWS-LEADER

“It’s a big treat for me.”

KATIE’S TAKE

An antique shop shares space in the building with Spring Creek Tea Room. JESS HEUGEL/FOR THE NEWS-LEADER

ready packed, and it’s just a Tuesday. When we do sit down, Wayne orders the flavored tea of the day, and he decides on the house salad with a cup of soup and a roll ($7.45). He opts for the poppy seed dressing. The flavored iced tea is included in his meal price, which is something I haven’t seen before. Every day is a different flavor, and Wayne usually likes whatever it is. “I’ll drink just about anything,” he says. When Wayne orders his meal, he also orders dessert, because he doesn’t want to risk the tearoom running out of the pecan chocolate torte he’s been eyeing. When his plate arrives, he digs into the salad. “Big restaurants don’t have anything on this salad. It is so good,” he says. Spring

Creek Tea Room’s house salad has strawberries, slivered almonds, croutons and Romaine lettuce. “You think a high-end restaurant salad would look like that,” he says. Even though it looks fancy, “it’s not that expensive,” he says. Today’s soup is potato. He likes that the soup is thick, but the “taters” are cut small. “You don’t need to have a great big bowl to end up stuffed,” he says. The pecan chocolate torte ($3.25) has chocolate icing that Wayne loves. “They’re well-known for their desserts,” he says. When his wife and her friends dine on Fridays, it’s not uncommon for them to take a boxed dessert home. “This is one of my favorite places to eat when I’m off,” he says.

Wayne’s recommendation has me giggling. He looks exactly like you’d expect a blacksmith at Silver Dollar City to look, and it’s funny to me that his go-to would be a tearoom. He tells me to look around, though, and notice that he’s definitely not the only man in the room. The place is packed with all kinds of diners, many of whom seem quite focused on dessert. Wayne’s not the only diner who makes sure to order dessert with the main meal. The favorites don’t last long at Spring Creek Tea Room. I’m also shocked at how busy it is so early in the lunch hour. I’ve never seen this at a tearoom, but most of those waiting don’t seem to mind, as they get to browse for antiques. When we finally get to sit down, I order the chicken salad croissant sandwich with a salad ($7.45). Following Wayne’s lead, I make sure to order my dessert as quickly as possible, too. The salad is eye-catching and full of goodies. I certainly wasn’t expecting so many things on a house salad. I order mine with peppered ranch dressing, and it pairs well with the sweet strawberries and

savory croutons. Wayne’s right in that the Romaine lettuce makes it taste fresh. I’m also shocked at how large the salad is for the price. I’ve been to tearooms before where I spend over $10 for a plate that leaves me feeling like I need to hit a drive-thru on the way home. The chicken salad croissant is basic, and it’s a lot of food. I only eat half, and I’m stuffed. The chicken salad has fruit in it, which I typically don’t prefer, but it tastes good. For dessert, I order the Reese’s cheesecake. Peanut butter and cheesecake just go so well together. The peanut butter taste isn’t overwhelming, and it’s super creamy with lots of chocolate on top.

THE DISH, THE RESTAURANT Husband-and-wife team Kerry and Brenda May opened the antique shop in June1998, and the tearoom followed that November. “At the time, there really wasn’t any place in town where you could get a soup and sandwich, so we decided we could do something like that,” Kerry says. He attributes the tearoom’s success to the fact that the pair started with just four or five tables. “As our business grew, we would add tables,” he says. Now the restaurant is up to being able to seat 90, and it’s not uncommon for people to wait some days. “We started small. As the customer base grew, we could expand a little bit,” he says. “We didn’t open a big place and watch it sit empty.” Consistency is also key. In the morning, the staff hand-shreds the Romaine and red leaf lettuces and spinach for all the salads. “We know it’s going to be fresh and some of the best that we can put out,” he says. People sometimes call the house salad the strawberry salad, because of the strawberries. The soups are made in house every day. “Nothing comes from outside the

shop,” he says. “Everything is made in house.” The same goes for the restaurant’s famed desserts. Brenda and Kerry come in very early, and Brenda gets started on the day’s baking. In the morning, she’ll bake six to eight cakes and three to four

$

pies. “We think it’s some of the freshest product in town with some of the best quality and some of the best prices,” Kerry says. And the fact that the place is packed is definitely a good indication that folks think their food is pretty high quality, too.

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cover: Thriller on C-Street WANT TO GO? What: Thriller on C-Street When: Saturday » 4 p.m.: family-oriented show » 7:15 p.m.: “PG13” pre-show » 7:30: “PG13” dance begins Where: Commercial Street between Boonville and Robberson avenues Admission: Free VIP seating: $20. Eighty frontrow seats are reserved for those who want to be sure of a good view. Information: cstreetzombie corps.com

ALSO: FRIGHT NIGHT AT THE SAVOY BALLROOM » 8 p.m. Saturday at the Savoy, 224 E. Commercial St. » A benefit event for Ashley House (previously known as Regional Girls’ Shelter). Music, dancing, drink specials, raffle prizes, $300 prize for best costume. » Tickets: $15 in advance, $20 at the door. Advance tickets: 417862-9634, missouri.pchas.org and at all Springfield locations of Metropolitan National Bank

MORE SCARY EVENTS » “Rocky Horror Picture Show” and the Rocky Horror House Band, 8 p.m. Saturday, doors at 6:30 p.m., Gillioz Theatre, 325 Park Central East. Tickets: $12 advance; $15 door. 417-863-9491; gillioztheatre.com » Hotel of Terror, 334 N. Main St. Hours: 7-11:30 p.m. SundayThursday; 7 p.m.-1:30 a.m. Friday-Saturday and Halloween. Hotel may close one hour early depending on attendance. Admission: $11 Sunday-Thursday; $13 Friday-Saturday. 417863-9640; hotelofterror.com » McCauley’s Haunted Woods, 7-11 p.m. Friday-Saturday, Halloween and Nov. 1-2, across from 1017 E. North St., Nixa. Half-mile of trails through the woods. Nightly scary movie on outdoor movie screen included in fee. Admission: $13; $10 for groups of 12 or more. 417-379-4828; mccauleys hauntedwoods.com

Visitors to Commercial Street on Saturday afternoon and evening can expect to see many different zombies. NEWS-LEADER FILE PHOTO

Jo Fritts says being part of the “Thriller” troupe is a fun way to get exercise. IMAGINATIONAL

About 175 dancers will perform at Thriller on C-Street. IMAGINATIONAL


NEWS LEADER § NEWS-LEADER.COM

10.24.2013 Weekend

DEAD

7

ON THEIR

FEET More thrills in store at C-Street zombie dance

Andy Walls (red costume) and Anne Walls (striped pants) perform on the front line at the 2012 Thriller on C-Street. The Wallses are co-owners of the Savoy Ballroom and Dance With Me, which presents the event. IMAGINATIONAL

By Ed Peaco Steve Fritts, left, helped create the pre-show.

FOR THE NEWS-LEADER

Z

ombies will be lurching and heaving through their fourth annual Thriller on CStreet extravaganza on Saturday, a show that organizers have worked to make bigger and better every year. The event has developed into a lively program of undead pageantry with professional makeup and macabre costumes inspired by Michael Jackson’s undying pop song. Festivities begin at 4 p.m. on Commercial Street between Boonville and Robberson avenues, with roughly 175 dancers performing the not-overly-scary, family-oriented version of “Thriller” in front of the Savoy Ballroom. Minutes later, the dancers will do a repeat performance after organizers encourage the crowd to recirculate to allow spectators from the back to move forward to a better view. At 7:15 p.m., the “PG13” version, somewhat scarier, will commence with a pre-show of a zombie-fied circus. The dance will start at 7:30 p.m., followed by a repeat as before.

IMAGINATIONAL

A zombiesteampunk carnival fills the gap between shows. IMAGINATIONAL

Four years along, there’s no letup of hunger for the show, said Andy Walls, co-owner with his wife, Anne Walls, of the Savoy Ballroom and Dance With Me, which presents the event. Even with an ambitious preshow, Andy Walls said the main draw is the dance itself, which the Wallses’ troupe performs at functions throughout the year. “It’s ‘Thriller.’ People come out of the woodwork for ‘Thriller,’ ” he said.

Pre-show develops The first show, in 2010, was a 10-minute dance for

which the crowd endured a three-hour wait. Starting in 2011, Steve and Jo Fritts volunteered to create a pre-show to add value to the event. The first pre-show was heavy on scripted sketches that were funny, but only for the few who could hear them. Last year, they introduced the “Dr. Deadalous Traveling Zombie Show,” crafted for the outdoor audience. The show has a vintage, steampunk circus theme with a cast of zombies. “There’s no talking at all in this one,” Jo Fritts said. “It’s just creepy music and weird little

side acts on the street, and we spread the acts across the whole street, so everyone can see them instead of just the people in the center.” “Dr. Deadalous is the guy who runs the show,” Steve Fritts said. “He comes in on this awesome carriage, and he cracks a massive whip.” This year, spectators will see a refined version of this pre-show with new acts, including a zombie knife thrower, a zombie can-can act and a zombie fire-eater who, due to its undead condition, cannot blow fire, only smoke, Steve Fritts said. The long-term goal is

to fill the gap between the early and later shows with the zombie-steampunk carnival, Steve Fritts said. The idea is to keep spectators on the street and encourage them to visit the stores and restaurants. Last year, four restaurants on Commercial Street had record sales on “Thriller” night, Anne Walls said.

No experience necessary Most of the people who do “Thriller” aren’t dancers to begin with. Some of them say they don’t like to dance, but they’ll do “Thriller.” They come from all walks of life, young and old. “If you can get them through a couple of classes, they’re fine,” Anne

Walls said. “We have people like them who have been in their shoes who can say, ‘Hey, the first time was a train wreck. Come to the second class; it will be better.’ ” Because it’s a line dance, in which everyone is doing the same thing, participants learn quickly as a flocking effect takes hold in the group, Andy Walls said. The studio holds auditions for the dancers at the front of each line to set good examples, he said. Jo Fritts joined the “Thriller” troupe the year after she had open-heart surgery. Her doctor recommended she stay active. “It’s a fun way of getting exercise ... You do what your body is capable of doing, and because you’re a zombie, it’s OK.”


The Guide 8 Weekend 10.24.2013

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WANT TO MAKE THE GUIDE? SEE PAGE 2 FOR DETAILS ON HOW TO GET YOUR EVENT INCLUDED.

24 TODAY EVENTS

The Air and Military Museum of the Ozarks, open noon-4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, 2305 E. Kearney St. Admission is $5; $3 for ages 7-12; FREE for ages 6 and younger; FREE admission for military and patriotic holiday events throughout the year. 417-864-7997 American Girls Party featuring American Girl Molly, 7 p.m. today, Barnes and Noble, 3055 S. Glenstone Ave. FREE; reservation required. 417-8850026 Conservation Kids’ Club: Timber, 6:30-7:45 p.m. today, Springfield Conservation Nature Center, 4601 S. Nature Center Way. Meet Nathaniel “Stub” Borders, as portrayed by storyteller Alex Primm, to learn about his life as a railroad tie logger. Ages 7-12. No younger siblings and only one adult per group of kids. FREE; registration required. 417-888-4237 Fall Revival and 146th Church Anniversary, 7 p.m. today (continues Friday), Washington Avenue Baptist Church, 1722 N. National Ave. Guest speaker will be Bishop Kenneth Robinson of Antioch Full Gospel Baptist Church, Little Rock, Ark. 417-8662750 Film screenings of “A Place at the Table,” 6:30-8:30 p.m. today, Lay Hill auditorium, campus of Drury University and 6-8:30 p.m. today, Pickwick House, 607 S. Pickwick Ave. (RSVP required at Pickwick, scurrao@yourdowntownymca.org). A documentary based on the lives of three families as they struggle to provide food for their loved ones. Admission is a donation of healthy shelf-stable foods. Christy Claybaker: 417-862-8962 ext. 2142; email: cclaybaker@yourdown townymca.org Film screening of “The Wrecking Crew,” 7:30 p.m. today,

Gillioz Theatre, 325 Park Central East. A retrospective film of studio musicians behind several hits of the 1960s and ’70s. Tickets: $10. 417-863-9491; gillioztheatre .com

Friends of the SpringfieldGreene County Library Fall Book Sale, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. today (continues through Sunday), Remington’s, 1655 W. Republic Road. FREE admission. Info: email friends@thelibrary.org Greater Springfield Farmers’ Market, open 8 a.m.-noon today and Tuesday, 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday, Battlefield Mall parking lot, 2825 S. Glenstone Ave. springfieldfarmersmarket.com; email: info@springfieldfarmers market.com Heart-Healthy Store Tour, 6-7 p.m. today, Hy-Vee, 1720 W. Battlefield Road. FREE Register: 417-881-1950 “I’ll Watch the Moon” (book discussion), 1:30-2:30 p.m. today, Library Station, 2535 N. Kansas Expressway. Adults. FREE 417-865-1340; thelibrary.org Learn How to Check Out Library E-Books: E-Ink EReaders, 10 a.m. today, Library Station, 2535 N. Kansas Expressway. All ages. FREE; registration required. 417-865-1340; thelibrary.org Springfield Organic Gardening Club, 7-8:30 p.m. today, Library Center, 4653 S. Campbell Ave. FREE. 417-882-9157 Branson: Silver Dollar City’s National Harvest Festival, today (continues through Saturday), Silver Dollar City, 399 Silver Dollar City Parkway. More than 125 craftspeople and artists from across the country will demonstrate their skills. Features Western stunt show, music, Texas Trick Riders. Tickets and information: 800-831-4386; silver dollarcity.com Fair Grove: Feature Films at

Take a lantern-light tour of Smallin Civil War Cave at 7 p.m. Saturday, 3575 N. Smallin Road in Ozark. Admission is $29.95. Info: 417-551-4545 or smallincave.com NEWS-LEADER FILE PHOTO the Library “Frankenweenie,” rated PG, 4 p.m. today, Fair Grove Branch Library, 81 S. Orchard Ave. All ages. FREE 417-759-2637; thelibrary.org

world of “Harry Potter.” K-5. FREE 417-732-7284; thelibrary .org

Marshfield: Webster County Republican FREE Chili Supper, 6-8 p.m. today, Webster Elementary, 650 N. Locust St. 417838-5985

Willard: Teen Thursday, 2:30 p.m. today, Willard Branch Library, 304 E. Jackson St. Play board and video games, and a make-and-take bonus activity. Grades 6-12. FREE 417-742-4258; thelibrary.org

Osage Beach: Community Health Fair, presented by Lake Regional Health System, Elks Lodge, 5161 Osage Beach Parkway. The health fair will include FREE blood pressure readings, body fat analysis and pulmonary function screenings. The Camden County Health Department will offer flu shots for $20. Appointments are not required. Info: 573-348-8222; lakeregional.com/ events

Eureka Springs, Ark.: 66th annual Original Ozark Folk Festival, today (continues through Sunday). Features the Barefoot Ball, Queen’s Contest, a parade, arts and crafts, FREE music in Basin Spring Park and WoodSongs Old-Time Radio Hour, 7:30 p.m. Saturday at Eureka Springs City Auditorium. Reserved seating: $35-$75. TheAuditorium.org; OzarkFolk Festival.com, WoodSongs.com

Republic: Second annual Owls of Harry Potter, 4 p.m. today, Republic Branch Library, 912 N. Lindsey Ave. Play games, do crafts and eat snacks from the

Mountain Home, Ark.: Autumn in the Ozarks Quilt Show, 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m. today (continues through Saturday), Educational Building, Baxter

County Fairgrounds, 1507 Fairgrounds Drive. Admission: $5; FREE for ages 11 and younger. 870-425 -1105

MUSIC

Joplin: Pro Musica presents the Linden String Quartet, 7-9 p.m. today, Ozark Christian College Chapel, 1111 N. Main St. FREE admission, accepting donations. 417-625-1822; pro musicajoplin.org

THEATER

“Disney’s Little Mermaid Jr.,” presented by Springfield Little Theatre, 7:30 p.m. today (continues through Sunday), the Landers Theatre, 311 E. Walnut St. Tickets: $15, $12 for ages 14 and younger. 417-869-1334; springfieldlittletheatre.org Mozart’s “Cosi fan Tutte,” presented by Springfield Regional Opera Lyric Theatre and starring Robert McNichols Jr., 7:30 p.m. today (continues through Sunday), Springfield Art Museum, 1111 Brookside Drive.

Performed in English. Directed by Ann Marie Daehn and conducted by Amy Muchnick. Tickets: $15$30; $10 student rush. 417-8631960; srolyrictheatre.org Marshfield: “Forever Plaid,” presented by Marshfield Community Theatre, 7 p.m. today (continues through Sunday), 420 S. Marshall St. Tickets: $12; $6 youth. marshfieldtheatre.org/ Home.html; 417-501-5628

25 FRIDAY COMEDY

MainStage presents: Improv Sportz, 8 p.m. Friday; Save Ferrous, 10 p.m. Friday, Skinny Improv Comedy Theatre, 308 South Ave. Admission is $12; $10 students; late show admission is pay what you will. 417-831-5233; theskinnyimprov.com Branson: Jim Belushi & The Chicago Board of Comedy, 8-10 p.m. Friday, the Oak Ridge


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10.24.2013 Weekend inflatables, laser tag, tattoos, cotton candy, popcorn and candy. FREE admission with a donation of one canned food item to Least of These food pantry. nixa.com

Boys Theatre, 464 Missouri 248. Tickets: $45. 866-707-4100; oak ridgeboystheatre.com

DANCE

Nixa: Live Band Dance, 7 p.m. Friday, Nixa Senior Center, 404 S. Main St. Cover charge. 417-7252322

Ozark: The OC’s Forest FunTacular! 5:30-8:30 p.m. Friday (continues Saturday), The Ozark Community Center, 1530 W. Jackson St. Features safe trick-ortreating, carnival games, storytelling, kid-friendly movie, concessions. Admission: Trick or Treat Forest is $4; includes safe trick-ortreating, storyteller/fire-pit, outdoor movie, plus one 50 cent carnival game ticket. 417-5817002; ozarkmissouri.com

EVENTS

Advanced Sushi Techniques with Chef Marty, 6-7:30 p.m. Friday, Hy-Vee Club Room, 1720 W. Battlefield Road. Cost: $10. Register: 417-881-1950 Boo Bash, 6-8 p.m. Friday, Pat Jones YMCA, 1901 E. Republic Road and G. Pearson Ward YMCA, 417 S. Jefferson Ave. Features a sock hop, haunted maze, face painting, candy, prizes, costume contests. FREE 417-862-7456

Republic: » BOOgie Bash, 5:30-8 p.m., Friday, Republic Community Center, 711 E. Miller Road. The Halloween-themed event features games, crafts, face painting, hayrides, costume contest and music. Admission is $3 for children ages 2-12 (includes a goody bag filled with Halloween treats). 417-732-3500.

