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Winter 2016

NEW HAMPSHIRE INSTITUTE OF ART NEWS MAGAZINE

NEXT 100 YEARS

CATALYST

IN THIS ISSUE: 100th Anniversary of Emma Blood French Hall | A 21st Century Curriculum Students Forging Their Future | 70th Annual Members Exhibition

New Hampshire Institute of Art

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NEXT 100 YEARS Winter 2016

EDUCATE. ENGA

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IN THIS

ISSUE

From the President......................... 2

FIRST 100 YEARS

Emma Blood French Hall 100th Anniversary.......................... 4

NEXT 100 YEARS

Branding is the Meaning Within................................ 8 Ella Carlson.........................................11 21st Century Curriculum.......12 Bill Schaaf............................................14

Students Forging Their Futures.....................................18 Millennial Press...............................20 Graduate Programs Past, Present and Future.........22


NEXT 100 YEARS Winter 2016

AGE. EMPOWER.

COMMUNITY

Our Place in History...................26 70th Annual Members Exhibition..................29 The City is Our Lab......................32

Alumni Students

and Staff updates.........................34

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FROM THE

PRESIDENT You may have noticed that we have a new look. And a new name for our semi-annual magazine, one that describes how we see our role in the community and in our students’ lives: Catalyst. As I’ve traveled around our state this past year speaking with artists, alums, business leaders, and government officials I’ve become very much aware of how NHIA has become an economic as well as a cultural catalyst in the lives of many Granite Staters. NHIA graduates are making a difference here in New Hampshire and elsewhere. They contribute not only as fine artists, but as photographers, interior designers, creative directors, web designers, and copywriters in fields as diverse as architecture, design, finance, insurance, and manufacturing. Artists comprise a growing percentage of our economy, working in jobs that did not even exist 20 years ago, and making important contributions to our communities. We are also playing a significant role in leading economic revitalization and urban renewal. Just look at the economic transformation that has taken place in downtown Manchester over the past decade as NHIA expanded from occupying two to ten buildings and along the way preserved, restored, and re-purposed several historic structures. We are leading by doing. Today we’re the oldest and largest arts institution in the state, and one of only a handful of distinguished arts and design colleges in all of New England, offering undergraduate and graduate degrees in the visual arts, design, creative writing, and arts education and serving over 2,000 students annually. So, as we celebrate the 100th anniversary of our iconic Emma Blood French Hall this month, and reflect on just how much has changed since NHIA was founded through the merger of the Manchester Art Association and the Manchester Electric Club 118 years ago, I have no doubt that the best years for the college lie ahead.

Kent Devereaux

President & Chief Academic Officer New Hampshire Institute of Art


New Hampshire Institute of Art

Winter 2016

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FIRST 100 YEARS Winter 2016 New Hampshire Institute of Art

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Emma Blood French Hall

100

@

by Gary Samson, Chair of Photography


TECHNOLOGY, MUCH LIKE ITS NAMESAKE IN ENGLAND. HARNESSING THE POWER OF THE MERRIMACK RIVER RESHAPED THE SMALL TOWN AT THE WATER’S EDGE INTO ONE OF THE GREAT MANUFACTURING

FIRST 100 YEARS

WHEN EMMA BLOOD FRENCH HALL WAS COMPLETED IN 1916, MANCHESTER WAS A GIANT OF INDUSTRIAL

CITIES IN AMERICA, CATAPULTING MANCHESTER TO PROMINENCE ALONG WITH THE RISING TIDE OF THE INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY.

Opposite page: A view from the Manchester Public Library of French Hall under construction Opposite page inset: Emma Blood French French Hall as it appears today (Rob Shiels, MFA, Photography)

It was the inspired vision of Emma Blood French to bring culture to Manchester through art, music, literature and science in a big way. For the betterment of the community, she underwrote and built a permanent educational structure in the urban center of the city, and upon its completion, gifted it to The Manchester Institute of Arts and Sciences and its members. Now there would be a place for lectures, concerts, art exhibits, film presentations and, most importantly, learning, available at an affordable cost to virtually anyone who wanted to take advantage of the school’s offerings. The Manchester Institute of Arts and Sciences is now New Hampshire Institute of Art, and has grown to include two campuses, numerous undergraduate, graduate and

