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A Visitor’s Guide Lincoln City’s Culture of Glass, Secrets of The Siletz, Regatta Park, Clamming, Beaches and so Much More!

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A News-Times Publication www.NewportNewsTimes.com


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onnecting ommunity

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Reserve your space now for the next issue of

Call 541-265-8571

STARFISH MANOR HOTEL

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Publisher James Rand

Advertising Contacts Barbara Moore barbaramoore@newportnewstimes.com 541.254.8571 ext. 237 Jack Davis jackdavis@newportnewstimes.com 541.254.8571 ext. 214 Teresa Barnes teresabarnes@newportnewstimes.com 541.254.8571 ext. 223 John Anderson johnanderson@newportnewstimes.com 541.254.8571 ext. 238 Krisstina Borton krisstinaborton@newportnewstimes.com 541.254.8571 ext. 227

Editor Steve Card

Copy Editor Monique Cohen

Contributors Rick Beasly

Cover Illustration & Layout eon graphic design & illustration www.eongdi.com

A Publication of the We also carry:

Coastal Shoes

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Made in Germany • Tradition since 1774 1317 NW Hwy 101 Lincoln City Open 7 days a week 541-996-SHOE

Discover Lincoln City is published by the News-Times. All rights reserved, material may not be reprinted without written consent from the publisher. The News Times has made every effort to maintain the accuracy of information presented in the magazine, but assumes no responsibility for errors, changes or omissions. Contact Us

831 NE Avery St. Newport, OR 97365 • 541-265-8571 www.DiscoverLincolnCity.com


Glass Act!

pg 8

Secrets of the Siletz

pg 10

Dreamland Skate Park

pg 13

Siletz Bay Steamers

pg 14

Lodging in Lincoln City

pg 16

Coastal Cuisine

pg 18

Lincoln City’s Events Calendar

pg 21

Lincoln City Parks Guide

pg 22

Area Map North Lincoln City

pg 24

Area Map South Lincoln City

pg 25

You Gotta go to Regatta

pg 26

Delake Bowl

pg 27

Crabbing’s a Piece of Cake

pg 28

Inside Game

pg 30

Home Run Derby

pg 31

Lincoln City Community Center

pg 32

Cultural Center Farmers Market

pg 34

AA Auction

pg 35

How to get to the Beach

pg 37

Tide Charts

pg 38

Tidal Pool Map

pg 39

Cascade Head

pg 40

Lincoln City History

pg 44

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Photo by eon gd&i

Lincoln City’s culture of glass, fused or blown, releases the artist inside everybody! By Rick Beasley Amid the hiss and roar of industrial furnaces arose a squeal of joy as 10-year-old Holly Schumake drew a molten orb of glass from a white-hot combustion chamber at the Jennifer Sears Glass Studio, one of Lincoln

City’s top family destinations. It could have been the cry heard across time as generations of budding artists rediscover the ancient art of glassblowing, a technique dating back to the ancient

Photo by Rick Beasley

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Phoenicians of 50 B.C. that involves inflating molten glass into a bubble with the aid of a blowpipe. A block away in another Taft glass studio, Mor-Art, budding artists hovered close to an oven as owner/instructor Dan Watts lifted the heavy lid to reveal an array of handmade glassware awash in swirls of bright colors or subtle hues. The anticipation melted away with a rush of warm air and cries of astonishment. “I can’t believe it — it’s beautiful,” whispered a mother to her son, the boy behind four eye-popping glass coasters swimming with sea life. Under the eye of talented instructors, visitors to the glass studios of Lincoln City form broken chunks and liquefied globs of glass into priceless treasures, unforgettable gifts or practical and beautiful accessories. With classes that can fill a couple of hours or several days, glassmaking has become a vacation calendar item for many returning visitors. Kelly Howard, a gifted artist whose fame is anchored in her hypnotic sea floats and contemporary sculpture, manages the Jennifer Sears studio where visitors can blow their own floats, fluted bowls, paperweights, starfish or hearts. “This is a chance to get up close and


Photo by Rick Beasley

personal with the process of creating art glass,” she said. “You feel the warmth of the ‘glory hole’ as you create a lasting memory in colored glass. Our friendly instructors guide each student through a creative process that has been handed down from generation to generation through the centuries. We supply everything — all you need to bring is your creative talent!” Under her experienced eye, instructors maneuver people through the process, a venture involving blast furnaces, thick gloves and protective eyeglasses. This is the kind of industrial artistry where a first-time student produces stunning objects of glass and light that typically fetch hundreds or thousands in the urban gallery districts. But here, prices begin at $65 for a glass float, or $95 for the jumbo piece. At the top of the class scale is the fluted bowl, a

breathtaking production for $135. Finished pieces are cooled overnight at the studio and may be picked up the next day or shipped to the artist via UPS for a small fee. The Jennifer Sears Glass Art Studio is located at 4821 S.W. Hwy. 101 at the south end of Lincoln City. Hours are 10-6 Wed.Sun.; the website is JenniferSearsGlassArt. com. The pace is methodic and personal at MorArt, too, where glassmaker Dan Watts and chief instructor Maurice Martinez employ a different technique, fused glass. Here, glass stacked in layers of the artist’s choosing is fired in a manner dating back to the ancient Egyptians that provides eye-popping depth, relief and shape. Typical projects include coasters, platters, plates, bowls, trays and jewelry. “We start playing with the glass until they

Photo by Rick Beasley

come up with their own concept, like a boat under the moon or fish swimming upstream — wherever their imagination takes them,” said Maurice. “We cut the pattern but you choose the colors and place it exactly where you want it. It’s a great family activity and a way to stock up for your unforgettable Christmas gifts.” A set of four coasters is a mere $25 to create, while the 15-inch bowl emerges from the kiln and overnight cooling for $145. Walk-ins of all ages are welcome for classes that typically run 1-1/2 -2 hours before the kiln takes over. Mor-Art is located at 4933 S.W. Hwy. 101 in Lincoln City. Hours are 10-5, Tue.-Sun. For more information, call 541-994-2427, or go to morart.com on the web. Photo by Rick Beasley

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Photo by Brian Gaunt

Explore the Siletz National Wildlife Refuge by kayak and camera! By Rick Beasley, Photos by Brian Gaunt The big raptor came out of nowhere, silent as an incoming missile on wings that spanned almost seven feet. Like an aircraft on final approach, its feathered flaps turned the rapid descent into a gentle hover as a talon touched the water and clasped an unwary trout. With a mighty flap, the eagle rose from the jet-black channel clutching the squirming blueback and began her short journey to a nest hidden somewhere in the nearby trees. The closest most people come to the awesome spectacle of nature is an Imax movie, but Lincoln City is surrounded by wildlife. Here, in an amphitheater called the Siletz National Wildlife Refuge, the best seat in the house is a kayak or canoe. Few adventures can top that of exploring the Siletz National Wildlife Refuge, a 100acre tidal marsh located south of town that is home to an eye-popping array of wildlife. Unmolested by hikers and noisy traffic, the animals and birds that are part of this amazing habitat can be seen from the fringes of the refuge with powerful binoculars or upclose by a rented kayak or canoe from Siletz Moorage, located a quarter-mile upriver from the junction of Siletz Hwy. 20 and Hwy. 101. Larry and Belinda Ellis run the operation from a building that still has signs from the old days advertising 15-cent soft drinks and

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triple cones for two bits. “It’s real easy to learn the kayak,” said Belinda, a transplanted rancher from eastern Oregon who finds the moist coast weather easy on the skin.” Most people get the hand of it after a few minutes in the bullpen — that little area between the docks where you can practice. The tour begins a quarter-mile upstream at the channel entrance into the 100-acre refuge, established in 1991 to return the Milport Slough salt marsh to its natural

state. Once criss-crossed with ditches to create pasture for dairy cows, work crews from the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, Ducks Ultd. and the Confederated tribes of the Siletz Indians reclaimed the area by breaching and removing 9,300 ft. of dikes and refilling 1,200 ft. of ditches. Massive helicopters were employed to return trees and woody debris to the brackish habitat, which appears other-worldly when the morning fog embraces the salt-streaked skeleton trees of the marsh.

