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arts. culture. life. jersey city. FALL 2012

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CONTENTs

CONTRIBUTORS & STAFF Steve Gold is a staff photographer for NEW and the Jersey City Independent. His photographs have also appeared in the Jersey Journal, New York Daily News and other newspapers and magazines. popzero.com

Matt Hunger covers City Hall for the Jersey City Independent. A Virgo by circumstance, a Knicks fan by birth and a saxophone player in a psychedelic surf band by conscription, Matt will report on mostly anything for just about any amount of pay.

Mickey Mathis is a freelance photographer who has spent many years documenting the changing faces of Jersey City. His photographs have appeared in The New York Times, New York Magazine, Essence and other publications, as well as in galleries and museums. mickeymathis.smugmug.com

Eric Schkrutz is a Jersey City-based photographer. He likes to play soccer in Lincoln Park, read about urban planning and drink tea out of jars. He once walked all the way home from New Brunswick, where he studied history at Rutgers. ericofjerseycity.com

Dan Strauss is an illustrator, writer and performer based in Jersey City who produces the comic strip for NEW. He is the founder of 1RODHWY and Jersey City Comics, and has participated in group art shows in New York City and Portland, Oregon. jerseycitycomics.com

Chuck Kerr is the art director at NEW, where he moonlights from his day job as the award-winning art director for the alternative newsweekly the San Antonio Current. chuckkerr.com

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NEW

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PUBLISHER Catherine Hecht checht@jerseycityindependent.com EDITOR Jennifer Weiss editor@jerseycityindependent.com ART DIRECTOR Chuck Kerr STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER Steve Gold GUIDE PHOTOGRAPHER Beth Achenbach CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Melissa Surach

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COVER IMAGE Robert Piersanti

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MAP DESIGNER Jaden Rogers/FinePointDesigns.net SPECIAL THANKS TO The loyal support of all businesses and organizations that encourage and sustain NEW. Advertising support makes NEW possible. Please show your thanks by supporting our advertisers. ABOUT NEW NEW is published four times a year by the Jersey City Independent. No part of this publication may be reproduced without prior written consent.Copyright 2009-2012. We belong to the New Jersey Press Association, New Jersey Hyperlocal News Association, Authentically Local, and the NJ News Co-op.

8 Let the games begin

CONTACT US general info@jerseycityindependent.com to advertise checht@jerseycityindependent.com

It's still early, but the mayor's race is shaping up to be a fight years in the making between two-term mayor Jerramiah Healy and Ward E Councilman Steven Fulop.

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16 Life on the water

Pamela Hepburn is devoted to the tugboat Pegasus, a 100-footlong boat she used to call home — and Jersey City's waterfront.

24 Dog show

The canine population is booming. Meet some of the many people exploring the city leash in hand.

32 Organically grown

Hound About Town owners Elizabeth and Donovan Cain are launching a second business catering to new parents like them.

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FACE OFF The 2013 mayoral race is shaping up to be a grand battle between the old guard and new — and it’s a fight we’ve been watching develop for years. BY MATT HUNGER H PHOTOS BY STEVE GOLD

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lections for a government’s top spot can usher in renewed civic involvement like little else. Or they can give an incumbent the mandate to continue with his or her vision. This is the scenario awaiting voters in May, in what is shaping up to be a showdown between a call for change versus approval for a mayor who has weathered one of the more challenging economies in recent memory. While the mayoral field has been slow to come into focus, it’s starting to look like whatever happens, this race may only have two serious runners. Mayor Jerramiah Healy plans to campaign for a third full term in office since winning a special election in 2004 for an interim job as the city’s top executive. Steven Fulop, not exactly a novice as a second–term Downtown councilman and most vocal politician in town, is viewed nonetheless as the newcomer seeking to be the head man in City Hall.

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With more than $630,000 raised as of the writing of this story, Fulop is approaching the ability to sink anyone who doesn’t have the fund–raising capacity of an incumbent, let alone an as–yet undeclared candidate. While Healy had only raised $100,000 as of the summer, he was able to raise $3 million in 2009, and it’s assumed that his coffers will be filling up any day now despite the conservative fund–raising goals spouted by some close to his campaign. But the fight to run this city extends beyond the heft of opposing war chests to the larger struggle between newer residents and others seeking change and those who would rather maintain the status quo.  HHHHHHHHHHH Fulop has taken to saying he has two opponents, one he’s worried about and the other

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Councilman Steven Fulop at a gathering of supporters of his latest board of education candidates at the barrestaurant LITM in April.

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he’s not: apathy and Healy, respectively. He seems to have assembled a team to beat apathy. Less clear is whether that will be enough to beat Healy. “If voters stay apathetic, that’s the best scenario for Healy,” says Fulop, who acknowledged the mayor has the “institutional base” of active voters on his side. “That’s a losing formula for me.” Voter turnout, aside from 2004, which coincided with a presidential election, where there were 62,641 voters, has been trending downward. Last election, in 2009, there were 30,650 votes cast, or around one–fifth of the number of registered voters in this city of a quarter–million, while in 2005 there were 35,564 votes, and in 2001 37,274.  For all of the criticism you hear at City Council meetings, if voters aren’t voting, they likely aren’t that unhappy. It’s not much of a mandate from the public, but it may be enough to give Healy the distinction of being the longest sitting mayor in 66 years. Which means the election, according to Fulop, will be decided not necessarily by money, but by time and effort, energized voter bases and something more hands–on than radio spots, televised commercials

or sloganeering advertisements. It will be decided, at least in Fulop’s view, by volunteers. And so far, the councilman has more than 450 of them and counting. The campaign has already held a slew of creative fund–raisers to energize young voters — a comedy night, rock concert and wine tasting — as well as big–ticket sessions that can cost up to $2,600 (the maximum donation allowed by state law) to attend. These, as described by Veronica Park, a lead volunteer behind Fulop’s fund–raising efforts, often include a keyboardist performing in the background, art hanging on the walls and locals with money who can bend Fulop’s ear. Some of these people, Park acknowledges, are those who do business in Jersey City but may not live here (similarly, a recent Healy fund– raiser was held at the Essex County Country Club, but no details were made available). Fulop’s team also holds $250–per–person three–course dinners and $100–per–person meetups at residents’ homes throughout the city. A recent home visit in the Heights was of the free–to–attend variety and had a different purpose altogether than its fund–raising equivalent.

While the format is similar — Fulop answers questions, listens to pressing concerns, and explains policy ideas — his goal is to gain active supporters. The money, as Fulop puts it at the event, is “replaceable.” What cannot be replaced, he tells those present, is a volunteer’s time. “It’s the most valuable thing we get,” he says. This type of meet–and–greet happens about five or six times a month, and it’s where the councilman looks to test the pulse of largely apolitical residents who want Fulop to address concerns ranging from garbage to crime to what is going on with a certain bus route. At these meetings he’s been described positively, in part for his wonkish knowledge of the issues, but also at times negatively, as someone whose passion is more to get the job than to do good for the city.  While he talks up the grassroots nature of the campaign — 85 percent of donations to Fulop are $250 or less, and 61 percent are $100 or less — Fulop’s personal bank account is apparently cushioned enough to allow him to quit his job at the wealth management firm Sanford Bernstein to work as a councilman — and campaign — full–time. And he is spending serious

money. So far he’s enlisted big–name campaign consultants Putnam Partners (of Obama’s 2008 campaign fame) and pollsters Global Strategies, who have helped politicians such as Rahm Emanuel when he won Chicago’s mayoral election. A recent poll conducted by the group predicting who else might run for mayor has already informed some pretty big strategic decisions, according to Fulop.  Still, Fulop says his reliance on volunteers goes far beyond the norm — beyond the low–skill jobs like running voter drives and canvassing, he has volunteers working highly skilled jobs such as creating campaign literature and commercials or thinking up fund–raising events. By comparison, a person close to Healy’s campaign acknowledged that the mayor’s volunteers, which he described as “numerous,” are primarily holding down the phones and canvassing efforts. But some of the more expert help on Healy's campaign comes from those deeply rooted in the political scene. For example, Jersey City Corporation Counsel Bill Matsikoudis, who describes himself as a longtime friend of the mayor, first got to know Healy while working on his unsuccessful campaign for mayor in 1997.

Mayor Jerramiah Healy at a May City Council Caucus meeting.

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superintendent and a district veteran.  

Fighting through the off–season

One issue the mayor and Ward E councilman have agreed on is the Spectra gas pipeline approved for construction in Jersey City. Both have spoken out against it.

