__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

1 WINTER 2020

Be Yourself at Claremont

Full House for the

The show must

Dobson Trophy Challenge

‘virtually’ go on ‘Claremont Extra’ rides the airwaves


2

A ‘New Normal’, a New Chapter... W BY MR BUNKER

e were delighted to welcome back all of the children and teachers in September and to see so many new families joining Claremont for the first time. Everyone quickly adjusted to the ‘new normal’ and with all the children happy to be back and reunited with their friends, it wasn’t long before the school was a busy hive of purposeful learning and creative energy. The Michaelmas term is always extremely busy and despite the challenges posed by COVID-19, we were united in our determination to make each day count. We continued to mark important annual calendar events, made full use of our wonderful grounds and woodlands, and looked beyond ourselves and to those less fortunate by taking part in many local and national fundraising initiatives which this year included Water Aid, Children in Need, The Sea View Centre, St Michael’s Hospice and Dom’s Food Mission. We celebrated and learnt all about Black History Month, indulged in the written word on National Poetry Day, marked UNESCO World Teacher Day and celebrated our cultural diversity on European Day of Languages. Through virtual assemblies the children were able to perform recitals, make speeches and share their thoughts with the rest of the school. We also paused for thought during a beautiful and poignant assembly to mark Armistice Day, during which the children also pondered the sacrifices being made by our front line workers in the fight against Coronavirus. This term I was happy to see our Green Flag Award recognised in So Magazine and Times of Tunbridge Wells, some of the children’s artwork appear in the Wealden Times and Sussex Life, and I really enjoyed reading an article written by the Head of Drama at the Senior School in A+ Magazine and on the Wealden Times website about how Drama and performing arts help prepare children for life, as

well as a live audience. It reminded me of all the wonderful work Miss West does with our LAMDA students, Mrs Pena and Mrs Barry with the children on the Claremont stage, all the fabulous music we hear up and down the Prep school corridors each week, the children’s ‘virtual’ production of Joseph and his Technicolour Dreamcoat last term, the wonderful poetry recitals for National Poetry week, and our bilingual pupils who shared their second languages with us on camera for our European Day of Languages celebration back in September. From our String Babies and young actors from the Winter Warmer, to our Nativity stars and musicians at the all-school virtual Carol Service - being yourself at Claremont is always a bit of a performance, and I am so happy that in becoming a COVID-safe school, we ensured that could continue this year. After work was forced to stop on our new Pre School and Pre-Prep building over the summer, the children were particularly excited to return in September to see workmen and diggers back on site and large parts of the structure being craned into place. Throughout the autumn months we continued to watch the activity on site with great interest, whilst always thinking ahead to the grand unveiling in Spring 2021, and a new chapter in Claremont’s incredible history. The children and teachers have worked so hard to

Mr Bunker gets stuck in


3

Contents NURSERY & PREP SCHOOL

make the best of a challenging situation and embed the ‘Spirit of Claremont’ into everything they have done this term, and I would like to thank each and every one of them. By working together they really brought Claremont back to life after such a long time away and I am so proud to have been a part of it.

In the news.... Sussex Life: A+ Magazine

Friends Indeed

3

A Drop of Kindness

3

A truly Dahlicious day!

3

European Day of Languages

4

Matters of the Art

6

Walking in a Woodland Wonderland

8

Claremont School given the Green Flag

9

The Arrow

10

Harvest Festivities

11

We Love STEM

11

Nursery Stories

12

Christmas 14 National Poetry Day

15

Music Maestros!

16

The show must go on

17

Instagram Stories

18

Pre-Prep Update

20

In Pursuit of the Dobson Trophy

22

SENIOR SCHOOL & SIXTH FORM From Mr Dickie

24

CSSN and Claremont Extra on air!

26

Art and Photography

28

Performing Arts

30

Claremont Artwork 2

Instagram Stories

32

Ones to Watch

It’s all in the Head

34

Goodbye Year 8

34

Lessons in Lockdown

34

Farewell and Good Luck

35

Meet the Head Drama Story Claremont Artwork 1

Times of Tunbridge Wells Green Flag

atch

w Click to


4

IENDS OF FR

CHOOL TS N

Friends Indeed

AREMO CL

A Drop of Kindness Clean, safe drinking water is something that most of us take for granted, but Prep School pupils discovered that this is not the case for many children around the world. As part of their Water Aid topic, Year 5 presented an assembly, and Year 3 tried their hand at carrying water on their heads - getting a taste of what life is like for children in developing countries.

It was an unusual start to the year as we cancelled our Bonfire Night and Christmas Bazaar, and were unable to support the Dobson Cup and Children in Need. However, in good community spirit, the committee still donated £200 to charity and funded over £900 worth of activities, including a fabulous Year 8 Street Dance Workshop which had us all tapping our toes, and new Pre-Prep scooters. We also kept to tradition and Santa surprised the children with a Christmas gift! Thank you for continuing to support the FOCS Uniform Shop with card payments and Click&Collect. And remember, we always welcome new committee members! Tricia Edwards, FOCS Chair tricia_iversen@hotmail.com

A truly Dahlicious day! Dahlicious Day, one of the most colourful and anticipated days in the Prep school calendar, was no exception this year as both children and teachers alike enjoyed coming to school dressed as their favourite Roald Dahl characters. Willy Wonker and Charlie met a Mr Bunker-sized-Oompa Lumpa, whilst some Fantastic Mr Foxes and Matildas had fun playing in the sunshine with a Giant Peach! Thank you to everyone who took part and made the day such fun.

The children helped raise funds with a Mufti Day and a water droplet ‘UN 6’ display was created - representing the United Nations Development Goal 6, which is to have clean water and sanitation for all by 2030.


5

European Day of Languages W

e are proud of our diverse community here at Claremont, and are extremely fortunate to be able to teach children who embrace new languages with such joy and interest. It can be scary learning a new language, but this term Madame Hood was on hand once again to remind us that we learn step-by-step and mustn’t worry about making mistakes, as that is how we learn. Señora Osborne and her team always thrive on celebrating the annual European Day of Languages with the whole school, and although faced with so many COVID-19 restrictions, they were determined the day would still take centre stage. Thankfully, the theatre company, Onatti Productions, came to the rescue. Although they were unable to visit schools on site, they produced some inspiring films to help pupils continue with their learning. The films are set in a foreign country and native language is spoken in real situations – they are amazing for building confidence and listening skills. For a few days we were virtually transported to the exquisite city of Paris and sunny Sevilla...and the pupils loved it!

