Page 1


I QUIT SM KING at Jersey City Medical Center

The I Quit Smoking at Jersey City Medical Center program combines the power of pharmacology, counseling and medical testing. Using a one-to-one customized approach, the science-based treatments minimize your tobacco withdrawal symptoms to maximize your chance of successfully quitting. As featured on the Today Show and other national and local television programs, I Quit Smoking ensures the highest quit rates, over 15 times the national average. The program features an intense assessment of each patient’s tobacco addiction and a look at why treatment has proven ineffective in the past. Medication and counseling help the individual to conquer both the physical and psychological dependence to tobacco addiction.

A proven and successful way to get people to stop smoking forever. Medical Team: Victor Marchione, M.D., is the Medical Director of the program. Board certified in pulmonary and internal medicine, Dr. Marchione has been involved in smoking cessation programs since 1999 and often speaks and appears on television as an expert in this area. Matthew Bars, a board certified tobacco treatment specialist, has been engaged in the treatment, management and administration of nicotine addiction programs since 1980. He has been Director of the New York City Fire Department’s Tobacco Treatment Program since 2001. Since then, smoking in the FDNY has been reduced by 70 percent.

1-800-45-SM KE 1-800-457-6053 www.libertyhealth.org

A Primary Teaching Affiliate of the Mount Sinai School of Medicine and your Quality Regional Healthcare Provider The only hospital in Hudson, Essex, and Union counties to be recognized with the prestigious Magnet Award for Nursing Excellence! 2010 & 2011 #1 Overall NJ Hospital (fewer than 350 beds) by the Castle Connolly Medical Ltd.’s Survey of NJ Doctors.


CONTRIBUTORS & STAFF

2

ST E

GE N

W

V

I

LAND

PARK

6 NEIGHBORHOOD

18 MANAFEST DESTINY

Jersey City is a city of neighborhoods. In

Contemporary, the big and ambitious

the fourth of an ongoing series, we visit

arts center that brings a new kind of art

Pavonia/Newport.

experience to Jersey City.

34 JERSEY CITY MAP

12 OFF THE 'CHOP'PING

26 CITY OF CATS

36 LIVING GUIDE

A Food Network appearance helped

to manage the problem of homeless

bring Soul Flavors back from the brink.

felines.

L

EL

IS

IS

ND

LA

BLOCK

to advertise checht@jerseycityindependent.com

WeAreNew.com JerseyCityIndependent.com Twitter.com/JCIndependent Facebook.com/JerseyCityIndependent

A

D

HOOK

BOR

SPOTLIGHT

ER

E

EN

B

DS

G E R

CONTACT US general info@jerseycityindependent.com

T

LI

RT

PO

E

E

T

E

P

TA RTY TE

T

E

ABOUT NEW NEW is published four times a year by the Jersey City Independent. No part of this publication may be reproduced without prior written consent. We belong to the New Jersey Press Association, Online News Association, New Jersey Hyperlocal News Association and Authentically Local.

ND

MUNI

OWER VOR E PHO ST VE ARTISSUTSRIE ARK CHACTN GE HAR PAUL

PLACE

G RE

MANY SPECIAL THANKS TO The loyal support of all businesses and organizations that encourage and sustain NEW. Advertising support makes NEW possible. Please show your thanks by supporting our advertisers.

N

RK IS LNA P VILA LH R D AG SIMAUS E E COV

US

HILL

12

EX

E B

MAP DESIGNER Jaden Rogers/FinePointDesigns.net

RE

RE

GIN

STREET

Y

GRO

Mc

LE

THE

J

6 ILL

ARK F T AY -LA RBGE CO EN M W LI P ES B T S E

CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Sharyn Jackson

Y BOLE AZA HOL TUNNE L OURNAL H SQ UA HET TO HAMILTON P CON R S ER

ERTY

OL C N

LIN

COPY EDITOR Elizabeth Weill-Greenberg

ARE

VAN

N

P SID

GUIDE PHOTOGRAPHER Beth Achenbach

HEI GHT S PL L IB

MIOAR

DIA SQU

IN

S UAQ RE

STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER Steve Gold

WE

ND

BE

ART DIRECTOR & COVER DESIGNER Chuck Kerr

S

RN

R

IVE

ASSOCIATE EDITOR Shane Smith

YA R

Chuck Kerr is the art director at NEW, where he moonlights from his day job as art director for the alternative newsweekly the San Antonio Current. His work has earned him a 1st Place AAN award for Cover Design in 2007, as well as recognition from the Society of Publication Design and magazine design blog Coverjunkie. chuckkerr.com

T R N

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Catherine Hecht

LL

STEVE GOLD is the staff photographer at NEW and the Jersey City Independent. His photographs have also appeared in the Jersey Journal, the New York Daily News and other newspapers and magazines. popzero.com

X PE T O O R O L HE

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Jennifer Weiss

ES

LARYSSA WIRSTIUK is a writer who teaches creative writing at Rutgers University. Born and raised in North Jersey, Laryssa moved to Jersey City because she was curious about the city where her mother was raised. commansentence.com

C

VE

BRENDAN CARROLL is a writer, visual artist and curator based in Astoria who regularly covers the arts for Jersey City Independent and Hyperallergic. He's also the co-founder of the Agitators Collective. brendanscottcarroll.com

26

FI

MARK DYE is an independent photojournalist who has loved living and working in Jersey City for the past six years. Originally from Buffalo, he has been embedded in Baghdad, and covered the earthquake in Haiti, big events and everyday life in America for publications like the Star-Ledger, Reuters and others. markdyephoto.com

18

PUBLISHER Jon Whiten

VI

JOSH DEHONNEY regularly shoots for lifestyle magazines Yellow Rat Bastard and Urban Latino. In addition to photography, Josh is passionate about independent hip-hop, microbrews and his young son and future first assistant, Jalen. joshdehonney.com

NEW

W

MEG HEERY is a freelance writer and editor. Her first "rescue" animal was a turtle, which she found in the street when she was 5 years old. To this day her mother insists it "escaped," but she knows better. Meg lives in Jersey City with her husband and two cats.

CONTENTs

L

L

E

Eugene Lemay has a bold vision for Mana

How Jersey City's animal advocates work

4 ON THE COVER

52 MARKETPLACE


ON THE COVER "IN THE FUTURE, EVERYONE WILL BE 2 5 AM E R I CAN C RA F T ta p s GROVE ST. PATH PLAZA

FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES" LOVE IT OR HATE IT, Jersey Shore stars Snooki and JWOWW are

(NEWARK AVE. & GROVE ST.)

MAY THROUGH DECember

- Andy warhol

all of our new (temporary) neighbors. When we heard the news that the reality-starlets were renting a house on Mercer Street, and when we saw what a visceral reaction said news elicited from our online readers, we knew we wanted to make note of the moment in NEW. As we thought about it, the idea hit us: what better way than to channel Mr. Celebrity himself, Andy Warhol, and create a faux-Warhol portrait of Snooki for the cover? (Sorry Jenni, but your castmate is definitely the more recognizable face of the brand.) Departing from our usual Cover Contest formula, we quickly tapped art director Chuck Kerr to work up an image.

LOVE IT OR HATE IT, it's our Spring 2012 cover.

$10 LUNCH SPECIAL FRI & SUN 163 NEWARK AV E, JERSEY CITY, NJ 07302 201.332.4555| BARCADE JERSEYCITY.COM Paid for by or in part by the Jersey City Urban Enterprise Zone Program

Local farms, multiple vendors and extensive selections www.jcdowntown.org

PAID FOR BY OR IN PART BY THE JERSEY CITY URBAN ENTERPRISE PROGRAM

WORLD-FAMOUS


C

E X P O R O OL HTE S

RN

HEI GHT S PL

FROM THE ASHES OF INDUSTRY

ST E

WE

BE

While Jersey City residents can (and will) continue to debate whether or not the neighborhood is cool, authentic or even a "real" part of Jersey City (debates that have raged since before most of it was even built), it's undeniable that the transformation of Pavonia/Newport that's taken place in the past quarter century has been dramatic.

DIA SQU

AR IO J NS IN

ARE

W

FI

OYE B L AZA L L I H O L OURNAL H TUNNE L O H A Q UA HET T P MILTON CON R S ER

VE

M

T R N

R IVE

ND

neighborhood spotlight

With its gleaming skyscrapers defining much of the Jersey City skyline and its daytime bustle of whitecollar workers, its easy to forget what an accomplishment the Pavonia/Newport area really is.

N-

GE

RT

PO

LAND

STREET

THE

PLACE

US

HOOK

EX

ERTY

GRO

VAN

BOR

PARK L

EL

IS

IS

ND

LA

pedestrian walkway connecting Newport to Hoboken Terminal opened in late 2009, providing easy access between Pavonia/ Newport and Hoboken. And the neighborhood continues to grow. Ground has been broken on a new 40-story retail/ residential building in that most northeastern corner of the neighborhood, across from Target (a park and playground quietly opened there over the winter). The building, which features two prominent towers and a bulky base, is slated to include 790 residential units, 15,000 square feet of retail and 876 parking spaces. A prominent new commercial tenant – The Depository Trust & Clearing Corporation – will also soon make Pavonia/Newport its home, lured from Manhattan with nearly $90 million in state and local incentives. As the neighborhood has grown, it is increasingly becoming less like other cities' financial districts at night and on the weekends, with entertainment options popping up at several restaurants, and more small businesses opening up in new buildings' retail space.

WANT TO STAY? Rents in Pavonia/Newport are still high compared to the rest of Jersey City. You're paying a premium for quick access to Manhattan and all-inclusive apartment complexes. According to NewportRentalsNJ.com, prices range from $1,775 for studios (in older buildings like George Washington, James Madison, Thomas Jefferson and John Adams) to $3,875 for three-bedroom, two-bath apartments with balconies in the newer Aquablu building.