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Matsikoudis was a law student living with relatives in Greenville at the time. "The mayor started out against the establishment when he ran in '97, when he was the first councilman–at–large to be elected running on a losing mayoral ticket in 2001, even though he literally did not raise one dollar, and he proved he is not beholden to the establishment when he bucked New Jersey's political leaders and became one of the first mayors in the nation to support Obama for President," he wrote in an email. Matsikoudis said he believes Healy will win because "over many years, he has established a reservoir of goodwill and support throughout this entire city, where he has also served as a judge, prosecutor and councilman, in addition to raising four children here, all of whom were educated and live with their families in Jersey City." Still, new volunteers have been signing up every day at Fulop’s website. Not five minutes after I speak with Fulop about his campaign, he forwards me an email from someone who had just signed up to volunteer via his website and was willing to talk to a reporter on Fulop’s behalf. “He’s bucking the establishment,” says the new volunteer, Michelle Edwards, a Ward E resident who moved to Jersey City in 2005. “He’s pro–transparency, he wants to get rid of corruption and he’s promoting affordable housing throughout the city.” Edwards says this will be her first time volunteering for a campaign, something true of most of the Fulop volunteers I spoke with. While amassing Ward E volunteers

was never going to be a challenge, Fulop says a full 70 percent of his volunteers come from the other wards, a figure that couldn’t be confirmed. An energized volunteer base has paid dividends for Fulop, who backed each of the current members of the Board of Education — the last time around, working alongside a new committee, Parents for Progress. Fulop’s trio of candidates easily beat those endorsed by Healy and the powerful teacher’s union. Fulop called the victory evidence of city–wide support. Fulop’s relationship with the board has allowed him to push for change in the struggling school district, which is still under partial state control. He successfully worked toward the ouster of longtime schools superintendent Charles Epps and has spoken positively of incoming superintendent Marcia Lyles, an out–of–towner with the controversial Broad Superintendents Academy on her resume. Some accused Fulop of orchestrating Lyles’ hiring during the search process — Fulop maintained the decision was the board’s alone — and revelations that he had convened a secret meeting between state Department of Education head Chris Cerf, two board members and two board members– elect in May 2011 did not endear him to those eager to have the district out from under the state’s thumb. Healy, mostly quiet during the superintendent search, came out in its final moments in favor of Franklin Walker, the interim

Election season starts early in Jersey City, and getting a head start is vital. If there is an off–season, the city’s self–appointed political watchdogs usually circulate enough truth, rumor and speculation to keep the conversation simmering through what otherwise would be the slow months in between elections. Consider also the political intrigue that has weighed on each council and Board of Education election in recent years, coupled with Ward E Councilman Steve Fulop’s intention to eventually run for mayor written all over his every proposed ordinance or slight of the mayor since 2009.  And while he didn’t end up running that year, Fulop did transfer the remaining $116,486 from his campaign coffers from his city council run to his mayoral fund. Since then, things have been more than a little heated between the mayor and the man who is gunning for his seat, and the accusations — of nepotism and back–room dealing towards the incumbent, of hypocritical politicking and being a “petulant child” towards the challenger — have flown.  An active election conversation is especially true lately — after all, 2013 will see the fifth straight year of city council elections, thanks to extenuating circumstances such as the failing health of one former council member and the criminal indictment of another in the notorious “Operation Bid Rig.” Along with netting former Council President Mariano Vega, the FBI sting took down others who were either working for the city or close to Healy, and who helped raise funds or brought out the vote in Healy’s past campaign, like Leona Beldini, at the time a deputy mayor; Joseph Cardwell, who sat on the city’s municipal utilities authority; Joseph Castagna, formerly the city’s Health Officer; Guy Catrillo, a former mayor’s aide; and Edward Cheatam, a Housing Authority Commissioner who plead guilty for taking bribes and passing them to Healy’s campaign for re–election. Then there was former Hudson County Democratic Organization

operative Jack Shaw, who was charged with illegally accepting money but was found dead in his apartment. The HCDO is seen as politically powerful and likely to back Healy. Healy, of course, was investigated by the FBI but was found to have done nothing wrong. Which makes the fact that the upcoming election will be Healy’s bid to extend his term as mayor to 13 years, making him the longest sitting mayor of New Jersey’s second largest city since Mayor Frank “I am the Law” Hague held the seat for 30 years (1917–1947), even more impressive.  Some think Healy’s biggest political feat was back in 2004, when photographs of him naked and passed out on his porch after drinking one too many couldn’t derail his bid to replace former Mayor Glenn Cunningham who had died of a heart attack in a special election.  But it is clear that Healy has other accomplishments on his resume that give him staying power, having successfully navigated the city through its latest economic crises — the Great Recession and tremendous job loss, a $70 million budget shortfall, and cuts to public services and jobs. That, coupled with his winning streak as a politician – having also won a council at–large seat in 2001 (he lost his first bid for mayor in 1997 in a runoff with Bret Schundler) — makes Healy formidable against anyone trying to unseat him.  What is uncertain is whether he has enough resources to attract a full council team (he had not announced a council slate as of this writing) and bring in new supporters to help get across the finish line the next time around.  Fulop obviously doesn’t think so.  “I expect Jerry to have to raise twice as much money to go as far as the money I raise,” he says. That, he continues, is true despite the “infrastructure” in place of “city employees and workers” who allegedly helped Healy the last time around.  One person close to Healy’s campaign, however, scoffs at the idea that paid workers were coerced into helping out in 2009. “That’s fucking bullshit,” the man says. “There was one lawsuit [against Healy] and the judge threw it out, which shows 15


He’s pro-transparency, he wants to get rid of corruption and he’s promoting affordable housing througHout the city. — MICHELLE EDWARDS, FULOP CAMPAIGN VOLUNTEER

you what that accusation was worth.” Yet in another suit, Mark Russ, the former executive director of the Jersey City Parking Authority, said he was under pressure to refrain from handing out parking tickets the night of the election in order to help Healy “curry favor” with residents. When Russ wouldn’t follow orders he said he was fired, as per the claim in his suit. Healy and JCPA board members denied the claim at the time, but ultimately jointly settled with Russ for $82,500 on the advice of their insurance company (Russ’s suit sought $1 million). The decision to settle was based, as per court documents, the apparent “physical manifestation of emotional distress damage.” Another reason to suspect money might not play as large a role for Healy’s campaign? Ever since a Healy fund–raising effort in February, when the cost of $300 tickets had to be cut in half in order to fill Synaxis in Asbury Park, the mayor’s campaign appears to be laying low. But a person close to the campaign denied it was as embarrassing for Team Healy as it was depicted in the news, and said it is “natural” for ticket prices to events to be cut. In fact, he insisted $10,000 was raised at the event, though he would not provide evidence. “We don’t expect to go out in full force until January of 2013, at the earliest,” he said. The source argued the cost of the election this year will be considerably less. Citing the struggling economy and the strengthened pay–to–play laws, he predicted the campaign to only raise between $750,000 and $1 million, or about a third of four years ago. “The laws are 16

now so strict that no one wants to risk giving money around the time of a campaign,” he said. Healy’s campaign consultants, White Horse Strategies, refused to answer any questions about Healy’s reelection just yet. “We’re raising money, building a staff and considering a council slate that will continue moving Jersey City forward,” was all the group’s founder, Joshua Henne, would say. Lest there be confusion on the issue, further comment from Healy’s campaign was requested multiple times, but they are apparently opting to keep their strategy close to the vest. “In my experience, the candidates who love talking in–depth with reporters — or anyone who will listen — about long–term campaign strategy a year before Election Day are often the candidates whose reasons for running have more to do with their own ego than doing good for the people they seek to serve,” Henne said. And if Healy’s campaign says it has no need to call attention to itself (it could be said that everything the mayor does speaks to his qualifications to be re–elected, or not), Fulop’s campaign stands in stark contrast.

