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Bakery

MARCH 2017 No. 1

Journal for bakery and confectionery professionals www.foodreview.co.za

Celebrate the goodness of baking

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Bread’s all round value | Sharp snacking solutions | Conveying systems at work


1 READ STREET ♦ CNR HARRIS DRIVE ♦ OTTERY ♦ CAPE TOWN ♦ SOUTH AFRICA

Converters of flexible packaging materials and allied products • Polypropylene (BOPP) / Cellophane • Bio-degradable starch based film • 3 side sealed laminated pouches • Stand-up pouches, with or without zipper • Stand-up pouches, with or without spouts

Tel: (021) 704 1135/6/7 | Fax: (021) 704 1210 | Email: pracpak@iafrica.com | www.pracpak.com


Bakery Journal for bakery and confectionery professionals

MARCH 2017 No. 1

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Ingredion The evolving market of baked goods

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MultiSnack Showing strong and consistent growth

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10 Matrix Software Systems Turnkey solutions at work 11 Anchor Yeast The many health benefits of bread 12 Protea Chemicals A supplier of speciality chemicals and polymers 13 Chiorino HACCP approved conveying systems 14 Sandvik The benefits of oven belts 16 IRP Engineering Plastics Automotive processes that reduce costs 18 InnerOUT Capitalising on skills scarcity

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Our food cling films are manufactured from polyethylene material which is now used across Europe and the USA Competitive pricing, quality products and great service. Plus we run a GFSI program called iso22000 which is part of the good foods safety initiative. Multi-layer cast pallet wrap, mono and multi-layer shrink films, polyethylene food cling films, mono and multi-layer agricultural films. • PALLET WRAP • FOOD CLING FILM • GREEN HOUSE COVERS

• SHRINK FILMS • MULCH FILMS • GRAPE COVERS

Contact: Cell: 083 407 3600/1 Tel: +27 021 931 2169 Email: admin@wraptite.co.za Web: www.wraptite.co.za

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Celebrating a strong and vibrant industry!

EDITORIAL Editor: Maryke Foulds +27 (0)11 715 8012 maryke.foulds@newmediapub.co.za Assistant Editor: Aarifah Nosarka +27 (0)11 877 6209 aarifah.nosarka@newmediapub.co.za Contributors Karin Meissner Layout & Design: David Kyslinger david.kyslinger@newmediapub.co.za ADVERTISING Sales Executive: Anita Raath +27 (0)82 976 6541 anita.raath@newmediapub.co.za Sales Executive: Carla Melless +27 (0)83 260 6060 carla.melless@newmediapub.co.za Sales Executive: Candida Giambo-Kruger +27 (0)71 438 1918 candida.giambo-kruger@newmediapub.co.za CIRCULATION Circulation Manager: Felicity Garbers +27 (0)21 701 1566 felicity.garbers@newmediapub.co.za PUBLISHING TEAM

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elcome to the very first edition of Bakery Review! We are very excited about this new project. This publication is aimed at bringing you the latest ingredient information, technology launches and software updates in the bakery industry. This supplement is guaranteed to be a helpful tool. A hot topic currently in the news is the high rate of obesity in South Africa. This fact is placing healthier diets at the forefront of consumer consumption behaviour, especially for indulgent items such as baked goods. Customers, particularly those in the middle to upper LSM groups, will pay higher prices for products offering health benefits. These include products featuring a low glycaemic index, high fibre content, fortification, added vitamins and omega oils. Affordability remains a key factor in these difficult economic times. Manufacturers must ensure that products are competitively priced if they want to gain market share. Leading players must answer to the demand for convenient and smaller packs. Chris Brockman, food and drink research manager at Mintel, says the following key consumer trends and product innovations are shaping the bakery market in 2017. ‘We are increasingly seeing the snackification of breakfast as

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General Manager: Dev Naidoo

consumers lead busier lives. New formats need to target on-the-go breakfast consumers, for example breakfast biscuits. Bakery brands should look to gain share of these new formats by making products portable and snackable. ‘Experimentation has become a key driver in the bakery market and a way to spark interest with younger consumers. Brands are starting to experiment through hybrids. Given that one quarter of UK cake buyers say they are interested in new formats, such innovation could also find appeal in South Africa,’ he enthuses. Consumers are also experimenting with flavours and types of bread. Growth in the market is being driven by more versatile and interesting bread varieties, such as flatbreads and Ethnic breads. I hope that you enjoy this first edition of Bakery Review! Please don’t hesitate to contact me if you have any comments or suggestions at maryke.foulds@ newmediapub.co.za. Happy baking!

