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CONTACT US general info@jerseycityindependent.com to advertise checht@jerseycityindependent.com WeAreNew.com JerseyCityIndependent.com Twitter.com/JCIndependent Facebook.com/JerseyCityIndependent

7 NEIGHBORHOOD SPOTLIGHT

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Could Pro Arts become the "umbrella" organization the Jersey City scene

the spotlight on McGinley Square.

needs?

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beer makers and beer lovers together to

government in the state to do so. But is

celebrate the craft of homebrewing.

it doing enough to keep its pedestrians

Jersey City recently enacted a Complete

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HOP TO IT: DIY BEER CULTURE GROWS IN JC

The Jersey City Brew Club is bringing

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the second of an ongoing series, we put

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ABOUT NEW NEW is published four times a year by the Jersey City Independent. No part of this publication may be reproduced without prior written consent. We belong to the New Jersey Press Association, Online News Association, New Jersey Hyperlocal News Association and Authentically Local.

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COPY EDITOR Elizabeth Weill-Greenberg

MANY SPECIAL THANKS TO The loyal support of all businesses and organizations that encourage and sustain NEW. Advertising support makes NEW possible. Please show your thanks by supporting our advertisers.

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GUIDE PHOTOGRAPHER Beth Achenbach

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STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER Steve Gold

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ART DIRECTOR Chuck Kerr

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Chuck Kerr is the art director at NEW, where he moonlights from his day job as art director for the alternative newsweekly the San Antonio Current. His work has earned him a 1st Place AAN award for Cover Design in 2007, as well as recognition from the Society of Publication Design and magazine design blog Coverjunkie. chuckkerr.com

ASSOCIATE EDITOR Shane Smith

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STEVE GOLD is the staff photographer at NEW and the Jersey City Independent. His photographs have also appeared in the Jersey Journal, the New York Daily News, and other newspapers and magazines. popzero.com

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ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Catherine Hecht

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DREW KATCHEN has lived in Jersey City for roughly seven years. He works for MSNBC, and likes pictures, beer and Born Against. flickr.com/staticsilence

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Jennifer Weiss

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MELISSA SURACH is a writer and comedian who was born and raised in Jersey City. She is a Fiction MFA candidate at The New School and drinks way too much beer. melissasurach.com

PUBLISHER/EDITOR Jon Whiten

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BRENDAN CARROLL is an artist, curator and writer who regularly covers the arts for the Jersey City Independent. He's also the co-founder of Agitators Collective, which creates site-related installations in urban locales that have fallen into neglect or dereliction. brendanscottcarroll.com

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ANA BENAROYA is an illustrator and designer working out of Jersey City. She loves bright colors, hot sauce and muscular men. When not drawing, she often finds herself contemplating the meaning of life. anabenaroya.com

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JOSH DEHONNEY regularly shoots for lifestyle magazines Yellow Rat Bastard and Urban Latino. In addition to photography, Josh is passionate about independent hip-hop, microbrews and his newborn son and future first assistant, Jalen. joshdehonney.com

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LIA PETRIDIS MAIELLO is a veteran reporter whose fields of expertise are international politics, the arts and investigative pieces. She is currently a graduate student at Seton Hall University for international relations/diplomacy.

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CONTRIBUTORS & STAFF


FROM THE PUBLISHER'S DESK

ON THE COVER

Hey there Jersey City! I want to share a few things and bring you up to date with the latest developments here at NEW and the Jersey City Independent.

This issue's cover features the work of Jersey City's Robert Delacruz. The 35-year-old freelance photographer has lived in neighborhoods all over Jersey City for the past 10 years, and is now settled Downtown with his wife and two pets. ("I love it here; everything is in walking distance," he says.) We love the lines and colors of his nighttime photograph of Columbus Drive and feel like it had a nice fall vibe. Also, in a happy coincidence, it fits in well thematically to our feature on pedestrian safety and traffic issues in Jersey City (see p. 26). Delacruz, who works full-time at a manufacturing company in Rahway, mainly photographs local boxing bouts, New York fashion shows and other events for freelance clients like Asian Journal, Filipino Reporter and others. But the 35-year-old says he mainly just loves taking photos of "everything and anything," either with his SLR or using his iPhone and publishing via Instagram. robertdelacruznow.tumblr.com

• At the risk of greatly understating things, local journalism is a tough industry to succeed in. Put simply, small local publishing businesses – like any other momand-pop shop in town – need help and support. Lucky for us, we have a strong core of readers, advertisers, donors and community partners here in Jersey City. And now we can add another pillar of support to the equation: other companies like ours. This summer we had the good fortune of joining Authentically Local, a new coalition of small publishers that aims to nurture and support local news that is produced locally as huge companies like AOL, Google and Groupon enter the space. We're proud to be a part of the group, and proud to not just be about Jersey City – but in it, and of it, as well. authenticallylocal.com • We're rolling out a new feature in the Jersey City Guide section this issue: QR codes. So what's a QR code? It's a barcode designed to be read by smartphones (you have to download a QR reader app) that takes a user to a destination that has more information. We think it is a great way for our advertisers to bridge the print/ digital divide and point readers to easy places to find out more about their business, whether that's a website, a Facebook page or just a phone number. • This issue of NEW brings a few changes to our masthead. As we continue to grow both in print and online, there are bound to be times we need to shuffle the deck a bit to make sure we keep thriving – and this is one of them. I'm excited to report that former contributing editor and writer Jennifer Weiss is going to be joining me in running the show on the editorial side. Jennifer, a very talented Star-Ledger alum, is now the editor-in-chief of NEW and JCI, while I'm moving into the role of publisher/ editor. Meanwhile, there's a business side change too. Ever since we brought Catherine Hecht on in June 2010 to be our sales manager, I've thought the title didn't quite encompass all she brings to our organization. Luckily, titles can change. In her new role as associate publisher, Catherine will continue to manage all sales for our publications while working with me to ensure that we have a long and sunny financial future.

WE WANT YOU! We are always looking for new submissions to our cover contest, so send in your ideas, artwork or photography. More info at: jerseycityindependent.com/covercontest

NEWS BY THE NUMBERS 505

247,697 2 The official 2010 Census

Number of residents

0.48¢

rode in Bike JC's 2nd

count of Jersey City's

who have lodged formal

single ride on the MTA's

annual Ward Tour on

total population

noise complaints against

New York City subway,

Number of bicylists who

June 4

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7,642

The number of residents

Miles of bike lanes on the the Census says Jersey streets of Jersey City,

City has gained since

which is 21.1 square

2000

miles in size

4.54

25,000 The dollar figure on a

Per-station cost of a

Groove on Grove, Creative which has 468 stations Grove and other events at the Grove Street PATH plaza

0

Number of citations Jersey City has issued for actual violations

772

13.46¢ Per-station cost this

summer of a single ride on the PATH, which has 13 stations

21.15¢

Miles of bike lanes on

contract issued by Jersey

the streets of Hoboken,

City to a firm that will

which is 2 square miles

help challenge the 2010

in size (a recently passed

Census numbers, which

a petition to show support Port Authority's $1 fare

ordinance will increase

city officials believe were

for these events (as of

hike has been completely

that figure to 24.6 miles)

too low

August 21)

phased in

Number of signatures on

Per-station cost of a

single ride on the PATH in the fall of 2014, when the


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main church was completed). McGinley remained pastor at St. Aedan's until his death in 1936. Another historic building on the eastern end of the neighborhood is the National Guard Armory, which sits at Montgomery Street and Summit Avenue. The 175,000 square-foot, three-story Beaux-Arts structure was built in 1937 as a federal Works Progress Administration project, and it serves as a headquarters for the state's National Guard and is leased to Jersey City, which runs youth and athletic programs at the site. The armory replaced the neighborhood's medieval-style Fourth Regiment Armory, which sat at the current location of Hudson Catholic High School and was destroyed by a fire in 1927. The armory that stands today is notable for its boxing history. Chuck Wepner, aka "The Bayonne Bleeder," fought former heavyweight champ Sonny Liston there in 1970, and Mohammed Ali was on site for a benefit event two years later. Last year, mixed martial arts producer Urban Conflict Championship brought a new style 7

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ike so many Jersey City neighborhoods, McGinley Square is home to some deep history. It’s right down the street from historic Bergen, which was founded in 1660 and was the first permanent settlement in New Jersey – and the genesis of present-day Jersey City. McGinley Square is also home to several major historic buildings, one of which contains the origins of the neighborhood’s name. St. Aedan's Church, at the corner of Bergen Avenue and Mercer Street, is a massive and ornate Romanesque Catholic church that was constructed in the early 20th century for the sizable sum of $1 million. Ground was broken in the spring of 1929, and the church was dedicated in the fall of 1931. But the parish of St. Aedan's actually predates the church building. It was created by the Catholic church in 1912, and the Rev. Roger McGinley was tapped to become its first pastor. When McGinley arrived in Jersey City, he decided the parish needed a parochial school more than a new church, and St. Aedan's School was opened in the fall of 1913 (worship services were held in the school until the

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As you walk south on Bergen Avenue from Journal Square, you’ll eventually come to McGinley Square, which sits at the corner of Bergen and Montgomery. But where exactly does the neighborhood of McGinley Square begin? There’s no formal defining line; when making his neighborhood map of Jersey City, Matthew Ward used Montgomery as the northernmost boundary. And the website of the nonprofit McGinley Square Partnership simply says “Journal Square” is the northernmost border. For our purposes, we’ll split the difference and say the neighborhood is bordered to the north at Highland Avenue – though as we know, neighborhood boundaries can be nebulous.