A city’s shifting loyalties

Jersey City is as diverse a city as exists in the world, and a mayor will need to reach most every demographic. And within this city, Fulop’s biggest coup did not come from reaching across ethnic lines, which he has to a large extent already done. Rather, it can be seen with the defection of Healy’s born–and–Jersey City–bred friend and former ally, Shawn “Sully” Thomas.  The grandson of a former Hudson County Clerk and the former owner of Sully’s Tavern (both “friends” of the current administration), Thomas was once the kind of Jersey City native son that might have looked at the Fulops of the world — i.e. the gentrifier–rich kids from out of town — with something close to disdain. In fact, he once did exactly that. “In the beginning it was a concern of mine that he wasn’t a born–and–raised Jersey City guy,” Sully told NEW. “But it actually helped him because people have started to come around to the reality that he is what we need. Unlike

a lot of Jersey City people, he’s not politically jaded, he’s a breath of fresh air for the city.” As a former Irishman of the Year honoree — a distinction, says Thomas, which is a big deal for the Irish Catholic old boys club of Jersey City, of which Healy, Council President Peter Brennan, and Ward D Councilman Bill Gaughan belong — Thomas knows that scene well. So when he used that parade as a platform to announce his change of political teams, it wasn’t far off from a slap in the face to the current administration. In fact, Healy congratulated Thomas on the award shortly before the march since he didn’t yet know Thomas was departing Team Healy for Fulop. This meant a big — and public — surprise. Thomas couldn’t help but laugh at the memory of being on a float in the parade that said “Steve Fulop proudly supports Sully for Irishman of the year.” Healy’s name was nowhere to be seen on the float. “It was a great opportunity for Fulop to make inroads with the residents of Ward D,” Thomas adds. Since then, the two have been hitting the bars to watch ballgames and meet other long–time residents once considered sure votes for Healy. “Meeting Steve was hope at first sight,” says Thomas, who nevertheless is quick to say he has nothing but respect for Healy on a “personal level.” Still, he insists the current administration has “failed the city” in terms of policy. Notably, he talks about the garbage in Ward D, the lack of public services in police presence, and the supposed lack of transparency at the top. For his efforts, Thomas is a Ward leader for Ward D, which means he oversees the 50 or so volunteers that have signed up in that ward. That means helping out at fund–raisers, getting the word out by canvassing, and organizing civic–minded events like garbage pickups. When asked if Thomas was being considered for the Ward D council candidate seat for 2013 — Fulop says he’ll have 9 council candidates on his ticket, one of which will be current At–Large Councilman Rolando Lavarro — Thomas laughed it off. “I like being the behind–the–scenes guy.” On the other hand, at least one former volunteer is now on his ticket. 

Over many years, he has established a reservoir of goodwill and support throughout this entire city. — bill matsikoudis, jersey city corporation counsel

Candice Osbourne, the Downtown Jersey City transplant who will be running on Fulop’s ticket for the seat he now holds in Ward E, says she got involved because she was taken with his attitude on education. Then, when she saw the “grassroots” nature of his campaign, she thought, this is a person who “really understood how to get things done.” The two have worked together since about 2009, when Osbourne, a tech–savvy businesswoman, found in Fulop the politician she says the city needed. She’s since used her experience in promotion to help get the word out, and has been rewarded as the woman pegged to fill Fulop’s seat, should his slate prove successful. All of this comes through an online platform called Basecamp, a project–management application that volunteers are directed to when they sign up on his website (which was put together by Stephen Musgrave, another volunteer on Fulop’s campaign). This allows the campaign to bring volunteers more solidly into the fold and steer them to different action groups where various concerns can be addressed. But with all of this energy in his campaign now, and with the election almost a year away, it begs the question: How will he keep up the momentum? And what happens when Team Healy does finally make its campaign public?  If tension is high now at Council meetings, where already both Fulop and Healy supporters trash each other’s candidates with rumor and innuendo, just wait and see what happens in a few months. Additional reporting by Ricardo Kaulessar 17


Tugging at harbor history

Tugboat Captain Pamela Hepburn is working to preserve her boat, and the area’s maritime past By Matt Hunger Photos by Steve Gold

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It was after a series of bad dreams that Pamela Hepburn made the decision to relocate in a big way. Pamela Hepburn on her boat, navigating the Hudson River.

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She had spent too many sleepless nights in her Manhattan apartment consumed with worry about the major financial decision she’d docked across the river in Jersey City: a historic 100-foot-long steel tugboat called the Pegasus. It was also the only boat in the tugging company she’d started not long before. She would spend long work days on it, hauling ships that often carried oil through the difficult to navigate Upper New York Bay. But at night the dreams were persistent, and left her with little choice but to take the hour-long trip to Jersey City’s waterfront whenever she could to check on the tug. It was 1987, and Hepburn was in her mid-30s, a single mother with a daughter in grade school. She was visiting the boat late at night at a time when the streets of Jersey City’s waterfront neighborhoods were much rougher than they are today, but Hepburn didn’t care. She had to see for herself that no catastrophe had befallen her Pegasus. More than just her livelihood or financial investment, her tug and its business represented the culmination of years spent as someone else’s employee. She’d worked her way up from apprenticing for a family-operated tug operation to a job at Exxon-Mobile to finally heading her own company. And in all those years, she’d seen exactly what could go awry if a boat was left unattended for long.  Hepburn soon decided she was traveling back and forth so much that she

should just move onto the boat with her daughter, Alice. So that’s what she did. The pair lived on the boat for the next 14 years, with Hepburn working from the tug by day while her daughter went to school. They were able to sleep there in part because the Pegasus was docked at what was then called Roderman Shipyard, today’s Liberty Harbor Marina. Employees there realized tenants would give them the added benefit of free overnight surveillance, Hepburn says. The decision to move onto a boat, which offered a modest amount of living space between a handful of rooms, may seem strange to some. The Pegasus has a galley, better known as a kitchen, and a captain’s room, plus an engine room and upper engine fiddley — a boat’s version of a hallway, granting access to the old coal engine. There is also the wheelhouse, a bathroom and boiler room. But Hepburn is one of those rare types who say they feel more comfortable on sea than on land. And so Jersey City’s waterfront — or rather, waters — became her home. In some ways, it was a dream situation. She’d cut down her commute time from Manhattan and almost never had to leave the water. Which is why it was so hard for her recently, a decade after she and her daughter moved off the Pegasus, to move the boat. In April, the boat was relocated — she says forced by circumstances — across the river to Pier 25, where historic boats still take tourists around the harbor. It’s a result, she says, of a fading interest in Jersey City’s historic waterfront and the industries that go with it. When Jersey City’s waterfront has been in the news lately, it has most often been for reasons like high-rise condos and redevelopment plans that aim to turn so-called blighted property into more valuable real estate. The day-today relationship of most Jersey City residents to the nearby water features a level of remove — it’s seen in the 21


Left, the life preserver is imprinted with the boat's new home. Right, the galley, aka kitchen.

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distance from the Light Rail, traveled below via the PATH, or above on the ferry. What residents rarely consider, at least in everyday life, is the water’s significance as a once busy commercial port, or the people who make their livings off it (or on it). Ports are on the fringe of the city’s economy, just as they are on the fringe of its borders, and have all but faded from view in an era where Wall Street’s financial instruments have replaced a harbor’s mechanical ones. For a city once rooted in manufacturing, Jersey City didn’t lose its way so much as favor modern-day, big-city promises such as the idea of Wall Street West. There has been some effort to create new manufacturing jobs recently; Goya Foods announced it would construct a warehouse in the city, but one that’s closer to the highways and rail system than the harbor.  Yet aside from a tour of the harbor in early July, when City Planner Bob Cotter entertained passengers on the Pegasus with the area’s history, Hepburn says there has been little discussion among the city’s planning staff of preserving the harbor as it was before the real estate boom. But there are still ships in the river — from the coast guard’s to ferries to Hepburn’s tug, some new, some practical and others historic like hers. While

the first two are in no danger, the third just doesn’t rank in tough economic times. This is why the tugboat Pegasus is headed to its new home. There’s so much more waterfront on an island as long as Manhattan. It is kind of ironic that for the tug Pegasus and its ties to Jersey City to be remembered, to reach a market that will allow it to work financially, it has to leave.

Formerly known as S.O. Co. No. 16 —

short for Standard Oil Company of New Jersey Boat Number 16 — Hepburn’s tug was a class of boat nicknamed a “battleship tug,” a once indispensable ship on the Hudson’s waters, helping ports up and down New Jersey and New York flourish. At the time, the Standard Oil Company — which would later turn into Exxon — dominated the market, with reports estimating that the company controlled some 80 percent of the nation’s oil market. Which is what S.O. Co. No. 16 spent its early days doing, working the waters to bring in the petroleum necessary to the country’s development. Nearby in Bayonne the company maintained its largest refinery in the country, but tug S.O. Co. No. 16 served numerous ports along New Jersey’s

coast and those in Queens and Brooklyn as well. But this was also the time of toothy antitrust regulation, and Standard’s control of the market became its eventual downfall after it was forced to split up. The boat would trade hands among various shipping companies over the years, changing names as it went. First to SOCONY following the dissolution of Standard, then it was known as the ESSO Tug No. 1, then the John E. McAllister, until finally Hepburn bought the boat in 1987 for $25,000 and decided to dub it Pegasus after the winged horse from Greek mythology.  Hepburn would keep the boat running for 10 years until she retired, at just around its 90th year of existence — though according to the way historic preservation measures boats, the Pegasus was considered just shy of its 50th year. (Preservationists measure the time from the moment the engine was switched from coal to diesel, a major enough change to warrant a re-calculating of history.)  She founded the TugPegasus Preservation Project around the same time, a nonprofit company dedicated to keeping the ship afloat as a a museum of Jersey City’s past now that it is too small to handle the kinds of loads modern tugs haul.  It’s been a 15-year struggle since, she says, but she recently came to terms with the biggest problem. “It’s about exposure,” she explains — and exposure is not what the Pegasus was getting at Morris Canal. Visiting the boat there requires a trek through a muddy dumping ground of spare ship parts at the canal, a hard sell for most, especially likely visitors such as young students. “We need to move or else we’re going to go under,” she said at the time.  The tug Pegasus is not alone in looking to Manhattan’s shores for potentially lucrative exposure to tourists. Two other ships recently moved to Pier 25 as well: a former coast guard boat called the Lilac that was once responsible for the upkeep of lighthouses along the Delaware River, and Clipper City, a replica tall mast sail boat commemorating pre-Civil War ships. The move followed the winter’s off-season, when Hepburn undertook the lengthy and