Publishing Manager: Natalie Da Silva +27 (0)11 877 6281 natalie.dasilva@newmediapub.co.za Production Controller: Rae Morrison Art Director: David Kyslinger JOHANNESBURG OFFICE New Media Publishing, Ground floor, Media Park, 69 Kingsway Avenue, Auckland Park 2092 Tel: +27 (0)11 877 6111 Fax: +27 (0)11 713 9024 POSTAL ADDRESS PO Box 784698, Sandton, Johannesburg 2146 Published on behalf of Media24 by New Media Publishing (PTY) Ltd. GROUP COMMERCIAL DIRECTOR: John Psillos MANAGING DIRECTOR: Bridget McCarney NON EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR: Irna van Zyl HEAD OFFICE New Media House, 19 Bree Street, Cape Town 8001 Tel: +27 (0)21 417 1111, Fax: +27 (0)21 417 1112 Email: newmedia@newmediapub.co.za Postal address PO Box 440, Green Point, Cape Town 8051

Bakery Review is published by New Media Publishing (Pty) Ltd. Views expressed in this journal, other than where specifically stated, are not necessarily those of the publisher. The editor welcomes for publishing consideration news items, press releases, articles and photographs relating to developments in the food and beverage industries. No responsibility is accepted should contributions be lost. Bakery Review is printed and bound by Tandym Print.

Readers are prohibited from using the contact details displayed in any advertisement or editorial within the pages of this publication to generate and/or distribute unsolicited bulk emails or other forms of mass marketing correspondence.


AVAILABLE PRODUCTS

An extensive range of

Seed, Grain, Flours, Pulses and Proteins to support your business. Improve your product offering with local and imported quality products

Sesame seed Sunflower seed Linseed seed Pumpkin seed Poppy seed Chia seed Caraway seed Aniseed Butterfly popcorn Mushroom popcorn Wholewheat couscous Couscous Dehulled Oats Rolled oats Crushed Wheat Crushed rye Dehulled millet Quinoa Red quinoa Bulgur wheat

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IN G RE D I O N

Celebrate the

goodness of baking

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The global baked goods market is at an all-time high. Karin Meissner of specialist ingredient supplier Ingredion, looks at how the market in South Africa is evolving, and how manufacturers can develop new products to meet areas of high consumer demand.

he local bakery and cereals market is one of the fastest growing across the globe, according to Canadean’s Consumer and Market Insights report. Mintel expects the market to grow by 4.3 per cent by 2021. Growth is partly driven by the well-established bread and rolls subcategory, which continues to thrive. New high growth segments are emerging, including on-the-go snacking and cakes, sweet biscuits and cookies. These products account for 38 per cent of new products launched from 2012 to 2016. South Africans have a strong culture for snacking on-the-go. Sweet baked goods (SBGs) are a frequent choice when

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consumers fancy a treat, are hungry or feel they deserve a reward. Sweet biscuits and cookies, as well as cakes and pastries are the two categories that have consistently topped new product development in the region over the last twelve months. This represents a significant opportunity for food manufacturers. Eating occasions in South Africa typically determine the type of product consumed. Certain baked goods are seen as everyday items, while others are more likely to be eaten only on special occasions. Consumers buy from stores that meet their need for freshness or extended shelf life. As the South African food retail market continues to mature, it is likely

that areas such as on-the-go snacking will grow in strength.

Key considerations for the South African bakery market: • Affordability This is a key consideration for consumers and manufacturers. To meet demand, food producers can keep food fresher for longer and extend shelf-life. This will deliver attractively priced, on-trend products that appeal to retailers and consumers. This can be achieved by removing ingredients such as fat and sugar. By removing these ingredients, manufacturers are able to improve the affordability of their products while


IN G RE D I O N improving freshness. Recipe reformulations require a combination of technical expertise and ingredient knowledge to ensure the overall product quality and eating experience is maintained. • Sensory experience and clean labels South African consumers want the same taste, texture and sensory experience whether a bakery product is a full or reduced fat version, contains wheat or is gluten-free. ‘By using a speciality ingredient such as Novation Indulge 3920 functional native starch manufacturers can create products which are low or reduced fat and clean label.

Featuring recognisable, storecupboard ingredients listed on a product’s label can have a positive influence on consumer purchasing behaviour. While the clean label trend is relatively new in South Africa, it is gradually becoming more established. • Health and nutrition As we move into 2017 and beyond, any new product development within the bakery category needs to take into account the global health and nutrition trend. There is strong interest in reduced glycaemic products. Resistant starches made from maize, capable of being highly processed and label-friendly, is a good way to achieve this claim.