Over the years, the glass-domed auditorium on the second floor of Emma’s building has hosted lectures by nationally known writers, artists and politicians including Carl Sandburg, Bennett Cerf, Marlin Perkins, Nora Ephron, Arthur Schlesinger, George Tice, Jerome Witkin, and Vice President Joseph Biden. How do we celebrate the 100th anniversary of the great gift that really set this institution into motion, and the woman who made it all possible? This fall, NHIA hosted multiple events in Emma Blood French Hall and Roger Williams Hall, culminating with a grand “Gatsby at the French Gala” on November 12. The exhibitions featured architectural drawings, historical photographs of the construction of the building and documents from the early years of the organization’s education programs. Artwork created by former and current instructors was presented in the gallery of Williams Hall, honoring the diverse talents of the many artists who have taught here over the decades. A documentary film was also produced, exploring the history of French Hall, narrated by way of interviews with students, faculty and staff who have played important roles in the shaping of the college. ◊

For more information about exhibitions and events visit nhia.edu/Exhibitions

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Businessmen, engineers, visionaries and laborers made Manchester a vital and successful place to live and work, but something was missing: an institution where the city’s inhabitants could go to learn about a bigger, more complex world that included painting, sculpture, music, literature, botany and ornithology, among numerous other subjects.

community education programs, multiple buildings for instruction, housing for students and exhibition facilities.

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In the Amoskeag Manufacturing Company millyard, immigrants from France, Ireland, Scotland, Greece, Canada, Poland, Germany, Russia and numerous other countries produced 600-miles of a cloth a day. Shoes, cigars, and locomotives were just a few of the other diverse products manufactured here.


FIRST 100 YEARS

ABOUT THE ARCHITECT William Gibbons Rantoul was born on August 31, 1867, in Beverly Farms, MA, and graduated from Harvard in 1889. After graduating, Rantoul worked as an architect with the firm of Andrews, Jaques, and Rantoul until 1897; after that date he was a sole practitioner. Rantoul was particularly noted for designing grand houses in the Colonial Revival style, including Turner Hill in Ipswich and Maudslay, a Newport-like mansion on the Moseley Estate in Newburyport, MA. In addition to French Hall, Mr. Rantoul worked closely with Mrs. French in designing both her summer home on Little Boar’s Head in North Hampton, NH and Dr. and Mrs. French’s home in the North End of Manchester. French Hall and the Little Boar’s Head residence are both included in historic districts listed in the National Register of Historic Places.

ABOUT THE BUILDING

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(From the National Register of Historic Places) Constructed in 1916 across Concord Street from Carpenter Library, the Manchester Institute of Arts and Sciences was made possible by a gift from Frank Carpenter’s sister-in-law, Emma Blood French.

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The building, constructed of New Hampshire granite, was designed by architect William Rantoul. The symmetrical, two-story structure is oriented with its principal façade facing Concord Street. The central block is capped by a low pediment and consists of an elliptical projecting portico supported by four twostory fluted columns and foliate capitals. The central entrance contains a pair of oak double doors, capped by a full entablature including cyma reversa moldings enriched with leaf and tongue moldings. ◊

Top: A detail of the architect’s drawing of the front entrance to the building Opposite Page: Albert L. Clough, President, Manchester Institute of Arts and Sciences, 1899-1940


FIRST 100 YEARS

DEDICATION OF EMMA BLOOD FRENCH HALL

“All other Institute happenings appear insignificant in comparison with the supreme event of this year and indeed the Association’s entire history - the acquisition of the building which at last affords the Institute a permanent home of a character beyond the most extravagant dreams of its most enthusiastic members.

EMMA BLOOD FRENCH BUILDING GALA SPONSORS 100 Market Group, LTD

All Metals Industries, Inc. Anagnost Companies

Ansell and Anderson, P.A.

Northeast corner of Pine and Concord Streets and the entire plant became the property of the organization. No attempt at a description of the monumental structure is required at this time. It speaks eloquently for itself in terms of beauty and utility and will

Baker Newman Noyes Bellman Jewelers

Bellwether Credit Union Brady Sullivan

Brophy Wealth Management, LLC Capital Commons, LLC

continue to do so for generations to come.

Catholic Medical Center

I shall make no attempt to compass the impossible task of expressing in

Cityside Corp.

words the gratitude of the Institute for this princely benefaction. Anything that can be said or written, however heartfelt, must be pitifully inadequate. There is only one way by which our appreciation can be effectively shown and that is by the use which is made of the gift in the years to come. It is within the power of every officer,instructor and member to show by his or her individual efforts the extent to which this benefaction is appreciated, by putting forth redoubled efforts to make the Institute a perfect instrument for the extension of rational culture and for the dissemination of useful knowledge; by striving to preserve the liberal and democratic principles upon which it was founded and by so administering the plant that it can be

Central Paper

Devine, Millimet and Branch, P.A. Eastern Bank Charitable Foundation

Farley White Interests Elliot Hospital

Farley White Interests

Fiduciary Trust of New England Harvey Construction Howe, Riley & Howe

turned over to our successors with the least possible deterioration.