Photo by Brian Gaunt


Photo by Brian Gaunt

and raccoon. The five-mile trip through the refuge can be accomplished in two hours, but a four-hour. kayak rental leaves plenty of time to linger with binoculars and camera. Half-day rentals of the 14.5-ft. one- and two-person kayaks or canoes are $20 per person, or $35 for an all-day rental. All equipment, including life vests and paddles, is included. For more information, contact Siletz Moorage, 82 Siletz Hwy., or call 541-996-3671. The moorage is open at 7:30 a.m. daily, with long hours into the early evening to accommodate the tides. Wildlife photographer Brian Gaunt, a licensed fishing guide, spent many hours exploring the Siletz National Wildlife Refuge with his camera. Photo by Brian Gaunt

Red-tailed hawks and bald eagles, often visible roosting on these snags, are usually the first wildlife kayakers will see. Moving silently except for the occasional gasp or squeal of surprise, kayakers will likely catch glimpses of a great blue heron, great egret and many species of waterfowl foraging in the mud flats and shallow waters that are the nursery grounds for coho and chinook salmon, steelhead and cutthroat trout. Songbirds including warblers, thrushes and chickadees often serenade the passing boats. Surrounded by forest and young riparian alder with a carpet of vegetation, the marsh is a salad bowl for resident blacktail deer and Roosevelt elk. The wetland forest also supports a variety of smaller mammals including beaver, mink, river otter, muskrat, Photo by Brian Gaunt

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801 SW Hwy 101 #104

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Seagulls • Statuary Bird Baths • Pelicans Wind Chimes • Wall Hangings Glass Art • Recovery Items and So Much More

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Located in beautiful Depoe Bay across from the Post Office

479 N Hwy 101 541-765-7620

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Photo by Rick Beasley

Lincoln City’s world class skate park! By Rick Beasley At more than 8,000 sq.ft., Lincoln City’s municipal skate park is ranked highly by skateboarders around the northwest. “In my opinion, it’s the best in the U.S.,” said Nick Momma, 16, a 12-year veteran of skateboarding who practically grew up at the Kirtsis Park attraction that was built in 1999 by volunteers for a mere $64,000. “It’s a place where kids can come, skate and be free.” Nick called skateboarding a “stress reliever,” but a first glance from the lip of “The Bowl” is likely to leave you breathless. According to the authoritative website skateoregon.com, this lighted skate park will keep you up at night. “The Lincoln City Dreamland Skate Park is timeless and so straight forward it hurts,” a reviewer says. “Without a kink, ripple or even hesitation, the park’s simplicity and clarity is startling. The only limits are those of the user; it is as if the park is transparent. The fluidity and challenge poured into Dreamland ensure a healthy community facility for decades to come. It is not as easy to dive into the cradle as it looks, but it is a hay of a ride.” Featuring four separate bowls, half-pipes and hair-raising runs, the covered skate park was billed as the “gnarliest” skate park in America by Thrasher Magazine and given a rating of “9” out of a possible “10” in the difficulty rating. The four bowls include the Moguls Bowl,

The Cradle and Half Pipe (covered against the elements), and the Swimming Pool, with its tight transitions and the Snake Run. Even if you don’t ride a board, the activity is an exciting spectator sport occurring daily at Kirtsis Park, N.E. 22nd Avenue and Reef St.
To get there from Hwy 101, go east on N.E. 22nd St., then south on N.E. Reef St.

Photo by Rick Beasley

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Photo by Rick Beasley

Crawl out of your shell and go clamming! By Rick Beasley LINCOLN CITY — Here’s an overlooked sport that should make you as happy as a clam at high tide. It requires no expensive or fashionable accessories, boats, aircraft, spare bandoleers or guides. There are few special techniques, little brutal terrain and the quarry won’t kill and eat you if you make a mistake. Clamming, in fact, is an inexpensive and fun outdoor pastime the whole family can enjoy. Five major clam species live in Oregon’s scenic coastal bays or along stretches of surf-battered beach, and all provide a yearround source of delicious table fare. They include gapers, cockles, littlenecks, butters, softshells and razors. The prime clam-digging area in Lincoln City is Siletz Bay, where eastern softshell clams (also known as mud clams) and purple varnish clams can be found in fair numbers along Cutler City’s muddy flats. The softshell steamers, which may reach a half-pound at maturity, are typically taken in the four to five-inch range. The purple varnies — newcomers to Oregon that traveled here in the water ballasts of shipping vessels — are mainly found in muddy exposures at the

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Photo by Rick Beasley

mouth of Drift Creek on the south side of the bridge. Farther south, Agate Beach yields highly mobile and prized razor clams, while Yaquina Bay’s tidal flats hold stationary gapers (horsenecks) and cockles. Some flats along the southeastern shore of the bay are home

to butter clams, which can be harvested with a garden rake. To the north, the clam flats of Nestucca Bay offer more softshell clamming. Like most outdoor pursuits, clam digging is simple and straightforward, despite the complex rituals and Aztec calendars employed by the curmudgeons. Razor clams,


Photo by Rick Beasley

they’ll tell you, move too fast for the slowwitted novice. Horsenecks are too tough to eat without employing some secret gadget that tenderizes them. And clam guns made of PVC will backfire. The truth? Clamming takes only a shovel, a bucket, the weekly tide table from the News-Times and a willingness to get wet, sandy and muddy. And all of Oregon’s clam species, from the homely gaper to the oval razor, are mouth-watering delights. Greenhorns will find Siletz Bay an excellent location to hone their clamming skills with zeal and a common garden shovel. First, look for the “show,” the watery hole left by the clam’s spurting, then dig with the thin blade of your clam shovel. Like the big gaper clams of Yaquina Bay, the eastern softshells have a neck that gives their location away: usually an oblong hole an inch or less in diameter. The varnies also leave a tell-tale sign. The intertidal bivalves can be found six to 20 inches beneath the muddy surface. They can be dug individually or, when numerous, by the trench method. In all cases, check the state angling regulations for rules on shellfish limits and zones. Many people like to soak their steamers in cool water overnight to cleanse any impurities. In any event, softshells can be frozen in their shells for up to three months. So grab your shovel and crawl out of your shell. With a bucket full of steamers simmering on the stove or a platter of breaded gapers fried to a golden hue, you’ll be glad you stuck your nose in the mud. In fact, you’ll be happy as a clam.

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Courtesy of the Coho Inn

Diverse lodging options for every need! Lincoln City offers an incredibly wide selection of lodging and accommodation choices. Whether your tastes lean toward a quaint B & B or an elegant oceanfront suite, you will find something to suit your desires and pocket book. Lincoln City has over 50 hotels and motels, five bed and breakfast properties, seven camping and RV parks and countless vacation rental properties. Within this plethora of lodging options are choices to suit your individual needs. There are hotels and vacation rentals that are pet friendly, so you can bring your best friend with you. But if you are allergic or adverse to some one else’s “best friend”, there are plenty of pet free establishments as well. Oceanfront establishments such as the Coho Inn, Sailor Jack’s Courtesy of the Coho Inn

and Surftides put the ocean at your fingertips. Ocean front rooms run the range from exquisite to economical. Many have direct beach access. Along Highway 101 are a range of economically priced establishments, some, like the Landmark Best Western offer a surprising array of amenities. The Anchor Inn offers an incredible free breakfast in an eccentrically funky decor. Vacation rentals abound in Lincoln City. Many agencies in town can locate just the property to fit your exact family or group lifestyle requirements. Vacation rentals are perfect properties to hold family reunions, or intimate retreats. Many are located right on the beach, or have spectacular ocean views. If you are RVing to Lincoln City, you have your choice of several parks, some national chains, some regional operations and some locally owned and operated. Between these parks you can choose from ocean, lake or river access, depending on your location. No matter what you drive or your lifestyle preferences, you are bound to find what you are looking for at one of Lincoln City’s many lodging and RV establishments. Courtesy of the Coho Inn

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Hotels/Motels

all locations in Lincoln City, Oregon

COMPANY NAME

ADDRESS

PHONE #

WEB ADDRESS

A Vista D’Mar

1421 NW Harbor Ave

541.994.6300

www.avistadmar.com

All Seasons Vacation Rentals

2850 NE Highway 101

541.996.3549

www.allseasonsvacation.com

America’s Best Inns & Suites

1014 NE Highway 101

541.994.9017

www.americasbestinn.com

Anchor Motel & Inn

4417 SW Highway 101

541.996.3810 541.996.7500

Ashley Inn

3430 NE Highway 101

Best Western-Landmark Inn

4430 SE Highway 101

541.994.6060

www.bestwestern.com

Best Western-Lincoln Sands

535 NW Inlet Ave

541.994.4227

www.bestwestern.com

Captain Cook Inn

2626 NE Highway 101

541.994.2522

Chinook Winds Casino Resort

1501 NW 40th St

541.994.3655

www.chinookwindscasino.com

City Center Motel

1014 NE Highway 101

541.994.2612

Coho Oceanfront Lodge

1635 NW Harbor Ave

541.994.3684

www.thecoholodge.com

Comfort Inn-Lincoln City

136 NE Highway 101

541.994.8155

www.comfortinn.com

Cozy Cove Beach Front Resort

515 NW Inlet Ave

541.994.2950

Crown Pacific Inn Express

1070 SE 1st St

541.994.7559

D Sands Motel

171 SW Highway 101

541.994.5244

Econo Lodge

1713 NW 21st St

541.994.5281

Edge Cliff Motel

3733 SW Highway 101

541.996.6265

Ester Lee Motel

3803 SW Highway 101

541.996.3606

Hide-A-Way Oceanfront Motel

810 SW 10th St

541.994.8874

Inn At Spanish Head

4009 SW Highway 101

541.996.2161

Inn At Wecoma

2945 NW Highway 101

541.994.2984

Lincoln City Inn

1091 SE 1st St

541.996.4400

www.crownpacificinn.com www.econolodge.com www.esterlee.com www.spanishhead.com www.lincolncityinn.com