With interest in health and nutrition becoming more prominent globally, the top two growing health claims in South Africa are low cholesterol, and low, reduced or fat-free. Food producers should look at developing breads, cakes and snacks using wholegrain ingredients to support health and nutrition claims. Using products such as Sustagrain whole grain barley can boost fibre and beta glucan content of baked goods. These ingredients are known to lower blood cholesterol. When formulating bakery products, consideration needs to be given to the properties of ingredients, which need to be functional to fortify baked goods. Products must also be easy to formulate, colourless and have a neutral taste and odour profile to maintain the positive sensory experience of eating. The outlook for the South African bakery market is positive. There are new opportunities for manufacturers to develop new products. The key lies in differentiation within core categories such as bread and rolls, and growing segments such as cakes, sweet biscuits and cookies. • Ingredion – www.ingredion.com/emea

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Clean label

Innovative Bakery Solutions. Baked goods with a difference Baked goods and snacks deserve great tastes and textures. Create winning gluten-free formulations with HOMECRAFT® Create GF speciality flour; boost nutritional value using HI-MAIZE® resistant starch; and go clean label with NOVATION® functional native starch ingredients. With our ingredients, you can make compelling marketing claims, and realise cost efficiencies through reformulation. Take advantage of our unique combination of consumer study programmes and insights, cutting edge ingredients, and formulation expertise to achieve consumer-preferred, indulgent and affordable baked goods and snacks.

Start at: +27 (0) 11 86 79 260 | Ingredion South Africa Ltd www.ingredion.com/emea

The INGREDION mark and logo are trademarks of the Ingredion group of companies. All rights reserved. All contents copyright © 2013.

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M U LT ISN AC K

{ Sharp snacking} Founded in 2011, MultiSnack specialises in importing and distributing a selection of edible nuts, dried fruit, seeds and sweets to the South African food and bakery industry. Headquartered in Montague Gardens, Cape Town, the company is showing strong and consistent growth.

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e import our nuts, dried fruit and seeds from exotic places all over the world,’ explains managing director Gerhard van der Merwe. ‘We also support the South African economy by sourcing products from local farmers. We are proud of supplying consistently high quality products, so all products (imported or local) are sourced from only the most reliable suppliers. This careful selection of suppliers ensures that our customers will receive an end product of superior quality. We roast, salt, spice, coat and pack all of our own nuts, seeds, dried fruit and sweets on-site at our facilities,’ he enthuses. MultiSnack distributes across the entire spectrum of South Africa. It is fast becoming one of the country’s preferred suppliers of a wide range of products. There are a number of reasons for this. ‘We are extremely flexible when it comes to customer service. We are well-known as being exceptionally accommodating to those customers who need customised products and packaging,’ Van der Merwe adds. ‘Our company strives for customer satisfaction, and we pride ourselves on not only supplying top quality products, but also in building and maintaining a strong professional relationship with all of our clients. To us, these practices are not simply part of the process of doing business, but forms part of our company’s very culture.’ MultiSnack supplies product to fastmoving customer goods bakeries, the FMCG

market, retailers, food manufacturers and the food service industry. ‘Our house brands are available in packaging configurations from one kilogramme upwards. At our on-site factory store, we offer our products in 500g and one kilogram packages directly to the public,’ Van der Merwe adds. ‘We supply both in bulk and in smaller quantities, catering to businesses of any size. No customer is too big or too small for us to provide them with our best service. We also have our own brand names. We sell our products under Jolly Snacks and Banting Basics. ‘As a company, we take pride in the fact that we adhere to the highest industry standards when it comes to the processing, packaging and warehousing of our products. MultiSnack takes food safety very seriously. Our company has been accredited by various notable institutions, such as the South African Bureau of Standards, Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points, National Independent Halaal Trust, Food Safety Assessment and the Union of Orthodox Synagogues of South Africa. •

MultiSnack – www.multisnack.co.za

“As a company, we take pride in the fact that we adhere to the highest industry standards when it comes to the processing, packaging and warehousing of our products” 8 BAKERYREVIEW ISSUE 1 2017


Reliable suppliers of quality nuts, dried fruits and seeds

Tel: 021 552 6861 Fax: 086 604 5476

Email: info@multisnack.co.za www.multisnack.co.za


M AT R I X S O F T WA RE

Effective control

– from ingredients to retail shelves Matrix Software offers two custom manufacturing software solutions for most processing and manufacturing plants in the food, beverage and meat industry.

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randed as Meat Matrix and Food Matrix, the technology is a must-have solution for any industry where stock control, yield management, traceability, productivity and cost margins is a necessity. The software is developed in South Africa specifically for the African market, thereby giving the benefit of support and cost-effectiveness as opposed to expensive foreign systems. The technology is leased on a month-to-month basis. This reduces the initial up-front capital outlay - ensuring successful implementation and ongoing support. ‘Our footprint spreads across South Africa and neighbouring countries.