Boobapalooza 2013, 7-10 a.m. Friday, Coyote’s Adobe Cafe, 1742 S. Glenstone Ave. Includes breakfast, a silent auction and T-shirt. Cost of meal: $7. Proceeds benefit Breast Cancer Foundation of the Ozarks. alice955.com Boxing for a Cause, 7 p.m. Friday, doors at 5 p.m., Ramada Plaza Hotel and Oasis Convention Center, 2546 N. Glenstone Ave. Proceeds benefit Springfield Workshop Foundation, ARC of the Ozarks and charities benefiting local law enforcement. Admission: $10, $15 and $20. 417-865-0500; email: info@body smithpilates.com Chili, Soup and Bingo, 4 p.m. Friday, Springfield South Side Senior Center, 2215 S. Fremont Ave. Cost of meal: $3.50-$4. 417-890-1313 An Evening with Daniel Woodrell, 7 p.m. Friday, Plaster Student Union Theater, 1110 E. Madison St., campus of Missouri State University. Woodrell, acclaimed author of “Winter’s Bone,” will read from his latest book, “The Maid’s Version.” FREE 417-836-6565 Fall Revival and 146th Church Anniversary, 7 p.m. Friday, Washington Avenue Baptist Church, 1722 N. National Ave. Guest speaker will be Bishop Kenneth Robinson of Antioch Full Gospel Baptist Church, Little Rock, Ark. 417-866-2750 Friday Flix: “Ghostbusters,” 8 p.m. Friday, Gillioz Theatre, 325 Park Central East. Tickets: $5. 417-863-9491; gillioztheatre.com Friends of the SpringfieldGreene County Library Fall

9

» Undead Prom Costume Party, 6 p.m. Friday, Republic Branch Library, 912 N. Lindsey Ave. Grades 4-12. FREE 417-7327284; thelibrary.org

Silver Dollar City’s National Harvest Festival continues through Saturday. The Branson theme park is filled with more than 125 visiting craftspeople from around the country, Western musicians and stunt show, cowboy poets and more. Tickets and information: 800-831-4386; silverdollarcity.com SILVER DOLLAR CITY Book Sale, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Friday (continues through Sunday), Remington’s, 1655 W. Republic Road. FREE admission. Info: email friends@thelibrary.org Ghost Tours, 8 and 10 p.m. Friday, Pythian Castle, 1451 E. Pythian St. Cost: $15. 417-8651464; http://pythiancastle.com Corn Maze and Pumpkin Patch, 5-10 p.m. Friday (continues through Sunday), Rutledge-Wilson Park Farm, 3825 W. Farm Road 146. All ages. Pumpkins sold by weight. Corn maze: $3.50 for ages 5-11; $5 for ages 12 and older. 417-837-5949; park board.org Haunted Trail, includes hayride to trail entrance, 6-10 p.m. Friday (continues Saturday), RutledgeWilson Farm Park, 3825 W. Farm Road 146. Admission is $5; ages 12 and younger must be accompanied by an adult. 417-8375949; parkboard.org

Monster Mash Storytime, 10 a.m. Friday, Midtown Carnegie Branch Library, 397 E. Central St. Dress up, trick or treat and enjoy a monstrous story time. All ages. FREE 417-862-0135; thelibrary .org Prescription drug take back event, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Friday, Findlay Student Center Circle, campus of Drury University, 900 N. Benton Ave. FREE 417-8736871 Sports Card Show, Friday (continues through Sunday), Battlefield Mall, 2825 S. Glenstone Ave., during mall hours. 417-883-4111; simon.com/mall/ battlefield-mall Springfield Art Museum Trivia Night, 6 p.m. Friday, Springfield Art Museum conference room, 1111 Brookside Drive. Trivia groups of 2-5 people are welcome to participate with trivia based on the theme of Hallow-

een and art history. FREE admission. Ages 18 and older. springfieldmo.gov/art; 417-837-5700; email: artmuseum@springfield mo.gov Teen Friday Nights, 6-8 p.m. Friday, Library Station, 2535 N. Kansas Expressway. Games, crafts and special events. Grades 6-12. FREE 417-865-1340; thelibrary. org Battlefield: City Hall Haunt, 6-8 p.m. Friday, Battlefield City Hall, 5434 S. Tower Drive. FREE 417-883-5840 Billings: St. Joseph’s Annual Craft Show, 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Friday (continues Saturday), St. Joseph Catholic Church, 100 Washington Ave. Arts and crafts and bake sale. Soup and salad luncheon at 11 a.m. Saturday. 417-732-6180; email: 1970 mustang@sbcglobal .net Branson: Silver Dollar City’s

Willard: Dungeon of Doom Haunted House, 5:30-10 p.m. Friday (continues Saturday), Willard Recreation Center, 133 N. Missouri Z. Admission: $3. 417742-2262 or http://www.willard parks.com/trunk-or-treat-andhaunted-house.html National Harvest Festival, Friday (continues Saturday), Silver Dollar City, 399 Silver Dollar City Parkway. More than 125 craftspeople and artists from across the country will demonstrate their skills. Features Western stunt show, music, Texas Trick Riders. Tickets and information: 800-831-4386; silverdollarcity.com Hollister: Hair Raising Fundraiser, presented by Tri-Lakes United Way, 5:30 p.m. Friday, Ye Olde English Inn. The overnight ghost hunt includes dinner and a professional spirit guide and area historians. Proceeds benefit Tri-Lakes United Way. Tickets: $125; includes overnight stay, or $65 for the evening. Ages 21 and older. Reservations: LaDella Thomas, 417-243-2115; email: LThomas@bransoncvb.com Nixa: Halloween Spooktacular at The Center, 6-9 p.m. Friday, Nixa Community Center, 701 N. Taylor Way. Features hayrides,

Eureka Springs, Ark.: » 66th annual Original Ozark Folk Festival, Friday (continues through Sunday). Features the Barefoot Ball, Queen’s Contest, a parade, arts and crafts, FREE music in Basin Spring Park and WoodSongs Old-Time Radio Hour, 7:30 p.m. Saturday at Eureka Springs City Auditorium. Reserved seating: $35-$75. TheAuditorium.org; OzarkFolk Festival.com, WoodSongs.com » 11th annual Mad Hatter’s Ball, presented by Eureka Springs School of the Arts, 6:3011 p.m. Friday, Crescent Hotel, 75 Prospect Ave. Includes a pasta buffet, dancing, cash bar, auction items. Tickets: $50. 479-253-5384; essa-art.org » Fifth annual Voices from Eureka’s Silent City cemetery walking tours, presented by the

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Guide

include balloon art, pumpkin painting, hula hooping, live cooking demonstrations, kids bounce house, gardening education and a Farmer Appreciation Awards ceremony. FREE admission; purchase $1 tickets for food and beverages at the gate. fooddaycelebration.org or Sheila Nichols, at 417-773-2033

Continued from Page 9 Eureka Springs Historical Museum, 5:30-8:30 p.m. Friday (continues Saturday). The living history tours feature live actors telling stories of early citizens of Eureka Springs. Tickets: $10; $5 for ages 12 and younger. Tickets may be purchased at the Chamber of Commerce, Cornerstone Banks or the museum downtown at 95 S. Main St. FREE parking and shuttle service will be provided at the former Victoria Inn parking lot, Ark. 62 East. 479253-9417; eurekaspringshistorical museum.org; email: info@eureka springshistoricalmuseum.org

Haunted Trail, includes hayride to trail entrance, 6-10 p.m. Saturday, Rutledge-Wilson Farm Park, 3825 W. Farm Road 146. Admission is $5; ages 12 and younger must be accompanied by an adult. 417-837-5949; park board.org Farmers Market of the Ozarks, 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday and Tuesday, 4139 S. Nature Center Way, at the new year-round multi-use pavilion at Farmers Park. Trick or Treat and Pumpkin Carving Contest Saturday. Enter by 9 a.m. at the market info hub. 417-766-8711; email: Lane@LoveYourFarmer.com; LoveYourFarmer.com

Mountain Home, Ark.: Autumn in the Ozarks Quilt Show, 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Friday (continues Saturday), Educational Building, Baxter County Fairgrounds, 1507 Fairgrounds Drive. Admission: $5; FREE for ages 11 and younger. 870-425 -1105

THEATER

“Disney’s Little Mermaid Jr.,” presented by Springfield Little Theatre, 7:30 p.m. Friday (continues through Sunday), the Landers Theatre, 311 E. Walnut St. Tickets: $15, $12 for ages 14 and younger. 417-869-1334; springfieldlittletheatre.org Mozart’s “Cosi fan Tutte,” presented by Springfield Regional Opera Lyric Theatre and starring Robert McNichols Jr., 7:30 p.m. Friday (continues through Sunday), Springfield Art Museum, 1111 Brookside Drive. Performed in English. Directed by Ann Marie Daehn and conducted by Amy Muchnick. Tickets: $15$30; $10 student rush. 417-8631960; srolyrictheatre.org Marshfield: “Forever Plaid,” presented by Marshfield Community Theatre, 7 p.m. Friday (continues through Sunday), 420 S. Marshall St. Tickets: $12; $6 youth. marshfieldtheatre.org/ Home.html; 417-501-5628

26 SATURDAY COMEDY

MainStage presents: Improve Sportz, 8 p.m. Saturday; Down the Rabbit Hole, 10 p.m. Saturday, Skinny Improv Comedy Theatre, 308 South Ave. Admission is $12; $10 students; late show admission is pay what you will. 417-831-5233; theskinny improv.com

In the mood for scares? The Hotel of Terror is open at 334 N. Main St.. Hours are 7 p.m.-1:30 a.m. Friday-Saturday and Halloween; 7-11:30 p.m. Sunday-Wednesday. Hotel may close one hour early depending on attendance. Admission is $11 Sunday-Thursday, $13 Friday-Saturday. NEWS-LEADER FILE PHOTO

DANCE

Nixa: Live Band Dance, 7 p.m. Saturday, Nixa Senior Center, 404 S. Main St. Cover charge. 417725-2322

EVENTS

Antique Festival of the Ozarks, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday (continues Sunday); Ozark Empire Fairgrounds, 3001 N. Grant Ave. Admission: $5. 417-8332660; ozarkempirefair.com Beginning Genealogy, 9:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday, the Library Center, 4653 S. Campbell Ave. Adults. FREE; registration required. 417-616-0534; thelibrary .org Book Signing, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday, Library Center, 4653 S. Campbell Ave. Peter Longley will sell and sign copies of his latest book, “Forsythia.” FREE 417-6160566; thelibrary.org Book Signing, noon Saturday, Barnes and Noble, 3055 S. Glen-

stone Ave. Lisa Livingston-Martin will sign copies of her books, “Missouri’s Wicked Route 66,” “Haunted Joplin: Civil War Ghosts of Southwest Missouri” and “Haunted Cathage.” FREE 417-885-0026 Third annual BoogerMan Trick or Treat for Breast Cancer, stands open at 3:30 p.m.; racing at 5:30 p.m. Saturday, Springfield Raceway, 2110 N. Farm Road 123. FREE admission for kids in costume with giveaways and candy. Adult admission: $15. 417-863-0097; springfieldrace way.com Centennial Celebration of the Historic Greene County Courthouse, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday, 940 N. Boonville Ave. The ceremony opens with the Central High School Choir singing the national anthem and a Sheriff’s Office Color Guard. Tours of the courthouse will include displays of historic sites and events and stories of famous trials and

happenings in the courthouse narrated by former Greene County Prosecutor Dee Wampler. Former Greene County Presiding Commissioner David Coonrod will present a history of the courthouse at 12:15 p.m. FREE; refreshments provided. Info: Dee Wampler, 417-882-9300, or David J. Eslick, 417-889-9332 The Colorectal Rundie 5K Run/Walk, 8 a.m. Saturday, CoxHealth Meyer Center, 3545 S. National Ave. Entry fee: $20, $45 family; event day entry fee is $25 and $60. 417-269-7037 Conservation TEEN Club: Reunion, 6-8 p.m. Saturday, Springfield Conservation Nature Center, 4601 S. Nature Center Way. If you have ever attended a Conservation TEEN Club event, you and your family are invited to an anniversary reunion barbecue and program. All ages. FREE; registration required. 417-8884237

Corn Maze and Pumpkin Patch, 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Saturday (continues Sunday), RutledgeWilson Park Farm, 3825 W. Farm Road 146. All ages. Pumpkins sold by weight. Corn maze: $3.50 for ages 5-11; $5 for ages 12 and older. 417-837-5949; parkboard .org Halloween-Fest, 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday (continues Sunday), Rutledge Wilson Farm Park, 3825 W. Farm Road 146. Wear a costume and join in with arts and crafts, games and a hayride. Admission is $1. The pumpkin patch and corn maze are open for an additional fee. 417-8375949; parkboard.org Harvest Party, in celebration of Springfield Food Day 2013, 5-9 p.m. Saturday, Farmers Market of the Ozarks pavilion, 4139 S. Nature Center Way. Local farmers, restaurants and vendors will serve local food. Musical entertainment includes Barak Hill and Dallas Jones. Other activities

Friends of the SpringfieldGreene County Library Fall Book Sale, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday, (continues Sunday), Remington’s, 1655 W. Republic Road. Half-price day is Saturday. Info: email friends@thelibrary.org Ghost Tours, 8 and 10 p.m. Saturday, Pythian Castle, 1451 E. Pythian St. Cost: $15. 417-8651464; pythiancastle.com Greater Springfield Farmers’ Market, 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday (open 8 a.m.-noon Tuesday and Thursday), Battlefield Mall parking lot, 2825 S. Glenstone Ave. 417-887-4585; springfieldfarmers market.com; email: info@spring fieldfarmersmarket.com Haints of the Ozarks and Things That Go Bump in the Night, 9 a.m. Saturday, Morris Center Missouri Room, 301 S. Jefferson Ave. Explore the haunted history, lore and science behind some of the ghost stories of the region. Cost: $50. 417-8368974 Halloween Night at the Museum, 6:30-9:30 p.m. Saturday, Discovery Center, 438 St. Louis St. Wear your costume and explore scientific activity stations. All ages. Admission: $10 non-members; $7 members, FREE for ages 2 and younger. 417-862-9910; discoverycenter.org Halloween Storytime, 11 a.m.

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Night Life NEWS LEADER § NEWS-LEADER.COM

10.24.2013 Weekend

Missouri 248, 866-707-4100; oakridgeboystheatre.com: John Michael Montgomery, 8 p.m. Saturday, $43.50 The Outland Ballroom, 324 South Ave., 417-869-7625: FearFest with Population: O with Fiera, Death May Die, 8 p.m. today, no cover; Roger Creager and the Cole Porter Band, 9 p.m. Friday, cover; Halloween Throwdown with Speakeasy and Kentucky Knife Fight, 9 p.m. Saturday, cover; He is Legend with Over the Winter and Dead Ties, 6 p.m. Sunday, cover

Listings are provided as a reader service. Bands or venues are responsible for calling in weekly play dates. Call Barbara Palmer on Mondays or Tuesdays at 836-1184.

The Alibi Lounge, 2109 N. Glenstone Ave., 417-865-3700: Karaoke with DJ Tracy, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. today-Saturday, no cover

American Legion Post 676, located at the new Barn House Events Complex, 5484 W. Sunshine St., 417-882-4676: Karaoke with Dave Spencer, 6:30-10 p.m. today, no cover; Dave Spencer & the Dixie Creek Band, 6-10 p.m. Sunday, cover Archie’s Lounge, 1817 E. Grand St., 417-864-4109: The Rock Mob Syndicate, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. FridaySaturday, no cover Branson Tribute Theatre, 3310 W. Missouri 76, Branson, 417-2391000: Don’t Stop Believin’ — Journey Tribute Band, 8 p.m. today, Sunday and Tuesday, cover Cartoons Bar & Grill, 1614 S. Glenstone Ave., 417-849-1009: Honky Tonk Renovators with special guests Craig Cook & the Marauders, doors at 8 p.m. Friday, cover; Halloween Party with Members Only, doors at 7 p.m. Saturday, cover; Challenger’s Sports Bar & Grill, 5739 S. Campbell Ave., 417-8896060: Art Bentley, 9 p.m. today, no cover; Act A Fool, 9 p.m. Friday, cover; Open Fire, 9 p.m. Saturday, cover Cody’s South, 1440 E. Republic Road, 417-883-0253: Soup of the Day, 7 p.m. today, no cover; Bob Bobo Davidson, 5-8 p.m. Friday, no cover; JD & the Mudhounds, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Friday, cover; Littlefield, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Saturday, cover; Karaoke with George Luce, 7 p.m. Wednesday, no cover Crazy Hat Lounge, 2000 N. National Ave., 417-866-9212: Karaoke, 10 a.m.-1:30 a.m. Monday-Saturday; noon-midnight Sunday, no cover

CreekSide Pub, 3830 S. Lone Pine Ave., 417-882-1899: Corey J., 7 p.m. today, cover; Karaoke, 8 p.m.-midnight Friday, no cover; Reed Waddle, 9 p.m. Saturday, cover

Dennis’ Place, 921 W. Sunshine St., 417-865-8373: Karaoke, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. today, no cover; Open Fire, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Friday, cover; Sweet Tea and Distortion, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Saturday, cover; Karaoke, 9 p.m. Sunday, no cover; DJ and Karaoke, 9 p.m. Wednesday, no cover Down The Hill Pub, 2916 S. Lone Pine Ave., 417-655-1222: Corey J, 8-11 p.m. Friday, no cover Downtown Halloween Pub Crawl, Instinct Nightclub, Blue Bull, Tropical Liqueurs, Bugsy Malones, Mudlounge, Finnegan’s Wake, Ophelia’s, Patton Alley Pub, Harbells, Barcade, Kai, Farmer’s Gastropub, Milles, Coyote’s Sports Cafe and Trolleys, 9 p.m. Saturday, $10 advance; $15 door; downtownspringfieldbars.com Dublin’s Pass Irish Pub downtown, 317 Park Central East, 417-862-7625: Hamburger Cows, 10 p.m Friday, no cover; Sock Monkey, 10 p.m. Saturday, no cover; Mark Barger, 9 p.m. Tuesday, no cover Dublin’s Pass Irish Pub south side, 2767 W. Republic Road, 417-8777625: Allen Ross, 9 p.m. Friday, no cover; Smiley Miller, 9 p.m. Saturday, no cover The Dugout, 1218 E. Trafficway, 417-866-2255: Casey Lynne & the Deal Breakers, 9 p.m. Friday, no cover Ernie Biggs, 213 South Ave., 417-865-4782: Dueling pianos, 8 p.m.-1 a.m. Friday-Saturday, cover The Flea, 637 S. Kimbrough Ave., 417-862-0220: Kyle Young and

11

Pappy’s Place, 943 N. Main Ave., 417-866-8744: The Rev and Stormin’ Monkey, 3-6 p.m. Saturday, no cover; Ila and Scotty, 6-8 p.m. Monday, no cover; Chris and Corey, 6-8 p.m. Wednesday, no cover

The Cole Porter Band, pictured, plays with Roger Creager at 9 p.m. Friday at the Outland Ballroom, 324 South Ave. There is a cover charge. NEWS-LEADER FILE PHOTO Brandon Moore, 9 p.m. today, no cover; Techs & the Roadies, 9 p.m. Friday, no cover; Halloween Costume Party with Lilly Bee & the Pollinators, 9 p.m. Saturday, no cover Frisco Tap Tavern, 504 E. Commercial St., 417-865-7432: Karaoke, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. FridaySaturday, no cover Friends Karaoke Pub, 1211B W. Battlefield Road, 417-882-1517: Karaoke, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. today, Friday, Saturday and Wednesday, no cover Galloway Station, 1281 E. Republic Road, 417-881-9730: Halloween Party with IRoc, 9 p.m. Saturday, cover; Galloway Irish Jam Session, 7-9 p.m. Monday, no cover Gillioz Theatre, 325 Park Central East, 417-863-9491; gillioztheatre.com: film screening of “The Wrecking Crew,” studio musicians behind several hits of the 1960s and ’70s, 7:30 p.m. today $10; Neewollah Bar Creep with Jesse & the Rippers, 10:30 p.m. Saturday, cover; Gordon Lightfoot, 8 p.m. Tuesday, $30-$95; An Evening with Steve Vai, 8 p.m. Wednesday, $50-$25 The Hangout, 1906 E. Meadowmere St., 417-862-9911: The Bluesberries, 8 p.m.-midnight Friday, no cover; Blues Society of the Ozarks Memphis Bound Blues Challenge with the Cottengim Brothers, Gary Alexander, Kentucky Gentlemen, Mark Montgomery, Mark Rosen, Nina Melody,