E

YA R

EN

D

T -

G E R

DS

E

ER

L IB

S UAQ RE

ND

W

B

VOR E PHOOWUER ST VE ARTISSTSRIE ARK CHACTN GE HAR PAUL

TA RTY TE

T

VI LL

RK IS LNA P VILA L HAR D AG SIMUS E E COV

MUNI

LI

6

GIN

HILL

ES

W

Y

RE

FA L BE Y C A ERNG OM LI WE P B ST S E

ARK

LIN

OL C N

P PAVONIA/ SID P ENEWPORT B G RE A E RE T T E N E Mc

LE

hile historic starting points of the current neighborhood can also be debated, 1978 is a good place to begin. That's when Ohio developer Herb Glimcher first checked out the 60-acre swath of rusted out railroad, abandoned warehouses and decrepit piers that the Erie Lackawanna Railway was selling. Over the next few years, Glimcher partnered with several other firms, and the project picked up more and more acreage in the process. Eventually, in a June 1986 groundbreaking ceremony, the master plan was unveiled for the development, which was now being spearheaded by the LeFrak Organization, fresh off of building Battery Park City across the Hudson. In 1987 and 1988, the neighborhood saw the addition of five residential towers, an office tower, the Newport Centre mall and the Marin Boulevard strip mall that now houses Best Buy and A&P, as well as several parking decks and plenty of infrastructure. The 20-plus years since have seen dozens more buildings rise on the land, bringing thousands more office workers and residents to the neighborhood each day. The long-awaited

WRITTEN BY: Jon Whiten IMAGE BY: Matthew Ward

Plenty of shares in the neighborhood, as well as the occasional good deal, can be found on Craigslist.


EATING IN PAVONIA/NEWPORT If you need a bite to eat, you could land in a worse place than Pavonia/Newport. Here are a few highlights.

• AZUCAR: This popular after-work spot is perhaps now best known for having a Cuban sandwich that beat celebrity chef Bobby Flay's version on an episode of the popular Food Network show Throwdown with Bobby Flay. Chef/owner Nick Vazquez's menu goes beyond sandwiches, however, to offer a wide variety of Cuban dishes. The restaurant also features solid happy hour drink specials during the week and a cigar menu. 495 Washington Boulevard azucarcubancuisine.com • BOCA GRANDE: Along an unassuming strip of restaurants on Washington, Boca Grande has carved out a niche, bringing the brand of visual arts and live music that's thriving in other parts of Downtown to Pavonia/Newport. There are weekly open mics, rotating art exhibitions, and live music or DJs most weekends. The menus is large and diverse, and the drink specials are a must. Upcoming can't miss show: Jersey City's Chico Mann performs at the closing reception for Jersey City painter Robert Piersanti's work on Friday, March 30. 564 Washington Boulevard bocagrandenj.com • CONFUCIUS ASIAN BISTRO: If you're looking for solid Chinese food in a comfortable and spacious setting, this is your spot. The restaurant also offers some Thai-style options, as well as bubble tea. 558 Washington Boulevard 201 386 8898 (no website) • FIRE & OAK: This self-proclaimed "unique American grill" opened on the ground floor of the new Westin Jersey City Newport hotel in 2009. Run by the same restaurant group behind the neighborhood's now-defunct South City Grill, Fire & Oak offers everything from steaks to sushi in a upscale yet relaxed environment. 485 Washington Boulevard fireandoak.com

• KOMEGASHI TOO: Ten years after the 1990 opening on Montgomery Street, Komegashi expanded with a second location – aptly named Komegashi Too – in Pavonia/Newport. The restaurant offers some great views in its waterside dining room, a creative take on modern Japanese food and delicious, fresh sushi. 99 Town Square Place komegashi.com • MICHAEL ANTHONY'S: There are a few things about Michael Anthony's that are worth checking out – the massive yachts you often walk by as you stroll out the pier to the restaurant, the right-on-the-water indoor/outdoor bar area and the accompanying views. And that's before you even get to the food. The restaurant, which opened in 2009, serves excellent Italian cuisine, and just this year brought on Bryan Gregg as its new executive chef. 502 Washington Boulevard michaelanthonynj.com

Thank you to our readers, loyal supporters, and all of our advertisers. You are the reason we continue to publish The Jersey City Independent & NEW Magazine.

C

M

Y

CM

MY

CY

CMY

• MORTON WILLIAMS: The small New York metro area grocery chain opened a gleaming new location here in 2008 as the Newport development expanded to the north. The supermarket offers a full range of regular grocery items, but the real draw for many is the store's large selection of Asian and Indian foods and ingredients. 105 River Drive mortonwilliams.com • NEWPORT CENTRE: The Newport Centre mall is probably the first thing that comes to many minds when "Newport" is mentioned as a destination. The three-story shopping center has seen some welcome additions in recent years, including new international dining options in the food court like HD Iskender Grill (Turkish) and Thali (Indian). The addition of Jersey City's first Jamba Juice location is also a big plus. 30 Mall Drive West newportcentre.com

K


Smart Families Know Real Value When They Find It.

These Families Did. Easy s accE. s287! to Rt “A major aspect in my decision was being able to get a brand new single-family house in Central New Jersey for a reasonable price.”

“Heritage met all of our requirements at a great price point and provided us with all of the amenities we always wanted but never had as renters.”

Ketan Pandya Heritage at Piscataway Homeowner

Christina Ling and Ha tran Heritage at Piscataway Homeowner

priced from

416,990!

$

3 & 4 Bedroom Colonial Homes with 2 car oversized garages

AmericanProperties.net • 732.356.6122 49 Dahlia Court, Piscataway, NJ 08854 Sales Center Open Daily 10am - 5pm

AMERICAN PROPERTIES AT PISCATAWAY, LLC

BROKERS WELCOME

AN ATTIC ORIGINAL

blood & oil a dark comedy written & directed by billy mitchell PREMIERE PRODUCTION: APRIL 20–29 201-413-9200 or AtticEnsemble.org

THE ATTIC ENSEMBLE

at The Barrow Mansion 83 Wayne St., Jersey City, NJ

Owned PIZZA Family Since 1968


OFF ‘CHOP’ THE

PING

BLOCK How a Food Network Appearance Helped Bring Soul Flavors Back from the Brink

WRITTEN BY: Laryssa Wirstiuk PHOTOGRAPHY BY: Mark Dye

12

13


Blackened catfish over potato nest with a lemon tomato butter sauce

A single day in September 2010 changed Wayne Lyons' life and the future of his business. Unfortunately for Lyons, he woke up that morning with a head cold. The executive chef and owner of Soul Flavors in Downtown Jersey City had been looking for a way to get some publicity for his restaurant. The soul food eatery, which opened on Grove Street in 2007, had been struggling. Lyons, his wife, Jill, and his business partner, sous chef Shawn Santana, were considering closing its doors. But Lyons' publicist had a better idea, suggesting Lyons apply for a chance to compete on the Food Network show Chopped, which challenges four chefs to create a three-course meal from a basket of mystery ingredients. A panel of three food experts critiques the dishes based on presentation, taste, and creativity. Lyons submitted an online application, and within a few weeks Food Network 14

producers invited him to participate. "I was somewhat shocked because they tell you they go through thousands of applicants," says Lyons. "I really felt honored." On the day of the competition, however, Lyons almost didn't show up. "With a cold, your palete is shot," says Lyons. But the producers wouldn't grant him a sick day. "They said they would have tea and cold medication for me," says Lyons. "I decided to go for it." The mystery ingredients for the appetizer included oysters, clementines, Chinese okra, and French dressing. For the entrée, required elements were duck breasts, green tea, adzuki beans, and Brussels sprouts. Finally, the chefs had to create a dessert using Meyer lemons, cottage cheese,

passion fruit, and soba noodles. In the final round, Lyons defeated Adam Powers of New York City's Fetch and won $10,000. The episode aired on May 17, 2011. "Prior to being on Chopped, we were actually thinking about closing. After Chopped, we have been doing so well we have considered moving to a larger space to be able to keep up with the volume," says Lyons. "It's somewhat surreal. I've gotten emails from people saying they watched the show and that they were so inspired. I just thought it would be an opportunity ... to bolster my business. I still can't get over it." Lyons' passion for food began at home with his family. Because his mother doesn’t cook, Lyons learned cooking from his aunt – a home economics teacher – and his grandmother. He would cook for parties his mother hosted at her home in Queens and create dishes for neighborhood street fairs. "I think from the time I was very young, I have always loved cooking," he says. "We would have like 100-150 people at my mom’s house sometimes, and I would cook all kinds of things. People always liked coming to our parties because of the food."

Though friends and family admired his cooking, Lyons had not yet considered pursuing culinary arts full time. Instead, he studied to become an architect. However, in 1988, a battle with addiction and time in rehab inspired him to reconsider his career goals. "When I got out of rehab, I decided I wanted to do something different with my life. I felt that working as an architect was too sedentary," says Lyons. "I wanted to do something that would give me some sort of joy." A family friend who had admired Lyons' cooking worked for the hotel chain Marriott, in the human resources department. "My friend told me to look him up, and I decided I would take him up on the offer," he says. "Marriott decided to give me a shot. It was meant to be, obviously." Lyons' time at Marriott gave him the experience and confidence he needed to later work for himself. While there, Lyons had the chance to take continuing education classes at the Culinary Institute of America. Those courses were his only formal education in the culinary arts. 15


when i got out of rehab, i decided i wanted to do something different with my life ... something that would give me some sort of joy

Pan fried oysters over greens and broiled oranges with tomato aioli

Red snapper with port wine reduction, ribboned vegetables, and mung bean and spinach croquette