expensive process of fixing up the ship. This is work that requires finding parts that she often can’t afford, which are often donated by friendly shipowners with spare parts or found luck of the draw at Staten Island’s Arthur Kill Ship Graveyard along the west coast of the borough. When I toured the boat in July, Hepburn was awaiting a replacement generator she’d be acquiring from a friend’s vessel. “It’s a tight-knit community,” she says, as there are only so many small boats in the area. Other repairs on the ship are far less critical to its operation, but keep the vintage aesthetic intact. These can range from installing wood paneling of an appropriate era to adding additional bunks to putting up gating around the boat’s rails for when young children visit. Lately, keeping the tug afloat has meant Hepburn spends more time on land than water, where she is focusing on the nonprofit end of the business. Describing the challenge as a labor of love, albeit an exasperating one, she acknowledges it’s not something her hands-on training on boats has necessarily prepared her for — writing grants, running a business, networking, attracting a largely disinterested public, or convincing a city that it ought to care more about its harbor’s past. There’s been progress, she says, and one great help has been her board of trustees. But she says unless things turn around, there may not be much time left for her fledging nonprofit — and one more piece of Jersey City’s history might be sold off to someone far less dedicated to its preservation.

On July 14th, the Pegasus is back

in Jersey City briefly to pick up passengers for a free trip on the Hudson River. The occasion is the fifth annual City of Water Day, a celebration of the metropolitan area’s relationship to its harbor past and an attempt to draw more visitors to the waterfront. The Pegasus, carrying about 15 passengers and five volunteers, slips in between the waving passengers on the garish high-speed 23


yellow water taxis and white mini-cruise ships, as well as the occasional slow-moving sailboat and New York state police vessel. Hepburn steers the tug — at a speed of about 10 or 11 knots — pretty easily through the mess of boats in a harbor that’s busier than usual because of the event. For a hundred-year-old boat, this ability to stop and start and fit into small berths is pretty impressive — though of course it once did such maneuvers tugging huge ships much bigger than it is. You get a sense of what the water’s past was like when industry depended on ships moving in and out of the dock quickly and efficiently. Along for the ride that gray summer day is Cotter, the city planner, who is giving a tour similar to ones he has given for years. While the passengers get only a short biography of the Pegasus, as told by

Mixed in with the time-period pieces is the occasional anachronistic bit of technology, like the GPS. Hepburn over the boat’s PA system, they get a brush-up on the history of Ellis Island, peg-legged Captain Peter Stuyvesant, and the original colony of Paulus Hook in 1633, which was evacuated when Dutch settlers killed over a hundred Native Americans at the Pavonia Massacre, and under threat of retaliation, were ordered to evacuate. The Pegasus, black-hulled with red metal sidings, was built in 1907 but is in the historic register from the date of its most extensive overhaul in 1953, when the antiquated steam engine was replaced by its current diesel engine. Even though most parts in the ship are older than ‘53 — some wood panelings are original, the stove is from ‘46, the cast-iron rail from 24

the '30s — the retrofitting of an engine is such a drastic change for a boat that, historically speaking, the preservation society essentially considers it reborn. A pastiche of 20th-century equipment, Hepburn keeps it this way purposefully. In fact, although the cast-iron rail is over 70 years old, she only acquired it relatively recently. It is a perfect example of adaptive reuse by necessity, and with a heavy reliance on donations, it’s not as though she can be choosy. Mixed in with the time-period pieces is the occasional anachronistic bit of technology, like the GPS system in the wheelhouse that has become indispensable to modern shipping, even if her boat is only giving passengers tours of the water.  Externally the boat looks its era, which is to say it’s different from other tugs. And that’s not just because Hepburn has jettisoned some of the ship’s unneeded tugging equipment after retiring the boat from its intended purpose and converting it into a floating museum. It really is of a different time, Hepburn says, and that is visibly apparent in the curved steel plates of the hull, which are much different than the squared, mass-produced look of modern tugs today. “It’s almost hand-crafted,” she says of the process used to bend and curve the steel, a process she says shipbuilders don’t bother with anymore. “Now all boats are boxy because it’s quicker to make.” Hepburn, though, wants more than just other mariners to appreciate the uniqueness of the boat and the art of shipbuilding — she wants and needs funding. Fortunately, there has been some support for the boat in the past, such as help from Hudson County Executive Tom DeGise, who found funding for the tug to take the Boys and Girls Club of Jersey City on the Passport-to-the-Hudson trip, a historic tour of the city’s waterways in 2010. There are also occasional grants coming in, explains Hepburn, who writes four to five of them a year to cover expenses, and there’s always something to fix or replace, even if just from the weather’s impact. These

can range from $80,000 to operate in a low-budget year to more than $120,000 when serious repairs are needed. But most grants can only be spent on capital projects, costs associated with the actual restoration of the boat as opposed to its operation and upkeep. Which means her ability to pay her one full-time employee, Glenn Garver, an abstract painter who moonlights as a jack-of-all trades on the boat, is always in question. Garver, she says, does a variety of work on the boat, from fighting off deterioration caused by the weather — repairs he describes as almost always in need of being redone — to repairing woodwork and installing bunks. “Without Glenn,” says Hepburn, “nothing would get done on the ship.” His craftsman’s touch is invaluable on a century-old tug that boasts intricate woodwork people rarely bother with anymore. Compared to a modern boat, which is made from material more resistant to the weather and is less hand-crafted, a historic ship requires upkeep that is not especially cost-efficient. When she runs out of money to pay Garver, she says she will have to wrap things up. “This country doesn’t care about historic preservation like other places,” Hepburn says. And for all of the

money and zoning available to protect historic buildings, the same safety net does not exist for ships, she maintains — or at least not enough of it. Perhaps at some point Jersey City’s waterfront will have space and time for its harbor’s history, but before then, we may end up with more condos. When I talked to Hepburn in July, she was more upbeat. The winter of this year was hard for the Pegasus. “That was a dark period,” said Hepburn. But by April she had finished repairs to the boat and installed a new gangway to help passengers get onboard. With the major work done, it’s just a matter of “cleaning out the boat and working on some maintenance,” she said. “She’s not going to look perfect, but much better.” Hepburn says if it wasn’t for the generosity of Warren George Inc., the group that allowed her to dock free of charge in Jersey City, in particular Tony Tirro who she said harbored the boat since 2006, she would have sold the boat a long time ago. She has also received $10,000 in grant funding from the Hudson River Foundation, which is funding the boat for the fourth straight year. The money, she says, will go towards getting it ready for a coast guard inspection. “Everything is happy,” Hepburn says, which is good news for the waterfront.

Big-money development looms in the backdrop of the Pegasus' former dock in Jersey City.

25


MATCHES MADE IN HEAVEN The dogs of Jersey City, like its people, are a colorful assortment of the world’s possibilities.

TEXT & PHOTOS BY ERIC SCHKRUTZ 26

Connie Zappella with Katy and Bear Breed: German Shepherd Where: Morris Canal Section of Liberty State Park (Colgate Park) Constance “Connie” Zappella, who became Jersey City’s first female fire captain last year, appreciates how her two German shepherds open up the city to her. “Every time I walk my dogs," she says, "I see and learn about Jersey City a little more." She says she becomes more approachable as she walks the streets, dogs in tow. On their walks, she meets all kinds of people, some of whom she never would have talked to “if not for our common bond, the love of our dogs." Not content to just walk Katy and Bear around the block, Connie takes them swimming in the Hudson River. After a dip, the dogs dry off by chasing tennis balls and sometimes, other canines eager for a good romp in the park. 27


Manny Pagan with Max

HERB GLAZERMAN with REBA

Breed: Pit Bull Where: Lincoln Park

Breed: Redtick Coonhound Where: Hamilton Park

When a friend of Manny's niece was in the end stages of colon cancer, he adopted Max from the ASPCA for companionship. The man passed away in the spring, and Max found a new home with Manny. I met the pair walking around the pond in Lincoln Park as the sun was setting. They often walk outside the park instead because Manny worries other dog owners will worry Max is aggressive because he’s a pit bull. (He’s the opposite.)