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WHILE YOU'RE THERE • ASTOR BAR: Grab a drink at this legendary bar favored by local elected officials, power players, cops and city workers. 725 Montgomery Street • COCONUT: One of the neighborhood’s newest places to eat, this Latin-Caribbean restaurant and grill features a mix-and-match grill selection as the main menu draw, as well as a $5 lunch special. 681 Montgomery Street • ED'S SALVAGE CO. & ED'S EXCHANGE: Ed Ramirez is expanding his footprint in McGinley Square. The owner of the vintage/ consignment shop Ed’s Salvage Co. (264 Fairmount) has taken over another location around the corner (672 Bergen Avenue), where he now runs a second store and oversees Ed’s Exchange, a weekly indoor/outdoor flea market. The market runs every Sunday through at least the end of October. • IMAGO BEAUTY GROUP: Jersey City native Stephen Cunniff had been running a full-service salon of the same name in Hoboken for 10 years before he opened a second location in 2007 near his home, in the Basilico condominium building. 673 Bergen Avenue • LEE SIMS CHOCOLATES: If you walk through the doors into this diminutive treats store, you won’t be able to resist buying something – it smells that good. 743 Bergen Avenue • RAPH'S PLAZA: This small internet cafe, tucked into the ground floor of a Bergen Avenue brownstone, doubles as an African market and has hosted scores of art, food, music and open mic events since opening last summer. 709 Bergen Avenue • STAN'S RECORDS: Sometimes called Stan’s Square Records, but more often just Stan’s, this record store is a local institution specializing in R&B and doo-wop records, but with a wide selection of platters in all genres. The store’s been open on a reduced schedule in recent years due to Stan’s health; Saturday is your best bet to stop by. 737 Bergen Avenue

of fights to the Armory when it began hosting events there. Today, McGinley Square is beginning to bloom as an arts enclave, with dozens of artists and musicians making their home in the neighborhood or nearby. Just take a look at the JC Fridays or Studio Tour maps – the cluster of dots around McGinley Square gets a bit more dense each quarter and year. The nonprofit Uptown Crew, dedicated to nurturing art and culture outside of Downtown, is headquartered here, with its twice-monthly open mics taking place just down Monticello Avenue at Moore's Lounge (189 Monticello), which also hosts a monthly jazz night. But how the McGinley Square area will look 10 or 15 years from now remains unclear, as much of the neighborhood is currently targeted for major redevelopment. This spring, the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development awarded a $250,000 planning grant to study how best to transform the Montgomery Gardens-McGinley Square corridor into a mixed-income neighborhood. The study is mostly concerned with how best to replace Montgomery Gardens' high-rise buildings with public housing that's more integrated into the neighborhood. The federal program, known as the Choice Neighborhoods Initiative, is a new extension of the HOPE VI program that has transformed public housing in Jersey City and elsewhere over the last decade and a half. Overlapping with this effort is an ambitious development plan covering a huge swath of land surrounding Montgomery Street. The proposal calls for 370,000 square feet of new retail space, 230,000 square feet of new office space, five residential towers, a 150-room hotel and an entertainment center feauturing a new movie theater. It would also expand McGinley Square park and create two new pedestrian-only thoroughfares, which the developer envisions as being lined with retail shops, restaurants and bars. (One would run from Tuers to Jordan Avenues in between Montgomery and Mercer Streets, and the other would run from Nevins Street to Monticello Avenue between Storms Avenue and Orchard Street.) Assuming things go as the developer plans, this multi-phase project would break ground next August, with the bulk of the development completed by the summer or fall of 2016.

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Jersey City Brew Club brings beer makers and beer lovers together to celebrate the craft of homebrewing

ch elissa Suraonney M y b n e t it r H W y by Josh De Photograph

Jersey City Brew Club founder John Misarti

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Jersey City Brew Club's Kendall Eskew and John Misarti

The craft beer renaissance has come to Jersey City at last. This past year has seen the opening of Barcade and the re-dedication of Star Bar as craft beer mecca Pint, plus regular "Meet the Brewer" events at a number of bars. Beer lovers and bar owners plan on opening brew pubs as soon as zoning allows them, and North Bergen’s New Jersey Beer Co., the only brewery in Hudson County, is looking to relocate to Jersey City. And a number of Downtown bars and restaurants – like The Iron Monkey, LITM and Skinner’s Loft, for example – boast of their craft beer selections. But craft beer isn't just for drinking at bars. Just as with any other hands-on discipline – whether food-related like cheese making, or tactile like jewelry making – craft beer comes with a distinct and thriving DIY subculture: homebrewers. While making one's own booze is certainly not new (the American Homebrewers Association estimates people were "brewing beer in small batches 12,000 years ago"), the practice has accelerated in recent years, as the number of small breweries has grown and craft beer has become more mainstream (Brooklyn Lager at Major League Baseball games, anyone?). Homebrewing has exploded in Jersey City, and brewers say it has been helped along greatly by John Misarti. The Downtown resident, now 27, had only been in Jersey City for a few months before he started Jersey City Brew Club in September 2010. 12

"I just wanted to find people to brew and drink good beer with," Misarti says. He'd been brewing for about a year and a half when he posted on the community forum JCList.com to recruit members. Three people who’ve become core organizers – Kendall Eskew, Greg Boland and Tyler Hutchinson – signed on, and now the club boasts about 116 participants, including eight brewers. The original idea was to brew on a regular basis, plan group trips to breweries and organize bar crawls around the area. The club has also become a go-to source for many beginning homebrewers around town. Always looking for new members, the website states that "there are no dues, no fees and no real requirements," although sometimes a hat is passed around for donations at popular events like Drink Our Suds night, where the group showcases its latest beers in someone's apartment. "Drink Our Suds is a great way to spread the word of Jersey City Brew Club and to showcase the latest brews of our members," Misarti says. The group supplies 5 gallons (the equivalent of 48 12-ounce beers) from its latest collaborative group brew day. A recent Drink Our Suds featured an American Strong Ale, kegged and gassed in the bathtub, that clocked in at 13 percent alcohol by volume (ABV), making it much stronger than the typical beer (most mainstream beers like Budweiser are 5 percent ABV at most). At Drink Our Suds events, the members who are brewing 13 13


typically show up with a six-pack of their own to share their newest beers in exchange for feedback and critiquing. But the events are far from exclusive; an open invitation is sent out online and the core members of the group invite strangers into their apartments to drink their beer. There's no charge – and there's lots of free beer. "It’s a great way to meet new people, and a cheap way to spend a weekend evening," Misarti says. "As long as everyone fits into an apartment and the beer is flowing, we're happy to entertain all our guests." The current core members of the group are relatively young – the oldest is 30. "It's weird meeting other groups," Misarti says. "They tell us, 'you're so young,' and they're all overweight old guys with beards." In addition to the group’s youthful tilt, it’s easy to notice something else: there are no women brewers in the club, and everyone is white. While homebrewing has long been perceived as a white male hobby, that has certainly changed, and the club is trying to expand as well. "We would love to have the most diverse base as possible, to be exposed to different brewing techniques, recipes, ingredients," Hutchinson says. "We all came here for knowledge, and the

BASIC PROCESS

Make the wort: Boil 18 liters (4.5 gallons) of water. Turn off the heat and mix in malt extract, until the powder is fully dissolved. Return the mixture to a boil and monitor to watch for boil-over. Lower the heat as needed. Boil for 15 minutes, then add hops. Boil for another hour, then cool. While waiting for the liquid to cool, wet the dried yeast with warm, sterile water. Stir the cooled wort clockwise and allow the hops to settle in the center, then siphon off

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only way to do that is to expand our base." He adds that one of Jersey City Brew Club's main functions is to simply share information and create a communal knowledge base. In addition to monthly meet-ups at Barcade, group brewing days and Drink Our Suds nights, the club's website is a resource for recipes, Jersey City water quality conditions, and original articles about yeast culturing, among other things. The group has cultivated about 16 different yeast strains thus far. As any homebrewer will tell you, it's one thing to brew your own beer – and it's another thing entirely to be able to enjoy how it tastes in the end. Beyond peer feedback within the club, Misarti encourages members to submit their beers to brewing competitions. "It's the best way to get feedback," he says, noting that contest judges are specifically trained to rate the strengths and weaknesses of a beer by the definition of its style. Misarti himself was preparing to enter Pilsner Urquell's pilsner competition this summer. And the club has decided to host its own contest as well. At this year's 4th Street Art & Music Festival, Jersey City homebrewers will be on hand to explain the ingredients and process behind their creations. Unlike

A SUPPLIES

(via homebrewersassociation.org)

To make your own beer, you need some basic equipment. Some of it you may already have, and some of it you’ll have to buy. What you probably already have:

• A stove • Running water • A pot with 2 to 5 gallons capacity (or more; the bigger the better) • Cooking spoon • Can opener • Strainer • Measuring cup • A clean cup or small bowl What you’ll probably need to buy:

(via beer.pdqguides.com)

the wort into the fermenter. Add wet yeast and stir vigorously. Fermentation: Between a few hours to a day, bubbles should appear in the airlock. If there’s no sound and no sight of bubbles within a couple of days, your yeast is probably dead, but there are dozens of other possible causes. If you still don’t see any activity, wait a few days, then start over. Allow the wort to ferment for 5 to 7 days. The time will vary with recipe, with environment,

yeast and several other variables; you’ll need to experiment. Siphon into the secondary fermenter, stored in an area several degrees cooler. Allow to sit for another 7 days. After fermentation, some recipes call for adding a little cane sugar or corn sugar, though many consider this optional or even undesirable. Experiment to taste. Pour into bottling container then siphon off the top. Fill each bottle, leaving ample space near the top. Store 2-3 weeks at room temperature, then chill.

• Fermenter • Air lock and stopper • Thermometer • Racking cane and tubing • Bottling bucket • Bottle filler • Bottle capper • Sanitizing agent • Bottles • Bottle cleaning brush • Hydrometer (not required, but recommended) • Glass carboy & accessories (not required, but recommended) 15


professional contests like Pilsner Urquell's, the Brew Club's competition will be judged in part by patrons of the October 1 festival.