In 1995, Lyons founded Melange Catering with Santana, and he was successful enough at personal and corporate catering to leave Marriott. Looking to purchase property with his wife in 2004, Lyons considered moving

to the opposite side of the Hudson River when a good friend who lived in Jersey City encouraged him to explore the growing real estate market. "It was diverse and up-and-coming. Houses are relatively inexpensive considering what you're getting. I was really impressed with the neighborhood," says Lyons, who now, coincidentally, lives Downtown on a street that shares his first name. Lyons, along with Jill and Santana, opened Soul Flavors in May 2007. Before Chef Lyons overtook it, the storefront at 354 Grove Street was home to a restaurant called Casablanca, and Lyons kept many of the elements from the previous tenant. "The place, for the most part, was like this. We just kind of came in and repainted," says Lyons. "I'd like to redesign the space at some point, but not now." Instead, Lyons' passion for design and architecture finds its way into the meals

he creates. He prefers three-dimensional food and likes his presentations to showcase a dish's depth and height. He also makes use of different colors and textures, as showcased by a recent special: cornmeal-crusted trout. Lyons makes nearly everything (he outsources the bread) from appetizers to desserts. "I don't buy processed foods," he says. "All my sauces are made from stock. Everything is made from scratch. If you're going to do it, do it right." The cuisine is a blend of Southern and Caribbean; the Southern influence honors many of the friends and family from Lyons' childhood, and the Caribbean honors both sides of his family. His father's side is from Trinidad and Tobago, and his mother's side is from St. Kitts and Bermuda. "It's comforting and warming food," says Lyons. "I like to go to other restaurants and have fancy food, but ... comfort food would be my choice." Lyons emphasizes the idea that soul food isn't just fried chicken, even though this crispy bird is both the restaurant's

most popular dish and Jill's favorite. According to Lyons, soul food is any food that warms the soul. As he proclaims, "Love is my main ingredient. If you don't have a passion for what you do, it will come through. People will know." Over the past few years, the menu at Soul Flavors has evolved to accommodate local tastes and preferences. Based on customer requests, Lyons has added a few menu items, including a vegetarian dish and some fish dishes. "Jersey City has a fairly large vegetarian community, and I think I hit on something that's reflective of who we are and gives the vegetarians something really filling, not just lettuce," says Lyons. "I developed a vegetarian gumbo with textured vegetable protein, vegetable stock, and puff pastry. It's an interesting, tasty, and filling dish. It touches the soul and reflects who we are." When he's not at Soul Flavors, Lyons rarely cooks at home. Instead, he and Jill try to support Jersey City's restaurant scene. He admires the chef at O’Connell's, mourns the closing of Ox, and enjoys the burgers at The Merchant. At the beginning of the year, Lyons treated his staff to an appreciation dinner at Skinner's Loft. "Jersey City has grown over the period of time that I've been here, and there are a lot more restaurants offering a better quality product and more options," Lyons says. "I think that with more competition, it inspires me to try new things." The banner attached to the restaurant’s facade proudly advertises Lyons' Chopped victory, but local fans need not worry about losing him to success. "We don't want to leave Jersey City. We have a huge client base here, and this is where my home is. This is where we got our start," says Lyons. "The reason why we're as successful as we are is the support we have gotten from the neighborhood."

Soul Flavors 354 Grove Street 201 217 3004 soulflavors.com


Eugene Lemay has a bold vision for Mana Contemporary, the big and ambitious arts center that brings a new kind of art experience to Jersey City.

MANAFEST Written by Brendan Carroll Photography by Josh DeHonney


Jersey City is known for

Eugene Lemay caption of Mana here Contemporary tk tk tktktk tktktktkt tk tk tktk tktktktk

its scrappy, artist-run exhibition venues and performance spaces, which get by on sweat equity and love. But it may soon be known for another kind of arts venue as well: Specifically, one of the biggest contemporary arts institutions in the state and surrounding area, including the metropolis next door. Mana Contemporary is located inside the former Lorillard Company industrial complex in the Marion section of Jersey City. To the north run Routes 1&9, to the south run train tracks, and to the east sits India Square. To the west lies a post-industrial wasteland, the perfect foil to New Jersey's sublime chemical sunsets. Rather than knock down a pre-existing structure or construct a sleek new building, Mana Contemporary chose to reuse an old industrial complex on the edge of town. The building itself became a muse for Mana's founders, its size and scope not only matching their ambitions but continuing to encourage new ideas and experiments. The conversion is miraculous. CEO and co-founder Eugene Lemay is happy with the choice. "We decided this building was the right fit for Mana after viewing the large square footage, which fosters incredible opportunities for the art community in Jersey City," Lemay says. "This combined with all the natural light, raw aesthetics, and the fact that it’s in a low-risk zone for environmental and security hazards made the Lorillard factory the ideal location for Mana Contemporary." Lemay suggests a larger picture to the creative reuse of existing architecture. "The most positive point of reclaiming buildings is that instead of land and buildings being left to rot in stagnation, they can be reclaimed, restored, and re-used," he says. "We recognized that this often has 20

"AN OPPORTUNITY TO BRING LIFE, ART, AND COMMERCE BACK INTO THE AREA." 21


creative reuse of existing architecture. “The most positive point of reclaiming buildings is that instead of land and buildings being left to rot in stagnation, they can be reclaimed, restored, and reused. We recognized that this often has a tremendously regenerative effect upon a local community. We saw the abandoned factory as an opportunity to bring life, art, and commerce back into the area,” he says. I wonder what would have happened if the former landlord of 111 First Street shared the same foresight and imagination as Eugene Lemay. If you remember, Goldman knocked down the old tobacco factory to construct the centerpiece of the Powerhouse Arts District known as the Hanging Towers. The mixed-use structure, designed by renowned architect Rem Koolhaas, is 52 stories and holds 1.2 million square feet of mostly residential space. Too bad the project is dead in the water. The resulting space is big and ambitious. The 500,000-square-foot facility (with plans to expand to more than 1 million square feet) provides artist studios, exhibition and performance venues, collection and storage facilities, and art-handling services. It is a sanctuary for contemporary artists and an innovative venue for collectors, institutions and the greater community. By comparison, Manhattan’s New Museum is 60,000 square feet. Mana Contemporary Art Center is the newest offshoot of Moishe’s Moving Company. As the moving company’s former president and chief executive, Lemay helped develop the business beyond domestic moving and storage and into niches such as art handling, collection and management. Mana Contemporary is a love story between art and business. If the marriage is successful, Jersey City might become home to one of the most dynamic art centers in the country. The space opened to the public with a bang on May 15 of last year. More than

2,000 people from Jersey City, New York, and the immediate area attended the reception, which included food, music and performance. Charlie Rose and Milton Esterow, editor and publisher of ARTnews, made opening remarks. The inaugural exhibition showcased the Eileen S. Kaminsky Family Foundation, which includes such heavyweights artists as Ida Applebroog, Bill Viola, and Julie Heffernan. Several international and nationally acclaimed artists have studio space in the buildings. Notable artists include Yigal Ozeri, Carole Feuerman, Lili Almog, Doug Argue, Trudy Benson, Shen Wei, Stanley Casselman and Lemay himself, to name a few. Since its inception, Mana Contemporary has become something of a mini art city. When Lemay and his co-founders Yigal Ozeri, a renowned painter, and Mike Weiss, a gallery owner, conceived of it, it was an all-in-one art center that would bring together influential artists, collectors, galleries, and dealers, as well as the general public. If the name Mana rings a bell to Jersey City art scenesters, there’s a reason: Mana Fine Arts previously operated out of the Moishe’s Moving Company building under the New Jersey Turnpike extension in Downtown Jersey City; the space was an art-storage facility, and it also hosted a number of exhibitions in the first floor gallery, including the 2006 studio tour show What Have You Got to Say?, The Chair Show, and Gaia’s Wonder Women III group exhibition. As an art center, Mana Contemporary has come along way from its previous incarnation. “Mana existed on a relatively small scale at its original location on Coles Street,” Lemay says. “Perhaps it was the vastness of the new building combined with the potent local artistic community that offered the opportunity for Mana to fully bloom.” In addition to being the founder and CEO of Mana Contemporary, Lemay

a tremendously regenerative effect upon a local community. We saw the abandoned factory as an opportunity to bring life, art, and commerce back into the area." I wonder what would have happened if the former landlord of 111 1st Street shared the same foresight and imagination as Eugene Lemay. If you remember, he knocked down the old tobacco factory to construct the centerpiece of the Powerhouse Arts District known as the Hanging Towers. The mixed-use structure, designed by renowned architect Rem Koolhaas, is 52 stories and holds 1.2 million square feet of mostly residential space. Too bad the project is dead in the water. Mana's resulting space is big and ambitious. The 500,000-square-foot facility (with plans to expand to more than 1 million square feet) provides artist studios, exhibition and performance venues, collection and storage facilities, and arthandling services. It is a sanctuary for contemporary artists and an innovative venue for collectors, institutions and the greater community. By comparison, Manhattan's New Museum is 60,000 square feet. Mana Contemporary is the newest offshoot of Moishe's Moving Company. As the moving company’s former president and chief executive, Lemay helped develop the business beyond domestic moving and storage and into niches such as art handling, collection and management. Mana Contemporary is a love story between art and business. If the marriage is successful,

Jersey City might become home to one of the most dynamic art centers in the country. The space opened to the public with a bang on May 15 of last year. More than 2,000 people from Jersey City, New York and the surrounding area attended the reception, which included food, music and performance. Charlie Rose and Milton Esterow, editor and publisher of ARTnews, made opening remarks. The inaugural exhibition showcased the Eileen S. Kaminsky Family Foundation, which includes such heavyweight artists as Ida Applebroog, Bill Viola, and Julie Heffernan. Several international and nationally acclaimed artists have studio space in the buildings. Notable artists include Yigal Ozeri, Carole Feuerman, Lili Almog, Doug Argue, Trudy Benson, Shen Wei, Stanley Casselman and Lemay himself, to name a few. Since its inception, Mana Contemporary has become something of a mini art city. When Lemay and his co-founders – Ozeri, a renowned painter, and Mike Weiss, a gallery owner – conceived of it, it was an all-inone art center that would bring together influential artists, collectors, galleries and dealers, as well as the general public. If the name Mana rings a bell to Jersey City art scenesters, there's a reason: Mana Fine Arts previously operated out of the Moishe's Moving Company building under the New Jersey Turnpike extension in Downtown Jersey City; the space was an artstorage facility, and it also hosted a number of exhibitions in the first floor gallery,

23


including the 2006 studio tour show What Have You Got to Say?, The Chair Show, and _gaia's Wonder Women III group exhibition. As an art center, Mana Contemporary has come a long way from its previous incarnation. "Mana existed on a relatively small scale at its original location on Coles Street," Lemay says. "Perhaps it was the vastness of the new building combined with the potent local artistic community that offered the opportunity for Mana to fully bloom." In addition to being the founder and CEO of Mana Contemporary, Lemay is also an accomplished artist and successful businessman. Born in Grand Rapids, Mich., Lemay spent his formative years living and studying in Israel. His series of abstract photographs use both Hebrew and Arabic letters, which coalesce above dark expanses. He has recently exhibited in solo shows at Total Arts Gallery in Dubai and Galeria De Art in Buenos Aires as well as a group show at Art Affairs Gallery in Amsterdam. Weiss is the advisor of Mana Contemporary. For nearly two decades, he has been involved in the art world as a curator, advisor and entrepreneur. In 2003, he opened Mike Weiss Gallery in Chelsea. The aim of the gallery is to present the work of ambitious contemporary artists at all levels of their careers and development. His roster of artists includes KAORUKO, Trudy Benson and Christian Vincent. And Ozeri is Mana Contemporary's booster and champion. Like Lemay, he also maintains a large studio space in the facility. He is a member of the Board of Directors of the Eileen S. Kaminsky Family Foundation and is represented by Mike Weiss Gallery. His latest muse is Lizzie Jagger, the daughter of Mick Jagger and Jerry Hall. He has exhibited his work at SCOPE Basel in Switzerland; Tel Aviv Museum of Art; and Jenkins Johnson Gallery in San Francisco, among others.