Click to watch

In Spanish, Year 7 & 8 pupils watched the comical film “La Fiesta” – an amusing story about a girl called Conchita who persuades her friend Paloma to hold a party for her birthday. Year 3 pupils enjoyed learning a little Spanish from classmate Ellie: they learnt the names of some colours and animals, and how to say good morning. They were particularly impressed with Ellie’s reading book, ‘un cumpleaños de altura’. Muchas gracias, Ellie! For French, the children watched “Sortir” - a short film which merged three stories linked by one location – a Parisian apartment. Children in Year 3 had a chat in German and Italian with Mrs Skinner, who told them some amazing facts about her country of origin, Canada, and all about the colourful face mask she was wearing, which had an interesting story behind it. This inspired the children to find out more about the Jellybean Row in Canada. Danke, Mrs Skinner!

Up at the Senior School, Señorita Bell, Madame Armstrong and Señora Osborne were also flying the language flags. Throughout the day, lessons and tutor groups were bustling with language activities: there were House competitions, quizzes and Mr De Pleave treated everyone to a wealth of language knowledge and accompanying activities.

It was a super team effort from everyone and we look forward to celebrating the day again next year!


6

Matters of the T

his term, the pupils took part in lots of crosscurricular art projects. Our youngest children enjoyed creating mixed media art pieces inspired by their topic of the seaside. Reception class also used collage, sponge printing, painting and drawing to assemble their art pieces inspired by the unique features of Hastings and the beach. These included the net shops and beach-launched fishing vessels, having watched film footage of the fishing fleet returning to the shore. Meanwhile, inspired by the classic and timeless story of the Mousehole Cat, Year 1 pupils enjoyed creating multi-layer dioramas to illustrate Mousehole Village.They used mixed media in their art pieces and learnt about the Cornish coastal landscape, whilst Year 3 artists took their inspiration from the story of Mary Anning to create their own illustrations of the Jurassic coastline.

Pupils in Year 2 created artworks inspired by the nostalgic travel posters of a bygone era to great effect whilst our Year 4 pupil artists worked hard on their crosscurricular projects, which linked in with The Vikings topic they were studying in History. They learnt about the Lindisfarne illuminated letters and created their own versions by combining their initials and symbols of flowers and animals in watercolour and pen compositions. Year 5 worked collaboratively to identify what makes a good illustration by analysing a range of styles. They worked to a project brief inspired by illustrator Emily Gravatt, whose work includes ‘The Imaginary’. Their drawing studies of conch shells, bird nests, a mannequin hand, compass, torch, pieces of white silk and geometric sculptural puzzle pieces were incorporated into a story set in ‘Claremont Woods’ where the objects came to life like the world imagined by the character Amanda.

CLAREMONTSCHOOL.CO.UK


7

Art Year 6 artists tried their hands at creating their own William Morris inspired symmetrical designs. This linked in perfectly with their History project focusing on the industrialisation of Britain. In Year 7, the children recreated the volcanic landscapes of JMW Turner, Katsushika Hokusai, Joseph Wright and Marianne North in watercolour and mixed media. Sadly, ‘lockdown’ prevented us from viewing artworks inspired by the war artists John and Paul Nash in the flesh, however, both projects really helped the children develop new skills and techniques they will no doubt call on in future projects.

Finally, artists in Year 8 spent the term honing their drawing techniques from still life observation and creating mini sketchbooks to record experimental and guided exploration of the watercolour medium, culminating in abstract compositions inspired by Wassily Kandinsky. Happily there was still time for everyone to help conjure up some stunning festive decorations to adorn the Chapel for the Carol Concert and Winter Warmer.

Click to watch


8

Walking in a

Woodland Wonderland

I

f you go down to the woods today, you’re sure of a big surprise! The Forest School children had plenty of lovely surprises this term, from spotting a wealth of wildlife on the Science Department’s trail camera to discovering hidden fungi right under their noses. The children have been busy this autumn learning all about senses. They practised their hearing skills by listening to instructions on how to create woodland stick animals, and then had a go at giving instructions to their peers - it was harder than they thought! Smell is a powerful communication tool in the animal kingdom, so, as a fun challenge, the children had a go at identifying their ‘pack’ members, simply from scent. They learnt how smell can trigger long-term memory, with particular scents taking us back in time to an event or place, and how the scent of some herbs, such as rosemary and lavender, can help us in everyday life.

Prep pupils built a gorgeous hedgehog hibernation house, with lovingly crafted bricks made of hay and clay. They learnt the importance of creating a doorway deliberately facing south to protect from winter weather, yet small enough to keep predators out. In true ‘spy-style’, the children monitored the trail camera and laid a smooth layer of clay at the door to capture any visiting footprints. With an inviting warm bed of straw and a few tasty mealworms, they are looking forward to someone moving in soon! The Nursery and Pre-Prep children weren’t left out; they have been looking at minibeasts and insects this term and enjoyed designing their own ‘rooms’ in an impressive bug hotel. After all that hard work, there was still time for relaxation; as the season turned, children from Nursery all the way up to Year 6 spent time honing their outdoor culinary skills, including sitting around a fire for that old school favourite activity - toasting marshmallows.

Did you know a fungus has been discovered which can digest plastic? It might help to save the planet one day! As part of UK Fungus Day, the children went on a ‘fungus foray’ and learnt some interesting names: ‘Destroying Angel’, ‘Panther Cap’, ‘Dead Man’s Fingers’ and ‘Stinkhorn’ were some favourites, although we wouldn’t recommend getting your nose too near the Stinkhorn! Some pupils had a go at creating their own fungus and made up some cracking names: ‘Forest’s Peace’, ‘Devil’s Victim’ and ‘Bottle Cruncher’, to name but a few. With the woods full of wildlife at this time of year, the children were keen to spot creatures in their natural habitats.

Click to watch


9

Eco warriors take delivery of Green Flag distance learning programme, the children were already primed and ready to apply their hands-on learning to their own eco initiatives from afar. The increased intensity of birdsong and activity in the late spring did not go unnoticed but with our plans to plant a wildflower meadow at school dashed, and the Eco Store temporarily closed for business, we were reminded that the relationship between the natural environment, climate and people was as fragile as ever.