Longchamps Electric

The donor of the building

Milestone Engineering

has implied, by her munificent action, that she has the confidence in the future of the organization. Let us all labor steadfastly and actively to the end that this confidence shall prove to have been well placed.” Albert L. Clough President October 14, 1916

Merrimack Mortgage People’s United Bank

Prime, Buchholz & Associates, Inc. Puritan Backroom Restaurant

Rath, Young and Pignatelli, P.C. Redimix Companies

The Rowley Agency. Inc. Stibler Associates, LLC Truncellito & Davis

Wieczorek Insurance

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over to officers of the Institute a deed of the land and buildings at the

AutoFair Group

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On the afternoon of Monday, October 2nd, Mrs. Emma Blood French turned


NEXT 100 YEARS Winter 2016 New Hampshire Institute of Art

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BRANDING IS THE

Meaning Within by Jen Robertson, Director of Marketing


A STRONGER LOGO, AND NEW MISSION, VISION AND VALUES STATEMENTS, ALL OF WHICH IS THE END RESULT OF A YEAR-LONG COLLEGE REBRAND.

NEXT 100 YEARS

YOU MAY HAVE NOTICED WE’RE SPORTING A NEW LOOK: VIBRANT COLORS,

The inspiration for our transformation begins in the autumn of 1898, when the Manchester Electric Club and the Manchester Art Association decided the city needed an educational institution that would “promote the cultivation of the arts and sciences, give a more general impulse and systematic direction to scientific research and encourage and stimulate the study of history, literature and industrial institutions” (Proceedings of the Manchester Institute of Arts and Sciences, Vol. 1, 1898). On December 31, 1898, they combined to officially create the Manchester Institute of Arts and Sciences. Fast forward to 1996, when the organization reinvented itself as the New Hampshire Institute of Art, adding undergraduate degrees to its founding community education programs. Today, with four gallery spaces, two campuses, and Youth Arts, Pre-College, Undergraduate, Graduate, Art Educator, and Community Education programs that serve over 2,000 students and members of the community annually, we truly offer something for every stage of an artist’s journey. But NHIA still had an identity problem. No one knew who we were. To be honest, we weren’t sure who we were either. So how does a 118-year-old school find itself? By simultaneously looking backward and forward. Our story is steeped in tradition, complete with black and white photos of Victorian-clothed locals keen on promoting the arts and sciences and buildings gifted to us from across two centuries. It’s a story of Manchester, a center of textile production and a melting pot that brought influences from all around the world to our backyard. It’s a story we didn’t want to lose, yet we needed to find our way forward.

“...have you ever noticed how many colleges in New England use

BLUE as their primary color?”

But what about how we look? We’ve had many logos over the years, all of them focused on spelling out the entire name of our college in a rigid serif font, a very outdated practice.

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Next up was our name. After all, we’re not an institute. We’re a college. Was it still appropriate? Who better to ask than 700 teenagers? Turns out, hundreds of prospective students didn’t find “New Hampshire Institute of Art” to be a problem. They understood that we’re a college focused on the arts, located in New Hampshire. Branding job two, complete. We do not need to change our name.

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We started by reviewing our mission, vision and values statements and determined they were lacking in direction forward. So a branding committee, comprised of students, faculty, staff and board members, came up with statements that better represent who we are, where we are headed, and who we want to be. These statements act as founding principles, reflected in our programs, galleries and even in how we work with each other. Branding job one, complete: we have a proper set of guidelines to follow that will stand across time.


NEXT 100 YEARS

And have you ever noticed how many colleges in New England use blue as their primary color? Enter the logo you see on the cover. The overused blue is gone and NHIA is the most prominent piece of our logo, yet our full name is firmly attached. What this does is encourage our community, inside and outside of the college, to refer to us as “NHIA” clearly and consistently, rather than using a garbled expression that is not quite right. The full name is attached, at least for a while, for those who don’t know what NHIA stands for. The colors were selected to reflect our roots. Purple, from an art history perspective, was prized because it was difficult to produce, therefore reserving it for royal textiles and art. Manchester is the Queen city, so purple suits us well. The “A” and “ART” are set off in a copper color to give a nod to the Electric Club who helped bring us into being. Now we have school colors of Queen City Purple and Electric Club Copper that pay homage to our past, paired with a clean logo design that’s forward facing with an appropriate acronym. Branding job three, complete. We have a logo. But is that it? Mission, name, and logo? Not at all. There are countless ways what we have created will seep into everything we do and say. Other visual candy currently in the works includes regal banners that will adorn Fuller, French, and Williams Hall. Playful flags will mark our other historic landmark buildings including Lowell and Concord Hall. Purple is popping up all over campus from lanyards and office signs, to curtains and crisply painted walls. Our neighborhood is also in on the fun. Our de facto quad, Victory Park, is getting a facelift including newly planted gardens that will be ringed by Manchester Cultural District banners hung from multiplying wrought iron lightposts. Beyond the visuals, there are also a great many changes behind the scenes: curriculum updates that offer more flexibility and professional experience, partnerships with other colleges that expand our programs by more than double, work with the city that promotes civic engagement for students and staff alike—all of this anchored to our mission, vision, and values.