Randall Rosenthal:

"We both desired to bring Box of contemporary artists into the space Money #2 as a way to attract art enthusiasts to the building [and] area," Lemay says of Ozeri. "Mike Weiss suggested bringing in an art foundation to get collectors, art dealers, and artists interested in the space. This spawned the rebirth of the company as Mana Contemporary, representing a concentration in services for the contemporary art world." Now Mana Contemporary is evolving into something larger, more ambitious and philanthropic, a giant community center with aims to bridge cultural divisions. An "all-inclusive art complex for the vast and ever-expanding artistic community," as Lemay puts it. "A sculpture garden, dance studio, theater partnership, and artist residency program are all in the works," he says. While many of Mana's projects are in the hush-hush development stage, with scant details available, we got the scoop on a few. The sculpture garden will be located mainly in front of the building, and will continue all through the sprawling complex’s grounds. The dance studio, located in the building, will feature rehearsals that are open to the public. "[We're] interested in showing the process of creating a dance, not just the finished product," Lemay says. Meanwhile, other institutions are partnering

George D. Green: Flying Pooch Blues

with Mana and putting together inventive programming at the center. Videoart.net, which provides a community for makers of experimental film and, as the name implies, video art, is a prime example. The organization, based in New York City, now has a screening room on Mana's sixth floor, where it has featured selections from its annual Video Art and Experimental Film Festival. But perhaps the most interesting development is the creation of a Middle East Center for the Arts (MECA). "MECA is a personal project of mine," Lemay says. "I grew up in the Middle East and have witnessed firsthand the social, political, and economic strife that encompasses the region. This left me very interested in art from the area." MECA will be "a gallery, an idea lab, and a production studio committed to the mission of a better Middle East," he says. "The gallery offers a chance for artists from regions of conflict to display and work side by side." Exciting projects are afoot for the year ahead. "We have a full year of events already in the works, with each endeavor centering on a different important theme," Lemay says. "Our first exhibition will feature 16 artists working and living in Israel ... the artists differ in age, speak separate languages, and come from diverse religious and cultural backgrounds – Jewish, Muslim, Christian, and Druze." When I first learned about Mana

Contemporary, I wondered how it would fit in as part of Jersey City, with its reputation as the underdog of the art world, a reputation I frankly cherish. To be blunt, I was put off by the size, ambition and vision of Mana Contemporary, and approached the institution with a fair amount of skepticism: These guys are carpetbaggers, bringing a top-down approach to Jersey City’s very bottom-up arts scene. They’re out-of-towners, interlopers, just looking to make a buck. What do these guys know of Chilltown, anyway? These sentiments, mind you, are coming from a guy who was born and raised not in Jersey City but in the New Jersey town of Kendall Park, some 35 miles outside of the city. Why I clung to this provincial idea of what Jersey City is, and should be, I have no idea. A large, fiscally sound, artist-led institution is a good thing. So ... what was I afraid of? I don't know. To alleviate my fears, and quench my curiosity, I visited Mana Contemporary back in September to see the photorealist collection of Louis P. and Susan K. Meisel, and I was astounded by the work on view. Although I was not a fan of the entire show – photorealism is too cold for me – I did appreciate the oncein-a-lifetime opportunity to see the Meisel's personal collection in one venue, which included work by Chuck Close, Richard Estes, Audrey Flack, Don Eddy and others. The collection also featured "'73 Malibu" (1974) by Robert Bechtle, which is one of my favorite paintings. I was also floored by the facility, with its pristine exhibition spaces and customized studios. One of my favorite experiences was just looking outside the windows on the sixth floor, which overlook industrial wasteland, as well as Manhattan. As I took in the exhibition, and popped in and out of artist studios, I could not believe that I was still in Marion. A thriving art city is developing on the outskirts of town in the shadow of the Pulaski Skyway. What could be better?

"A THRIVING ART CENTER ... IN THE SHADOW OF THE PULASKI SKYWAY"


City of Cats

How Jersey City’s Animal Advocates Work to Manage the PROBELM of homeless felines

Written by Meg Heery Photography by Steve Gold

26

27


, I ve been feeding the cats.

Carol McNichol of Companion Animal Trust

limited by their housing capacity; they're not bound by law to take in all animals the way a state-licensed municipal animal shelter is. The number they take in is typically determined by the number of staff members – usually volunteers – available to foster animals in their homes. This means that no-kill shelters can become selective about who they admit, and It started the week after Thanksgiving, people seeking a haven for an animal risk when I came in the back door of my getting a "no room at the inn" response, apartment building and found a gingerno response at all or worse – admittance hued feline with gold eyes picking through to a shelter where severe overcrowding the trash cans. A few days later I saw results in even more suffering. another one, a scrawny little black and A little over a week after my email, I white thing that was a dead ringer for one heard back from Joan Mackiewicz of the of the kitties that lives with me and my Hudson County Animal League (HCAL), husband. I had seen a third recently too, an who wrote, "Since you’re in Jersey City, all-black mama that lurked in the shadows you should contact the Liberty Humane around our block, and wondered if they Society." (HCAL did not respond to were acquainted. Maybe even related. interview requests for this story.) So I did what any fan of the blog Cat Liberty Humane Society (LHS) is Saturday would do: I snapped a few Jersey City's municipal animal shelter. pictures and posted them on Facebook. Find a stray animal? Call Jersey City's Then I started contacting nearby shelters: Division of Animal Control; they'll pick it People for Animals, Jersey Animal Coalition, up and it will likely end up at LHS, where Sean Casey Animal Rescue in Brooklyn. it will be treated for immediate illness My email spiel went something and injuries, tested for terminal disease like this: I have found three cats at my and put in the pipeline toward adoption. apartment building in Jersey City. One is That doesn't mean the animal will be friendly, chatty and affectionate. Another adopted: Sometimes animals are too sick is an older kitten, scared but curious, and or too feral for the shelter to handle. the third is kind of a mystery, possibly feral. here are as many as 50 million cats Can you please take one or more in, or in the U.S., according to estimates advise me about what to do with them? from Julie Levy, professor of veterinary One shelter I didn't immediately contact medicine and a specialist in feral was the one closest to us: Liberty Humane cat population control at the University Society. My knee-jerk reaction: There is no way I am sending these cats to a traditional of Florida. By Levy's formula – human population divided by six – that means shelter (read: to face certain death). In there could be up to 40,000 cats living my mind, these cats would go to a no-kill in Jersey City, both in homes and on shelter or I would keep them on my own, the street. With numbers like that and outdoors – a prospect that made me an internet clogged with LOLcats, queasy because it was getting cold out. you can ignore the Man's Best Friend Unfortunately, many no-kill shelters are

T

28

propaganda: We are a nation of the kittaaaay. Yet it's our very fascination with the cat that has led to many of its problems – mainly, our idea that they are independent creatures left well enough alone. In a recent Harris poll conducted for the nonprofit Alley Cat Allies, when given the choice between leaving a stray cat where you found it and having the cat put down, 81 percent of respondents said they would let the animal be. The assumptions being, presumably, that cats can take care of themselves and that the shelter is where all cats go to die.

caption here tk tk tktktk tktktktkt tk tk tktk tktktktk

Part of that is born of American shelters' ugly history: According to Nancy Peterson, cat programs manager for the Humane Society of the United States, 15 million dogs and cats were put down each year in the 1970s, on average. Today it's down to about 4 million, "and most of those certainly are cats," Peterson says. One reason for the decline is the push to spay and neuter pets. But another, Peterson says, is a little thing called TNR, or trap-neuter-return. In this model, a volunteer caregiver (usually the owner of the property where the cats are 29


found or a friendly neighbor) traps feral cats; has them sterilized and vaccinated at a vet's office, usually with help from a nonprofit that subsidizes the cost; and then returns them to their habitat with the promise to provide regular food, shelter from the elements and vet care as needed. Ferals are cats that live outdoors, were probably born outdoors and are not socialized. Considered unadoptable, they're the ones that, if brought to any shelter, almost invariably perish. In the past five years, Peterson says, the number of known TNR programs in the U.S. and Canada has doubled, from 700 to 1,400. And where those TNR programs exist, shelters euthanize fewer cats.