Soggy Soybeans, Stella and Maddog, doors at noon, music at 1 p.m. Saturday, $10. Info: tome@bluessocietyoftheozarks.com Jalen’s Lounge, 1611 N. Campbell Ave., 417-862-5033: R & B Soul Music with DJ Jeff, 9 p.m. Friday, no cover; Halloween Party with Sarah the DJ, 8 p.m. Saturday, cover; NFL Live Madden Tournament, 3 p.m. Sunday, no cover; Comedy Night Open Mic with Steve Leck, 9 p.m. Monday, no cover; Karaoke, 8:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. Wednesday, no cover Jimm’s Steakhouse, 1935 S. Glenstone Ave., 417-886-5466: Randy Rudd, 8-11 p.m. FridaySaturday, no cover Jo’s Gather ‘n Place, 2931 E. Chestnut Expressway, 417-8647723: Karaoke with Bailey Entertainment, 7-11 p.m. Friday, no cover Just One More, U.S. 60, Republic, 417-766-3000: Leather and Lace, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Friday-Saturday; Halloween Costume Party, 9 p.m. Saturday, no cover Lil Dallas Sports Bar and Grill, 701 Red Top Road, Fair Grove, 417759-9308: Crossroads Band, 9 p.m. Friday, no cover; John Miner Band, 9 p.m. Saturday, no cover Lindberg’s, 318 W. Commercial St., 417-868-8900: No Dry County, 9 p.m. today, cover; Sketches, Scrapes and Lines, 6:30 p.m. Friday, cover; Violet Vonder

Harr with the Violet Lockets, 9 p.m. Friday, cover; According to Nadia, 6:30 p.m. Saturday, cover; Molotov Latte with Scene of Irony, The Reach Arounds, 9 p.m. Saturday, cover Luttrell’s Auction, 2939 W. Kearney St., 417-861-6701: Kari Garrison, Travis Scott, Roger Blevins, Jerry Menown, Lloyd Hicks, George Gyser, Gale Richey with John Richter, 6 p.m. Saturday, cover Midnight Rodeo, 1773 S. Glenstone Ave., 417-882-0309: KTTS Catch A Rising Star Concert Series with Chase Rice, 7 p.m. Friday $15-$25; Dance Lessons, DJ Tommy T, 7 p.m. Saturday, cover Misty’s Place, 1109 E. Commercial St., 417-868-8808: Karaoke, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Friday-Saturday, no cover Mount Pleasant Winery, 3125 Green Mountain Drive, Branson, 417-336-9463: New Acoustic Jazz Trio, 5-7 p.m. Friday-Saturday and Wednesday, no cover Mulligan’s, 2820 N. Glenstone Ave., 417-869-3900: Terry Armes, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. FridaySaturday, no cover Neewollah Bar Creep, Gillioz Theatre, Ernie Biggs Piano Bar, Dublin’s Pass Downtown, Big Whiskeys, Vintage Dancelounge and Parlor 88 Downtown, 10 p.m. Saturday; Facebook; gillioztheatre.com Oak Ridge Boys Theatre, 464

Parlor 88 South, 1111 E. Republic Road, 417-882-8882: Third annual Halloween Masquerade with Sequel Dose, 9 p.m. Saturday, cover Patton Alley, 313 S. Patton Ave., 417-865-1188: Halloween Pub Crawl with Shawn James & the Shapeshifters, 10 p.m. Saturday, cover Schultz & Dooley’s, 2210 W. Chesterfield Blvd., 417-885-0060: Karaoke, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. FridaySaturday, no cover Springfield Brewing Company, 301 S. Market Ave., 417-832-8277: 180 featuring Kristi Merideth, 8 p.m. today, no cover; John Strickler Trio, 6-9 p.m. Friday, no cover; the Ryan Talbot Experience, 6-9 p.m. Saturday, no cover; AKA, 9 p.m. Saturday, cover; Molly Healey and Dallas Jones, 7 p.m. Sunday, no cover; Ken Hopper, 6 p.m. Wednesday, no cover Step 13, 3165 S. Campbell Ave., 417-887-1320: Allen Ross and Brandon Burough, 8 p.m.midnight today, no cover; Triple Shot, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Saturday, cover Three 20’s, 3005 S. Kansas Expressway, 417-881-1520: The Stonehorse Band, 9 p.m. Friday, cover; The Mark Chapman Band, 9 p.m. Saturday, cover Wacky Jack’s Saloon, 3632 Missouri EE, Highlandville, 417-4430223: Karaoke with DJ Chris, 8:30 p.m.-midnight today; Big Iron, 8 p.m.-midnight Friday, no cover; Karaoke, 8:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. Saturday, no cover


12 Weekend 10.24.2013

NEWS LEADER NEWS-LEADER.COM §

art: 11th annual Stone County Art Studio Tour

Artists in Stone County join forces for tour By Camille Dautrich FOR THE NEWS-LEADER

Quick — name a town with “Spring” in its title that’s known for its artists. Did you say Eureka Springs? You’re right, of course, but there’s a place even closer with a long tradition of working artists and craftspeople. It’s Reeds Spring, just down the road, and this Saturday, a group of local studios and galleries will be open to visitors who want to spend the day browsing through everything from pottery to mosaics to jewelry to watercolors. The 11th annual Stone County Art Studio Tour will also include artists in Galena and Kimberling City. Maps to all the venues will be provided at each location, or if you prefer, you can download one from the group’s Facebook page. Many, if not most, of these artists have their workplaces open on a regular basis, but artist Mark Oehler, owner of Omega Pottery, said this is a convenient way for visitors to make optimum use of their time. “By joining resources,” Oehler said, “these local artists can offer a broader, more enjoyable experience to a greater number of people by creating a tour of all the studios on the same weekend.” The tour is sponsored by the following studios: Toad’s Tool Copper Shop, Hess Pottery and Baskets, Omega Pottery, Karen Deeds Watercolors, Gallery at the Lake, Flutter Jewelry & Ozark Reflections, New Coast Gallery and Tablerock Art Guild Gallery.

Mosaic and glass work by Bruce Anderson will be shown at New Coast Gallery.

The Gallery at the Lake is among the venues on the 11th annual Stone County Art Studio Tour. SUBMITTED PHOTOS This bracelet is from Flutter Jewelry & Ozark Reflections in Galena.

Terracotta pie plates by Tom Hess and pine needle baskets by Lory Brown can be seen at Hess Pottery and Baskets.

Hundreds of original works will be on offer, and visitors will have the chance to interact directly with artists. Several artists will also be demonstrating how they create their art. Longtime area artists such as Oehler, along with Tom Hess and Lory Brown, whose yurt-style studio between Reeds

Spring and Galena has been on the tour for years, will be part of the day, but there are also several new studios and artists exhibiting as well. New this year will be mosaic and glass work by Bruce Anderson, which will be shown at New Coast Gallery. Anderson is the creator of Aza the Goddess in Eureka Springs, Ark.,

which was featured in this column about a year ago. In this year’s tour, Anderson will be exhibiting several of his decorative mirrors. Anderson began working with mosaics at Reeds Spring’s Rock House, the home he shares with Jeanette Bair, designing and decorating a series of columns. From there he

Mark Oehler of Omega Pottery created this piece of carved pottery.

moved on to Aza and then to carefully crafted mirrors. “It seemed like sort of a natural thing to do,” Anderson said. “I had seen other mirrors by other artists and thought, ‘I could do that.’ “We needed mirrors around the Rock House, and so I made some. Those have been long sold, so I’ve

made more.” In addition to his mirrors, Anderson will also have other glass pieces, such as sun catchers and mobiles, at the gallery. Studios will be open from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday, and entry to all venues is free. For more information, visit Stone County Art Tour on Facebook or call 417-272-3283.


NEWS LEADER § NEWS-LEADER.COM

Guide

Center, 4653 S. Campbell Ave. Free admission, accepting donations. 417-875-5787; oa.org

Continued from Page 10 Saturday, Barnes and Noble, 3055 S. Glenstone Ave. Stories, activities, a costume parades and treats. FREE 417-885-0026 Halloween Storytime Stomp, 2-3 p.m. Saturday, Brentwood Branch Library, 2214 Brentwood Blvd. All ages. FREE; registration required. 417-883-1974; thelibrary.org Halloween Train Rides, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday (continues Sunday), 1100 N. Airport Blvd. FREE admission and parking. 417-866-6359; joplin springfield railway.com Hike and Float for families, 1-4 p.m. Saturday, Springfield Conservation Nature Center, 4601 S. Nature Center Way. Hike two miles on the nature center and Ozark Greenways trails, then float back to the nature center on Lake Springfield. Ages 12 and older with an adult mentor. FREE; registration required. 417-888-4237 Kickapoo Ozarks Food Harvest Fall Carnival, 6-8:30 p.m. Saturday, Kickapoo High School cafeteria, 3710 S. Jefferson Ave. Games, trunk or treating, haunted house, tattoo parlor. Admission is two canned food items a person. 417-523-8500 Make A Difference Day, a national day of community service, Saturday. Several volunteer opportunities are available. Volunteer with a group or choose your own project. Visit makeadifferenceday.com and click “project search.” Fifth annual Making Strides Against Breast Cancer threemile walk, 9 a.m., registration at 8 a.m. Saturday, Jordan Valley Park, 635 E. Trafficway St. Register: 800-227-2345; 417-881-4668; MakingStridesswmo.org Monster Mash Costume Parade, 11 a.m. Saturday, Library Station, 2535 N. Kansas Expressway. All ages. FREE 417-8651340; thelibrary.org “Moxie Mornings,” 10 a.m. Saturday, Moxie Cinema, 431 S. Jefferson Ave, Suite 103. Bring your 2- to 6-year-old for films, art and fun. FREE moxiecinema.com Overeaters’ Anonymous: Hope for the Holidays... Joy without Compulsive Eating, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday, Library

Ozark Coin Club’s Fall Coin Show, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday (continues Sunday), Ozark Empire Fairgrounds E-Plex, 3001 N. Grant Ave. FREE admission. 417-862-3867 Prescription Drug Take Back Event and Grant Beach Neighborhood Cleanup, 7 a.m.-noon Saturday, parking lot of Central Assembly of God, 1301 N. Boonville Ave. Residents of Grant Beach neighborhood can remove trash, appliances and other bulky items from their homes and yards and dispose of unused or expired prescription medications. FREE 417-631-4296 Pumpkin Carnival, 6-7:30 p.m. Saturday, Covenant Presbyterian Church, 2441 S. Lone Pine Ave. Features bounce, crafts, games, spooky science, laser-maze challenge, prizes, food, costume parade, pumpkin patch. Families with children ages birth-12 years. FREE admission. 417-881-4449; email: The Railroad Historical Museum, Inc., open 2 to 4 p.m. Saturdays, Grant Beach Park, 1300 N. Grant Ave. FREE admission. 417-865-6829 “Rocky Horror Picture Show” and the Rocky Horror House Band, 8 p.m., doors at 6:30 p.m. Saturday, Gillioz Theatre, 325 Park Central East. Tickets: $12 advance; $15 door. 417-863-9491; gillioztheatre.com Softball Day for Children with Autism, 9-11 a.m. Saturday, Harrison Field, campus of Drury University, 900 N. Benton Ave. FREE 618-406-6904 Solemn Evensong for All Hallows Eve celebration, 5 p.m. Saturday, St. John’s Episcopal Church, 515 E. Division St. The clergy and choir will offer a service of songs and readings for All Hallows Eve. FREE 417-8696351 Spooky Halloween Science and Costume Party, 7 p.m. Saturday, Library Center, 4653 S. Campbell Ave. K-6. FREE; registration required. 417-882-0714; thelibrary.org Sports Card Show, Saturday (continues Sunday), Battlefield Mall, 2825 S. Glenstone Ave., during mall hours. 417-883-4111; simon.com/mall/battlefield-mall Springfield Writers’ Guild

10.24.2013 Weekend meeting, 11 a.m. Saturday, Heritage Cafeteria, 1364 E. Battlefield Rod. Sharon KizziahHolmes will speak to the group about self-publishing. 417-8319921

Church, 100 Washington Ave. Arts and crafts and bake sale. Soup and salad luncheon at 11 a.m. Saturday. 417-732-6180; email: 1970 mustang@ sbcglobal.net

Tai Chi demonstration and class, 11 a.m.-noon Saturday, Mizumoto Japanese Stroll Garden in Nathanael Greene Park, 2400 S. Scenic Ave. The class, led by Chuck Mercer, is FREE; there is a $3 entrance fee to the stroll garden. 417-891-1515; Friends oftheGarden.org

Branson:

Taste of Home Cooking School, noon-6 p.m. Saturday, Springfield Expo Center, 635 St. Louis St. Vendor shopping begins at noon; show starts at 3 p.m. Tickets: $10 advance; $15 at door. Chris Louzader: 417-447-2043, clouzader@mwfmarketing.fm; Tasteofhome.com Thriller on C-Street, 4 p.m. family show, 7:30 p.m. PG-13 show Saturday, Commercial Street between Boonville and Robberson avenues. FREE 417869-6789; cstreetzombiecorps .com Trunk or Treat, 4-5 p.m. Saturday, Pathways United Methodist Church, 1232 E. Dale St. FREE 417-866-4378 Voyage of the Imagination, 1 p.m. Saturday, Barnes and Noble, 3055 S. Glenstone Ave. Kids are invited to create and share adventure-themed stories with Rory’s Story Cubes and Jungle Animals Make-a-Mask. FREE 417-885-2006. 2013 Zombie Rock4Kids Run, presented by Bass Pro Fitness Festival, 10:30 a.m., registration opens at 9:15 a.m. Saturday, Rutledge-Wilson Farm Park, 3825 W. Farm Road 146. Entry fee: $18. Info: fitness.basspro.com; email: fitness@basspro.com Wesley United Methodist Church annual Extravaganza & Vendor Village, 8 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday, Wesley United Methodist Church, 922 W. Republic Road. Features vendors, rummage sale and silent auction, a bake shop and lunch available for $5. FREE admission. 417-6550024 Battlefield: Happy Harvest Festival, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday, First Baptist Church of Battlefield, 4422 W. 2nd St. FREE 417-8619747 Billings: St. Joseph’s Annual Craft Show, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday, St. Joseph Catholic

» Final day of 2013 Silver Dollar City’s National Harvest Festival, Saturday, Silver Dollar City, 399 Silver Dollar City Parkway. More than 125 craftspeople and artists from across the country will demonstrate their skills. Features Western stunt show, music, Texas Trick Riders. Tickets and information: 800-831-4386; silverdollarcity.com

Festival, 2-6 p.m. Saturday, Sonrise Baptist Church, 1701 S. 6th St. FREE admission. 417-8379830 » Fall Fest, 4-7 p.m. Saturday, Ozark United Methodist Church, 2850 Missouri 14. FREE admission. 417-581-6853; ozarkumc.org

Saturday, Christian County Library, 1005 N. 4th Ave. Listen to author and ghost hunter Wesley Fox from Branson Paranormal Chasers recount his adventures ghost hunting in the Ozarks and discuss his experiences living in a haunted house. FREE 417-5812432

» Ghost Hunting in the Ozarks with Wesley Fox, 10-11:30 a.m.

See GUIDE, Page 14

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» Table Rock Zombie 5K, to benefit St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, 4 p.m. Saturday, Table Rock State Park, 5272 Missouri 165. Silent auction before and after the race. dance bransonschoolofthearts.com

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Carthage: Fall Festival, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday, Leggett & Plattce, 1 Leggett Road. Arts and crafts, live music, petting zoo, pumpkin patch, hayride, games. Proceeds benefit the United Way. FREE admission. 417-358-8131 Joplin: Twilight Thriller, 6:30 p.m. Saturday, Joplin’s Frisco Greenway South Trailhead, 955 E. North St. Features 10K-, 5K- and one-mile distances. Dress in your spookiest Halloween costume for this run. Registration deadline: Oct. 25. Details: starlitrunningco @gmail.com.

13

HOMEMADE down

to the last bite

53rd Anniversary Special

Nixa: Community Breakfast, 7-10 a.m. Saturday, Nixa Senior Center, 404 S. Main St. Members of Nixa City Council will be available to address community concerns and questions. Cost: $4; $3 for ages 12-5. 417-725-2322 Ozark: » Christian County Bark For Life, noon-3 p.m. Saturday, on the grounds of Ozark Veterinary Clinic, 1802 Missouri 14 East. Features a silent auction, petting zoo, pet Halloween costume contest, a silly pet tricks contest, face painting, demonstrations by a local dog trainer and a concessions tent with hamburgers and hot dogs for sale. Proceeds benefit American Cancer Society Relay for Life. 417-581-2414

53¢

ALL HOMEMADE DESSERTS All homemade desserts 53¢ per piece with the purchase of an entree. DINE-IN ONLY. LIMIT ONE PER ENTREE. TAX NOT INCLUDED OFFER VALID OCTOBER 23-31, 2013

» Civil War Lantern Light Tour, 7 p.m. Saturday, Smallin Civil War Cave, 3575 N. Smallin Road. Admission: $29.95. 417-551-4545; smallincave.com » 10th annual Community Fall

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14 Weekend 10.24.2013

Guide Continued from Page 13 » The OC’s Forest Fun-Tacular! 5:30-8:30 p.m. Saturday, The Ozark Community Center, 1530 W. Jackson St. Features safe trick-or-treating, carnival games, storytelling, kid-friendly movie, concessions. Admission: Trick or Treat Forest is $4; includes safe trick-or-treating, storyteller/firepit, outdoor movie, plus one 50 cent carnival game ticket. 417581-7002; ozarkmissouri.com » Oktoberfest, 6:30-11 p.m. Saturday, Elks Lodge #2777, 2400 N. 18th St. Featuring German food, beer tasting and music by the Steve Moeller Band. Proceeds benefit the Elks Foundation charities. Tickets: $15. 417-5814190 Reeds Spring, Galena and Kimberling City: 11th annual Art Studio Tour, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday, Toad’s Tool Copper Shop, Hess Pottery & Baskets, Omega Pottery Shop, Karen Deeds Watercolors, Gallery at The Lake, Flutter Jewelry & Ozark Reflections, New Coast Gallery and Tablerock Art Guild Gallery.