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There’s more to branding than a strict definition. Branding is the meaning within. It dares to go wider by shaping understanding, inspiring belief, and creating enduring human connections. It is how we, as an organization, make people feel, how we change them, how we make them better. It’s how we rally the community to bring about change. It’s leaving this place better than how we found it. We do all this to illustrate that we are more than a college that grants degrees and provides career opportunities. As NHIAers, we are driven to do better as artists, designers, educators and writers. We are fueled to become part of a creative collective who lead impactful lives that reach far beyond our own sphere of reference.

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And there’s much more to come. There will be more opportunities to use the city as our canvas, our classroom and our muse. More ways to use our talents to improve our neighborhoods. More programs and advocacy and outreach. Creativity harnessed by our community of students, alumni, faculty, and staff has limitless power to bend the ear, change the view, and raise perception. With all of these sweeping changes and our freshly crafted mission in mind, I am confident in stating we stand firmly prepared to educate, engage, and empower through the arts for at least another 118-years. ◊

THAT’S WHY WE REBRANDED.

INSTITUTE OF ART

NEW HAMPSHIRE


NEXT 100 YEARS

ELLA CARLSON

MFA ALUMNI & NHIA TRUSTEE

WORKING WITH HIGHLY MANIPULATED PHOTOGRAPHIC IMAGERY, BUT ON THE RECOMMENDATION OF FORMER GRADUATE DEAN ALISON WILLIAMS, ELLA ENROLLED IN NHIA’S VISUAL ARTS MFA RATHER THAN THE PHOTOGRAPHY PROGRAM.

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As a result, Ella received a kind of hybrid graduate education. “There were times I felt that I was out of my element,” she says. “But during the program, I came to understand that what I’d been doing was to create disparate works that pleased the eye. The MFA experience allowed me to connect my work to the world at large, to political issues, to issues of humanity, and to consider how my art could facilitate positive change. After years of working in just about every genre of photography and defining myself as a photographer, the MFA gave me a different way of seeing myself, namely as an artist— one whose primary medium is photography.” Ella is in the process of publishing a book on the subject of creating art using Photoshop, where she writes about the different artistic directions she’s explored using digital imaging tools. “You just need to start doing something, without thinking it through all the way, without letting the scope of it daunt you,” she advises. “Just sit down and work. Eventually you’ll find a direction.” ◊

Top: Reconsiderations #1 Bottom: Judges

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NEXT 100 YEARS

A

21 Century st

Curriculum

Winter 2016

by Emily Masterson, Director of Institutional Effectiveness Monica Bilson, Chair of BFA Creative Writing and Director of MFA Creative Writing

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AS OUR SENIOR EXHIBITION POWERFULLY ILLUSTRATES EVERY SPRING, NHIA HAS LONG BEEN KNOWN FOR PRODUCING GRADUATES WITH NOTABLE SKILLS IN THE ARTS. IN REVISING NHIA’S CURRICULUM, OUR BOARD MEMBERS, FACULTY AND STAFF WORKED TO ENRICH THIS COMBINATION OF TECHNICAL PROFICIENCY AND DEEP SELF-EXPRESSION IN A WAY THAT WOULD REINFORCE THE GOALS OF OUR NEW MISSION STATEMENT: “TO EDUCATE, ENGAGE, AND EMPOWER THROUGH THE ARTS.”


ENGAGE

EMPOWER

Our new partnership with University of New Hampshire (UNH) Manchester empowers students to expand their education beyond the walls of NHIA, doubling our course offerings without adding to the time or expense needed to complete a BFA degree. UNH offers courses in science, engineering, business, media, and other subjects that afford our students opportunities to develop into multi-faceted thinkers.

Creatives who engage with their communities and work across disciplines develop the perspective to make work that connects, communicates, and inspires. This philosophy lies at the heart of the new Foundations program.

NHIA is the first college in the country to require every BFA student to enroll in a minimum of nine credits of professional practices coursework.