"TNR is a great option, and it's a fabulous program because, honestly, there aren't enough homes for all these cats," says Irene Borngraeber, Liberty Humane's director of development. "Though I do have to say, tame animals that are out in the streets, they shouldn't stay [outside]… but for feral cats, for whom the street is their territory and who have a designated caretaker, that is a really great option, to let them be, to let them live." LHS doesn't have its own TNR service due to budget limitations, but it does provide referrals and advice to residents, and "it's something we would like to develop," Borngraeber says. While the old shelter stereotype is often still deserved – in 2009, 82 percent of cats taken to shelters statewide were euthanized, and 4 million 30

nationwide is still a lot of blood on the hands of shelter workers, the reluctant accomplices – the picture in Hudson County, where TNR programs are in place, is considerably less bleak. That same year, Secaucus Animal Shelter and Liberty Humane put down 23 percent of the 2,112 felines that came into their care. That's still a fourth of the cat intake. But perhaps a more telling figure is 42 percent, or 896 – that's the number of cats at those two shelters that were not reunited with owners, adopted or killed. In other words, they're still being cared for in the shelters or at authorized foster homes. All of those are from Liberty Humane. As for the overcrowded, disease-ridden cages, not so much at LHS. On two recent visits (one surprise, one short notice), there was little evidence of either. Much of the shelter's cramped quarters is taken up by three rooms of cats: a 24-cage intake area, a 72-cage isolation room for sick and injured animals, and Borngraeber's pride and joy, an 80-cage cattery. Each space was roomy enough for staff to walk around in, looked and smelled clean, and held no more than one feline per cage – the exception being in the cattery, where a handful were out and about and several cages held sibling kittens, for a total of 100 adoptable pets. The litter boxes were clean, the water was fresh and common shelter ailments like eye and upper respiratory infections were rare (as in, I saw one cat with a cold). What's more, many of them had been there long past the mandatory seven-day holding period. We're talking an average of 45 to 60 days, but many are here for months, even a year or more. "We do not make choices based on space," Borngraeber says. "Any decision [to euthanize an animal] is based on the ability of the animal to recover based on medical treatment. If something isn't working, and it's gone through a course of antibiotics and we don't know what's going on, then the cat's probably not

going to be adoptable. We make every attempt to not be motivated by space." What about when sick cats get better? "We do an adoption promotion, and they stay in isolation until we're ready to move them up." What about when a feral cat comes in? "For feral cats," she says, "TNR is the best thing to do." At Animal Control, demand for cat help is similarly reduced thanks to the caregiving and educational efforts of organizations like the Neighborhood Feral Cat Initiative. In 2011 the department received 910 cat-related calls, only nine of them about feral colonies (more than a third were about dead cats, though, and another 305 were strays). Coincidentally, Jersey City is the center of a growing TNR community, with organizations such as the Neighborhood Feral Cat Initiative and HCAL's TNR services sprouting up over the past few years. The Feral Cat Initiative started in 2009 to train people to care for their own TNR colonies, and HCAL recently began working on a TNR program with the city of Bayonne. The Division of Animal Control is all for it. "Cats, like other wildlife, have the right to exist, and we respond only when cats are creating a health or other type of nuisance," city spokeswoman Jennifer Morrill says in an email. Hardly a signal that potentially tens of thousands of cats are running amok. So why give them a second thought? Because the more cats there are, the more cats will end up in shelters. Duh. But, says HSUS's Peterson, "it's true, you can't trap cats you can't see." Therein lies the rub: Just how feral is a cat that's been sterilized and whose environment is engineered by people to an extent that cats grow dependent on caregivers for regular food and cozy shelter? Cats are smart (probably why we like them so much); given the option of

scarfing food from a dish that shows up at the same time every day and digging through trash cans, most will go for the dish. More significant, they go for the person offering it, a skill they likely picked up when, as many believe, they started living in humans' midst in ancient Egypt. "The [cat] efficiently protected the valuable fruits of the harvest, while charming one and all with their beauty, grace, cleanliness, independence and aura of mystery. These twin aspects of gentle companionship and fierce protectiveness appealed to the Egyptians' religious and artistic sensibilities," writes Wendy Christensen in her 2004 book Outwitting Cats. Spaying and neutering just intensifies the bond. "Intact cats are, in many ways, more like adult wildcats than neotenized domestic cats," Christensen writes. Neotenized cats are those that display permanent kitten traits due to genetic heritage, socialization with people, and removing sex hormones. Remove the biological imperative and add reliable food and shelter, and you get a recipe for easing myriad human burdens: you save property owners cat fights over mates and territory, spraying and trash-can tipping, and you save animal shelters from having to care for and often euthanize a surfeit of animals. Everybody's happy. But to riff on Peterson's observation, you can't trap cats that don't want to be trapped. And the ones that don't, you don't. Feral cats keep breeding and living in our shadows, and taking on a TNR colony means adopting your very own outdoor brood, with all the responsibilities of domestic-cat ownership and then some.

E

nter Carol McNichol. On a search for a solution to my own cat dilemma, all roads seemed to point to her. If I want to go the trap-neuter-return route, HCAL advised 31


me, talk to Carol McNichol. If I want help with stray cats, my church friends encouraged me, talk to Carol McNichol. If I want to see the kitties live, the Animal Control dispatcher warned me, talk to Carol McNichol. So I called Carol McNichol. As founder of the nonprofit Companion Animal Trust and its companion TNR program, the Neighborhood Feral Cat Initiative, McNichol devotes a large portion of her time to fostering adoptable cats and kittens and training others to manage TNR colonies. "I get phone calls all the time, people saying, 'I can't keep my cat or cats, I can't bring them to the shelter, I don't want them killed,'" she says. Truth be told, McNichol is more of a dog person. She's actually allergic to cats. "I bought a dog in 1987," she says. "It was an impulse, a little Shih Tzu, in a pet store. And I didn't know anything about animal welfare issues, like most people don't. Now I know that dog came from a puppy mill, no doubt. So I just loved this dog, and as time went on, this animal magnetism came out," she says, laughing. "I was just drawn to them." The native New Yorker became involved in the animal welfare issues in the mid-'90s, after she moved to Jersey City and became involved with Liberty Humane Society. When the shelter opened in 2002, she became a volunteer. "That took me to a whole new level of learning about the companion animal world, and the enormity of the homelessness of these animals," she says. "And back then I just wanted to save every one of them." She founded CAT in 2005 to create a dialogue about cats and provide practical ways to address the problem. The feral cat initiative was announced in February 2009 after McNichol received a private grant to provide training and subsidized veterinary services. "I've never been a cat person, really," she says. But her work at the shelter convinced her that if she wanted to make a dent in the well-being of animals, it would be in the feline world. "Seventy percent of cats that enter shelters in this country are killed. So that's

32

"They're the cats other people threw out. They keep the mice away, so I feed them."

not very good odds for cats to survive. The way I perceive it is, dogs are much more of a threat to humans, so municipalities really do enforce those laws. ... Cats? They're ignored. The cities just don't do anything because they're not as much of a threat." No harm, no foul. Until the collective myth of the independent cat leads to owners not sterilizing their pets and then letting them roam outside, and then finding themselves presenting a litter of kittens at the shelter or leaving them to fend for themselves, or colonies of cats having two or three litters of kittens each year. Which is where we find ourselves, with overcrowded shelters and free-roaming cats in the millions. "Now it's up to us in the community to educate ourselves and to educate the cities," McNichol says. "And they're getting smarter – right now we're talking to Bayonne to address the reproduction of free-roaming cats." Now in its third year, the Neighborhood Feral

Cat Initiative has trained nearly 275 people in Hudson County, most of them in Jersey City, and has sterilized 1,200 cats, including 80 of an estimated 225 in Country Village as part of a TNR collaboration between Neighborhood Feral and HCAL sponsored by PetSmart Charities. "Once feral cats are fixed, nuisance behaviors subside, like the fighting, the male spraying, obviously kittens," McNichol says. "The first question I ask [caregivers] is, 'Have you seen any kittens?' I mean, that's the whole goal." In Country Village so far, 10 kittens and three friendly adults have been pulled out of the TNR process at "N" and placed for adoption. "It's the right thing to do," says McNichol. "But in some cases, if I'm teaching people, if they don't have the wherewithal to find a home for a cat, and the cat is basically safe, and it's fixed now and you're feeding it, and it's a friendly cat, it's OK to put it back out in the colony. If it's safe and so on. But I can't do that because I have some resources and I just know better. I like to see friendlies come off the streets. That's my heart. They're susceptible to dangers – because they're friendly. They don't run away.” As head of a nonprofit rescue, McNichol fosters cats and kittens at her home. On the day of our visit, there are about 12 cats and kittens living in roomy pens, mostly one per cage, spanning two rooms. There is mewing all around, and most of the cats seem healthy and happy. One by one, she introduces each of her charges, including a trio of tiny orange tabbies – possibly the cutest cats ever – and opening the back door to the colony she tends outside. "Hi guys!" They look as healthy and happy as the gang inside, and McNichol lights up when she shows them off. All told, better than a shelter? "The best thing for feral cats is for them not to be [in shelters] at all," Peterson says. Wrong answer, according to Daphna Nachminovitch, vice president of cruelty investigations for People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA), which, somewhat ironically, does not oppose euthanasia. "TNR is nothing short of abandonment,"

she said in a phone call recently, pointing to the dangers cats face outdoors, such as vehicles, wildlife and extreme weather. In her time as an intake worker in a Chicago shelter, she said, "of the hundreds of cats I saw, the vast majority had severe injuries, frostbite or ear mite infestation so severe that they'd scratched off layers of skin. These are not wildlife; they are domesticated animals that depend on people for food." "That may be true," says Borngraeber of LHS, "but I've never seen a cat in survival mode go back to not being in survival mode." The bottom line for everyone in the animal welfare scene, PETA included, is solving the overpopulation problem at its root. "I think we can all agree that the cats shouldn't be out there in the first place,” Nachminovitch says. "It's really easy not to contribute [to the problem]. Adopt from a shelter. Spay and neuter your pets. Don't get an animal until you're sure you’re prepared to make that commitment. If people are willing to do these three things, they will be the difference between life and death." And, McNichol would add, take a TNR course. After thousands of years, our relationship with cats isn't going anywhere, whether we take them to a shelter or a rescue, leave them to fend for themselves in the streets, take on the costly burden of full-on TNR caregiving, or somewhere in between. One recent afternoon I crossed the path of no fewer than six cats on the sidewalk, gathering for food a woman was putting out. "They're the cats other people threw out," she said. "They keep the mice away, so I feed them." As for the cats outside my building, two of them are in my office recovering from neuter and abortion/spay surgeries. One is curled up on a chair, purring and napping; the other is on my lap, also purring and napping, and intermittently waking up to lick my knee. I told an intake worker at LHS that I may bring them in, but I haven't yet. The third, the dark, mysterious one, never showed up the first night we put the traps out and no one has seen her since.

33


PA LIS AD EA VE

29

ST

Van Vorst Park

MONTGO MERY ST

PATH HBLR

ST

GREENE ST

HBLR

HBLR

KE NN ED Y

OC EA NA VE

HBLR

WA Y

GAR FIEL D AV E

TH OR NF DA E AV

Liberty National Golf Course

Liberty State Park

FR EE ED OM

AV E BE RG EN

35

E AV

GRAND ST

HUDSON ST

< WARREN

MARIN BLVD

BO UL EV AR D M LK

E AV

BO UL EVA RD

ON ST N H JO

HBLR

E AV

HBLR

Bayside Park

HBLR

+

AW IP N U M M CO

HBLR

HBLR

LD IE RF GA

Lafayette Park

Arlington Park

REGENT STREET

BE SURE TO use your smartphone to SCAN THE GUIDE'S QR CODES FOR some EXCLUSIVE DEALS from our advertisers!