A

s a new school year began, and the effects of lockdown left us wondering if life would ever be quite the same again, we reflected on what we, as a school, achieved in a year before anyone had uttered the word ‘pandemic’. Inspired by Greta Thunberg’s work and remarkable address at the U.N Summit, pupils from Year 7 & 8 decided to launch the Claremont Eco Store - what we believe is one, if not the first, of its kind in a school. Working with charity onetreeplanted. org, the children used their profits to ‘plant’ trees in areas of the world most in need, and by February, over 225 new trees were donated to Kenya and Australia. Meanwhile, pupils up and down the school worked alongside a determined band of young ‘Eco Warriors’, to drive numerous other initiatives to educate and empower the whole school community to play their part in safeguarding the environment. Eco issues were addressed in Science, Art, Maths and even French, with discussions around the problem of plastic pollution in our oceans high on the agenda. Older pupils researched the world of Fairtrade as part of their Geography curriculum, before hosting their own all-school assembly. Global

citizenship was highlighted during Fairtrade Fortnight, when the whole school took part in the 90kg Rice Challenge to show solidarity with rice farmers in Malawi. Beach cleans at Hastings and litter picks around the school grounds became a regular part of ‘Warrior work’, and our ‘Switch off’ Week encouraged everyone to turn off unused electrical appliances at home, as well as in school. Recycling of paper, card, plastic and batteries continued throughout the year, and the school dining room became a focus of eco activity ahead of the ‘The Great British Spring Clean’. By Easter, the Newspaper Club produced a special Eco Edition of the school magazine to recognise and celebrate the ongoing work of the Eco Warriors and school community. ...and then the world slowed down, stopped and eventually stood still as life in lockdown became the new norm. Whilst recognising and facing up to the many challenges lockdown presented for our whole school community, we quickly embraced the surprising positives that resulted. With the launch of our ‘School without Buildings’

At Claremont, we have been on a journey to embed principles of sustainability in all that we do. The children’s efforts were finally recognised in July 2020, when the school received the much-coveted Green Flag Award, which arrived in September and was quickly run up the school flagpole. But this is just the beginning...

‘All we have to do is wake up and change’ Greta Thunberg


10

The Arrow T

his term, fresh from being awarded BBC Reporter School status, our newshounds have been extremely impressive in the face of the new measures tackling COVID-19. With tenacity, creativity and brilliant journalism, they produced the most packed edition of The Arrow yet, with Black History Month special features, epic sports challenges, in-depth interviews and bags of Christmas spirit.

Working in year pods with face masks, and sanitising equipment afterwards, they were undaunted in their pursuit of the stories that matter to pupils at our School. A big scoop for the journalists this term was a live interview with The Telegraph sports writer, James Corrigan. James is the Golf Correspondent for The Telegraph, as well as a rugby and football writer. His background is in sports journalism and general news, and he offered a rare insight into a high profile career. James would usually be travelling around the world covering international tournaments but, because of the pandemic, we were very lucky to be able to grab him for some inspiration and advice for our budding Claremont sports writers. We understand that our reporters were relentless in their questioning, so he was certainly put through his paces. You can read more about James’s career advice and all the famous sports players and celebrities he has interviewed (hint: the last president of the USA!) in this term’s edition of The Arrow. In the same issue, our Head of English, Mrs Glendinning, shares a poem she wrote for National Poetry Day celebrations back in October, and the term’s reporting ended on a muddy high with reporters heading out to the playing fields to bring back the story of another fabulously muddy Dobson Trophy Challenge Day. Read The Arrow online.


11

Harvest Festivities! This year’s Harvest Festival was another happy and thoughtprovoking event. With a wonderful bounty of food donations on display in the O’Byrne Theatre, our assembly focused on the importance of sharing, taking only what we need and making sure there is enough food for everyone. Led by our Year 8, pupils with the rest of the school tuning in remotely from their classroom bubbles, we enjoyed some lovely whole class poetry written to celebrate National Poetry Day. Mr Drinkwater’s class performed a Harvest-themed poem entitled ‘It’s Harvest Time’ and children from Year 3 and 4 signed to the song ‘Let’s Harvest’. The addition of a Harvest-

themed Kahoot quiz also ensured we were all kept on our toes. Did you know? Strawberries are the only fruit that wear their seeds on the outside!

We Love STEM With the start of the Michaelmas term came the return of all things STEM, no better demonstrated than along the top corridor during Friday enrichment sessions. Pupils eagerly crouched around chromebooks in-year group bubbles, programming their latest Lego creations, and particularly enjoying the challenges posed by our new Lego Spike Prime Kits. Others finished their final preparations for their cars so they could take to the track with our ‘Maths in Motion Club’ the cheering perhaps only matched by that seen during November’s Dobson House competition. In lessons we saw great competitive spirit throughout the ISP Mathletics competition, as well as the national BEBRAS Challenge, where children from Years 5 to 8, stretched their computational thinking to the limit. With some excellent results, we look forward to hearing which students Mr Slattery will select to progress to the next stage in the new year. We witnessed some wonderful creativity in Year 5 this term when the children became chocolatiers for the day, creating strawberryfilled chocolates in order to better

investigate changes of states, and in particular, reversible and irreversible changes. In any event, one thing is for sure: it went down as one of the most delicious lessons of the year so far. In Code Club we witnessed some fantastic robot building! Working with our new Lego Spike Prime Kit, Elvin and Noah from Year 8 made a grasshopper with the bricks and motors, coded the movement instructions, then transferred them via Bluetooth. James worked on a tipper with the Edison robot, and the Scratch language whilst Bethany from Year 5 made, and coded, a revolving satellite with Lego Wedo. Fantastic work. A packed start to our year bodes well for 2021 when we hope to see even more enthusiasm across the school for all things STEM.

Well done to Amelie RS, Tess R, Darcy B, Liberty BM, Zoe W and Anna B for planning such a joyful assembly, and thank you to the wider Claremont family for all the generous donations.


12

Nursery Stories

T

his term we were so excited to welcome all of our new starters to the Nursery, and of course see lots of familiar faces again, some of which we hadn’t seen since the first lockdown in March, so it was a very special moment. We helped the children become a little bit more independent (a welcome idea that needed little encouragement given the children in the Nursery always seem so keen to experiment and try something new), quickly establishing a good hand washing routine, encouraging the tiny ones to start to feed themselves and the older ones to clear the table up nicely after lunch and snack time.

Happily, it didn’t take long for all of our little ones to settle in nicely and for the Nursery to return to a busy hive of activity with lots of learning through play.

The Caterpillars spent lots of time exploring their senses with sand, bubbles, salt dough and lots of lovely sensory toys and the Butterflies never seemed to be without their trusty magnifying glasses - taking a much closer look at the world around them at every opportunity.

The Ladybirds got stuck into a whole manner of art and craft activities each week, creating Spooky Spider paintings for Halloween, and contributing to the carving of the ‘class pumpkin’. The glorious weather enabled everyone to enjoy plenty of autumn walks and the children to replenish their stocks of leaves and sticks to add to their seasonal collages and make some impressive paper mache leaf lanterns. The Dragonflies indulged in all things ‘Gruffalo’, creating Gruffalo action rhymes, Gruffalo-themed puppet shows and even having a go at making their own logpile houses. They spent time discussing what makes everyone different, which later inspired the creation of a colourful paper plate gallery for the Nursery display board. In the great outdoors, the Dragonflies needed little encouragement to put their wellies on for some good-old fashioned puddle jumping and the much loved Parachute game regularly threw a splash of colour onto the playing fields, challenging the children to do some lovely listening and counting in groups. ‘Learning walks’ provided many opportunities to identify mathematical

Click to watch


13

shapes in the landscape, but we lost count of the number of dens built in the woods. Whilst the Dragonflies were busy with the Gruffalo, the Damselflies spent time with the Three Billy Goats Gruff and the GingerBread Man. Working with the pictures and text in the book, they practised their numeracy and literacy skills, acted out the story with their own goat and troll puppet creations and even got busy with their weights and measures in the kitchen by baking their own biscuits. Yummy! Time always seems to fly by in Forest School and this term was no exception. Bugs were well catered for in the new outdoor houses the children built for them, moulded clay insects began to appear on the trees, the fire circle was the scene of many a woodland feast, as hearty helpings of warm toast and mugs of hot chocolate were regularly consumed, and a face-to-face encounter with some crickets, mealworms and a friendly cockroach brought our young adventures up close with nature, in a hands-on learning experience like no other.

