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2013-14 OPEN HOUSE SCHEDULE PRE-K

October 11 October 25 November 15 November 20 December 6

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9 a.m. 9 a.m. 9 a.m. 9 a.m. 9 a.m.

LOWER SCHOOL

October 22 | 11:30 a.m.

MIDDLE SCHOOL & UPPER SCHOOL November 6 | 5 p.m. January 16 | 9 a.m.

Newman seeks to enroll qualified students regardless of race, gender or creed. Need-based financial aid is available.


O U R

W

H I S T O R Y

hen financier and philanthropist Isidore Newman founded the Isidore Newman Manual Training School in 1903, he envisioned a superior education for the children of New Orleans and those of the Jewish Children’s Home. He wrote, “For years it has been the desire of my heart to do something for this city and State which have made me what I am. I have my reward in the school.” He hoped to provide skilled, competent, and well-trained labor to do the work that is necessary in a community. Over the past 100 plus years, Mr. Newman’s school has developed into one of the nation’s finest college preparatory institutions. Our curriculum has evolved into an academic program which today offers a full range of choices and rewarding challenges. Our student body has grown from an opening enrollment of 125 to a current enrollment of 900 students in pre-kindergarten through twelfth grade. The Jefferson Building, where all early classes were held, now opens “As excellent as Newman is, onto a campus of more than 11 acres and 17 buildings It’s always aspiring to be interspersed with playgrounds, patios, green spaces, and an athletic playing field. better. I like that.” In our quest to serve Mr. Newman’s vision, we —Joan Hiller Biderman, parent & alumna have grown, adapted, evolved and often taken the lead in education. In 1913, Newman became the first school in the State of Louisiana to earn accreditation from the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. We offered coeducation before any other school in New Orleans, and we enrolled African-American students before any other local independent school. As we look to the future, we are enriching our environment by reaching out to students of diverse backgrounds, teaching to different learning styles, offering unparalleled opportunities with technology, and continuing to maintain the relevance of our human development curriculum. The more we learn about children, the more we have shaped our courses of study to nurture and respond to their abilities and appetites at each stage of their development. The better we understand them, the better we answer the needs of their minds, bodies and spirits.


Statement of Purpose NEWMAN is a community of students and teachers learning and growing together in an environment of academic and personal integrity, trust, and respect for others. Newman expects each student to accept responsibility for his or her actions and to abide by the rules the School has established for the benefit of the Newman community. Each parent acknowledges and accepts those rules when the parent enrolls a child at Newman. Newman expects its students to have a strong sense of personal ethics. Newman does not accept behavior -academic, social, or personal -- that compromises Newman's standards of honesty, respect for others, and safety of the school community. 

Newman values each individual.

Newman is committed to the intellectual, ethical, emotional and physical development of each student.

Newman instills in each student the School’s core values of honesty, kindness, respect, and responsibility, and develops in each student self-confidence and an appreciation for cultural and personal differences.

Newman offers a challenging, comprehensive, and sequential curriculum from pre-kindergarten to twelfth grade, one which encourages creativity, critical and independent thinking, and different ways of learning

Newman promotes academic excellence and celebrates participation and accomplishment in the arts and athletics.

Newman provides each student the skills, attitudes, and character necessary for productive lifelong learning and service to others.

CORE VALUES: Honesty Kindness Respect Responsibility

HONOR CODE: One's word is the truth. One's academic work is entirely one's own. One respects the rights and property of others. U. S.-M.S. Honor Pledge (signed at the end of all graded assignments): On my honor as a Newman student, I pledge that I have neither given nor received any unauthorized aid on this assignment.


All about Pre-Kindergarten

Newman’s Pre-Kindergarten builds a solid foundation for learning, communicating, sharing, and navigating the world independently. Our teachers instill a love of exploration while creating an environment where all of our students feel comfortable taking risks and growing from their experiences. Students become active members of a classroom community, building self-reliance, self-esteem, and an appreciation for each individual. Balanced Literacy Communication -Speaking -Listening Handwriting Grammar Spelling Writing Workshop Reading Workshop -Phonemic Awareness -Phonics -Vocabulary -Comprehension -Fluency

Mathematics Logic Weight Classifying Length Comparing Temperature Shapes Time Ordering Graphs Seriation Numerals Patterning Volume Sets and Symbols

Pre-Kindergarten Highlights: Halloween Parade, Customs and Traditions, Special Friends’ Day, Fais-Do-Do, Farmer’s Market, Pre-K Art Show, Pre-K/K Musical, Splash Day, Field Day Special Subjects: Art, Library, Music, Physical Education/Motor Development, Science, World Language (French & Spanish) provide a rich educational experience for our Pre-Kindergarten students. The Newman Way: The Newman Way is our Character Education Program. Based on our core values of Honesty, Kindness, Respect, and Responsibility, we strive towards excellence in community, character and academics in our efforts to educate the whole child. We celebrate the ways, small and large, in which our students, faculty, and community members live, learn, and give in The Newman Way. Greenie Gatherings: All Lower School Greenie Gatherings and weekly Pre-Kindergarten/Kindergarten Greenie Gatherings help to build community and introduce global themes of character education.


All about Kindergarten

Newman’s Kindergarten meets the needs of each student through differentiated instruction while building self-confidence and independence. Students work in an environment where they are free to take risks, ask questions and experiment. Children enjoy hands on learning and play while growing both academically and socially. Balanced Literacy Communication -Speaking -Listening Handwriting Grammar Spelling Writing Workshop Reading Workshop -Phonemic Awareness -Phonics -Vocabulary -Comprehension -Fluency

Mathematics Logic Classifying Comparing Shapes Ordering Seriation Patterning Volume Weight Length Temperature Time Graphs Numerals Addition Subtraction Money Measurement

Kindergarten Highlights: Halloween Parade, Veggie Feast, Special Friends’ Day, Customs and Celebrations, Author’s Tea, Portfolio Party, Robot Parade, PreK/K Musical, Splash Day, Field Day Special Subjects: Art, Library, Music, Physical Education/Motor Development, Science, World Language (French and Spanish) provide a rich educational experience for our Kindergarten students. The Newman Way: The Newman Way is our Character Education Program. Based on our core values of Honesty, Kindness, Respect, and Responsibility, we strive towards excellence in community, character and academics in our efforts to educate the whole child. We celebrate the ways, small and large, in which our students, faculty, and community members live, learn, and give in The Newman Way. Greenie Gatherings: All Lower School Greenie Gatherings and weekly Pre-Kindergarten/Kindergarten Greenie Gatherings help to build community and introduce global themes of character education.


Middle School Course of Study 2013-2014 (Grades 6 – 8) GRADE S IX

GRADE S EVEN

GRADE EIGHT

English M athematics or M ath 6 Enriched (by invitation) General Science Louisiana History/ American Studies World Languages French, Latin, Spanish Arts Band, Chorus Arts Rotation (Acting, Dance, Studio Art) Physical Education

English Pre-Algebra or Advanced M ath (by invitation) Life Science United States History World Languages French, Latin, Spanish Arts Band, Chorus Arts Rotation (Acting, Dance, Studio Art) Physical Education

English Algebra I or Algebra I - Advanced (by invitation) Physical Science Cultural Geography World Languages French, Latin, Spanish Arts Band, Chorus Arts Rotation (Acting, Dance, Studio Art) Physical Education

Human Development classes are an integral part of the M iddle School curriculum.

Lower School Course of Study 2013-2014 (Grades Pre-K through 5) Subjects are integrated and presented as appropriate to the developmental needs of each grade and individual student. LANGUAGE ARTS Balanced Literacy Communication -Speaking -Listening Grammar Handwriting Spelling (Word Study) Guided Reading - Phonemic Awareness - Phonics - Fluency - Comprehension -Vocabulary Writing Workshop Reading Workshop - Introduction to Genres MATHEMATICS Singapore Math Number Concepts M ental M ath Problem Solving Logical Reasoning Estimation Basic Operations Fractions Decimals Early Algebraic Thinking Geometry M easurement Place Value

S OCIAL S TUDIES Culture Financial Literacy Geography Global Issues History Public Speaking & Debate Values

S TUDIO ART Artists’ Techniques Design Drawing Painting Pottery Sculpture Weaving

WORLD LANGUAGE Conversation Culture Vocabulary Grade PK – K French & Spanish Grades 1 – 5 French or Spanish

S CIENCE Chemical Reactions Current Environmental Issues Discovery Earth Systems Electricity & Circuitry Engineering Force & M otion Hands-On Inquiry Lab Techniques Peer Teaching Research Oriented Robotics Scientific Process Skills

MUS IC (Grades PK-3) Composers Dance/M ovement/Games Instrument Recognition M usic Categories M usical Notation/Terms Percussion Rhythm/Tempo/Beat Singing

LEARNING CENTER Academic Support Coordination of Assessments & Evaluations Organization Skills Study Skills Reinforcement

TECHNOLOGY S KILLS Keyboarding M edia Literacy Podcasting Programming M ultimedia Presentations Web Skills Word Processing

PERFORMING ARTS Grades PK - 3 Integrated Performance Arts Grades 4 - 5 Chorus & Drama Band CHARACTER EDUCATIO N

“The Newman Way” Newman’s Core Values Honesty Kindness Respect Responsibility In-Class Guidance Program Nutrition Service Learning

PHYS ICAL EDUCATION Activities Fitness Games Health Education M otor Development Sportsmanship Teamwork LIBRARY Library & Research Skills Literature Appreciation M edia Literacy


Upper School Course of Study 2013 – 14 (Grades 9 – 12) Students must successfully complete 24 academic credits, as follows, to graduate: English: Mathematics: History/Social Studies: Science: World Languages: Arts: Physical Education: Electives:

4 credits 4 credits 4 credits 3 credits 3 credits 2 credits 2 credits 2 credits

STANDARD COURSE OF STUDY (other sequences are possible)

FRESHMAN English I Algebra II World Language Gov’t/Econ Systems Biology Applied Art PE

SOPHOMORE English II Geometry World Language World History Chemistry Applied Art PE

JUNIOR English III Pre-Calculus World Language U.S. History Physics Applied Art PE

SENIOR English IV Calculus Global Studies Elective Elective Art History PE

COURSE OFFERINGS (Courses listed in bold require departmental recommendation. Art electives are open to students in grades 9 -12. All other electives are open to students in grades 10-12, unless otherwise noted.)