AVE

MARIN BLVD < GROVE ST

< WARRE N ST

GRO VE S T

WASHIN GTON ST

PROVOST ST

ERIE ST >

1. 14th Street Garden Center p. 51 2. 172 Newark p. 52 3. Another Man's Treasure p. 44 Liberty State Park 4. Art House Productions p. 48 5. The Attic Ensemble p. 11 6. Au Capoeira p. 52 7. Balance Hair p. 46 8. Barcade p. 5 9. Basic Builders p. 45 10. Bigdrum Art & Framing p. 54 11. Bubby's Burritos p. 38 12. European Wax Center p. 46 13. Gallerie Hudson p. 45 14. Groomingdales Pet Salon p. 52 15. Groove on Grove p. 11 16. Grove Street Bicycles p. 55 17. Grove Street Farmers Market p. 5 18. Hamilton Health & Fitness p. 50 19. The Hamilton Inn p. 41 20. Hamilton Square Back Cover 21. Hard Grove Cafe p. 38 22. Hound About Town p. 51 23. Hudson Pride Connections Center p. 55 24. The Iron Monkey p. 39 25. J CITY Theater p. 53 26. Jersey City Art School p. 53 27. Jersey City Children's Theater p. 49 28. Jersey City Medical Center p. 1 29. Jersey City Super Buy-Rite p. 43 30. Jersey City Tattoo Co. p. 55 31. Kanibal Home p. 54 32. Light Horse Tavern p. 36 33. LITM p. 40

PEARL ST

MONTGO MERY ST

PATH

YORK ST >

24

HBLR

GRAND ST

32

SUSSEX ST >

HUDSON ST

JERSEY AV E

WA SHIN GTO NS T

< MANILA

ST < COLES

BAR RO W

HBLR

D GRAN

Jersey City Medical Center

REGENT ST

HBLR

ADVERTISER DIRECTORY

HBLR

MORGAN ST

MORRIS ST >

City Hall

GRAND

STE UB EN ST

City Hall

HBLR

WASHIN GTON ST

PATH

AV E

HBLR

Jersey City Medical Center

12

10 47

GREENE ST

+

HBLR

ST

9

MO NTG OM ERY ST

22 31

DR

< GROVE

CH RIS TO PH NE ER WA CO RK LUM AV BU E SD R

11

ST

VORST ST

AV E ST

HBLR

< VAN

WAS HIN GTO N ST

MARIN BLVD

JERSEY AVE

THOMAS GANG EMI

GRO VE

AV E BE RG EN

W ES T

MO NT GO ME RY

HBLR

AVE

KE NN ED YB OU LE VA RD

AV E SID E

AV E

43

< 6TH ST

Van Vorst Park

DR

< 2ND ST

28

PATH

E AV

MA LL OR Y

DOWNTOWN DETAIL Mary Benson Park

K AR EW N

46

GRAND ST Newport Mall

JERS EY

Lincoln Park

Jones Park Hamilton Park

BA LD WIN

St. Peter's College

< MANILA

AV E SU MM IT

78

METRO PLA ZA

2 7 16 13 34 8 41 3 < BAY ST 33 5 384045 PATH 44 27 2115 17 <M ERC ER

BRIG HT ST

HOLLAND TUNNEL

AVE

23

New Jersey City University

1ST ST >

E AV

Holy Name Cemetery

CO MM UN IPA W

< 2ND ST

JERS EY A VE

PA LIS AD EA VE

MO NT GO MER YS YO T RK ST >

THOMAS GAN GEMI DR

< 4TH ST

3RD ST >

CH RIS TO PHE RC OLU <W MB US AYN DR E ST

PATH HBLR

5TH ST >

MARIN BLVD

PATH

6

<V ARIC KS T

AV E

Loews Jersey Theater

Christ Hospital

RK WA NE

SIP AVEN UE

36

+

NEWA RK AVE

48 42

Newport Mall

< 6TH ST

26

14 30

CE NT RA L

TONN ELE AVE

139

7TH ST >

ST >

CO LGA TE ST

Pershing Field Park

E AV

KE NN ED YB OU LE VA RD

K AR EW N

Mary Benson Park

MONMOU TH ST >

Riverview Park

MA NH AT TA NA VE

Jones Park DIVISION ST

SU MM IT

AV E

CE NT RA L

Leonard Gordon Park

< BRUNSW ICK ST

AV E

TO NN ELE

AVE

9TH ST >

78

Reservior

440

19 < 10TH ST 25 Hamilton 18 Park 20 37 < 8TH ST 4

39

HOLLAND TUNNEL>>> >

NEWPORT PKW Y

< WARRE N ST

JERSEY CITY

1

Washington Park CO NG RE SS ST RE ET

< ESSEX

HBLR 34. Made with Love 35. Maritime Parc 36. NYC-JC Suites 37. Project Pilates 38. Red Feast Wine & Liquors 39. SalonBe 40. Shampoo JC Hair Salon 41. Skinner's Loft 42. Steam Cafe 43. Super Impact Fitness 44. Tousled Hair Salon 45. Two Boots 46. Uptown Crew 47. The Warehouse Cafe 48. WOOLPUNKstudios

p. 40 p. 37 p. 44 p. 50 p. 44 p. 47 p. 47 p. 42 p. 40 p. 51 p. 46 p. 5 p. 55 p. 54 p. 53

OFF THE MAP Bike JC DI=VA Creativity Coaching FlorYoga Heritage at Piscataway JC Fridays JC Lofts JCF Boot Camp Jersey City Craft Mafia Magic Cleaning Service Melinda Hirsch-Robinson Michelle Timek Yoga Muller Insurance Not Yo Mama's Affairs Pinch-Hitter Qi for Wellness

p. 55 p. 52 p. 54 p. 10 p. 48 Inside Cover p. 49 p. 53 p. 52 p. 53 p. 54 p. 11 p. 53 p. 52 p. 54


JERSEY CITY GUIDE

SPRING 2012

LIGHT HORSE TAVERN

MARITIME PARC

199 WASHINGTON STREET JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 946 2028 lighthorsetavern.com

84 AUDREY ZAPP DRIVE JERSEY CITY 07305 T 201 413 0050 maritimeparc.com

Opened in 2002, this local favorite has become an institution. Light Horse Tavern has a new young chef, Carlos Ortega, who brings a new exciting vision to the Jersey City culinary scene. The chef's philosophy is to source seasonal ingredients and to preserve the integrity of the product when cooking. The seasonal menu always includes a variety of fresh oysters and clams, as well as lighter fare such as grilled octopus salad, or heartier favories like organic ale-braised rabbit with fresh garganelli pasta and green olives.

Welcome to Maritime Parc, which revitalizes the tradition of the great seaside restaurants of yesteryear for the modern diner, adding a signature spectacle: expansive views of the Hudson River and lower Manhattan that frame the scene like something out of a dream. Located in Liberty State Park, Maritime Parc welcomes guests from both sides of the Hudson to enjoy its scenic splendor and distinct brand of hospitality. Executive chef/owner Chris Siversen turns out seasonally inspired menus that spin local, organic and sustainable ingredients into crowd-pleasing dishes. Siversen's menu promises something for everybody, from casual visitors looking to unwind with a beer and a bar snack after work, to contemporary restaurant-goers seeking a three-course meal paired with an international selection of fine wines.

Whether settling in at the bar for a pint or indulging in the spectacular cuisine, you are sure to become addicted to the experience. Check the website for special events including live jazz, a Wednesday seasonal farmers market tasting menu, and wine tastings. Visit any day for lunch, weekend days for brunch, and always for exquisite food, people watching and pristine outdoor seating. 36

Maritime Parc's Lazy Sunday Brunch â&#x20AC;&#x201C; featuring unlimited or bottomless bloody marys or mimosas â&#x20AC;&#x201C; is the perfect way to sip into spring. 37


JERSEY CITY GUIDE

SPRING 2012

HARD GROVE CAFE 319 GROVE STREET JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 451 1853 hardgrovecafe.com Take one step inside this artsy Downtown restaurant and you'll know that you’re in for an entertaining evening. Latin music and Cuban mojitos set the tone for a South Beach-like party atmosphere, while authentic Cuban food choices are available – from Hemingway churrasco steak to shrimp with garlic sauce to the classic Cuban shredded beef. The Hard Grove Cafe has expanded its menu to include vegetarian selections with a Latin emphasis, like vegetarian lemon salsa chicken. On Tuesdays and Wednesdays, check out the allyou-can-eat Latin mango-pineapple BBQ chicken, ribs or pulled pork with prices starting at $9.99. The cafe offers brunch on weekends, and features selections like mixed berry pancakes, breakfast quesadillas and huevos rancheros – not to mention bottomless bloody marys and mimosas. Stop by the Hard Grove and enjoy a magnificent experience.

38

BUBBY's BURRITOS

THE IRON MONKEY

440 JERSEY AVENUE JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 333 1550 bubbysburritos.com

99 GREENE STREET JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 435 5756 ironmonkey.com

Bubby's Burritos is a cozy Downtown California-Mexican eatery which prides itself on providing fresh, natural, lard-free ingredients in all its dishes. Its homemade corn tamales, nachos, burritos, tacos and quesadillas are oil-free and never too hot or spicy, while its salsas, guacamole and chili are handmade fresh on a daily basis with onions, cilantro and natural ingredients. Bubby's offers delivery throughout Jersey City and Hoboken.

Founded 15 years ago by Stephen McIntyre, The Iron Monkey quickly became a favorite place for Jersey City residents to eat and drink. Today, The Iron Monkey offers casual, modern American cuisine with three floors for eating and drinking. The main bar has a wonderful traditional pub feel. The second floor offers an elegant, yet vibrant, dining experience that is perfect for dinner with friends or corporate parties. The Iron Monkey also boasts the only rooftop in Jersey City with dining and a full bar.

PAID FOR BY OR IN PART BY THE NJ URBAN ENTERPRISE ZONE PROGRAM

In addition to having the most unique space in Jersey City, The Iron Monkey has been a longtime proponent of the craft beer movement. With 39 taps devoted to craft beer and a bottle list that numbers well over 300 bottles, The Iron Monkey ranks among the elite destination beer bars in the Northeast. 39


JERSEY CITY GUIDE

SPRING 2012

LITM 140 NEWARK AVENUE JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 536 5557 litm.com Every day is new and exciting at LITM. The popular destination is a restaurant, bar & art/video gallery known for its creative, seasonal cocktails, extensive beer list, fun happy hour specials and excellent modern American food. Judge's Choice winner of 4th Street Mac & Cheese Cookoff 2010 and 2011. Monthly art exhibitions by local and international artists.