NEWS LEADER NEWS-LEADER.COM § The open studio tour will feature many artists creating art in their studios. Art will be for sale during the self-guided tour. FREE admission. 417-272-3283; facebook.com/StoneCountyArt Tour Republic: » Lego Saturday, 11 a.m. Saturday, Republic Branch Library, 912 N. Lindsey Ave. K-5. FREE 417-732-7284; thelibrary.org » Third annual Pumpkin Dash 5k Run/Walk, 7:30 a.m. Saturday, Republic Aquatic Center, 711 E. Miller Road. Entry fee and registration info: 417-299-5533 » Republic Paw Pantry’s Modern Day Pet Photo Contest, 9 a.m.-noon Saturday, Lasting Memories, 200 N. Main St. Professional photo contest will consist of three categories: Best Costume, Picture Perfect and Best Personality. Winner will be announced Nov. 17 via Republic Paw Pantry’s Facebook page. Entry fee will be a 10 pound bag (or larger) of any Purina pet food or $5 cash for each animal. Register your pet: 417-732-4717. Info: 417-893-0086

Sparta: Persimmon Day 5K Run and Fun Walk, 8 a.m. Saturday, Sparta Middle School, 217 Division St. Contact: Dan Leyland, 417-581-2258. Register: actnowracing.com Willard: Dungeon of Doom Haunted House, 5:30-10 p.m. Saturday, admission: $3 and Safe Halloween Trunk or Treat Festival, 5:30-8:30 p.m. Saturday, FREE admission, both at Willard Recreation Center, 133 N. Missouri Z. 417-742-2262; or willardparks.com/trunk-or-treat -and-haunted-house.html Eureka Springs, Ark.: » 18th annual Howl-O-Ween Spooktacular, 7-9 p.m. Saturday, Turpentine Creek Wildlife Refuge, 239 Turpentine Creek Lane. Includes games, food and a children’s costume contest. The main refuge compound will be open to experience the night habits of lions, tigers, cougars, bobcats and grizzly bear Bam Bam. Info: turpentinecreek.org; 479-253-5841 » 66th annual Original Ozark Folk Festival, Saturday (continues Sunday). Features the Barefoot Ball, Queen’s Contest, a

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» Fifth annual Voices from Eureka’s Silent City cemetery walking tours, presented by the Eureka Springs Historical Museum, 5:30-8:30 p.m. Saturday. The living history tours feature live actors telling stories of early citizens of Eureka Springs. Tickets: $10; $5 for ages 12 and younger. Tickets may be purchased at the Chamber of Commerce, Cornerstone Banks or the museum downtown at 95 S. Main St. FREE parking and shuttle service will be provided at the former Victoria Inn parking lot, Ark. 62 East. 479-253-9417; eurekaspringshistoricalmuseum .org; email: info@eurekasprings historicalmuseum.org Mountain Home, Ark.: Autumn in the Ozarks Quilt Show, 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday, Educational Building, Baxter County Fairgrounds, 1507 Fairgrounds Drive. Admission: $5; FREE for ages 11 and younger. 870-425 -1105

MUSIC

Full Throttle Band, 7-9:30 p.m. Saturday, Northview Center, 301 E. Talmage St. Admission: $4. 417-837-5808 Branson: John Michael Montgomery, 8 p.m. Saturday, the Oak Ridge Boys Theatre, 464 Missouri 248. Tickets: $43.50. 866707-4100; oakridgeboystheatre .com

THEATER

“Disney’s Little Mermaid Jr.,” presented by Springfield Little Theatre, 10:30 a.m., 2:30 and 7:30 p.m. Saturday (continues Sunday), the Landers Theatre, 311 E. Walnut St. Tickets: $15, $12 for ages 14 and younger. 417-8691334; springfieldlittletheatre.org Mozart’s “Cosi fan Tutte,” presented by Springfield Regional Opera Lyric Theatre and starring Robert McNichols Jr., 7:30 p.m. Saturday (continues Sunday), Springfield Art Museum, 1111 Brookside Drive. Performed in English. Directed by Ann Marie Daehn and conducted by Amy Muchnick. Tickets: $15-$30; $10 student rush. 417-863-1960; srolyrictheatre.org

1316 E. Republic Road • Springfield, MO 65804 Between Fremont and National

417.882.7997 shopcountrysidecottage.com

parade, arts and crafts, FREE music in Basin Spring Park and WoodSongs Old-Time Radio Hour, 7:30 p.m. Saturday at Eureka Springs City Auditorium. Reserved seating: $35-$75. TheAuditorium.org; OzarkFolk Festival.com, WoodSongs.com

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Marshfield: “Forever Plaid,” presented by Marshfield Community Theatre, 7 p.m. Saturday

(continues Sunday), 420 S. Marshall St. Tickets: $12; $6 youth. marshfieldtheatre.org/ Home.html; 417-501-5628

27 SUNDAY EVENTS

Antique Festival of the Ozarks, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday, Ozark Empire Fairgrounds, 3001 N. Grant Ave. Admission: $5. 417-833-2660; ozarkempirefair .com Corn Maze and Pumpkin Patch, noon-6 p.m. Sunday, Rutledge-Wilson Park Farm, 3825 W. Farm Road 146. All ages. Pumpkins sold by weight. Corn maze: $3.50 for ages 5-11; $5 for ages 12 and older. 417-837-5949; parkboard.org Halloween-Fest, noon-6 p.m. Sunday, Rutledge Wilson Farm Park, 3825 W. Farm Road 146. Wear a costume and join in with arts and crafts, games and a hayride. Admission is $1. The pumpkin patch and corn maze are open for an additional fee. 417-837-5949; parkboard.org Cupcake Club, 2 p.m. Sunday, the Library Center, 4653 S. Campbell Ave. K-6. FREE; registration required. 417-882-0714; thelibrary.org Friends of the SpringfieldGreene County Library Fall Book Sale, 1-5 p.m. Sunday, Remington’s, 1655 W. Republic Road. FREE admission. Info: email friends@thelibrary.org Ghost Tours, 8 and 10 p.m. Sunday, Pythian Castle, 1451 E. Pythian St. Cost: $15. 417-8651464; pythiancastle.com Halloween Train Rides, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday, 1100 N. Airport Blvd. FREE admission and parking. 417-866-6359; joplin springfieldrailway.com Lifetree Cafe, 6-7 p.m. Sunday, Brown Egg Coffee House, 607 E. Madison St. Topic: “Haunted...A ghost hunter’s investigation into the paranormal.” FREE 417-8384631

donations. 417-830-1290; pancan .org Shop and Skate Costume Party, 5-8 p.m. Sunday, Skateport, 3820 S. Glenstone Ave. Inflatables, candy, raffles, shopping. FREE for trick or treaters and shoppers; $5 to skate. 417551-1294 Sports Card Show, Sunday, Battlefield Mall, 2825 S. Glenstone Ave., during mall hours. 417-883-4111; simon.com/mall/ battlefield-mall Trunk-or-Treat, 5-7 p.m. Sunday, Walnut Lawn Church of God, 554 W. Walnut Lawn. FREE admission. 417-881-0826 Walking Tour of downtown Springfield, presented by The Remarkable Arts group, 4 and 7:30 p.m. Sunday, starting and ending at the Wilhoit Plaza parking lot, just off Jefferson Avenue. The 90-minute tour will be presented by magician and author Edward Underwood along with his wife, Karen, with a blend of history and mystery. Cost: $17.50; reservations are recommended. remarkableart s.com; Springfield Mystery Tour Facebook page. Ed Underwood, 417-771-7641; magicufoman @hushmail.com Fruitland: Harvest Festival, 6-8 p.m. Sunday, Fruitland Road Country Church, 9925 N. Farm Road 173. FREE admission. 417-827-9863; fruitlandroad.org Mount Vernon: Zombie Run to benefit the Randy Coldin Corporation for Disabled Children, 1-7 p.m. Sunday, Spirit of 76 Park, 400 N. Main St. Tickets: $10, $13 day of event; tickets for ages 12 and younger: $5 advance, $8 day of run; FREE for ages 4 and younger. 417-4408414 Neosho: The Ozark Mountain Region of the Sports Car Club of America Final Autocross for 2013, 10:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Sunday, registration is 8-10 a.m., Crowder College, 601 Laclede Ave. Entry fees: $20-$35; FREE for spectators. 417-620-249-0870; omrscca.org

Ozark Coin Club’s Fall Coin Show, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Sunday, Ozark Empire Fairgrounds E-Plex, 3001 N. Grant Ave. FREE admission. 417-862-3867

Eureka Springs, Ark.: 66th annual Original Ozark Folk Festival, Sunday. OzarkFolk Festival.com

PurpleLight — National Vigil for Hope for cancer survivors, 7-8 p.m. Sunday, CH Chub O’Reilly Cancer Center, 2055 S. Fremont Ave. FREE admission, accepting

Mark Farner of Grand Funk Railroad, 2 p.m. Sunday, RFD-TV Theatre, 4080 W. Missouri 76. Tickets: $30 and $50. 417-3394663; upcloseconcerts.com

MUSIC


NEWS LEADER § NEWS-LEADER.COM THEATER

“Disney’s Little Mermaid Jr.,” presented by Springfield Little Theatre, 2:30 p.m. Sunday, the Landers Theatre, 311 E. Walnut St. Tickets: $15, $12 for ages 14 and younger. 417-869-1334; springfieldlittletheatre.org Mozart’s “Cosi fan Tutte,” presented by Springfield Regional Opera Lyric Theatre and starring Robert McNichols Jr., 2 p.m. Sunday, Springfield Art Museum, 1111 Brookside Drive. Performed in English. Directed by Ann Marie Daehn and conducted by Amy Muchnick. Tickets: $15-$30; $10 student rush. 417-863-1960; srolyrictheatre.org Marshfield: “Forever Plaid,” presented by Marshfield Community Theatre, 3 p.m. Sunday, 420 S. Marshall St. Tickets: $12; $6 youth. marshfieldtheatre.org/ Home.html; 417-501-5628

28 MONDAY EVENTS

Ghost Tours, 8 and 10 p.m. Monday, Pythian Castle, 1451 E. Pythian St. Cost: $15. 417-8651464; pythiancastle.com Trick or Treat for Kids, 6-8 p.m. Monday, Hy-Vee, 1720 W. Battlefield Road. FREE 417-881-1950 Republic: Pajama Storytime, 7 p.m. Monday, Republic Branch Library, 912 N. Lindsey Ave. Ages 1-6. FREE 417-732-7284; thelibrary.org Willard: Canine Trick-or-Treat, 9:30 a.m.-7 p.m. Monday, Willard Branch Library, 304 E. Jackson St. All ages. Bring your canine family members with you to Willard Branch Library’s drive-up window Oct. 28-31 and they will receive their own treat. Enter a drawing for a gift certificate to All Pet Supplies. Ask for a prize entry slip at the window or pick one up at the check out desk; drawing Nov. 1. Pets are not allowed inside the library. FREE 417-742-4258; thelibrary.org

MUSIC

Full Throttle Band, 7-9:30 p.m. Monday, South Side Senior Center, 2215 S. Fremont Ave. Admission: $4. 417-890-1313

29 TUESDAY EVENTS

America’s Music: A Film History; Rock, 7 p.m. Tuesday, Plaster Student Union Theater, 1110 E.

10.24.2013 Weekend

Madison St., campus of MSU. FREE 417-836-5499 Farmers Market of the Ozarks, 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Tuesday and Saturday, 4139 S. Nature Center Way, at the new year-round multi-use pavilion at Farmers Park. 417-766-8711; email: Lane@LoveYourFarmer.com; LoveYourFarmer.com Ghost Tours, 8 and 10 p.m. Tuesday, Pythian Castle, 1451 E. Pythian St. Tickets: $15. 417-8651464; pythiancastle.com Greater Springfield Farmers’ Market, open 8 a.m.-noon Tuesday and Thursday, 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday, Battlefield Mall parking lot, 2825 S. Glenstone Ave. springfieldfarmersmarket .com; email: info@springfield farmersmarket.com “Kenya: Until Hope is Found” documentary, 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Brentwood Branch Library, 2214 Brentwood Blvd. View the latest documentary by Patrick Mureithi, artist in residence at Drury University. Adults. FREE 417-8831974; thelibrary.org Room on the Broom Storytime, 10 a.m. Tuesday, Barnes and Noble, 3055 S. Glenstone Ave. FREE 417-885-0026 Nixa: Ozarks Community Hospital Christian County Clinic Halloween Fest, 4-7 p.m. Tuesday, OCH Christian County Clinic, 105 S. Ridgecrest Ave. Family, friends and community members are invited for indoor trick-or-treating, fall games and apple cider and cookies. FREE 417-837-4279 Strafford: » Monster Mystery, 3:30 p.m. Tuesday, Strafford Branch Library, 101 S. Missouri 125. Grades 4-8. FREE 417-736-9233; thelibrary.org » “Robot Zombie Frankenstein!” Storytime, 11 a.m. Tuesday, Strafford Branch Library, 101 S. Missouri 125. Crafts, treats and games. All ages. FREE 417-736-9233; thelibrary.org Willard: Pumpkin Parade and Costume Party, 11 a.m.-noon Tuesday, Willard Branch Library, 304 E. Jackson St. Birth-age 6. FREE 417-742-4258; thelibrary .org

MUSIC

Gordon Lightfoot, 8 p.m. Tuesday, Gillioz Theatre, 325 Park Central East. Tickets: $30-$95. 417-863-9491; gillioztheatre.com

30 WEDNESDAY EVENTS

Coffee with Springfield Police Chief Paul Williams, 7-9 a.m. Wednesday, Coffee Ethic, 124 Park Central Square. FREE Fall Block Party, 6-8 p.m. Wednesday, Park Crest Baptist Church, 816 W. Republic Road. Features music, bounce houses, hayrides, food, and trunk or treat. FREE 417-883-1676; park crestbaptist.org Ghost Tours, 8 and 10 p.m. Wednesday, Pythian Castle, 1451 E. Pythian St. Cost: $15. 417-8651464; http://pythiancastle.com Seafood Cookery, 6-7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Hy-Vee Club Room, 1720 W. Battlefield Road. Chef Chadwick will instruct on simple techniques to include seafood in weekly menus, using seasonal and fresh ingredients. FREE Register: 417-881-1950 Fair Grove: Monthly Macabre: “Spanish Dracula,” not rated, 4 p.m. Wednesday, Fair Grove Branch Library, 81 S. Orchard Ave. Grades 7-12. FREE 417-759-2637; thelibrary.org

p.m. Saturday-Sunday and weeknights, 5-8 p.m. Monday-Oct. 31, Bass Pro Shops Outdoor World, 1935 S. Campbell Ave. Activities include a FREE photo with life-size cutouts of Peanuts characters, coloring sheets, Halloween scavenger hunts, crafts, a Halloween costume parade and trick-or-treating 6-7 p.m. nightly through Oct. 31. Event schedule: basspro.com/ halloween » Halloween Spooktacular, featuring hundreds of handcarved jack-o’-lanterns, 6:30-9 p.m. nightly through Oct. 31, Dickerson Park Zoo, 1401 W. Norton Road. Children ages 12 and younger will receive candy treats. Children are encouraged to wear costumes, but it is not required. Also includes Monster Mash dance party and a vintage carnival. Admission: $7 for everyone age 2 and older. Discounted advance tickets at Simmons First National Bank and Springfieldarea McDonald’s. 417-864-1800; dickersonparkzoo.org; park board.org » Hotel of Terror, 334 N. Main St. Hours: 7 p.m.-1:30 a.m. FridaySaturday and Halloween; 7-11:30 p.m. Sunday-Wednesday. Hotel

may close one hour early depending on attendance. Admission: $11 Sunday-Thursday; $13 Friday-Saturday. 417-863-9640; hotelofterror.com

for ages 3 and younger. A hayride and concessions will be available. All proceeds will go to Project Graduation. 417-2994190; 417-880-6211

Battlefield: Haunted House Battlefield, 6-10 p.m. FridaySaturday, 6:30-9 p.m. Oct. 31; 6-9 p.m. Nov. 1, 4051 W. Sierra St. (a residence), Battlefield. Admission: A nonperishable food item to be donated to the Ozarks Food Harvest food bank. hauntedhousebattlefield.com

Clever:

Branson: McKenna’s Pumpkin Patch, open through Nov. 2, 3265 Missouri F. Hours: 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Tuesdays-Thursdays; 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Fridays-Saturdays; and 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Sundays. Admission: $6.50, $3 for 66 and older, FREE for ages 2 and younger. Group rates available. Admission includes hayride, play area, big bale hay maze, pony swings, tricycle race track, corn box, baby farm animals, slides, 2-acre corn maze, pumpkin bounce house, face painting and rubber ducky races. 417-593-3159 Chadwick: Chadwick Haunted Hills, 7 p.m.-midnight FridaySaturday and Oct. 31, Missouri 125 South. Admission is $5; FREE

» Campbell’s Maze Daze, 177 Carob Road. The maze is open Friday-Sunday through Nov. 3; reservations for groups are available. Activities include a 4-acre corn maze, a haunted maze, a pumpkin patch, hayrides, pumpkin painting, scavenger hunt, live entertainment. Ages 12 and younger must be accompanied by an adult. For specific hours, pricing and special rates: 417-830-0243; email: info@ campbellsmazedaze.com » The Deadly Dungeons Haunted House, 302 S. Clarke Ave. Hours: 7 p.m. Friday-Saturday and Wednesday-Nov. 2. Admission: $10, ages 7 and younger FREE with paying adult. 417-743-3323. the-deadlydungeons.com Conway: Gunter Farms 11-acre Corn Maze and Pumpkin Patch. Hours: 6-9 p.m. Friday, 10

See GUIDE, Page 16

Republic: Little Monster’s Storytime and Costume Party, 10 a.m. Wednesday, Republic Branch Library, 912 N. Lindsey Ave. Ages 1-6. FREE 417-7327284; thelibrary.org Strafford: Halloween Snow Globe — Say What?, 3-5 p.m. Wednesday, Strafford Branch Library, 101 S. Missouri 125. Make a Halloween-themed snow globe. Materials will be provided. Grades 6-12. FREE 417-736-9233; thelibrary.org

New Fall Menu Famous Seafood Nachos & Alligator Tail

E E

MUSIC

An Evening with Steve Vai, 8 p.m. Wednesday, Gillioz Theatre, 325 Park Central East. Tickets: $25-$50. 417-863-9491; gillioz theatre.com Springfield-Drury Civic Orchestra Halloween Pops Concert, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, Clara Thompson Hall, Drury University, 900 N. Benton Ave. FREE 417-873-7296; http:// sdco.drury.edu

ONGOING FALL HAPPENINGS

Springfield:

» Bass Pro Shops Great Pumpkin Halloween Event: noon-5

Every Hunter’s Favorite: Venison-Stuffed Mushrooms White River Conference Center’s Acclaimed Ahi Tuna Crisp

Sportsman’s Catch

Duck Pastrami Sandwich

Ruby Red Trout

Thinly sliced duck topped with red onion jam on toasted rye bread. Served with a choice of fries or chips.

Steelhead trout pan-seared with smoked salts and fresh herbs.

Buffalo Ribeye & Jumbo Shrimp

Alligator & Shrimp Basket

Locally raised grass-fed buffalo grilled with jumbo parmesan garlic shrimp.

Fried gator and panko or coconut style shrimp. Served with fries.

Walleye Fingers

Big Sky Buffalo Burger

Direct from Canada. Breaded in our special blend and served with fries.

Lean buffalo cut with smoked gouda cheese topped with crispy onions. Served with choice of fries or chips.

Best Sunday Brunch By News-Leader– 417Magazine®

Hemingway’s: Proudly Serving Sustainable Seafood, Locally Raised Meats and Produce Whenever Possible

IInside Bass Pro Shops, 4th Floor, Call 417-891-5100 In BP132553

SL-0000340583

15


16 Weekend 10.24.2013

NEWS LEADER NEWS-LEADER.COM §

OCT.26&27 0//3 0/7/3

Saturday 9+- - 5.Sunday 0+- -5.-

SPRINGFIELD, MO

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The Friends of the Springfield-Greene County Library Fall Book Sale continues through Sunday at Remington’s, 1655 W. Republic Road. Admission is free; proceeds benefit the library. NEWS-LEADER FILE PHOTO

Guide

mazes and hayride to the pumpkin patch. 417-589-6845; gunter farm.com

Continued from Page 15 a.m.-9 p.m. Saturday, 1-6 p.m. Sunday. Weekdays and evening by reservation. Admission: $6, FREE for ages 2 and younger. Admission includes all games,

Exeter: Exeter Corn Maze and Pumpkin Patch, with activities through Nov. 3, 20803 Farm Road 1057, Missouri MM. Hours and pricing: 417-846-3959; exeter cornmaze.com

Joplin: Twisted Forest, 601 Reddings Road. Hours: 7 a.m.midnight Friday-Saturday and Halloween through Nov. 2. Admission: $15. 417-208-9508; thetwistedforest.com Lebanon: Ozark Nightmares Haunted House, 22599 E. Missouri 32. Hours: 7-11 p.m.


NEWS LEADER § NEWS-LEADER.COM

10.24.2013 Weekend

17

Looking for a fun outing this weekend? Take the kids out to a pumpkin patch. See the Ongoing Fall Happenings portion of the Guide, starting on Page 15, to find one near you. NEWS-LEADER FILE PHOTO Friday-Saturday and Halloween through Nov. 2. Admission: $7.50. 417-532-1002; ozarknight mares.com Marshfield: Hampton’s Green-

house, Pumpkin Patch & Corn Maze, 6817 Missouri 38 West. Hours: 6-9 p.m. Friday; 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Saturday, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Sunday through Nov. 2; special hours during holidays and group

trips. Admission: $7.50; $6 for ages 3-11; FREE for ages 2 and younger; $6 for senior citizens. Activities: campfire for roasting hot dogs and marshmallows, hayrides, pumpkins, scarecrow

contest, concessions, cow train, corn maze; no haunted maze. 417-859-4855; email: hamptongreenhouse@centurylink.net Nixa: McCauley’s Haunted

Food Day

The party on Saturday evening at Farmers Park will honor local farmers and businesses and give visitors a chance to learn about and

way to smoke that makes quitting

HARVEST PARTY VENDOR LINEUP » Farmer’s Gastropub » Mama Jean’s Natural Market » Gilardi’s Ristorante » Nelly Baxter’s Peruvian » Aviary Cafe & Creperie » Tiny Harvest » Big Pop’s Seafood

» Benissimo Gelato & Sorbet » Mother’s Brewing Co. » Springfield Brewing Co. » Whispering Oaks Vineyard » Iguana Roja Restaurante

EASIER!!!

s g i c E r e E z i r H T apo V NEW ! W O N N I COME porizer Sale" a

HEALTHY FOOD DRIVE Organizers of the Healthy Food Drive are seeking low-sodium, low-sugar, low-fat and high-fiber food. Download the healthy pantry wish list: http:// fooddaycelebration.org/wpcontent/uploads/2013/06/ Smart-Choices-revised-3.pdf Drop off food items through Monday at these locations: » Homegrown Foods, 607 S.

partake of real/local food. Activities will include tastings, live music with Barak Hill and Dallas Jones, a raffle and a children’s bounce house. Admission is

Pickwick Ave. » Downtown YMCA, 417 S. Jefferson Ave. » Drury University, Findlay Student Center, 900 N. Benton Ave. » Cox South hospital, Foster Auditorium, 3801 S. National Ave. » American National Family of Companies, 1949 E. Sunshine St.

free. Tickets for food and beverages can be purchased at $1 apiece. Ozarks Food Harvest will have its big truck at the party for food donations.