Herb Glazerman enjoys bringing his beloved Reba to dog parks throughout Jersey City. While she has the chance to run wildly off the chain if she wants, the redtick coonhound prefers to find a shady spot and chill out. Herb suspects Reba’s relaxed demeanor is the reason she did not become a hunting dog, the main function of her breed, and was instead left as a rescue dog. He’s not complaining: since he adopted Reba from a Long Island shelter in 2010, the two have been inseparable.

Steve Kaplan with Ozzy and Feebie Breed: Rhodesian Ridgeback Where: Van Vorst Park Steve Kaplan is not only the master at Jersey City’s Cobra Fencing Club, he is also the master of two seriously large dogs, Ozzy and Feebie. Ozzy is about the size of a small adult, but with the added effect of his bark, quite a bit mightier. Feebie is a bit mellower. These two Rhodesian ridgebacks can be found around the Van Vorst Park neighborhood. But don’t expect to see both together; Kaplan walks them separately to prevent them from causing a ruckus. 28

29


Julien Capestan with Ely Breed: Flat-Coated Retriever Where: Liberty State Park In Liberty State Park, as the sun is just slipping below the horizon, Julien Capestan comes running down a gravel path with Ely, a female black flatcoated retriever. Neither seem to mind stopping for a photo, adequately winded from their exercise. Julien, originally from France, has called Downtown Jersey City home for the last year and a half.

Jonathan Carrillo with Dexter Breed: Labrador Retriever Where: Washington Park Jonathan Carrillo, a recent law school graduate, has a special relationship with his dog Dexter. When not contemplating existential concerns or studying for the bar exam, Jonathan and Dexter explore the Heights, looking for the ideal location to let time pass. Jersey City is a far cry from the Upstate New York farm Dexter used to call home, but his owner says the new habitat suits him. “My dog is more than just a pet that I love and have fun with,” Jonathan says. “Dexter is inextricably connected to the universe in a way that I admire and desire, and I think the human would do well to learn from him and his four-legged friends.”

Katie Thompson with Gunner Breed: German Shorthaired Pointer Where: Hamilton Park Katie Thompson and Gunner are impressive fetch competitors. Katie throws the tennis ball to the fence of the dog run in Hamilton Park. Gunner starts towards the ball, but Katie yells “Stop!” Gunner, with amazing composure, stands completely still, staring at the ball in the distance. “Go!” Katie finally says, after what must seem like a torturous wait, and Gunner is off, kicking up dusty earth as he goes. 31


Jahz with Damu Breed: Pit Bull Where: Jersey City’s West Side Jahz brought Damu home on somewhat of a whim not too long ago. Lucky for Jahz (and Damu), his family fell for the young pit bull. This disproves the notion that pits are vicious animals. Damu is a sweetheart with a big tongue who will not hesitate to lick those who come near. With his silky blue coat, he is hard to resist.

Manny Duran with Rico Breed: Yorkie Where: Pershing Field Manny Duran enjoys walking her 4-year-old Yorkie, Rico, around Pershing Field. As he gets his exercise, so does she. Manny chose the name Rico in part because she’s Hispanic, she says. “I was trying to find a cute, suitable name that my whole family could pronounce without any trouble.” There is seldom a dull moment on Central Avenue in the afternoon; Rico adds to the scene as he soaks up the atmosphere.

Nicole Imthurn with Fargo (white) and Beulah (black) Breed: Fargo is a Border Collie-Dalmation, Beulah is a Border Collie-German Shorthaired Pointer Where: Washington Park Few how-I-got-my-dog stories compare to how Nicole Imthurn came to own Fargo. While driving in Whatcom County, Washington, where she was living at the time, Nicole spotted a dog wandering on the side of the freeway. She pulled over, put the animal into her Subaru station wagon and sent out notices to nearby shelters. Nicole lived on a sheep farm, and she’d noticed how adept the dog was at herding the animals. She had a hunch that this was an important dog to somebody. After three weeks she finally made contact with the owners, who lived 50 miles away in Canada. The owners offered a cash reward but Nicole asked if she could have a puppy instead. She got just what she wanted when the owners gave her Fargo, whose mother was the dog Nicole had rescued. Fargo joins Beulah, a border collie-German shorthaired pointer mix Imthurn rescued from a shelter in Washington. “The only reason I have any friends at all is because I step out with these dogs,” Imthurn says halfjokingly. “They’ve helped me become part of the community.” Other dog owners will often recognize her not by her face, but by her dogs — “a strange dog phenomenon,” she notes. 32

33


Entrepreneurs

about town Elizabeth and Donovan Cain Start a Family While Growing a Business

by Jennifer Weiss Photos by Mickey Mathis

W

Elizabeth and Donovan Cain with their son, Landon, in Hound About Town's Hamilton Park store.

hen you know, you know. For Elizabeth Cain, this rock-solid certainty came when she met both her husband and her dog. She found her dog first — Cain spotted Wiley, a hound, in the summer of 2002 in a North Shore Animal League trailer and adopted him the same day. She had moved to Jersey City six months before and was 23 and still learning the place. Walking Wiley forced her to get out, meet people and explore the local parks. "It was a nice way to get to know the community," she says. She met her husband, Donovan Cain, through Jersey City's music scene. Donovan, who spent much of his career working in radio, moved here from Philly in 2006 to play bass for the rock band the Milwaukees. Elizabeth and her friends were regulars at their shows. 35


1 1. Some of the offerings in Hound About Town's Hamilton Park location. 2 and 3. Dogs wait outside the store when it is closed.

2

Hound About Town 218 Montgomery Street 201 721 5532

17 McWilliams Place 201 918 5557

houndabouttownjc.com

36

Dog photos courtesy Hound About Town

3

Flash forward, and three of the four band members are married to women from this group of friends. With four young kids among them, including the Cains' infant son, Landon, and a set of twins due in the fall, the running joke is that a new band is coming soon: the Milwauquitos. As Elizabeth walked Wiley over the years, she noticed the dog population Downtown was on the rise. And after Fetch-It Pet Supplies closed, there were few pet shops within an easy walking distance. Seeing a need, she and Donovan opened their specialty pet store Hound About Town in 2011. The Montgomery Street location came first that April, replacing Antheia when the florist moved to a larger space in the Hamilton Square development on Hamilton Park. Then the Cains opened their own larger shop in Hamilton Square, while Elizabeth was pregnant. "It's been a busy year," Donovan says. Elizabeth has for years worked for Eric and Paul Silverman, the developers of Hamilton Square. While Hound About Town is self-funded, the Silvermans provided help and funding for the build-out of the Hamilton Park store. Other local business owners have offered assistance too, from cross-promotions and advice to manning the register in a pinch. "It takes a village," Donovan says. "We all support each other." The community aspect is one of the things they like most about running the business. Another is the short commute from their home Downtown, which allows them more time with their son. A former executive director of the Historic Downtown Special Improvement District, Elizabeth is well-versed in the local and organic-food movement; initiatives during her time in that job included Restaurant Row and the Farmers' Market. Hound About Town is among the local businesses around the country bringing the natural and organic-food movement from people's plates to the bowls of dogs and

cats. Offering foods from companies such as Fromm, the Honest Kitchen and Primal Pet Foods, it gives owners options free of the animal byproducts and artificial ingredients used in many mainstream brands, with all the food sourced and made in the U.S. Wiley, now 10, is a key taste tester; Elizabeth and Donovan have nixed products more than once based on his reaction. The neighborhood's dogs have provided invaluable help in other ways. Keith Myers, in the Hamilton Park store recently with his two kids and Weimaraner, Bloomy, said he can't pass Hound About Town without coming in. "We were there at the corner and she started whining," Myers says of Bloomy. "She knows where she wants to go." As other dog-centric businesses have opened Downtown, pet owners can also board, train and groom their dogs without going far. But the Cains have noticed another burgeoning population recently: babies. They decided to open a baby store, Hazel Baby, inside their Hamilton Park location. The store is named after Elizabeth's great-grandmother. Within about 200 square feet — about the size of the Montgomery Street store — it will offer a curated mix of gear, strollers (hoisted up off the ground), and natural and organic products to new and expecting parents. As of press time, it was scheduled to open soon. Elizabeth has grown more excited about Hazel Baby as she goes to trade shows, deciding on products for her family along the way. "I can't wait to get cribs and strollers," she says with a grin, "because we need them." That's one of the perks of a local business like this, in an age when everything can be bought online: the ability to walk in and talk to people who have their own dog and baby and have done a great deal of research. And, as dogs will attest, easy access to treats. 37


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18 < 10TH ST

BE SURE TO use your smartphone to SCAN THE GUIDE'S QR CODES FOR some EXCLUSIVE DEALS from our advertisers! PAID FOR BY OR IN PART BY THE NJ URBAN ENTERPRISE ZONE PROGRAM