MADE WITH LOVE 530 JERSEY AVENUE JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 451 5199 madewithloveorganics.com With artisanal breads, empanadas, quiches, cookies, pies and cakes made with organic ingredients, Made with Love is Jersey City's destination for sweet and savory baked goods. Now there's more to love: daily lunch, weekend brunch, communal dinners, art receptions, cooking/ baking classes and children's parties.

STEAM CAFE

THE HAMILTON INN

276 NEWARK AVENUE JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 706 2489 steamcafe-jc.com

708 JERSEY AVENUE JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 839 5818 hamiltoninnjc.com

Steam Cafe features TM Ward Ethiopian blend coffee and espresso, loose leaf tea, croissants and breads that are baked daily, and handmade bagels from Wonder Bagels. It also offers signature sandwiches, homemade muffins, sweets from Sassy Sweet Treats and Willow & Olivia Creations, as well as many other daily surprises.

40

PAID FOR BY OR IN PART BY THE NJ URBAN ENTERPRISE ZONE PROGRAM

The Hamilton Inn is a welcome revival within the Downtown Jersey City community. Nestled on the corner of 10th Street and Jersey Avenue, a block from Hamilton Park, the Inn's cozy, classic atmosphere invites guests to dine indoors or out on a well-rounded menu that features organic meats and local produce, and ranges from truffled egg pizza to signature East LA fish tacos. Or, enjoy an Inn Burger at the bar, where you can also find a nightly happy hour, signature cocktails, assorted craft beers, and an impressive list of fine yet affordable wines. With its kitchen open until 1 am on the weekends, a not-to-miss brunch experience featuring $4 cocktails, and weekly specials that include Tacos & Trivia Tuesdays, Half-Priced Cocktails Wednesdays, Endless Happy Hour Thursdays, and Wine-Down Sundays, The Hamilton Inn's friendly staff is not the only reason to visit this bustling neighborhood fixture.

41


JERSEY CITY GUIDE

SPRING 2012

SKINNER'S LOFT

JERSEY CITY SUPER BUY-RITE

146 NEWARK AVENUE JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 915 0600 skinnersloft.com

575 MANILA AVENUE JERSEY CITY 07310 (ACROSS FROM HOLLAND TUNNEL HOME DEPOT) T 201 239 1200 buyritewines.com

Skinner's Loft is an elegant yet casual, upbeat bistro-style restaurant. It features an eclectic menu of deliciously seasoned small plates and entrees, as well as tried and true comfort food, like a juicy burger. There are extensive beer, wine and liquor lists to accommodate those seeking the usual as well as satisfy the adventurous. The handcrafted bar is adorned with a copper ceiling and antique Italian tiled floor, with the loft space upstairs housing a beautiful, but comfortable, dining room. In the summertime, Skinner's Loft offers dining in the rooftop garden, serves specials daily, and features carefully made cocktails using fresh squeezed juices, housemade syrups, and house-infused liquors. Join us for lunch Tuesday through Friday, brunch on the weekends, and dinner until 11 every night.

Jersey City Super Buy-Rite is the largest liquor store in New Jersey, with over 30,000 square feet of retail space. Its size, financial strength and association with the Buy-Rite chain allows it to buy at the best prices possible and ultimately pass the savings along to you. Buy-Rite also has one of the largest beer selections in the world, as well as thousands of wines and spirits, and an extensive cigar selection. Buy-Rite might look like a big box retail store, but it strives to give you the same service you'd expect from a boutique wine shop, with numerous managers who are trained and certified wine, spirits and beer experts. Save 10 percent on wines with purchases of 12 bottles or more. Buy-Rite has free and ample parking, and delivery is also available to Hoboken and Newport â&#x20AC;&#x201C; mention this ad for free delivery!

42

PAID FOR BY OR IN PART BY THE NJ URBAN ENTERPRISE ZONE PROGRAM

43


JERSEY CITY GUIDE

SPRING 2012

RED FEAST WINE & LIQUORS

GALLERIE HUDSON

129 COLUMBUS DRIVE JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 333 3360

197 NEWARK AVENUE JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 434 1010

Red Feast features a large selection of wines from around the world plus imported, domestic and craft beers. Its owners are also open to customer suggestions, so let them know if there is something you would like added to the inventory. Free delivery to Downtown Jersey City, including The Village, Newport, Exchange Place and Paulus Hook ($30 minimum order).

Gallerie Hudson goes beyond just ordinary framing. In addition to creating awardwinning designs, it offers conservation and restoration services and expert advice on how to properly preserve and showcase your art. Also featured in the gallery are original works of art by local artists and artists from around the world. Gallerie Hudson has thousands of choices in frames, from hand-crafted Italian mouldings to contemporary American hardwoods. Whether you need to frame a family photograph or a Picasso original, this is the place to go. Gallerie Hudson is fully insured and guarantees the quality of its workmanship.

NYC-JC SUITES 88 BRUNSWICK STREET JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 706 1017 nyc-jc.com

44

NYC-JC Guest Suites offers luxury, short-term apartment rentals located on the waterfront in Jersey City, conveniently located close to the PATH stations. NYC-JC Guest Suites offers beautiful views and comfortable living at an unbeatable price. Come stay with NYC-JC, where they look forward to meeting you!

Gallerie Hudson now also offers digital photo restoration (see before and after pictures at left), as well as large-format photo and fine art printing. Hours: Tuesday through Friday 11 am-7 pm and Saturday 10 am-6 pm.

ANOTHER MAN's TREASURE

BASIC BUILDERS

353 GROVE STREET JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 860 9990 amtvintage.com

21 EMORY STREET JERSEY CITY 07304 T 201 433 7358 basicbuilders.com

Established in 2006, this "knockout vintage boutique" (Time Out New York) is open 7 days a week with new additions daily. Everything is hand-picked with current trends, classic seasonal styles and quality in mind. You can also visit AMT at its new showroom (pictured) to view its high-end vintage collection. To make an appointment, email showroom@amtvintage.com.

Jersey City's premier kitchen engineers, Peter and Lissa Welles will design and remodel your kitchen with amazing creativity and enthusiasm. Their backgrounds in mechanical engineering and architecture will allow you to experience contracting at a whole new level. Stylish kitchens with tight budgets are Basic Builders' specialty.

PAID FOR BY OR IN PART BY THE NJ URBAN ENTERPRISE ZONE PROGRAM

PAID FOR BY OR IN PART BY THE NJ URBAN ENTERPRISE ZONE PROGRAM

45


JERSEY CITY GUIDE

SPRING 2012

BALANCE HAIR

SALONBE

18 ERIE STREET JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 369 7000 balancehairjc.com

106 RIVER DRIVE SOUTH JERSEY CITY 07310 T 201 222 1101 hairsalonbe.com

Hair, style, culture, drama. Balance Hair, located in Downtown Jersey City, is the most cuttingedge salon this side of the river. Open 7 days a week, and starting 7 am weekdays, Balance offers a full array of services to men, women and children. Be sure to scan the QR Code for specials and hours.

With the perfect balance of a trendy yet upscale ambiance, Jersey City's premier salon has finally arrived. Located on the waterfront in Newport, SalonBe is here to help each client find their desired look for their personal lifestyle. Featuring some of Jersey City's most talented hairstylists, offering the most current services, and carrying the lead products in today's industry, SalonBe is sure to redefine and rejuvenate your confidence.

TOUSLED HAIR SALON 500-A JERSEY AVENUE JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 309 1200 mytousledhair.com There are good stylists who show up to work, and there are exceptional stylists who show up to create. Let the Tousled stylists create your next customized color and style for this season from a quaint Aveda haircare hub located in the historic Downtown district of Jersey City.

46

Drop by or call to indulge in some of our grand opening promotions – including free conditioning treatments with any service; 10 percent off all hair care products; and free cut, color and product consultations. Join SalonBe for complimentary wine and food every Friday as it showcases the work of a different local artist each week.

EUROPEAN WAX CENTER

SHAMPOO JC HAIR SALON

389 WASHINGTON STREET JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 239 6200 waxcenter.com

107 COLUMBUS DRIVE JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 395 0045 shampoojc.com

European Wax Center specializes in full-body waxing for men & women, and is truly "the ultimate wax experience" with its unique 4-step process. Its comfort wax system is 100% natural beeswax and applied at low heat; the stripless formula provides a quick application and silky smooth results. All new guests receive a free wax offer.

Shampoo JC Hair Salon is one of the most unique hair salons in Jersey City, inspired by decades of art, music and fashion. Whether you desire a hairstyle that's modern, classic, mod, sophisticated or bohemian, Shampoo JC's stylists will use their extensive artistic abilities to give you exactly what you want.

PAID FOR BY OR IN PART BY THE NJ URBAN ENTERPRISE ZONE PROGRAM

PAID FOR BY OR IN PART BY THE NJ URBAN ENTERPRISE ZONE PROGRAM

47


JERSEY CITY GUIDE

SPRING 2012

ART HOUSE PRODUCTIONS

JERSEY CITY CHILDREN'S THEATER

1 MCWILLIAMS PLACE 6TH FLOOR JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 915 9911 arthouseproductions.org

83 WAYNE STREET (IN THE BARROW MANSION) JERSEY CITY 07302 T 917 363 7429 jcchildrenstheater.org

For over a decade, Art House Productions has been bringing Jersey City the very best visual and performing arts entertainment. Join Art House for two exciting theatrical productions this spring. In May, Art House's STAGES! Theater Company for Youth will present Disney's Beauty & the Beast Jr., a timeless tale for the whole family. In June, Art House invites you to the world premiere of its original mainstage play, a collaborative project currently in development.

Jersey City Children's Theater (JCCT) celebrates the art of play and the diverse tapestry that is Jersey City. Through its unique and original curriculum of storytelling, play-making and theater games, children will discover new ways to express themselves and explore the world around them. In classes and performances, children will discover diplomatic ways to learn lessons of morality, courage, generosity and compassion â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and have great fun doing it! JCCT offers in-house classes and afterschool programs for children 3 to 13 years old.