ENGLISH 4 credits required English I English II English II Honors English III English III Honors English IV English IV Honors Spring Seminar Electives: (open to Juniors & Seniors)

Modern Drama The Grotesque Tradition in Southern Literature

Creative Nonfiction New Orleans Literature Creative Writing: Advanced Craft Practice Contemporary Prize Winning Literature English IV Honors Course

English Electives: Journalism: Print and Online Publications (f/s) Introduction to Creative Writing: Fiction (f) Public Speaking (s) Contemporary American Poetry (f)

MATHEMATICS 4 credits required Algebra I Algebra II Geometry Computational Geometry Honors Geometry Pre-Calculus Honors Pre-Calculus Intro to Calculus Calculus Honors Calculus AP Calculus AB AP Calculus BC AP Statistics


HISTORY AND SOCIAL STUDIES 4 credits required Gov’t & Econ – required World History – required AP World History U.S. History – required Honors U.S. History AP U.S. History Global Studies – required Topical Electives: American Foreign Policy (s) Gender Studies (s) The Ongoing Struggle for Social Justice (f) Intro to Economics (f) Constitutional Law (s) AP Economics AP US & Comparative Government AP European History (open to Juniors & Seniors)

Peer Leadership

SCIENCE 3 credits required (must include biology, chemistry & physics) Biology - required AP Biology Chemistry - required Honors Chemistry AP Chemistry Physics - required Honors Physics AP Physics B AP Physics C: Mechanics Genetics (f) Anatomy & Physiology (s) AP Environmental Science

Marine Biology Psychology (elective credit only)

WORLD LANGUAGES 3 credits required in one language during Upper School French: Advanced French French IV French IV Honors French V French V Honors French VI French VI Honors AP French Language & Culture French Seminar Spanish: Advanced Spanish Spanish IV Spanish IV Honors Spanish V Spanish V Honors Spanish VI Spanish VI Honors AP Spanish Language & Culture Latin American Studies (may be taken for Global Studies credit)

Latin: Latin II Latin III Latin IV AP Latin Chinese: Chinese I Chinese II Chinese III Chinese IV Chinese IV Honors AP Chinese Language & Culture (directed study)

ARTS .5 credit of Art History required Art History (f/s) Art History Honors Arts History Elective: Music History (f/s) (elective credit only)

Applied Courses: 1.5 credits required Introduction to the Studio Arts (f/s) 2-D Design & the Printed Image (f/s) Drawing and Painting (f/s) AP Studio Art: Drawing AP Studio Art: 2-D Design Acting – Int/Adv (s) Band Band/Chorus Ceramics – Beg (f/s) Ceramics – Int/Adv (f/s) Chorus Chorus – Mens Chorus - Womens Dance – Beg/Int (f/s) Dance – Int/Adv (f/s) Dance Production & Performance (s) Film Production – Beg Film Production – Int/Adv Photography – Beg (f/s) Photography – Int/Adv (f) Photojournalism Print Media Design (f/s) Tech Theater – Beg (f/s) Tech Theater – Int/Adv (s) PHYSICAL EDUCATION 2 credits required 9th – 12th Grade PE DIRECTED STUDY Available in all disciplines


Lower School Guidance Curriculum The guidance program for lower school, focusing on the “Newman Way”, is an integral part of the lower school curriculum. Themes for each grade are age appropriate and presented through age appropriate activities. PRE-KINDERGARTEN – Feelings The guidance curriculum in prekindergarten focuses primarily on building a “feelings vocabulary” and learning about the “Newman Way”. Students begin to learn how to identify and label various feelings that they may experience during the day such as happiness, excitement, frustration and many more. As a result of scheduled classroom guidance lessons, the students establish a familiarity with the Guidance Counselor and a climate is created where the students become comfortable talking about their feelings with each other. As a result, pre-kindergarteners begin to establish a dialogue with their classmates around feelings – both positive and negative. The long term goal is to lay the foundation for community building where students can express themselves openly and learn to negotiate their roles within the classroom, on the playground and in their social groups. The majority of guidance activities, at this age, are experienced through reading books and arts and crafts projects. KINDERGARTEN – How to talk about feelings In kindergarten, the guidance curriculum builds on the lessons from pre-kindergarten and further develops the students’ “feelings vocabulary”. Additionally, Newman’s core values of honesty, kindness, respect and responsibility are explored as students learn ways to live the “Newman Way”. Complex concepts are introduced such as empathy, how to help others and the value of an apology. Kindergarteners will begin to understand that feelings are a part of everyone’s day and that how we handle our feelings can affect our community, both positively and negatively. As a result of scheduled classroom guidance lessons, the students establish a familiarity with the Guidance Counselor. The long term goal is to lay the foundation for community building where students can express themselves openly and learn to negotiate their roles within the classroom, on the playground and in their social groups. The majority of guidance activities at this age are experienced through reading books and having a discussion about the themes, and arts and crafts projects. Some of the books we read at this age are: It’s hard to be Five by Jamie Lee Curtis, Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day by Judith Viorst and What are feelings? Feelings to Share from A-Z by Todd and Peggy Snow. FIRST GRADE – Empathy and community In first grade, students continue to explore the concept of empathy, which was introduced in kindergarten, and is designed to expand the awareness of self and others. Whether it is through the


theme of “we are alike, we are all different” or learning the difference between “put-ups” and “putdowns”, the first grade student will have the opportunity to develop a deeper awareness of themselves as individuals. There is also a continued emphasis on Newman’s four core values of honesty, kindness, respect and responsibility. All lessons are intended to increase the sense of community within the classroom, through heightened awareness of and respect for each individual’s uniqueness. SECOND GRADE – Friendship and peaceful partnership Second graders focus on issues of friendship and conflict resolution. The year begins with a whole class activity where the class creates a Friendship Rules book. Each student contributes their own page, and then the pages are bound and kept in the classroom to be referenced throughout the year. Subsequent lessons focus on strategies to make friends, keep friends and work through tough times with friends. The concept of apologizing is revisited from first grade, and students are given the opportunity to develop and practice simple conflict resolution skills. Additionally, Newman’s core values of honesty, kindness, respect and responsibility are explored as students continue live the “Newman Way”. THIRD GRADE – Tolerance and conflict resolution In third grade, the focus is on the theme of tolerance. Students will participate in a variety of hands-on lessons that are designed to put them in other students’ shoes. Much of the discussion in Guidance will revolve around social roles in the classroom and on the playground, understanding other people’s point of view and understanding how one’s actions affect others. Many of the lessons in the third grade are experiential and interactive. As in previous years, Newman’s core values of honesty, kindness, respect and responsibility are explored as students continue to learn ways to live the “Newman Way”. FOURTH GRADE – Choices Fourth graders focus on decision making skills. Through a series of handson activities, the students can begin to recognize what steps they take to reach a decision and what factors may influence their choices. Students will identify role models as well as influential people and messages in their lives. The intention of these lessons is to introduce early concepts of peer pressure and healthy choices around friends and wellness. Newman’s core values of honesty, kindness, respect and responsibility continue to be emphasized as students explore more ways to live the “Newman Way”. FIFTH GRADE – Leadership and personal responsibility As students reach their final lower school year, the guidance curriculum focuses on leadership. The fifth grade is the leadership class of the Lower School and the students are offered several leadership opportunities; Leadership Council and Greenie Greeters for example. The intention of many of the guidance lessons is for the students to have directed discussions around what qualities make a good leader, who are their leadership role models and situations wherein leadership is important. Students will explore what character traits and abilities are needed for leadership, such as courage, strength and strong communication skills. Additionally, Newman’s core values of honesty, kindness, respect and responsibility are explored as students continue to develop ways to live the “Newman Way”.


Middle School and Upper School Guidance Curriculum The Newman Counseling and Human Development Department provides for students in our community an opportunity to seek and develop resources and support for their own social and emotional development. Reflecting Newman’s Statement of Purpose, we are particularly committed to the values of compassion and responsibility for others, respect for cultural and personal differences, and the emotional well-being of each member of our community. The two primary goals of our department could be generalized as follows: first, to provide a confidential resource for any individual student and his/her family who may be having some emotional, social or behavioral difficulty; second, to provide a curriculum that allows students the opportunity, through facilitated classroom discussions, to explore issues relevant to their social and emotional development. The human development curriculum arose from a need identified by teachers, parents and administrators. It replaces the more traditional health curriculum with an integrated and progressive program serving Lower, Middle and Upper Schools.

Human Development Program The Middle and Upper School Human Development Program, the curricular side of the counseling program for the two divisions, supports and enhances the social, emotional and ethical growth of each of our students in grades 6-12. Middle and upper school counselors teach the course in a discussion format. Using the School’s four core values as the foundation for dialogue, the counselors encourage students to consider the choices they face in a complex world. The course offers middle and upper school students an opportunity to discuss human development topics honestly and safely with the counselors and their peers while receiving accurate information within a realistic social and ethical context.

Middle School Human Development Program Overview The middle school human development course occurs throughout the academic year for all middle school students. The curriculum includes age-appropriate lessons to promote character development and to educate students about topics relating to health & wellness; technology & media; peer-relations; and the challenges they may face as pre-adolescents. Although course meetings focus on these grade-level topics, the counselors adjust the curriculum if other issues arise that need to be addressed within a particular grade.


Students explore all topics within the context of Newman’s four core values and are asked to consider the following questions throughout their experience in the course: What do the four core values mean to me? How do I practice these values in my daily life? How do my values affect my decisions? SIXTH GRADE - The course specifically addresses the following topics: adjustment to middle school; positive self-regard; peer relationships; friendships; teasing, bullying; inclusion and exclusion; communication; and puberty. The course includes a particular emphasis on the uses and abuses of technology, including cyber-bullying, “sexting”, texting, inappropriate website access, privacy, and digital citizenship. SEVENTH GRADE- The course begins with a substance prevention and education unit led by the Council on Alcohol and Drug Abuse (CADA) prevention educators. The curriculum, entitled “Too Good for Drugs“, includes discussions and activities about the risks of substances as well as lessons on healthy decision-making, self-esteem, peer-influence, leadership, values and ethics (see attached CADA curriculum overview). The middle and upper school counselors attend all CADA classes with the students. For the second half of the course the counselors continue working with students on leadership and character development. The course also includes a review of digital media issues such as online safety, responsible technology use, personal media habits, and digital citizenship. EIGHTH GRADE – The course addresses ways students may make healthy decisions for themselves while considering how their values guide their decisions. Specifically the course includes lessons and discussions about wellness topics such as sexual health, nutrition and fitness, body image and self-esteem, eating disorders, and substance abuse education and prevention. Counselors utilize the most current adolescent brain research in a discussion of substance abuse education and prevention. Students also review topics of online safety and responsible technology use covered during the sixth and seventh grade courses.