ADVERTISER DIRECTORY

Liberty State Park

1. 172 Newark p. 56 2. 2 Stix & A String p. 55 3. Another Man's Treasure p. 55 4. Art House Productions p. 52 5. Au Capoeira p. 54 6. Barcade p. 6 7. Basic Builders p. 47 8. Bigdrum Art & Framing p. 53 9. Bubby's Burritos p. 40 10. Complete Physical Rehabilitation p. 48 11. Curious Matter p. 53 12. Delenio p. 44 13. Gallerie Hudson p. 47 14. Groomingdales Pet Salon p. 55 15. Grove Street Bicycles p. 54 16. Grove Street Farmers Market p. 4 17. Hamilton Health & Fitness p. 49 18. The Hamilton Inn p. 41 19. Hamilton Square Back Cover 20. Hard Grove Cafe p. 40 21. Hazel Baby p. 55 22. Hound About Town p. 50 23. Hudson County Art Supply p. 53 24. Hudson Pride Connections Center p. 56 25. The Iron Monkey p. 39 26. Jersey City Art School p. 53 27. Jersey City Children's Theater p. 50 28. Jersey City Medical Center p. 1 29. Jersey City Tattoo Co. p. 56 30. Kanibal Home p. 55 31. Light Horse Tavern p. 43 32. LITM p. 44

33. Made with Love 34. Maritime Parc 35. Nimbus Dance Works 36. Project Pilates 37. Red Feast Wine & Liquors 38. Rustique Pizza 39. Shampoo JC Hair Salon 40. Skinner's Loft 41. Steam Cafe 42. Super Impact Fitness 43. Tousled Hair Salon 44. The Warehouse Cafe

p. 42 p. 38 p. 51 p. 49 p. 44 p. 42 p. 46 p. 45 p. 42 p. 48 p. 46 p. 6

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39


FALL 2012

JERSEY CITY GUIDE

MARITIME PARC

THE IRON MONKEY

84 AUDREY ZAPP DRIVE JERSEY CITY 07305 T 201 413 0050 maritimeparc.com

99 GREENE STREET JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 435 5756 ironmonkey.com

Maritime Parc is the perfect summer destination for a quick evening escape or a weekend day-cation. Located in Liberty State Park, Maritime Parc welcomes guests from both sides of the Hudson to enjoy its scenic splendor and distinct brand of hospitality. Executive chef/owner Chris Siversen turns out seasonally inspired menus that spin local and sustainable ingredients into crowd-pleasing dishes.

Founded 16 years ago by Stephen McIntyre, The Iron Monkey quickly became a favorite place for Jersey City residents to eat and drink. Today, The Iron Monkey offers casual, modern American cuisine with three floors for eating and drinking. The main bar has a wonderful traditional pub feel. The second floor offers an elegant, yet vibrant, dining experience that is perfect for dinner with friends or corporate parties. The Iron Monkey also boasts the only rooftop in Jersey City with dining and a full bar.

Visit Maritime Parc's gorgeous patio â&#x20AC;&#x201D; featuring views of the Manhattan skyline, Jersey City and the Hudson River â&#x20AC;&#x201D; for the restaurant's famous Thursday night $20 Oyster & Burger Bash, or while away an afternoon over Sunday Brunch.

In addition to having the most unique space in Jersey City, The Iron Monkey has been a longtime proponent of the craft beer movement. With 39 taps devoted to craft beer and a bottle list that numbers well over 300 bottles, The Iron Monkey ranks among the elite destination beer bars in the Northeast.

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JERSEY CITY GUIDE

FALL 2012

HARD GROVE CAFE 319 GROVE STREET JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 451 1853 hardgrovecafe.com Take one step inside this artsy Downtown restaurant and you'll know that you’re in for an entertaining evening. Latin music and Cuban mojitos set the tone for a South Beach-like party atmosphere, while authentic Cuban food choices are available — from Hemingway churrasco steak to shrimp with garlic sauce to the classic Cuban shredded beef. The Hard Grove Cafe has expanded its menu to include vegetarian selections with a Latin emphasis, like vegetarian lemon salsa chicken. On Tuesdays and Wednesdays, check out the allyou-can-eat Latin mango-pineapple BBQ chicken, ribs or pulled pork with prices starting at $9.99. The cafe offers brunch on weekends, and features selections like mixed berry pancakes, breakfast quesadillas and huevos rancheros — not to mention bottomless bloody marys and mimosas. Stop by the Hard Grove and enjoy a magnificent experience.

BUBBY's BURRITOS 440 JERSEY AVENUE JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 333 1550 bubbysburritos.com Bubby's Burritos is a cozy Downtown California-Mexican eatery which prides itself on providing fresh, natural, lard-free ingredients in all its dishes. Its homemade corn tamales, nachos, burritos, tacos and quesadillas are oil-free and never too hot or spicy, while its salsas, guacamole and chili are handmade fresh on a daily basis with onions, cilantro and natural ingredients. Bubby's offers delivery throughout Jersey City and Hoboken.

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THE HAMILTON INN 708 JERSEY AVENUE JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 839 5818 hamiltoninnjc.com The Hamilton Inn is a welcome revival within the Downtown Jersey City community. Nestled on the corner of 10th Street and Jersey Avenue, a block from Hamilton Park, the Inn's cozy, classic atmosphere invites guests to dine indoors or out on a well-rounded menu that features organic meats and local produce, and ranges from truffled egg pizza to signature East LA fish tacos. Or, enjoy an Inn Burger at the bar, where you can also find a nightly happy hour, signature cocktails, assorted craft beers, and an impressive list of fine yet affordable wines. With its kitchen open until 1 am on the weekends, a not-to-miss brunch experience featuring $4 cocktails, and weekly specials that include Tacos & Trivia Tuesdays, Half-Priced Cocktails Wednesdays, Endless Happy Hour Thursdays, and Wine-Down Sundays, The Hamilton Inn's friendly staff is not the only reason to visit this bustling neighborhood fixture.

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JERSEY CITY GUIDE

FALL 2012

MADE WITH LOVE 530 JERSEY AVENUE JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 451 5199 madewithloveorganics.com With artisanal breads, empanadas, quiches, cookies, pies and cakes made with organic ingredients, Made with Love is Jersey City's destination for sweet and savory baked goods. Now there's more to love: daily lunch, weekend brunch, communal dinners, art receptions, cooking/ baking classes and children's parties.

STEAM CAFE 276 NEWARK AVENUE JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 706 2489 steamcafe-jc.com Steam Cafe features TM Ward Ethiopian blend coffee and espresso, loose leaf tea, croissants and breads that are baked daily, and handmade bagels from Wonder Bagels. It also offers signature sandwiches, homemade muffins, sweets from Sassy Sweet Treats and Willow & Olivia Creations, as well as many other daily surprises.

RUSTIQUE PIZZA 611 JERSEY AVENUE JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 222 6886 rustiquepizza.com Rustique serves killer brick oven pizza alongside delicious comfort Italian cuisine and homemade desserts. All bread and mozzarella cheese are made fresh in house elevating the menu items above and beyond the usual. Stop by to meet the Rosiello family in the dining room or take advantage of take out or free delivery!

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PAID FOR BY OR IN PART BY THE NJ URBAN ENTERPRISE ZONE PROGRAM

LIGHT HORSE TAVERN 199 WASHINGTON STREET JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 946 2028 lighthorsetavern.com Opened in 2002, this local favorite has become an institution. Light Horse Tavern has a new young chef, Carlos Ortega, who brings a new exciting vision to the Jersey City culinary scene. The chef's philosophy is to source seasonal ingredients and to preserve the integrity of the product when cooking. The seasonal menu always includes a variety of fresh oysters and clams, as well as lighter fare such as grilled octopus salad, or heartier favorites like organic ale-braised rabbit with fresh garganelli pasta and green olives. Whether settling in at the bar for a pint or indulging in the spectacular cuisine, you are sure to become addicted to the experience. Check the website for special events including live jazz, a Wednesday seasonal farmers market tasting menu, and wine tastings. Visit any day for lunch, weekend days for brunch, and always for exquisite food, people watching and pristine outdoor seating.

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JERSEY CITY GUIDE

FALL 2012

DELENIO 357 7TH STREET JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 798 9539 deleniojc.com Delenio offers Italian cuisine and homemade favorites by Chef Peter Stella. The food, reminiscent of grandma’s kitchen, includes dinner entrees, salads, pizza, and more. Online ordering is available & Delenio’s seasonal outdoor dining area seats ten. Coming along with friends & family and bring your favorite bottle of wine.