November prompted the children to make some colourful dancing firework pictures, many a birthday was celebrated in Butterflies and in a more contemplative activity on Armistice Day, Ladybirds and Butterflies discovered the colour red. Later in the month, everyone in the Nursery got together to support Children in Need and had lots of fun playing with yellow scented playdough, pasta, water and joining in with Joe Wicks for a spot of exercise. The festival of Diwali inspired Caterpillars to make some beautiful lanterns whilst our older Nursery children looked forward to their trip up to ‘big school’ for the eagerly anticipated weekly french lessons with Madame Hood. With December sneaking up on us, it wasn’t long before all the Nursery children turned their attention to rehearsals for their Nativity, which was filmed in glorious technicolour and shared with parents at the end of the term. Weekly yoga sessions with Anja, green-fingered moments in the Jubilee Garden and endless opportunities to breathe in the outdoor air kept everyone focused and energised throughout. It has been a busy Michaelmas term, and the children have loved every minute of it.


14

Christmas


15

National Poetry Day

T

o celebrate National Poetry Day, Prep school children enjoyed reading poetry aloud and wrote their own poems in English lessons.

Pupils in Years 7 & 8 wrote some striking poems linked to their class texts, with a focus on building adventurous vocabulary. Year 8 pupils tried their hand at writing pithy limericks to summarise the early chapters of ‘Lord of the Flies’, their word-building skills came on a treat. They also wrote their own poems inspired by Seamus Heaney’s ‘Storm on the Island’, imagining the impact of a storm on the pacific island, and experimented with imagery to create a sense of nature being in control.

Here are Elvin and Amelie’s fantastic poems, inspired by Lord of the Flies and ‘Storm on the Island’:

On a more mysterious note, pupils reading ‘The Ruby in the Smoke’ read Wilfred Owen’s ghostly poem ‘Shadwell Stair’, using the imagery from the novel to craft a descriptive class poem about Wapping Old Stairs, a key location in the novel, and Mrs Holland, a key character. Those studying the swashbuckling ‘Treasure Island’ read James Elroy Flecker’s magical poem ‘A Ship, An Isle, A Sickle Moon’, and were inspired by the imagery to write lines collaboratively for their own class poem: ‘A Pirate’s Song’.

‘The Storm on the Island’

By Elvin, Year 8

Storms bring a wave of fear of nothing and

But this storm was different

‘Storm on the Island’ By Amelie, Year 8

like a cat The sea began to claw at its bed ontrollably The palm trees began to sway unc ing havoc. Wind swept through the island caus the trees Whispers swooped in and out of Animals legged it to shelters letting out screams The sea began to roar like a lion Clouds danced through the sky.

Fear crept into the boys’ eyes pening. It began to sink in, what was hap ied behind the rocks With screams and shrieks they hurr eyes Tears flooded out of their shining long gone The calmness of the situation had The thought of death crept in. It went dead quiet No one spoke a book turning pages. The wings of the birds fluttered like Boys made their way out slowly Calmness swept back in and settled The sea sprang back like a yo-yo Like a blanket covering the sand.

solitude

For they were not prepared. Little ones running around not knowing what to do The Older Ones know their fate The black cloud carrying a wave of terror not

Lightning striking, each boom like a thud on

Water pouring down like silver shards falling

fear a drum

Waves crashing against the golden sand, now turning brown Trees crashing down like discarded twigs

And now, even the Older Ones panic.


16

Music Maestros!

Click to watch

BY LORRAINE BARRY - HEAD OF MUSIC

D

espite the challenges of the global pandemic, music has consistently filled the top corridors of the Prep School throughout the Michaelmas term as the children continued to enjoy their music lessons and group rehearsals, albeit socially distanced. I owe a debt of gratitude to all my visiting instrumental and singing teachers, who did an outstanding job embracing new technologies and delivering remote music lessons to many of the children during lockdown. I was treated to many a remote performance and was excited to hear about all the wonderful progress the children were making on their instruments. I was thrilled and relieved to welcome them all back to the department in September (along with masks, sanitiser, visors, sneeze screens, hand washing routines and rooms filled with multiple pianos and drum kits). We continued to build music into the wider life of the school and several students prepared performances for our virtual assemblies. Well done to Year 3 and 4, who became a signing choir for our Harvest Assembly, Ellie B (violin), Edward F (violin), Melanie C (violin), Varnika P (flute) and Eva G (flute) who played solos during our recent Music Assembly presented by Mrs Ratcliffe and the Bubble Choirs, as well as Penny C who sang in the Remembrance Assembly.

The annual Carol Service also served to be another of many ‘firsts’ this year with the Senior and Prep School coming together in the Prep School Chapel to perform a wonderful ‘all school’ virtual service. Much fun was had on filming day and the children behaved with real professionalism. Thank you to the children and staff for all their hard work in making contributed to make this event such a success. As the lights went out on the Carol Service, we started to look ahead to the Hastings Music Festival 2021. Although this will be another virtual event, the children have become pretty adept at performing in front of a camera and were clearly excited as they began preparations ahead of recording day in January. Finally, congratulations to all the children up and down the school who passed their ABRSM Music examinations in November. Not an easy task given that much of the preparation was done remotely.


17

The show must go on! B

eing allowed to proceed with practical drama lessons this term was a huge relief to both the children and staff. The Drama Department is always a hub of excitement and industrious creative planning and COVID did little to dampen our spirits or quash the children’s joy and enthusiasm. Two-metre marks on the floor helped define teachers’ and children’s performance spaces, there were lots of mask and visors worn, we kept a good distance from each other, were careful not to project our voices, made sure we kept our hands sanitised and ‘wiped down’ at the end of each lesson. Despite all this, the children quickly adapted to their ‘new normal’, and in every lesson, imaginations soured and creative energy flowed. There have been many dramatic highlights during our first term. A Year 7 Tech Team was formed, made up of eager pupils keen to explore theatre crafts such as set design, lighting, sound, stage management and production. I am so impressed by the maturity and responsibility they have shown in such a short space of time since being chosen for these important roles. In the Lent term, the team are looking forward to working with ‘StageWise’ as part of the Enrichment Programme. A strong team of costume and props creators and organisers have also emerged this term, and have flourished in every task they have been set. The drama pupils put together an emotional performance for Remembrance Day focusing on the heroes of all wars, with additional reference to the war against COVID. A moving

Click to watch

theatrical piece was created around the NHS heroes and war heroes, supported by some members of staff who read out some letters from the past. The year finished with children from Years 3 to 8 creating an inspiring piece of theatre for a virtual ‘Winter Warmer’ performance which was filmed and broadcast to parents ahead of the Carol Service. What a performance! And congratulations to all of our LAMDA pupils who passed their examinations with flying colours this term.