Looking Glass Inn

861 SW 51st St

541.996.3996

Motel 6-Lincoln City

3517 NW Highway 101

541.996.9900

www.motel6.com

Nordic Oceanfront Inn

2133 NW Inlet Ave

541.994.8145

www.nordicoceanfrontinn.com

O’Dysius Hotel

120 NW Inlet Ave

541.994.4121

www.odysius.com

Ocean Terrace Condominiums

4229 SW Beach Ave

541.996.3623 541.996.3300

Overlook Motel

3521 SW Anchor Dr

Palace Inn & Suites

550 SE Highway 101

541.996.9466

www.thepalaceinn.com

Pelican Shores Inn

2645 NW Inlet Ave

541.994.2134

www.pelicanshores.com

Sailor Jack Oceanfront Motel

1035 NW Harbor Ave

541.994.3696

www.sailorjack.com

Sandcastle Beachfront Motel

3417 SW Anchor Ave

541.996.3613

Sandpiper

1815 NW Harbor Ave # Office

541.994.2403

Sea Echo Motel

3510 NE Highway 101

541.994.2575

Sea Gypsy Condominium Motel

145 NW Inlet Ave

541.994.2552

www.theseagypsy.com

Sea Horse Oceanfront Lodging

1301 NW 21st St

541.994.2101

www.seahorsemotel.com

Seagull Beach-Front Motel

1511 NW Harbor Ave

541.994.2948

www.seagullmoteloregon.com

Shilo Inn

1501 NW 40th St

541.994.5255

www.shiloinns.com

Siletz Bay Lodge

1012 SW 51st St

541.996.6111

www.siletzbaylodge.com

Starfish Manor

2735 NW Inlet Ave

541.996.9300

www.onthebeachfront.com

Watersedge Condominium Motel

5201 SW Highway 101

541.996.9200

Westshore Oceanfront Motel

3127 SW Anchor Ave

541.996.2001

www.westshoremotel.com

Whistling Winds Motel

3264 NW Jetty Ave

541.994.6155

www.whistlingwindsmotel.com

Bed & Breakfast

all locations in Lincoln City, Oregon

COMPANY NAME

LOCATION ADDRESS

PHONE #

An Exceptional Place To B & B

1213 SW 52nd Ct

541.994.4920

WEB ADDRESS

Brey House Bed & Breakfast Inn

3725 NW Keel Avet

541.994.7123

www.breyhouse.com

Coast Inn B & B

4507 SW Coast Ave

541.994.7932

www.oregoncoastinn.com

Pacific Rest B & B

1631 NE 11th St

541.994.2337

Baywood Shores B&B

1281 SW 62nd Street

541.996.6700

www.baywoodshoresbb.com

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Opportunities for the adventurous food lover! Few towns its size boast as wide a variety of restaurants as Lincoln City. And we’re not talking the “cookie cutter� plethora of franchise chains found in so many cities. With very few exceptions, virtually all of the more than 40 restaurants in Lincoln City are either one of a kind proprietor run kitchens, or local or regional operations. And to the food lover, especially the adventurous food lover, this opens up a wonderful opportunity to sample some of the best food found on the entire Oregon

18

coast. You will probably find more original fish and chip and chowder recipes in Lincoln City than anywhere. Many of the local establishments proudly display plaques and trophies won from one of the regional seafood cooking competitions. Often as not, the local restaurants outdo nationally recognized restaurants from Portland and Seattle in these events. But Lincoln City is not just limited to seafood. There are some great steak houses, upscale eateries, Asian

restaurants, comfort food establishments and even vegan and vegetarian cuisine to be found in Lincoln City. One restaurant specializes in dogs - hot dogs that is. From barbecue to burgers, Mexican to Thai, you will surely find a meal to suit your every mood here in Lincoln City. For more information on where to eat in Lincoln City, check with the Lincoln City Chamber of Commerce at www. lcchamber.com or phone: 541-994-3070.


Restaurants

all locations in Lincoln City, Oregon

COMPANY NAME

LOCATION

PHONE #

60’s Cafe

4157 NW Highway 101 # 139

541.996.6898

Andaman Thai Cuisine

660 SE Highway 101 # 1

541.996.8424

Bay House

5911 SW Highway 101

541.996.3222

Beach Dog Cafe

1266 SW 50th St # C

541.996.3647

Beachside Bar & Grill

220 SE Highway 101

541.994.1688

Blackfish Cafe

2733 NW Highway 101

541.996.1007

Burger King

710 SE Highway 101

541.996.4500 541.557.4000

Dory Cove

2981 SW Highway 101

Eleanor’s Undertow Takeout

869 SW 51st St

541.996.3800

Fathom’s Restaurant

4009 SW Highway 101

541.994.1601

Foon Hing Yuen Restaurant

3138 SE Highway 101

541.996.3831

Hilltop Inn Family Dining

1910 SE Highway 101

541.994.6111

Jasmine Thai Restaurant

1437 NW Highway 101

541.994.2022

Kyllo’s Seafood & Grill

1110 NW 1st Ct

541.994.3179

La Roca

3243 SW Highway 101

541.557.1812

Lee’s Restaurant

144 SE Highway 101

541.994.8433

Lil Sambo’s Restaurant

3262 NE Highway 101

541.994.3626

Lum Yuen Chinese Restaurant

5045 SW Highway 101

541.994.0898

WEB ADDRESS

www.thebayhouse.org

www.bk.com

www.hilltop-inn.net

www.lilsambos.com

Mc Donald’s

4060 NE Highway 101

541.994.4838

www.mcdonalds.com

Mc Menamins Lighthouse Brewpub

4157 NW Highway 101 # 117

541.994.7238

www.mcmenamins.com

541.994.3877

Mist

2945 NW Jetty Ave

Mo’s Restaurant

860 SW 51st St

541.996.2535

Momiji Express

1500 SE E Devils Lake Rd # 101

541.996.8886

Muchas Gracias Mexican Food

2048 NE Highway 101

541.996.5552

Mulligan’s

266 SE Highway 101

541.996.2468

Old Oregon Tavern

1604 NE Highway 101

541.994.8515

Pig’n Pancake

3910 NE Highway 101

541.994.3268

Puerto Vallarta Mexican Rstrnt

3001 NW Highway 101

541.994.0300

Richen’s

317 SW Highway 101

541.996.8400

www.moschowder.com

Road House 101 Bar & Grill

4649 SW Highway 101

541.994.7729

SUBWAY

2185 NW Highway 101 # B

541.994.9917

www.subway.com

SUBWAY

4648 SE Highway 101

541.996.9917

www.subway.com www.tacotime.com

Taco Time

3350 NE Highway 101

541.994.0062

Tiki’s At 51st

1005 SW 51st St

541.996.4200

www.roadhouse101.com

Wildflower Grill

4250 NE Highway 101

541.994.9663

Rouge River Steakhouse

1777 NW 44th Str.

541.994.5962

www.chinookwindscasino.com

Rouge River Lounge

1777 NW 44th Str.

541.994.5962

www.chinookwindscasino.com

Siletz Bay Buffet

1777 NW 44th Str.

541.994.5961

www.chinookwindscasino.com

Euchre Creek Deli

1777 NW 44th Str.

541.996.6721

www.chinookwindscasino.com

Aces Bar & Grill

3245 NE 50th

541.994.8232

www.chinookwindscasino.com www.chinookwindscasino.com

Chinook’s Seafood Grill

1777 NW 44th Str.

541.557.4306

Figaro’s Pizza

4095 NW Logan Rd # B

541.994.4443

Gallucci’s Pizzeria

2845 NW Highway 101

541994.3411

Humble Pie Pizzaria

1114 NE Highway 101

541.994.4840

Papa Murphy’s Take ‘N’ Bake

2401 NW Highway 101

541.994.5560

www.papamurphys.com

Captain Dan’s Pirate Pastry

5070 SE Highway 101

541.996.4600

www.piratepastry.com www.rockfishbakery.com

Rockfish Bakery & Cafe

3026 NE Highway 101

541.996.1006

Maxwell’s At The Coast

1643 NW Highway 101

541.994.8100

Snug Harbor Bar & Grill

5001 SW Highway 101

541.996.4976

Shucker’s Oyster Bar

4814 SE Highway 101

541.996.9800

19


20


July 23 - 27

Let There Be Arts Children’s Summer Arts Workshops at the Lincoln City Cultural Center, 540 NE Hwy 101. FMI 503-812-7813 or Visit Our Website. Wheelchair Accessible

July 27 - 28

Hoop it up at the Beach in Lincoln City 3 on 3 Basketball tournament at Tanger Outlet Center. Brackets for all ages and skill levels. Visit our website for updates.

August 04

Devils Lake Revival includes live music, food, free kayak rentals, pontoon boat rides, stand up paddle board lessons and a sail boat race at Regatta Grounds from 10AM – 2PM. Free. FMI 541-994-5330

August 11

Sandcastle Contest in the Historic Taft District of Lincoln City! For more information visit the BAMA website.

Surf City classic car show at Chinook Winds Casino Resort. FMI 888-CHINOOK.

September 01 - 03

Wild Mushroom Cook-Off at the Culinary Center in Lincoln City from 11AM – 2PM. Free admission at the door with tasting-sized portions available for a small fee. FMI 800-4522151, 541-996-1274, or click here. Wheelchair Accessible

September 06 - 09

October 06

Lincoln City’s 5th Annual Pride festival (formerly the Iris Pride Festival)! Join in on this fabulous Pride weekend. Included in this year’s event will be amazingly fun entertainment, music, dancing, food, wine and beer garden, Flamingo Bingo, drag shows, camel rides on the beach, vendors and kids activities.! For more information send us an email. Wheelchair Accessible

September 15 - 16

Oregon Coast Soap Box Derby Rally Race on NE 22nd near the Elk’s Lodge. 8AM-5PM. FMI 541-921-8406.