The Jersey City Brew Club hosts a meetup on the third Wednesday of each month at 7 pm at Barcade (163 Newark Avenue). jerseycitybrewclub.org

JERSEY CITY BREW CLUB

HHHHHHHHHH

Homebrewing in America can be traced back to the colonial days, with founding fathers like George Washington and Thomas Jefferson participating in the craft. The practice took a hit in the early 20th century with the passage of Prohibition in 1919, which made making beer and wine at home illegal. Prohibition was lifted just 14 years later, with the passage of the 21st Amendment in 1933. But a clerical error meant that homebrewers would continue to be outlawed: the words "and beer" were missing from the statute that legalized home winemaking. It wasn't until February 1979 that making beer at home finally became legal again, thanks to California Sen. Alan Cranston and President Jimmy Carter. Though brew clubs had already started to pop up (L.A.'s Maltose Falcons, founded in 1974 and still going strong, is considered the country's oldest) the newfound legal status of homebrewing helped kick the modern homebrew movement into gear, with the founding of the American Homebrewers Association coming shortly thereafter, and the Beer Judge Certification Program coming six years later. Today, the American Homebrewers Association estimates there are close to 1 million homebrewers in America, and at least 1,000 clubs like Jersey City Brew Club, even though the practice is still outlawed in two states (Alabama and Mississippi). But homebrewing's popularity doesn't necessarily mean it's easy. The process itself is somewhat complicated and scientific ("not nearly as hard as making your own fusion reactor," the American Homebrewers Association "Homebrewing 101" guide jokes), but if you can follow directions and possess some patience, you should be able to master the art. (See sidebar for supplies, an abbreviated stepby-step guide, recipes and resources.) While most homebrewers use a partial-

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mash setup, a few have enough space to do a full-grain set up. Misarti goes the extra step and heads out to his parents' house in West Orange to enjoy their backyard and utilities on brew day, where he does full-grain brewing. "My setup includes one converted 15-gallon stainless steel keg, a second 12-gallon stainless steel pot, and one converted 18-gallon beverage cooler which is used for steeping the grains. I rely on a turkey fryer and a propane tank to properly head the keg and pot to the necessary temperature," he says. "It looks a bit like Frankenstein’s monster – parts are mismatched, metal taps and thermometers are sticking out of the pots and keg, and hoses connect everything together. Not the most beautiful creation, but it does its job well." HHHHHHHHHH

While some business owners might balk at the thought of people trying to train potential customers to create their products on their own, that's not quite how it works in the craft beer world. Specialty bars and small breweries are on board with homebrewing, which they see as simply spreading the gospel of good beer – a mission that benefits everyone working in that niche in the end. "We love that the Jersey City Brew Club has their meetings at Barcade," says owner Paul Kermizian. "We're happy to provide a space for people that are passionate about brewing and craft beer to get together." John McCarthy, the vice president of local brewery New Jersey Beer Co., agrees. "John Misarti and the Jersey City Brew Club are a huge force behind the continuing rise of craft beer in Jersey City," he says. "What they do not only benefits beer enthusiasts, but also bolsters beer businesses. … [We all] owe some serious gratitude to John and his club for their part in supporting the movement."

Jersey City Brew Club Pumpkin Ale • 3.3 lbs. Liquid Light Extract • 1 lb. Dry Light Extract  • 3 lbs. American 2-Row  • 1 lb. American Caramel 60L  • 0.5 lbs. Belgian Biscuit  • 0.5 lbs. Caramel Wheat malt  • 2 small pumpkins • 0.25 lbs. dark brown sugar  • 1 tsp. vanilla • 1/2 tsp. pumpkin pie spice • 1 oz. Mt. Hood hop pellets (60 min) • 0.5 oz. Hallertau hops (5 min) • American Ale Yeast

Before starting, cut the pumpkins into manageable pieces. Place them in a baking pan with a bit of water and bake them at 325º for an hour. Begin mashing the grains as is standard. Collect all wort and bring it to a boil. Add the liquid extract and begin boiling for 1 hour. Separate the flesh from the skin and add the pieces into the boil. Mash the pumpkin pieces with a potato masher as the wort is boiling. After the hour is up, add the vanilla and pumpkin pie spice. Cool and let ferment. Rack, then drink after 4-6 weeks. Aging will mellow the flavor. For more pronounced flavor, add the vanilla and pumpkin pie spice to the secondary vessel.

Johnny’s Bad Apple Seed

• 4 gallons of fresh pressed apple cider (not juice, and no preservatives!) • 1 gallon water • 2 lbs. Dry Malt Extract • 0.5 lbs. Crystal 60L malt • 1 oz. Torrified Wheat • 1 oz. Cascade hops • American Ale Yeast

Steep the Crystal and Wheat in 3/4 gallon of water at 152º for about 30 minutes. Collect the run-off. Rinse the grains with the remaining water at 168º and collect the run-off. Throw away the grains. Add the Dry Malt Extract and boil. Once the boil starts, add 0.75 ounces of Cascade hops and boil for 30 minutes. Cool the wort down to room temperature. Add the apple cider and yeast into your carboy. After fermentation has stopped (3-7 days), add the remaining 0.25 ounces of Cascade hops into the carboy. Wait another 5 days, then rack into secondary for a week. Finally, carbonate in bottles or in a keg.  

Turncoat Brown Ale

(a creation of Tyler Hutchinson ) Jersey City Brew Club brews a classic British brown ale with a bit of a twist – using only American hops and yeast (hence, the Turncoat). They're fermenting the Turncoat on top of the fresh yeast cake from Tyler's cream ale, a perfect lawnmower beer that's cool on a hot summer day (the recipe for that is on the website). • 5.25 lbs. Pale Ale Malt 2-Row • 2 lbs. Caramel Malt 90L 6-Row • 0.25 lbs. Chocolate Malt • 1 lb. light brown sugar • 1 oz. Willamette hops (40 min) • 1 oz. Liberty hops (15 min) • American Ale Yeast Prior to the mash, add 5 grams Calcium Carbonate and 3 grams Epsom Salt to 4 gallons of spring or distilled water. Get the water up to 160º and toss in the grains. Leave for 40 minutes. Then mash out to 168º for 10 minutes. Drain. Add the sugar and boil for 60 minutes.


, An Arts Group s New Groove Artist Megan G端lick at her Battered Bunnies show during the 2010 studio tour

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Could Pro Arts Become the ' Umbrella' Organization the Jersey City Scene Needs? WRITTEN BY: Brendan Carroll PHOtography BY: Drew Katchen (tour pictures)

Steve Gold (Hollingsworth portrait) 19


hen the annual Artists' Studio Tour kicks off this October, Pro Arts will be at the helm – as it has been almost since the very beginning. When the event began in 1990, it was Downtown-only and centered on individual artists' studios – many of them at 111 1st Street, which is now gone – rather than the curated group shows that have since become the focus. Charles Kessler organized that first Studio Tour with Pat Donnelly of the now defunct Gold Coast Magazine, and four years later Kessler co-founded Pro Arts, which has cosponsored the tour ever since. The idea behind both the tour and Pro Arts, he says, was to bring artists together, provide them some support and build up the city's arts community. Over the next 17 years, Pro Arts has persevered and become an elder statesman of the city's art scene. It has seen the city through plenty of tough years, but has also been derided at times as unfocused, defensive and ineffective – particularly when compared to the new generation of savvy cultural creatives and DIY types who have pushed the scene forward more recently. While it remains shrouded in a bit of mystery, the group seems to be at the start of a fresh chapter, and just in time. Pro Arts launched its first new programming in years in 2010: the Art Eat-Up, a recurring public dinner intended to use grassroots financial support to fund art projects. Meanwhile, the current recession has hit everyone hard, especially in the art world. 20

Money is tight. Resources are gone. Faced with a massive budget gap, the Jersey City Museum closed its doors in December. The opportunity for the public to engage in art and experience culture is being threatened at an alarming rate, with museums and galleries closing their doors all across the U.S. due to declining revenue. Into this complicated fray steps Sean Hollingsworth, Pro Arts' new executive director. An event producer with a deep love for the arts, Hollingsworth's job is to build on the group's existing work and, he hopes, make the nonprofit an even more vital part of the arts scene. Before taking a career break to help raise his twin daughters, who will turn 5 this October, Hollingsworth worked for more than 15 years in event production. He spent more than half of those years in the nonprofit sector, working the rest of the time for Fortune 500 clients. He has worked with a diverse array of nonprofit groups, including the Los Angeles Gay and Lesbian Center, Brooklyn's Pratt Institute and the Main Street Theatre in Quakertown, Pennsylvania. He is also the co-founder of B2: Productions, a special-events production company focused on serving urban, ethnic markets. The organization produces Black 2: Broadway, a regular concert event in New York featuring celebrity performers of color in a variety show

Sean Hollingsworth, Pro Arts' new executive director

I was very impressed with the longevity and legacy pro arts has built.'' 21


Live painting at 2010's 4th Street Art & Music Festival, a cornerstone event of the annual studio tour

The 2010 studio tour in the Powerhouse Arts District

format, as well as an annual Salute to the Tony Awards event spotlighting performers of color. Like most Jersey City residents, Hollingsworth, who lives in the Harsimus Cove neighborhood, says he became aware of Pro Arts by attending the Studio Tour, the annual two-day showcase of the art and artists of Jersey City. He started to research the group's history, speaking to several members of the board "to see if I could provide the leadership and time Pro Arts needed," Hollingsworth says. "I was very impressed with the longevity and legacy Pro Arts has built." Â While Pro Arts certainly has longevity, its legacy may be a trickier concept to pin down. Conversations with dozens of local artists and arts organizers revealed some mixed opinions on the group. (Disclosure: I have worked with Pro Arts in my roles as an employee of the Jersey City Museum and as a local artist.) Michelle Mumoli is co-founder of Pop-UP Art, a new group of artists coming together to organize art exhibitions and musical performances in temporary spaces across Jersey City. She suggests that Pro Arts embrace the changes in the city's arts community and stay current. 22