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Introducing an ALTERNATIVE

Continued from Page 3

depend on the will of the American public, according to a synopsis posted on fooddaycelebration.org/ movies/ Two screenings, both followed by discussions, take place this evening: at Lay Hall Auditorium at Drury University; and at Pickwick House, 611 S. Pickwick Ave. A passport program, leading to rewards at the Harvest Party, has accompanied the educational events. Passport carriers should bring their passports to be stamped at the screenings. Donations for the Healthy Food Drive will be accepted at both locations.

$10 for groups of 12 or more. 417-379-4828; mccauleyshaunted woods.com

Woods, 7-11 p.m. Friday-Saturday, Oct. 31, Nov. 1-2, across from 1017 E. North St. Half-mile of trails through the woods. Nightly scary movie on outdoor screen included. Admission: $13;

1437 S GLENSTONE AVE. SPRINGFIELD, MO 417-501-1034 | MON. - SAT. 9AM - 6PM


18 Weekend 10.24.2013

Guide Continued from Page 17 Pleasant Hope: Haunted Forest, 8996 N. Farm Road 149. Open: today-Saturday, TuesdayOct. 31, Nov 1-2. Hours: 7-10 p.m. weeknights, 7-10:30 p.m. FridaySaturday. Admission: $13. 417833-9467; hauntedforestmo.com Rolla: Haunted Mine Tours, 6-11:30 p.m. Friday-Saturday and 5-10 p.m. Oct. 31, Bridge School Road. Tickets: $10; $8 for ages 10 and younger; S&T students and military (both with valid IDs). Small children may visit from 5-6 p.m. Friday-Saturday. Admission is $5. A $2 discount will be given to each person who brings three canned goods to be donated to the Russell House. Info: email klptg6@mst.edu; 573-341-4753 Verona: The MAiZE, 23298 Lawrence 1150. Hours: 5-8:30 p.m. Wednesday; 5-10 p.m. Friday; noon-10 p.m. Saturday through Nov. 2; field trips by appointment. Features corn maze, hayrides, haunted maze, general store, petting zoo. Proceeds benefit GRIP Boys Home of Verona. Admission: $8, $4 for ages 5-11, FREE for ages 4 and younger and veterans with ID, group rates available. gripboys home.com, themaize .com for details.

le N ob

financ e

movieguide

NEWS LEADER NEWS-LEADER.COM §

review: “Carrie”

ee (out of a four-star rating)

NEW IN TOWN “BAD GRANDPA” 92 minutes • Not reviewed • R for strong crude language • Johnny Knoxville, Jackson Nicoll, Spike Jonze • A grandfather sets out on a journey across America with his young grandson • Campbell 16, Springfield 11, B&B Theatres, Branson Meadows “THE COUNSELOR” 117 minutes • Not reviewed • R for violence • Brad Pitt, Javier Bardem, Goran Visnjic, Michael Fassbender • A lawyer becomes entangled in the drug trafficking industry • Campbell 16, Springfield 11, B&B Theatres, Branson Meadows

Chloë Grace Moretz stars in a remake of the 1976 horror film “Carrie,” based on Stephen King’s best-seller. SONY PICTURES

New ‘Carrie’ falls short

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Movies are listed below with runtime, four-star grade based on reviews from wire services, its MPAA rating, the rating, a summary and where it’s playing.

By Claudia Puig USA TODAY

Rather than offering new blood, “Carrie” is a purely cosmetic revamp. There’s nothing inventive in the retelling of this American horror story based on Stephen King’s best-selling 1974 novel. If director Kimberly Peirce had brought a measure of the intriguing sensibility she demonstrated in 1999’s “Boys Don’t Cry,” this reboot might have been worth seeing. But Peirce’s version lacks the immediacy of Brian De Palma’s original. The result feels like a pale imitation. The story centers on Carrie White (Chloë Grace Moretz), a bullied teen misfit who wreaks ven-

geance on her high school classmates. Carrie is an intriguingly woebegone character. Painfully shy and endlessly mocked, Carrie has no refuge. At home her domineering, religious-zealot mom (Julianne Moore) alternates between babying Carrie and believing that the devil has overtaken her for wearing a sleeveless dress. When Carrie discovers she has telekinetic powers, the audience is rooting for her. When she wields her telekinesis for vengeful destruction — during a climactic scene at the prom that anyone who has seen the 1976 De Palma version with Sissy Spacek will never forget — the hell she unleashes is excessive. But in this version it’s more te-

dious than terrifying. Perhaps it’s because we’ve seen so much cinematic gore in the 37 years since the original hit screens. That’s all the more reason why this film should have taken a different tack. It’s not enough to update the era and add smartphones into the mix. Peirce should have taken either a more comic tone or a more somber one, exploring social isolation and assessing the damaging influences of school bullies. Moretz and Moore do their best, but they deserve better. “Carrie,” a Sony Pictures release, is rated R for bloody violence, disturbing images, language and some sexual content. Running time: 100 minutes.

“ESCAPE FROM TOMORROW” 90 minutes • eg • Not rated • An unemployed father’s sanity is challenged by a chance encounter with two young girls on holiday. • Moxie Cinema “THE SUMMIT” 95 minutes • Not reviewed • R for thematic content • A documentary based on the deaths of 11 people during a mountain climb in 2008. • Moxie Cinema

RETURNING “THE MORTAL INSTRUMENTS: CITY OF BONES” 130 minutes • eg • PG-13 for intense sequences of fantasy violence • Lily Collins, Jamie Campbell Bower, Robert Sheehan • A teen discovers truths about her past during her quest to rescue her mother from a demon attacker • Palace Theatre “PLANES” 92 minutes • eg • PG for some mild action • voices of Dane Cook, Stacy Keach, Brad Garrett • Despite his fear of heights, Dusty, a crop-dusting plane, is determined to compete in a world-famous aerial race • Palace Theatre

SPECIAL “GHOSTBUSTERS,” 105 minutes

• PG for thematic content • Bill Murray, Dan Aykroyd, Sigourney Weaver • Three parapsychology professors offer a ghost removal service. • 8 p.m. Friday, Gillioz Theatre “MOXIE MORNINGS,” 10 a.m. Saturday, Moxie Cinema, 431 S. Jefferson Ave, Suite 103. Bring your 2- to 6-year-old for films, art and fun. Programs are free; everyone welcome. • 10 a.m. Saturday, Moxie Cinema “RIGHT MINDED MOVEMENTS” 32 minutes • Not reviewed • Not rated • Jeremy Fullerton, Jimy Bennett, Josh Reynolds, Jordan Ricca, Curits Robb, Aron Terrell • A local skateboarding film by Jordan Ricca featuring professional and non-professional skateboarders professional from across the country • 6 p.m. Sunday, Moxie Cinema “THE ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW” 100 minutes • R for sexually explicit themes • Tim Curry, Susan Sarandon, Barry Bostwick, Richard O’Brien • A newlywed couple are stranded in an isolated area and seek the help of Dr. Frank-N-Furter. • midnight Friday and Saturday at Palace Theatre

STILL SHOWING “AUSTENLAND,” 97 minutes • eg • PG-13 for thematic content • Bret McKenzie, Georgia King, James Callis, Jane Seymour • A woman obsessed with all things Jane Austen spends her life savings to visit a resort that caters to like-minded women. • ends today, Moxie Cinema “BLUE CAPRICE” 93 minutes • eee • R for violence • Isaiah Washington, Joey Lauren Adams, Tequan Richmond, Tim Blake Nelson • Based on the 2002 Beltway sniper attacks • ends today, Moxie Cinema “CAPTAIN PHILLIPS” 134 minutes • eee • PG-13 for sustained intense sequences of menace •


NEWS LEADER § NEWS-LEADER.COM WHAT DO MOVIE RATINGS MEAN? Campbell 16 890-8457

G

Branson Meadows 332-2884

10.24.2013 Weekend OK for general audiences

PG

Branson’s IMAX 800-419-4832

Parental guidance suggested

PG-13

Elite Cinema III, Branson 800-419-4832

Hollywood Theaters 799-3456

Parents strongly cautioned; some material unsuitable for children younger than 13

Moxie 429-0800

Owen Drive-In, Seymour 935-2232

Tom Hanks, Barkhad Abdi, Barkhad Abdirahman • Based on the true story of the first American cargo ship to be hijacked in more than 200 years. • Campbell 16, Springfield 11, B&B Theatres, Elite Cinema III “CARRIE” 99 minutes • ee • R for bloody violence • Chloë Grace Moretz, Julianne Moore, Gabriella Wilde • A retelling of the classic horror story • Campbell 16, Springfield 11, B&B Theatres, Branson Meadows “CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS 2” 95 minutes • eee • PG for mild rude humor • Bill Hader, Anna Faris, Will Forte • Flint is forced to leave his post when he learns that his infamous machine is malfunctioning. • Campbell 16, Springfield 11, B&B Theatres, Branson Meadows “ENOUGH SAID” 91 minutes • eeeg • PG-13 for thematic content • James Gandolfini, Julia Louis-Dreyfus • A single parent begins a romance with a client • Moxie Cinema “ESCAPE PLAN” • 116 minutes • eg • R for violence and language • Sylvester Stallone, Arnold Schwarzenegger, 50 Cent • A structural-security authority is set up and incarcerated in the world’s most secure prison. • Cambpell 16, Springfield 11, B&B Theatres, Branson Meadows “THE FIFTH ESTATE” 128 minutes • eeg • Benedict Cumberbatch, Daniel Brühl, Carice van Houten • A thriller based on real events that reveals the quest to expose the corruptions of power that turned WikiLeaks into a fiercely debated organization. • Campbell 16, Springfield 11, B&B Theatres, Branson Meadows “GRACE UNPLUGGED” Not reviewed • PG for thematic elements • AJ Michalka, Kelly Thiebaud, James Denton • A Christian teen singer gets her big break • Campbell 16, Springfield 11 “GRAVITY” 90 minutes • eeee • PG-13 for intense perilous sequences • Sandra Bullock, George Clooney, Ed Harris • A medical engineer and an astronaut must work together after

R

NC-17

Restricted; 17 and younger admitted with parent/guardian

Ozark/Nixa 12 339-0081

The Palace 875-6200

new dvds “THE WAY WAY BACK”

Brad Pitt, left, and Michael Fassbender appear in a scene in “The Counselor,” hitting area movie theaters this weekend. KERRY BROWN/20TH CENTURY FOX an accident leaves them adrift in space. • Campbell 16, Springfield 11, B&B Theatres, Branson Meadows, Elite Cinema III and IMAX

family attempts to uncover the mysterious childhood secret that has left them connected to the spirit world. • Campbell 16, Branson Meadows

“GROWN UPS 2” 101 minutes • e • PG-13 for some violence • Adam Sandler, Kevin James, Chris Rock • After moving his family back to his hometown to be with his friends and their kids, Lenny finds out that sometimes crazy follows. • Palace Theatre

“MACHETE KILLS” 107 minutes • eg • R for strong bloody violence • Danny Trejo, Alexa Vega, Mel Gibson • The U.S. government recruits a killer to take down a Mexican arms dealer • Campbell 16, Branson Meadows

“THE HEAT” 117 minutes • eeg • R for pervasive language and strong crude content • Sandra Bullock, Melissa McCarthy • A special agent is paired with a Boston cop to rein in a drug lord • Palace Theatre

“MONSTERS UNIVERSITY” 110 minutes • eee • G • Billy Crystal, John Goodman, Steve Buscemi • In this animated tale, Mike and Sully reflect on their college days • Palace Theatre

IMAX FILMS: “OZARKS LEGACY AND LEGENDS” • “GRAND CANYON: THE HIDDEN SECRETS” • “ROCKY MOUNTAIN EXPRESS” “FLIGHT OF THE BUTTERFLIES” • IMAX “I’M IN LOVE WITH A CHURCH GIRL” 118 minutes • Not reviewed • PG Michael Madsen, Stephen Baldwin, Adrienne Bailon • A retired drug trafficker falls for a girl who is his exact opposite • Campbell 16 “INSIDIOUS: CHAPTER 2” • 104 minutes • eg • PG-13 for intense sequences of terror and violence • Patrick Wilson, Rose Byrne, Barbara Hershey • A haunted

“PERCY JACKSON: SEA OF MONSTERS” 106 minutes • eg • PG for fantasy action violence • Logan Lerman, Alexandra Daddario, Nathan Fillion • The son of Poseidon and his friends set out to stop an ancient evil from destroying their safe haven • Palace Theatre “PRISONERS” 153 minutes • eeeg • R for disturbing violent content • Hugh Jackman, Jake Gyllenhaal, Viola Davis • A father takes matters into his own hands when his daughter and her friend go missing • Campbell 16, Branson Meadows “RED 2” 116 minutes • ee • PG-13 for pervasive action and

violence • Bruce Willis, John Malkovich, Helen Mirren • Retired CIA agent Frank Moses reunites his team to track down a missing nuclear device • Palace Theatre “RUNNER RUNNER” • 91 minutes • ee • R for language and some sexual content • Ben Affleck, Justin Timberlake, Gemma Arterton • A college student must face off with a entrepreneur he thinks cheated him while playing online poker • Campbell 16 “RUSH” 123 minutes • eeee • R for sexual content • Daniel Brühl, Chris Hemsworth, Olivia Wilde • A re-creation of the 1970s rivalry between Formula One rivals James Hunt and Niki Lauda. • Campbell 16, Elite Cinema III “THE SMURFS 2” 105 minutes • eg • PG for rude humor • Hank Azaria, Neil Patrick Harris, Jayma Mays • The Smurfs band together with their human friends to rescue Smurfette. • Palace Theatre “WE’RE THE MILLERS” 110 minutes • eg • R for crude sexual content • Jennifer Aniston, Emma Roberts, Jason Sudeikis, Will Poulter • A pot dealer creates a fake family in order to move his product to Mexico. • Branson Meadows, Palace Theatre

(Blu-ray + Ultraviolet). Fox Home Entertainment ($39.99) Rated: PG-13, adult themes, language, sexual content, drug use The lowdown: An amusing and charming coming-ofage story about a 14-year-old boy who is dragged along on a family trip with his mom and her overbearing boyfriend. Critics gave the film an 85 percent positive rating at Rottentomatoes.com. Don’t miss: A making-of featurette, deleted scenes and a series of behind-thescenes featurettes comprise the major bonus offerings. Score: ★ ★ ★g

“BEFORE MIDNIGHT” (Blu-ray + Ultraviolet). Sony Pictures Home Entertainment ($35.99) Rated: R, sexual content, partial nudity, language, adult themes The lowdown: Ethan Hawke and Julie Delphy star in the third installment of director Richard Linklater’s series about Jesse and Celine, two decades after their first

19

No children younger than 17 admitted

Springfield 11 882-7469

meeting on a train. Critics fell in love, giving the movie a 98 percent positive rating at Rottentomatoes. Don’t miss: The supplemental materials include a question-and-answer session with Hawke, Delphy and Linklater, a commentary track and a featurette on the making of the movie. Score: ★ ★ ★ ★

“THE INTERNSHIP: UNRATED” (Blu-ray + DVD + Ultraviolet). Fox Home Entertainment ($39.99) Rated: Unrated and PG-13, language, sexual situations and crude humor The lowdown: The comedic talents of Vince Vaughn and Owen Wilson are tested in this formulaic feature about two old-school salesmen who connive their way into internships at Google. Critics gave it a 35 percent positive rating at Rottentomatoes. Don’t miss: Deleted scenes, an “Any Given Monday” featurette and a commentary track comprise the bulk of the extras. Score: ★ ★

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MOVING

PERFECT

Moxie Cinema gets new digs downtown

Kickapoo routs Hillcrest to stay undefeated

OZARKS, 1B

SPORTS, 1D

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2013 § SPRINGFIELD, MISSOURI § NEWS-LEADER.COM § A GANNETT COMPANY

Suspect released; timeline emerges

Five years ago, Jeff Schrag was introduced to craft beer through a magazine story. Today, he’s the owner of fast-growing Mother’s Brewing Co.

Leer released without charges after alleged threats led to lockdown By Steve Pokin SPOKIN@NEWS-LEADER.COM

Dustin Leer, 35, of Springfield, the man arrested Wednesday for suspicion of making terroristic threats, was released the same day at midnight without being charged with a crime. His alleged threats had prompted the lockdown of two colleges, five public schools and two other buildings. Springfield police presented information to the U.S. Attorney’s Office for Western Missouri, but federal prosecutors declined to file charges, said Lisa Cox, spokeswoman for Springfield police. The Greene County Prosecutor’s Office also reviewed the matter and concluded that no state charge specifically addressed Leer’s alleged actions, Cox said. Police, instead, were seeking to have Leer held involuntarily at a hospital for 96 hours, Cox said. The purpose of that

Only five years after Jeff Schrag had the idea to open a brewery, and just more than two years after he debuted Mother's Brewing Co., it is one of the fastest-growing craft breweries in the nation. VALERIE MOSLEY/NEWS-LEADER

SUDS OF SUCCESS

T

he day after Thanksgiving in 2008, Jeff Schrag read an article in The New Yorker about craft brews being the intersection of beer and wine and appealing to a middle class. The idea for Mother’s Brewing Company — a craft brewery in downtown Springfield — Ozarks Life wasOnborn. May 12, 2011, Schrag sold his first beer. Earlier this year, less than five years after he read that original article, Schrag read another story in The New Yorker: This one listed Mother’s Brewing Co. as the sevJuliana enth-fastest growing GOODWIN craft brewery in the nation. The article is framed on a “wall of fame” in his tasting room, located at 215 S. Grant Ave., in a building that has a long history in Springfield. His goal, he said, is to “move the culture of craft beer forward” in this community. Missouri has one of the lowest consumptions of craft beers, about See GOODWIN, Page 4A

GOVERNMENT SHUTDOWN: DAY 3

Budget blame game continues

Mother’s Brewing Co. is experimenting with aging beers in barrels. The business is housed in a building that’s grown over time. Its core was built in 1922. VALERIE MOSLEY/NEWS-LEADER

WANT TO GO? The tasting room at Mother’s Brewing Co., 215 S. Grant Ave., is open 4-7 p.m. Wednesday-Thursday; 4-8 p.m. Friday; 1-7 p.m. Saturday. There are free tours at 2 p.m., 3 p.m., and 4 p.m. Saturdays; first-come, firstserve. Be there 15 minutes before the start of the tour. About limited hours: Jeff Schrag limits hours because his goal is to get people to buy his beer elsewhere and he doesn’t want to compete with businesses that sell his brew.

Obama, Boehner trade barbs as government shutdown effects are felt By Jim Kuhnenn

WATCH

Associated Press

Go to www.NewsLeader.com to see a video of Mother’s Brewery.