18

Quiet please...we’re thinking! Claremont students push up the @mathletics3pl rankings as they take on fellow @ispschools pupils from all over the world... #ispmathschallenge #brainworkout

Year 3 House teams! #sparta #corinth #athens #spiritofclaremont #team #sport

Year 5 puts jelly babies through their paces in the name of science...#stem #handsonlearning #spiritofclaremont

Year 7 scientists’ homemade paper aeroplanes are cleared for take off during investigations into Forces. A special mention to Will, whose aircraft flew 8m 70cm ... #handsonlearning #usetheforce

Mrs Potter and Miss Newton prove very persuasive when it comes to securing a cheeky private tour around the new Nursery and Pre-Prep building site... #giftofthegab #rollonfebruary

A Google Meet to remember... #lestweforget


19

The first equestrian team training of this academic year! Great to see everyone there despite the gales! #equestrian #spiritofclaremont #team #training

Forest School explorers have been enjoying the September sun, whilst crafting mini architectural models ahead of a big build next week! #handsonlearning #forestfriends #thegreatoutdoors

Another fabulously busy few days of learning ... #spiritofclaremont

Year 5 & 6 rugby training #rugby #training #team #workhard #sunshine

Year 3 & 4 Dice Netball Challenge!! #spiritofclaremont #netball #team #challenge #mission #gameon #thisgirlcan

Christmas food hampers find their way to @domsfoodmission distribution centre courtesy of Mrs Ackerley and her two very strong elves. What a fabulous community initiative. Thank you to everyone who donated... #community #spiritofclaremont


20

Pre-Prep update...

W

ow! What a whirlwind first term we have had! We travelled ‘under the sea’, created artwork inspired by J.M.W Turner and even managed to get ourselves shipwrecked on a desert island where we had to decide which items were the most important for us to survive! We wrote messages in a bottle, poems inspired by what we might have found in our pockets and even designed our own treasure maps. We looked back into the past to the likes of Grace Darling, learning all about her daring rescue at sea before moving onto Guy Fawkes and his failed attempt to blow up the Houses of Parliament. We explored the traditional and cultural celebrations of Halloween and Diwali, came up with our own designs for a pumpkin and, after voting for our favourite, carved it into a real pumpkin before indulging in some Halloween-themed acrostic poetry. In Maths we spent lots of time honing our addition and subtraction skills using number stories and learning all about place value. After creating some amazing rangoli patterns we were also inspired to explore the properties of both twoand three-dimensional shapes.

As Year 1 discovered the fascinating world of nocturnal animals, Year 2 dived straight into their ‘Beside the Seaside’ topic with great enthusiasm. We welcomed some new crew mates to our happy ship and enjoyed stories, poems and songs about the seaside, whilst researching the history of boats, including the Mary Rose and Titanic. Each week the ‘String Babies’ worked hard to improve their pizzicato technique in the Chapel and Year 1 children continued to practise their French listening skills and got their enormous, colourful map of the world out on European Day of Languages to test their knowledge of flags. That was after a Pre-Prep diary favourite - Dahlicious Day, which had us all digging around in our dressing up boxes for the perfect Roald Dahl character costume. October saw the introduction of our ‘Playground Friends’ initiative where two pupils from each year group worked with duty staff during break times to identify any children who they felt may be in need of a friend, to join a game, or just to chat to. Throughout the autumn months Alice Mitchell, our new Level 3 Forest School teacher, introduced


21

the children to some new and exciting ways to explore nature in our woodlands, helping them to get up close and personal with some strange-looking bugs during many an outdoor investigation into the creepy-crawly world of insects. Meanwhile, some very cold and damp weather didn’t deter the members of the Gardening Club from getting togged up and out into the Jubilee Garden to take care of some pesky weeds and plant daffodils and strawberries ready for next Spring. Mr Drinkwater’s Year 2 class recorded their performance of a lovely poem called ‘It’s Harvest Time’ for the Thanksgiving Assembly and everyone wore green for a Mufti Day to help raise money for Water Aid. The fundraising spirit of Claremont returned to Pre-Prep later that month for BBC Children in Need week, during which everyone ‘wore spots to raise lots’ and Year 1 took part in the national ‘Big Bubble Sing Along’. Red poppies were crafted for a beautiful Remembrance Day display ahead of learning all about how the heroes and heroines of the First World War were honoured in France, with Madame Hood joining the rest of the Prep School for a special Remembrance Day assembly.

After Mr Bunker paid a visit to Pre-Prep to officially ‘launch’ Christmas, the children busied themselves with making decorations and ornaments for the Christmas trees, and of course, putting lots of practice time into their singing and speaking parts for the end of term Nativity performance. Staying in festive mood and donning red noses and antlers, the children still found time to take part in a charity ‘Reindeer Run’ before the end of term, managing to raise over £1000 for local children’s charity The Chestnut Tree House. Then, with the final edits complete, the much anticipated ‘Shine Star Shine’ Nativity performance recording was finally shared with the school and parents. Expertly planned, organised, rehearsed, produced and directed by the wonderfully calm and creative Mrs Wilson, the children told the story of the star who had lost her shine; a beautifully acted seasonal tale, which included a gorgeously traditional stable scene, filmed right in the heart of the Claremont forest. As the daylight faded, one last look back at our new Pre-School and Pre-Prep building left us all feeling very excited for the year ahead.


22

e h t f o t i u s r u In P Dobson Trophy T

he sun shone down once again on the Claremont playing fields for the annual Dobson Trophy challenge with a full Prep School contingency of runners eager to finish the course and earn points for their House. Mrs Edmunds ran the circuit several times, clocking up 6k of her own, whilst helping the children keep up the pace and battle hard to the finish line. All in all, it was another fantastic afternoon out in the grounds and woodlands, and wonderful to see all the children cheering their House on, delighting in each other’s individual performances and pushing themselves that little bit more to a final sprint when the end was in sight.

Congratulations to the runners from Athens who recorded the highest number of points and took the House trophy.