LITM 140 NEWARK AVENUE JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 536 5557 litm.com Every day is new and exciting at LITM. The popular destination is a restaurant, bar & art gallery known for its creative, seasonal cocktails, extensive beer list, happy hour specials, modern American food and monthly art shows. Judges' Choice winner of the 2010 + 2011 4th Street Mac & Cheese Cookoff and People's Choice winner of the 2012 Chili Cookoff.

RED FEAST WINE & LIQUORS 129 COLUMBUS DRIVE JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 333 3360 Red Feast features a large selection of wines from around the world plus imported, domestic and craft beers. Its owners are also open to customer suggestions, so let them know if there is something you would like added to the inventory. Free delivery to Downtown Jersey City, including The Village, Newport, Exchange Place and Paulus Hook ($30 minimum order).

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PAID FOR BY OR IN PART BY THE NJ URBAN ENTERPRISE ZONE PROGRAM

SKINNER'S LOFT 146 NEWARK AVENUE JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 915 0600 skinnersloft.com

Skinner's Loft is an elegant yet casual, upbeat bistro-style restaurant. It features an eclectic menu of deliciously seasoned small plates and entrees, as well as tried and true comfort food, like a juicy burger. There are extensive beer, wine and liquor lists to accommodate those seeking the usual as well as satisfy the adventurous. The handcrafted bar is adorned with a copper ceiling and antique Italian tiled floor, with the loft space upstairs housing a beautiful, but comfortable, dining room. In the summertime, Skinner's Loft offers dining in the rooftop garden, serves specials daily, and features carefully made cocktails using fresh squeezed juices, house-made syrups, and house-infused liquors. Visit Skinner's Loft for lunch Tuesday through Friday, brunch on the weekends, and dinner until 11 every night.

PAID FOR BY OR IN PART BY THE NJ URBAN ENTERPRISE ZONE PROGRAM

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JERSEY CITY GUIDE

FALL 2012

SHAMPOO JC HAIR SALON

GALLERIE HUDSON

107 COLUMBUS DRIVE JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 395 0045 shampoojc.com

197 NEWARK AVENUE JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 434 1010

Shampoo JC Hair Salon is one of the most unique hair salons in Jersey City, inspired by decades of art, music and fashion. Whether you desire a hairstyle that's modern, classic, mod, sophisticated or bohemian, Shampoo JC's stylists will use their extensive artistic abilities to give you exactly what you want.

TOUSLED HAIR SALON 500-A JERSEY AVENUE JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 309 1200 mytousledhair.com There are good stylists who show up to work, and there are exceptional stylists who show up to create. Enjoy an Aveda aromatic stress-relieving treatment and comforting tea with your hair cut. This Downtown salon also offers teeth whitening sessions to accentuate one of your greatest features ... your smile (scan the QR code for a special discount).

Gallerie Hudson now also offers digital photo restoration (see before and after pictures at right), as well as large-format photo and fine art printing. Hours: Tuesday through Friday 11 am-7 pm and Saturday 10 am-6 pm.

VIDERE DECORATIVE ARTS

BASIC BUILDERS

CITY WIDE | JERSEY CITY T 201 370 6771 andreamckenna.com

21 EMORY STREET JERSEY CITY 07304 T 201 433 7358 basicbuilders.com

Tired of white walls? Let Videre Decorative Arts transform your home with a beautiful upgrade. Offering classic and innovative custom faux finishes for walls, ceilings and furniture. Original and custom art also available. With 12 years experience, Videre Decorative Arts is owned and operated by local artist Andrea Mckenna. Estimates are always free!

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Gallerie Hudson goes beyond just ordinary framing. In addition to creating awardwinning designs, it offers conservation and restoration services and expert advice on how to properly preserve and showcase your art. Also featured in the gallery are original works of art by local artists and artists from around the world. Gallerie Hudson has thousands of choices in frames, from hand-crafted Italian mouldings to contemporary American hardwoods. Whether you need to frame a family photograph or a Picasso original, this is the place to go. Gallerie Hudson is fully insured and guarantees the quality of its workmanship.

PAID FOR BY OR IN PART BY THE NJ URBAN ENTERPRISE ZONE PROGRAM

Jersey City's premier kitchen engineers, Peter and Lissa Welles will design and remodel your kitchen with amazing creativity and enthusiasm. Their backgrounds in mechanical engineering and architecture will allow you to experience contracting at a whole new level. Stylish kitchens with tight budgets are Basic Builders' specialty.

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JERSEY CITY GUIDE

FALL 2012

COMPLETE PHYSICAL REHABILITATION

HAMILTON HEALTH & FITNESS

75 MONTGOMERY STREET SUITE 502 JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 433 6001 cprnj.com

161 ERIE STREET JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 714 7600 hamiltonhealthfitness.com

Since 2007, Complete Physical Rehabilitation has provided one-on-one physical therapy services specializing in vestibular (dizziness) rehabilitation and sports physical therapy, with the goal of helping clients return to active daily lifestyles. In addition to PT, it also offers acupuncture services, and hosts various weight loss and wellness seminars.

JCF BOOT CAMP CITYWIDE | JERSEY CITY T 201 484 7848 jcfbootcamp.com Daris Wilson started JCF Boot Camp in 2008 to give women an effective alternative to pricey personal training sessions and traditional gym settings, where the bulky equipment can be intimidating. The four-week program for women of all ages and fitness levels is designed to challenge your fitness level.

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Located inside Hamilton Square, Hamilton Health & Fitness combines the latest innovations with a spa-like setting. Taking its cue from the natural beauty of historic Hamilton Park, HHF is light, airy, green and natural. Large thermal windows flood the space with light, while natural stone and wood finishes accompany the most advanced cardio and weight-training equipment. In addition to an innovative, cutting-edge nutrition program, integrated amenities complete the experience for body and mind. HHF features an indoor lap pool, sauna and steam rooms, children’s room, group fitness classes and a fully equipped Pilates studio directed by Project Pilates. Group fitness classes include Pilates mat/tower/reformer, zumba, indoor cycling, intenSati, boot camp, kettlebell, yoga, water workout, and learn-to-swim classes. HHF offers the most holistic health and fitness experience in Jersey City.

SUPER IMPACT FITNESS STUDIO

PROJECT PILATES

650 MONTGOMERY STREET JERSEY CITY 07306 T 201 763 6617 superimpactfitness.com

161 ERIE STREET JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 HEALTHY (432 5849) projectpilates.com

Super Impact Fitness offers yoga, zumba, spin classes, and personal training. Super Impact’s XtremeFit circuits are 50 minutes of high intensity, fat burning, muscle toning and body shaping exercises designed to challenge every part of your body including your mind. Other services include Holistic Health & Wellness Coaching.

Pilates is great for muscle stamina, strength, flexibility, mental clarity, health, wellness and awareness. Project Pilates offers a variety of classes to fit any budget including private and semi-private sessions, group tower, group reformer and group mat classes. The studio specializes in pre-/postnatal Pilates and injury prevention and recovery.

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FALL 2012

JERSEY CITY GUIDE

JERSEY CITY CHILDREN'S THEATER

NIMBUS DANCE WORKS

83 WAYNE STREET (IN THE BARROW MANSION) JERSEY CITY 07302 T 917 363 7429 jcchildrenstheater.org

83 WAYNE STREET, SUITE #205 (IN THE BARROW MANSION) JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 377 0718 nimbusdanceworks.org

Jersey City Children's Theater (JCCT) celebrates the art of play and the diverse tapestry that is Jersey City. Through its unique and original curriculum of storytelling, play-making, and theater games, children will discover new ways to express themselves and explore the world around them—and have great fun doing it! JCCT offers in-house classes, school residencies, after-school programs, and birthday parties for children 3 to 13 years old.

Nimbus Dance Works presents world class dance in Jersey City and on tour nationally. Nimbus’s Spring Season showcases extraordinary, cutting-edge dance while the company’s Jersey City Nutcracker is one of Jersey City’s most popular theatrical events each year. Nimbus’s performances and educational programs in the Jersey City Public schools, senior centers and other communities serve over 6,000 people each year.

Visit JCCT's website today to find out more about birthday party packages, a list of fall and winter classes at your child's school or on location in our studio!

In Fall 2012, Nimbus launches The School of Nimbus Dance Works, offering top-quality training in Ballet and Modern Dance. The school emphasizes small classes, excellent instruction, and opportunities for students to work with the professional company. Visit the Nimbus Dance Works website for information about performances, the school and class schedules. Classes begin in mid-September. Photos: Otero/Seclen Photography & Chi Modu

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HOUND ABOUT TOWN

THE NORVILLES

218 MONTGOMERY STREET JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 721 5532 houndabouttownjc.com

CITYWIDE | JERSEY CITY T 201 936 9153 E info@thenorvilles.com thenorvilles.com

You live a stylish urban lifestyle — your pet should too! At Hound About Town, convenience meets community. These cozy boutiques focus on eco-friendly, locally made apparel and accessories, as well as optimal, sustainable nutrition choices for your pet. Second location at Hamilton Square (17 McWilliams Place — 201 918 5557).