Upper School Human Development Program Overview The upper school human development program consists of student workshops and group meetings led by the counselors individually and in partnership with organizations outside the school community. NINTH GRADE – The human development curriculum focuses on the topics of substance abuse education and suicide prevention. A facilitator from Freedom from Chemical Dependency (FCD), a national non-profit organization that provides school-based substance prevention services, conducts a week-long extensive workshop with students on drug and alcohol abuse and dependency (www.fcd.org). During that week the facilitator also leads an evening parent presentation. A trained facilitator from Teen Life Counts (TLC), a school-based suicide prevention and education program, presents to the ninth grade students during a class period over one week (www.teenlifecounts.org). The program aims to make students aware of warning signs for suicide so they may recognize individuals in their peer group who may be at a high risk for suicide and so students understand what resources are available to them to seek help for those peers in need.


TENTH GRADE - The human development course occurs during one class period every day for three weeks. The school counselors facilitate discussions with students and lead activities, including: ethics and decision-making; sexuality; dangers of drugs and alcohol; current adolescent brain research; and mental health issues, including: stress, depression, suicide, and eating disorders. Tenth grade students will also attend an all-day seminar led by Sudden Impact at LSU Medical Center. The presentation includes information about drinking and driving and texting and driving. The Louisiana State Police and LSU Medical Center conduct the program. The program lasts seven hours and occurs in the Trauma Center, allowing students to witness the devastation of motor-vehicle crash injuries and fatalities due to driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs, distracted driving and driving unrestrained. Trauma victims, ILH medical staff and state troopers present information to the students. The program ends with a visit to a patient in the Trauma ICU or Emergency Department. ELEVENTH GRADE – The human development curriculum revisits topics of substance abuse education and prevention. Students in their junior year also meet with a facilitator from Freedom from Chemical Dependency (FCD) for a one-week extensive workshop on drug and alcohol abuse and dependency (www.fcd.org). Eleventh grade parents are also invited to attend the evening FCD parent presentation. TWELFTH GRADE – In the twelfth grade, the counselors lead a transition group as the human development course. This program consists of six to eight weekly meetings of no more than eight students per group. As facilitators the counselors help students explore their feelings about the upcoming transition from high school to college, addressing themes such as leaving home, leaving friends, peer-pressure, substance awareness, time management, and stress.

Co-Curricular Programs The middle and upper school counselors partner with other school programs and develop and lead additional groups to support students and parents. They work with the Deans of Students for both divisions on the advisory program, specifically by offering support and guidance for advisors and by assisting the Deans in developing advisory projects. Counselors routinely communicate with the learning specialists about ways to support students in the Academic Resource Lab and co-facilitate small groups with ARL students as needed. Occasionally the counselors invite students to participate in small groups after school or at lunch to address social-emotional issues in common such as friendship problems, coping with divorce, or handling grief. The middle and upper school counselors are also involved in the following upper school student groups: Students against Destructive Decisions (SADD), the Gay-Straight Alliance (GSA), and the Peer Leadership Program. As part of these groups the counselors help to coordinate programs at assemblies and during special events that inform students about important issues that correspond to those taught within the human development program.


Parent Education Program As an extension of the counselors’ work to guide students’ development and well-being they communicate with parents and offer information and support about relevant topics and concerns. The counselors also work with the President of the Newman Parents Association to share ideas about the needs of the Newman parent community. 

Parent Discussion Groups In the middle school, parents meet by grade level with the counselors and class deans to discuss particular issues and topics of interest. Meetings occur approximately twice per trimester. In the upper school, parents across the four grade levels meet approximately twice per semester with the counselors to discuss common concerns, parenting strategies, and topics of interest.

Parent Presentations The school counselors develop evening presentations for parents to attend. Examples from previous years include: Parenting in the World of Digital Media The entire parent (and teacher) community, grades pre-K-12 was invited to attend this presentation. Led by Dr. Christine Ebrahim, the talk focused on issues of digital citizenship, issues of privacy, online safety and security, and what early habits parents can develop with their children to use technology and digital media responsibly and safely. Parents were presented with tools and programs they can use to increase the security and safety of specific digital media devices. Teen Drug and Alcohol Use Parents of students in the middle and upper school were invited to learn about current adolescent brain research and its relationship to teen behaviors with risktaking and decision-making. Additional topics included: the “intoxication instinct”, peer group influence, New Orleans culture, the marijuana dilemma, and what families can do to address these issues.


Curriculum Guide

Drama Technical Theater Film Production Visual Arts Choir Dance Photojournalism Photography Band History

Upper & Middle School

2013-2014


Arts Department Mission Statement We believe that the arts are a universal language that is essential to the development of the whole child. The arts develop creative thinking and self expression. They strengthen self-confidence and heighten aesthetic awareness, sensitivity, and the ability to visualise through the creative process. The arts can inspire conversation, reflection, civility and building self-esteem among all students. The arts help students better understand themselves, while engaging them in developing an appreciation for the arts. The arts teach honesty, kindness, compassion, respect, responsibility, and what it means to be human.

Mission & Arts Faculty

At Newman School we value each individual in the arts, and strive to provide the necessary tools to be successful in the world of the arts. We believe that every student is an artist and it is the mission of the arts department to foster the artist within each student. Through exploration of the arts, Newman students develop a broad and deep understanding of the world around them, greater intellectual development, and a well-rounded education. We want all Newman students to make connections between arts and life.

Arts Faculty • 2013-2014 Paul J. Tines, Dean of the Arts, Theater Allison Bach, Art History

Ginger Guma, Theater

Anthony Sears, Choir & Music History

Victoria Calabrese, LS Studio Art

Liese Weber Hammontree, Dance

Kathryn Scurlock, Gallery Director

Sheila Connolly, Pre-K & MS Studio Telly Higgins, Band Travis Stevens, Technical Director Art Meghann Niehus, Film, Photojournalism, Rebecca Thomason, Print Media Design Rachael DePauw, Ceramics Photography, & Film History Amanda Wadsworth, Music Brian Dufour, Band Andrew Rodgers, US Studio Art

ARTICULATION Motivation Musicianship

Confidence

Balance Inspiration

mastery Dynamic Focus Light influence Creation cut/paste HARD

risk-taking WORK EMPATHY

Communication

Flow

Harmony

zone

EGO Textural

Sacrifice

Rigor

composition

Enthusiasm

Respect

Dedicated

brilliance

Detail Sound

ARTS

Escape

Compassion Discipline moment Expression Artistic

Letting go

Energy

Respite

organic

Time

Universal Concentration PASSION Messy ACTION love Depth Genesis

Pride Experience

Catharsis

sublimefunExploration RELEASE evolution

Arts Department Retreat Word Cloud 2012 • Design by Rebecca Thomason


Upper School students must complete a minimum of 2 credits of Arts Courses:

1.5 credits of Applied Arts courses (Dance, Film, Music, Theater, Visual)

+ 0.5 credits of Art History Dance

Dance - Beginning/Intermediate • 0.5 credits, Offered both semesters The dance curriculum is to build a foundation of movement and dance technique at each student’s appropriate level and expand upon his/her individual expression through dance and movement. The focus will be on developing an understanding of the body as an instrument of expression. Students will be provided with a fuller appreciation of dance through structured and improvisational participation, observation, discussion, dance creation, and performance. Styles include: ethnic dance, modern, jazz, ballet, musical theater, tap, improvisation, and contact improvisation. Emphasis is placed on refining technical skills and visual perception, moving with accuracy and projection, increasing theoretical understanding of movement vocabulary, and increasing knowledge of dance history and anatomical awareness. Students earn both arts and PE credit.

Dance - Intermediate/Advanced • 0.5 credits, Offered both semesters, Prerequisites: Dance - Beginning*

Upper School

Dance classes are designed to further the student’s interest in dance on a more advanced level of study. Technical proficiency and performance quality will be emphasized during these years of study. Students will be expected to work in a focused manner with the intention of increasing their skill base. Students will be able to make connections between dance and healthful living, comprehend ways to prevent injury and identify strength and stretching techniques for injury rehabilitation, as well increase their comfort level and self-image as a dancer. Dance appreciation, creative communication through movement, and expanded preparation to dance beyond this program will be the ultimate goal. Students earn both arts and PE credit.

Dance Production & Performance • 0.5 credits, Offered spring semester, Prerequisites: Dance - Intermediate* The Dance Production & Performance class will provide an interactive classroom, which will combine technical expansion and strengthening in a variety of styles. The dance ensemble students will develop skills to create chorography for performances, using memebers of the class, and learn the format of critique related to dance and other movement forms. Elements of production will be introduced including: lighting, costuming, programming, and pre-production and post-performance details. During the semester, dance performance opportunities will be offered, which may include Arts Week. Students can earn both Arts and PE credit.

Film Film Production - Beginning • 1.0 credit, Full-year & 0.5 credits, Offered summer session In this hands-on course, students will be introduced to visual storytelling and video production. Students will learn the ins and outs of the production process – from planning, to writing, to shooting, to editing, to exhibition and critique. Working in production teams to produce short films, with an emphasis on the narrative fiction. Time permitting, documentary and montage will also be introduced. Topics to be explored in-depth include cinematography and lighting, mise-en-scene, sound recording and design, editing theory and technique, and screenwriting.

Film Production - Intermediate/Advanced • 1.0 credits, Full-year, Prerequisite: Film Production - Beginning Serious minded film production students can continue their cinematic education in this course. Students will work in production teams to create films for film festivals as well as other local and national exhibition. Through these projects, the story structure, character, and editing theory will be emphasized along with a continued focus on visual storytelling. Students will also explore more advanced lighting, audio, and post-production techniques. In the spring, *Prerequisite classes may be waived at the permission of the instructor and Dean of the Arts


the students will work to program and promote the annual Newman Film Festival.

Band • 1.0 credit, Full-year

Music

First Semester – The Football band performs at home football games. Participation in a Pep Band for away games is optional. A Winter Concert closes out activities for this semester. Second semester – The Concert Band performs for Founder’s Day, competes in the LMEA Large Ensemble Festival, and presents a Spring Concert at the end of the semester. A volunteer Pep Band performs at some home basketball games. Every other year the band makes an out of state trip to compete in a national band festival. Band students are exposed to a wide variety of band literature including both pop and classical music. In addition, percussion students perform in a unique percussion ensemble which uses only instruments of the percussion family. The ensemble performs as part of the Winter and Spring Band Concerts, and often performs at other events both on and off campus. Enrollment is not limited.

Chorus • 1.0 credit, Full-year This course has emphasis on performance of music, both accompanied and unaccompanied, of several styles from the Renaissance to the 21st century. Attention is paid to fundamental concepts of intonation, sight singing and vocal production.