August 12

September 20 - 23

17th Annual Charity Golf Scramble to be held at Salishan Spa and Golf Resort. Proceeds benefit North Lincoln Hospital Foundation. FMI call 541-996-7102

August 17 - 18

Corvette Club Car Show at the Lincoln City Community Center. FMI 541-549-6175 Wheelchair Accessible

August 18

3rd Annual Cruisin’ the Bay Car Show in the Historic Taft District of Lincoln City! For more information visit the BAMA website.

August 25 - 26

October 06

Special Glass Art Drop of 50 sand dollars or crabs along the 7.5 miles of Lincoln City beaches, weather and ocean conditions permitting. FMI 800-452-2151, 541-996-1274, www.oregoncoast.org

SUPH2ORODEO J.A.W.S Northwest presents a 3 discipline stand up paddle board competition comprised of a 2 mile and 5 mile race on Devil’s Lake, a 6 1/2 mile open-ocean race from Road’s End State Park to Siletz Bay and an SUP surfing contest. FMI SUPH20RODEO

August 11 - 12

9994 Wheelchair Accessible

Celebration of Honor is a community-wide celebration to honor veterans of the armed forces, active duty personnel and their families. FMI Chinook Winds Casino Resort or 888-CHINOOK Wheelchair Accessible

September 22 - 23

The Doobie Brothers at Chinook Winds Casino Resort. Tickets: $45-$60. Show begins at 8:00PM Sat and 5:00PM Sun. Wheelchair Accessible

October 05

Glass Art Show Opening Reception in the Chessman Gallery at the Lincoln City Cultural Center. 5:00PM-7:00PM. FMI 541-994-

Artober Brewfest at the Lincoln City Cultural Center. FMI 541-994-3070 Wheelchair Accessible

October 06 - 07

Special Glass Art Drop of 50 sand dollars or crabs along the 7.5 miles of Lincoln City beaches, weather and ocean conditions permitting. FMI 800-452-2151, 541-996-1274, www.oregoncoast.org

October 08 - 14

WBCA Pool Tournament at Chinook Winds Casino Resort. FMI 888-CHINOOK Wheelchair Accessible

October 13 - 14

Fall Kite Festival at D-River Wayside - As Lincoln City’s “original” Kite Festival, help us celebrate 34 years of fun. This year’s them is “Stars & Stripes”. Enjoy demonstrations by expert fliers, kid’s kite making, kite-making workshops, and more fun in the sand! FMI 800-452-2151 or visit our website Wheelchair Accessible

October 20, 2012 - May 27, 2013

Finders Keepers on the Beach - Weather and ocean conditions permitting, every day colorful hand-blown glass floats are placed on the beach. If you find a float, bring it to the Lincoln City Visitors Center at 540 NE Hwy 101 to receive your certificate of authenticity and a biography of the artist who made the float. FMI 800-452-2151 or 541-996-1274

21


Photo by Rick Beasley

Explore Lincoln City’s remarkable parks! By Rick Beasley Lincoln City has a remarkable system of parks, open spaces and trails with facilities for athletic events and opportunities for quiet seclusion. For more information about Lincoln City parks, call the Parks & Recreation Dept. at 541-994-2131.

N. Lincoln City Parks WECOMA PARK: N.W. 31st & Jetty Ave. Playground, restrooms, picnic table and basketball court.

HOLMES RD. PARK: Holmes Rd. & West Devils Lake Rd. Boat ramp, restrooms and fishing dock.

SANDPOINT PARK: Loop Drive, off East Devils Lake Rd. Restrooms, swimming area, picnic tables, BBQ, beach.

DORCHESTER PARK: N.E. Neptune Ave. and N.W. 28th St. Public tennis courts, restrooms, covered picnic table (rentable).

KIRTSIS PARK: N.E. 22nd St. Three baseball/softball fields, basketball court, picnic shelter, skateboard bowls.

REGATTA PARK: West Devils Lake Rd & Regatta Park Rd. Restrooms, covered picnic facilities (rentable), interpretive center, walking trails, playground.

Photo by Rick Beasley

S. Lincoln City Parks VIC HILL MEMORIAL PARK: Hwy. 101 & S.W. Galley. Covered picnic table, sitting bench.

CANYON DRIVE PARK: S.W. 11th & Coast Ave. Restrooms, sitting bench, easy beach access. TAFT WATERFRONT PARK: S.W. 51st St. Covered picnic shelter, parking, easy beach access, fishing and crabbing dock, restaurants.

SILETZ BAY PARK: Hwy. 101 & Schooner Creek Bridge. Interpretive center, picnic tables, restrooms, bay access, parking. JOSEPHINE YOUNG MEMORIAL PARK: S.W. 65th St. Picnic tables, easy beach access, restrooms, lovely wooded area.

KIDS PARK & SENIORS TOO: S.W. Picnic tables, basketball, play equipment. Photo by Rick Beasley

22


Open Space AGNES CREEK OPEN SPACE, 1700 S.W. Coast Ave. CUTLER CITY WETLANDS OPENS SPACE, S.W. 63rd Ave. D RIVER OPEN SPACE, Hwy 101 and N.E. 1st WILDWOODS & TRAILS OPEN SPACE, W. Devils Lake Rd. and N.E. 26th

REGATTA GROUNDS OPEN SPACE, Regatta Park Rd. and Regatta Park

S.E. 3rd ST. OPEN SPACE, S.E. 3rd St. SEID CREEK OPEN SPACE, East Devils Lake Rd. & S.E. Port Ave.

SPRING LAKE OPEN SPACE, N.E. 14th St. & West Devils Lake Rd.

SPYGLASS OPEN SPACE, Spyglass Ridge Rd. & Harbor Dr.

Photo by Rick Beasley

Gimme’ Shelter! The Lincoln City Parks and Recreation Dept. has four picnic shelters available for rent at Dorchester Park, Siletz Bay Park, Regatta Park and Taft Waterfront Park. If you’re planning a reunion, birthday party, wedding reception or other event, these are good outdoor alternatives. More complete descriptions of these Parks and their amenities are available at the Lincoln City Community Center. Taft Waterfront Park is $25 per hour. The remaining three are $10 per hour with a two-hour minimum. A standard facilities use agreement from the city is available online at LincolnCity.org. Forms are also available at the Lincoln City Community Center front desk. Photo by Rick Beasley