We count small retail outlets to huge processing plants utilising over 100 workstations on our books,’ enthuses Full operational shop floor systems for director Deon Snyman. food, bakery and meat industry ‘Our software is compatible to the latest Controls margins from all aspects mobile technology including Smartphone, namely costings, profitability, yield iPad and Android. Ultra-fast and reliable control, stock control and statistics SQL server access components, ensure encrypted data storage. It also integrates Systems linked together in one package complete with probes, scales, A label printers and – from raw ingredient to retail shelves all major scanners. It is a must for any the food industry that Full MRP System - calculates foryield the Meat, operation Food &inBeverage Industry requires better control, cost savings, outputs and recipe ingredients • Abattoir Slaughtertraceability Control and information needed to Traceability on all products that identify problems and react faster. It also • Full Meat Stock Control Systems conform to standard integrates into most financial packages • Software For Food And Meat Industry available in the market,’ Snyman concludes. • Standard costing system for all block

Matrix: benefits in a nutshell: • •

• • • •

SOFTWARE SOLUTION

• Full MRP & Traceability Solutions A complete

tests and recipes.

Matrix Software – www. Matrixsoftware.co.za SOFTWARE SOLUTION

• Specialists In Meat Systems (Abattoir / Debone / Production) for the Meat, Food & Beverage Industry

• Retail Point Of Sales Systems

• Abattoir Slaughter Control • Scales, Label Printing And Probes Solution's • Full Meat Stock Control Systems

Yield Control Systems A complete • Recipe A& complete

• Software For Food And Meat Industry

SOFTWARESOFTWARE SOLUTION •SOLUTION Mobile Systems (Smartphone / iPad / Android)) • Full MRP & Traceability Solutions for the Meat, Food & Beverage Industry

for the Meat, Food & Beverage Industry • Specialists In Meat Systems (Abattoir / Debone / Production) • Retail Point Of Sales Systems

• Abattoir Slaughter Control • Abattoir Slaughter Control

• Scales, Label Printing And Probes Solution's • Full Meat Stock Control•Systems Full Meat Stock Control Systems • Recipe & Yield Control Systems • Software For Food And•Meat Industry Software For Food And Meat Industry • Mobile Systems • Full MRP & Traceability Solutions • Full MRP & Traceability Solutions

(Smartphone / iPad / Android))

• Specialists In Meat Systems (Abattoir / Debone / Production) • Specialists In Meat Systems (Abattoir / Debone / Production) • Retail Point Of Sales Systems • Retail Point Of Sales Systems • Scales, Label Printing And ProbesLabel Solution's • Scales, Printing And Probes Solution's • Recipe & Yield Control Systems • Recipe & Yield Control Systems • Mobile Systems

(Smartphone / iPad / Android))

• Mobile Systems

(Smartphone / iPad / Android))

MATRIX MATRIX S O F T W A R E S O F T W A R E

MATRIX MATRIX S O F T W A R E

www.matrixsoftware.co.za

www.matrixsoftware.co.za [e] info@matrixsoftware.co.za

S O F T W A R[t]E+27 16 423 5537 • [f] +27 86 605 5406

MEAT

FOOD

S O F T W A R E

S O F T W A R E

[e] info@matrixsoftware.co.za P.O Box 24424, Vereeniging, 1941

Meat Matrix•Software (Pty) [t] +27 16 423 5537 [f] +27 86Ltd 605 5406

VAT No: 4470228604 • Registration No: 2005/000495/07 MATRIX MATRIX P.O Box 24424, Vereeniging, 1941 www.matrixsoftware.co.za Meat Matrix Software (Pty) Ltd MEAT FOOD www.matrixsoftware.co.za

MATRIX

S O F T W A R E

MEAT Matrix.indd 1 FOOD

MATRIX

MATRIX

VAT No: 4470228604 • Registration No: 2005/000495/07

S O F T W A R E

Meat Matrix Software (Pty) Ltd

MEATVAT No: 4470228604 FOOD • Registration No: 2005/000495/07

MATRIX MATRIX 10 BAKERYREVIEW ISSUE 1 2017

S O F T W A R E

MATRIX

[e] info@matrixsoftware.co.za [e] info@matrixsoftware.co.za [t] +27 16 423 5537 • [f] +27 86 605 5406 [t] +27 16 423 5537 • [f] +27 86 605 5406 P.O Box 24424, Vereeniging, 1941 P.O Box 24424, Vereeniging, 1941

S O F T W A R E

S O F T W A R E

S O F T W A R E

Meat Matrix Software (Pty) Ltd VAT No: 4470228604 • Registration No: 2005/000495/07

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A N C H O R YE A S T

Great value in every slice South African bread offers consumers good all-round value: it is not only an affordable staple available in multiple varieties, but also has many health benefits.