Mens Chorus • 1.0 credit, Full-year In this class, students explore and perform all-male choral literature, both accompanied and unaccompanied, from the medieval period to the present. Attention is paid to the fundamental concepts of intonation, vocal production, sight-singing, and vocal independence. Emphasis is on building a strong musical foundation with at least one concert performance each semester. This non-auditioned course is ideal for both the outgoing performer, as well as the young man who has never performed in a choral setting.

Upper School

Womens Chorus • 1.0 credit, Full-year Womens Chorus is an ensemble that is an extension of the Upper School Choir. No audition is necessary for this group. This ensemble will be introduced to the concepts of musicianship through sightreading, as well as performance through treble repertoire from the Renaissance era to the Contemporary period.

Theater

Acting - Beginning • 0.5 credits, Not offered 2013-2014 This course is not only for the beginning actor, but for any student who would like to increase self-esteem and understand the basics of acting. Fundamental acting skills are developed through physical, vocal, and improvisational exercises. Character, monologue, and scene study prepare students for auditions and performances as well as interviews and classroom presentations. The Meisner and Adler acting techniques are the underlying foundations of the course. Evaluation is based on class participation as well as performance, written assignments, and tests. No previous experience is necessary.

Acting - Intermediate/Advanced • 0.5 credits, Offered spring semester, Prerequisite: Acting Beginning* This course is for the student who wants to further mature and develop as an actor. Voice, movement, character analysis, and scene study will be emphasized. The Meisner, Adler, and Stanislavski acting techniques are the underlying foundations of the course. Evaluation is based on class participation as well as performance, written assignments, and tests.


Playwriting • 0.5 credits, Not offered 2013-2014 This course introduces students to the basic techniques of structure and dialogue in playwriting. We will read a variety of modern and contemporary short plays, exploring the craft through a variety of writing assignments, in-class discussions and critiques. While the focus will be on gaining a broader understanding of basic elements of playwriting, the course will also encourage students to develop the necessary discipline for writing creatively. Students will develop their own one-act play, and one of these will be chosen for development and production on Newman’s stage. Students will receive both Arts and English Elective credits for this course.

Technical Theater - Beginning • 0.5 credits, Offered both semesters This course is an expansion of the terminology and techniques used in technical theatre. This course examines the physical theater, scenic construction and finishing techniques, stage equipment uses and safety, scene shop equipment uses and safety, technical theater design communication including use of scale and drawings, stage lighting techniques and practices including use of intelligent lighting and computer controlled lighting, stage sound techniques and practices including use of wireless microphones and sound effects, and backstage crew practices and safety. Students in this course will be actively involved in Upper School Theater Department productions. This class has a requirement of working outside of school hours on Newman play productions.

Technical Theater - Intermediate/Advanced • 0.5 credits, Offered both semesters, Prerequisite: Technical Theater - Beginning Advanced Technical Theater is continued course of study in the design and production elements of theater. Students will build upon and refine their skills in scenic design and construction, sound and lighting, and work on the crew for performances. Students are encouraged to specialize in a particular discipline, and to further hone the design and production crafts. This class has a requirement of working outside of school hours on Newman play productions.

Repertory Theater – Newman Children’s Theater • 0.5 credits • Not offered 2013-2014

Upper School

This course will emphasize theater designed and staged specifically for young people. Dramatic presentations of fiction, drama, and poetry will be explored. Additional topics will include: basic set construction, make-up, costume design, script analysis, staging, and basic acting techniques. Participants will create a touring children’s theater production. No prior theatrical experience necessary.

Ceramics - Beginning • 0.5 credits, Offered both semesters

Visual Arts

This course serves as an introduction to ceramics as a three-dimensional art medium. Students will learn various handbuilding and wheel-throwing techniques, using mid-range stoneware clay for both functional and sculptural creations. Projects will become increasingly more involved as the semester progresses and will expand upon the fabrication skill-set learned from each previous project. In addition to these basic techniques, students will also gain a working knowledge of overall surface decoration, proper glaze application, and electric kiln firings. Students will be exposed to basic ceramic terminology and also both formal and conceptual aesthetic qualities. The learning processes and experiences in this course will provide students with a new vocabulary in art making and self-expression.

Ceramics - Intermediate/Advanced • 0.5 credits, Offered both semesters, Prerequisite: Ceramics - Beginning This 2nd year ceramics course revisits clay as a three-dimensional art medium with a heightened focus on the individual student’s particular interests. Students will be able to concentrate on their particular interest in either handbuilding or wheel-throwing techniques, using low-fire terracotta and mid-range stoneware clay. Projects will become increasingly complex as the semester progresses and will expand upon the fabrication skill-set learned from previous projects. In addition to these techniques, students will also expand their working knowledge of overall surface decoration, proper glaze application, and electric kiln firings.


Print Media Design • 0.5 credits, Offered both semesters & summer session Students will use the computer as a tool to convert their ideas into vector images using Illustrator and Photoshop. Drawing inspiration from the world around surrounding us, students will reference 21st century visual culture and use it to influence how they express themselves through art. Focus will be on creating original illustrations, successful compositions, and color combinations that translate from screen to paper true to the artist’s intention. Students will have both physical examples and a digital portfolio by the end of the semester.

Photography - Beginning • 0.5 credits, Offered both semesters This course will be an introduction to photography through the exploration of classic photographic concepts and current practices. Students will learn how to balance light through the artistic interpretation of the exposure triangle (ISO, aperture, and shutter speed). Students will also learn the basics of composition, light quality, lenses and optics, and postprocessing techniques. A strong emphasis is also placed on the image file management and workflow. Students should provide their own digital camera for the course with manual override capabilities. This course is a prerequisite to Photography – Intermediate/Advanced and Photojournalism.

Photography - Intermediate/Advanced • 0.5 credits, Offered fall semester, Prerequisite: Beginning Photography Students with previous experience with photography will deepen their understanding camera techniques and post production processes. Students will gain a greater understanding of the work notable photographers by completing projects which emulate their style. Additionally, students will have the opportunity to explore and become more specialized in an area of photography in which they have particular interest, all while developing a comprehensive and varied portfolio of work. Students must provide their own digital cameras for this course (a DSLR is strongly recommended). Not open to freshmen.

Photojournalism • 1.0 credit, Full-year, Prerequisites: Beginning Photography or Print Media Design*

Upper School

The Photojournalism class operates as the yearbook production staff as a part of Newman Publications. Students may specialize in a particular area of yearbook production depending on their role on the staff. In this course, students will study photography, visual design, and journalistic writing by applying these concepts to work intended for publication in the Absinthe. Students will also be expected to complete additional learning exercises to supplement their photography, design, and journalistic skills. Not open to freshmen.

An Introduction to the Studio Arts • 0.5 credits, Offered both semesters This course is the prerequisite for all Studio Arts courses. Beginner Art in the US begins with a reinterpretation of the basic shapes and the Elements of Design and Composition. Basic drawing skills and the materials and tools used by artists are introduced and taught with the use of a wide variety of still-life subjects and individual attention from the instructor. Painting, both watercolor and acrylic, is reintroduced along with color theory, including complimentary colors, analogous colors and tertiary colors, along with color mixing. Different media are introduced along with new techniques; problem solving techniques and strategies are also introduced. A wide range of projects including linear perspective are presented and introduced to the student in hope that he or she will get an understanding of what possibilities are available for an artistic student.

Drawing and Painting • 0.5 credits, Offered both semesters, Prerequisite: Introduction to Studio Arts This class is designed as an intermediate level course that examines the traditional aesthetic link between the paper and the canvas. Drawing is the beginning of all visual art and students will begin the course through exhaustive drafting study and end the course creating oil paintings in the glaze and varnish style of the old masters.


2-D Design & The Printed Image • 0.5 credits, Offered both semesters, Prerequisite: Introduction to Studio Arts This course is designed as an intermediate level class that examines the strength of the icon and the printed image in today’s culture. Through studio study and lecture, students will understand the basics for graphic design before the onset of digital technologies. Drawing, printmaking, collage and other visual art techniques will be learned and employed.

AP Studio Art: Drawing and AP Studio Art: 2-D Design • 1.0 credits, Full-year Prerequisites: Introduction to Studio Arts, Drawing & Painting, and 2-D Design & The Printed image This class is the terminal fine arts course. Students examine advanced topics in aesthetics in truly challenging and rigorous projects ranging from oil painting to intaglio prints. A large body of work is produced by all of the students in the course. The AP students work closely with the instructor to develop both their portfolios for application into an art and design school as well as their vision as young artists. Several field trips are taken to local galleries as well as museums that give the Newman art student the ability to work hands on with world class artwork.

Studio Art – Directed Independent Study Courses are offered for both the beginning and advanced students. Once a student has completed the regular curriculum in a particular area of study, he or she may apply for a Directed Study to purse advanced work in the area.

History Art History • 0.5 credits, Offered both semesters

Upper School

Art History exposes students to the art of many cultures dating from the ancient world to contemporary works. The art of the Western world is the focus of the latter half of our study. The course is designed to introduce basic art appreciation as a skill that can be easily acquired and enjoyed. Students are encouraged to participate in conversations and formulate opinions about what they see on a regular basis. Those interested in a more intensive year-long course of study should instead enroll in Honors Art History.

Art History – Honors • 1.0 credit, Full-year, Prerequisites: B in previous History course* This course seeks to provide students with a fundamental appreciation of the art of many cultures dating from the ancient world to contemporary America. Whereas much of the course focuses on the Western tradition, we will also work towards an understanding of the art of Asia, Africa, and the Americas. As we place art in its historical and cultural context, you will endeavor to both speak and write with honest confidence about what you see as you justify whether you find merit in it. Preference is granted to Seniors.

Drama History • 0.5 credits (Not offered 2013-2014) This course will explore how humans have depicted life through theater and performance art throughout the ages. We will begin with ritual and myth in “primitive” societies, move through Greek and Roman theater, the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, 19th Century, all the way to modern day. Primarily, our task will be to discover the historical context through textual analysis of exemplary plays from each era. Always, we will return to the question of how drama is a tool for distilling the human experience, and the extent to which it is/was a relevant means to this end. To this, we will employ the motto RAW: Read, Analyze, Write. Aside from being a reading- and writing-intensive course, this course will be heavily discussion-based—you will be expected to challenge your own and one another’s thinking, and to always keep an open mind. Students watch film adaptations of plays, films of staged versions of plays, and will visit the theater in person at least once. Guests from within and outside the Newman community will make special presentations at different points throughout the semester. Much of this course will require self-direction, self-motivation, and self-discipline from you.


Students will be provided with guidelines, which will be their responsibility to mold into a course of personal study.