The Norvilles offer daily doggie playgroups. Your dog will be picked up to play for an hour with friends from the neighborhood in a private playground located in downtown Jersey City and dropped off at home afterwards to take a well-deserved nap. Your pooch will love spending time at The Norvilles!

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JERSEY CITY GUIDE

ART HOUSE PRODUCTIONS 1 MCWILLIAMS PLACE 6TH FLOOR JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 915 9911 arthouseproductions.org For over a decade, Art House Productions has been bringing Jersey City the very best visual and performing arts entertainment. Join Art House for an exciting kickoff to their 12th season this Fall. In September 2012, Art House will present the SO-LOW Theater Festival, featuring a powerful lineup of one-person shows at extremely low ticket prices. In November, Art House and Insurgo present the Third Annual Your Move Modern Dance Festival and in December, Art House’s STAGES! Theater Company for Youth will present the beloved musical Annie, Jr. Visit the Art House website to register for adult and childrens’ classes, and to find out about upcoming art exhibitions, concerts, film screenings, and plays!

Custom Framing Framed Art Celebrating 18 Years in Business

Open 7 Days a Week in Jersey City’s Powerhouse Arts District 201-418-8771 BIGDRUM ART & FRAMING Whether the job is big or small, Bigdrum prides itself on quality workmanship and attention to detail. 201 418 8771 | 127 1st St. | bigdrumart.com

“[T]he most intellectually rigorous shows in the area.” –CityArts

Photo: Peter Richter

C U R I OUS M AT TE R

JC FRIDAYS CITYWIDE | JERSEY CITY T 201 915 9911 jcfridays.com Art House Productions presents JC Fridays, a quarterly festival held throughout Jersey City at the start of every season. Local businesses and arts organizations join together to celebrate art and culture with a wide range of free events for the public. Next dates: September 7, December 7, March 1.

HUDSON COUNTY ART SUPPLY Get student discounts on supplies, and huge canvas & studio furniture discounts at Hudson County Art Supply's two locations. hudcoart.com

CATHERINE WALKER VOCAL STUDIO Broadway singer & actress now accepting students in Jersey City. Learn proper vocal technique and many singing styles. All ages and levels welcome! 917 216 8922 | catherinewalker.biz

CURIOUS MATTER Independent, not-for-profit, contemporary art exhibitions & publications. For more information or to make a donation visit: curiousmatter.org. curiousmatter.org.

VIOLIN & VIOLA LESSONS WITH MELINDA HIRSCH-ROBINSON

JERSEY CITY ART SCHOOL Courses include painting, sculpture, jewelry making, digital photography and kids classes. Figure Drawing every Wednesday. 326 5th St. | jcartschool.com

Photo: Laura DeSantis-Olsson

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Professional violist with over 15 years teaching experience. All ages and levels. First lesson is half price with ad. Call today! 917 771 8063 | mhrmusic.com


Free 90 day Layaway Plan for Bicycle Purchases. Select in Stock Bicycles on Sale (while supplies last) Bring this Ad in and recieve: 10% Off Any In Stock accessory or clothing item. This discount can be combined with other specials! Vist our Website for Coupons and Specials

PROFESSIONAL REPAIRS ON ALL BRANDS OPEN 7 DAYS • 3.5% SALES TAX (Excluding Labor) www.grovestreetbicycles.com

365 Grove Street Jersey City, N.J. 07302

(201) 451-BIKE

Paid for in part by the NJ urban enterprise zone program

AU CAPOEIRA Classes for adults & children in the Brazilian art form that combines dance, acrobatics and self-defense. 54 Coles St. | 908 432 2405 | aucapoeira.com

GROVE STREET BICYCLES This full-service shop carries bikes for the entire family and offers lifetime service with every new bike purchase. grovestreetbicycles.com

HAZEL BABY This family owned boutique has everything you need to make baby's world happy, healthy and safe. 201 918 5557 | 17 McWilliams Place | hazelbabystore.com

ANOTHER MAN'S TREASURE Affordable vintage fashions and accessories for men & women, on trend picks, seasonal styles, hundreds of new items weekly! 201 860 9990 | amtvintage.com

MICHELLE TIMEK YOGA On-site outdoor/indoor vinyasa, pre/postnatal & restorative classes. Private, semi-private & group sessions. All are welcome! michelletimekyoga.com

DI=VA LIFE COACHING Life Coaching with Yaromil Fong-Olivares certified life coach, Reiki healer & personal trainer. Mention NEW and receive 25% off 3-month package. Schedule your free consultation: yaromilolivares.com

DIAPERS & DUMBBELLS The preeminent source for mommy fitness where mothers are empowered to reclaim their bodies, bond with their baby and renew their beauty. 201 243 7585 | diapersanddumbbells.com

KANIBAL HOME Offering a range of refurbished furniture, found objects, vintage dishware and plenty of new home goods, apparel and gift items. 551 200 9386 | kanibalhome.com

QI FOR WELLNESS WITH JANINE BERGER-GILLET Certified Wu Ming Qigong instructor of the Dragon’s Way & Wu Ming Qigong for Breast Health. For more information and a class schedule: qiforwellness.com.

FLORYOGA.COM Yoga, personal training & wellness delivered to your door. Yoga Alliance accredited teacher trainings and pre-/post-natal yoga teacher training. 866 333 YOGA

GROOMINGDALES PET SALON Professional, courteous pet styling with comfort as the first priority. Only all-natural products used. 201 659 5559 | 351 2nd St. | groomingdalesnj.com

2 STIX AND A STRING Offers a variety of yarns from fabulously funky to worldwide imports. For classes and events visit their website. 201 435 5408 | 234 ½ York St. | 2stixandastring.com


ON THE COVER Robert Piersanti is best known for his bold portraits of pinups, young women showing off their assets and expressive faces against backdrops flecked with pop, rock and retro imagery. He shoots photos of his mostly local models and then paints from the photos in his sunsoaked top-floor loft in the Wells Fargo building near Hamilton Park.

After spending the last few years mananging the

His show "Model Citizen" opened June 5 at LITM and included something unusual for the artist: portraits of men. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A lot of people would ask me, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;How come you never paint guys?'" Piersanti told the Jersey City Independent's Summer Dawn Hortillosa, who previewed the show. Using candid photos he's shot at art openings and other events as a guide, Piersanti created a small series of portraits of men in his signature style, but with less skin showing.

Gull's Cove sales office, Natalie Miniard is back at home at Liberty Realty.

Inspired by this new direction, NEW asked Piersanti to paint a portrait of Jersey City's mayor, Jerramiah Healy, and top mayoral candidate Steven Fulop, the Ward E Councilman, as the two prepare to fight it out for the mayor's seat this spring. While it's still early and anything could happen, this is a political battle that's been years in the making. Piersanti chose to focus on Healy and Fulop's faces only, putting them against a backdrop of an American flag. NATALIE MINIARD, SALES ASSOCIATE With 10+ years of experience in Jersey City, Natalie can handle all your real estate needs. 201 610 1010 | 800 620 2240 | nminiard@libertyrealestate.com

UPTOWN CREW Presenting an open mic on the 4th Thursday of each month, readings and theatrical productions, and a teen program. 917 536 2682 | uptowncrew.org

172 NEWARK You live Downtown. You shop Downtown. Now work Downtown. Offering cowork desk rentals for creative professionals, near the Grove PATH. jgsrealty.com

HUDSON PRIDE CONNECTIONS CENTER This full-service LGBT community center has programs for LGBT youth, seniors & everyone in between. 201 963 4779 | 32 Jones St. | hudsonpride.org

JERSEY CITY TATTOO CO. The best place in Jersey City for custom tattoos. Open 7 days a week; walk-ins welcome. 201 360 0139 | 253 Newark Ave. | jerseycitytattoo.com

JERSEY CITY CRAFT MAFIA Providing handmade businesses with opportunities to network with artists and to organize selling, networking and educational events. jccraftmafia.com

COMIC

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A HOME YOU’LL LOVE LIVING IN.

HAMILTON SQUARE LOFT PHOTOGRAPHY: EVAN JOSEPH

A LIFESTYLE YOU’LL LOVE LIVING.

Hamilton Square offers elegant, thoughtfully designed spaces to suit every taste. Studio, one-, two- and three bedroom lofts are available, offering sparkling views of Manhattan and Historic Hamilton Park.

O N S I T E S AL E S OF F I CE LO C ATED AT 232 Pavonia Avenue, Jersey City, NJ 07302 60

L i v i n g O n T h e P a r k . c o m | 201 434 1000

EST.1981

NEW Magazine: Fall 2012  

The Fall 2012 issue of Jersey City's NEW Magazine

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