Humanities and science courses have been opened up to student choice. Courses such as “Activism in America”, “Gender, Race, and Media”, “Sustainability” and “Ethics and Contemporary Social Problems” bring issues at the forefront of society into the classroom, challenging students to think about the community in which they practice and how that relates to creative expression. Additionally, NHIA students can experience other cultures firsthand and develop a broader perspective through study abroad programs in Greece and Italy.

Cross-disciplinary engagement does not stop in the first year. Coursework in graphic novels, book arts, letterpress, and publishing allow students to work closely with peers in other disciplines to produce complex works that engage multiple audiences. Student-run exhibition spaces, community service experiences, visits to artistic communities beyond Manchester, and lectures by visiting professionals all ask students to think beyond their immediate focus and imagine how to contribute to larger communities. The community of Manchester, NH has become as much a part of the college as NHIA is of it. Students recently worked with visiting artists to repaint the Dupont Splash Park with a mural focused on community identity. GYK Antler, the Palace Theater, the Manchester Monarchs, Dyn, and many other local businesses have developed partnerships with NHIA, allowing students to contribute to the rich innovation already present in Manchester.

Our new BFA/MAT Dual Degree program lets students achieve both their Bachelor of Fine Arts and a Masters in Teaching Visual Arts in five years, leaving NHIA with their K-12 NH State Licensure in Visual Art Education, a graduate degree, and significant experience in the field. In the NHIA Design department’s “Design NH” course, students run an in-house design agency. They learn to design and implement professional strategies including time management, budgeting, and technology as they work together to create and produce work for actual clients, such as the Manchester School District and other local non-profits. Similarly, the Creative Writing students publish an in-house literary and arts journal, Ayris, along with a regular blog featuring interviews with key people on campus and descriptions of happenings around town.

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We invite students to break down disciplinary boundaries and combine interests by adding a minor in Art History, Ceramics, Comic Arts, Creative Writing, Design, Fine Arts, Illustration, Photography, or Printmaking to any one of the undergraduate majors.

Through courses like “Your Professional Creative Path,” NHIA is empowering students with professional communication, money management, and selfmarketing skills, so they will graduate with an understanding of how to maintain a career in the arts.

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For more information about our Mission, Vision, Values visit nhia.edu/Mission

New Hampshire Institute of Art

The new undergraduate curriculum at NHIA gives students more autonomy. Students provide the framework for their studies based on what interests and inspires them.

Through readings, films, historical explorations, visiting artists, and their own visual and written work, students critically examine the very definition of why they are creative practitioners. Collaborating with peers working in different media, students examine subjects like identity, influence, and culture, and then remix and respond through their own creative work.

NEXT 100 YEARS

EDUCATE


NEXT 100 YEARS

Bill Schaaf A CONVERSATION WITH THE NEW DEAN OF UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES

FOR OVER 20 YEARS, BILL SCHAAF HAS BEEN WORKING IN HIGHER EDUCATION, INCLUDING 18 YEARS IN THE UNITED KINGDOM (UK). HIS BACKGROUND INCLUDES TEACHING 40 DIFFERENT DEGREE PROGRAMS, DELIVERING BOTH THEORY AND PRACTICAL SKILLS TO UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE LEVEL COURSES. FROM 2006 TO 2016, HE WAS RESPONSIBLE FOR STRATEGIC AND OPERATIONAL ASPECTS OF A RANGE OF CREATIVE INDUSTRIES AT BUCKINGHAMSHIRE NEW UNIVERSITY, INCLUDING MECHANICAL ENGINEERING, PRODUCT DESIGN, INTERIOR DESIGN, FURNITURE DESIGN,

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INTERACTION DESIGN, JEWELRY AND SILVERSMITHING,

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CERAMICS AND GLASS, GRAPHICS AND ADVERTISING, TEXTILES, FASHION, FINE ART, VISUAL AND MATERIAL CULTURE AND FOUNDATION. HE ALSO CO-WROTE AND LED ONE OF THE FIRST GAMES DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS IN THE UK. THIS YEAR, IN COLLABORATION WITH LEADING GLOBAL ORGANIZATIONS, HE IS IN THE PROCESS OF LAUNCHING A WORLD-FIRST MASTERS OF RESEARCH IN THE INTERNET OF THINGS.


New Hampshire Institute of Art

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NEXT 100 YEARS

WHAT TYPE OF CREATIVE WORK ARE YOU CURRENTLY INTERESTED IN DOING? WHAT ARE SOME EXPERIENCES THAT HAVE BEEN MAJOR INFLUENCES IN YOUR CREATIVE WORK? At this stage in my career, my focus has shifted from active design consultancy to educational design and collaboration.

printmaking techniques to speed up and enhance my own capabilities when time is limited.