Film History • 0.5 credits, (Not offered 2013-2014) Through viewing, critiquing and writing, students will learn various ways of reading a film as text. The course will focus on the development of visual narrative technique, concentrating specifically on mise-en-scene, editing, cinematography, and sound. A chronological viewing sequence, featuring both European and Hollywood films, will help students understand the historical processes of technical innovation through distinct eras and styles, including: primitive film, silent film, French Impressionism, German Expressionism, Soviet montage, the Hollywood studio system, and Italian Neo-realism. Class discussions follow the viewing of each film and students will be responsible for writing short response papers each week. A major analytical paper on either Citizen Kane or Psycho will constitute the mid-session exam. For the final exam, students will be required to analyze sequences from films shown throughout the course.

Music History • 0.5 credits, Offered both semesters

Upper School

This course follows the evolution of Western classical music through the six major periods of history: Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque, Classical, Romantic, and Modern. The course is designed to develop listening skills and the vocabulary needed to talk about music. The text not only presents the genres, compositional techniques, and composers of each period, but also relates music to politics, socio-economic class structure, religion, philosophy, art, and science. Students will learn about the biographies and personalities of composers and characteristics of their music that make it unique to their respective time period.


6th grade students are required to choose from one of the four art options: Beginning Band, Band, Chorus

OR

Arts Rotation (Acting, Movement, Studio Art)

Band, Beginning Band, and Chorus are year-long. Students who select the Arts Rotation will rotate through Acting, Movement, and Studio Art, taking one each trimester.

7th grade students are required to choose from one of the four art options: Beginning Band, Band, Chorus

OR

Arts Rotation (Acting, Movement, Studio Art)

Band, Beginning Band, and Chorus are year-long. Students who select the Arts Rotation will rotate through Acting, Movement, and Studio Art, taking one each trimester.

8th grade students are required to choose from one of the four art options:

Middle School

Beginning Band, Band, Chorus

OR

Arts Rotation (Acting, Movement, Studio Art)

Band, Beginning Band, and Chorus are year-long. Students who select the Arts Rotation will rotate through Acting, Movement, and Studio Art, taking one each trimester.

Dance

Dance 6: Movement for Life In the Sixth Grade Movement for Life rotation, students will begin to learn a basic understanding of several dance/ movement forms including: historical, contemporary, martial dance, tap, theatrical, popular and improvisational forms. The students will work individually, with partners and in groups while exploring how to move in relation to self and others. In addition to learning supporting forms of movement (such as yoga and flexibility), the dancers will be exposed to dance history and movement vocabulary basics. The course content during each trimester rotation will develop in accordance with the interests of the class participants.

Dance 7: Movement for Life In the Seventh Grade Movement for Life rotation, students will build on the basics learned in the 6th Grade rotation, while developing a deeper connection between movement and wellness. Complex patterns and an understanding of several dance/movement forms including: historical, contemporary, martial dance, tap, theatrical, popular and improvisational forms will be layered. Each class will develop the path of their interests in movement, and the students will work individually, with partners and in groups while exploring how to move in relation to self and others. In addition to learning other supporting forms of movement (such as yoga, Pilates, flexibility, and strength work), the dancers knowledge of dance history and movement vocabulary will be broadened and challenged. The course content during each trimester rotation will develop in accordance with the interests of the class participants.


Dance 8: Movement for Life In the Eighth Grade Movement for Life rotation, students will build on the basics learned in the 7th Grade rotation, while developing a deeper connection between movement and wellness. Complex patterns and an understanding of several dance/movement forms including: historical, contemporary, martial dance, tap, theatrical, popular and improvisational forms will be layered. Each class will develop the path of their interests in movement, and the students will work individually, with partners and in groups while exploring how to move in relation to self and others. In addition to learning other supporting forms of movement (such as yoga, Pilates, flexibility, and strength work), the dancers knowledge of dance history and movement vocabulary will be broadened and challenged. The course content during each trimester rotation will develop in accordance with the interests of the class participants.

Music Band – Beginning This course is for students with little or no prior playing experience. Students learn the basics of tone production, embouchure formation, and fingering for their chosen instrument. Students also learn basic note reading, phrasing, dynamics, and ensemble playing. By the second semester students will perform with the Cadet Band in concert for the Newman community.

Band 6 The main purpose of the 6th grade band class is to continue with the basic skills of music that began in the Lower School including note reproduction, finger placement, rhythmic structures, and time signatures. Sixth graders perform with the Cadet Band which consists of 5th, 6th, and Middle School Beginner band students.

Middle School

Band 7 First Semester – The Football band performs at home football games. Participation in a Pep Band for away games is optional. A Winter Concert closes out activities for this semester. Second semester – The Concert Band performs for Founder’s Day, competes in the LMEA Large Ensemble Festival, and presents a Spring Concert at the end of the semester. A volunteer Pep Band performs at some home basketball games. Every other year the band makes an out of state trip to compete in a national band festival. Band students are exposed to a wide variety of band literature including both pop and classical music. In addition, percussion students perform in a unique percussion ensemble which uses only instruments of the percussion family. The ensemble performs as part of the Winter and Spring Band Concerts, and often performs at other events both on and off campus. Enrollment is not limited.

Band 8 First Semester – The Football band performs at home football games. Participation in a Pep Band for away games is optional. A Winter Concert closes out activities for this semester. Second semester – The Concert Band performs for Founder’s Day, competes in the LMEA Large Ensemble Festival, and presents a Spring Concert at the end of the semester. A volunteer Pep Band performs at some home basketball games. Every other year the band makes an out of state trip to compete in a national band festival. Band students are exposed to a wide variety of band literature including both pop and classical music. In addition, percussion students perform in a unique percussion ensemble which uses only instruments of the percussion family. The ensemble performs as part of the Winter and Spring Band Concerts, and often performs at other events both on and off campus. Enrollment is not limited.

Chorus Emphasis here is on performance of music, both accompanied and a cappella, of several styles from Renaissance music to pop, and Broadway. Attention is paid to fundamental concepts of intonation, sight singing, and healthy vocal production. Chorus is strongly recommended for those students interested in Newman musical productions.


Theater Acting 6 This one trimester course introduces students to the fundamentals of acting. Students will work on improvisations and theater games, write and perform scenes, and will begin to learn how the actor approaches a scene. Vocal projection, characterization, and body language will be emphasized. A short introduction to musical theater will culminate in a lip synch project. The class is open to any student in the Middle School.

Acting 7 This trimester course is part of the arts rotation in Middle School and is offered to students who want to continue to explore the world of the actor. Theater games, vocal and physical warm-ups, improvisations, and group projects are used to develop the acting tools - voice, body language, and facial expressions. For the final project of the trimester, students are assigned a short scene to present in class. The project includes staging the scene, creating a character, and memorizing dialogue. Grades are based on audience behavior, participation, and willingness to take risks on stage.

Acting 8 This trimester course is part of the arts rotation in Middle School and is offered to students who want to continue to explore the world of the actor. Theater games, vocal and physical warm-ups, improvisations, and group projects are used to develop the acting tools...voice, body language, and facial expressions. Students will be assigned several short scenes to present in class. This will involve staging the scene, creating a character, and memorizing dialogue. Grades are based on audience behavior, participation, and willingness to take risks on stage.

Visual Art

Middle School

Studio Art 6 As an entry to middle school art, students will be introduced to a variety of media and art techniques. Drawing from observation is a core component to looking, researching, and communicating ideas and will be a recurring theme. Focus will be on reinforcing previously learned skills while acquiring new artistic knowledge including fundamentals of perspective, shading and painting as well as expanding arts vocabulary.

Studio Art 7 Elements of art will be reviewed and expanded. Students will explore the relationships of line and composition while improving their perceptual skills through observational drawings. Emphasis will be on contour drawing, shading, and creating multiple dimensions. Perception, analysis, and critical judgment skills will be refined through creating, studying and discussing art work.

Studio Art 8 Students will continue to develop and refine drawing skills with frequent observational drawing exercises. The relationships of color will be introduced and explored through acrylic and water color painting. Students will also learn basics of printmaking in addition to working with wood and Styrofoam.


Overview Visual Art Pre Kindergarten and Kindergarten Art at Newman is a special time as it’s our students’ earliest inception of specified art time in a specified place: the studio. This is the beginning of their relationship to art and, hopefully, a life-long engagement with it. Students are introduced to a variety of artists, methods, and media. The use of space is an important factor in the art studio. Students frequently immerse their entire bodies in the art process and they are encouraged to do so. Whether spreading out on the floor in groups, working against the wall with their papers pinned to it, or building vertically at the tables or on the floor, the students locate the space that suits their creative endeavors. This provides the children with a medium for problem-solving, planning, and adaptive skills. Making the space their own seems to enable the creative flow. Students are guided in discovering their own strategies and methods that are unique to their interests while fitting within the larger framework and curriculum. The foundation of an arts vocabulary begins in these years as well as a foundation of exploration and observation. Both fine motor skills and socializing skills are developed in the studio, but mostly it is simply a place to immerse themselves in creativity and fun. In first grade art students begin to work with a variety of materials from watercolors to cardboard and clay. Together we explore the elements of art with these materials and study their importance in each piece of art. While in first grade, the students also begin to apply a critical eye while in the Reynolds Ryan Art Gallery where they learn to observe the similarities and differences of individual artists and their unique styles. In second grade art students delve deeper into different art processes such as printmaking and acrylic paint. During this time, collaboration with their peers is also introduced. Project times become longer and more in-depth and students are allowed to find their own inspiration for their art.

Lower School

In third grade art students become more aware of artists practices such as creating artists’ statements and learning about proportion. During this time, the students draw skeletons and become more familiar with figure drawing. In addition, they also explore various sources of visual stimulation through nature, architecture, and galleries. In fourth grade art students become fully immersed in sculpting and sketch-booking. In the beginning of the year, the students are given their own sketchbooks to use for planning out projects and working out multiple ideas for long term projects. Furthermore, the students explore different media to execute their artistic visions. In fifth grade art students work across curriculum with their humanities classes for the majority of their long term projects. In some of these projects, they create their own Japanese tea bowls for a tea ceremony while studying feudal Japan, they also create mosaics while learning about the Golden Age of Islam, and they even create Celtic sketches while exploring the Book of Kells and the Middle Ages. These long term projects are also broken up by sketchbook assignments and trips to the Reynolds Ryan Art Gallery.

Music

The Lower School music curriculum is designed for students to be exposed to many different genres of music, instruments, games, and songs. Students explore the opera, symphony orchestra, ballet, world music, and jazz. They learn about different composers and terminology associated with each genre of music. In class they play and read rhythms, accompany songs with instruments and movements, and they learn how to read and write music. They have the opportunity to perform in different ensembles throughout the school year including the hand bell choir, Orff instrument ensemble, and an African drum circle. Music technology is also incorporated into the curriculum. Each year every grade level presents musical performances to the Newman community. PK and Kindergarten present a musical every spring. They learn the music, make their own costumes, and design and paint their own scenery for the show in art class. First grade learns about patriotic music and they lead the Lower School in a patriotic sing along. Second grade presents two performances each year including a Pow Wow featuring Native American music, and Pioneer Day where they learn songs and dances from the pioneer days. Third grade performs songs from Louisiana that are featured at their Character Day performance. In addition, the fourth and fifth graders give choral, band, and theater performances.


Additional Arts Programs Summer New Jazz School The New Jazz School is a free two week program under the direction of the renowned jazz master, Donald Harrison, Jr., in partnership with the Isidore Newman School, the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Foundation, Iberia Bank, and Surdna Foundation. For more information, please go to www.newjazzschool.wordpress.com. Summer Theater Conservatory

Additional Information

The Isidore Newman School Summer Theater Conservatory is a four week program designed for rising 6th – 12th grade students, and runs during the month of June. The program is also open to students who do not attend Newman. For more information, please go to www.newmanschool.org.

Evening

Newman at Night Adult art classes. Classes have included: Alignment-Based Yoga, Awareness Through Movement, Ceramics, Graphic Design, Jewelry Design, Line and space-Print Making, and Mastery of Light-A Survey of Oil Painting, For more information, please go to www.newmanatnight.com.

Weekend

Theater Saturdays Isidore Newman’s Theater Saturdays is a ten-week program offered to students currently in grades three through six. Participants do not have to be Newman students to attend. Classes meet Saturday mornings in Newman’s dance studio located in the Stern Center. Participants study and explore acting, dance, and voice. Their experience culminates in a workshop production. Saturday Art Class This eight week class is for the self-motivated child artist ready to expand their knowledge and love for drawing. We will be using multiple drawing materials including but not limited to, charcoal, pencil, and India ink. This class will offer the opportunity to work for more time and on a larger scale than the normal school day allows. Children from all schools are welcome in Saturday classes.

Parent Arts Liaisons Arts Community Liaison: Ellen Balkin Art Gallery/Visual Arts: Alicia Bendana Band: Kim Kaye Ceramics: Stephanie Huger Chorus: Mamie Gasperecz, Laura Sillars Theater: Cathy Drennan, Nora McAlister For more information about the arts at Newman, contact: Paul J. Tines, Dean of the Arts, paultines@newmanschool.org, 504-896-6414


Athletics The Athletic Department supports the School’s statement of purpose by developing the intellectual, ethical, physical and emotional growth in the individual student. Newman is a college preparatory school, focusing on the development of well-rounded students. The philosophy of the Newman Athletic Department mirrors the overall school philosophy and encourages excellence in all aspects of school life while affording students the opportunity to succeed in interscholastic sports. The Newman athletic program is dedicated to developing character, a competitive spirit and physical skills through a wide variety of individual and team sports. We develop highly competitive individuals who demonstrate teamwork, show respect for themselves and others, are honest in their efforts and achieve quality in all they do. Newman varsity athletic teams compete as members of the Louisiana High School Athletic Association (LHSAA) in Class 2A. Middle School boys’ teams compete primarily in the Metro League consisting of public, parochial and private schools. Middle School girls’ teams compete primarily in the Ivy League consisting mainly of private schools. Both the Metro League and the Ivy League are committed to providing a competitive balance, a limited number of games per week and an emphasis on skill development. Newman offers the following sports: baseball, basketball, cross country, football, golf, gymnastics, soccer, softball, swimming, tennis, indoor and outdoor track and volleyball. In addition there are two support positions for students; cheerleading and student athletic trainers. Ninety-two percent of middle school students and seventy-three percent of upper school students chose to participate in at least one of these activities last year. Whether a team has eight participants or sixty, all have the same standing and support, and are open to all interested students. The middle school athletic program’s purpose is to develop appropriate attitudes, skills, techniques, behaviors and the concept of sportsmanship that are part of being on a team. While participation is a key emphasis, middle school athletics does establish the foundation for our varsity athletic programs. At the varsity level, the goal and the emphasis shifts to performance and fielding competitive teams. Therefore, the commitment and expectations to team goals and working together to achieve them are substantial. The eighty-three state championships and hundreds of district championships earned through the years reflect a strong work ethic, a passionate dedication and a thorough commitment to excellence by both athletes and coaches. Newman is exceptionally fortunate to have a caring, committed, dedicated and professional coaching staff. The coaching staff, which is comprised of faculty and non-faculty coaches, provides and promotes the


development of each child’s potential. Newman coaches are expected to model behavior reflecting the core values of the school: Honesty, Kindness, Respect and Responsibility. This modeling is positive and constructive, and it has a significant impact on our student athletes that cannot be over-emphasized. The result for our student athletes is a wonderful balance and appreciation for the values obtained through athletics. Newman was one of the first area schools to employ a full-time certified trainer to evaluate the injured athlete, monitor progress, and work with students in rehabilitation. Today, Newman is the first and one of only a few schools to have two full-time trainers on staff. The two trainers are NATA (National Athletic Trainers Association) certified and direct the sports medicine program which includes supervising students who choose to serve as student trainers. In the fall of 2010 Newman trainers brought the ImPact (Immediate Past Concussion Assessment and Cognition Testing) program to Newman to ensure the cognitive safety of our athletes that participate in contact sports. This innovative program, which assists our team physicians and athletic trainers in evaluating and treating head injuries (e.g. concussions), is the same program used by the NFL and Newman is one of only a few high school in Louisiana currently using this program.

For more information about athletics at Newman, contact: Billy Fitzgerald Athletic Director billyfitzgerald@newmanschool.org 504-896-6380


College Counseling The Path to College This informational meeting is for parents of Newman’s seventh, eighth, ninth, and tenth grade students and is intended as an opportunity for parents to familiarize themselves with a variety of topics related to college admission, including course selection, co-curricular and summer activities, standardized testing and test preparation, and researching colleges. College Coffee Throughout the year, the college counselors will host informational meetings for parents centered on specific topics. Usually held in the Reynolds Ryan Art Gallery, College Coffees are informal and offer ample opportunity for parents to ask questions of the counselors and special guest speakers. Topics recently covered include “Standardized Testing” and “The Role of Athletics in the College Process.” SAT Test Prep Classes During the first semester of the junior year, all juniors are enrolled in an SAT Test Prep class which is held during one of the student’s free periods. The SAT Test Prep class is 8 weeks long (half of the fall semester). All juniors will complete this class prior to what is generally their first sitting for an SAT exam in January of the junior year. Junior Workshops Throughout junior year, the college counselors hold mini workshops with juniors to familiarize them with the usefulness and versatility of Naviance/Family Connection (the web-based platform utilized by the college counseling office). Junior Parent College Night This meeting will introduce parents of juniors to the college search and selection process, which begins in earnest at Newman during the second semester of the junior year. College Admissions Symposium The College Admissions Symposium is the official kick-off of the college search and selection process for juniors and their families. Deans of Admission from several colleges and universities across the country will lead breakout sessions on various elements of the college search and selection process. Meetings with College Counselors Following the College Admissions Symposium, students and their families will begin meeting with the college counselors to research colleges, develop prospective college lists, and eventually develop an active application list of colleges to which the student will apply in the fall of the senior year. College Application Boot Camp These hands-on workshops focus on getting seniors started on the Common Application, as well as covering the nuts and bolts of the college application process, such as how to request transcripts and send official test scores to college admission offices. Sessions are limited to 20 students to allow for plenty of one-on-one interaction with the college counselors. Seniors are required to attend one of four Boot Camp sessions, which are generally held during the second week in August. ISAS Financial Aid Night Each January, the college counseling staff of the New Orleans area ISAS schools (Newman, McGehee, St. Martin’s, Sacred Heart, and Country Day) host a joint meeting on the college financial aid process. A financial aid representative from one of the area universities leads this financial aid overview, providing information on the FAFSA, the CSS Profile, the TOPS program, and much more.


Technology Isidore Newman School is a technology rich environment. Used in all divisions and in every department, technology has become an integral part of the day to day workings of the School. Wireless internet and network access is pervasive across campus. Laptops are now ubiquitous. Digital projection technology can be found in every classroom in each division. Most importantly, teachers, students, and staff regularly find new uses and applications for the devices at their disposal. In short, the School has taken the necessary steps in the last several years to ensure that students at all levels are exposed to the tools they will need to become 21 st century learners, citizens, and leaders. Technology plays an important role in the Newman educational experience. With unprecedented access to information via the Internet, it is now easier than ever for students and teachers to get the content they need to be successful in every subject area. Communication between faculty, students, parents, and administration is virtually seamless via the School’s internal electronic mail system. Most importantly, technology has the potential to transform the learning experience at its most fundamental level. It allows students to transition from simple consumers of information to producers of digital content synthesized from several different ideas and subject areas that can be shared with anyone, anywhere. This is one of the most important skills that Newman students take with them when they graduate, a skill that they will rely on for the rest of their lives. Creativity and critical thinking, skills necessary in today’s work force, are important components of this digital production process. Newman students are exposed to iPads as early as Pre-Kindergarten. Our Technology Coordinator works closely with teachers and students to support classroom instruction and differentiated learning. Students develop essential skills by sharing and working together in a variety of ways. Creating multimedia presentations, programming, and digital media integration are all a part of Newman’s technology experience. Newman’s 1-to-1 laptop program begins in the fourth grade and continues through twelfth grade. The School provides first-level support for all student laptops, manages service with the vendor, if necessary, installs additional software as needed for specific academic purposes, and continually updates anti-virus software. Students have access to disk storage on the School network 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Technology at Newman is just one of the many ways Newman continues to provide its students with excellence in education, just as it has since 1903.


2009

Newman School is the only co-educational, non-sectarian, independent day school in the city of New Orleans. Open to students of all races and creeds, the school has a current enrollment of 900 students in pre-kindergarten through twelfth grades, taught by 139 full and part-time faculty members. The campus is located on four city blocks in a residential neighborhood near St. Charles Avenue, Audubon Park, and Tulane University. The school’s college preparatory curriculum is complemented by a rich tradition of co-curricular activities. Newman is accredited by both the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools and the Independent Schools Association of the Southwest. The school is also a member of the National Association of Independent Schools, the Educational Records Bureau, the College Board, the National Association for College Admission Counseling, and a founding member of the Association of College Counselors in Independent Schools. Newman is a member of the Global Online Academy, a consortium of the world’s leading independent schools that provides rigorous online courses that diversify and deepen our students’ learning experience. GOA courses maintain the expectations of intellectual rigor, inquiry, and collaboration that distinguish our member schools. All GOA faculty also teach at a member school.

Newman’s Global Studies program consists of a series of Regional Studies courses taught in a college seminar setting. Each Global Studies course (China/Japan, Indian Subcontinent, Africa, Middle East, and Latin America) emphasizes critical inquiry, collaboration, and sustained investigation from the perspective of the region in question. All seniors must take one full-year Global Studies course to fulfill the History requirement in the Upper School.

: GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 24 course units are required for graduation and are distributed as follows: UNITS

SUBJECT

4……… 4……… 4……… 3……… 3……… 2……… 1.5…… 0.5…... 2………

English Mathematics History Science (including Biology, and Chemistry or Physics) World Languages (French, Spanish, Latin, or Chinese) Arts (including both Applied Arts and History) Elective Computer Science Physical Education

: AP & HONORS COURSES At Newman, students must qualify to take AP courses by either completing prerequisites or meeting other departmental requirements.

A D VA N C E D P L A C E M E N T C O U R S E S • Science (Biology, Chemistry, Environmental Science, Physics B, Physics C; Mechanics, and Computer Science A) • History and Social Studies (U.S. History, US Government and Politics, World History, Microeconomics, and Macroeconomics) • World Languages (Spanish Language, French Language and Culture, Latin, and Chinese Language and Culture) • Mathematics (Statistics, Calculus AB, Calculus BC, Calculus BC Honors with Differential Equations) • Fine Arts (2-D Design and Drawing)

:

A D VA N C E D P L A C E M E N T E X A M I N AT I O N S • Although Newman does not offer AP English courses, 18 students took an AP English exam last year, and 78% of the scores were 3 or higher. • In the 2011 - 2012 school year, 146 Newman students in grades ten through twelve took 262 AP exams in 22 subjects. 77% of the scores were 3 or higher. Newman’s college preparatory curriculum includes a limited number of Honors courses, in which students may enroll only by invitation of the faculty. They are offered in the following specific areas: • Mathematics (Geometry, Pre-Calculus, Calculus) • Science (Chemistry, Physics) • World Languages (Chinese IV, French IV, French V, French VI, Spanish IV, Spanish V, Spanish VI) • Fine Arts (Art History) • English (English III, English IV)

: RECENT GRADUATES CLASSES OF 2009 - 2012 • 339 Students

DISTRIBUTION OF GRADE POINT AVERAGES

• 42% Female, 58% Male • 99% immediately entered four-year colleges

Mid-50% range: 3.0 - 3.8 • 3.8 and above………

26%

• 3.4 to 3.7……………

30%

• 3.0 to 3.3……………

25%

• 2.7 to 2.9……………

9%

• 2.4 to 2.6……………

7%

• 2.3 and below………

3%

ISIDORE NEWMAN SCHOOL

• 23% were named National Merit Semifinalists (48), Commended Students (25), National Achievement Finalists (5), or National Hispanic Scholars (1) C O L L E G E E N T R A N C E E X A M I N AT I O N S Mid-50% of SAT scores • Critical Reading/Verbal...………… • Mathematics……………..……..….

1 9 0 3 J E F F E R S O N AV E N U E

560 - 690 580 - 700

NEW ORLEANS, LA 70115-5699


Kristen Kurowski Associate Director of College Counseling kristenkurowski@newmanschool.org 504.896.6313 Anita L. Hedgepeth Registrar & Assistant College Counselor anitahedgepeth@newmanschool.org 504.896.6324

COLLEGE COUNSELING STAFF

Edward M. Graf Director of College Counseling edgraf@newmanschool.org 504.896.6333

: In the past four years, 338 Newman graduates have matriculated to 101 different colleges and universities. 40% enrolled in public universities, 60% in private. 22% elected to remain in Louisiana, 34% chose institutions in other Southern states, and 44% enrolled in colleges and universities in other regions of the country or Europe.

Newman limits each student to a maximum of ten college applications. Alabama, University of American University Arizona State University Auburn University Austin Community College Barnard College Baylor University Boston College Boston University Bowdoin College Bradley University Brown University Bucknell University California – Santa Cruz, University of Carnegie Mellon University Centenary College of Louisiana Chapman University Charleston, College of Chicago, University of Citadel, The Colgate University Colorado – Boulder, University of Colorado School of Mines Columbia University Cornell University Dartmouth College Dickinson College Duke University Eckerd College Elon University Emerson College Emory University Fordham University George Washington University Georgetown University Georgia, University of Harvard University Holy Cross, College of the Howard University Incarnate Word, University of the Indiana University Lehigh University Louisiana, University of Louisiana – Monroe, University of Louisiana State University Loyola Marymount University Loyola University New Orleans Lycoming College Macalester College Manhattanville College Miami, University of Miami University, Oxford Middlebury College Millsaps College Mississippi, University of Missouri University of Science and Technology Morehouse College New Orleans, University of New York University Nicholls State University North Carolina – Chapel Hill, University of Northwestern University

: COLLEGE MATRICULATION CLASSES OF 2009 - 2012

Oberlin College Occidental College Oregon, University of Oxford College of Emory University Pennsylvania, University of Pomona College Princeton University Rhodes College Rice University Richmond, University of Santa Clara University Scripps College Smith College Sewanee: The University of the South South Carolina, University of Southern California, University of Southern Methodist University St. Edward’s University Stanford University Texas, University of Texas A&M University Texas A&M University, Galveston Texas Christian University Trinity College Dublin Trinity University Tulane University Vanderbilt University Vassar College Vermont, University of Virginia, University of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University Wake Forest University Washington and Lee University Washington University in St. Louis Wellesley College Wesleyan University William Woods University Williams College Wisconsin – Madison, University of

ISIDORE NEWMAN SCHOOL

Phone: 5 0 4 . 8 9 6 . 6 3 2 4 Fax: 5 0 4 . 2 6 9 . 6 2 1 5 newmanschool.org School Code:

1 9 0 3 J E F F E R S O N AV E N U E

192045

NEW ORLEANS, LA 70115-5699


Isidore Newman School Tuition and Fee Schedule School Year 2013 - 2014

Tuition Lunch and Snack Fee Activity fee Books & supplies Technology fee Science fee

Pre-K 2025

Kindergarten 2024

1st Grade 2023

2nd Grade 2022

3rd Grade 2021

4th Grade 2020

5th Grade 2019

                                 16,361                                        ‐                                       159                                         180                                         150                                            50

                    16,361                          860                          159                          180                          150                            50

                    17,447                          860                          129                          180                          250                            50

                    17,447                           860                           129                           180                           250                             50

                     17,447                           860                           129                           180                           300                             50

                    17,447                          860                          129                          180                          300                            50

                    17,447                          860                          129                          180                          400                            50

16,900

17,760

18,916

18,916

18,966

18,966

19,066

Total

Tuition Lunch and Snack Fee Activity fee Athletic fee Class trip Technology fee Science Fee Supply Fee PSAT Plan Test

6th Grade 2018

7th Grade 2017

8th Grade 2016

9th Grade 2015

10th Grade 2014

11th Grade 2013

12th Grade 2012

                                 19,693                                       960                                         259                                         100                                         125                                         600                                            75                                          75                                        ‐                                        ‐

                    19,693                          960                          259                          125                          125                          600                            75                           ‐                           ‐                           ‐

                    19,693                          960                          259                          125                          725                          600                            75                           ‐                           ‐                           ‐

                    20,322                           960                           259                           125                       1,175                           600                             75                            ‐                            ‐                             10

                     20,322                           960                           259                           125                            ‐                           600                             75                            ‐                             18                            ‐

                    20,322                          960                          259                          125                           ‐                          600                            75                           ‐                          500                           ‐

                    20,322                          960                          259                          125                          150                          600                            75                           ‐                           ‐                           ‐

21,887

21,837

22,437

23,526

22,359

22,841

22,491

Total

Reminder: Enrollment deposit of $1,000.00 is automatically deducted from tuition.

Tuition Refund Insurance: Grades Pre-K - K Grades 1 - 5 Grades 6 - 8 Grades 9 - 12

$261.78 $279.15 $315.09 $325.15

Band Fee

Photography Fee

MS and US $50 per year

Upper School $50 per semester

Visual Arts Fee Middle School $40 per tri-mester

MS and US $50 per semester

Advanced Placement  Upper School $87 per semester


Financial Aid Program Isidore Newman School offers financial assistance to families who demonstrate financial need and whose children are enrolled in pre-kindergarten through twelfth grade. The primary responsibility for financing education rests with the family. If after the family has evaluated the potential family contribution, it is less than the cost of tuition, parents may wish to apply for financial aid to make up the difference. Applying for financial aid will not affect one’s chances for admission; applications are accepted for admission on a need-blind basis. Once accepted, candidates for financial aid are referred to the Financial Aid Committee which awards aid to families who demonstrate financial need as determined by the guidelines of the School and Student Services for Financial Aid (SSS) and Newman’s own policies. Financial need is determined by taking into account many factors including income and taxes, medical and basic living expenses, parental and student assets, debts, family size, and the number of children attending tuition-charging schools and colleges. Because the Financial Aid Committee recalculates all financial aid applications to correct errors and to apply Newman School’s policies, the family contribution we determine may differ from the one indicated on the SSS Family Report and from figures determined by other schools. For the 2013-2014 school year, 20% of the student body is receiving aid totaling approximately $1.8 million. Because financial aid funds are limited, we are unable to meet fully the increasing demand for financial assistance. It is imperative that families (both returning and new to the school) who wish to be considered for financial assistance for the upcoming 2014-2015 school year, complete the financial aid process, including allowing time for Newman’s receipt of the SSS report, by February 17, 2014. Applications completed after that date will be considered only after all applications received on time have been acted upon. Committed to enrolling the best students in the greater New Orleans area regardless of socio-economic status, Isidore Newman School admits students of any race, color, religion, sex, national and ethnic origin, or sexual orientation. Despite our strong commitment to our financial aid program and to the enrollment of an economically diverse student body, it is possible that the number of students who qualify for financial aid is greater than Newman School is able to support. Therefore, some students who have been admitted to the school could be denied aid and placed in the financial aid waiting pool. Please see below for more information on the financial aid waiting pool.