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orraine Bezuidenhout, bakery business director Anchor Yeast, says since 2009, most bread has been fortified with a number of vitamins and minerals, including vitamin A, iron and zinc. These supplements are important from a public health perspective. Last year, bread manufacturers also reduced the amount of salt added to their loaves. ‘Bread is now required, under legislation restricting the salt content of many foods, to have a reduced sodium content. This is significant, given that the average salt intake in South African adults is 8.6g/day – well above the World Health Organization’s recommended 5g/day. Legislation ensures bread remains an important staple by providing vital vitamins and minerals, without negatively adding to South Africans’ overall sodium intake,’ says Bezuidenhout. She adds that bread still contains salt, just less than before. In recent years, retailers and bakeries have added significantly to the category by offering consumers many different types of breads to suit not only varying budgets, but different tastes and specific dietary requirements. This has further cemented bread’s position as a much-loved household staple. Despite these positive strides, and the fact that bread is one of the five most commonly consumed foods bought by eight out of 10 South African households, many consumers don’t realise their regular loaf of bread has so much value to offer. This is just one of the findings coming out of a recent review of the local bread industry by well-known dietician Jane Badham, commissioned by Anchor Yeast. ‘South Africans love their bread,’ she enthuses. ‘In 2008, 2 800 million loaves of bread were sold in South Africa. This equates to the consumption of approximately 62 loaves per person that year, or three slices of bread per person per day. Many South Africans don’t realise exactly what they’re getting from their everyday sandwiches, especially when

it comes to nutrition. Incorporating bread is part of a balanced, healthy diet,’ she explains. Badham’s review found that bread contributed to South Africans meeting their daily nutrient needs. It also acts as a vehicle to improve diversity in people’s diets through the multitude of toppings and fillings it could be paired with. She

“Legislation ensures bread remains an important staple by providing vital vitamins and minerals, without negatively adding to South Africans’ overall sodium intake” also notes that bread played a role in achieving two of the 11 South African Food Based Dietary Guidelines. This is critical, given that poverty precludes so many South Africans from eating healthily. ‘A survey found that some 13.3 per cent or 2.2 million households had to skip a meal in the last 12 months. One fifth of households did not have enough money to buy food. Looking at the increase in the cost of the food basket, it’s not hard to see why. A healthy diet remains largely unachievable for many South Africans,’ Badham adds. Although the cost of bread has risen accordingly, Badham’s review shows that it remains a competitively priced starch. Based on the serving size listed on the packaging

by the manufacturer, which might differ from what consumers eat or what dietitians recommend, regular brown and white bread are priced second after uncooked rice. There is a 29c differential per serving. It is almost the same price as maize meal (mealie meal being 5c more expensive per serving); and is significantly less expensive than pasta, with a R1.68 differential. These findings are important, given that recent SA National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (SANHANES) data indicates that price is the main driver behind food choices. With bread having so much to offer, it is a sound food choice indeed. • Anchor Yeast – www.anchor.co.za

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PR OTE A CH E M I C ALS

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More than just a chemical supplier Omnia’s Chemical division, operating under the Protea Chemicals brand, has a wealth of experience and a reputation for excellence in the distribution of speciality, functional effect chemicals and polymers in sub-Saharan Africa.

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rotea Chemicals Food Ingredients business offers high-quality, full-service warehousing and distribution to the market for food ingredients, chemicals and blends. As a major player in both South Africa and the rest of the African continent, this business unit adds value through cost effective reliable supply into the following sectors: • Beverage (alcoholic and non-alcoholic) • Dairy • Baking and confectionery • Meat and culinary. Protea Chemicals Food Ingredients offers a wide variety of quality products that enables it to leverage the basket offering to market.

Key product lines include (but are not limited to): food commodities, acids, preservatives, starches, sweeteners, milk powders, soy isolates, phosphates, gums, stabilisers and specialty products such as wine chemicals. ‘Our valued partnerships are key to our customers’ success and our team of product managers play a critical role in ensuring we bring excellent quality products to the market,’ enthuses Nicole Lombard, industry manager, food and beverage. Protea Chemicals recognise that maintaining internationally benchmarked safety standards through safety, health, environment and quality (SHEQ) implementation is critically important to all stakeholders. Dual Product Testing Policy

is therefore applied to all products sourced from emerging markets. It is another example of the company’s commitment to the continuous supply of superior foodstuffs. Membership of the Omnia Group, ISO accreditation and a SANAS accredited laboratory, offers customers a distinct advantage with regard to both quality and product assurance. ‘Our long-term growth strategy for this business unit includes partnering with key clients and suppliers to promote synergies and responsible, sustainable sourcing of food products,’ Lombard concludes. •

Protea Chemicals – www.proteachemicals.co.za

MORE THAN JUST A

CHEMICAL SUPPLIER Tel: 011 821 3300 | 021 550 8100 031 468 5424 | 041 403 1000 Website: www.proteachemicals.co.za Email: info@proteachemicals.co.za

12 BAKERYREVIEW ISSUE 1 2017

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C H I O R IN O

Your partner in food safety conveyor belts

Chiorino manufactures conveyor and process belts that fully comply with the latest European and international food regulations. These products are particularly recommended for HACCP systems.