Click to watch


23

nt

#spiritofclaremo

23


24

From Mr Dickie of this existed last year, let alone the idea of everyone wearing facemasks. I am hugely proud of the way in which everyone in the community has adapted to the protocols. The fact that we have remained open throughout the term is testament to the level of discipline shown by everyone, alongside a healthy dose of luck!

T

his has been a term like no other. With the last hints of summer still in the air, we came together at the start of September for the first time since mid March. The sense of excitement and relief were tangible and it was wonderful to welcome a new generation of students and families to the Senior School. Our new Year 9 students have already shown themselves to be a fantastic bunch, impressing inside and outside the classroom with their enthusiasm and hard work. Equally impressive have been our new additions to the Sixth Form who are already making their mark across school life. A whole new language of ‘bubbles’, ‘social distancing’, ‘Google Meets’ and ‘systems of control’ has had to be learnt as we have coped with the challenges of Covid-19. None

The period of lockdown and school closure was incredibly hard for all concerned, not least the two exam years who missed the opportunity to show what they were capable of in the exam room. As it was, they were rewarded with grades that, ultimately, reflected their hard work and talent. Analysis that takes into account the inflation of grades across the country, demonstrates that both our GCSE and A Level results were the finest in the school’s history. Most importantly, our ‘value added’ figures made a major leap forward. There were some outstanding individual performances across the board, not least Mary Woodfear and Max Estall, both of whom achieved nine Grade 9s. The past two years has seen a significant drive to raise our academic game and it is pleasing to see the hard work bearing fruit. We are determined to ‘get better’ in all that we do and this term there was an outstanding focus, from both students and teachers, in ensuring that learning in the classroom was of the highest quality. Perhaps the threat of impending closure, at any moment, focused the minds, but the sense of purpose that has been prevalent in all year groups has made me very hopeful that the success of this year’s exam cohorts will be matched, or even


25

improved, by the new Year 11 and 13. This term has also seen an introduction of a new progress monitoring system that we hope will fuel success and encourage students to aim high across all of their subjects. New management in the Sixth Form, led by Victoria Liggett, has been another of the many steps taken in a relentless pursuit of academic excellence and ‘potential fulfilled’ for each and every student in the school. That all of this has been achieved against the backdrop of a Covid pandemic makes it all the more pleasing. This has been a term to embrace technology like never before and this Review is littered with examples of staff and students using technology in order to keep things ticking over. The wonderful Claremont Extra podcast, online parent and target meetings, online parent forums, videoed Head of School hustings, ‘virtual’ open days and endless pieces to camera - the list goes on and on. Some areas of the school have been decidedly prolific! It is fair to say that we have really embraced and, dare I say it, enjoyed this new way of working. We are getting our message out to both the parent community and the outside world and I can imagine many of the new innovations outlasting the pesky virus. We are proud that Claremont was singled out amongst all of the ISP European schools for the excellence of its work in the past six months, a tribute to our fabulous Marketing and Communications team. For all of the digital content that flowed, normal school activities continued to thrive. We held fundraising and awareness events for important causes such as World AIDS Day, performed a powerful Remembrance Commemoration and celebrated Black History Month in October. The CoCurricular Programme ran at close to normal levels with Lea Owen and the indefatigable JP overseeing an evolution of this vital part of school life. Creative, Academic Plus and Service activities have been thriving, and the Performing Arts Department has been on fire, a hub of energy and creativity.

LAMDA exams were a triumph, with record numbers of students achieving Distinctions, and the Performing Arts team also launched a new ‘Outreach’ programme that will, in time, see their performances taken out into the community. Defying the naysayers, Sport ran on a daily basis with some notable successes when we were able to hold fixtures (admittedly a rare event!). Our Hockey and Netball provision has gone from strength to strength, led by the dynamo that is Rak Patel. There has been a greater level of participation than at any point in the school’s history and it has been fantastic to see the hordes of students jumping on their buses for training each lunchtime. We now hope for the return of some fixtures next term so that the students can see their efforts in training translate into victories on the field. After the year that we have all had it is not difficult to be excited about the potential of 2021. One hopes that the gradual easing of Covid restrictions will allow us to return to something that resembles how we operated prior to the first lockdown. There is plenty to look forward to. We have already started planning for an exciting junior outdoor production of Romeo & Juliet, workshops in the Dance Studio, ISP’s first Film Festival, the return of sporting fixtures and a full season of exams!! This year also represents the 10th Anniversary of the founding of the Senior School in 2011, and we very much hope that we will be able to celebrate this in style in the summer. Above all else it will be a joy to see the year groups come together again after their long period of separation. At its heart Claremont remains a school where relationships are key. We have to remember that it will not always be like this. While there are many who have suffered greatly during the current pandemic, I believe we can take some comfort from the fact that this dreadful period has made our community stronger.

Ed Dickie,

Senior School Headteacher


26

Click to watch

CSSN and Claremont Extra on air!

T

his term, news from Bodiam has taken a whole new turn. Claremont Senior School News (or CSSN as it’s referred to on site), and the brilliant podcast ‘Claremont Extra’have both launched this term through the Co-Curricular Programme, putting news reporting firmly into the hands of the students themselves. In local TV bulletin style, the team from CSSN bring the latest issues, stories, opinions and events to the TV screens across the school. Reporting on the real issues that matter to the students. The team, expertly led by news anchors Charlie, Bobby, Oliver and Madeleine, carefully balance harder-hitting stories with more light-hearted interviews with teachers and students. So far this term, the team have produced a fascinating report on bullying to coincide with Anti-Bullying Week, coverage of the Armistice Day commemorations to include an inspiring interview with Mr Divall focusing on his time serving in the Princess of Wales’s Royal Regiment, an insight into the Girls’ Football Academy and an exclusive interview with the U14 Boys national champions.

Meanwhile, in a soundproof recording room not far away, is ‘Claremont Extra’. The launch of the podcast this term was an idea born out of the confines of lockdown, when Drama and Music students started to work with the original and powerful creative medium of Radio in order to share the plays they had been devising and rehearsing with an audience. Claremont Extra’s main feature is the student-produced radio drama ‘Holly Avenue’, which is scripted, voice-acted and edited by the students. Each Podcast episode also includes a quote of the week, chosen and read by our Senior School Head, Mr Dickie, and exclusive interviews with members of staff from across the school in a feature entitled ‘The Sofa’. The students are responsible for all elements of the radio show, from scheduling, planning and recording interviews to creating jingles and soundbeds, and the first three episodes proved a huge hit with Senior School students and parents alike.