23


LINCOLN CITY NORTH

74th S Hwy. 18

t

dS

St st 71

NE Ne pt

S 70th NE

NE 69th St

01

NE

NH wy 1

7

St

d 2n

une Dr

N Logan Rd

7 3r

NE 68th St NE Port Dr

NE 67th St

NE Oar Dr Quay C o rt Dr t

N Clancy Rd

NE S alNW Keel Av

NW 59th St NW Pine St

NW 51st St

Voy a NE

NE L

a ke

Dr

Dr

Ave

NE 12th St NE 11th St

REGATTA PARK

Rd

Devils La NE East

r

SCHOOL C hetlo P

Pe p p

10

th

POLICE DEPARTMENT

NE

th

NE

01

D

MUNICIPAL BUILDING

NE La k e

St

FIRE DEPARTMENT BEACH ACCESS

SE 3rd St

PARK C re

ek

Rd

POST OFFICE

k

ke La

oc

ils ev

R

Ea NE

SE Tide Av

SE Surf Av SE Reef Ave

Ave

DELAKE DISTRICT

SE 2nd

SE Quay Ave

l

SE Neptune Ave

dP

SE Oar Ave SE Tide Ave

2n

y Ave

et Ave

SE Harbor Ave

SE

Key P

Ct

SE Mast Ave

STATE PARK d

st D

10 1 Ebb Ave

SW 5th St

st Devil ke R

ge A ve

PUBLIC RESTROOMS

St

DEVILS LAKE

SE 2n

SW 4th S

LEGEND THEATRE

15th

NE 6

St

SE 3rd St

p

NE

NE Wes t

COMMUNITY CENTER

1s t St

Ha rbo rA ve

SH wy

1s t

Lo o E N

La k NE Lake

Tide

Ct

NE Eagle Pl

NE ils La ke R

NE Tide Ave

NE Regatt

SEVENTH DAY ADVENTIST SCHOOL

NE 20th St

D ev

St

NE

ge NE Voy a

eD

NE Yacht Ave

Devils Lake Rd

N E West

NE Surf Ave

NE 26th St

Dr

SE

NE Ea

e

d

NE Union Ave

r

D

NE 28th St

er

w oo d

oo

p

Voyage Ave

NE Yacht Ave NE Yacht A v

NE Surf Ave

NE Tide Ave

2

rf Su NE

NE R eef A ve NE Reef Ave

ay Qu NE

SAMARITAN NORTH LINCOLN HOSPITAL

d 2n

NE

HA ve NE I Ave

e e hns Av

op NE Johns Lo

NE Johns Loop

Dr NE Su rf

Re ef Dr

Ave

NE Quay NE NE Ree

NE Quay

Q uay Ave NE

Pl

l rP Oa

NE Jo

N West Devils La

NH wy

Port Ct Port Ave NW Port Ave NW NW Port Av

NW Q u

Port Av

NW Port D

NW Oar Av NW Oar

NW Port Ave

Oar

N W Oar Pl NH wy 101

NE C Av e

d ke R

7

SAND POINT

Dr

Dr th

wy 1

let Av

19th

r e s Dr ho e dg od wo

NE Pa rk Ln

NH

NW In

23rd

Harbor R Lake i

Pl

v st A

Ma

C

BEACH ACCESS

th

Lincoln S

NE Keel Ave

h

6 NE

NW 6th Dr

Dr

NE 41st St 40th St NE

HOLMES ROAD PARK

NE 27 th St

OCEANLAKE SCHOOL

NE 14t hS t

NE 12th St

7t

D RIVER WAYSIDE STATE PARK

27th Ct

a Way

NE 10th St

NE Friedmann Way

3 4th L

NE 31st C

NE 28th St

NE 27t h

E

NE 32nd

9th St

OCEANLAKE DISTRICT

NE 11th St

NE D Av

NW 44 t NW Lee Ave

Marine

Mast

Neptune Ave

NW Neptune Av

Mast

101 wy NH

N NE Mast Ave E Lee

NE Oar Ave

bor Ave

Har

NW Inlet A ve

NW

NE 13th St

r uD NE Neo ts

St nd 42

LAKE POINT

NE 30th Dr

Pl

NW 13th S

NW 12th S

NW

DEVILS LAKE STATE PARK CAMPGROUND

NE 14th St

st S

th 20

NE 16th St

NW 15th St NE 15th St NW 14th St

NE 18th S

NE 17th St

NE 43rd St

NE

NE

NW 16th St

33rd St

rd St Rd NE 33 Holmes NE

NE 31

NE 19th S

NW 18th St NW 17th St

CONNIE HANSEN GARDEN

NE 20th St

NW 19th St

NE 35th St

NE 35th St

NE 34th St

NE 21st St

NW 20th St

NE 36th Dr

NE 29th Dr

NE

Mast

NW 21st St

NE Port Ave

BEACH ACCESS

NW

l tP as M

48th St

49th St

38th St

NE

NW 22nd St

NW Lee Ave

NW Jetty Ave

NW Keel Ave

NW Inlet Ave NW Harbo

r Ave

17TH STREET PARKING LOT

NW Jetty Ave

BEACH ACCESS

NW Mast Pl

Mast

NW 26th St

r Pl Oa e Av

NW Oar Ave

Marine

NW Mast Ave

NW Jetty

NW Lee Ave

Av e

NW 30th St

NW 28th St

23rd

OCEANLAKE GRADE SCHOOL

N

NW 32nd St

NW 25th St

KIRTSIS PARK

Neptune Ave

Keel

st

Lee Ave

31

NW Inlet Ave

NLFD FIRE DEPARTMENT

Neptune

Ave

Ave

NW Jetty

NW Keel

Keel

Ave NW Jetty Ave

NW Inlet

NW 33rd St

Pl

NE 40th Ct

N

NW 34th St

NW 31st St

DORCHESTER PARK

35th NW

Pl

r

St 37th NW St 36th NW

BEACH ACCESS

WECOMA PARK

NW 38th St

D

NW 39th St

1 10

ay

NW Mast Av

N W 40th St

NE G NE

NE 50th St

NE 50th St

NE 49th Av e

NE Jo NE hn Av F sA e v

NW Lo

NEOTSU

t

Dr

NW 40th P

NE 50th S uD r

s Lake

Bl ke NE W e st Devils La NE Voyage Ave

NW

P

BEACH ACCESS

st Devils Lake Rd

NE

vd

p

e Loo

NE 47th S

NW Pa

Lincoln

cific Te rrace gan Rd

Voyag

Sho coln W Lin

NE

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s

N

th 44

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Lo

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NW

CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

st

51

St

46th Pl

W4 7 th S t

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NE N

Sta re

1 10 wy H

51s

NE

NW 50th St op Lo r Re

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NE Ea

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Bell Ct

NE

Vo ya g

Pl

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Ct

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N

l

NE

55

NE Voyage Av e

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53rd

Rd

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NE Port L

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Nep tu

NW Je tty Ave NW Ke el Av NW Lee Ave 53

n

51st Dr

sort/ N W Miramar

PACIFIC OCEAN

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NW 52

CHINOOK WINDS CASINO

Ct

Ct

Po r

th

Lo

rd St

KEY TO STREET PREFIXES

57

th

ROADS ENDN

SE

55

NE 56t

N

NE

57th St

SW

La- S

NE 58th St NE

D RIVER

24

NE

ea

HW

NE Spin d

1

P NE

r ift Ct

Y. 1 0

NE 64th Dr

63rd St

N Logan Rd

ROADS END STATE PARK BEACH ACCESS

NE

NE Mast Ave

64th

NW

NE Neptune Dr

NE 66th St

CITY LIMITS

hla Hig


N

N

d 2n

DEVILS LAKE STATE PARK CAMPGROUND

NE

tD

Ea s NE

SE Tide Av

SE Surf Av

Rd S E Hill

S

SE

Re

ef

Pl

ay

SE Lee Ave

SE

Rd

23 r

d

Dr

SW 28 th St SW 29th St

S pyglass R idge D

Pl th

Ct

r

SE S p y g l a

t 35th C

37

th

SE

Hig h

t

SW Anchor SW 37

C

Dr

34th

SE Galley C

SE

St

idge ss R

SE

Av e

St

SE Fle et

A Coa s t

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Anchor Av 35 Be a ch A th v Pl

35th St

S

NELSCOTT DISTRICT

s t St

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SW 38th St

St

C

5th

SE Dune Av

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31

27 th

S Dune Av Hwy

Av

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SW A

SW

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SW 34

3 SW

St

32

SW 33

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28th

10 1

SE

SE

THEATRE WEST

SW 32

S

B EACH ACCESS

SE

D SW

Beach Ave

u ne

Ave

SW Anchor Av

e

Dr

u EQ

Dr Oar SE

SW Galley C

SE 19th St

S Hwy 101

SW

B

ard

Dr

SW Coast

SE 16th St

SW

S W 2 4t h

SE Reef Ave

SE Tide Ave

SE Quay Ave

SE Oar Ave

Pl

SW Harbor Ave

Ave

SE Oar Ave

SE 14th St

SW 16th St

SW 17th St

Bard Lo

rock Pl

TAFT HIGH SCHOOL

SE

SE 39th S

TAFT MIDDLE SCHOOL

ve yA

S SCHOONER CRE SE 51st S SELe t eA ve

tty

Pl

SE 47th St SE

In le tA ve

SW 51st St

SE Keel Av

50th St

E

EK ROAD

l hP 48t

SE 50th St

LEGEND

SE 51st St

S Hwy 101

SW

S

S E J ett

SE Inle

SE 43rd St SE 44th

SE Jetty Ave J e

SW 48th S

SW Ebb Ave

S

SW Fleet Ave Ga lley Av

une Ave SW D 48 th C t

1

SW Beach Ave

TAFT DISTRICT W

10

SW 48th S

y

TAFT ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

w

OREGON COAST COMMUNITY COLLEGE

H

NLFD FIRE DEPARTMENT

SW Coast Ave

B EACH ACCESS

tA

l Dr Schoo High SE

SE 40th S

S

B EACH ACCESS

THEATRE PUBLIC RESTROOMS

AY B Z

MUNICIPAL BUILDING

ET

SCHOOL

10 y Hw

St th

SE

64

OA D

63

St

EE KR

rd

SW

S

62

SW

nd

SW

1

POLICE DEPARTMENT St

e Av el Ke

SIL

FIRE DEPARTMENT BEACH ACCESS

SW Harbor Ave

SW Fleet Ave

SW 69th St

SW Galley Ave

SW 68th St

CUTLER CITY DISTRICT SW Inlet Ave

SW 65th St

SW 66th St

DR

IFT

CR

SW 64th St

B EACH ACCESS SW Ebb Ave

PACIFIC OCEAN

SE 14th St

op

SW Sham

ET

SW 15th St

SE

KEY TO STREET PREFIXES

SE 3rd St

SE 5th

Port

SW Fleet Av

SW 14th St

Rd

SE East Devils Lake Rd

UTL

O GER TAN TER CEN

SW 13th St

SW 19th S

SW

SE Jetty Ave

SW 11th St SW 12th St

STATE PARK

ke La

POST OFFICE

SE Je

l

r

SW SW Dune Ave

1 HW Y. 1 0

D RIVER

SE 8th St

St

SW 10th St

Fleet Pl

SW 10 th P Canyo D n

9th

SE 2nd

ils ev

SE

SW 10th St

B EACH ACCESS

SE

SW 9th St

SE Neptune Av

SW 7th St SW 8th St

l

SE Oar Ave

SW Fleet Ave

VISITOR CENTER/CITY HALL & DRIFTWOOD PUBLIC LIBRARY

NE

SW Galley Ave 1 10 wy SW Harbor Ave SH

SW 6th St

dP

DELAKE DISTRICT

SE Inlet Ave

SE Harbor Ave

SW Ebb Ave

SW 5th St

2n

Key P

SE

SE 3rd St

POLICE DEPARTMENT

Ct

d

SE Keel Ave

SE 2n

SE Mast Ave SE Neptune Ave

t St

ve tty A

1s

Ha rbo rA ve

SH wy

SE

SW 4th S

NW

1s t St

10 1

D RIVER WAYSIDE STATE PARK B EACH ACCESS

DEVILS LAKE

Dr

LINCOLN CITY SOUTH

PARK POST OFFICE CITY LIMITS

25


Photo by Rick Beasley

By Rick Beasley Regatta Park is a crown jewel of the Lincoln City parks system, a place where families are united by the joy of an old-fashioned, has-it-all park. Here, dads teach sons about the marriage of worm and hook, moms push their toddlers on the swing and wound-up kids burn energy on a block-sized jungle gym built by volunteer neighborhood sweat. This terrific day-use park offers stunning views of Devil’s Lake from every corner of the grounds. The park, built on the side of a steep hill that drops you down to the lake sharply off of 14th St. Drive, is beautiful and well kept. From the entrance you’ll get a view of Devil’s lake that will make you wonder what the true attraction to Lincoln City really is, the beach or this inland aquatic playground. A boat dock and parking are situated at the lake’s edge, and there are park benches, onsite BBQ’s, and restroom facilities. Sandcastle Playground is an amazing play area that sprawls like a medieval labyrinth, a puzzle of wooden madness that will keep kids entertained for quite some time. The parents will enjoy watching their children play as they take in the scenery from above the lake. 



 To discover Regatta Park, turn east off Highway 101 on 14th, go one-half mile east, and

Photo by Rick Beasley

look for the park on the south side of 14th. The park sneaks up on you as you go up and down the rolling hills on 14th, so keep your eyes peeled. The entrance to the park is a very steep downward hill. Photo by Rick Beasley

26


Photo by Rick Beasley

Pin your family fun to bowling! By Rick Beasley Lincoln City is home to what many 10-pin aficionados consider the best all-wooden bowling alley in the state, Delake Bowl. Open Tue.-Sun. well into the night, Delake Bowl features the “three B’s,” a trio of essential elements for family fun: bowling, billiards and a burger bar. Okay, skip the burger if you must. The iconic sport of the 50s is being rediscovered as a great form of anaerobic physical exercise that is similar to walking with free weights. Even though it seems like too much fun to be good for you, bowling burns calories and works muscle groups that you may have been ignoring. While many sports are not for elderly people, bowling is a pastime that can be pursued at almost any age. In ten pin bowling, matches consist of each player bowling a “game.” Each game is divided into ten “frames.” A frame allows a bowler two chances to knock down all ten pins. The number of pins knocked over in each frame is recorded, a running total is made as each frame progresses, and the player with the highest score in the game wins the match. Scoring is straightforward. Scores can be greater than the actual number of pins knocked over if strikes or spares are bowled.

A “strike” is scored when a player knocks down all pins on the first roll in the frame. Rather than a score of 10 for the frame, the player’s score will be 10 plus the total pins knocked down on the next two rolls in the next frame. A “spare” is scored when all pins are knocked down using both rolls in the frame. The player’s score for that frame will be 10 plus the number of pins knocked down on the first roll in the next frame. A

player who rolls a spare or strike in the last frame is given one or two more rolls to score additional points, respectively. The friendly staff at Delake Bowl will answer your questions about scoring and rules, and provide you with pro-level advice that can improve your delivery. Delake also hosts family and group parties. For more information, call 541-994-9595 or drop in for a game at 316 S.E. Hwy. 101.

Photo by Rick Beasley

27


Photo by Rick Beasley

...then drop a line for cutthroat while the Dungies gather! By Rick Beasley LINCOLN CITY — Big, feisty Dungeness crabs that will pack a

You can tackle crab from boat, bridge or dock using a simple ring

stove pot with the most succulent seafood on the planet are the

or basket setup purchased at your favorite outdoors store. Bi-Mart

payoff for a day spent on Siletz Bay, 1,800 acres of crabbing and

in Lincoln City usually carries a good variety of crab traps, including

fishing fun!

the smaller rigs that can be used with a fishing pole. Dungies are found in all Oregon bays from the entrance and upriver with the tidewater. In Siletz Bay, crabbers find success off the pier at Mo’s Restaurant in Taft, from the beaches, tide pools, jetties, riverside and even the Hwy. 101 bridge. Always refer to Oregon fishing regulations before you toss your pot. Crab can be caught year-round in the bay, but the game heats-up starting in July when breeding crabs begin returning to their Siletz sanctuaries, peaking in numbers in the fall. During the day, drop your pots in the subtidal areas. As daylight wanes, head to the intertidal areas next to the tidal flats. You can put your money on a stretch of river running from Mo’s dock south for about a half-mile. Crabbing from the sidelines along Salishan Spit or Cutler City can be pretty productive. Belinda Ellis of Siletz Moorage, 82 Siletz Hwy., rents outboard boats and crab gear from her docks a mile south of Lincoln City at the foot of the Hwy. 101 bridge. She Photo courtesy Jesse Sampson, SmallStreamOutfitters.com

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Photo by eon gd&i

explained why the Siletz is a crabber’s dream. “We had someone catch a three-pounder right across from the moorage,” she said. “The tidewater runs 16 miles upriver so the crabbing goes up a long ways. We have one of the longest-running tides besides the Columbia River.” Ellis suggests baiting your baskets with oily shad or chicken parts, which draw the Dungies like moths to a flame. While waiting for the pots to fill, go on a sightseeing trip or try casting for sea-run cutthroat trout. The hard-fighting bluebacks will strike Panther Martins, wedding rings and Rooster Tails. The river is also home to shiner, pile and redtail surf perch which add up to a nice pan fry. According to a state fish commission study, fishing for crab, salmon, perch and flounder is best in that 1,200-yard stretch from the mouth of the spit to mid-bay. The bluebacks can be found up to a thousand yards west of the Hwy. 101 bridge all the way upriver. According to the same report, the best times to fish are: Crab, March-Oct. Salmon, Aug.-Oct. Perch, Flounder, March-Aug. Searun Cutthroat Trout, Aug.-Sept. For boat rentals or current conditions, contact Siletz Moorage at 541-996-3671. The moorage is open at 7:30 a.m. daily, with long hours into the early evening to accommodate the tides.

How to cook your crab You can cook crab in your kitchen without the smell of low tide permeating the house. In a couple of gallons of water add your customary amount of salt (a tablespoon or so) and two tablespoons of pickling spice. Boil for 20-30 minutes. The odor will be like that of cooking corned beef but the crab scent will be gone and the pickling spice will not flavor the crab meat. Map courtesy Fish Commission of Oregon

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Photo by eon gd&i

Chinook Winds G.C. features indoor driving range By Rick Beasley Rain or shine, the indoor driving range at Chinook Winds G.C. always features shirtsleeves weather. The 30-yard drive into the net or the target green for chip shots is a pleasant and efficient way to warm-up for the game or to retire from a downpour. Buckets come with 30 balls for three bucks, and the advice of golf pro Aaron Johnson. The 17-year veteran pro offers 30-minute, one-on-one classes in “course management” for $45. It’s a whirlwind course in how to play and make winning shots and clean-up your short game, the all-important chipping and putting. The popular 4,200-yard, par-65 course is both fun and challenging, known for its tricky, uneven lies and sneaky breaks on the greens. It’s also a family-friendly course where kids 12 and above can play by themselves. “It’s an all-encompassing course with some real challenges on the back tees,” said Johnson. “A lot of golf courses cater to the top 10 percent, but here you can bring the whole family and everybody plays.” Rates are $55 for 18 holes on the weekends, including cart, and $50 on weekdays. Golf clubs can be rented for $5 per well-equipped bag.

The golf course also features a firstrate restaurant and lounges, Aces, with big-screen sports TVs and an indoor golf simulator to keep up your game with settings for windy Bandon Dunes, Troon, Phoenix and Pebble Beach golf courses. Finally, an eye-popping fitness center rounds-out the services at Chinook Winds G.C. A weight room features free weights and Nautilus machines with a full complement of cardio equipment: treadmills, bikes, ellipticals, stair-steppers and more. Two raquetball courts, a yoga room and martial arts-workout room mean there’s a space and the gear for almost any kind of physical training. The dressing rooms are equipped with steam and dry saunas, the perfect cap to your workout or round of golf. The fitness center is open Mon.-Fri. 5 a.m.-10 p.m.; Sat.-Sun. 8 a.m.-6 p.m. Drop-in rates are $8, or $5 for seniors 55 and above. Annual dues are $50 single, $70 couple and $80 framily, with a 10 percent discount for seniors. For information on how to get into the swing of things at Chinook Winds G.C. and Fitness Center, call 541-994-4474. Open 8 a.m.- 7 p.m. Sun.-Fri and 8 a.m.-7 p.m. Sat. Photo by Rick Beasley

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Photo by Rick Beasley

Step into the swing of things at All-American Putt ’n Bat! By Rick Beasley The term “Fun for all ages!” fits like a used baseball glove at All American Putt’n Bat in Lincoln City, where it’s easy to find the kid in anyone. While arcades are as much a part of Lincoln City’s DNA as beaches and glass floats, the mix of slot games and America’s pastimes — baseball and golf — has produced a place where the clientele runs from six to 60, and beyond. Located in the Nelscott neighborhood at 1255 NW Hwy. 101, it’s the kind of destination where dad can showcase his skills, and the kids can put him in his place. Stepping to the plate in one of the arcade’s batting cages was the wily veteran of the feed company softball picnics in Gooding, Idaho, Joe Arkoosh, 64. Stuffing tokens in the slot for a round of 20 m.p.h. slow pitches, he quickly found his groove on the lobbing mushballs. Next door in another chain-link cage, Jerry Sneed, 11, an up-and-coming player for K&K of the Lincoln City Youth League, pushed the selecting lever to 80 m.p.h. Facing a respectable majors-level speed even, he set his Louisville Slugger for the regulation 60-ft. hardball. The slap of the streaking ball against the padded backstop sounded like a catcher’s

mitt on fire — “Whap!” — strike one! “Whap!” — strike two! Jerry refreshed his stance and — “Crack!” — drilled the ball with a swing that would take the stitches out of a surgical patient. Your money travels like a Cal Ripken homer here: a buck-fifty buys 20 swings, barely a dent for Little Leaguers but more than most older bodies can take without liniment. On the other hand, the 17-hole miniature golf course — the only one at the central coast — is less about lightning reflexes than a decisive but deft putt. Most people, even avid mini-golfers, are surprised

at the fun and challenge of the greens. “We mini-golf at some of the nicest courses around,” said San Francisco’s Jennifer DiAngelo as she emerged from a hole with pinball pegs as the hazard, putter in hand. “I’d say the course is simple and in fairly good condition. You have to give kudos to a place that has a Plinko-style hole, and one that runs down a huge 20-foot tube towards the hole.” Summer hours are Mon.-Fri. 12-8, Sat. 11-8 and Sunday 12-7. In winter, Putt ‘n Bat is open Mon.-Fri. 2-7, Sat. 12-8 and Sun. 12-6. Batter up!

Photo by Rick Beasley

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Find your inner kid at the Community Center! By Rick Beasley LINCOLN CITY — When you’re putting together your list of “Must-See, Must-Do” attractions, the Lincoln City Community Center should be at the top! In a town surrounded by water, this is the only place you won’t need a wetsuit to fully enjoy yourself. The world-class 25-m. swimming pool features a 56-ft.waterslide with a 360-degree loop, a 14-ft. water slide, a rope swing, water basketball and one- and three-meter diving boards. A 3-1/2 ft. wading pool with a giant pelican that erupts with a blast of water turns out to be perfect for babies, toddlers and their parents. Lifeguards are always on duty. More fun awaits at the 24-ft. rock-climbing wall, which provides a challenging test of power and skill under the supervision of an instructor who operates the fail-safe automatic belay. Here, size matters — the minimum body weight for climbing is 35 pounds, and climbers must be at least 44-inches tall. For a good workout, the Community Center offers fully-equipped weight and cardio rooms, an indoor walking/running track and a full-size gymnasium perfect for pickup games. A 12-person spa is the right complement to sore muscles after your workout. Photo by Rick Beasley

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Drop-in prices for all the fun you can handle start at $3.50 for kids 17 and under, $5 for resident adults and $6.50 for nonresidents. The Community Center is open seven days, from 5 a.m.- 9 p.m. Mon-Fri., Saturdays 8:30 a.m.-9 p.m. and Sundays 9 a.m.-5 p.m. The Community Center is located at 2150 N.E. Oar Place, just one block east from Hwy. 101 and N.E. 22nd St. For more information, call 541-994-2131.


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Photo by Rick Beasley

Put on ‘yer bib overalls and get some culture! By Rick Beasley LINCOLN CITY — If you drop the word “culture” in passing conversation, you’re likely to be considered the high-brow type. But that’s not the case at the Lincoln City Cultural Center, where art and music meet the masses almost every day. Leave your tux and tails behind when you visit this non-stop showcase of eye-popping entertainment, live music, gem shows and art exhibitions. One of the steady attractions at the Center is the Lincoln City Farmers Market.

Featuring 60 booths, the event is held Sundays on the front lawn, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. In October, the event migrates inside the building of the Center, formerly the historic D-Lake Elementary School at 540 N.E. Hwy. 101. The Center also features a membersonly gift shop where the talents of Center supporters are on display. Another way to fill out your summer days, the adult and childrens’ art workshops, can

Photo by Rick Beasley

bring out the hidden artist in anyone. Other classes reveal the secrets of ballet, guitarmaking, sculpture and ceramics. Meanwhile, an exciting calendar of performing arts at the center can be found at at lincolncity-culturalcenter.org, or drop by and talk to a friendly representative at the information center for complete details on events and citywide activities. For more details, call 541-994-3302. Photo by Rick Beasley

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Photo by Rick Beasley

Mark first Saturday for auction fun! By Rick Beasley On the first Saturday of every month at 6 p.m. the melodious chant of the auctioneer beckons hundreds of bargain hunters to Streetcar Village, an eclectic shopping mall of antique stores at the south end of Lincoln City. Parked cars spill out of the lot and line Hwy. 101 for a hundred feet in either direction, a testament to the attraction of AA Auction. Inside the auction house, Col. Bob Duby scans the crowd like a hawk to keep the pace fast. Housewares, furniture, tools, antiques and collectibles are stacked on the wings of Duby’s stage like aircraft in a holding pattern, and everything must go. AA Auction has been in business here for 32 years, earning its reputation as an honest auction house that provides a night of oldfashioned entertainment whether you’re here to buy or just bask in the warmth of an oldfashioned American pastime. “We have a great inventory,” said Duby. “Most of it comes locally, from estates, people who are moving, downsizing or changing around. Tonight, we’ve got furniture from a retired NFL star who has a vacation home in Depoe Bay. You’ll find anything from the home, office or garage, but all good quality and guaranteed to work.”

It’s easy to participate. “It’s real simple,” explained Duby. “Just walk in the door, sign up, get your number and we’ll take it from there. You hold up your sign to bid, and we’ll gather up the items for you when you’re ready to pay.” When the action starts, the auction room fills with anticipation and the aroma of

homemade peach cobbler from the snack bar. Before long, you’ll spot something you can’t live without, and that’s when the fun begins. AA Auction is open 10-5 Wed. at 6334 S. Hwy. 101, with the monthly auction the first Saturday at 6 p.m. For more information, call 541-996-3327.

Photo by Rick Beasley

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Photo by eon gd&i

Use this simple guide to find the beach in Lincoln City: Beach Access, North NW 50 st Street NW 41st Street NW 40th Street NW 37th Street NW 34th Street

Photo by eon gd&i

NW 21st Street

Beach Access, South

NW 26th Street (includes restrooms)

SW 11th Street

NW 15th Street (includes restrooms)

SW 34th Street

NW 5th Street

SW 35th Street

Beach Parking, North

SW 44th Street

NW 17th Street (includes restrooms)

SW 51st Street Taft Waterfront Shelter

NE 15th Street

SW 66th

NW 15th Street

SW 68th SW 69th SW Fleet Street SW Galley Street SW Harbor Street SE 50th Stree

Beach Parking, South SW 50th Street (includes restrooms) SW 32nd Street SE 3rd Street Photo by eon gd&i

Sprint Parking Lot: SE State Highway 101 37


tide charts

South Beach, Yaquina River, Oregon 2012

tide tables courtesy NOAA

Tidal Adjustment Table To estimate the high tide for a particular location, add the high minutes to the South Beach predicted high time from the monthly table. If the time is negative, subtract the indicated number of minutes. To estimate the low tide for a particular location, add the low minutes to the South Beach low time. To find the estimated tidal height, multiply the South Beach predicted high height by the indicated high ratio and the South Beach low height by the indicated low ratio.

Example The find the estimated high tide at Taft, add 7 minutes to the South Beach time and multiply the predicted high tide height by the ratio of 0.76. To find the estimated low tide at Taft, add 39 minutes to the South Beach time and multiply the predicted low tide by the ratio of 0.68.

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Photo by eon gd&i

Spectacular views abound on Cascade Head Interpretive Trail Cascade Head is a grand basalt testament to an ancient, uplifted, underwater volcanic flow. The Nature Conservancy preserve atop Cascade Head encompasses 270 acres of forests and meadows, traversed by The Nature Conservancy Interpretive Trail, which clambers from Knight Park to the south, three and a half miles up toward an elevation of 1,200 feet. The lower section of trail switches through forests of red alder, Sitka spruce and western hemlock. Here and there the mature understory of red elderberry and salmonberry overreaches the path where sunlight dapples through. Identify yellow monkey flower and stream violets and listen for woodpeckers rapping upon grey snags. The meadows above are special, predominantly hosting native species, including red fescue, wild rye, Pacific reedgrass, coastal paintbrush, goldenrod, streambank lupine and blushing striped candy flower; and rare western blue violet and hairy-stemmed checkermallow. Cascade Head catchfly is a beautiful plant almost exclusive to Cascade Head. Among flowers currently blooming in the meadows are red paintbrush, purple-blue lupine, yellow buttercup, and brilliant white wild cucumber. Photo by Jason Evans

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Photo by eon gd&i

Step softly up the path, wary of sunning garter snakes and butterflies drying their wings. Elk, deer, coyote, snowshoe hare and the Pacific giant salamander frequent the preserve. Bald eagle, great horned owl, northern harrier, red-tail hawk and peregrine falcon may be spotted flying overhead. Among the many smaller birds such as savannah sparrow racing above, or darting about the meadow, wonder at the aeronautic agility of bank swallows.