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he value of a company is represented not only by its size but also by the goals it sets for itself. This is the viewpoint of Malcolm Turner, managing director of Chiorino South Africa. ’The product range is customised to suit each individual customer’s needs. Confronting new challenges and hitting increasingly ambitious targets, requires synergy and collaboration between company departments, customers and suppliers. Chiorino’s philosophy is to enhance the valued contribution of all stakeholders,’ Turner enthuses. HP belts offer increased resistance to high temperatures compared to traditional polyurethane belts. It maintains its characteristics even at the lower temperatures. It also offers excellent resistance to chemical agents, fats and aggressive oils, including palm and coconut oil.

You partner for food safety

Resistance to abrasive cleaning systems

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Thanks to the high resistance to hydrolysis, HP belts don’t deteriorate. Users can benefit from the belt’s long service life and significant cost reduction. Compared to modular belts, HP belts offer considerable water, time and energy savings. High hygiene levels are also assured since most food scraps are easily removed during the cleaning and sanitisation processes. ‘We offer a comprehensive range of high performance food belts for processing of any kind of dough throughout the production chain. This includes items such as bread, pizza, biscuits and crackers. Food belts can be fitted on Meincke, Imaforni, Rademaker, Rondo, Sogem and Baker-Perkins lines (amongst others). The excellent release properties of dehesive belts assure the best performance for even the stickiest products such as muesli bars or other kinds of snacks.

Key features of Chiorino belts: • Excellent resistance to cuts and abrasions • Superior resistance to most aggressive fats and oils • No edge fray

• High flexibility

• Resistance to high temperatures.

‘Our aspiration is to be a dynamic company that is constantly evolving. We also aim to be a reliable partner whose mission is total customer satisfaction. Innovative prospects, winning entrepreneurial choices and a top level production division have made Chiorino a leader in the production of conveyor and transmission belts,’ Turner concludes. • Chiorino – www.chiorino.com

HACCP conveyor and process belts

Johannesburg | T: +27 (0)11 397 1268 | met@chiorino.co.za Cape Town | T: +27 (0)21 510 1361 | wh@chiorino.co.za Durban | T: +27 (0)31 792 5500 | rfz@chiorino.co.za www.chiorino.com

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SA N DV IK

Cost, quality and cleanliness – the benefits of a Sandvik bake oven belt

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ew companies have had a more enduring relationship with the bakery industry than Sandvik Process Systems, suppliers of bake oven belts since 1925. The company is the world’s largest manufacturer of steel belt oven belts. It supplies products to oven builders and end users around the world. Its current range of high performance steel grades and belt sizes (800mm to extra-wide 3 500mm conveyors) can meet different production requirements. The unique sales proposition of a steel bake oven belt lies in its physical form: no other material can compete when it comes to a steel belt’s baking qualities. Not only does it deliver reliable operation in applications where temperatures can reach as high as 400ºC, but it does so with outstanding reliability. Good tension and tracking characteristics, and resistance to stretching, results in low maintenance requirements. Exceptional durability means a working life of 20 plus years is far from unusual. One Sandvik belt was found to be fully operational an incredible 72 years after it was first installed! As Fabio Conti, global product manager for Sandvik’s food business says, ‘Other belt materials may carry a lower purchase price, but it’s important to consider productivity, lifetime costs and overall return on investment.’ Another factor that infl uences long-term costs is the energy efficiency

Belts up to 3 500mm wide enable increased productivity in existing facilities, without the need for expensive extensions

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of an oven. This is another area in which Sandvik’s belts can offer significant benefits. ‘The heavier the belt, the more energy is required to heat it,’ Conti explains. ‘Solid steel belts are lighter than wire mesh. Perforated steel belts are lighter still, and can cost up to 30 per cent less to heat. Each time a belt exits the baking chamber, it begins to cool. It then has to be heated up again so the savings are continuous. As much of 25 per cent of an oven’s energy consumption is needed to heat the belt, so savings can be considerable.’ This weight advantage also means less energy is needed to “drive” the belt through the oven.