1903 JEFFERSON AVENUE, NEW ORLEANS, LA 70115-5699  (504)899-5641  FAX (504)896-8597


Newman will provide instructions for applying for financial aid to families who indicate an interest in financial aid on the admission application. Instructions for applying for aid are also available on Newman’s website under the Admissions tab. All information received by the Financial Aid Committee is held in the strictest confidence. To complete the application process, parents must submit the following: 1)

A financial aid application, formally called the Parent’s Financial Statement (PFS), must be completed online through School and Student Services by NAIS (SSS) at http://www.sss.nais.org. SSS will provide Newman, and other schools you may designate, the financial analysis that helps the schools determine an appropriate financial award.

2)

A copy of the parents’ 2012 Tax Return, as filed with the Internal Revenue Service (Form 1040/1040A with all schedules and all W-2 forms), must accompany the application. This information can be uploaded directly to SSS or hard copies can be mailed to SSS. Specific instructions on submitting your tax forms are available on the SSS website.

An application for financial aid is not complete and will not be acted upon until the Financial Aid Office has received all of the documents. In addition, any falsification of any information on the financial aid application will result in immediate withdrawal of the financial award for the year. A copy of the parents’ 2013 Tax Return, as filed with the Internal Revenue Service (Form 1040/1040A with W-2 and all schedules) must be sent to School and Student Services by NAIS (SSS) by April 30, 2014, to verify income and finalize the financial aid award. Families who file for an extension on their federal tax deadline should provide the school with appropriate documentation. In some cases, the committee may not be able to make a final award until the actual tax forms are completed. Student Applications Priority I: Returning students who received financial assistance in prior years and qualify for aid in the upcoming school year will receive first priority in the financial aid award process. Priority II: Returning students who were not receiving financial assistance in prior years but who qualify for aid in the upcoming school year will receive second priority in the financial aid award process. Priority III: New students who qualify for aid in the upcoming school year will receive third priority in the financial aid process. Before financial aid can be offered to a new student, the student must be accepted for admission to Newman, and the child’s parent(s) must also have made a commitment for the child to attend Newman by submitting an Enrollment Agreement and paying a refundable tuition deposit. A specific date by which the aid must be accepted or declined will be included in the financial aid award letter. If the aid is


declined in writing on or before that date, the tuition deposit will be refunded and the enrollment agreement becomes null and void. If the family deems the aid insufficient, procedures for an appeals process are outlined in the information below. Parents Who are Separated, Divorced or Who Were Never Married Financial need is determined by a family’s ability to meet educational expenses, not by a willingness to pay. In most cases, the Financial Aid Committee will make an award only after considering the financial resources of both parents. Therefore, each parental household must complete the full application process. If either parent remarries, the financial information of the stepparent must be included on the financial statement in order to allow us to assess the true financial position of the applicant family. We will take into consideration individual financial arrangements as well as obligations of the parent and stepparent to their other children as we process financial information. If one parent is not involved in the who is aware of the situation in a school official, for example) may parent. Please contact the Financial

child’s life, a statement to this effect from a third party professional capacity (a lawyer, member of the clergy, be substituted for the financial documents from that Aid Office to discuss this situation.

Appeals Process Families who feel they are unable to meet the financial expectations outlined in the financial aid award agreement may request a second review of their financial aid application. In order to initiate the appeals process the parent should call Sally Uzee, Director of Stewardship and Financial Aid (504-896-6411) and prepare the following:   

a detailed monthly or annual budget showing all income and expenses a statement of changes, if any, in financial circumstances since the financial statement was completed detailed explanations of unusual expenses and/or debts that were not fully explained on the original financial statement(s)

Financial Aid Waiting Pool Qualified financial aid applicants whom the budget is unable to support will be placed in a financial aid waiting pool. As funds become available, students in the wait pool will be considered, and we will offer aid according to the current enrollment needs of the school. To remain in the financial aid waiting pool, families should submit a letter to the Admission Office noting that they are unable to enroll due to insufficient aid and requesting to be placed in the waiting pool. Should funding become available, families in the waiting pool will be notified by the Financial Aid Office. Parents will be notified of financial aid awards as soon as possible after the enrollment contract is submitted. If other means of paying the tuition become available, please contact the admission office.


Isidore Newman School reserves the right to require additional financial information as needed to determine financial aid awards. Admission decisions at Newman are made without regard to a family’s financial situation. Questions regarding the financial aid process may be addressed to Sally Uzee, Director of Stewardship and Financial Aid at 504-896-6411.

2013-2014


HOW TO APPLY (for academic year 2014-15) To be assured of timely processing, applications should be submitted as early in the fall as possible.

PRE-KINDERGARTEN & KINDERGARTEN Child should be 4 by August 31, 2014, for Pre-K, and 5 by August 31, 2014, for K.     

Application – $50.00 fee (non-refundable). Teacher recommendation from current school. (Request will be sent by Newman. Release form required.) Developmental screen scheduled by Newman – $50.00 fee. Observation at current school Children may be asked to visit Newman for a morning / play date.

FIRST – FOURTH GRADES  Application – $50.00 fee (non-refundable)  Half day classroom visit.  Teacher recommendation/transcripts from current school. (Request will be sent by Newman. Release form required.)  Admission testing scheduled by Newman during classroom visit.  Intellectual Assessment administered by a child psychologist – see list of recommended psychologists. Fees vary. FIFTH – TWELFTH GRADES  Application – $50.00 fee (non-refundable).  Half day school visit. (Please contact Newman Admissions to schedule visit.)  Admission testing – Independent School Entrance Exam (ISEE) - Saturday, January 25, 2014 (deadline to avoid late registration fee is January 4, 2014). There will be a $100 fee payable to Educational Records Bureau at time of test registration. This fee is not to be paid to Newman School. You may register online at: www.erbtest.org/parents/admissions/isee, or you can register by mail with a registration form that will be provided at your request to Newman’s Admission Office, 504-8966323. ISAS schools will share testing results at your request. After January 25, admission testing may be arranged through Newman’s Admission Office.  Students graduating from their current New Orleans ISAS school will not be required to take the ISEE. A writing sample will be required.  Teacher recommendation/transcripts from current school. (Request will be sent by Newman. Release form required.)  Grades 6 – 12: Applicant interview and writing sample. (This will be scheduled by Newman and the applicant family.


SUGGESTED PSYCHOLOGISTS An intellectual assessment is required for admission to grades one through four. Please contact one of the psychologists below, or any other qualified tester you may choose, to arrange the administration of a Wechsler Pre-School and Primary Scale of Intelligence (WPPSI-III) or the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC IV), depending on the age of the child. If you are unfamiliar with these, please ask the psychologist to describe the evaluation and explain how the assessment can be helpful to you in choosing a school for your child. We strongly encourage parents to schedule a conference with the psychologist to go over the results. Fees for the WPPSI and WISC vary. Dr. Chin-Chin Ho offers the assessment to ISAS school applicants for a fee of $295, including a consultation with Dr. Ho about the results. If you have any questions about this process, please call the Admission Office at 504-896-6323. UPTOWN AREA Dr. Adrianne Brennan Dr. Chin-Chin Ho Dr. Melanie McGrath Dr. Lynn Parker-Malik Dr. Sean Ransom Dr. Marianne Walsh

504-309-4924 504-525-5070 504-957-2272 504-269-0200 504-383-3815 504-656-4411

METAIRIE AREA Dr. Susan Andrews Dr. Melissa Aubert Dr. Gayle Baer Dr. Randee L. Booksh Dr. Ron Cambias Dr. Leslie Higgins Dr. Mary Munger Dr. Katherine Robison

504-455-0109 504-455-0109 504-885-1442 504-455-0109 504-779-5270 504-885-1442 504-832-3066 504-913-2688

RIVER RIDGE AREA Dr. Andy Burka

504-842-4025

GRETNA AREA Dr. Christine Powanda

504-460-4889


Dr. Susan Andrews Dr. Melissa Aubert Dr. Randee Booksh

2626 N. Arnoult Road, #220 Metairie, LA 70002

Dr. Gayle Baer Dr. Leslie Higgins

5500 Veterans Boulevard, #304 Metairie, LA 70003

Dr. Adrianne Brennan

4640 S. Carrollton Avenue, #235 New Orleans, LA 70119

Dr. Andy Burka

1514 Jefferson Highway Jefferson, LA 70121

Dr. Ron Cambias

3108 Cleary Avenue, #104 Metairie, LA 70002

Dr. Chin-Chin Ho

1820 St. Charles Avenue, #211 New Orleans, LA 70130

Dr. Melanie McGrath

7607 Maple Street New Orleans, LA 70118

Dr. Lynn Parker-Malik

644 N. Carrollton Avenue New Orleans, LA 70119

Dr. Mary Munger

300-C Codifer Boulevard Metairie, LA 70005

Dr. Christine Powanda

1005 Whitney Avenue Gretna, LA 70056

Dr. Sean Ransom

4904 Magazine Street New Orleans, LA 70115

Dr. Katherine Robison

2201 Veterans Boulevard, #410 Metairie, LA 70002

Dr. Marianne Walsh

4011 Baronne Street New Orleans, LA 70115

13-14


Isidore Newman School Campus 1903 Jefferson Avenue New Orleans, LA 70115

Greenie House Annex

504-899-5641 www.newmanschool.org

.

Stern Center Lupin Kindergarten

Lupin Field

Tuohy Gym

ola

Aven u

e

Oreck Building Cotonio Palaestra

Valmont Building

Loy

Bart Park Saratoga Building

Keller Center

Stone Building

rson

Aven u

Jefferson Building

e

Stre e

t

Fine Arts Building

neel

Lemle Building

Heymann Science Center

Dan

Jeffe

Usdin Patio Levy Student Center Gottesman Entrance

Illustration by Franklin Adams

Percival Stern Early Education Center Besthoff Entrance Larry Reynolds Room Lupin Kindergarten Goldring Fine Arts Center Good Conference Room David Oreck Building

Theodore Cotonio Palaestra Fitzgerald/Skertich Arena Berger Fitness Center Spirit Store Gottesman Pool Philipson Health Center Bertha Marcus Levy Student Center

Gottesman Entrance and Lawn Gottesman Gate Valmont Building Valmont Courtyard Saratoga Building Student Commons Jefferson Building

5320 Loyola Street

1953 Jefferson Avenue

1903 Jefferson Avenue

Aronson Hall Savoie Science Center Yarrut/Fishman Entrance Reck Forum Bart Park Doris Stone Building Devlin Library

Dining Hall Mini Theater Parents Office Levy Conference Room Archives Greenie House Annex

Lapeyre Conference Room Lecture Hall Popp Library Fine Arts Building

1836 Soniat Street

5333 Danneel Street

Henson Auditorium Rosenthal Jacobs Theater Workshop Krohn Foyer Reynolds Ryan Art Gallery


Newman Admission Package