INSIDE

KBOOHER@NEWS-LEADER.COM

ST. LOUIS — It wasn’t the nosebleed section. Not by a long shot. But some might consider Section 269, Row 13 of Busch Stadium not all that spectacular, given it is tucked away in the left-field corner and you

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livery boys, if you caught up with Jeremy Hill, Jimmy Ruedlinger and Jeff Stegen on Thursday. The trio were among the lucky can’t really see the names emblazoned 45,693 in attendance for the St. Louis Cardinals-Pittsburgh Pirates playoff on the backs of jerseys. However, it sure beat sweating in a opener. back kitchen throwing pepperoni and sausages on pizzas and sending off deSee FANS, Page 3A St. Louis cruises to victory in Game 1 of NL Division Series. Page 1D

Index VOL. 123, NO. 277 ©2011, NEWS-LEADER

Weather

MSU President Clif Smart, above, says not locking down the campus was the right call, but not quickly telling the campus community what was going on was an error. Page 6A

See THREATS, Page 6A

Cards fans soak up playoff atmosphere By Kary Booher

INSIDE

Automotive Business Classified Comics Crossword

1F 6B 5C 4C 2C

Dear Abby 2C Deaths 7A Employment 5C Garage Sales 5C Heloise 2C

Life Lottery Merchandise Movies Nation/World

1C 1B 5C 3C 2A

Opinion Ozarks Real Estate For Sale Rentals

4B 1B 6C 6C

WASHINGTON — Three days into a government shutdown, President Barack Obama pointedly blamed House Speaker John Boehner on Thursday for keeping federal agencies closed while the bitter budget dispute moved closer to a more critical showdown over the nation’s line of credit. The Treasury warned of calamitous results if Congress fails to raise the debt limit. Answering Obama, Boehner complained that the president was “steamrolling ahead” with the implementation of the nation’s new health care law. As the government operated sporadically,thestockmarketsank

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§ TODAY 840 MOSTLY SUNNY § TONIGHT 590 STORMS LATE § TOMORROW 630 SHOWERS LIKELY

INSIDE The shutdown keeps Missouri Lt. Gov. Peter Kinder, above, from filing for a run for Congress. Page 5A Help for women and children will continue. Page 5A Casualties of the shutdown are shattering stereotypes. Page 2A

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NEWS-LEADER § News-Leader.com

TODAY QUOTABLE

“You’ll be able to see virtually any movie playing within a 150-mile radius in one square block of downtown Springfield.” RUSTY WORLEY, executive director of Urban Districts Alliance. Story, 1B

GET OUT circle-r-festivals.com » Drop off your change at a nearby Mama Jean’s Store and Mama Jeans will match the change can donations up to $250 to benefit Breast Cancer Foundation of the Ozarks. Store locations: 1727 S. Campbell Ave.; 1110 E. Republic Road; 3530 E. Sunshine St. mamajeansmarket.com » First Friday Art Walk, a self-guided art gallery tour, is 6 to 10 p.m. today in downtown Springfield. Exhibits remain at galleries through the month. Free. 417-862-2787, ext. 25; ffaw.org

WEATHER AT SPRINGFIELD

Showers

Tonight 59° Chance of showers

By Michael Kunzelman and Kevin McGill

ALMANAC Yesterday by 7 p.m. 84°/66° 73°/51° 91°/1969, 2006 30°/1987 7:11 a.m. 6:53 p.m.

Associated Press

Precipitation: 0.00 MTD/MTD (avg): 2.88/4.99 YTD/YTD (avg): 41.03/35.10 Moon phase: Waning crescent Moon rise: 5:46 a.m. Moon set: 6:01 p.m.

POLLEN COUNT (highest percentage of count) Mold Grass:

Very high, cladosporium Low

Trees: Weeds:

Absent Moderate, ragweed

NATIONAL FORECAST

National forecast

Forecast highs for Friday, Oct. 4

Sunny

Pt. Cloudy

Fronts Cold

-10s

-0s

Showers

0s

10s

20s 30s 40s

Rain

T-storms

50s 60s

Warm Stationary

70s

Flurries

80s

Cloudy

Pressure Low

High

90s 100s 110s

Snow

Ice

Tornado Outbreak In The Midwest, Blizzard To Its West A major severe weather outbreak is likely across the Corn Belt Friday. Meanwhile, heavy snow and strong winds will combine to create blizzard conditions over parts of the Rockies and High Plains. Fire weather concerns will increase near the West Coast. Weather Underground • AP

YESTERDAY Atlanta Birmingham Chicago Denver Detroit Fairbanks Flagstaff Great Falls Greensboro,N.C. Houston Jacksonville Juneau Kansas City Las Vegas Little Rock Los Angeles Memphis Miami Minneapolis New Orleans New York City Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix St. Louis San Francisco Seattle Tulsa Wash.,D.C. Wichita

HIGH 82 83 78 64 77 52 65 41 84 88 84 48 84 86 86 74 87 85 61 90 78 90 83 94 88 69 56 87 86 89

LOW 65 65 60 40 58 32 37 34 60 72 64 45 70 66 68 62 68 73 57 73 63 70 63 70 70 54 49 72 65 71

TODAY

PRECIP

.08

.10 .24 .65 .05 1.18 .90

.13 .07

HIGH 85 86 84 43 81 44 53 50 86 91 85 51 87 70 88 89 89 88 70 88 79 88 84 88 89 78 64 90 87 88

LOW 63 66 66 36 64 30 32 27 59 73 67 42 68 58 70 61 71 77 57 75 65 70 66 70 68 56 47 73 67 70

From left to right: Jeff Stegen, Jimmy Ruedlinger and Jeremy Hill stand and cheer as the Cardinals are introduced before Thursday’s game. KARY BOOHER / NEWS-LEADER

School volleyball match. Prather, who provided his extra tickets, previously never missed a playoff game. “I haven’t got as much ever from watching sports than watching Rachel play (volleyball) this year,” Prather wrote in a text message. “Not being at her game never crossed my mind.” By noon Thursday, a buzz among Cardinals fans already began to form as many already were lined up four hours in advance of the first pitch. The atmosphere

figures only to improve in future seasons, given construction continues on Ballpark Village, which is a mix of retail, condos and seating. The village sits beyond the left-field bleachers, at the site of the old stadium. Not new was a recent hallmark of St. Louis’ postseason rosters of years past. It’s packed with 17 former Springfield Cardinals, including three who were with the club this year. “We watched a lot of these guys come up from the (Double-A) club,”

Ruedlinger said. “It’s exciting to see them in Springfield. It’s more exciting to see them up here.” Stegen noted that the playoff schedule fell on a good day. Thursdays usually mean a breather ahead of busy weekends. “Marty always takes care of us,” said Stegen, who anticipates a dramafilled, five-game series and expects it to go to the wire. “It’s special every time. You get to remember what it’s all about. As Cardinals fans, might get spoiled sometimes.”

TOMORROW COND Clr PCldy Cldy Snow Cldy Snow Clr PCldy Clr Cldy PCldy Rain PCldy Clr Cldy Clr Cldy PCldy Rain Cldy Cldy Cldy Cldy Clr PCldy Clr Clr Cldy Cldy Clr

HIGH 84 86 78 56 80 42 54 63 85 89 86 50 60 76 85 92 85 88 57 84 79 89 84 88 76 79 67 66 87 62

LOW 64 67 67 27 64 29 29 35 60 73 69 44 52 55 69 64 71 77 55 75 64 70 64 65 67 58 50 50 67 46

COND PCldy PCldy Rain Clr Cldy PCldy Clr Clr Clr Cldy Cldy Rain PCldy Clr Rain Clr Rain PCldy Cldy Rain Cldy Cldy Cldy Clr Rain Clr PCldy Cldy PCldy Clr

x- Indicates missing information SOURCES: AP, NWS, Springfield-Greene County Health Department

Find the latest hour-by-hour forecasts, radar and satellite maps at News-Leader.com/weather.

MIAMI — From a tiny, vulnerable island off the Louisiana coast to the beaches of the Florida Panhandle, Gulf Coast residents prepared Thursday for a possible hit from Tropical Storm Karen, which threatened to become the first named tropical system to menace the United States this year. Karen was forecast to lash the northern Gulf Coast over the weekend as a weak hurricane or tropical storm. A hurricane watch was in effect from Grand Isle, La., to west of Destin, Fla. A tropical storm warning was issued for the Louisiana coast from Grand Isle to the mouth of the Pearl River, including the New Orleans area. In Alabama, safety workers hoisted double red flags at Gulf Shores because of treacherous rip currents ahead of the storm. In Mississippi, Gov. Phil Bryant declared a state of emergency, urging residents to prepare. State Emergency Management Agency Director Robert Latham said local schools will decide whether to play football games. He said the southern part of the state could have tropical storm-force winds by late today. “I know that Friday night football in the South is a big thing, but I don’t think anybody wants to risk a life because of the potential winds,” Latham said. Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal also declared a state of emergency, citing the possibility of high winds, heavy rain and tides. Florida Gov. Rick Scott also declared an emergency for 18 counties.

The Army Corps of Engineers said it was closing a structure intended to keep storm surge out of the Inner Harbor Navigation Canal in Louisiana — known locally as the Industrial Canal — where levee breaches during Hurricane Katrina led to catastrophic flooding in 2005. Mayor David Camardelle of Grand Isle, La., an inhabited barrier island and tourist town about 60 miles south of New Orleans, called for voluntary evacuations as he declared an emergency Thursday afternoon.

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“It’s something special to be a part of,” said Hill, who was attending his first big-league playoff game. “When you’re at home and watching on TV, it’s a lot more distant. To be here amid the action is pretty cool.” Thursday’s game marked the opening salvo to what Cardinals fans hope is truly a red October, in which the Cardinals must secure 11 wins in order to capture St. Louis’ 12th World Series. Tickets remain for Friday’s noon matinee — go to stlcardinals.com or Stub Hub, among other sites — and Busch Stadium would host a Game 5 of the Cardinals-Pirates first-round series, should the matchup reach next Wednesday. But seats are limited, which is about as common in October as the Budweiser Clydesdales trotting around the warning track during pre-game. Hill, Ruedlinger and Stegen are all managers for area Domino’s Pizza locations operated by Marty Prather, who threw everybody a curve by being missing in action. Prather preferred to cheer on his daughter, Rachel, in a Catholic High

Gulf Coast braces for tropical storm

Saturday 63°/41° Cooler, with storms likely

Sunny

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BEER SALES Earlier this year, The New Yorker Magazine listed Mother’s Brewery in downtown Springfield as the seventhfastest growing craft brewery in the nation. Here’s how many bottles of beer the company has sold since its first sale on May 12, 2011. » 2011: 771,561 » 2012: 1,910,863 » Through August of this year: 1,685,452

Continued from Page 1A

half the national average, Schrag said, citing statistics from the Brewers Association. He has no where to go but up.

Starting out Schrag, a Kansas native, moved to Springfield in 1995. He’s a journalist by training, a businessman and he dabbles in real estate. In addition to the brewery he owns Daily Events (a newspaper dedicated to legal notices and courthouse record) and a cufflink company. Before he opened the brewery — which has grown twice as fast as he anticipated — he had no training in the world of beer. Except for the fact that he’s a beer enthusiast. “That’s my only real credential, I am a good drinker,” laughed Schrag, as he gave me a tour of Mother’s Brewing Co. He learned fast and lucked into a good brewmaster: Brian Allen. He met Allen through Match.com — sort of. It’s a joke Schrag likes to tell. When he was in the initial stages of founding the brewery, Schrag went on a date with a woman he met through the online dating website and told her about his plans to open a brewery. A few weeks later, she called and said she had just met a brewmaster from Wisconsin. He had recently moved to Springfield and was looking for a job. It was a perfect match.

The process For a man who had never brewed his own beer, Schrag has learned a lot about the process. One of the first steps happens in the malt room. Malt is grain, usually barley, that has been soaked in water to start the germination process. Then the grain is roasted to stop the germination. Sort of like a coffee bean, the grain is toasted to different strengths and colors. Each of those grains have names and are listed from light to dark: Pale 2Row, Caramel Lite,

WHAT IS A CRAFT BREWER?

Brad Culbertson works on a batch of beer at Mother's Brewing Co. earlier this week. The brewery sold more than 1.9 million bottles of beer in 2012. VALERIE MOSLEY/NEWS-LEADER

Chocolate, etc. The light ones are the building blocks; Schrag uses the darker ones as seasoning. The malt will affect the mouth-feel, aroma and color of the beer. “A little dark malt goes a long way,” he said. Next, the malt is milled to crack the grain and expose the starches inside. Hot water is mixed with the milled malt to convert starches to sugars. They separate the sugar liquid — referred to as wort — from the grains and collect it in the steam kettle. The steam kettle brings it to a rolling boil and hops are added. Hops added at the beginning will impart bitterness. Hops added at the end of the boil will contribute to the flavor and aroma. Hoppy beers are the trend now, Schrag said. Next, the wort is cooled, yeast is added and fermentation begins. Yeast metabolizes sugar

and creates alcohol and carbon dioxide. “Yeast live short, happy lives reproducing like crazy,” Schrag said. The beer ferments in tanks for six to eight days. After fermentation, the brewers drop the temperature and let it rest for six to eight days. Then the beer is filtered (though not always, it depends on the beer), carbonated and ready to be bottled. Schrag sold more than 1.9 million bottles last year. “We have to be able to keep capacity ahead of demand. The worst thing you can do in this business is convince someone to sell your product and then not be able to meet demand. They may not give you another chance,” he said.

The beer Lately, the brewers (there are three) have

ONLINE For a look at the history of the building occupied by Mother’s Brewing Co., visit News-Leader.com

been experimenting with more barrel-aged beers. Beers with an alcohol content of 8 percent or higher are aged anywhere from 90 days to six months in oak barrels. Some of the aging barrels come from Copper Run Distillery and Stone Hill Winery — Schrag sources regionally whenever possible. They are experimenting with a one-year, barrel-aged beer now, but have no idea whether it will work, Schrag said. Because Missouri’s beer and wine licenses are different and beer manufacturers can only produce up to 6 percent alcohol content, Schrag carries a wine license, which allows him to produce a product with up to 22 percent alcohol content. “Most craft brewers in

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Missouri do (carry a wine license),” he said. This year, he released five new beers, which was a bit ambitious. He’d like to scale back to three next year. The brewery’s best seller is Three Blind Mice, a brown beer with characteristics of English, Irish and German browns. Then there’s Thing 1 and Thing 2, which is where the brew master splits a batch of beer and does something different with each batch. The idea is to drink them side-byside to taste the different characteristics. One of the most popular beers in the tasting room is the Black Cherry Sherry Thing, which was a happy experiment where the brewers threw cherries into a batch of beer and aged it in sherry barrels for four to six weeks. The beers, like the brewery, have unique names. While employees brainstorm names, “the

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» Craft brewers are small brewers. The hallmark of craft beer and craft brewers is innovation. Craft brewers interpret historic styles with unique twists and develop new styles that have no precedent. » Craft beer is generally made with traditional ingredients like malted barley; interesting and sometimes non-traditional ingredients often are added for distinctiveness. » Craft brewers tend to be very involved in their communities through philanthropy, product donations, volunteerism and sponsorship of events. » Craft brewers have distinctive, individualistic approaches to connecting with their customers. » Craft brewers maintain integrity by what they brew and their general independence, free from a substantial interest by a non-craft brewer. » As of June, 2013, there were 2,538 breweries operating in the United States. — Source: Brewers Association

brewmaster is incredibly effective in coming up with our names,” Schrag said. So where did the “Mother’s” come from? “We wanted a name people could remember and pronounce,” Schrag. “We went through hundreds of names. The idea of Mother’s came from mothers sharing love with their family. We’re sharing love with our community by brewing beer. Once we had that name, we never looked back.”


NEWS LEADER Friday October 4, 2013

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Mayor drops Fair Grove lawsuit Though reason for dismissal after impeachment vote is unclear, motions indicate settlement reached By Stephen Herzog SHERZOG@NEWS-LEADER.COM

The Fair Grove mayor has dismissed a lawsuit against the city, which was filed after aldermen voted to impeach him. Papers in the case indicate that the mayor and aldermen have negotiated to end the case. Whether that means the impeachment attempt has also died is unclear; attempts to reach the

mayor and aldermen by phone and email on Thursday were unsuccessful. The case was dismissed Sept. 27, a day after Mayor Tim Smith filed the motion. The reason for the dismissal is not detailed, but previous motions filed by aldermen indicate the parties were nearing a settlement. An attorney representing the city and its aldermen requested

Tim Smith sued, saying aldermen failed to notify him before voting to impeach him

a stay of all proceedings in the case on Sept. 16. In that document, aldermen asked for an extension of time “due to ongoing settlement discussions.” It also says, “plaintiff and defendants have now reached a set-

Moxie’s on the move

tlement agreement and are in the process of finalizing the same.” The document says Smith’s attorney consented to the motion for extension. The lawsuit was filed in June, on Smith’s behalf. The lawsuit alleged that board members met privately, in violation of Missouri open records law, and failed to give Smith any notice of charges against him before making a motion and subsequently voting to impeach him at the May 28 meeting. “The Board’s action constitu-

tes egregious violations of the Missouri Sunshine Law Act and of Mayor Smith’s right to due process of law,” the petition states. A docket entry in the case indicates the case will be reviewed by the judge on Nov. 5. The dismissal of the lawsuit isn’t the only loose end tied up recently in Fair Grove. This year, the city missed a deadline to pass a budget, fired its police chief and had the Greene County sheriff review See MAYOR, Page 2B

Expert: Slaying suspect ‘a child’

The Moxie Cinema’s current location is in the Wilhoit Plaza. The theater opened in September 2005. VALERIE MOSLEY/ NEWS-LEADER

Lawyer says woman didn’t understand rights after man’s 2012 killing By Jess Rollins JROLLINS@NEWS-LEADER.COM

The Moxie Cinema is planning a move to this new downtown location at 305 S. Campbell Ave., in January. VALERIE MOSLEY/NEWS-LEADER

Art cinema relocating to new location downtown Mike Stevens, the Moxie’s executive director, says of the new location, “We’ll suddenly have tons of free covered parking, comfy new seats and be on a lively stretch of Campbell that only looks to get busier.”

News-Leader Staff

T

he Moxie Cinema — Springfield’s only art-house movie theater — is moving to a new downtown location in January. Construction crews have started building the two-screen location on the ground floor of 305 S. Campbell Ave., which is a three-story mixed-use building attached to the College Station parking garage being developed by Brentwood Management. The move will not increase the size of the theater but will give it several key amenities, said Mike Stevens, Moxie executive director. “We’ll suddenly have tons of free covered parking, comfy new seats and be on a lively stretch of Campbell that only looks to get busier,” Stevens said in a news release. The move comes just months after the Moxie — a nonprofit that is overseen by a volunteer board — raised $120,000 to pay for a new digital pro-

NEWS-LEADER FILE PHOTO

jection system mandated by Hollywood studios. The new projection system will make the move as well. “It’s been a busy year at the Moxie,” said Stephanie Stenger Montgomery, president of the theater’s board of directors. “We’re so appreciative

that Springfield rallied behind the Moxie. It really showed how much the community values what the Moxie does, namely bring artistically worthy films to town.” See MOXIE, Page 2B

Marya Von Brandt’s attorney hopes a psychological analysis will help the 19-year-old, who is charged with murder. Although a defense expert’s conclusions are unflattering, Von Brandt’s lawyer says the diagnosis shows his client was unable to understand her rights before allegedly admitting to shooting a man in the head. The gun just went off, she told police shortly after the Nov. 6, 2012, shooting on East Grand Street. Police say Von Brandt shot and killed Kevin Engh, 41, a man who had previously paid her for sex. Police said Von Brandt’s story changed often during hours of questioning. One version involved her going to an apartment near Park Central Square for meth. Once in the vehicle, the story goes, Engh requested oral sex, he hit her with a gun, she fought for the gun and shot Engh. But this explanation and others should not be admissible in court, Von Brandt’s attorney said in a motion filed this week in Greene County. According to a psychologist cited by the defense, Von Brandt was suffering from multiple psychiatric disorders, meth withdrawals and a regressed mental state when she agreed to speak with Springfield police. She was “overwhelmed, incoherent and dissociated” the expert continued. She was nearly 19 years old when it happened, but emotionally, the expert said, Von Brandt was only 9 or 10 years old. “She functions more like a child than an adult,” psychologist Kent Franks said, according to the motion filed by Von Brandt’s attorney. Details of Franks’ practice or expertise were not available in the court record. Franks went on to say that Von Brandt had in the past suffered physical and sexual abuse at the hands of family members. See EXPERT, Page 2B

Rountree Elementary joins 2 others as ‘world school’ News-Leader Staff

Springfield Public Schools now has three elementary schools authorized as an International Baccalaureate World School after implementing the Primary Years Programme. Rountree Elementary, a 270-

student school at 1333 E. Grand St., recently received the nod. The school board voted in late 2008 to implement the Primary Years Programme at Rountree. The school was considered a candidate for the inquiry-based, globally focused curriculum, until an IB review team recently

determined it was fully and successfully implemented. Two other elementary schools, Field and Boyd, have already been designated as PYP schools. “It’s nice to have this official confirmation. Our parents, students, faculty and staff have em-

braced PYP as the choice option for Rountree,” said Rountree Principal David Martin, in a news release. “It’s been a lot of late nights and weekend hours receiving training and evaluating the process.” Martin added, in the release, “our students will now be part of

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a global community of schools whose curriculum will have an impact on our community and beyond.” The effort to transform Rountree started in 2009. It included extensive staff training

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2B Friday, October 4, 2013

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Mayor

HELPING HANDS

Continued from Page 1B

the police department. Greene County Sheriff Jim Arnott presented the results of the assessment Aug. 27. The same night, the city promoted Sgt. Adam Mallory to acting police chief. A week later, the city adopted a budget, which included raises for police officers. With the lawsuit dropped, the city can move forward with finding an attorney. John Housley, whose contract was not renewed the same night that former police chief Shawn Eakins was let go, has been serving as city attorney until a replacement is hired, according to meeting minutes. The city sought and received proposals for a new attorney, but aldermen voted Sept. 24 to wait on awarding a bid until the lawsuit was settled.