American-style real butter cookies require a solid bake oven belt to deliver the attractive crisp base

Quality baking and the cookie factor Just as importantly, the properties of steel belt can add up to better baking performance. Much of this is due to excellent heat transfer and thermal conductivity of the belt, but stability is also key: a solid or perforated steel belt will keep its shape and stay fl at as it passes through the intense heat of the oven, resulting in consistent product quality. There’s one other reason why the bakery industry remains a key market for Sandvik and that’s the global appetite for Americanstyle cookies. As these products use real butter, and often chocolate chips too, they need to be baked on a solid belt to eliminate the risk of

“Exceptional durability means a working life of 20 plus years”

melted product dripping and causing a fire, or simply drying out. The use of a solid steel belt also produces an attractive crisp base. This globalisation in taste is leading a growing number of bakery operations to look at how best to capitalise on the opportunities available, and many are arriving at the decision to switch their facilities from wire mesh to solid steel systems. For some this means investing in entire new production lines, but for others, close cooperation between Sandvik and OEMs has made it possible to upgrade the conveyor system while retaining existing ovens.

Hygiene and cleanliness Alongside product quality and lifetime cost there is a third factor that bakeries have to consider, and that’s the ability to maintain the highest standards of cleanliness and hygiene. As a conveying medium that’s completely fl at and smooth, a solid steel belt has the major advantage of having no gaps, recesses or crevices in which carbon deposits could collect. This fl atness also means that cleaning operations are simpler, faster and therefore more economical than for other materials. •


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STEEL BELTS PLUS

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STEEL BELTS & HYGIENIC PROCESS TECHNOLOGIES FOR THE CONFECTIONERY INDUSTRY Sandvik steel belts offer unparalleled versatility. A smooth flat surface with outstanding thermal properties delivers perfectly baked cookies, biscuits, cakes and bread, and that’s why more companies are upgrading to steel belt-based baking. But we offer far more than just belts. From conveyors and our QuickCleaner process to high performance pastillation and scattering systems, we’re able to offer complete production solutions.

 Solid and perforated steel bake oven belts – service and upgrades  Belt only or complete conveyor systems incl. tracking etc.  QuickCleaner system – fast and easy removal of carbon residues  Rotoform 4G FD pastillation system for chocolate, emulsifiers, fats and more  Rotary screen scattering for decorative patterns on baked goods

WWW.SANDVIK.COM/STEELBELTS Sandvik Process Systems, Sandvik (Pty) Ltd, PO Box 25038, East Rand, 1462, South Africa · T: +27 11 570-9610


IR P E N G IN E E R IN G PL A S T I C S

The advanced choice in

bakery conveying Bread production is very competitive and production costs must be kept to a minimum. Highly automated processes are used to reduce overall operating costs, and are instrumental in keeping maintenance costs in check. The bakery industry is a harsh and aggressive production environment. Conveyor belt failures can have significant knock-on effects for overall productivity and efficiency.

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RP Engineering Plastics is a local manufacturer of bakery specific conveyor belts, the 2540 HPP and 1270 series belts in particular. These units are specifically designed and developed to bring solutions to counteract aggressive wear and tear when conveying bread pans. They reduce conveyor belt failures in the general conveying and packaging areas of the bakery. Significant cost savings and increased efficiencies in the production process are now possible. IRP’s 2540 HPP series is manufactured using a unique high performance polymer. The material delivers a conveyor belt with properties that can handle high and excessive heat, wear, impact and loads.

Increase the lifespan of bread pans Drawing a comparison between conveying metal objects on St-Steel or steel belts, to conveying the same objects on plastic belts, it becomes clear that conveying metal objects on plastic belts results in less friction (35 per cent). When conveying bread pans on St-Steel or metal belts compared to conveying bread pans using IRP’s 2540 HPP series belt, the latter yields a significant decrease in friction and wear. This can significantly increase the life span of bread pans in the bakery production process.

Conveying metal objects on plastic belts results in less friction

advantages and cost reduction by reducing work load and extending the life of drive motors, while reducing power consumption. This series has proven to drastically decrease operating noise levels during the production process.

Simple conversions from St-Steel to 2540 HPP The 2540 HPP series has been specifically designed to easily and directly replace its equivalent St-Steel version of chain, which means a very simple conversion with minimal downtime for installation. All existing chassis, wear strips, guides and bends can remain installed on the conveyor when converting to 2540 HPP, only the chain, sprockets and idlers would need to be replaced to convert to 2540 HPP.

Less power consumption The 2540 HPP series delivers high performance properties at a metre by metre weight. This is half the weight of traditional St-Steel chains. The reduction adds further

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Benefits of the 2540 HPP: • It increases wear life of pans • Decreases load on motors and reduce power consumption • Decreases noise levels • Simple conversions.

Benefits of IRP’s 1270 Belt: • • • • •

Patented self collapsing pin Superior double pin retention system Less snag and belt failures Double tooth sprockets for improved grab Easier installation of sprockets.