Visit the Art House website to register for adult and childrens' classes, and to find out about upcoming art exhibitions, concerts, film screenings, and plays!

Please watch the JCCT website for more information about the upcoming Spring Break Story Telling Series, as well as Summer Camp offerings!

Photo: Lisa Gabriella Creery

JC FRIDAYS CITYWIDE | JERSEY CITY T 201 915 9911 jcfridays.com Art House Productions presents JC Fridays, a quarterly festival held throughout Jersey City at the start of every season. Local businesses and arts organizations join together to celebrate art and culture with a wide range of free events for the public. Programs include art openings and exhibits, music, dance, theater, poetry, film/video screenings and more! Next dates: June 1 and September 7.

48

JCF BOOT CAMP CITYWIDE | JERSEY CITY T 201 484 7848 jcfbootcamp.com Daris Wilson started JCF Boot Camp in 2008 to give women an effective alternative to pricey personal training sessions and traditional gym settings, where the bulky equipment can be intimidating. The fourweek program for women of all ages and fitness levels is designed to challenge your fitness level.

49


JERSEY CITY GUIDE

50

SPRING 2012

HAMILTON HEALTH & FITNESS

HOUND ABOUT TOWN

161 ERIE STREET JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 714 7600 hamiltonhealthfitness.com

218 MONTGOMERY STREET JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 721 5532 houndabouttownjc.com

Located inside Hamilton Square, Hamilton Health & Fitness combines the latest innovations with a spa-like setting. Taking its cue from the natural beauty of historic Hamilton Park, HHF is light, airy, green and natural. Large thermal windows flood the space with light, while natural stone and wood finishes accompany the most advanced cardio and weight-training equipment. In addition to an innovative, cutting-edge nutrition program, integrated amenities complete the experience for body and mind. HHF features an indoor lap pool, sauna and steam rooms, children’s room, group fitness classes and a fully equipped Pilates studio directed by Project Pilates. Group fitness classes include Pilates mat/tower/reformer, zumba, indoor cycling, intenSati, boot camp, kettlebell, yoga, water workout, and learn-to-swim classes. HHF offers the most holistic health and fitness experience in Jersey City.

You live a stylish urban lifestyle – your pet should too! At Hound About Town, convenience meets community. These cozy boutiques focus on eco-friendly, locally made apparel and accessories, as well as optimal, sustainable nutrition choices for your pet. Second location now open at Hamilton Square (17 McWilliams Place - 201 918 5557).

PROJECT PILATES

SUPER IMPACT FITNESS

161 ERIE STREET JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 HEALTHY (432 5849) projectpilates.com

650 MONTGOMERY STREET JERSEY CITY 07306 T 201 763 6617 superimpactfitness.com

Pilates is great for muscle stamina, strength, flexibility, mental clarity, health, wellness and awareness. Project Pilates offers a variety of classes to fit any budget including private and semi-private sessions, group tower, group reformer and group mat classes. The studio specializes in pre-/postnatal Pilates and injury prevention and recovery.

Super Impact Fitness offers a wide range of classes designed to help you sculpt your body. Classes include yoga, zumba, indoor/outdoor boot camps, spin class and kettlebell training. Super Impact's group exercise programs will help you create balance, build strength and bolster confidence – all while having a fun, challenging and rewarding experience.

14th STREET GARDEN CENTER 793 JERSEY AVENUE JERSEY CITY 07310 T 201 963 1414 14thstreetgardencenter.com Jersey City's premier family run garden center has a wide selection of indoor foliage and outdoor blooming flowers. From quart-size annuals perfect for window boxes to fresh locally grown herbs and large bamboo plants, it keeps a full selection of plants year round to suit your city living. 14th Street will pot and deliver your plants too!

51


Pinch-Hitter.com "If you don't have the time to do it, we'll do it for you!"

20 Fabulous Crafters

Hand-Crafted Drink Specials Prizes Fun Foolery

PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZER & PERSONAL ASSISTANT

Seriously. We’re not joking.

Sunday, April 1, 2012 • 11am-5pm

Eliminate, Delete, Remove, Throw Out !

140 Newark Ave Jersey City, NJ Grove PATH

PINCH-HITTER If you don't have the time to do it, Pinch-Hitter will do it for you. Hours of availability: 6 am to 9 pm daily. 201 618 0278 | pinch-hitter.com

AU CAPOEIRA Classes for adults and children in the Brazilian art form that combines dance, acrobatics and self-defense. 908 432 2405 | 58 Coles Street | aucapoeira.com

MAGIC CLEANING SERVICE LLC $15 off when you mention this ad! Call 201 963 1147 or email info@magiccleaningservicellc.com to book an appointment. magiccleaningservicellc.com

DI=VA LIFE COACHING Life coaching, wellness and fitness training. Mention NEW and get 25% off a 3-month coaching package. This year, invest in you. yaromilolivares.com

GROOMINGDALES PET SALON Professional, courteous pet styling with comfort as the first priority. Only all-natural products used. 201 659 5559 | 351 2nd St. | groomingdalesnj.com

172 NEWARK You live Downtown. You shop Downtown. Now work Downtown. Offering cowork desk rentals for creative professionals, near the Grove PATH. jgsrealty.com

NOT YO MAMA'S FOOLS' FAIR Not Yo Mama's Affairs kicks off BlitzCraft 2012, their 4th year of craft fairs, with Fools' Fair. Check the website for more fairs in 2012. notyomamasaffairs.com

J CITY THEATER Telling each story with sophisticated simplicity. Conveniently located to all Jersey City and the surrounding area. 252 9th Street | jcity.org

WOOLPUNKSTUDIOS Showcasing local artists and functional items including jewelry, ceramics, and vintage collectibles. 201.602.9790 | woolpunkstudios.com

JERSEY CITY ART SCHOOL Courses include painting, sculpture, jewelry making, digital photography and kids classes. Figure Drawing every Wednesday. 326 5th St. | jcartschool.com

JERSEY CITY CRAFT MAFIA Providing handmade businesses with opportunities to network with artists and to organize selling, networking and educational events. jccraftmafia.com

VIOLIN & VIOLA LESSONS WITH MELINDA HIRSCH-ROBINSON

Professional violist with over 15 years teaching experience. All ages and levels. First lesson is half price with ad. Call today! 917 771 8063 | mhrmusic.com


Bake Sale

the WARE HOUSE CAFÈ

Celebrating 18 Years in Business

140 BAY ST JERSEY CITY NJ FUN07302 DRA ISE R 8-6 EVERYDAY Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, ettes thewarehousejc.com ligula sitet nullatet  pretium

INTELLIGENTSIA FRESH ROASTED COFFEE

TAVALON TEAS

!

DATE : Wednesday

, February 1, 2012 BALTHAZAR CLASSIC BAKERY WHE RE: ET SANDWICHES 1234 Main St, Anytown FIZZY (Rhoncus integera place LIZZY SWEET HAUS BARS rat)

Custom Framing Framed Art

TIME : 8am to 3pm

Dolor sit amet ettes.

THE WAREHOUSE CAFE Come get plugged in and restored at The Warehouse. 201 420 8882 | 140 Bay St. | thewarehousejc.com

Open 7 Days a Week in Jersey City’s Powerhouse Arts District

Six wards, fifteen miles, two wheels Bike JC's 3rd Annual Jersey City Ward Tour Sunday, June 03, 2012 Check bikejc.org for registration information and more details. Registration required.

Free 90 day Layaway Plan for Bicycle Purchases. Select in Stock Bicycles on Sale (while supplies last) Bring this Ad in and recieve: 10% Off Any In Stock accessory or clothing item. This discount can be combined with other specials! Vist our Website for Coupons and Specials

PROFESSIONAL REPAIRS ON ALL BRANDS OPEN 7 DAYS • 3.5% SALES TAX (Excluding Labor) www.grovestreetbicycles.com

365 Grove Street Jersey City, N.J. 07302

(201) 451-BIKE

Paid for in part by the NJ urban enterprise zone program

201-418-8771 BIGDRUM ART & FRAMING Whether the job is big or small, Bigdrum prides itself on quality workmanship and attention to detail. 201 418 8771 | 127 1st St. | bigdrumart.com

BIKE JC A citizen-based advocacy organization that aims to make Jersey City streets safe and welcoming for bicyclists. Ward Tour: May 13. bikejc.org

GROVE STREET BICYCLES This full-service shop carries bikes for the entire family and offers lifetime service with every new bike purchase. grovestreetbicycles.com

Uptown Crew a NJ Nonprofit Corporation

Spotlighting the

KANIBAL HOME Offering a range of refurbished furniture, found objects, vintage dishware and plenty of new home goods, apparel and gift items. 551 200 9386 | kanibalhome.com

MICHELLE TIMEK YOGA On-site outdoor/indoor vinyasa, pre/postnatal & restorative classes. Private, semi-private & group sessions. All are welcome! michelletimekyoga.com

JERSEY CITY TATTOO CO. The best place in Jersey City for custom tattoos. Open 7 days a week; walk-ins welcome. 201 360 0139 | 253 Newark Ave. | jerseycitytattoo.com

people, places and history of the Upper and Outer reaches of Jersey City  Community and Commerce   History and Culture   Arts and Entertainment 

THE CREW IS YOU. UptownCrew.org facebook.com/TheUptownCrew FLORYOGA.COM Yoga, personal training & wellness delivered to your door. Yoga Alliance accredited teacher trainings and pre-/post-natal yoga teacher training. 866 333 YOGA

QI FOR WELLNESS WITH JANINE BERGER-GILLET Certified Wu Ming Qigong instructor of the Dragon’s Way & Wu Ming Qigong for Breast Health. For more information and a class schedule: qiforwellness.com.

HUDSON PRIDE CONNECTIONS CENTER This full-service LGBT community center has programs for LGBT youth, seniors & everyone in between. 201 963 4779 | 32 Jones St. | hudsonpride.org

UPTOWN CREW Presenting an open mic on the 2nd & 4th Thursdays of each month, readings and theatrical productions, and a teen program. 917 536 2682 | uptowncrew.org


PARTING SHOT: THE MOUND WHERE 111 1ST STREET ONCE STOOD

JANUARY 24, 2012

57


NEW Magazine: Spring 2012  

The Spring 2012 issue of NEW features in-depth reporting on Jersey City's feral cat population, Chef Wayne Lyons of Soul Flavors, and the Ma...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you