In the UK, I was active in promoting and overseeing many ‘live’ projects from urban furniture design in High Wycombe to spaces and art for well-being with the National Health Service. I have already met with a number of individuals and organizations in the region and am very excited to be contributing to potential developments in city arts, makerspaces and brand extension activities.

With a statistician for a father and a craft-loving botanist for a mother, my parents helped enhance my appreciation for seeing the world through very different filters. When I was a child, we lived in Madrid for a year and that deepened my appreciation for city life and for entirely different world views and cultures. I am a technophile so am continually evaluating technologies, tools and methods for how they may enhance my own creativity as well as that of others. At the moment, the explosion of augmented and virtual reality has me excited; price, access and ease of use continues to collapse enabling everyone to interpret them for their own use. Likewise, the Internet of Things, alongside rapid-prototyping equipment, is rapidly changing our mediated landscape and sparks my creative energies. ◊

Within the education sector, I am always designing new experiences, courses and degree offerings, alongside devising processes, tools and templates which (ideally) make life a bit smoother, richer and more effective for everyone. In my private life I still enjoy sketching and a variety of crafts. Most recently, I have been experimenting with laser-cutters and traditional

WHAT DREW YOU TO NHIA?

Winter 2016

The infrastructure, the vision and the people. I have a particular passion for craft in the 21st century—not simply maintaining traditional hand-crafting skills but expanding them through the integration of new tools and techniques.

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Craft skills are not dying arts. They lie at the heart of social histories, embodying understandings about material, environment and what is meaningful to those cultures. NHIA has a strong tradition in this area as well as excellent facilities and an active community. More importantly, we are positioned well to expand those capabilities into digital arenas. In researching NHIA from afar, I saw a place with a strong tradition and a vision of engaging with and making an impact upon their community, whether that was defined as city, state or country. That’s a belief I share and look forward to helping intensify. ◊

All images above: Municipal seating projects managed (designed by students and colleagues) in High Wycombe, England.


Plan for change. If students only view higher education as training to get a job, they may be swiftly disillusioned when they graduate. ‘Game-changing’ technologies and social change are happening at such a rapid rate that entirely new disciplines, jobs and markets will likely emerge while they are still studying. At NHIA, our goal is to prepare students to adapt by providing skills in life-long learning, in interpreting the world and in communicating with different audiences. These are the same skills necessary to be good global citizens who hold jobs, find personal fulfillment, and change the world for the better.

With a statistician for a father and a craft-loving botanist for a mother, my parents helped enhance my appreciation for seeing the world through very different filters.

NEXT 100 YEARS

WHAT PREDICTIONS DO YOU HAVE FOR OUR INCOMING FRESHMAN CLASS WHEN THEY GRADUATE IN 2020?

I hope our ‘Freshers’ focus on the big picture and do what they love, which is not necessarily easy to identify. It is easy to say ‘I love painting’, but painting involves a huge set of activities. The part that I enjoy the most might be mixing just the perfect color or seeing others react to my work. Getting this specific may open up other ideas and job prospects: for example, as a stylist, color trend forecaster, or surface designer. Similarly, it may drive one to embrace collaboration across disciplines. To be an artist or designer today requires more skills and capabilities than ever before. When this class graduates, they will need to have online presences which are media-rich and involve moving as well as static imagery, no matter what their discipline. If you love painting for the haptic feedback of the brush rippling over a textured canvas then chances are you will need to work with other specialists who have photographic, design, editorial and video skills. That’s why we’ve put collaboration at the heart of our curriculum. ◊

(Top) Metaphorical pencil sketch for a presentation and ElephantPerspex (Bottom) a laser-cut Plexiglas sample used for traditional printmaking as well as giveaway product.

‘Digital design’ is frequently confused with a lack of physicality; we live in a mediated world comprised of a hybrid of physical and digital spaces. Creating art or design for such spaces requires active engagement with both to deliver rich, embodied experiences. ◊

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There are fantastic opportunities for new courses and degree programs which, in some cases, we are already positioned to deliver thanks to our new partnerships. I’m also excited to integrate new digital skills in ways which expand upon our existing offerings. Too many times have I seen workshops ripped out to be replaced with computer labs without properly evaluating the impact of such change.

Winter 2016

IN WHAT AREA ARE YOU MOST EXCITED ABOUT A MAKING AN IMPACT?