27

“There is no end to how we can use this medium and the students have an abundance of ideas for the coming weeks, months and who knows... maybe years!” THE CLAREMONT PERFORMS TEAM

Subscribe to Claremont Extra

Series 1: Episode1

Series 1: Episode 2

Available on itunes and soundcloud

Series 1:Episode 3

Click to watch

Series 1: Episode 4


28

Art & Photography Art

It has been a welcome relief to be physically back on site with the Art students. Despite the students working really hard during lockdown earlier this year, it is much better when we are all together in the Art Department inspiring each other creatively. Year 9 Tribal Patterns & Masks project Year 9 artists have been improving their acrylic paint technique & modeling skills. They have researched different cultures’ tribal patterns and mask designs. They will continue to learn about building a portfolio of work and developing their ideas as they progress. Year 9 Tribal pattern ceramic tiles.

Year 11 GCSE Art Year 11 artists have also been busying themselves with their coursework; based on a self-portrait project called ‘Identity’. They have been learning about the face, proportion and how to draw themselves. Year 13 For Year 13 Art students, Michaelmas is a very important term as they are not only producing a practical project on a theme of their choice, but also writing an essay on it too! Broad themes such as ‘Love’, ‘Creepy-Crawly’ and ‘Holes’ have been chosen.


29

Photography The Photography department has been a hive of activity since we returned to school and the students have been really pleased to be able to once again use the studio and darkroom for practical work. Year 10 Photography The Year 10 students have started their technical project by experimenting with long exposure and light drawing. They have also been focusing on learning about the manual camera settings to take shallow depth of field photographs whilst researching Martin Parr’s Real Food photography. Next, the students moved on to researching historical photographers, such as Karl Blossfeld, and taking magnification photographs of flora fauna. To begin digital editing skills, the students created repeat patterns inspired by Horst’s Patterns from Nature, using their magnification photos. Year 11 Photography The Year 11 students have been building their portfolio project work. Most of the students are focusing on a Portrait Project, whilst others are developing personal projects inspired by motor cars and industrial landscapes. Year 12 Photography Year 12 students began the year in the darkroom, experimenting with black & white photograms and film photography. The students then started looking at digital studio still life photography. They experimented with different types of lighting and compositions. Inspired by Yorch Miranda’s collages, they have also been experimenting with proportion and scale in their digital edits. Year 13 Photography Year 13 photographers have been busy completing an in-depth research essay in conjunction with their practical project, including titles such as ‘Frozen’, ‘Holes’ and ‘Carrier’.


30

Performing Arts Drama Dance

Click to watch

It was another busy term for our dancers. For part of their Foundation Diploma course, Year 12 BTEC dancers enjoyed a session with professional dancer, Jordan Nesbitt, who appeared in the film ‘Mama Mia! Here We Go Again’. Jordan worked with all the students in dance exam classes to extend their contemporary training with some complex choreography. Mrs Eckhoff said: “What a joy it was to see the students work with an industry professional who trained in street dance and contemporary. All of our dancers were focused throughout and had huge smiles on their faces”. Jordan studied Dance at Urdang Dance College and as well as showcasing his talents on the dance floor, also shared his experience of working with London casting agencies.

Click to watch Throughout the term, Year 11 and 12 students continued to work hard on their practical examination pieces leading to some original and vibrant choreographies based on ideas such as unemployment, Banksy Art works and the Holocaust, whilst Year 12 Diploma students began to finalise their first written assignments based on an area of choice in relation to the growth of the Performing Arts Industry. Ahead of choosing GCSE options in the new year, Year 9 students also had the chance to dip their toes into a GCSE level Dance class this term with Mrs Eckhoff. After working on dance improvisation, contemporary technique and creating their own work, we feel sure Mrs Eckhoff will have discovered some new and aspiring performance artists in her studio.

The thought of trying to get our students to produce firstclass theatre whilst living under a whole host of restrictions imposed by COVID 19 was not a pleasant thought for the Drama department back in the summer, but, true to form, it did not take long for the Claremont Drama students to adapt and develop their ways of working to produce some dynamic and engaging theatre. The focus this term was on completing devised exam work that students were unable to complete during lockdown. The students were able to develop and refine their original ideas and add new scenes and roles in order to create performances that challenged and gripped an audience of peers. The Sixth Form piece ‘Behind the Walls’ was based upon coercive control and domestic violence. This group of actors treated this difficult topic with a great deal of respect but also a great deal of realism - they were courageous in playing the various perpetrator and survivor roles as they wanted their work to hit hard with their Sixth Form audience. They wanted us to think about what we saw and to wrestle with our own attitudes towards these extreme behaviours. Prior to performing the piece as a stage play, the group had demonstrated their versatility during lockdown by creating and recording a radio version of the play. In the first half of the Michaelmas term, Year 11 students produced six devised plays, all with very different storylines but all equally intense and thought-provoking. The work involved in creating original performances as part of an ensemble is enormous and it is credit to this cohort that they were fully committed to the process and spent lots of their own time in rehearsal. The topics explored were Post-traumatic Stress Disorder, the kidnapping of a child, addiction and obsession, parental neglect, survivor’s guilt and sexual harassment and the pressures faced by young girls. The students shared their stories with emotional gravitas, characterisations that felt whole and relatable and with some fantastic physical theatre to build tension and intensity on stage. Students from Years 11 and 13 ended the term rehearsing for their scripted exam performances having chosen monologues and duologues from playwrights such as Jez Butterworth, Laura Wade, Tristan Bernays, Sheila Delaney, Simon Stone (after Lorca) and Enda Walsh. Mrs Cakebread said...“Reflecting on a challenging year for theatre, we are really looking forward to getting back to creating work across the year groups to include rehearsals for our Junior Summer Show for 2021.”


31

Music It was a delight to hear music filling the Performing Arts Centre at the Senior School again, with one-to-one instrumental lessons, despite the challenges of working with a variety of safety measures in place. Year 9 musicians had the opportunity to learn the guitar or ukulele as part of their academic music lessons, and learnt to read TAB, play melodies and chords and perform with correct technique. The students then applied their understanding of chords and melodies to a songwriting project and enjoyed writing and performing original Christmas songs. A virtual music concert showcased the work of our new Year 9 instrumental students as well as musicians at the beginning of their GCSE and A Level Music studies, including many music scholars. Performances were of a very high standard and we look forward to hearing more from them as their studies progress. Senior School was in contemplative mood as Archie W from Year 12 performed the Last Post for the virtual Remembrance Day service, which was streamed live to all tutor groups ahead of rehearsals for the ‘all-school’ virtual Carol Service for both singers and instrumental students.