Operation Santa goal: Bring cheer Mary Lou Webb, a wife and mother to U.S. Marines, is asking local businesses and individuals to donate to “Operation Santa,” which is in its ninth year, according to a press release. “This project was developed to help bring the spirit of Christmas to our service men and women currently serving in Afghanistan,” Webb said in a press release. “Men and women who will be spending the holidays away from their loved ones, often for the first time. Many do not receive mail, let alone pack-

ages.” This year the organization is adopting Marines from 3/7 Battalion, Kilo Company and H&S Company, who are serving in Afghanistan. There are approximately 550 Marines. Each Marine will receive a Christmas stocking filled with items like candy, snacks, hand-held games and a personal Christmas card addressed to them, according. There is another box to be shared by each platoon filled with games, DVDs, CDs, Christmas music, holiday decorations and a decorated Christmas tree. Those who are interested can donate any of the above items or a monetary donation that will go toward purchasing items and paying for the ship-

ping. Last year’s shipping costs for 48 boxes was $1,747.08, according to a press release. Monetary donations can be made by check, cash or gift cards to places where gifts for the Marines can be purchased. Donations are exempt from taxes. The deadline to donate is Nov. 1, and items will be mailed on Nov. 19. For information, call Webb at 417-860-8997 or email marylou@papermywalls.com. Do you have stories of Ozarkers helping out each other? If you or your group is holding a fundraiser, donation drive or church benefit, for example, email information to webeditor@news-leader.com. Include contact information. Emailed photos are accepted but please send only one.

Rountree Speaker aide who left gun Continued from Page 1B

and documentation. Rountree parents and staff rallied around the proposal as a “good fit for the diverse Rountree population,” Martin said in a 2008 interview. He also noted that because of the school’s proximity to Missouri State University, there were many students from other countries. PYP is a curriculum framework for students, age 3-12, that encourages students to think from a global perspective. It also focuses on the “development of the whole child as an inquirer, both in the classroom and in the world outside.” All students at a PYP school also take a foreign language. Rountree students study French.

in Capitol restroom resigns Associated Press

JEFFERSON CITY — An aide to Missouri House Speaker Tim Jones has resigned after leaving a loaded handgun in a state Capitol bathroom last month. Jones chief of staff Tom Smith said Thursday in a statement that he accepted the resignation of Dave Evans on Sept. 27. Missouri Capitol Police said a gun belonging to Evans was found by another legislative employee on top of a toilet paper dispenser in a basement bathroom. The gun was in a black

Tickets for the 8 p.m. concert today with Clint Black are $54.66. The price was incorrect in Weekend. ——— The News-Leader strives for accuracy and fairness. We will correct errors or misunderstandings created by stories, headlines or photos. To request a correction, call the newsroom at 836-1199.

well as for himself and his family, to move on to another endeavor,” Smith said. “The office will sorely miss his strong work ethic and high level of professionalism.”

Continued from Page 1B

The January move will create a theater district with the Regal College Station 14 only one block north on Campbell Avenue. “You’ll be able to see virtuRusty ally any Worley movie playing within a 150-mile radius in one square block of downtown

Expert Continued from Page 1B

“She is extremely immature for her age and did not graduate from high school,” the motion said. Franks said she didn’t remember the shooting or speaking with police. For these reasons and more, Von Brandt’s attorney, Branden Twibell, argues that his client did not understand her right to an attorney or her right to remain silent. Therefore, Twibell said in the motion to Judge Thomas Mountjoy, her statements should be suppressed at her upcoming trial. On Tuesday, Greene

Springfield,” said Rusty Worley, executive director of Urban Districts Alliance. “This reinforces the walk-ability of downtown and the opportunity to park once and enjoy a wide variety of offerings.” The Moxie Cinema screens first-run independent and foreign films that otherwise would never come to Springfield. The original onescreen location on 408 W. Walnut St. opened in September 2005. The theater became a nonprofit in 2010 following a national trend among art-house theaters.

County prosecutors pushed back — filing their own motion arguing that Von Brandt understood her rights and knowingly waived them. “Dr. Franks suggested that the police coerced or manipulated the defendant because they were too nice,” wrote assistant prosecutor Todd Myers. In his motion, Myers acknowledged that Von Brandt’s behavior might have been “odd” during questioning, but a video recording of police interrogation shows “she is tracking what is occurring.” Mountjoy has not ruled whether the statements will be admissible. A hearing is scheduled Monday.

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Research firm plans 320 jobs Associated Press

Correction

nylon holster. Police say the gun was found Sept. 20 and that Evans has a concealed carry permit. A Missouri law passed in 2011 allows elected officials and their employees to carry concealed firearms inside the Capitol if they have permits. After the incident, Evans was instructed to take an additional gun safety course. Smith said Thursday he was satisfied with the corrective actions to which Evans had agreed. “He ultimately felt it was in the best interests of his colleagues and friends in the Capitol, as

Moxie

JEFFERSON CITY — A Canadian pharmaceutical and biotechnology contract research company plans to spend $31 million expanding its operations in St. Charles in a move that could create 320 jobs, state officials said Thursday. The state is offering about $4.2 million to Pharma Medica Research Inc.’s expansion project through the Missouri Quality Jobs

Program. The company will need to meet job creation and investment criteria to receive the state incentives. Pharma Medica Research is based in the Toronto area and conducts research and development for pharmaceutical companies and performs trials. The company’s work includes scientific affairs, medical writing, bioanalysis, data management and clinical trial monitoring.

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BUSINESS WATCH

NEWS LEADER

Stocks slide as shutdown enters its third day

Friday October 4, 2013

BUSINESS

Stocks closed lower across the board as a partial shutdown of the U.S. government entered a third day. The Dow Jones industrial average fell 136 points, or 0.9 percent, to close at 14,996 Thursday, its biggest decline in two weeks. The Standard & Poor’s 500 index dropped 15 points, also 0.9 percent, to 1,678. The Nasdaq composite fell 40 points, or 1.1 percent, to 3,774.

Retail group predicts rise in shopping for holidays By Anne D’Innocenzio Associated Press

Oil, metals prices fall alongside stocks

NEW YORK — Americans, who’re increasingly optimistic aboutimprovingeconomicconditions, are expected to spend at a more rapid clip during the upcoming holiday shopping season than they did last year. But that could change if the partial government shutdown that has forced about 800,000 federalworkersoffthejobcontinues andcausesshopperstoloseconfidence in the economy. The National Retail Federation forecast Thursday that sales in November and December will rise 3.9 percent to $602.1 billion. That’s above the 3.5 percent increase a year ago and the 10-year average in holiday sales growth of 3.3 percent. But Matthew Shay, the group’s president and CEO, said the forecast was calculated before the governmentshutdownafterCongressfailedtopassaspendingbill by Monday’s midnight deadline. Shay said the group’s forecast does not account for the possibility that the shutdown could go on for a prolonged period of time that he defines as two weeks or more. But it does factor in the optimism Americans feel as jobs have become easier to get and the housing recovery has gained momentum. “Whatwearetryingtobalance here is the underlying fundamentals with the economy, which seem strong, against all that consumer unease and the uncertainty coming from Washington,” Shay said.

The price of oil fell Thursday, along with stocks and metals. U.S. benchmark oil contract for November delivery fell 79 cents to close at $103.31 a barrel on the New York Mercantile Exchange. Gold, silver and copper also fell.

Jobless aid applications tick up to 308,000 The number of Americans seeking unemployment benefits rose 1,000 last week to a seasonally adjusted 308,000, hovering near six-year lows. The tiny increase suggests companies are still cutting very few jobs. The less volatile four-week average for applications fell to 305,000, the Labor Department said Thursday. That’s the lowest since May 2007, seven months before the recession began.

Average rate falls on 30-year mortgage Average U.S. rates on fixed mortgages fell for the third straight week to their lowest point in three months, as a decline in consumer confidence and the onset of the government shutdown forced rates down. Mortgage buyer Freddie Mac said Thursday that the average rate on the 30-year loan dropped to 4.22 percent from 4.32 percent last week. The average on the 15-year fixed loan declined to 3.29 percent from 3.37 percent. Both are the lowest averages since early July.

Growth at service firms ebbs amid sales slump Growth at U.S. service companies slowed in September from an eight-year high in August, as sales fell sharply, new orders dipped and hiring weakened. The Institute of Supply Management says its service-sector index fell to 54.4 in September, down from 58.6 in August. August’s reading was the highest since December 2005. Any reading above 50 indicates expansion. The report measures growth in service industries, which cover 90 percent of the workforce, including retail, construction, health care and financial services.

Instagram to start showing advertisements Instagram, the mobile photosharing app owned by Facebook Inc., said it will start showing “occasional” photo and video advertisements in the coming months. It’s Instagram’s first step toward making money. While users can already follow brands and businesses, part of the app’s appeal has been its simplicity and, for some, a lack of advertisements. Facebook bought Instagram last fall for $715.3 million.

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon speaks at a dedication for the Robert W. Plaster Center for Free Enterprise and Business Development on Thursday. NATHAN PAPES/NEWS-LEADER

Center gets grand opening Gov. Jay Nixon speaks in dedication of Robert W. Plaster Center News-Leader Staff

Gov. Jay Nixon spoke at the grand opening and dedication ceremony for Missouri State University’s Robert W. Plaster Center for Free Enterprise and Business Development on Thursday. “The new generation of entrepreneurs who will come through these doors will thrive as a result of the investment made by the Plaster Foundation, the University, and the civic and business leaders of Springfield,” the governor said. A plaque honoring the late Robert W. Plaster also was unveiled. Steve Plaster, Robert’s son,

Get market updates online Find the latest in business and economic headlines along with a market update and the ability to search for your stocks of interest: News-Leader.com/stocks

Missouri native: Mobile-payment firm valued at $3.25 billion By Thomas Gounley TGOUNLEY@NEWS-LEADER.COM

Jim McKelvey urged area business leaders on Thursday to constantly look to innovate — even if pitfalls arise. “Just fail fast and try again,” he said. McKelvey is co-owner of mobile-payments company Square Inc. of San Francisco. He spoke at a luncheon hosted by the Springfield Area Chamber of Commerce. McKelvey’s wide-ranging comments touched on the rise of Square, his glass-blowing studio and his efforts to fill programming jobs in the St. Louis area through a recently launched nonprofit. He also spoke with area businessman Doug Pitt during the Chamber’s annual B2B Expo, in which more than 250 area businesses and organizations set up

booths at the Springfield Exposition Center. Chamber President Jim Anderson said in his opening remarks, “It’s also a day when we come together as a community to celebrate the growth of our local businesses.” McKelvey, who was born and raised in St. Louis, is best known for co-founding Square with Twitter co-founder Jack Dorsey in 2009. The graduate of Washington University in St. Louis also has teamed up with others to found Brentwood-based Mira Digital Publishing, St. Louis-based Cultivation Capital and other companies. McKelvey, 47, said an ability to process an international payment for one of his glass faucets — he took up glass blowing in college — led him and co-founder Dorsey, who at the time had left Twitter, to found a company focused on mobile payments for small vendors. “They’ve been getting ripped off for years, so we have a very loyal customer base,” he said.

STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST Check the performance of any stock at News-Leader.com/stocks Tuesday: Ticker symbol; Wednesday: Year-to-date percent change; Thursday: Price-earnings ratio; Friday: Dividend; Saturday: 52-week highs and lows. Name AT&T Inc Aetna Agilent AlcatelLuc AlliBern Altria Ameren Apple Inc BP PLC BP Pru BSD Med BcpSouth BkofAm Baxter BestBuy

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spoke, as well as representatives from MSU, the University of Missouri System, the U.S. Department of Commerce and the local community. In 2010, a seven-figure gift from the Robert W. Plaster Foundation resulted in the naming of the center and enabled the renovation of the former Willow Brook Foods turkey processing plant on Jefferson Avenue. The plant, according to property records, dates from 1930. The cost of renovating the building — including its purchase, furniture and technology — was $11.5 million. MSU’s eFactory, housed in the center, leases half of the 40,000 square feet to businesses

in the fields of manufacturing; medical device and health services; logistics and supplychain management; and technology. The eFactory is designed to assist startup and growth in new small businesses and provide continuing education and training for businesses and other organizations. The center also is home to Missouri University of Science and Technology and MSU’s cooperative engineering program; the Springfield Angel Network; the Procurement Technical Assistance Center; Missouri Enterprise; Service Corps of Retired Executives; and MSU’s printing and postal services.

Square co-founder speaks at B2B Expo

MARKETS Dow Jones 14,996.48 -136.66 -0.90% NYSE 9,619.20 -70.10 -0.72% S&P 500 1,678.66 -15.21 -0.90% Nasdaq 3,774.34 -40.68 -1.07% Russell 2000 1,070.90 -11.65 -1.08%

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50,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Oct 13 164.50 164.72 163.75 164.10

Jim McKelvey Says small vendors have “been getting ripped off for years.”

The Square Register allows merchants and consumers to use debit and credit cards on smartphones and tablets, swiping the card through a small plastic device that plugs into an audio jack. Last year, McKelvey said, Square processed $15 billion in payments. In September 2012, the company completed an investment round that valued it at $3.25 billion. McKelvey’s share of that is estimated to be worth more than $300 million, but he said the company doesn’t have plans to go public. “The hope with Square is that it’s going to be a persistent thing that changes commerce,” he said. McKelvey said he was driven to start LaunchCode — EMC Cp EastChem EmersonEl EmpDist ExpScripts ExxonMbl FordM Gannett GenDynam GenElec GlaxoSKln Google GrtSoBc Greif A GuarFBc HarleyD HewlettP HomeDp HovnEn pf A HuntJB Intel IBM IntPap JDS Uniph JPMorgCh

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the nonprofit he launched to pair coders with engineers at 100 St. Louis-area companies — when a colleague’s son was killed in north St. Louis last year. McKelvey wanted to create economic opportunities for people he felt turned to violence because of a lack of other options. “Every company we’ve talked to has said ‘yes,’ ” he said, illustrating the need for programming skills in the workforce. In addition to recounting the efforts he’s involved in, McKelvey spoke generally, crediting his success on either “ignorance or denial.” “I never think it’s that hard,” said McKelvey, who wrote a programming textbook in his freshman year of college when he thought the one he was using was lacking. In his closing remarks, he reflected on the change he’s seen in his lifetime. “The opportunity now to create things are greater than they’ve ever been.” .80 2.64 .22 1.20 .72 3.24 1.12 1.72 1.10 1.12 .56 1.91 1.72 1.47 .84 .48 1.00 .34

ProctGam RegionsFn SanderFm SiriusXM SouthnCo Starbucks 3M Co TimeWarn Tyson UMB Fn USA Trk US Bancrp ValeroE ValVis A VerizonCm WalMart Walgrn WellsFargo Wendys Co WmsCos Yahoo

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86.77 89.15 89.65 93.05 94.87 92.90 90.55 79.25 76.10 77.75

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‘Sing’ a clever, fast-paced treat

NEWS LEADER Friday October 4, 2013

1C

News-Leader.com

“Sing for Your Supper,” the tasty new revue that packs 60 songs into two fast-paced hours, makes it abundantly clear why the creations of Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart have never lost their appeal. The duo’s vast output from 1925 to 1943 has inspired performers as varied as Judy Garland, Elvis Presley, Janis Joplin, Bob Dylan and the Cowboy Junkies. In the early 1960s, Dion and the Belmonts and Larry T. the Marcels hit top of the COLLINS the charts with ARTS SCENE “Where or When” and “Blue Moon,” while current stars Lady Gaga (with Tony Bennett) and the cast of TV’s “Glee” revived “The Lady Is a Tramp.” Springfield Contemporary Theatre’s tuneful tribute, conceived by Richard Lewine and John Fearnley and directed by Robert Bradley, boasts four stellar singers, a trio of fine instrumentalists and an Italian menu created by chef Peter Tinson that adds literal spice to the occasion. Singer-actors Kim Crosby, Carol Reinert, Jeff Carney and Rick Dines offer glowing interpretations of songs both famous and obscure, romantic and sardonic. Crosby is particularly winning in the lilting “Falling in Love With Love” and the dramatic “Ten Cents a Dance,” Ruth Etting’s 1930 torch classic that now sounds like a proto-feminist anthem. Reinert’s smoky tone and jazzy inflections are perfect for “Little Girl Blue” and “My Funny Valentine,” but she also nails the deadpan humor of “To Keep My Love Alive,” the song in which Hart memorably rhymed “horses neck to me” with “appendectomy” and “patricide” with “mattress side.” Carney’s operatic pipes give full bloom to romantic gems like “Dancing on the Ceiling” and “Where or When,” then soften to convey the repressed longing of Hart’s autobiographical “Nobody’s Heart.” Dines shines in the exultant “With a Song in My Heart,” the charming “I Could Write a Book” and the rhythmic and intricatelyrhymed “Mountain Greenery.” All four singers combine their talents in two clever thematic sequences. One pays homage to places like Chicago, Paris and ancient Syracuse, while the other demonstrates how important the proper lyric is to a song’s success. “Blue Moon” was originally “Prayer,” a comic number intended for Jean Harlow. A rewrite turned it into the sultry “The Bad in Every Man,” but it wasn’t until Hart applied one of his simplest, most heartfelt lyrics that the song became a standard covered by everyone from Mel Torme to the Mavericks. In addition to quartet accounts of “Glad to Be Unhappy” and “Sing for Your Supper,” both adopted by the Mamas and the Papas in 1960s, cast members mix and match partners

LIFE

To report a news tip, call 417-836-1199 or email webeditor@news-leader.com

THE LONG ROAD BACK

“One of my very first thoughts was that I was going to die. We had to start talking about health directives and wills. It was very hard for my husband to talk about this.” MELANIE BLAIR cancer survivor

Breast Cancer Awareness Month brings attention to early detection, support services By Katie Tonarely For the News-Leader

W

INSIDE A list of events to help support Breast Cancer Foundation of the Ozarks and support available with Springfield’s hospital systems, 3C

hen Melanie Blair, 30, noticed a mass in her breast three years ago, it didn’t seem possible it could be breast cancer. She was so young, but when the test results showed that she did, in fact, have a 7.5 centimeter tumor in her breast, her cancer journey began. “One of my very first thoughts was that I was going to die,” she recalls. Blair had been married to her husband, Sam, for six months. “We had to start talking about health directives and wills. It was very hard for my husband to talk about this.” For local women diagnosed Melanie with breast cancer, the road Blair map to recovery can seem winding, lonely and scary. Organizations such as the Breast Cancer Foundation of the Ozarks help women financially and emotionally during treatment and recovery. During October, as a part of Breast Cancer Awareness Month, there are many events to benefit BCFO, including their biggest fundraiser, Hooked on Dance 2013: Havana Nights (sold out tonight). BCFO also has opportunities to volunteer.