NEXT 100 YEARS

BANK OF AMERICA FOUNDATION

INTERNSHIP GRANT We are happy to announce that NHIA is the recipient of a new grant from the Bank of America Foundation for its Student Internship and Workforce Development Initiative. This grant was established to make the internship experience more affordable for students. It also put emphasis on supporting interns with non-profits such as The Water Project, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Students are stretching into the NH community and beyond by creating connections at the Currier Museum of Art, Boy’s and Girl’s Club in Manchester and the Children’s Museum of New Hampshire.

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This grant helps to support students who take the initiative to apply for internships across the country.

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Internships also provide emerging creative with critical employment pathways, opportunities for first-time work experience, and important 21st century workforce skill and leadership development. NHIA looks forward to continually expanding the assistance and opportunities for our students.

STUDENTS FORGING

Their Futures

by Lindsay Coats, Director of Career and Alumni Services

AT NEW HAMPSHIRE INSTITUTE OF ART, WE BELIEVE IN THE VALUE OF TAKING LEARNING OUT OF THE CLASSROOM, CONNECTING EDUCATION TO THE CAREER A STUDENT WILL EMBARK UPON AFTER LEAVING COLLEGE.

That’s why our new curriculum puts gaining professional skills front and center, making internship or community engagement experiences a requirement for every student—and ensuring that every graduate of NHIA will have had the opportunity to put their talents to work in real-world contexts, learning invaluable lessons about how to succeed beyond school. Through internships, students learn how to be a professional within a larger organization in a supportive educational environment. The experiences and skills they acquire add fuel to the launch of their full-time careers, giving them a vital edge in a job market where even entry-level positions sometimes require one to three years of prior experience.

Perhaps even more importantly, the internship experience broadens horizons, helping students to discover new paths and passions that could lead them to unexpected and unexplored options for life after graduation. But all of this is more than just giving—NHIA gains so much through our internship program and partners. Students don’t just leave the impact of their experience at the doors of their internship partner, but bring what they’ve learned back to campus. Interns share their experiences through presentations at information sessions throughout the school year. This is about so much more than practicing public speaking skills: it puts students in the role of mentor, demystifying and celebrating their new knowledge with younger classmates. Our commitment to helping students succeed in their careers doesn’t end here. NHIA’s Career and Alumni Services Office at NHIA continues to offer students vital support as they navigate a creative economy that is constantly growing and changing, helping each of them blaze their own unique path to success. ◊


DESIGN, 2018 | DISNEY INTERN WHAT WAS YOUR FIRST DAY LIKE?

NEXT 100 YEARS

TREVOR WARREN I worked for Walt Disney Food and Beverage and they would come up with new concepts for restaurants for the park. We were given concept art and we put it together in a nice presentation to the people who were making decisions on new projects.

HOW DO YOU FEEL NHIA PREPARED YOU? My boss told me the reason he hired me over the other applicants was because I had more of a fine arts background from a small arts school. NHIA prepares you with not only the programs, but gives you more thought behind your choices of color and typefaces. I feel like we view it differently, more as an art form rather than just graphic design.

ELIZABETH REED CREATIVE WRITING, 2018

For more information about Design visit nhia.edu/Design

WHAT KINDS OF ORGANIZATIONS ARE YOU PART OF ON CAMPUS?

I now produce mostly poetry and creative essay, however, I used to write more fiction. I have always said, “I am a poet. I know that I love poetry. But I am here to master the prose.” I have learned that both go hand in hand, and should be mastered equally. The one thing that has changed dramatically is the content that I like to write about. Now I like to write more about the human experience. When I was a freshman I liked to write about mythical and abstract things.

For more information about Creative Writing visit nhia.edu/CreativeWriting

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HAVE YOU EXPERIENCED ANY EVOLUTION OF STYLE SINCE YOUR FRESHMAN YEAR?

Winter 2016

It started when I became the Editor for Ayris, NHIA’s Creative Arts Journal. I then started the Ayris Club and became the president. This role led me into becoming a Student Director for Vault Gallery, as well as the Editor in Chief for NHIA’s team of bloggers (Odyssey). I was then offered the position of Department Intern for Creative Writing, where I focus on fostering a friendly literary community on campus. I am also heavily involved in other clubs on campus including: Verge Gallery, NHIA Radio, Drama Club, Student Leadership Committee, and Constant: Writers.


NEXT 100 YEARS

PRINTMAKING STUDENTS RAISE MONEY FOR A NEW PRESS by Erin Sweeney, Printmaking Faculty

IN THE FALL OF 2015, I TOOK A GROUP OF BOOK ARTS STUDENTS TO A PRINT SHOP IN GARDNER, MA CALLED CHAIR CITY COMMUNITY ART CENTER. THERE, OWNER TRACIE POULIOT IS CREATING HAND-PRINTED BOOKS CELEBRATING THE STORIES OF LOCAL PEOPLE WHO WORKED IN THE FURNITURE FACTORIES THAT USED TO THRIVE IN GARDNER.