Click to watch


32

Year 12 Foundation Diploma dancers have a Zoom call with Cleo Demetriou - the West End’s first Matilda and Olivier Award winner #whataperformance

DofE whatever the weather... #stillsmiling

Year 10 sculptors head to the fruit bowl for inspiration whilst Year 12 Fine Artists look to the mountains...#artforlife

Pro dancer Jordan Nesbitt sets the pace in the Dance Studio. #fancyfootwork

Year 12 Media students prepare for their next production #watchthisspace

‘Bodiam Bear’ joins EAL students for class...#tgifriday


33

Make moves while the sun shines’ #welovechess

Ahead of their showcase film release next week, we got a sneaky peek of our Performing Artists at work...#drama #dance #music #spiritofclaremont

Claremont remembers ... #lestweforget

Great to see the U16 Hockey squad playing a match #fixtures #matches #hockey #fieldhockey #playing #sport #wecanbeatthistogether

O’ Chemistree, O’ Chemistree, how lovely are your... Alkalis #festivelab #christmasspiritofclaremont

Spain are the final winners. Yearr 9 Boys Hockey tournament came down to goal difference in the last game but Spain winning 3-0 gave them just enough to take it. #Hockey #dragflick #PenaltyFlick #grayshockey #ritualhockey #hockeylife #hockeyplayer #hockeygoalie


34

It’s all in the Head

Goodbye Year 8

Mrs McNally’s A Level Psychology students started their course learning all about research methods with the help of an unlikely visiting teacher: Harvey the Bunny! Having studied the theory, students conducted their own structured observation of Harvey’s exploratory behaviours in comparison to that of the students themselves. It proved a novel lesson during which the students not only learnt about the ethical issues in observing behaviour, but also the dangers of making assumptions about it, without being able to ‘interview’ the participant.

It wasn’t quite the send-off we had planned for Year 8 at the beginning of the year, but this resilient and happy year group made the very best of the opportunity to spend some socially distanced time with each other just one last time before the holidays and the beginning of their new Senior School adventures. The Leavers’ Assembly was streamed live, with over 150 viewers tuning in from home to share in congratulating our prize winners from afar and reliving some of the most memorable moments during their extraordinary final year with us at the Prep School.

Lessons in Lockdown T

he impact of lockdown on our local community has been profound, and as a school, we have learnt much along the way. Although we have been using Google Suite for many years, the moment we launched our ‘School without Buildings’ programme, the challenges of distance learning gave rise to a remarkable surge in creative energy from both teachers and students alike. As we expanded our working knowledge of many new digital tools and resources, teachers and students began to hone and develop skills as presenters, videographers, quizmasters, fundraisers, graphic designers, project managers, activists, scriptwriters, actors and filmmakers; and in doing so, we were able to finely tune our approach to ‘blended learning’. The result has been an enriched student experience and the ability to keep the Claremont community close together whilst apart. Our mission is to ensure that young people have the opportunity to fulfill their ambitions, be themselves and be equipped to take good decisions in a complicated

world. Our Sixth Form is the ultimate manifestation of this aspiration and I am delighted that so many of our students were able to realise this in an extraordinary final year with us at Claremont. As we wish them all well with their new ventures, we look ahead to a new year and an effective vaccine programme. I believe the lessons of lockdown have made us more resilient as a school community and better prepared us for any challenges yet to come our way as a result of the pandemic. With exciting site developments in full swing at the Prep School site and a bag of new online and technological skills up our sleeves, I believe we have much to look forward to in 2021. Giles Perrin - Principal


35

Farewell and Good Luck

T

he Senior School ‘Class of 2020’ celebrated significant rises in A Level performances this year, with close to two-thirds of results graded between A* and B. It had been a very difficult six months for the students since their schooling came to such an abrupt end on March 21st, but so many of them saw their efforts in the Sixth Form rewarded, which is a remarkable result given that like many schools across the country, they saw teacher predictions downgraded in a number of subjects. Special mentions go to Emily W who, following her A*A*A grading, went to the University of Kent to study Medicine, to Jake and Jackson Li who achieved A*AA grades in Maths, Physics and Further Maths, allowing them to access Maths and Engineering courses at Edinburgh and Bristol University respectively, and to Charlie F, who went on to study Biotechnology at Edinburgh. Congratulations also to Matt C and Tabby W, who both achieved double starred distinctions in BTEC Sports Science, all our Fine Artists who were graded at B or above, and we are sure we will see super-talented Maya O on the stage one day having achieved A*AA in Drama, English Literature and French and secured her place at Rose Bruford Drama School. Drama, Dance and Music students also celebrated the opening of their state-of-theart Performing Arts Centre with very strong results indeed, most notably in Dance which was only introduced to the curriculum last year. The Senior School celebrated its ten year anniversary this year, but in that short time the teaching team and students have certainly succeeded in building strong foundations for academic, artistic and sporting excellence.

We feel the next ten years will be very exciting indeed for the whole Claremont community.

2020 Leavers’ Destinations: Shifan (Jake) Li - Mathematics, Edinburgh Xiaoxian (Jackson) Li - Civil Engineering, Bristol Mingshan Liu - Psychology, Exeter

Adunoluwa Oluwasemilore Adelakun International Business, Finance, Economics, Essex Eleanor Barltrop - Photography, Norwich Hester Carpenter - Linguistics & Social Anthrop, Edinburgh George Cochrane Rice - History and Politics, East Anglia Matthew Constable - Law & Criminology, Liverpool Joshua James Emerson - Business Management, Leeds David Emodi - Mechanical Engineering, Loughborough Yanwei (Shareef) Fang - Education Studies, York Charles Farrant - Biotechnology, Edinburgh Charles Gladders - Rural Land Management, Cirencester Thomas Edmund Goodwin - Arts & Humanities Foundation, Sussex Ya Haddy Jobarteh - Business Management with Foundation Year, University of Wolverhampton Marcus Owen Kent - American Studies with Politics, Sussex Yao (Orange) Lu - Architecture, De Montford Maya Ostle - Brighton Rose Bruford Drama School (Foundation before BA in Drama) Drama & Theatre Arts Poppy Payne - Drama and Film & Television Studies, Exeter Arka Perrin - Journalism, City University of London Thomas Pitts - Real Estate, Oxford Brookes Oliver Plomer-Roberts - Accountancy and Finance, Richmond Hollie Pooke - Criminology and Psychology, Southampton Scott Pope - Film/TV Production, Royal Holloway Tamara Raman - Architecture, Kent Zhuyu (Hannah) Tian - Fashion Business Management, Westminster Daisy Underdown - International Hospitality Management, Bournemouth Emily Winter - Medicine, Kent and Medway Medical School Tabitha Wylie - Bloodstock and Performance Horse Management, Royal Agricultural University at Cirencester Hewenyi (Cindy) Zhu - Business Management, Kingston


36

t, s i t r a n a e c n O ist! t r a n a s y a w l a

Claremont Connects New Alumni community network...

Coming Soon! 2019

Celebrating achievements, connecting with old friends and sharing the wealth of experience and skills we have amassed as a community. enquiries@claremontschool.co.uk . claremontschool.co.uk

Profile for Claremont School

Claremont Review - Winter 2020  

Senior School and Sixth Form Highlights from Michaelmas Term 2020

Claremont Review - Winter 2020  

Senior School and Sixth Form Highlights from Michaelmas Term 2020

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded