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Cutone, who nevertheless couldn’t resist inserting a cherry red sofa into the mix. “I just thought, with all the whites, blacks, silvery grays, and chrome, that we needed a punch of color somewhere.” While the owners love to entertain, dinners are more likely to be barbecues on the deck than sitdown meals inside. The small custom table stationed between the living and kitchen areas can expand to accommodate six in a pinch, but guests can usually be found at the marble-topped island, nursing a cocktail and munching on crackers. (“She doesn’t like to cook,” teases Cutone. “He’ll cook you a great piece of fish. From her, you’re going to get Goldfish.”) A pass-through at one end of the kitchen frames a fully stocked bar. Since space was at a premium, the architects tucked a washer and dryer underneath the counter in back. “One side stores French wine, and the other side stores Tide,” Cutone quips. His-and-hers master suites anchor either end of the great room. Each features a peaked shiplap ceiling that falls just short of the walls, creating a shadow line around the perimeter. “We thought it would be kind of fun to make them appear like they’re floating,” says Cutone. There’s a practical benefit, too, since the gap prevents splitting and cracking due to humidity changes. In keeping with the wife’s mission to simplify the house, much of the furniture is built in. “The rooms

“T

he rooms aren’t super huge, and by using built-in furniture you maximize efficiency,” says Mark Cutone. The custom beds appear to hover.

aren’t super huge, and by using built-in furniture you maximize efficiency,” explains Cutone, whose custom beds appear to hover over the floor, making the rooms look bigger. While both master bathrooms have a shower, hers includes a freestanding elliptical tub with a breathtaking view of the undulating, flower-dappled dunes. (“I never use the shower,” the wife declares. “Ever.”) Feathery ornamental grasses caress the sides of the house, dissolving into a meadow dotted with ox-eye daisies, asters and Queen Anne’s lace. “Our goal was to make it look like it’s always been there,” says landscape designer Emily Dutra, whose clients even deemed hydrangeas too fancy for this scrubby, blustery terrain. “It really is a very severe environment,” she adds. “That’s one of the reasons why we use native plants, because nothing else is going to grow there.” That’s also one of the reasons why her clients head back home to Florida every fall. “I adore this house. I could stay here forever,” proclaims the wife. “I just don’t want to be here in January, February, and March!”  RESOURCES : For more information about this home, see page 234.

146  New England Home | September–October 2018

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Profile for New England Home Magazine LLC

New England Home September - October 2018  

Carefree Comfort

New England Home September - October 2018  

Carefree Comfort