"Organizations that label themselves as art organizations have to stay up-to-date on what is going on in their immediate community," says Mumoli. "They cannot solely rely on the vision of yesterday. That stifles everyone and does not bring about change." Others who have worked closely with Pro Arts in the past echoed this concern. Â One person who recently worked directly with the group says it was time to end the relationship because there was too much resistance to, and anxiety about, change. Instead of reaching out to and partnering with other like-minded arts groups, says the artist, who requested anonymity so as not to further damage the relationship with the group, Pro Arts has hunkered down and tried to go it alone. With the current economic state of Jersey City and the broader art world, this is not a recipe for growth, but in fact the exact opposite. And it showed, with what the source says were sagging enrollment numbers and low member involvement. Hollingsworth counters that despite having "weathered time and economic decline," Pro Arts has succeeded at its mission of serving its

members and "is clearly not in need of fixing," adding what he sees as the group's legacy – its survival and very organic growth over the years. "[It's] the fact that Pro Arts has survived as a volunteer-driven organization for almost 20 years," he says. "It has grown to include a parttime paid staff member and continues to look to the future and evolve. This is no small feat. Through this, Pro Arts has remained dedicated to its artist members and core values." Still, Hollingsworth concedes that Pro Arts should do more. "Working with the board of directors, we will next identify new needs within our community and expand our services and programs to include our new generation of professional artists living and working in Jersey City," he says. Clearly, the time is right and there are plenty of possibilities. While Jersey City's arts groups mostly play nice together, they often work on separate, parallel tracks. An organization that could somehow harness all of the energy and creative thinking of Jersey City's arts community, and present it to the rest of the metro area and beyond, would certainly be a welcome addition to the scene, particularly

with the closure of the Jersey City Museum. "I think that [Pro Arts] is in a prime position to step up as an umbrella arts organization in Jersey City," says Thomas John Carlson, the painter who founded the thriving Jersey City Art School in December 2009. Heights-based artist Ann LePore agrees. "With the tragic and ridiculous closing of the Jersey City Museum, organizations like Art House Productions and Pro Arts are now even more integral to filling the cultural void," she says. "I'd like to see Pro Arts take a more active role," arts event producer Sophie Penkrat says, pointing to a member-based multi-purpose arts hub in Williamsburg as a possible example. "It would be great for them to take a leadership role, perhaps using 3rd Ward in Brooklyn as a model, with classes and seminars that are meaningful, and their own events." Hollingsworth says Pro Arts is up to the challenge. His aim is to develop a sustainable arts community for Jersey City, Hudson County, and possibly the region. It's a lofty goal, but Hollingsworth believes it can be done over the long term "[by] expanding public awareness of Pro Arts and our services, expanding our 23


An artist works on a mural during last year's 4th Street Art & Music Festival

membership and – most importantly – cultivating active partnerships with other artist groups in New Jersey and New York," he says. Hollingsworth points to the Art Eat-Up as an example of Pro Arts' growth and success. Former Pro Arts executive director Rebecca Feranec organized the first one in March 2010, inspired by Brooklyn's FEAST, a recurring public dinner designed to use grassroots financial support to fund new and emerging artists. Eat-Up attendees buy tickets to dine or have drinks and vote on a group of as many as 10 art proposals presented by individual artists and arts groups. The community and the artists have an opportunity to discuss the proposal and their work, and the winning proposal receives the money raised. So far, Pro Arts has organized three such dinners and awarded cash prizes – which have grown each time – to three local arts groups. 4th Street Arts was awarded $1,059 to create a mural on Brunswick Street between 2nd and 3rd Streets and create a documentary film about the Village Neighborhood; Penkrat and Anne McTernan were awarded $695 for their proposed project to create a public art exhibition to heighten awareness of the 6th Street Embankment in Jersey City and highlight its importance to the community; and Carlson was awarded $640 to rejuvenate the Jersey City Art School's 1,100 square-foot backyard and create a space where 24

artists can draw plants and be inspired by nature. 4th Street Arts founder and director Mike McNamara points out that Pro Arts has a "big role" to play in Jersey City, particularly if it can bridge generational divides in the arts community. "Pro Arts has contributed to the art tour for many years; currently they are scheduling professional portfolio reviews for artists, giving out grants for shows in town," McNamara says. "Remember, many of the active members of Pro Arts are old-school Jersey City artists, circa 111 [1st Street] and prior. There's a lot of wisdom and experience in that." Maryanne Kelleher, the director of Jersey City's Cultural Affairs Division, makes a similar point. "I respect Pro Arts' roots and history in Jersey City; they were one of the first arts organizations dedicated to promoting visual artists in our city," she says. "Several of Pro Arts' founding members were instrumental in the beginnings of the art tour, which remains an important established annual event in our city, aimed at sustaining our vibrant arts community." Hollingsworth says Pro Arts is hard at work at making this year’s Artists' Studio Tour a success. The event, produced by both Pro Arts and the city's Cultural Affairs division, is a tour of artist studios, group exhibitions and art in public spaces. This year's tour, scheduled for October 1 and 2, will be the 21st annual event; last year, hundreds of artists participated in nearly 100

exhibitions all over the city. And in what may be considered a sign of increasing inclusiveness, Hollingsworth says Pro Arts has been working this year with a number of arts organizers, like Creative Grove's Uta Brauser and the folks behind Grassroots Community Space, to help increase artist outreach and involvement. He also says that after budget cuts forced the city to eliminate a citywide shuttle bus last year, bus service will return this year to ferry folks to art shows all over the city. The tour provides an opportunity for artists and other neighborhood residents to come together for and through art. On a simple level, it's almost like a weekendlong party. It's also a walking tour of the city's art scene, offering visitors a glimpse into the lives and workspaces of artists. Like MTV’s Cribs, but with emerging and under-recognized artists (and more often with PBR than Cristal). True to Jersey City's character, most of the artists' studios and showcases exist in alternative spaces, makeshift galleries, and converted rooms in apartment buildings and houses. The official Pro Arts show, and the closing party, will once again be at Parlay Studios in the Powerhouse Arts District this year. And the tour is not designed to be an insular affair, by artists and for artists. "It is for everyone," says Hollingsworth. "The aim of this year's tour is the same as it has been from the beginning: to provide an audience and focus to Jersey City artists, and Jersey City as a destination for creative people. Our goal is to continue to grow our audiences and our artists."

some highlights of this year's studio tour The best thing to do during a Studio Tour is to just let your feet be your guide. But we thought we'd point out a few must-see exhibitions. Our list is by no means exhaustive, so check the JCI website as the tour approaches for a more robust guide. • Mana Contemporary hosts Our Own Directions, a blockbuster exhibition of works from the collection of famed art dealers Louis and Susan Meisel, with a focus on photorealism. The show features the work of some three dozen, including founding members of the photorealist movement like Chuck Close, Audrey Flack and Richard Estes, as well as many of their contemporary counterparts. It will be one of the most significant shows ever in Jersey City, says Greg Brickey of Jersey City's Cultural Affairs Division. 888 Newark Avenue • From Across the River, Sandra Swieder’s photographs of 9/11 from the New Jersey perspective at the Brennan Courthouse's Rotunda Gallery. 583 Newark Avenue • The Pro Arts members show at Parlay Studios, curated by Meredith Lippman and Mike Smith and featuring works in a diverse array of media by 28 artists, including glass sculpture by Christine Barney, large textural paintings by Christopher Winslow and drawings by Nisha Drinkard. 161 2nd Street • The first-ever JC Powerhouse Short Film Festival will take place in tents on Provost Street between Bay and 1st Streets in – you guessed it – the Powerhouse Arts District. • Hispanic Heritage exhibition at City Hall featuring Carlos Bautista, Miguel Hernandez and others. 280 Grove Street • Dividing Light Measuring Darkness, a group exhibition that explores the physical, optical, psychological and metaphorical aspects of light and darkness, at Curious Matter. 272 5th Street • 4th Street Art & Music Festival featuring tons of live music, art, food, drinks and more. (Saturday, October 1 only) • Kirkland Bray is not only one-half of the duo behind Jersey City leather goods company Billykirk, he's also a talented painter. Bray will have a solo show of new paintings, Gatherings, at 58 Gallery. 58 Coles Street • Open studios by John Ruddy, Shauna Finn, Rita Marandino, Sandra DeSando and dozens of others. 25


THE RULES OF THE ROAD

IS JERSEY CITY DOING ENOUGH TO KEEP ITS PEDESTRIANS SAFE? WRITTEN BY: Lia Petridis Maiello ILLUSTRATIONS BY: Ana Benaroya

R

icardo Torres was walking to the Newport Centre mall two summers ago when he almost lost his life. He was on the northeast corner of 6th Street and Marin, waiting for the light to change, and when it did and he got the "walk" signal, he stepped out onto Marin. Motorists routinely ignore the 25-mile per hour speed limit on this four-lane road as they race to and from the Holland Tunnel, Hoboken, the mall or elsewhere. Almost instantly, he saw a black truck barreling toward him. On surveillance video released by the Jersey City Police Department, Torres, clad in a black T-shirt and baseball cap, raises his arms, as if in surrender – just moments before being run over by the truck as it speeds through the red light. Police estimated the truck was going about 45 miles per hour. 