Support for the journey

ABOUT BCFO Breast Cancer Foundation of the Ozarks offers a variety of ways to support women who have been diagnosed with cancer. Here are some: » Short-term, nonmedical financial assistance to residents of southwest Missouri and the four states/Joplin area who are being treated for breast cancer with a demonstrated financial need » Assistance to children of families affected by breast cancer through the Charlie and Mary Beth O'Reilly Family Children’s Fund » Free screening mammograms to the uninsured and underinsured through qualified medical centers throughout southwest Missouri. Lymphedema garments for the uninsured and underinsured. » Survivor support groups and mentoring programs » For information or to apply for assistance, go to bcfo.org or call 862-3838.

“For most of our patients, our services are a bit of a financial relief,” Crystal Webster, Executive Director of BCFO, says. BCFO encourages breast cancer patients struggling to pay for care to fill out an application, sign a medical release and let the volunteer committee determine what financial help is needed. The average patient receives $2,000, though that amount Crystal varies wildly, Web- Webster ster says. In addition to health care costs, many patients have to travel for treatments, which can be costly, too. When children are in the home, additional assistance can be offered, too. BCFO may See CANCER, Page 3C

See COLLINS, Page 3C

DAILY PLANNER

History museum needs volunteers Officials of the History Museum on the Square announced a call for volunteers to assist with trunk programs and to help staff the museum during three-hour shifts. As the volunteer base grows, officials plan to allow public access to the museum Monday through Saturday. Those interested in volunteering should contact John Sellars via email, john@historymuseumonthesquare.org, or at 417-831-1976.

Ticket fees to be waived

Patrons of the Gillioz Theatre will have an opportunity to waive ticketing fees for upcoming shows during the theater’s new Happy Hour. Officials of the theater will choose an hour or two each week when service fees will be waived for all shows scheduled at the Gillioz. Follow the theater on Facebook or Twitter to learn about selected times each week.

Band meshes old, new for timeless mystery

A

simple old-timey banjo vamp sets a quaint feel, but a stomp rhythm steers the tune into creepy territory. A gruff voice chants a song title’s demand — “Set me free!” — and menacingly frail women’s voices echo the calls. Moments later, a grinding whine of distortion steadily Ed the PEACO overtakes piece, building to something like a thunderous ringing in the ears, suggesting a psychotic or fatal event may be just around the corner. What’s going on? Should we shudder, laugh, both, other? “I think it’s a good thing to be a little mysterious in a song, ambiguous. The more people think about something, it stays it in their brain, percolates through more,” said Jason

HEAR CLAWHAMMER Where: Lindbergs, 318 W. Commercial St. When: 9 p.m. Saturday Call: 417-868-8900

Clawhammer (from left): Jason Childress, Lisa Wilson, Chelsea Childress, Chris Peterson SEPTEMBER CHILDRESS

Childress, who integrates these old and new elements. If you are looking for answers, check out Clawhammer on Saturday at Lindbergs. The band also has a recent, selftitled 7-inch album on Wee

Rock Records of Springfield. The group melds pre-bluegrass music with contemporary styles and technology. Childress and Chris Peterson switch off among banjo, guitar, bass and percussion. Childress

excels at banjo and conducting loop samples, Peterson at playing bass and providing the funky, jazzy beats that they mesh with rustic materials. Jason Childress’ wife, Chelsea Childress, cultivates the eerie vocals from old-time recordings and brings vintage clothing to the look of the band. The fourth member, Lisa Wilson, who is on a lengthy hiatus, has contributed duet voicings with Chelsea Childress. The ghostly effects from old-time recordings were due to the tools, not because the singers were trying to be Halloweenish. “Those old recordings have such a neat sound. See PEACO, Page 3C


NEWS-LEADER § News-Leader.com

Friday, October 4, 2013

Cancer/Important to take active role in prevention Continued from Page 1C

help with school clothing and supplies, daycare, summer camps, holiday gifts — a wide range of child-specific services, Webster says. Blair applied for financial assistance with BCFO, thinking maybe it could help pay for her mortgage. “Thankfully, we didn’t have to utilize the assistance,” she says. Blair’s cancer was diagnosed as stage three, and she was only given a 50 percent chance of survival. Through treatments and even a double mastectomy, Blair says it was challenging. “It was hard, but I chose to surround myself with really positive people,” she says. Blair has been in remission since May 2011, and despite doctors saying she might never have children, she learned she was pregnant in November 2011. She now has 15-month old twins, Avery and Jackson. “I think my story is really pretty cool,” she says. “I was given a 50 percent chance to live and a 50 percent chance to have children, and now I’m the mother of 15month old twins.” Blair gives back to BCFO as much as she can. “I’ve become pretty active,” she says.

The Mercy Sunshine Run, held Oct. 12 this year, is one of many events that help support the Breast Cancer Foundation of the Ozarks. NEWS-LEADER FILE PHOTO

Webster says it’s important for breast cancer patients to hear survival stories like Blair’s. “Most people want to talk to someone who has been in a similar situation and has been in a successful outcome,” she says.

How to help Webster says it’s volunteers like Blair who help make BCFO a successful avenue for helping breast cancer patients with financial needs. During October, the or-

ganization has several events and activities that give back to BCFO. Finances help, but Webster says the organization needs volunteers, too. Office volunteers and personal shoppers keep the organization’s day-today operations going. (Right now, Webster and BCFO desperately need about 50 volunteers to work from 6 to 10 a.m. for the Oct. 12 Sunshine Run. Visit mercy.net/volunteer -opportunities-sunshinerun-2013 for volunteer sign-up.)

Be proactive Finding a tumor early often gives patients a better chance of survival. “It’s important for women to take an active role in prevention and early detection,” Webster says. Currently, the American Cancer Society recommends the following for early detection: » ACS recommends yearly mammograms for women starting at age 40, but some women may need one earlier due to family history. » Women in their 20s and 30s should receive clinical breast exams every three years, and every year after age 40. » Women should start monthly breast self exams in their 20s. » Some women with a family history of breast cancer, or others based on a physician’s suggestion, will need a yearly MRI. Blair noticed her tumor by paying attending to her breasts. “I was only 27-years-old,” she says. “People weren’t interested in having me do a mammogram.” Blair says all women should be their own best advocates. “Don’t just take the doctor’s word for it. If you have a gut feeling, you should follow that.”

NEED MORE HELP?

BCFO SUPPORT EVENTS

Check out the support available with Springfield’s hospital systems. (Details about groups can be found with this list online.)

Check out these events to help support Breast Cancer Foundation of the Ozarks. Visit bcfo.org for more info. » Barnyard Days at Circle R Ranch, in Neosho, todaySunday. A portion of admission benefits BCFO. circle-r-festivals.com/barnyard_days.html; 417-451-3399. » Last Chance Couples 2-Day Scramble, Saturday and Sunday. Tanger stores will provide prizes for competing couples. The event is $49 per player.Visit bcfo.org. » Pink Apple 5K and two-mile fun walk/run, Saturday in Lamar with proceeds benefiting BCFO. Visit bcfo.org. » Mercy Sunshine Run 5K, Oct. 12 at Hammons Field. Visit active.com or mercy/net/registration-sunshinerun-2013 to register. » Paint the Landing Pink: The Branson Landing will be “pinked out” on Oct. 12. bransonlanding.com. » Cruisin’ for Cleavage-Poker run, Oct. 19. Registration begins at 9:30 a.m., first bike out at 10:30 a.m. Call 417-862-3838 or visit bcfo.org for details.

MERCY BREAST CENTER – CHUB O’REILLY CANCER CENTER 2055 S. Fremont Ave., No. 120; 417-820-2500 » Sharing the Journey Cancer Support Group, meets 2-3 p.m. every Tuesday. » Cancer Caregiver Support Group, meets 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. the first Thursday of each month. » Men’s Cancer Coffee Club, meets 7-8 a.m. every Tuesday. » Breast Cancer Network, 6-7 p.m. October 15. » Wellness Wednesday, 11:15 a.m.-noon first Wednesday of each month. » Yoga for Cancer Survivors, 8:30-9:30 a.m. every Wednesday. » Tai Chi Chih, meets 10-11 a.m. every Wednesday. » Meditation and Relaxation, meets 7-8 p.m. Tuesdays, and 4:30-5:30 p.m. Thursdays.

COXHEALTH/HULSON CANCER CENTER 3850 S. National Ave.; 417-269-5257 » REACH Together Breast Cancer Support Group, meets 7 p.m. on the second Thursday of the month, Breast Care Clinic, third floor, Hulston Cancer Center. » Pink Ribbon Pie Party, meets 1:30 p.m. on the third Wednesday of the month, Village Inn on South Campbell Avenue. » Image Reborn, meets quarterly. Contact the Center for Plastic Surgery, 875-3246 » Patient & Caregivers Support Group, meets 5:30 p.m. third Thursday of the month, conference room, ground floor, Hulston » Caregivers Support Group, meets 4:30 p.m. first Thursday of the month, Patient Classroom, Ste. 200, Hulston.

The old equipment is real lo-fi by today’s standards, but you can kind of replicate it using the hi-fi effects — lots of reverb,” Jason Childress said. The band also embraces the minimalist structure of the old songs, as well as their themes of sin, wrongdoing and consequences. The song “Hell” is about the destination where the voice in the song expects to arrive as a result of a vague but horrible act. The old-time, onechord songs, often sustained by a simple repeating pattern, force the musicians to be more creative, Jason Childress said.

“In one way, you’re limited, but in another way, it kind of makes things more interesting, because you have to think about it,” he said. “How can I make it really interesting just using one chord?” Jason Childress said he found a connection between old-time music and the one-chord vamp of classic funk, such as Sly and the Family Stone. “Hell,” among many other Clawhammer originals, benefits from this fusion. The loop sampler opened up new creative avenues, he said. He and Peterson work together to perform a brief sequence that they sample using a foot pedal. Once that sequence is looped, the

» Tanger Outlets PinkStyle Card Promotion continues through Oct. 25. Purchase a PinkStyle card for Tanger Outlets at Shopper Services or by calling BCFO and receive 5-25 percent off coupons. The cards are $5 each. » Mama Jean’s Natural Market Spare Change Cans: Drop change at a Mama Jean’s Natural Market through October, and Mama Jean’s will match donations to $250. » Panera Bread will donate 25 cents from the sale of every cherry vanilla Pink Ribbon Bagel sold in October.

ALSO HAPPENING Making Strides Against Breast Cancer, Oct. 26 in Jordan Valley Park to benefit the American Cancer Society; walk at 9 a.m. following a short program at 8:30 a.m. No fee, but participants can register at MakingStridesSWMO.org. » Find more Breast Cancer related events online.

musicians move on to other parts and instruments. All the samples and loops are executed live. The electronics serve the song by intensifying the emotional experience to melodramatic or horror-movie proportions. But above all, the stories drive the songs, he said, as in “Hell.” “What’s going on here? We don’t even know. Someone’s been murdered, but you don’t know why, exactly,” he said. “There’s a lot of questions to be answered there.” Ed Peaco writes about locally grown Ozarks music for the News-Leader. Contact him at 417-413-9029 or EdPeaco @gmail.com

Collins/Musicians lend solid support Continued from Page 1C

“You Took Advantage of Me.” Lending solid instrufor duet versions of “This mental support are piaCan’t Be Love” (Reinert nist/music director Jeanie and Carney), “Blue Raney, bass player RichRoom” (Crosby and ard Kittleman and percusDines) and a dozen other sionist Jeff Gouge. favorites. The tight quarters in The men have great the banquet room of Nonfun with two comedy na’s Italian Café, 3512 S. numbers, “Happy HuntNational Ave., limit vising Horn” and “It’s a Lovely Day for a Murder,” ibility on occasion, a fullystaged production, but the and special guests Craig main attraction here is Crosby and Sara Lampe gorgeous singing that lets up the humor quotient you savor every note of with “Thou Swell” and

Rodgers’ lovely melodies and each nuance of Hart’s wise and witty words. Performances are at 7:30 p.m. today and Saturday and at 2 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. For tickets ($18 and $16), call 831-8001. Seating for dining starts one hour before each show. A $12 foodand-drink minimum applies. Larry T. Collins reviews the performing arts for the NewsLeader.

American Legion Post 676, 5484 W. Sunshine St., 417882-4676: Lynn Howe & the Ozark Country Band, 7-10 p.m., cover Andy Williams Moon River Theatre, 2500 W. Missouri 76, Branson, 800-666-6094; andywilliams.com: Clint Black, 8 p.m., $54.66 Archie’s Lounge, 1817 E. Grand St., 417-864-4109: Act-A-Fool, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., no cover Cartoons Bar & Grill, 1614 S. Glenstone Ave., 417-8491009: Chris Knight with special guests Ben Knight and Dirt Road Sinners, doors at 7 p.m., $12.50 advance; $15 door Cody’s South,1440 E. Republic Road, 417-883-0253: Bob Bobo Davidson, 5-8 p.m., cover; The Bluesberries, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., cover CreekSide Pub, 3830 S. Lone Pine Ave., 417-882-1899: Karaoke, 8 p.m.-midnight, cover Dennis’ Place, 921 W. Sunshine St., 417-865-8373: Big Iron, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., cover Dublin’s Pass Irish Pub downtown, 317 Park Central East, 417-862-7625: Iron Mike Norton, 10 p.m., no cover Dublin’s Pass Irish Pub south side, 2767 W. Republic Road, 417-877-7625: Smiley Miller, 9 p.m., no cover Ernie Biggs, 213 South Ave., 417-865-4782: Dueling Pianos, 8 p.m.-1 a.m., cover The Hangout, 1906 E. Meadowmere St., 417-862-9911: The Norman Jackson Band, 8 p.m.-midnight, no cover Jalen’s Lounge, 1611 N. Campbell Ave., 417-8625033: Ladies Night with DJ, 9 p.m., no cover Jimm’s Steakhouse, 1935 S. Glenstone Ave., 417-8865466: Lori Locke and Clint Dinkins, 7:30-11 p.m., no

NEWS LEADER Home of the week. Sunday in Life.

cover Lil Dallas Sports Bar And Grill, 701 Red Top Road, Fair Grove, 417-759-7308: Kapps & Stems, 8:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m., no cover Lindberg’s, 318 W. Commercial St., 417-868-8900: Kevin Renick, 6:30-8:30 p.m., cover; The Essentials, soul and funk from New Orleans, 10 p.m., cover Mr. Eclectic, new location, 411 N. Boonville Ave., 417763-7861: Allen Ross and Nick Sibley, acoustic set, 7 p.m., no cover Mulligan’s, 2820 N. Glenstone Ave., 417-869-3900: Terry Armes, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., no cover The Outland, 326 South Ave., 417-869-7625: Jesse & the Rippers, 9 p.m., cover; Delta Sol Revivial, Nate Fredrick Band, 9 p.m., cover Park Central Square, Springfieldjazzfestival.com, 417831-6200: Springfield Jazz Festival, Park Central East, 6 p.m.: Linda Sala Project, Brandon Mezello Triptet, Richard Bruton Quintet, MSU Missouri State University Jazz Studies Ensemble, Park Central Square Stage, 6:30 p.m.: MSU Jazz Studies Ensemble, MSU Jazz Faculty Quintet, Elaine Richards, and Bread Leali with the Missouri Jazz Orchestra, no cover RFD-TV Theatre, 4080 W. Missouri 76, Branson, 417332-2344; rfdtvtheatre.com: Pam Tillis and Lorrie Morgan, 7 p.m., $45-$56 Springfield Brewing Company, 301 S. Market Ave., 417-832-8277: John Strickler Trio, 6-9 p.m., no cover; Jazz after Art Walk with Brandon Mezzelo Triptet, 9 p.m., no cover Three 20s, 3005 S. Kansas Expressway, 417-881-1520: Brookline Station and Pogue Mahonez, 9 p.m., cover WEHRENBERG THEATERS - 4005 South Ave - Springfield, MO 417-890-8457 OR 1-800-Fandango x2406

FIND US ON FACEBOOK! GRAVITY: AN IMAX 3D EXPERIENCE (PG13) 12:00 2:30 5:00 7:45 10:15

ONGOING:

Peaco/Music benefits from fusion Continued from Page 1C

NIGHT LIFE

3C

CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS 2 3D (PG) 12:15 2:35 4:55 CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS 2 2D (PG) 11:15 1:50 4:10 7:15 9:35 GRAVITY 2D (PG13) 1:30 6:45 GRAVITY 3D (PG13) 11:00 4:00 9:15 RUSH (R) 11:05 1:55 4:45 7:05 9:50 BAGGAGE CLAIM (PG13) 7:30 9:50 THE FAMILY (R) 11:10 1:45 4:20 7:20 9:55 DON JON (R) 11:30 2:00 4:50 7:35 10:10 THE WIZARD OF OZ 3D (G) 11:05 1:35 METALLICA: THROUGH THE NEVER 3D (R) 4:15 7:25 10:00 RUNNER, RUNNER (R) 11:45 2:05 4:30 7:00 9:40 GRACE UNPLUGGED (PG) 11:35 2:10 4:40 7:40 10:05 PRISONERS (R) 11:25 2:45 6:30 9:45 SL-0000339268

GRAVITY (PG-13) 100 PM (315 PM) GRAVITY IN REALD 3D (PG-13) (130 400 530) 720 750 940 1020 RUNNER RUNNER (R) 120 335 740 1010 CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS 2 IN REAL D 3D (PG) (320 PM) CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS 2 (PG) (105 PM) 705 PM 945 PM DON JON (R) (115 325) 725 955 BAGGAGE CLAIM (PG-13) (145 430) 730 950 RUSH (R) (200 445) 735 1025 PRISONERS (R) (150 PM 505 PM) 1000 PM INSIDIOUS: CHAPTER 2 (PG-13) (210 450) 755 1030 RIDDICK (R) (110 420) 710 1015 ELYSIUM (R) (1255 410) 700 935 WE'RE THE MILLERS (R) (125 440) 805 1035 THE WOLVERINE (PG-13) (140 435) 715 1005 DESPICABLE ME 2 (PG) (135 405) 655 930 SL-0000339270

FOR TICKETS & TIMES VISIT WWW.WEHRENBERG.COM SHOWTIMES ARE FOR: FRIDAY 10/04

■● GRAVITY 3D (DLP) PG-13 12:00 1:00 2:30 3:30 5:00 6:05 7:30 8:30 10:00 11:00 ■● GRAVITY (DLP) PG-13 11:30 1:50 4:15 6:45 9:15 ■● RUNNER RUNNER (DLP) R 12:00 2:25 4:50 7:15 8:50 9:45 11:15 ■● GRACE UNPLUGGED (DLP) PG 1:00 3:30 6:50 9:20 ■● DON JON (DLP) R 12:40 3:00 5:20 7:40 10:10 ■● RUSH (DLP) R 1:10 4:05 7:00 10:00 ■● CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS 2 3D (DLP) PG 11:55 2:20 4:45 7:10 9:35 ■● CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS 2 (DLP) PG 12:55 1:40 3:20 4:05 5:45 6:30 8:10 BAGGAGE CLAIM (DLP) PG-13 12:15 2:45 5:15 7:45 10:15 INSIDIOUS CHAPTER 2 (DLP) PG-13 11:45 2:20 4:55 7:30 10:05 11:05 THE FAMILY (DLP) R 6:40 9:30 INSTRUCTIONS NOT INCLUDED (DLP) PG-13 12:45 3:40 6:25 RIDDICK (DLP) R 9:10 LEE DANIEL’S THE BUTLER (DLP) PG-13 11:40 2:40 WE’RE THE MILLERS (DLP) R 11:40 2:15 4:55 7:35 10:15 ■=NO PASSES ●=NO VIPS AFTER 6PM DLP=DIGITAL PROJECTION SL-0000339269

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