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The Apprentice School 2011-12 Annual Report Craftsmanship

Scholarship

Leadership

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Leadership Messages

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Director’s Message

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The Apprentice School – At-A-Glance

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Craft Training

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Academics

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ADMISSIONS, ATHLETICS AND Student services

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Alumni

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Looking to the Future

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A Contributors: Tim Gardner; Jim Heath; Will Prescott; April Shockley, editor; and Vince Warren Graphic designer: LaMar Smith Photographers: Chris Oxley; Ricky Thompson; and John Whalen

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Table of Contents 2011-12

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“The development of our workforce at Huntington Ingalls Industries is a top priority for me and for the entire leadership team. At HII, we are both a hightech and high-touch business and having a skilled and trained workforce is a critical component of our ability to succeed. The Newport News Shipbuilding Apprentice School is a recognized ‘best practice’ in the workforce development arena and has more than 90 years of demonstrated excellence in not only developing skilled shipbuilders but also in cultivating leadership and commitment in every apprentice. HII benefits immensely from these efforts.”

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Mike Petters President and CEO Huntington Ingalls Industries

“Shipbuilding is a very specialized craft that demands an extensive training process. More than 90 years ago, we developed an integrated apprentice program, blending classroom education and on-the-job training. The Apprentice School has forged thousands of careers since. Not only has it produced talented shipbuilders, it has also become the foundation for producing leaders. Today, we are designing, building and maintaining the most sophisticated and most formidable ships the world has ever seen. The projects are large and complex, and take many years to complete. Developing and training a skilled workforce is critical to our business, and The Apprentice School is key to its success. Yet no matter what our best is today, we will always strive to do better tomorrow. Our new state-of-the-art Apprentice School will do just that – allowing us to continue our proud tradition of developing craftsmanship, scholarship and leadership while creating an even brighter future.”

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Matt Mulherin President Newport News Shipbuilding

“The educational experience offered by The Apprentice School is different than the ‘traditional’ routes. We create events and opportunities that shape how our apprentices think, how they solve problems and how they respond to emerging technologies, customer demands and obstacles. We rapidly shape their experiences, perspective and intuition as shipbuilders. And, we develop a sense of focus, urgency and speed in what they do. Parents often tell me how quickly we matured their son or daughter. In reality, apprentices mature themselves as they learn to contribute, and lead, in a highly competitive and challenging environment.”

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Danny Hunley Vice President, Operations Newport News Shipbuilding Class of 1977

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Overview and Vision for the Future The Apprentice School celebrated its 93rd anniversary in 2012 and continued its commitment to craftsmanship, scholarship and leadership by exploring new and exciting programs, unleashing the potential of each student and addressing changing business demands across our company. We offered 19 shipbuilding disciplines and seven advanced programs of study and challenged apprentices to learn and master the art of shipbuilding through rigorous academics, on-the job instruction and trade related theory education. Our graduates are well positioned to attain highly successful careers at Newport News Shipbuilding, the country’s finest nuclear shipyard. The new beginnings and milestones of 2012 are a testament to the dedication and professionalism of our faculty and staff. Their focus on “raising the bar” has led to numerous enhancements throughout the year, including a unique supervisor development program called FrontlineFAST, curricula and course delivery revisions, a new honors program and improved admissions standards. Legislators and shipyard leadership broke ground for our state-of-the-art educational campus to be occupied in late 2013. During a July 31 ceremony in Washington, D.C., Secretary of Labor Hilda L. Solis and the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Apprenticeship recognized the school as a 21st Century Registered Apprenticeship Trailblazer and Innovator.

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Throughout the year apprentices contributed to significant milestones in the construction and overhaul of the world’s most technologically advanced naval vessels. Our student-athletes approached competition with the same commitment to excellence as they do shipbuilding, which led to some of their most successful seasons to date, winning 64 percent of their contests. Rounding out the year’s accomplishments were the contributions of The Apprentice School Students’ Association. Their activities and professional societies provided members an opportunity to develop their leadership skills while giving back to our community. As an alumnus and the school’s eighth director, I am extremely proud of the accomplishments of the school’s faculty, staff and student body. When you read about the latest year in the life of The Apprentice School, look forward, as I do, to their valuable contributions to production and the exciting milestones and opportunities to be experienced during 2013. Enjoy learning about the school’s proud past while focusing on its bright future!

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Everett H. Jordan Jr. Director, Education

Director’s Message

The Apprentice School Class of 1977

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The Apprentice School

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The Apprentice School—founded in 1919 at

Leadership

Newport News Shipbuilding—is the preeminent

Apprentices become leaders in the classroom and on the

apprenticeship program in the nation and offers

waterfront through the development of The Apprentice School’s

four- and five-year apprenticeships in 19 shipbuilding

nine leadership principles:

disciplines and seven advanced programs of study. Accredited by the Council on Occupational

Integrity

Education and registered with the Virginia

Commitment

Apprenticeship Council, the school offers apprentices

Improvement

the opportunity to earn college credit, receive

Respect

competitive pay and benefits and learn a trade. The

Teamwork

school holds a commitment to fostering apprentices’

Empowerment

development of craftsmanship, scholarship and

Communication

leadership:

Planning Decision Making

Craftsmanship

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Apprentices spend a minimum of 7,000 hours

Graduates of The Apprentice School are well prepared to

learning their chosen shipbuilding trade and play

continue Newport News Shipbuilding’s long tradition of building

an integral role in the construction, maintenance

the most complex and powerful naval vessels in the world.

and overhaul of the U.S. Navy’s nuclear-powered submarines and aircraft carriers.

Our Mission The mission of The Apprentice School is to contribute to the

Scholarship

profitability and growth of Newport News Shipbuilding by

Apprentices build a strong academic foundation

recruiting, training and developing men and women for careers

during their completion of the World Class

in shipbuilding. The school seeks to provide the company with

Shipbuilder Curriculum, completing courses in

a continuous supply of journeypersons who possess the skills,

subjects ranging from physics to communications

knowledge and pride of workmanship which have traditionally

that complement trade theory courses and on-the-job

distinguished shipbuilding craftsmen. The school is determined to

training.

develop core leadership principles in all students along with the character and technical competence required to fully meet the challenges of a shipbuilding career.

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Our Core Values Since 1919, The Apprentice School has contributed significantly to Newport News Shipbuilding’s success and legacy of “Always Good Ships.” An unwavering commitment to the company’s core values provides a solid foundation that supports the mission and philosophy of The Apprentice School.

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INTEGRITY Integrity is at the heart of who we are and what we do. We are each personally accountable for the highest standards of ethics and integrity. We will fulfill our commitments as responsible citizens and employees. We will consistently treat customers and company resources with the respect they deserve.

HONESTY We are committed to being honest and fair with our customers, our employees, our stakeholders and each other. We will be truthful, trustworthy and honorable in all aspects of our work.

ENGAGEMENT Employees are very involved in what they do and take ownership of their work and their work processes. Engagement is a heightened level of ownership where employees want to do whatever they can for the benefit of their internal and external customers and for the success of the organization as a whole.

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RESPONSIBILITY We seek and accept personal responsibility for our actions and results. We keep promises and commitments made to others. We are responsible for ensuring quality is built into everything we do. We take pride in providing outstanding customer service.

PERFORMANCE We hold ourselves to a very high standard of performance. We are committed to improving our company performance while upholding our strong values. Superior performance and quality ensure future trust and confidence in our products. We promote continuous improvement, innovation and creativity.

B A new day dawns on Newport News Shipbuilding, The Apprentice School’s 550-acre learning lab.

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C Building 30 (C. 1919) Building 30, a one-story wooden building, became The Apprentice School’s first instructional facility in 1919. The building originally housed a glass-bending shop and later a restaurant during World War I.

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Building 517 (c. 1926) The school moved to Building 517, a brick building opposite Newport

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News Shipbuilding’s main administration building, where classes continued to meet until the naval inspection force took over the building in 1929.

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D Building 63 (c. 1933) Building 63 was constructed in 1891 and converted from stables and a hayloft to instructional space in 1929 before becoming the school’s third facility.

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Building 14 (February 16, 1953) The Apprentice School moved from Building 63 to Building 14, the school’s current facility, in 1943.

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The building includes an auditorium, drafting room, classrooms and the school’s administrative offices.

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A Proud Past ... 2011-12 4

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APPRENTICE SCHOOL COMMUNITY PLAYS ROLE IN CEREMONY Administrators, faculty, staff, apprentices and alumni

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supported the May 3 groundbreaking ceremony for The Apprentice School’s 85,000-square-foot facility. The Apprentice School Students’ Association members served as ushers. Ashley Gilliam (front row, second from right), marine design apprentice, led attendees in the Pledge of Allegiance, and Chris Kelce (back row, second from right), heating and airconditioning craft instructor, sang the national anthem at the opening of the ceremony. Before shipyard leadership and state and local leaders broke ground for the new facility, Kevin Doyle (front row, far right), planning apprentice and student government president, had the honor of ringing The Apprentice School bell.

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FACILITY BUILT THROUGH PARTNERSHIP WITH STATE AND LOCAL ENTITIES The new Apprentice School facility is the result of a publicprivate partnership among the City of Newport News, the

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Commonwealth of Virginia, Armada Hoffler Holding Co. and Huntington Ingalls Industries. The partnership reflects the shipyard’s commitment to community and education. The development’s mix of workforce housing, retail space, a parking garage and the school’s instructional spaces, labs and learning resource center will continue to create opportunities for the local community. Danny Hunley (Class of 1977), vice president, Operations, Newport News Shipbuilding welcomes members of the Hampton Roads community to the ceremony marking the beginning of the latest chapter in the school’s history.

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B NEXT CHAPTER IN SCHOOL’S HISTORY BEGINS WITH TURN OF A SHOVEL (left to right) Danny Hunley, vice president, Operations, Newport News Shipbuilding; Newport News Mayor McKinley Price; U.S. Rep. Bobby Scott; Matt Mulherin, president, Newport News Shipbuilding; Gov. Bob McDonnell; Mike Petters, president and CEO, Huntington Ingalls Industries; U.S. Rep. Rob Wittman; U.S. Rep. Scott Rigell; and Lou Haddad, president and CEO, Armada Hoffler Holding Co., break ground for the facility, which will be occupied in late 2013.

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C Building Tradition Third generation shipbuilder Tabitha Beverly, millwright apprentice, began her apprenticeship with advice from her father Rigger Craft Instructor Jarrod Burke (Class of 1988), “My father told me to study hard, make good grades and stay on top of my jobs. I have his utmost support, and he always wants me to do my best.” Burke envisions a bright future for his daughter, “All parents wish for their children to be more successful. We will have to see what future my daughter makes for herself. She did tell me she wants to take her craft instructor’s job when he retires, so I guess the apple doesn’t fall too far from the tree.”

Building Patriotism

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Patriotism and pride are constants from one generation of shipbuilders to the next. After the World Trade Center and the Pentagon were attacked the morning of September 11, 2001, Stan Best (Class of 1988), academic instructor and manager, training, found himself standing between the USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76) and the USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) when a passenger jet flew overhead. Stan recalls, “At that moment I realized what we were building and why. My hope is that we keep doing a good job as shipbuilders, so no one will ever again feel the way we did that dreadful day. Stan’s son Walter Best, a fourth generation

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shipbuilder and electrician apprentice, expresses a sentiment similar to his father’s, “Helping to build the most impressive naval vessels in the world makes me feel like I am helping secure our country and our freedom. Being a shipbuilder brings feelings of patriotism and pride over me and is empowering.”

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Building Influence After being encouraged to attend the school by his godfather, Marine Design Craft Instructor Bruce White (Class of 1997) suggested the school to his son Sheet Metal Apprentice Marcus White. “My godfather Bobby Maxwell, who was a

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general foreman at the shipyard, referred me to the school. He believed the program was a stellar opportunity for a veteran of the armed forces and held a bright future for the right candidate,” reflects Bruce. Marcus was born during the first year of his father’s apprenticeship and recognized the value of the program as he watched his father complete school work, participate in school functions and graduate with honors. When Marcus began to plan his goals beyond high school, he was encouraged by Bruce to consider the school, “My father played a huge role in my decision to attend the school; he made it clear that The Apprentice School was one of the best options.”

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Building EXPERIENCE While a father and son have an apprenticeship in common, there is no guarantee their shipyard experiences will be the same. Pipefitter Craft Instructor Wayne Lucas (Class of 1981) chose The Apprentice School “to learn a trade, play

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baseball and earn a living.” Throughout his apprenticeship, Wayne managed school two partial days each week, played baseball and worked in various shops and on ships, an experience quite different from that of his son Patternmaker Apprentice Kenneth Lucas. Kenneth, who attends school two full days per week and works in the shipyard’s Pattern Shop, says, “One difference between my dad’s apprenticeship and mine is that I will probably not have a rotation on a carrier or submarine. The type of work I

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do in the Pattern Shop is different. I doubt my dad ever worked on a pattern for a 22

BUILDING A LEGACY

thousand-pound strut arm for a ship.

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Overview and Vision for the Future An Apprentice School education is marked by thorough training and a challenging, varied work experience in all essential elements of a skilled trade. Eighty-five years ago the school introduced the role of the craft instructor— unique among registered apprenticeship programs today—to help apprentices develop the core leadership principles and craftsmanship necessary for a successful shipbuilding career. Sixty-eight craft instructors ensure apprentices receive the training and the types of jobs they need to develop targeted skill sets, document the skills development of apprentices and provide apprentices with regular and consistent evaluations. Apprentices made considerable contributions to production while maintaining a focus on safety and first time quality during 2012. The lower bow unit (680-ton) of the Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78) was lifted in to place. Joining the lower bow to the other ship units completed the length of the 1,092-foot aircraft carrier. Craft instructors and apprentices contributed to improved performance with the installation of the steering and dive guide tubes on Virginia-class submarines and contributed to completing work in record time on the John Warner (SSN 785) submarine. Apprentices made significant contributions in the propulsion plant, deck machinery and combat systems areas of the USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71). In 2011 we experienced our first graduate from the

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molder apprenticeship program since 1994, and the program now boasts 16 apprentices. Also, the first two graduates of the nuclear test technician apprenticeship program qualified as shift test engineers. Assigned to aircraft carrier overhaul and submarine construction, they will be responsible for nuclear operations while the vessels are at Newport News Shipbuilding. During the coming year, craft training will continue to focus on safety, instructional delivery and supporting our various product lines. We will implement FrontlineFAST, a comprehensive training program to produce a pool of apprentice graduates with the desire, aptitude and skill set to be frontline supervisors. A series of broad program reviews with the heads of all departments in which we offer apprenticeships will be conducted to document and ensure our program objectives and content are current with the company’s manufacturing and construction processes to best meet customer demands.

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Dan Brookman Manager, Craft Training The Apprentice School

Manager’s Message

Class of 1976

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Apprentice Captivates and Educates Inspectors Andrew Daly, non-destructive testing

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apprentice, created a course for inspectors to promote first time quality in the inspection and non-destructive testing of Virginia-class submarines (VCS). Daly spent several weeks developing the course, which culminated in a successful pilot. Chief Inspection Supervisor Patrick Woodington said of the course, “The presentation of the material was captivating, and the whole class was engaged.” The VCS program will experience reduced costs and increased customer satisfaction as a result of the course.

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Apprentices Design John F. Kennedy Process Improvements

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Marine Design Apprentices Angel Averett, Ashley Ober, Tobuic Scott and Eric Tellefsen were selected for a special rotation in Newport News Shipbuilding’s Concept of Operations department. During the rotation they focused on process improvements to reduce labor and material costs for the construction of the John F. Kennedy, the second Gerald R. Ford-class carrier. At the end of the rotation, they presented proposals to use cutting edge technology in the engineering and configuration of compartment spaces. Scott, Ober and Tellefsen (left to right) pose outside the Herbert H. Bateman Virginia Advanced Shipbuilding and Carrier Integration Center, where they completed their

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Molder Grad’s Career Heats Up Todd Gular, a 2011 molder graduate, was promoted to foundry foreman shortly after his graduation from The Apprentice School. Gular is the first graduate to be promoted in the foundry since the molder apprenticeship was restarted in 2008. Manager, Product Training, Ed Dise states, “This promotion is a great testament to a lot of foresight, hard work and dedication of Gular, Craft Instructor Steve Robertson, the foundry and The Apprentice School’s management team. This team of shipbuilders was instrumental in getting the molder apprenticeship up and running again after a long period of inactivity.”

B “When I heard what The Apprentice School offered, I knew that there was a unique opportunity to be able to get an education, work and get paid to do both. I received an education, a career and a paycheck all wrapped up in one, and I’m not left with debt from student loans. Graduates of the school are known throughout shipyards nationally as symbols of what hard work, dedication and a determination to get things done the right way represent. I am proud of my career and being able to tell my friends and family that I build nuclear-powered aircraft carriers and submarines for the U.S. Navy. Newport News Shipbuilding offers a great program that will allow me to continue my education even after finishing my apprenticeship. The Apprentice School gave me a really good starting point to help me continue to advance in my career and education.” David Pagliughi, Marine Design Apprentice

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“While I have been with the school for seven years—a relatively short period of time—far reaching changes have occurred to better meet the needs of our internal and external customers. For example, we have implemented a blended learning approach for our production planning course,

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allowing apprentices to increase the amount of time they spend on the work site, exposing them to a different method of course delivery and preparing them for continued study at twoand four-year schools. Additionally, our optional advanced program offerings have responded to technological developments in the shipbuilding industry with the creation of the modeling and simulation program. Whether in the classroom or on the job, our apprentices gain invaluable experiences with technology and its ability to enhance the work they produce.” Nicole Boney-Sharpe, Academic Instructor

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Hazard Prevention Begins In The Classroom Craft training continued its delivery of Phase II Recognize, Evaluate and Control (REC) safety training. Pipefitter Craft Instructor Tim Gardner reports the training has been revised to include a tour of the USS Theodore Roosevelt to gain experience in real situations using the REC methods and an endof-course writing assignment to support the school’s Writing Across the Curriculum initiative. Both activities reinforce REC methods and the value of understanding the hazards apprentices face on a daily basis.

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VAC Recognizes Apprentice for ‘Outstanding’ Contributions Nuclear Test Technician Apprentice Greg Hoefflin (center) received the Virginia Apprenticeship Council’s (VAC) Outstanding Apprentice award from Virginia Secretary of Trade and Commerce Jim Cheng (left) and VAC Chairman Donald Kemp (right). Hoefflin was nominated for his contributions to the USS Abraham Lincoln mechanical test group by creating and implementing a status board for the aircraft carrier’s overhaul, allowing Nuclear Testing to develop a process for tracking work associated with temporary systems. He plans to become a shift test engineer

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and pursue a degree in mechanical engineering. He is the ninth Newport News Shipbuilding apprentice to receive the award since its creation in 1998.

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Shipfitter Apprentices Honored for Custom Fit Quality Andrew Hooper and Ryan Sparks (above), shipfitter apprentices, received an Employee Recognition Program Award from Joe Sabol, trade director, for their role in the installation of sway braces aboard the USS Theodore Roosevelt. Hooper, Sparks and a team of shipfitters custom fit each piece to result in a job with little or no gap. While working in close quarters, the team maintained first time quality and completed the installation without damage to the new electrical cables and piping systems.

Creativity Applied to Supply Chain Procurement Model Increases Engagement

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Cost Estimating Apprentice Emily Lamb learned of a model developed for Supply Chain Procurement used to strategically divide resources and workload among team members based upon their job scope. Lamb recognized the applicability of the model to Contracts and Pricing and delivered a proposal to Director, Contracts and Pricing, Eric Wishon. Lamb proposed that the department could use the same model to increase engagement by assigning job tasks based upon employee strengths and improving communication and teamwork within groups.

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Electricians Plugged in to First Time Quality

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Dennis Rossi (above) and Shamar Marsh, maintenance electrician apprentices, completed the clean up and proper labeling of equipment feeder locations in nearly half the time allotted for the job, taking only two and a half days instead of four to run 100 feet of steel conduit through an overhead maze of piping. Their efforts promoted the company’s commitment to safety by ensuring machines, equipment and systems were properly isolated from energy sources before they were used.

Work-related Injury Reduction Is No Accident Craft instructors were recognized at a Jan. 18 luncheon for their focus on safety and efforts to create an accident-free work environment. Everett Jordan, director, education, hosted the event and commended craft instructors for

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reducing apprentices’ work-related injuries by 25 percent. Craft instructors and apprentices experienced 15 weeks with one injury or fewer and eight injury-free weeks during 2011.

“While I was a member services representative at BayPort Credit Union, many of my high school friends would come to the credit union for account services. While speaking with them, I noticed they were very pleased with their lives. They told me about their apprenticeship with The Apprentice School, including how they were being paid to further their education and learning a useful trade skill to excel in a

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rewarding career. I knew The Apprentice School was where I wanted to be.” Jessica Welling, Dimensional Control Apprentice

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Apprentice Fits Right in with Hull and Tank Team

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Shipfitter Apprentice Jonathan Wilson completed a construction supervisor special rotation aboard the USS Theodore Roosevelt. Wilson worked in the hull and tank area to establish and maintain steam plant cleanliness conditions and successfully worked with other trades and Supervisor of Shipbuilding inspectors to support overhaul efforts for the aircraft carrier. Director, Carrier Overhaul, Dave Fletcher said, “Wilson has been a great help to us on the Hull and Tank Team on CVN 71. He has an excellent work ethic and attitude. He was eager to take on whatever task was assigned and always did it with a ‘can do’ attitude. He has been a pleasure to work with and has a bright future with the company.”

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Machinist Apprentice Recognized ‘ON-the Spot’ for Safety and Quality Machinist Apprentice Dwayne Roes (center) received a “Machine Shop On-The-Spot” recognition and

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a special coin for his commitment to quality and safety from Superintendent, Machine Shop, Joey Perry (right) and Manager, Quality, John W. Parker Jr. (left). While working on a submarine rod, Roes identified a faint linear crack. He stopped work and immediately reported the crack to Machinist Craft Instructor Charlie Smith.

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Lead Mechanic Rotation Means Bright Future for Electricians

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Five apprentices received commendations from the New Carrier Construction Program for their contributions to the completion of three super lifts ahead of schedule for delivery to the ship in dock. Shipboard Electrician Apprentices Josh Day (left), Brian Holub, Dan Knoll, Carmelo Roman and Dan Tatum, with the direction of Shipboard Electrician Craft Instructors

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Ken Logan and Paul Newton (right), served as lead mechanics and supervised apprentice work crews as they installed more than 800 wire way hangers and 250 lights during a four-day period. They completed the job ahead of schedule and ensured the lights were energized before the units were delivered to the dock.

“The most memorable aspect of my apprenticeship is being able to

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participate in the ground breaking ceremony for the school’s new facility. I am proud to be a part of The Apprentice School’s history. Being an apprentice is a privilege, and it is an honor to be part of such a great organization that is an opportunity to build craftsmanship, scholarship and leadership and to promote my personal and professional growth.” Ashley Wells, Coatings Specialist Apprentice

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Quality Work Helps Welder Make Connections Welder Apprentice Stephanie Way received

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an Employee Recognition Program Award May 16 for her role in welding jobs for the Virginia-class submarines. The award read, “Ms. Way has played a major role in welding some of the very tight jobs, i.e., welding the weapons mid, the J-stiffeners and various other tight jobs. Ms. Way is known for, and takes pride in, the quality of her work. She has a go-getter attitude and a fantastic work ethic. On 668D, Ms. Way played a key role in welding the weapons module and worked with Non-destructive Testing to make it the fastest weapons load to date.”

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Craft Instructor Lends Expertise to Judge LEGO Competition Dimensional Control Craft Instructor Melissa Wheeler judged the semi-finals and finals of the Virginia Ship Repair Association’s 6th Annual Ship Repair Industry Awareness LEGO competition. Five teams of Hampton Roads sixth- through eighth-graders competed in the April 26 finals to design a solution to a ship repair problem using a LEGO modeling program and identify the trades instrumental to implementing the solution. The design team from The Academy of International

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Studies at Rosemont, in Norfolk, Va., took first place at the competition. The team received a $500 cash award for their school, a LEGO kit to construct a 3-D model of their design and tickets to Nauticus.

“As an alumnus of The Apprentice School, former craft instructor and current associate athletic director, it is an honor to be a part of this program. I have grown as a person because of The Apprentice School. Being able to aid in the development of apprentices allows me the chance to give back to this program. This past summer, I had the opportunity to tour the USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72). Walking on the upper decks, I recalled my days down in the engine room and around the

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reactors fitting the pipe that helps that great ship operate. Knowing this was my part to help maintain our country’s defense is incredibly meaningful to me.” Mark Tomlin, Associate Athletic Director (Class of 1986)

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Outside Machinists Are Models of Excellence Outside Machinist Craft Instructor Billy Norton (front left) and Outside Machinist Apprentices Lionel Bailey, Chris Downing (back

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left), Calvin Holloway (back right), Ricardo Palacios and Zachary Waynick (front right) received Newport News Shipbuilding’s Model of Excellence Award as members of two teams that challenged existing shipbuilding processes to increase safety, achieve first time quality, reduce costs and meet schedule. Norton, Bailey, Downing and Holloway were members of the Gerald R. Ford Fitted Fasteners Clearance Team that reduced the fitted fastener process for the aircraft carrier’s Main Propulsion Complex by 50 percent. Palacios and Waynick were members of the USS Albany (SSN 753) Sail Repairs Team that worked to redeliver the submarine one day ahead of schedule, within budget and without accidents, injuries or quality issues, despite a significant increase in work. Award winners were honored at a Sept. 19 banquet, where Vice President, Quality and Process Excellence, Ron Murray presented the awards.

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Electrician Craft Instructor Energizes Crew to Produce First Time Quality Shipboard Electrician Craft Instructor Mike Jones and his apprentice crew were praised for their work on Combat Systems by the USS Theodore Roosevelt Project Team. Apprentices provided significant support for the project during the past three years. Jones and his apprentice crew successfully turned over all Combat Direction Center Complex compartments with no recordable items, enabling Supervisor of Shipbuilding and Test Engineering to load software necessary for the aircraft carrier’s overhaul. Additionally, Jones and his apprentice crew received an Excellence In Action recognition for the project at a Nov. 6

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Outside Machinists Assist in First of Its Kind Job Outside Machinist Craft Instructor Daryl Welch (right) and Outside Machinist Apprentices Miriam Lopez and Tim Anderson assisted veteran mechanics with the load out of the first two Electro-magnetic Launch Systems (EMALS) generators on the Gerald R. Ford aircraft carrier, the first time such a job was performed at Newport News Shipbuilding.

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Craft Instructor Leads Apprentices in Testing of Roosevelt’s Main Engines A team of outside machinist apprentices and Apprentice School alumni, including Outside Machinist Craft Instructor Josh Baker (above) recently completed the spin tests of the main engines aboard the USS Theodore Roosevelt. Testing of all four main engines was completed with no major issues and enabled lost time from previous delays to be made up. USS Theodore Roosevelt Refueling Complex and Overhaul Project Lead General Foreman Steve Monfalcone said the successful tests are the result of “the high quality standards and ownership instilled in their critical component teams.”

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Craft Instructor Continues Family Tradition of Apprenticeship Production Planning and Cost Estimating Craft Instructor David Nicholas Jr.’s (left) family lore is filled with stories about working at the shipyard. He is the fifth generation of the Nicholas family to graduate from The Apprentice School. The legacy began with David Jr.’s great-great-grandfather Chief Engineer John Nicholas Sr., who was the school’s 13th graduate and the first alumnus with 50 years’ service to the company. David Jr.’s great-grandfather John Nicholas Jr. and grandfather Jack Nicholas inspired his father David Nicholas Sr. (right), sheet metal foreman and 1975 alumnus, to maintain the family tradition of service to country through shipbuilding. “Being a fifth generation alumnus of the school significantly contributes to the level of pride I take in being an American shipbuilder. It’s equivalent to a family business that’s been passed down from generation to generation. This is my opportunity to learn the family business and ensure that it continues to grow and succeed until the next generation is prepared to take it on,” says David Jr.

B “During my apprenticeship, I had the privilege to work with some excellent mechanics, instructors and supervisors. I have tremendous respect for those who helped me when I knew very little about mechanics or shipbuilding. Forty years later I still remember the first names of almost all of them and the specific skill each one taught me. The school is populated by some of the best, most well rounded instructors you can find anywhere in the U.S., and the talented, dedicated and caring staff has a lot to do with the high caliber of graduates we consistently produce.” Ed Dise, Manager, Product Training (Class of 1970)

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Overview and Vision for the Future All apprentices complete the challenging course work of the Trade Related Education Curriculum (TREC) and the World Class Shipbuilder Curriculum (WCSC). The TREC complements the on-the-job training apprentices receive during their craft rotations and equips them with a strong foundation in the theory of their chosen trade. The mandatory WCSC includes courses in business, communications, drafting, mathematics, physics and ship construction and prepares apprentices to work in their shipbuilding trades, continue their education in one of the school’s advanced programs and pursue a two- or four-year degree through Newport News Shipbuilding’s Education Assistance Program. The past year was marked by the expansion of existing academic initiatives, the creation of new trade theory courses and an increase in paths to two- and four-year degrees for apprentices. Our Writing Across the Curriculum program expanded to include writing and critical thinking activities in trade theory and academic courses and craft rotations. Thirteen apprentices attended the second annual Advanced Shipyard Operations Curriculum-College of William & Mary Leadership Course. Trade theory courses in advanced blueprint reading and patternmaking were piloted. The school augmented its existing partnerships with local colleges and universities through the offering

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of an Associate of Applied Science in Technical Studies from Thomas Nelson Community College, leading to a Bachelor of Science in Occupational and Technical Studies from Old Dominion University. The academic program looks forward to two exciting opportunities in 2013. First, the academic program will move in to its new facility, featuring instructional spaces, drafting labs, a physics lab and a learning resource center equipped with the latest in instructional and distance learning technology. Office spaces for our community college and university partners will also be included. Second, the school is creating a new professional development program. The Apprentice School will partner with Old Dominion University in engineering and with Saint Leo University in business administration/project management on this exciting initiative. James H. Hughes, Ph.D. Manager, Academics The Apprentice School

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“The Apprentice School gave me an opportunity to work, play football and receive a free education. Working in the engine room under Outside Machinist Craft Instructor Josh Baker has been the most

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memorable aspect of my apprenticeship. Baker has taught me a lot on the job, helped me with school and football, and gave me tips on life. Jobs nowadays are hard to get, even with a college degree. With The Apprentice School, you are guaranteed a job and earn a college degree. You can’t beat that!” Tyshawn Washington, Outside Machinist Apprentice and Football Player

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Instructor Returns to School for PE License Jennifer Ryan, academic instructor, became a licensed Professional Engineer in Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering after passing the exam in hydrostatics, structural design and electrical machinery fundamentals. “Now that I’ve been teaching at

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the school for six years and the exam covered a good portion of the material I teach, the time was right to get my license,” says Ryan. She prepared for the exam by completing an online review course and working plenty of problems.

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D School Innovates Its Way To Department of Labor Recognition The United States Department of Labor’s Office of Apprenticeship recognized The Apprentice School as a 21st Century Trailblazer and Innovator of programs, practices, strategies and partnerships that play a critical role in preparing the 21st century workforce. Representatives of the school accepted the recognition at the “Out-Educate, Out-Build, Out-Innovate” national summit in Washington, D.C. The summit was sponsored by the National

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Registered Apprenticeship System and Secretary of Labor Hilda L. Solis, and Everett Jordan, director, education, was a featured speaker.

B Saint Leo University Agreement Shores Up Continuing Education Everett Jordan, director, education, signs an updated continuing education agreement with Susan Paulson, Saint Leo University’s assistant vice president for Continuing Education. The June 15 agreement between The Apprentice School and Saint Leo University helps meet Newport News Shipbuilding’s program management needs and supports alumni pursuing associate and bachelor’s degrees in business administration with a specialization in technology and project management.

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Five-Year Apprenticeship Culminates in Two Exams for nuclear test technicians Greg Bone (top) and Josh Tanner (bottom) are the first two graduates of the school’s nuclear test technician advanced program, having passed their oral boards to become Shift Test Engineers (STE) during 2012. Bone describes

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how his desire to become an STE was inspired by Stan Best, manager, training, and academic instructor. “The training and study requirements Best described intimidated me, but he told me they would help me find out what kind of leader I was capable of being. Those were the words that convinced me to commit myself to achieving the distinction of being an STE.” “An STE must be able to handle an intellectual and educational challenge; accept responsibility on a large scale; and combine technical knowledge with the ability to work with people,” says Tanner. “The Apprentice School prepared me well.” Bone and Tanner were selected for the nuclear test technician advanced program and worked as electrical test engineers and mechanical test engineers before completing the nine-month STE School. Attendance at the school is a full-time job filled with independent study

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and instructor-led seminars about the operation and functionality of the ship’s nuclear propulsion system. Their studies culminated in an eight-hour written examination and a one-hour oral examination that required them to successfully demonstrate their ability to direct a team testing the propulsion plant.

“My career has been shaped tremendously by all the professionals I have come in contact with at the school. I fell in love with the program as an apprentice because of our academic and craft instructors. Because of their effect on me, I had a strong desire to be a part of the team as a craft instructor. As a Student Services administrator, I now have the opportunity to listen and offer help to apprentices as they develop their career and educational goals. Working directly with apprentices in this fashion is

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wonderful and fulfilling.” Regina McLean, Student Services Administrator (Class of 2006)

Campers Take Time to Engineer Clocks The Apprentice School and Newport News Shipbuilding’s Career Pathways Program co-sponsored the 2012 Peninsula K-Next Summer Camp. During the week-long summer camp hosted by Thomas Nelson Community College, rising ninth- through 11th-graders learned about all aspects of advanced manufacturing as they worked in teams to build three different clock models. A panel of engineering, technology and manufacturing experts assessed teams on their

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safety, teamwork and organization and the quality and cleanliness of their

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B Apprentices Receive an Historical Leadership Perspective Thirteen Advanced Shipbuilding Operations Curriculum (ASOC) apprentices participated in the ASOC-College of William & Mary Leadership Course. William & Mary faculty and staff conducted a series of leadership exercises designed to gauge apprentices’ leadership styles, examine their values and explore teamwork, and Newport News Shipbuilding administrators hosted a boat building competition, requiring apprentices to put their new perspective on leadership to the test. Mike Petters, president and CEO, Huntington Ingalls Industries; Matt Mulherin, president, Newport News Shipbuilding; and Jerome Thomas, director, programs, shared how they apply leadership principles daily. Danny Hunley, vice president, Operations, Newport News Shipbuilding; and Larry Pulley, William & Mary dean and professor of business administration, presented participants with a framed certificate of completion and commemorative photograph. The week-long learning opportunity culminated in a brief to Hunley, who commended the participants for playing a role in realizing his dream of a unique leadership experience for ASOC apprentices.

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Luncheon Panelists Inspire Attendees to Achieve The second annual Apprentice School Women in Shipbuilding Luncheon was held Sept. 14. This year’s

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special guest panel included Joanne Belote, director, Program Planning and Scheduling; Jennifer Dunn, director, Communications; Alma Martinez Fallon, director, Supply Chain Procurement; and Deborah Moore, director, Labor Relations. The panelists shared their experiences and insights in response to questions posed to them by women affiliated with The Apprentice School. Keisha Pexton, athletic director, poses a question to panelists.

“At age 45 I came to Newport News Shipbuilding to begin a second

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career. My first supervisor recommended The Apprentice School, and I am thankful for her advice. The school provided me with the fundamentals of shipbuilding and a foundation that allowed me to ultimately complete a graduate-level college degree. As an apprentice graduate, I understand first-hand the balance that apprentices must strike among family, work and study. As an instructor, I find joy in helping apprentices attain their goals.” Steve Stallings, Academic Instructor (Class of 2006)

Instructor Named Modern Day Technology Leader at Global Conference

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At the 26th Annual Black Engineer of the Year Award STEM Global Conference, Alicia Uzzle, Ph.D., manager, training, and academic instructor, received a 2012 Black Engineer of the Year Award in the Modern Day Technology Leader category. Nominated for her effectiveness as an instructor of physics, mechanics and engineering, Uzzle is a published researcher in nuclear physics and a highly regarded educator in postsecondary science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

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Forty Alumni Earn Degrees from Local Community College Thomas Nelson Community college held its 44th annual commencement exercises at Hampton University Convocation Center. Forty apprentice graduates earned associate degrees in business administration, engineering and engineering technology. Many are currently taking advantage of Newport News Shipbuilding’s Education Assistance Program to complete bachelor’s degrees.

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Ring Luncheon Marks End of Apprenticeship Everett Jordan, director, education, hosted 52 members of the Class of 2012 at one of the school’s ring luncheons. Danny Hunley, vice president, Operations, was the featured speaker at the event. Hunley challenged attendees to take an active role in their success and continue in their career and personal development after graduation. During the event apprentices received class rings from the director of the department in which they completed their apprenticeship. Robert Chappell Sr., director, Waterfront

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Support Services, presents Dory Fields, rigger apprentice and member of the Class of 2012, with his class ring. They are joined by Jordan.

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Shipyard Leadership Recognize Award Winning Graduates Everett Jordan, director, education, hosted the annual graduation awards luncheon. Recipients

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of the Charles F. Bailey, Frank F. Satchell Jr. Outstanding Faculty, G. Guy Via, James P. Healy Community Service, Niels Christiansen and William R. “Pat” Phillips awards were honored at the luncheon. Jennifer Boykin, vice president, Engineering and Design; Peter Diakun, vice president, Energy Programs; and Danny Hunley, vice president, Operations, attended the event. Adam Horak, outside machinist graduate, receives the Homer L. Ferguson Award from Hunley at the Class of 2011’s graduation ceremony. The award is bestowed upon the

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graduate with the highest combined shop grade and required academic grade point average.

Class of 2011 Names Outstanding Faculty Member Academic Instructor and retired U.S. Marine Corps Col. Mark Costa, Ph.D., receives the Frank F. Satchell Jr. Outstanding Faculty award from Vice President, Gerald R. Ford Carrier

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Construction, Rolf Bartschi during the Feb. 24 graduation ceremony. The award recipient is nominated by the graduating class, and the award is given in honor of Frank F. Satchell Jr., former faculty member, school administrator and 37-year shipbuilder.

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Overview and Vision for the Future Admissions, Athletics and Student Services provide many apprentices with their initial interaction with The Apprentice School and its staff, the beginning of a relationship sustained throughout their apprenticeship. Student-athletes build leadership skills through training and competition. The department’s staff helps apprentices plan a household budget, draft résumés, practice interviewing skills and establish career and educational goals. Additionally, interviewing skills assistance offered through Student Services’ Graduate Resource Center is available to alumni who wish to advance their shipbuilding careers. During 2012 Admissions, Athletics and Student Services processed more than 5,500 applications and interviewed more than 450 candidates for one of the school’s approximately 250 annual slots. The candidate pool continues to grow and includes many applicants who hold two-year, four-year and master’s degrees. Builder Athletics experienced another round of incredibly successful seasons, with our men’s and women’s basketball teams earning U.S. Collegiate Athletic Association (USCAA) National Tournament bids and the baseball team placing second at the USCAA Small College World Series. Student Services supported the efforts of a variety of student organizations that donated many hours of service to their communities.

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The next year will bring additional opportunities for apprentices to develop their leadership skills and plan their professional and educational futures. Our staff will continue to meet the needs of an ever expanding and diversifying applicant pool. Builder Athletics will strive to best their 2012 record of winning 64 percent of contests. The third phase of Student Success Orientation, focusing on career advancement, will be piloted. Workshops will be offered twice per year, and topics will include home ownership, financial planning and interview and dining etiquette. Phil Janaro Manager, Admissions, Athletics and Student Services The Apprentice School

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Donation a Hole-In-One for Athletic Program and Overseas Troops Marine Designer Sandra Wilkins, mother of U.S. Army Specialist Louis Adams (second from left), requested golf balls for overseas troops to use during their leisure time, and Builder Athletics stepped in to fulfill the request. Adams presents a flag to Everett Jordan (second from right), director, education, in appreciation of the school’s donation of 9,000 golf balls to troops in Kuwait. They are joined by Athletic Director Keisha Pexton (far right) and Construction Supervisor and Head Golf Coach Joey

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Maben (far left).

Peninsula Sports Club Honors Co-Athletes of the Year Marcus Chevres (left), wrestler and outside machinist apprentice, and Isaih Harrison (right), basketball player and 2012 sheet metal apprentice graduate, were honored by

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the Peninsula Sports Club as The Apprentice School Co-Athletes of the Year. Additionally, Harrison was recognized as the Outstanding In-State College Male Athlete of the Year, the first time an apprentice has won the award in 12 years. Chevres is a four-time National Collegiate Wrestling Association AllAmerican and holds The Apprentice School career record for wins, winning 134 of 171 matches. Harrison is a three-time USCAA First Team All-American and set nine career records and 12 single-season records during his final season.

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Campers Dribble Their Way to Better Skills The Apprentice School basketball teams hosted 75 participants at

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their June 29 basketball camp. The event was free and open to children of Newport News Shipbuilding employees. Men’s and women’s basketball coaches and players led campers in a series of drills and activities designed to improve their core skills, and campers received lunch and a t-shirt. Lady Builder and Foundry Apprentice Shanae Hilliard leads campers in a dribbling exercise.

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“I chose The Apprentice School to learn a new trade, earn a degree without having to pay for it and take advantage of the endless opportunities to move up in the company. I am a part of something great. The Apprentice School is a great opportunity to further your career and educational goals with many people behind you 100 percent, helping and watching you succeed.” Christina Licano, Welder Apprentice and Women’s Basketball Player

B Percussionists Drum Up Excitement at School Events Formed in 2007, The Apprentice School’s drum line is a creative outlet for apprentices and current Newport News Shipbuilding employees to gain leadership experience, develop self-discipline and promote school spirit. Each Sept. through Feb., the drum line performs at home football and basketball games, local holiday parades and selected Newport News Shipbuilding events. Valarie Gray, marine design graduate and head drum line coach, and Matthew Landon, welding equipment repair apprentice and assistant drum line coach, lead the group.

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“After working in the personnel office for eight years, I had a choice to transfer to the school to work in the new admissions office or stay and work for personnel. Transferring to the school was the best decision ever! For 35 years, I have enjoyed the individuals I work for and the people I work with. I also enjoy seeing the graduates who have worked

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so hard during their apprenticeship be promoted throughout the shipyard.” Judy Hester, Administrative Assistant (Honorary Apprentice School Alumna)

C GOLFERS DRIVE FOR A RECORD SEASON The Builders ended their spring 2012 golf season with a fourth place finish at the Roanoke College Invitational held at Roanoke Country Club. Rigger Apprentice Ben Hunter earned a medalist honor at the invitational and set a new lowest scoring season record with a 75.04 over 22 rounds, besting the record of 75.9 held by Assistant Coach B.J. Maben. Apprentice School golfers closed the fall 2012 season with a fourth place finish at the USCAA National Championship. Hunter and Coatings Specialist Apprentice Kyle Mutter (right) captured second and fourth place, respectively. Mutter finished the season with USCAA All-Academic honors.

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MEN’S BASKETBALL SEASON A SLAM DUNK ON ALL FRONTS Men’s basketball players earned post-season honors from the USCAA at the pre-tournament banquet held March 7. Isaih Harrison, sheet metal apprentice, was named a USCAA First Team All-American for the third consecutive year. Tevin Andrews (front right), rigger apprentice, was named a First Team All-American for the second consecutive year. The men’s basketball team finished fourth at the 2012 USCAA Nationals in Uniontown, Pa., and finished the season with a 17-11 record.

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Builder Baseball Coach Amasses 37 Years and 500 Career Wins Bryan Cave celebrated his 500th career win with a 7-3 victory over Penn State Greater Allegheny

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on March 4. Cave has been affiliated with Builder baseball for 37 years, successfully transitioning from student-athlete to coach. Cave’s Builders have finished in the top three in seven of 13 trips to the USCAA National Championships. Cave’s teams placed second at the USCAA three times, including 2012, and won the 2007 national championship. His outstanding record includes having coached 37 USCAA All-Americans, 14 USCAA Honorable Mention All-Americans and 20 USCAA All-Academic selections in his 23 seasons as head coach.

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Wrestlers pin down spots on AllState Team

Builder wrestlers closed the season and finished 11th of 79 teams at the National Collegiate Wrestling Association National Championships in Daytona Beach, Fla. The wrestling

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team had three members recognized on the All-State Wrestling Team by the Virginia Sports Information Directors. Heavy Metal Fabricator Apprentice Ian Jones was a first team selection, while Maintenance Electrician Apprentice Ty Ford and Outside Machinist Apprentice Marcus Chevres were second team selections. This is the only team that encompasses all schools in the state. Chevres is a threetime honoree now with a first team selection in 2010 and two straight second-team selections. Machinist Apprentice Stuart Roes (right) wrestles for a win against Anderson University’s Jordan Denmark with an 8-7 decision.

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BUILDER BASEBALL HITS HOME RUNS ON THE FIELD AND IN THE CLASSROOM The Builders earned high academic and athletic honors during their latest season. Sam Massie, electrician apprentice, and Chris Scarola, dimensional control apprentice, were named USCAA All-Americans on May 6, at the USCAA Small College World Series in Illinois. Devorn Lake, rigger apprentice received an honorable mention. Additionally, Travis Franklin, marine design apprentice; Zach Harding, electrician apprentice; Scarola; and David Sebera, welder apprentice, earned USCAA All-Academic honors, which requires a grade point average of 3.5 and the completion of their

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first year of athletic eligibility. The Builders earned a second place finish at the USCAA Small College World Series and finished the season with a 29-18 record. This was the third time the Builders took second place in the series. Chris Aldridge, outfielder and pipefitter apprentice, dives for a catch.

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Lady Builders Rally for An Historic Season Head Coach Lanica Williams-Tallon and Assistant Coach Dickran Parunak coached

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the Lady Builders to 23 wins during the 2011-2012 season. Lady Builders enjoyed their second most wins per season in school history and earned a bid to the USCAA National Championships held in Union Town, Pa. Their trip to the national tournament was the 10th for the Lady Builders. For the second year in a row, Electrician Apprentice and Guard Courtney Collins was named to the USCAA’s Honorable Mention Women’s All-American Team. Collins led the team in scoring and was named USCAA Player of the Week for her performance at the December 2011 Penn State Brandywine Tournament.

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Cheer Team and Mascot Craft School Spirit The Apprentice School cheer team and Builder Man mascot bring the spirit to home football and basketball games. Coached

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Builder Football Takes to the Field with New Head Coach Offensive Lineman Larry Peterson and Punter Blake Penix, both electrician apprentices, were recognized at the Hampton Roads Sports Commission’s Celebration of College Football Awards Banquet for their performance during the 2011 season. Each college football team in Hampton Roads nominated an offensive player and a defensive player to be honored. Additionally, Penix received First Team All-State College division honors from the Virginia Sports Information Directors Association. After the close of the season, Paul Hoffman returned to the coaching staff as head football coach, a position he last held from 1990-97.

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“Before coming to The Apprentice School, I had been out of school for nine years and had worked two jobs for a substantial period of time. I was tired of having two

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jobs; I wanted a career and chose the school because I saw a real future here. I don’t know anywhere else you can get paid to learn a trade and get an education at the same time. The most memorable aspect of my apprenticeship has been the relationships I’ve formed. The friendships I have made with my fellow apprentices and the relationships I’ve built with my craft instructors and academic instructors are awesome. The Apprentice School can open a lot of doors for people; there are so many possibilities and career paths to choose from at the school.” Adam Ferry, Pipefitter Apprentice

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Jaycees Student Chapter Reaps Awards Members of the Apprentice Jaycees Student Chapter (AJSC) attended the United States Jaycees Chapter Annual Meeting in Des Moines, Iowa, from June 27-30. Outside Machinist Apprentice Cameron Collier (front right) received the

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AJSC Presidential Medallion Award of Appreciation for his hard work and dedication to the chapter. Earlier in the summer, the AJSC received the Best New Project award from the Virginia Apprentice Jaycees Chapter (VAJC) for their work with Achievable Dream’s Egg Drop Competition. Collier also received New Member of the Year honors from the VAJC. Collier receives the award from

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AJSC President Sean Brady, a 2011 marine design graduate.

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Dine and Learn Event Feeds Apprentices’ Employability Skills Student Services sponsored a March 15 “dine and learn” seminar for apprentices. Fifty apprentices arrived prepared for the event with a copy of their résumé and dressed in business attire. Marcie Bombelyn, staffing representative, delivered a presentation about résumé development and job interview skills, and Debbie Bruss, etiquette instructor, shared information about dining etiquette for business meetings.

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The Apprentice School Student Chapter of the Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers (SNAME) hosted its fifth annual boat design competition for Virginia high school students. The chapter partnered with the University of Michigan and Webb Institute, two of the most prestigious marine engineering, naval architecture and shipbuilding academic programs in the country, to judge the entry design packages. Forty teams competed to be among the four finalists whose boats would be constructed by apprentices and raced in Lake Maury, at The Mariners’ Museum, in Newport News, Va. Teams from Lee County Career and Technical Center, Jamestown High School and York High School were finalists in the

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competition. The Predator, designed by a team from Jamestown High School, in Williamsburg, Va., was the

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Alumnus Designs Webb Institute Tour for SNAME Members The Apprentice School’s student chapter of the Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers (SNAME) visited Webb Institute, in Glen Cove, N.Y, from Sept. 21-23. Don Rickerson (Class of 2008), marine design graduate and current Webb student, hosted the group. Chapter members attended a lecture about ship design and model testing, conducted model tests and performed calculations to scale the model test results to full scale. Rickerson

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led the group on a tour of the campus and a sailing excursion on the Long Island Sound. Jennifer Ryan, academic instructor and SNAME faculty advisor; Dawn Hardister, planning apprentice; Jarrod Griffith, nuclear test technician apprentice; Gary Garner, non-destructive testing apprentice; Rickerson; Rick Neilson, dean, Webb Institute; and Nic O’Brien, welder apprentice, pose on the Webb Institute campus.

“Since I was hired, I spent the majority of my career affiliated with The Apprentice School, both as an apprentice and craft instructor. While an apprentice, I had valuable experiences and learned a multitude of things which shaped me into the shipbuilder I am today. These experiences not only taught me the craft of dimensional control and about the ship’s processes, but they taught me the leadership skills and what it takes to build the greatest warships in the world for the U.S. Navy.” Melissa Wheeler, Dimensional Control Craft Instructor (Class of 2007)

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Cardboard Boats Race to Raise Funds for Charity The Apprentice School’s student chapter of the Society of Manufacturing Engineers held the Fifth Annual Cardboard Boat Regatta to benefit the Khedive Shrine Hospital Patient Transportation Fund and Shriners Hospitals for Children on Sept. 15. The regatta was sponsored by BayPort Credit Union, Chapter 217 of the Society of Manufacturing Engineers and The Apprentice School. The regatta drew one of its largest crowds to date and featured boats constructed by academic and craft instructors, The Apprentice School Alumni Association, various student organizations and Newport News Shipbuilding employees. A DJ, the school’s drum line and cheer team provided

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The Apprentice Alumni Association has a long tradition of supporting the Society of Manufacturing Engineers’ cardboard boat regatta, a tradition they continued in 2012 with their entry The Miracle. Santa Claus, portrayed by Tom Gentry, association past president, captained the boat with a crew of elves and reindeer. The team raised more than $1,000 to benefit the Khedive Shrine Patient Transportation Fund and Shriners Hospitals for Children and received awards for Best Dressed and Fan Favorite.

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“My apprenticeship gave me a good understanding of what is expected of me and prepared me to become a leader in the carrier overhaul program. Also, my experience helps me to be the best coach I can be; I fully understand the demands of an apprentice student-athlete. I enjoy watching apprentices apply themselves in a positive direction and working with them on the golf course. I feel a great sense of pride watching my golfers accomplish their goals and walk across the stage at graduation.” Joey Maben, Nuclear Construction Supervisor and Head Golf Coach (Class of 1982)

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Shipbuilders Get Kids Hooked on Fishing Alumni, apprentices and other shipbuilders participated in the Apprentice Alumni Association’s 17th Annual Children’s Fishing Clinic. The July 20 event was free and open to

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children ages eight to 12. Children spent a day on the James River with their shipbuilder mentors and learned how to bait hooks, fish and untangle lines.

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C VAAA Rewards Alumni for Continuing Education Norris Williams (center), Virginia Apprenticeship Alumni Association (VAAA) president, poses with alumni Don Rickerson (left) and Carlyn Swanson (right), who received scholarships from the association for the 2012-2013 academic year. Rickerson, a 2008 marine design graduate, is pursuing a Bachelor of Science in Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering at Webb Institute, Glen Cove, N.Y. Rickerson holds an Associate of Applied Science in Mechanical Engineering Technology from Thomas Nelson Community College. Swanson, a 2010 marine design graduate, earned a Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering from Old Dominion University and currently attends The George Washington University, where she is pursuing a Master of Science in Engineering Management and Systems Engineering. Rickerson and Swanson are both active members of the VAAA and will use the scholarships to complete their degrees.

Alumni Take a Crack at Raising Money for Food Bank The Apprentice Alumni Association held its 70th Annual Crab Feast July 20, at the Newport News, Va., Knight of Columbus’ Carpenito

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Hall. More than 350 alumni and their guests feasted on steamed crabs and a buffet of barbeque, cole slaw, corn, baked beans and crab salad. Members who donated canned goods at the event were entered into a special raffle to benefit the Peninsula Food Bank, a staple fund-raiser at all major Apprentice Alumni Association events. Sixteen bags of canned goods and $250 were collected during the event and donated to the Peninsula Food Bank. David Lee Conlon (Class of 1980), machinist graduate, enjoys a feast of steamed blue crabs.

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Commemorative Coin Links Past and Future A Director’s Coin is embedded in the new

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facility’s foundation to commemorate The Apprentice School’s proud past and bright future.

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Master Shipbuilders Make Their Mark at New Facility The Apprentice School’s Master Shipbuilders, who possess more than 200 years’ shipbuilding experience, place a Director’s Coin in the foundation of the new school facility. They are (front, left to right) Ed Dise, manager, product training; and Frank Stutts, welding craft instructor; and (back, left to right) Ron Liles, manager, product training; Steve Hall, academic instructor; and Charlie Smith, machinist craft instructor.

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The Apprentice School 4101 Washington Avenue Newport News, VA 23607 www.apprenticeschool.com www.gobuilders.com Accredited by the Accrediting Commission of the Council on Occupational Education www.council.org

The Apprentice School Annual Report 2011-2012  
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