•••••••••• 26

Between 2000 and 2009, more than 47,700 pedestrians were killed on American streets, according to a study by the advocacy group Transportation for America. The figure is "the equivalent of a jumbo jet full of passengers crashing roughly every month," as study author Michelle Ernst points out. Over the same period, 1,514 people died while walking in New Jersey, accounting for one out of every five traffic fatalities. And here in Hudson County, 95 pedestrians lost their lives, a number that equaled 35.6 percent of all traffic victims, the second highest county ratio in the state. Although these numbers seem shocking, the streets of New Jersey do not represent the greatest danger for walkers in the country – far from it. In fact, New Jersey only ranks number 21 on the list of "most dangerous states for pedestrians," according to Transportation for America. 27


Nevertheless, the recent headline-grabbing deaths of pedestrians this summer along Kennedy Boulevard, not to mention the anecdotal stories one hears of friends of friends hit or nearly hit while walking or biking, are a constant reminder of the risk involved in getting from Point A to Point B. With more and more Jersey City residents choosing to walk or bike instead of drive, there is clearly a growing need for two key things: safety measures and adequate road design; and observant, respectful behavior. Take these scenes, witnessed by this reporter late one morning in July, enough to leave her stunned by the way drivers and pedestrians interact in every-day road traffic: There is Abimal, a 17-year old from Journal Square, running frantically across

of the devices. One poll released in 2009 found that the number of New Jersey drivers who said they sent text messages while driving actually increased by 40 percent the first year the law was in effect. That year, there were 362 crashes in Hudson County alone that involved a driver who was talking on a handheld or hands-free phone. In 2010, pointing to the nearly 10,000 citations for phone violations issued to motorists each month, Pam Fischer, then-director of the state’s Division of Highway Traffic Safety, admitted the agency's work is "far from done" in urging motorists to "hang up and just drive." It’s pretty clear then: people keep flouting the law and putting themselves and others at risk. Maybe they usually don't, but Wait here’s an important call I just have to take. Or maybe they

"WHEN YOU BUILD A ROAD, YOU BUILD IT FOR ALL USERS." Jersey Avenue to reach the library. "Cars sometimes pass the red light when they make a left turn onto Jersey," he explains. "That's why I run." Just down the block, at the busy intersection of Columbus Drive and Jersey Avenue, a headphone-wearing man in his early 30s steps onto Columbus and gets halfway across before noticing that the signal has changed and cars are now barreling his way, fast. The driver of one such vehicle, a massive elevated sports utility vehicle, honks at headphone man – while talking on his cellphone. "Inattention, texting while driving, or even talking on the phone while driving" are the root causes for most pedestrian-related crashes, says John Burke, who has been working as an attorney for victims of automobile accidents in Jersey City for the past fourteen years. Talking on a handheld cellphone or texting while driving has been illegal in New Jersey since 2008, but that obviously has not stopped the use 28

think, I can handle multi-tasking. What is perhaps less clear is how to stem the tide. But advocates and officials all agree that fighting device use by drivers needs to be just one part of a broader fight against illegal and reckless driving. "I know about police sting operations in other cities where cops dressed as civilians cross the road in order to see if cars will stop," Burke says. Jersey City spokeswoman Jennifer Morrill says the JCPD has done similar operations here as well, with plainclothes officers leading stings against drivers who don't stop for pedestrians in crosswalks. Burke, in the meantime, also pleads for a stronger focus on driver education and more public awareness of the issues at play. Jose Amendano, a driving instructor with Amin Driving School in Jersey City, agrees that drivers need to pay closer attention, pointing to a "great lack of educated motorists in Jersey City." He has been teaching young drivers in Jersey City for the past nine years and complains that a lot of them have little awareness of their surroundings.

"People too often ignore the speed limit, in particular on Kennedy Boulevard in Journal Square," says Amendano, who acknowledges that a lot of young drivers who attain their licenses "are not ready to drive yet." Considering that 16 year-old motorists must undergo a six-month period of supervised driving in New Jersey, but only need to attend six on-the-road lessons with a professional instructor, that observation might not be that surprising.

•••••••••• This summer, Jersey City paved the way for a more egalitarian use of the city's transportation infrastructure by establishing a Complete Streets policy. The policy, which calls for "roadways that enable safe and convenient access for all users," represents the planning community’s rethinking of what – and whom – a road should be designed for. According to Jay Corbalis, a policy analyst at New Jersey Future, a nonprofit organization that promotes smart growth, a Complete Streets policy is the "philosophy that when you build a road, you build it for all users." He says Jersey City is a huge addition to the handful of municipalities that have embraced the policy. "Jersey City is the biggest jurisdiction [in New Jersey] to adopt the Complete Streets policy, aside from the state," Corbalis says. Jersey City's policy will guide future infrastructure construction and road repairs to "safely accommodate travel by pedestrians, bicyclists, public transit, and motorized vehicles … with special priority given to pedestrian safety." The policy, however, is non-binding and is subject to being implemented only "whenever feasible." The move is being greeted as a positive first step by pedestrian and bicycle advocates, even if some remain concerned about just how the policy will be implemented. Complete Streets ideas were already being used in several projects before the policy was 29


officially adopted in May, Morrill says. The favored concept in the Route 440 redesign project, for example, is to replace the four-lane highway with an urban boulevard featuring vegetation, barriers and bicycle- and pedestrian-friendly elements. The massive Bayfront Redevelopment Plan, which will create a number of new streets on the Hackensack Riverfront, also calls for a Complete Streets-type approach. But there are apparently no plans to retrofit the majority of Jersey City's existing roadways to fit the Complete Streets framework, making

for crossing against a signal and 11 citations for pedestrians not crossing at an intersection and/ or failing to yield the right of way to the driver. It's not only local drivers who cause the problems, says Morrill. "Surely the volume of cars that are coming into Jersey City, or that are passing through on way to New York City play a role in [the number of accidents here]," she says. Jersey City has received funds from the New Jersey Division of Highway Safety for several years to implement pedestrian

missed opportunity to help make life better for Jersey City's pedestrians: the muchneeded $4.2 million redesign and paving of Columbus Drive. The city's plan does plenty to accommodate commuters who rush to and from Exchange Place on a daily basis (though the idea to eliminate on-street parking at rush hours, temporarily turning the four-lane road into a wider one, was abandoned). What is noticeably lacking, however, are significant traffic-calming devices like speed bumps, neckdowns, curb extensions and bike lanes.

diet," whereby a road is reduced in number of travel lanes or effective width, as examples. "[These are] small, inexpensive infrastructure changes that can be done," she says. "If you make it difficult for people to speed, chances are they won't speed – but often the wide, four-lane streets were not designed with pedestrians in mind." One of those wide – and dangerous – streets is John F. Kennedy Boulevard. The fourlane road, on which two pedestrians were killed in Jersey City just this summer, has been repeatedly named the most dangerous

"FOR BETTER OR WORSE, WE ARE AND HAVE BEEN A DRIVING CULTURE." advocates and other politicians wonder if the city will ever really break the car-centric mold. "There is a culture prevailing in Jersey City where pedestrians are simply not in charge of the road," Ward E councilman Steven Fulop says. He blames "a lack of enforcement as it relates to traffic violations" for the current situation, but Morrill counters that there has been a stepping up of enforcement. According to the New Jersey Administrative Office of the Courts, there were a total of 281 citations where motorists were found guilty of violating the pedestrian’s right of way in Jersey City last year. As for pedestrians, 7 citations resulted in violations

30

safety programs that place emphasis on education, enforcement and engineering. Asked about current projects regarding traffic safety in Jersey City, Morrill puts together a list that enumerates police sting operations; walkability workshops with local stakeholders; a median in Montgomery Street between Warren Street and Marin Boulevard that was extended by city engineers to create a mid-block crosswalk pedestrian refuge; an engineering project that provides safety improvements to streets adjacent to four schools; and another that will do the same for streets near 21 additional schools. But one recent project sticks out as a

"I can see people blazing through here since the street has been paved," says Columbus Drive resident Thomas Tonkin. "They are often actually speeding up and shooting the red light ... at least with the potholes the cars didn't speed as much." Transportation advocates acknowledge that reckless or distracted driving and speeding are key factors in pedestrian deaths, but they say enforcement is only part of the solution. As explained by the Tri-State Transportation Campaign's Janna Chernetz, road design is just as important. She points to the introduction of speeding hurdles, such as speed bumps, the change of speed limits, the painting of more crosswalks, or even a so-called "road

road for pedestrians in Hudson County by the Tri-State Transportation Campaign. The high-capacity urban roadway is "intensely congested" since it serves as a "crossroad to the metropolitan area," Hudson County spokesman Jim Kennelly says. In other words, the accident levels are proportional to the traffic levels – and Kennelly acknowledges that a significant decrease in traffic volume will probably not be achieved within the next ten years. "The infrastructure for pedestrians is simply not there," he says. "For better or worse, we are and have been a driving culture."

•••••••••• 31


But here's the thing about culture: it's not stagnant. As Americans face peak oil, record gas prices, a depleted ozone and extreme weather, many are eschewing the sprawling habits that once seemed quintessentially "American," and are returning to cities in record numbers. As they do, many are realizing that it's often easiest and cheapest to leave the car back in the 'burbs, and in time come to support less car-centric policies in our urban areas. Folks of this persuasion often point to Europe or South America as places to look for solutions. While different sizes and political landscapes may make comparisons difficult, Germany and the Netherlands are clearly doing

cycling and pedestrian fatalities dropped by 57 percent and 73 percent, respectively. Reducing fatalities among the walking and cycling communites is foremost the result of both countries having recognized these modes of transport as equal, not inferior, to driving. The improvement of infrastructure in Western Europe also goes hand-in-hand with the willingness of individuals to pay higher taxes for the common good. For example, the individual tax rate for Germans can be as high as 42 percent, depending on income, enabling the government to set aside a sizable portion of this revenue for infrastructure development. Here’s a telling comparison: In 2011, Germany invested 10 percent of its federal budget in transportation, while 12 percent went to defense; but in America, 25 percent – the largest single share – went to defense, while only 2 percent went to transportation.

