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CLINICAL TB CPD

TB IN SA:

3 CPD POINTS

ARE YOU PROTECTED?

Despite international attention to the importance of strengthening the global healthcare workforce, TB transmission in healthcare settings remains a serious concern.

Evidence indicates that healthcare workers (HCWs) are at increased risk of acquiring TB in settings where they are systematically exposed to both undiagnosed and diagnosed TB patients. In response to this, TB infection prevention and control (IPC) measures are internationally recommended, including training on the mode of transmission and TB infection prevention as a part of the hierarchy of TB infection control. In SA, the National Tuberculosis Management Guidelines recommend that HCWs be educated on the symptoms, prevention and treatment of TB. Despite widespread endorsement of TB IPC recommendations, few studies have explored TB IPC training and whether practices are being implemented and supported. A literature review of 39 studies found no evidence linking training with either adherence to IPC practice or reductions in infection rates. A more recent systematic review, however, indicated that training was effective in improving workers’ occupational health practices. Another study reported a positive impact of education on knowledge, attitude and practices related to occupational health among 150 HCWs, and more recent evidence supports lower HCW TB rates associated with IPC training. In a recent study, Malotle et al (2017) explore factors associated with the development of TB among HCWs in a provincial tertiary hospital, including availability of TB personal protective equipment (PPE) in the hospital and factors associated with its adherence.

62% of interviewees were unaware of the hospital’s TB management protocol

It also looks at training related to TB IPC across occupations and departments. They considered availability of and attitudes toward the provision of health services for HCWs with TB, along with the reported rate of TB among the HCWs in this study.

TB AN OCCUPATIONAL HAZARD? A tertiary hospital in Gauteng, with a high burden of TB patients and high risk of TB exposure among healthcare

workers (HCWs) was the setting for this large, international mixed-methods study. The aim was to determine HCWs’ adherence to recommended TB infection prevention and control practices, TB training and access to health services and HCW TB rates. Interviews were conducted with 285 HCWs using a structured questionnaire. Despite 10 HCWs (including seven support HCWs) acquiring clinical TB during their period of employment, 62%

of interviewees were unaware of the hospital’s TB management protocol. Receipt of training was low (34% of all HCWs and <5% of support HCWs trained on TB transmission, 27% of nurses trained on respirator use), as was the use of respiratory protection (44% of HCWs trained on managing TB patients). Support HCWs were over 36 times more likely to use respiratory protection if trained; nurses who were trained were approximately 40 times more likely to

MEDICAL CHRONICLE | MAY 2018 15

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Medical Chronicle May 2018  

Medical journal magazine

Medical Chronicle May 2018  

Medical journal magazine

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