16 BAKERYREVIEW ISSUE 1 2017

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1270 series and bread conveying The company recently launched its new 12.7mm pitch belt. The 1270 series is a light duty belt used for general bread conveying and packaging. This belting development brings innovative features and added benefits - making it the advanced choice for use in the bakery industry. Its unique and patented self collapsing pin allows the pin to locate on both sides of the belt for a double pin retention system. This system removes the risk of the pin exiting the belt in applications. This is a major cause of snag ups and belt failures. IRP has designed a unique double tooth sprocket. The technology engages the teeth of the sprockets on every pocket area of the belt. This drastically improves the grab factor on the belt reducing any sprocket slippage. Sprockets are easily installed and can be placed anywhere on the belt without fear of misalignment etc. • IRP Engineering Plastics – www.irp.co.za


12.7mm Pitch Modular Belt - Designed for Bread Conveying, Cooling and Packaging

FEATURES

BENEFITS

• UNIQUE PATENTED DESIGN FOR DOUBLE PIN RETENTION

• DRASTICALLY IMPROVE PIN RETENTION RETAINING PIN IN BELT

• PIN LOCATED ON BOTH SIDES OF BELT FOR IMPROVED RETENTION

• STRONGER, STIFFER PIN KEEPS BELT MORE RIGID IN APPLICATION

• UNIQUE PIN DESIGN THAT SELF COLLAPSES FOR EASY INSERTION AND REMOVAL

• SUPERIOR BELT AND PIN DESIGN PROVIDING INCREASED UPTIME AND BELT LONGEVITY

Convert from abrasive Stainless Steel Conveyor Chains to IRP’s Revolutionary 2540 HPP Series and experience

Reduce pan wear by up to 35%. Reduce running costs. Reduce operating noise. Lower maintenance costs. Run greener by saving energy. BEFORE

AFTER

BEFORE

AFTER

IRP Engineering

For the many advantages of converting to 2540 HPP contact IRP today! LOCALLY MANUFACTURED Johannesburg Branch Durban Branch Cape Town Branch

Tel Tel Tel

GLOBALLY ACCEPTED : 011 462 2241 : 031 205 0200 : 021 556 6990

Email : jhb@irp.co.za Email : durban@irp.co.za Email : capetown@irp.co.za


IN N E R O U T

How to capitalise on skills scarcity The food and beverage processing industry is faced with many unique challenges. One of these is the specialised skill sets required by employers to optimise efficiency in production.

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n Skills Education Training Authorities (Seta) terms, some skills in the industry are scarce - specifically processors in the meat and baking industries. By definition these skills are unavailable or hard to obtain. When a skill is not readily available, it needs to be developed by the employer. This means the business will need to spend time and money on trainees and mentors to achieve the requisite skill levels. ‘At InnerOUT Training Solutions we take care of training that will support companies in achieving their business goals, says Karen Rabie, Business Development Executive. As an accredited training provider, InnerOUT is able to assist employers to access Seta funding, SARS tax incentives, and BBB-EE points, as well as all the trade advantages associated with compliance. ‘Instead of scarcity costing you money, it can save and make you money,’ Rabie points out. ‘Our passion lies in developing the

employees that make a processing plant or bakery/ butchery turn over. We focus on learnerships and skills programmes at NQF levels one to three,’ Rabie adds. The company offers functional expertise, coupled with the ability to adapt to the constraints of the production environment when implementing training. Extensive knowledge of Seta processes and quality requirements has also earned InnerOUT an excellent reputation. Using integrated learning and assessment practices results in cutting back on time spent on training and assessment. It leaves time to focus on practical workplace experience.

Individual final practical observation of learners adds a higher level of quality assurance. ‘Our Seta scope covers meat and fresh meat processing, bread and fl our confectionery baking, food safety and hygiene, packaging operations, quality control and basic HACCP. It extends into receiving and despatch, stock control and professional driving. Supervisor development can follow – a critical skill in any operation. We will also be happy to provide input to help companies prepare their Workplace Skills Plan for 2017/2018,’ Rabie explains. • InnerOUT – www.iots.co.za

Learning changes the vantage point... We believe that skills development is the rope that makes ascent to greater heights possible. Our values support your growth as a business: • Commitment to quality • Respect for ourselves and others • Selfless service to you and your employees • Integrity in knowing and doing what is right • Courage to accept and lead change in challenging times

Allow us to take your business above and beyond: contact Karen at 082 927 3735 or karen@iots.co.za and visit our website www.iots.co.za.

18 BAKERYREVIEW ISSUE 1 2017


Bakery review 01 2017  

Welcome to the very first edition of Bakery Review! This publication is aimed at bringing you the latest ingredient information, technology...