••••••••••

something right when it comes to the integration of pedestrians and cyclists as full-valued members of the transportation ecosystem. In the last few decades, both countries have made extraordinary progress to improve the safety of pedestrians and bicyclists. During the period between 1975 and 2001, bicycling trips in Germany doubled but bicycling deaths declined by 64 percent, while pedestrian fatalities fell by 82 percent. Over the same time period in the Netherlands,

32

The driver of the truck that hit Torres, the Downtown Jersey City resident struck on his way to the mall, sped away. Torres, meanwhile, was rushed to the Jersey City Medical Center, where he had his liver and kidney removed and was treated for a broken hip and facial injuries. Doctors induced a coma. "I am feeling much better today," Torres says. "A lot has to do with the fact that I don't remember a thing." He considers himself lucky that the entire episode was caught on camera, which led to the arrest of a 19-year-old driver from Bayonne 10 days later. But despite the fact that the man had committed a crime, Torres and his family pled for a mild punishment. "I don't believe in jail," he says. These days, he takes a more philosophical approach to traffic safety in his hometown. "I believe that mankind is not there yet, where we really care for each other," he says. "That we are at least civil to each other." Additional reporting by Matt Hunger and Jon Whiten.

WHAT ARE THE DUTCH AND THE GERMANS DOING RIGHT? 1. 2.

Their policies consist of six crucial elements:

Better Facilities for Walking and Cycling

German and Dutch policies call for widespread auto-free zones for pedestrians; wide, well-lit sidewalks; pedestrian refuge islands; clearlymarked zebra crosswalks; and pedestrian-activated crossing signals.

Traffic Calming

Traffic calming limits the speeds of motor vehicle traffic through physical barriers. Traffic calming techniques include raised intersections and crosswalks, traffic circles, road narrowing, zigzag routes, curves, speed bumps and artificial dead-ends created by midblock closures. In both the Netherlands and Germany, city officials use traffic calming to tame whole areas, not just isolated streets. By approaching the problem from an area-wide perspective, German and Dutch officials ensure that faster through-traffic gets displaced onto arterial routes designed to handle it – not simply shifted from one local road to another.

3. 4. 5. 6.

People-Oriented Urban Design New suburban developments in the Netherlands and Germany are designed to provide safe and convenient pedestrian and bicycling access. Residential developments almost always include other uses, such as cultural centers and shopping or service establishments that can easily be reached by foot or bike. When non-motorists must traverse an obstacle such as a highway, railroad or river, Dutch and German cities usually provide them with safe and attractive pedestrian and bicycle crossings.

Restrictions on Motor Vehicle Use Dutch and German cities also restrict auto use by charging much more for parking than American cities. In addition, most Dutch and German cities prohibit truck traffic and through-traffic of any kind in residential neighborhoods.

Traffic Education Driver training for motorists in the Netherlands and Germany is much more extensive, thorough and expensive than in the United States. In their training programs, the Dutch and Germans emphasize how crucial it is to pay special attention to avoid collisions with pedestrians and cyclists. Motorists are required by law to drive in a way that minimizes the risk of injury for pedestrians and cyclists even if they are jaywalking, cycling in the wrong direction, ignoring traffic signals or otherwise violating traffic regulations.

Traffic Regulations and Enforcement Traffic regulations in Germany and the Netherlands strongly favor pedestrians and bicyclists. The most significant difference between the transportation policy of these countries and that of the United States is how much more strictly they enforce traffic regulations for motorists. German and Dutch penalties can be high, even for minor violations. They consider not stopping for pedestrians at crosswalks a serious offense and will ticket a motorist for non-compliance, even if pedestrians are only waiting at the curb and are not actually in the crosswalk.

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HBLR 33. LITM 34. Made with Love 35. Maritime Parc 36. Next Step Broadway 37. Park & Sixth Comfort Food 38. Port-O Lounge 39. Project Pilates 40. Red Feast Wine & Liquors 41. SalonBe 42. Shampoo JC Hair Salon 43. Skinner's Loft 44. Smith & Chang General Goods 45. SunMoon Yoga 46. Super Impact Fitness 47. Tonal Art Music Center 48. Tousled Hair Salon 49. Uptown Crew 50. The Warehouse Cafe

p. 40 p. 40 p. 38 p. 50 p. 40 p. 38 p. 46 p. 42 p. 45 p. 45 p. 37 p. 44 p. 55 p. 47 p. 56 p. 44 p. 55 p. 56

OFF THE MAP Birdbrain Projects Creative Enabler JC Fridays JC Lofts JCF Boot Camp Jersey City Craft Mafia Magic Cleaning Service Masterpiece Painting Michelle Timek Yoga One Jersey City Pinch-Hitter Qi for Wellness Show Me Your Faces

p. 53 p. 56 p. 52 Inside Cover p. 48 p. 53 p. 54 p. 54 p. 55 p. 6 p. 54 p. 55 p. 53

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JERSEY CITY GUIDE

FALL 2011

HARD GROVE CAFE 319 GROVE STREET JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 451 1853 hardgrovecafe.com Take one step inside this artsy Downtown restaurant and you'll know that you’re in for an entertaining evening. Latin music and Cuban mojitos set the tone for a South Beach-like party atmosphere, while authentic Cuban food choices are available – from Hemingway churrasco steak to shrimp with garlic sauce to the classic Cuban shredded beef. The Hard Grove Cafe has expanded its menu to include vegetarian selections with a Latin emphasis, like vegetarian lemon salsa chicken. On Tuesdays and Wednesdays, check out the allyou-can-eat Latin mango-pineapple BBQ chicken, ribs or pulled pork with prices starting at $9.99. The cafe offers brunch on weekends, and features selections like mixed berry pancakes, breakfast quesadillas and huevos rancheros – not to mention bottomless bloody marys and mimosas. Stop by the Hard Grove and enjoy a magnificent experience.

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BUBBY's BURRITOS

SKINNER'S LOFT

440 JERSEY AVENUE JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 333 1550 bubbysburritos.com

146 NEWARK AVENUE JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 915 0600 skinnersloft.com

Bubby's Burritos is a cozy Downtown California-Mexican eatery which prides itself on providing fresh, natural, lard-free ingredients in all its dishes. Its homemade corn tamales, nachos, burritos, tacos and quesadillas are oil-free and never too hot or spicy, while its salsas, guacamole and chili are handmade fresh on a daily basis with onions, cilantro and natural ingredients. Bubby's offers delivery throughout Jersey City and Hoboken.

Skinner's Loft is an elegant yet casual, upbeat bistro-style restaurant. It features an eclectic menu of deliciously seasoned small plates and entrees, as well as tried and true comfort food, like a juicy burger. There are extensive beer, wine and liquor lists to accommodate those seeking the usual as well as satisfy the adventurous. The handcrafted bar is adorned with a copper ceiling and antique Italian tiled floor, with the loft space upstairs housing a beautiful, but comfortable, dining room. In the summertime, Skinner's Loft offers dining in the rooftop garden, serves specials daily, and features carefully made cocktails using fresh squeezed juices, housemade syrups, and house-infused liquors. Join us for lunch Tuesday through Friday, brunch on the weekends, and dinner until 11 every night.

PAID FOR BY OR IN PART BY THE NJ URBAN ENTERPRISE ZONE PROGRAM

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JERSEY CITY GUIDE

FALL 2011

MARITIME PARC 84 AUDREY ZAPP DRIVE JERSEY CITY 07305 T 201 413 0050 maritimeparc.com Maritime Parc captures the spirit of the sea, featuring an outdoor stone patio where food, drink, and the company of friends and family can be savored in the open air; a year-round indoor dining room where accessible yet sophisticated cuisine is served by an attentive staff; and an event hall perfect for any celebration. The restaurant revitalizes the tradition of the great seaside restaurants of yesteryear for the modern diner, adding a signature spectacle: expansive views of the Hudson River and lower Manhattan that frame the scene.

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PORT-O LOUNGE

THE IRON MONKEY

286 1ST STREET JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 420 9550 portolounge.com

99 GREENE STREET JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 435 5756 ironmonkey.com

Port-O Lounge brings the essence of Portuguese cuisine and the elegance of port wine to Downtown Jersey City. Port-O offers an array of tapas, selected wines, and refreshing sangrias, served in a friendly and relaxed atmosphere. At nightfall Port-O turns into a hip lounge complemented by great cocktails, stylish ambiance and the sound of euro beats. In the warmer season, guests can enjoy outdoor dining under the shade of a graceful tree.

Founded 15 years ago by Stephen McIntyre, The Iron Monkey quickly became a favorite place for Jersey City residents to eat and drink. Today, The Iron Monkey offers casual, modern American cuisine with three floors for eating and drinking. The main bar has a wonderful traditional pub feel. The second floor offers an elegant, yet vibrant, dining experience that is perfect for dinner with friends or corporate parties. The Iron Monkey also boasts the only rooftop in Jersey City with dining and a full bar. In addition to having the most unique space in Jersey City, The Iron Monkey has been a longtime proponent of the craft beer movement. With 39 taps devoted to craft beer and a bottle list that numbers well over 300 bottles, The Iron Monkey ranks among the elite destination beer bars in the Northeast. 39


JERSEY CITY GUIDE

FALL 2011

MADE WITH LOVE 530 JERSEY AVENUE JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 451 5199 madewithloveorganics.com With artisanal breads, empanadas, quiches, cookies, pies and cakes made with organic ingredients, Made with Love is Jersey City's destination for sweet and savory baked goods. Now there's more to love: daily lunch, weekend brunch, communal dinners, art receptions, cooking/ baking classes and children's parties.

LITM 140 NEWARK AVENUE JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 536 5557 litm.com Every day is new and exciting at LITM. The popular neighborhood destination is a restaurant, bar and art/video gallery known for its creative, seasonal cocktails, extensive beer list and excellent American food by executive chef Alana Puentes. Voted Jersey City's Best Mac & Cheese in 2010. Monthly art exhibitions by local and international artists.

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PARK & SIXTH COMFORT FOOD

JERSEY CITY SUPER BUY-RITE

364 GROVE STREET JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 918 6072 parkandsixth.com

575 MANILA AVENUE JERSEY CITY 07310 (ACROSS FROM HOLLAND TUNNEL HOME DEPOT) T 201 239 1200 buyritewines.com

From its braised brisket sandwich and four different chicken salads to its homemade mozzarella, Park & Sixth has redefined the standard in comfortable food served quickly, affordably and hospitably. It's called comfort food for a reason â&#x20AC;&#x201C; come find out why.

Jersey City Super Buy-Rite is the largest liquor store in New Jersey, with over 30,000 square feet of retail space. Its size, financial strength and association with the Buy-Rite chain allows it to buy at the best prices possible and ultimately pass the savings along to you. Buy-Rite also has one of the largest beer selections in the world, as well as thousands of wines and spirits, and an extensive cigar selection. Buy-Rite might look like a big box retail store, but it strives to give you the same service you'd expect from a boutique wine shop, with numerous managers who are trained and certified wine, spirits and beer experts. Save 10 percent on wines with purchases of 12 bottles or more. Delivery available to Hoboken and Newport â&#x20AC;&#x201C; mention this ad for free delivery!

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JERSEY CITY GUIDE

42

FALL 2011

RED FEAST WINE & LIQUORS

ANOTHER MAN's TREASURE

129 COLUMBUS DRIVE JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 333 3360

353 GROVE STREET JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 860 9990 amtvintage.com

Red Feast features a large selection of wines from around the world plus imported, domestic and craft beers. Its owners are also open to customer suggestions, so let them know if there is something you would like added to the inventory. Free delivery to Downtown Jersey City, including The Village, Newport, Exchange Place and Paulus Hook ($30 minimum order).

Now in its sixth year, this local "knockout vintage boutique" (Time Out New York) continues to impress with its selection of wearable vintage fashions and accessories. Every item is carefully hand-picked in an effort to keep the racks affordable with ontrend finds, seasonal styles and designer duds. Open 7 days a week with new additions daily!

DOWNTOWN COOP

DEEN

29 MCWILLIAMS PLACE JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 855 6767 downtowncoop.com

88 MORGAN STREET JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 963 3336 shopdeen.com

Downtown Coop is Jersey City's alternative grocery store specializing in a diverse selection of local, organic and sustainable foods. It strives to build a lasting relationship between local, independent producers of high quality food and the wonderful community that is Jersey City. Get Healthy, Get Local.

DEEN is a lifestyle boutique located in the Powerhouse Arts District in Downtown Jersey City. Find trendy fashion, accessories and home decor from a unique mix of brands and local designers – all at affordable prices. Enjoy 10 percent off your purchase at DEEN's new location in Trump Plaza when you bring this ad.

14th STREET GARDEN CENTER

HOUND ABOUT TOWN

793 JERSEY AVENUE JERSEY CITY 07310 T 201 963 1414 14thstreetgardencenter.com

218 MONTGOMERY STREET JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 721 5532 houndabouttownjc.com

Jersey City's premier family run garden center has a wide selection of indoor foliage and outdoor blooming flowers. It keeps a full selection of plants year round to suit your city living. Autumn brings a variety of pumpkins, gourds, haystacks and corn stalks. Fall is also great for window boxes – 14th Street will pot your plants and deliver them too! Christmas Trees arrive Thanksgiving day.

You live a stylish and progressive urban lifestyle – and your pet should too! At Hound About Town, convenience meets community, creating a healthy, eco-conscious and social experience for pets and people, with a focus on eco-friendly, locally made apparel and accessories, as well as a wealth of knowledge and choices for optimal, sustainable nutrition for your pet.

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JERSEY CITY GUIDE

FALL 2011

SMITH & CHANG GENERAL GOODS

SALONBE

230 PAVONIA AVENUE JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 420 0557 smithchang.com

106 RIVER DRIVE SOUTH JERSEY CITY 07310 T 201 222 1101 hairsalonbe.com

Smith & Chang General Goods in Hamilton Square is a one-stop shopping destination for everything essential in your home. Featuring kitchenware, furniture, lighting, hardware, personal accessory and bath products, the store melds both vintage and new to create an atmosphere stylish and easy to live with.

With the perfect balance of a trendy yet upscale ambiance, Jersey City's premiere salon has finally arrived. Located on the waterfront in Newport, SalonBe is here to help each client find their desired look for their personal lifestyle. Featuring some of Jersey City's most talented hairstylists, offering the most current services, and carrying the lead products in today's industry, SalonBe is sure to redefine and rejuvenate your confidence. Drop by or call during the month of September to indulge in some of our grand opening promotions – including free conditioning treatments with any service; 10 percent off all hair care products; and free cut, color and product consultations. Join SalonBe for complimentary wine and food every Friday in September as it showcases the work of a different local artist each week.

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TOUSLED HAIR SALON

SHAMPOO JC HAIR SALON

500-A JERSEY AVENUE JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 309 1200 mytousledhair.com

107 COLUMBUS DRIVE JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 395 0045 shampoojc.com

There are good stylists who show up to work, and there are exceptional stylists who show up to create. Let the Tousled stylists create your next customized color and style for this season from a quaint Aveda haircare hub located in the historic Downtown district of Jersey City.

By way of NYC’s Lower East Side, Harley DiNardo of Shampoo Avenue B has opened up shop in Downtown Jersey City. "We want clients to feel as comfortable about getting their hair done here in Jersey City as they would in a hip Manhattan salon."

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JERSEY CITY GUIDE

FALL 2011

HAMILTON HEALTH & FITNESS 161 ERIE STREET JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 714 7600 hamiltonhealthfitness.com Located inside Hamilton Square, Hamilton Health & Fitness combines the latest innovations with a spa-like setting. Taking its cue from the natural beauty of historic Hamilton Park, HHF is light, airy, green and natural. Large thermal windows flood the space with light, while natural stone and wood finishes accompany the most advanced cardio and weight-training equipment. In addition to an innovative, cutting-edge nutrition program, integrated amenities complete the experience for body and mind. HHF features an indoor lap pool, sauna and steam rooms, childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s room, group fitness classes and a fully equipped Pilates studio directed by Project Pilates. Group fitness classes include Pilates mat/tower/reformer, zumba, indoor cycling, intenSati, boot camp, kettlebell, yoga, water workout, and learn-to-swim classes. HHF offers the most holistic health and fitness experience in Jersey City.

PROJECT PILATES

SUPER IMPACT FITNESS

161 ERIE STREET JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 HEALTHY (432 5849) projectpilates.com

650 MONTGOMERY STREET JERSEY CITY 07306 T 201 763 6617 superimpactfitness.com

Pilates is great for muscle stamina, strength, flexibility, mental clarity, health, wellness and awareness. Project Pilates offers a variety of classes to fit any budget including private and semi-private sessions, group tower, group reformer and group mat classes. The studio specializes in pre-/postnatal Pilates and injury prevention and recovery.

46

Super Impact Fitness is Jersey City's premier boutique fitness and dance studio created strictly to offer classes. There are no oversized and intimidating weight machines or equipment. Instead, you will find a small intimate space with high ceilings, an exposed brick wall, a large mirror, hardwood floors, a stretch bar (ballet bar) and all-glass floor to ceiling windows. Super Impact's certified instructors offer adult yoga, zumba, abs and core aerobics, cardio kickboxing and indoor boot camps, while its dance instructors offer Latin dance, salsa, hip-hop and Bollywood. Other classes include Muay Thai, kettlebell training and belly dancing. Super Impact also offers KidsYoga, KidsZumba and much more. The studio is conveniently located across from The Beacon in the upscale m650 Flats condo building, and is also available to rent for workshops, an art show or other purposes.

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JERSEY CITY GUIDE

FALL 2011

Jersey City Dance Academy 107 WEST SIDE AVENUE JERSEY CITY 07305 T 201 435 8943 jerseycitydanceacademy.com Jersey City Dance Academy (JCDA) provides the atmosphere and training that nurtures both the recreational dancer and the budding performer. It provides a positive and safe setting that stresses proper technique. Developing dancers soar to their potential through JCDA's progressive approach.JCDA's Early Childhood program works towards mastering the basic concepts through imagination and exploration. Classes are designed for each developmental stage for ages 2 to 5. For ages 6 through adult, JCDA offers a multi-level performing arts program with 70+ classes a week in ballet, jazz, tap, lyrical, hip-hop, gymnastics, musical theater and zumba! New this year: Boys Training Program and Acting. Classes begin Saturday, September 10. Free registration with this ad ($25 value) for new students. Promotions can't be combined.

JCF BOOT CAMP

GALLERIE HUDSON

CITYWIDE | JERSEY CITY T 201 484 7848 jcfbootcamp.com

197 NEWARK AVENUE JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 434 1010

Daris Wilson started JCF Boot Camp in 2008 to give women an effective alternative to pricey personal training sessions and traditional gym settings, where the bulky equipment can be intimidating. The four-week program for women of all ages and fitness levels is designed to challenge your fitness level.

Gallerie Hudson goes beyond just ordinary framing. In addition to creating award-winning designs, it offers conservation and restoration services and expert advice on how to properly preserve and showcase your art. Also featured in the gallery are original works of art by local artists and artists from around the world. Gallerie Hudson has thousands of choices in frames, from hand-crafted Italian mouldings to contemporary American hardwoods. Whether you need to frame a family photograph or a Picasso original, this is the place to go. Gallerie Hudson is fully insured and guarantees the quality of its workmanship. So drop by for a friendly, professional design consultation or peruse its collection of original art. Store hours are Tuesday through Friday 11 am-7 pm and Saturday 10 am-6 pm. (Member of the American Professional Picture Framers Association.)

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JERSEY CITY GUIDE

FALL 2011

JERSEY CITY CHILDREN'S THEATER 83 WAYNE STREET (IN THE BARROW MANSION) JERSEY CITY 07302 T 917 363 7429 jcchildrenstheater.org Jersey City Children's Theater (JCCT) celebrates the art of play and the diverse tapestry that is Jersey City. Through its unique and original curriculum of storytelling, play-making and theater games, children will discover new ways to express themselves and explore the world around them. In classes and performances, children will discover diplomatic ways to learn lessons of morality, courage, generosity and compassion – and have great fun doing it! JCCT offers in-house classes and afterschool programs for children 3 to 12 years old. Please watch the JCCT website for more information on the next performance by its professional actor educators – Grimm's fairytales for "big kids" and Mother Goose nursery rhymes for "little kids" – on December 3 and 4.

NEXT STEP BROADWAY

GRACE CHURCH VAN VORST

233 9TH STREET JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 706 3025 nextstepbroadway.com

39 ERIE STREET JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 659 2211 gracevanvorst.org

Former Radio City Rockette Amy Burnette is the proud owner of Next Step Broadway. Amy and her professional staff offer ballet, tap, jazz, musical theater, hip-hop, voice and acting classes for all ages and levels. Fall classes are filling fast – register today. Visit Next Step's website for more information and a full schedule.

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A vibrant, progressive Episcopal church located in Downtown Jersey City, Grace Church Van Vorst has been serving the community since 1847. GCVV is a leader in innovative arts and social justice programs that reach out to those who are seeking a deeper connection to God and neighbor. The Grace Senior Center for Healthy Living and the Breakfast Plus! Program provide activities, support and food for hundreds of our most needy. 2011 marks the 22nd year of its annual Cathedral Arts Festival, scheduled for November 12 – it's the longest running celebration of the visual arts in Hudson County. And of course, there are worship services in the beautiful sanctuary every Sunday. All are welcome to join a traditional service at 9:15 am or a contemporary worship (with child care) at 11 am. Be sure to check the website often for upcoming events. There’s always something happening at Grace Church Van Vorst.

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JERSEY CITY GUIDE

ART HOUSE PRODUCTIONS 1 MCWILLIAMS PLACE 6TH FLOOR JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 915 9911 arthouseproductions.org For over a decade, Art House Productions has been bringing Jersey City the very best visual and performing arts entertainment. Join Art House November 11-13 for the second annual Your Move, Jersey City's cutting-edge modern dance series featuring modern and postmodern dance, physical theater, dancetheater, improvisational performance, dance films and more. Beginning this September, Art House will launch STAGES!, a 12-week after-school program designed for children and teens (grades 4-12) to study with theater professionals and perform in a full-scale musical.

MARKETPLACE PRODUCTS & SERVICES

TO ADVERTISE IN THIS AREA PLEASE EMAIL: checht@jerseycityindependent.com

At Art House Productions, home is where the ART is.

Photo: Peter Richter (2mindseye.com)

JC FRIDAYS CITYWIDE | JERSEY CITY T 201 915 9911 jcfridays.com Art House Productions presents JC Fridays, a quarterly festival held throughout Jersey City at the start of every season. Local businesses and arts organizations join together to celebrate art and culture with a wide range of free events for the public. Programs include art openings and exhibits, music, dance, theater, poetry, film/video screenings and more! Next dates: December 2 and March 2. Photo: Mike McNamara

52

JERSEY CITY ART SCHOOL Courses include painting, sculpture, jewelry making, writing & digital photography. Weekly: Figure Drawing (Wed.) & Sunday night Film Forum. jcartschool.com

SHOW ME YOUR FACES Actors and other performers go to John Crittenden's studio in Jersey City Heights for portraits & headshots that bring success. showmeyourfaces@yahoo.com

JERSEY CITY CRAFT MAFIA Providing handmade businesses with opportunities to network with artists and to organize selling, networking and educational events. jerseycitycraftmafia.com

BIRDBRAIN PROJECTS Hand printed items made in Jersey City. T-shirts, tote bags, stationary, art. Shop online at birdbrainprojects.com.


professional organizer & personal assistant

Uptown Crew a NJ Nonprofit Corporation

Spotlighting the

ELIMINATE. DELETE. THROW OUT.

KANIBAL HOME Offering a range of refurbished furniture, found objects, vintage dishware and plenty of new home goods, apparel and gift items. 551 200 9386 | kanibalhome.com

It's time .....

people, places and history of the Upper and Outer reaches of Jersey City

to experience the

 Community and Commerce   History and Culture   Arts and Entertainment 

feeling of freedom!

THE CREW IS YOU.

pinch-hitter.com

UptownCrew.org facebook.com/TheUptownCrew

PINCH-HITTER If you don't have the time to do it, Pinch-Hitter will do it for you. Hours of availability: 6 am to 9 pm daily. 201 618 0278 | pinch-hitter.com

MASTERPIECE PAINTING Interior & exterior work for residences and businesses. Everything from wall/ceiling repairs to custom mural work. 201 565 7808 | themasterpiecepainting.com

Custom Framing Framed Art Celebrating 18 Years in Business

Open 7 Days a Week in Jersey City’s Powerhouse Arts District

UPTOWN CREW Presenting an open mic on the 2nd & 4th Thursdays of each month, readings and theatrical productions, and a teen program. 917 536 2682 | uptowncrew.org

BIGDRUM ART & FRAMING Whether the job is big or small, Bigdrum prides itself on quality workmanship and attention to detail. 201 418 8771 | 127 1st St. | bigdrumart.com

SUNMOON YOGA Offering hot yoga, vinyasa and restorative classes. Take a class and get your second one free. 201 963 7999 | 413 Monmouth St. | sunmoonyoganj.com

HUDSON PRIDE CONNECTIONS CENTER This full-service LGBT community center has programs for LGBT youth, seniors & everyone in between. 201 963 4779 | 32 Jones St. | hudsonpride.org

QI FOR WELLNESS WITH JANINE BERGER-GILLET Certified Wu Ming Qigong instructor of the Dragon’s Way & Wu Ming Qigong for Breast Health. For more information and a class schedule: qiforwellness.com.

MICHELLE TIMEK YOGA On-site outdoor/indoor vinyasa, pre/postnatal & restorative classes. Private, semi-private & group sessions. All are welcome! michelletimekyoga.com

Personalized lessons for guitar, piano, flute, and voice All teachers hold masters in music. 84 Wayne Street, Jersey City

TonalArtMusic.com MAGIC CLEANING SERVICE LLC $15 off when you mention this ad! Call 201 963 1147 or email info@magiccleaningservicellc.com to book an appointment. magiccleaningservicellc.com

973-665-2051

TONAL ART MUSIC CENTER Personalized music lessons for guitar, piano, flute or voice. At 84 Wayne Street near the Grove Street PATH. 973 665 2051 | tonalartmusic.com Diane Dragone, Director Beginner thru Professional Kennedy Dancers Repertory Co. & Inner City Youth Jr. Dance Co.

A Non Profit Corp. Since 1976. 79 Central Ave Jersey City, NJ 07306 (201)- 659-2190 www.kennedydancers.org kennedydancers@aol.com

Teen Scholarship Pre-Professional Program

SUMMER DANCE CAMP FULL OR PART-TIME AGES 5-14 JULY 5 TO AUGUST 12 SUMMER DAY AND EVENING DANCE CLASSES FOR AGES 3 TO SENIOR CITIZENS

IRIS RECORDS LPs/CDs with new arrivals weekly. We buy collections! Hours: Thurs/Fri 3-8 pm; Sat/Sun 12-6 pm. 609 468 0885 | 114 Brunswick St. | recordriots.com

THE KENNEDY DANCERS Classes for children & adults, from beginner to professional. Get $20 off if you mention this ad. 201 659 2190 | 79 Central Ave. | kennedydancers.org Diane Dragone, Director

Beginner thru Professional

A Non Profit Corp. Since 1976. 79 Central Ave Jersey City, NJ 07306


Free 90 day Layaway Plan for Bicycle Purchases. Winter Storage–6 months storage and free Basic Tune Up for only $99.00! Select in Stock Bicycles on Sale (while supplies last) Bring this Ad in during January or February and receive one of the following: –$10.00 Discount on Complete Tune Up (package #2 - $69.99 value). That’s Almost 15% off! –Free Grove Street T-shirt ($17.99 value) with a Complete Tune Up (package #2) at full price. –10% Off Any In Stock accessory or clothing item. This discount can be combined with other specials! PROFESSIONAL REPAIRS ON ALL BRANDS OPEN 7 DAYS • 3.5% SALES TAX (Excluding Labor)

365 Grove Street Jersey City, N.J. 07302

(201) 451-BIKE

THE WAREHOUSE CAFE Come get plugged in and restored at The Warehouse. 201 420 8882 | 140 Bay St. | thewarehousejc.com

GROVE STREET BICYCLES This full-service shop carries bikes for the entire family and offers lifetime service with every new bike purchase. grovestreetbicycles.com

JERSEY CITY TATTOO CO. The best place in Jersey City for custom tattoos. Open 7 days a week; walk-ins welcome. 201 360 0139 | 253 Newark Ave. | jerseycitytattoo.com

CREATIVE ENABLER Kick that brand into high gear on a budget and make 2011 your best year yet. Downtown Jersey City owned and operated. creativeenabler.com

GROOMINGDALES PET SALON Professional, courteous pet styling with comfort as the first priority. Only all-natural products used in a stress-free environment. 201 659 5559 | 351 2nd St.

172 NEWARK You live Downtown. You shop Downtown. Now work Downtown. Offering cowork desk rentals for creative professionals, near the Grove PATH. jgsrealty.com


NEW Magazine: Fall 2011  

The Fall 2011 issue of NEW, Jersey City's magazine of arts, culture and lifestyle.

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