Silverspot butterfly Listed as threatened under the United States Endangered Species Act, the Oregon silverspot butterfly frequents the meadows of Cascade Head. The meadows are among a handful of remaining viable habitats for the silverspot in Oregon, Washington and California; development, pesticides, grazing and off-road vehicles continue to threaten the species. Historically, coastal meadow habitats silverspot shared were maintained in an early successional state by periodic fires, preventing trees and shrubs from overshadowing plants such as western blue violet - from which silverspot larvae and adults feed. Fires have been prevented in recent years, deemed undesirable by developers and environmentalists alike; meadow habitat is gradually replaced by forest. Recognition of the role of fire and other periodic disturbance inspires fire-management strategies conducive to silverspot habitat maintenance. Silverspots have unique orange and brown markings with black veins and black spots on the dorsal or top-sides of the wings, and bright metallic silver spots on the ventral,

Photo by Rick Beasley

or undersides. Adults emerge throughout the late summer and early fall to mate; eggs are laid during the fall and hatch shortly thereafter. Larvae feed for a short time in the fall, and then enter a dormant state, in which they spend the winter. In the spring, larvae resume feeding until the late spring or summer when they pupate. Pupation time is short, and adults soon emerge to continue the cycle.

Conservation Volunteers organized an effort to protect Cascade Head from development in the early 1960s; by 1966 they had raised funds to purchase property, which they gave to The Nature Conservancy. Because of its ecological significance, Cascade Head Preserve and surrounding national forest

and other lands have won recognition as a National Scenic Research Area and a United Nations Biosphere Reserve. On the preserve, researchers are testing methods of maintaining and restoring meadow habitat for the silverspot, including prescribed fire. However, a few years gestation are required for the western blue violet to reach maturity. In the meantime The Nature Conservancy has teamed up with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Lewis and Clark College, and the Oregon Zoo to gather female silverspots for captive rearing. After being hatched, and raised at the college and zoo, progeny are reintroduced as pupae. Conservancy ecologists also monitor populations of rare plants throughout the year. In spring and summer volunteers

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Photo by Phil Burnett

remove invasive species (such as Himalayan blackberry), maintain trails, assist with research projects and participate in educational outreach. Each year more than 10,000 visitors hike the preserve for the views, wildflowers and wildlife. The Nature Conservancy is an international nonprofit organization, preserving plants, animals and natural communities representing the diversity of life on Earth, by protecting the lands and water they need to survive. To volunteer at Cascade Head, in support of The Nature Conservancy, call 503 802-8100. • • • Cascade Head is located north of Lincoln City. The Nature Conservancy Interpretive Trail climbs the southern face between two trailheads. The southern trailhead is located at Lincoln County’s Knight Park on the Salmon River Estuary. Turn west onto Three Rocks Road from U.S. Highway 101, just north of the Salmon River, and travel a couple of miles to the park past Savage Road. The two and a half mile hike to the upper viewpoint is a good climb - find the metal stud, a simple survey marker; and space-sufficient for a family to picnic. From the upper trailhead, seasonally accessible by vehicle July 15 through Dec. 31, enjoy an easy one-mile hike to the upper viewpoint. Drive 2.4 miles north of the Salmon River on Hwy. 101, almost to the summit of Cascade Head. Turn left on Cascade Head Road (USFS Road 1861). Continue shy of 4 miles, bearing left where the road forks. The upper trailhead is marked by a small parking lot and sign. Access to the preserve is restricted to

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hikers; dogs are not allowed. Vault toilets and trash facilities are available at Knight Park, and are the only public facilities in the preserve. No potable water is available

and visitors are asked to plan accordingly. Sensitive ground nesting birds, and other animals and plants, require visitors to stay on the trail.

Photo by eon gd&i


Nelscott House

  

Now celebrating our 6th year nestled in the heart of the Nelscott District.

              

Antiques, Art & Gifts

1500 square feet of Antiques, collectibles, glass, jewelry, art & gifts. Something for all generations. Large selections of Sterling, fine & costume jewelry, Fenton, Cranberry glass, Orientalia, Disneyana & much more! Also - Oregon-made Gifts! Come visit with our friendly staff.



   

 





Gifts

Antiques

Lincoln City Community Center

Open to the Public!

Souvenirs

541-994-9761

3200 SE Highway 101 • Lincoln City OR 97367

2150 NE Oar Place • Lincoln City 541-994-2131 • www.lincolncity.org

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Courtesy of the North Lincoln County Historical Museum

Homesteaders began arriving in what is now the Lincoln City area soon after Congress passed the Dawes Act in 1887. This act opened up Coast Reservation lands to white settlement and gave 80-acre “allotments” to reservation Indians. Native Americans, as well as white settlers, first inhabited land along the Siletz River, Siletz Bay and the Salmon River. Early settlers homesteaded the land and combined subsistence farming with fishing and hunting in order to survive on the isolated coast. Sissie and Jakie Johnson Jr. were the first residents of Taft. They had been given a 160-acre allotment on Siletz Bay as compensation when reservation lands were taken away. With its location on Siletz Bay providing access to the coast and ocean, and the Siletz River

Courtesy of the North Lincoln County Historical Museum

44

providing transportation to people living along the river, Taft became the center of north Lincoln County’s social and economic life. Homesteaders came into town for festivities on most holidays, but the Fourth of July drew the biggest crowds. John W. Bones erected the first store in Taft, establishing a post office in the store on Jan. 22, 1906 with Mr. Bones as the first postmaster. When naming the town, Mr. Bones requested first the name of Siletz Bay, but this was rejected since there was already a town of Siletz in the area. He named the town for William Howard Taft, who was then Secretary of War and later became president. In the mid-1920s and early 30s, Herbert Rexroad, one of the earliest businessmen to settle in Oceanlake, operated a campground in the grove of trees believed to have been the exact spot where Jason Lee and his party camped. The large tract owned by Rexroad and his partner, Edgar L. Hoyt, was registered as “Devils Lake Park” and constituted the main business section of the town. Another large tract of land, owned by the Catholic Church, was called Raymond, named for Father Raymond, the church’s pastor. The town had no official name until 1926, when a post office was established with A. C. Duel as the first postmaster. Some have given Mr. Duel credit for naming the town, but it is also thought Mrs. H.E. Warren, a member of the booster club, is the author of the name, having described the area as lying between the ocean and the lake. Oceanlake annexed Wecoma Beach, another small town to the north, and was incorporated as a full city on Nov. 3, 1945. Boyd C. Jenkins, a dentist, was the first mayor. The earliest homesteaders included Mr. and Mrs. Henry Hostetler, who bought Indian allotment land as early as 1910, and the Thorpe brothers, Alvin and Harry. Harry purchased land to the south of the Hostetlers and named the platted tracts “Camp Roosevelt” and “Roosevelt by the Sea” after the newly completed highway.


Courtesy of the North Lincoln County Historical Museum

The origin of the name Delake has several versions. In one, early Finnish homesteaders would say of the area, “I’m going to de lake,” and the name stuck to the area. In another, the d and e constitute a French word meaning “by,” hence the area “by the lake.” The first store and post office in Delake was established in 1924. A.C. Duel was the storekeeper and became the town’s first postmaster. The “D” River, which runs through the center of Delake, has been known by various names in the past including “the outlet.” A contest determined its permanent name, giving the shortest river in the world the shortest name. Possibly because of Nelscott’s dense forest of spruce and hemlock, no settlers are known to have inhabited the future town site until shortly before 1910, when August Wallace homesteaded on the land. In the early 1900s, Charles P. Nelson glimpsed a lovely valley gently sloping to the sea as he walked the beach from Taft to Cloverdale, noting the wooded hills on three sides and crystal stream flowing to the sea. Years later, when Mr. Nelson and Dr. W. G. Scott were looking for land to develop, they revisited the area, found it for sale, and purchased it. Combining their last names at the suggestion of Mrs. Nelson, they formed the Nelscott Land Company and the town of Nelscott was born. When Nelscott’s second store opened in 1927, it contained offices for the Land Company, a restaurant, a bus depot, hotel rooms and living quarters. In 1929, it also contained Nelscott’s first post office. Cutler City was the third town site in north Lincoln County. Originally part of the allotment of Charlie Depoe, a Siletz Indian, the land was sold to Mary and George E. Cutler of Dallas, who established a town site on June 4, 1913. The North Lincoln Rhododendron Society was organized in 1938 for the purpose of preserving native plants and celebrating the blooming season. Cutler City, abloom with so many colorful rhododendrons from May through June, was chosen as its rhododendron capital.

In the 1930s, these towns competed with other coastal towns to attract tourists and increase business. Annual events like Taft’s Redhead Roundup and Oceanlake’s Regatta drew visitors from all over the state and further emphasized the distinctive characteristics of each town. Because government services to these communities, such as fire and police protection, were needed by all, a long debate ensued as to whether the towns, some of which had incorporated as cities, should combine. However, since all of the towns in the area developed somewhat independently of one another, and had separate post offices, many people were reluctant for the towns to join together as one, and a protracted discussion ensued. On March 3, 1965 - after several failed attempts - Cutler City, Taft, Nelscott, Delake, and Oceanlake incorporated as Lincoln City. When it was determined that using one of the five cities’ names would be too controversial, a contest was held to find a new name. Lincoln City, a name submitted by school children, was the one chosen from among the entries. www.northlincolncountyhistoricalmuseum.org

Courtesy of the North Lincoln County Historical Museum

45


Great soup, salads, and sandwiches! Also serving wine and beer. Monday - Saturday 11am - 7pm Sunday 11am - 5pm (541) 614-1300 1509 NW Hwy 101 Lincoln City 46


It was the tastiest and most abundant seafoodbased Cioppino I had ever tried.”... ~ Tripadvisor Review “Pounding is using his fisherman connections to offer the freshest seafood at unpretentious prices” ~Northwest Palate

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Discover Lincoln CIty  

The Lincoln CIty Magazine on the Oregon Coast

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