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Millennial New Hampshire Institute of Art

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Press


NEXT 100 YEARS

TRACIE LET THE STUDENTS HAVE A TURN AT HER FLATBED CYLINDER PRESS. THE STUDENTS LOVED PRINTING ON THE PRESS AND TALKED OF HOW WONDERFUL IT WOULD BE TO HAVE ONE IN OUR LETTERPRESS SHOP AT NEW HAMPSHIRE INSTITUTE OF ART. Fast-forward to the spring semester when several of those students were in my “Intro to Letterpress” class. Dreams of how NHIA could get a flat-bed cylinder press permeated every discussion, but turned into something more than wishful thinking when Sam Kelly (Fine Arts, 2016) took the initiative to apply for a grant to our Student Leadership Committee (SLC) to see if they would give us the money. Though the grant application was turned down, the committee did make the class an intriguing offer. “If you raise half, we will match you,” they told us. Soon afterward, I made a proposal to the class. “Do you guys want to just drop the syllabus and turn this course into a job shop to raise funds for the press?” The answer was an immediate and resounding yes! My nine students threw themselves into the project, getting help from two design students who had already taken the class, as well as a recent graduate. They designed their own brand, Millennial Press, complete with a logo created by Danny Mauri (Design, 2016) and an Instagram page managed by Christin Graham (Photography, 2017). We had weekly meetings and watched our numbers rise.

A BIG THANKS TO THE INTRO TO LETTERPRESS CLASS! Bronte Boulet (Illustration, 2016) Tim Elwell (Fine Arts, 2016) Christin Graham (Photography, 2017) Samantha Kelly (Fine Arts, 2016) Rebecca Lennon (Fine Arts, 2016) Jacinta Morais (Photography, 2016) Trevor Rager (Fine Arts, 2018) Julia Starr (Fine Arts and Illustration, 2018)

AND WE COULDN’T HAVE DONE IT WITHOUT: Danny Mauri (Design, 2016) Lucas Silva (Design, 2016)

The students made cards, bags, patches, and organized a 2017 calendar with a page done by each student, plus myself and colleague Bill Cass. Every detail was considered and completed. They met with our finance department’s amazing Nancy Jordan, who helped us start a YouCaring donation page. Lucas Silva (Design, 2016) built the donation page and monitored it throughout the semester. Additionally, Josh Stewart (Illustration, 2016) donated the proceeds from the sale of a limited edition print which he designed, printed, packaged, and shipped with the assistance of Millennial Press.

In just 15 weeks, the students had raised over $10,000, including the matching funds from the SLC. That was enough money to pay for a Vandercook 320G flat-bed cylinder press to be picked up by professional riggers and delivered to us at NHIA. Since it arrived in June, we’ve begun printing, and Millennial Press will continue to operate as a job shop with the hope of raising money for other ventures in the future. To say I’m proud of what this class achieved is an understatement. ◊

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At the end of April, we had “Press Print Party” event in the print shop at French Hall. Every press was being operated by a student, with giveaways for all attendees. There was a ‘zine produced so that visitors could receive stickers at each print station, and if they completed at least three, they could enter into a raffle. Prizes included prints donated to the project by Amos Paul Kennedy, Bobby Rosenstock, and James Chase, and another very popular item: a coveted parking spot here at NHIA! Thanks to Julia Starr (Fine Arts and Illustration, 2018), the Puritan Restaurant donated ice cream, and a good time was had by all.

Winter 2016

Josh Stewart (Illustration, 2016)


NEXT 100 YEARS

GRADUATE PROGRAMS

Past, Present, Future.

Winter 2016

by Lucinda Bliss, Dean of Graduate Studies Buzz McLaughlin, Director of MFA Writing for Stage and Screen Monica Bilson, Chair of BFA Creative Writing and Director of MFA Creative Writing

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NEXT 100 YEARS IN THE FEW SHORT YEARS SINCE THEIR INCEPTION, NHIA’S GRADUATE PROGRAMS HAVE CONTINUED TO GROW AND EXPAND, PUSHING BOUNDARIES AND FORGING POWERFUL CONNECTIONS THAT CHALLENGE ARTISTS TO THINK AND MAKE OUTSIDE THE BOX.

At the core of NHIA’s residency experience is what we call the “concurrent curriculum.” While our graduate students are in residence, they zero in on generative themes and questions, engage in dialogue and critique, and claim the creative work that will sustain them at their home desks and studios. But thanks to the fact that our residencies occur simultaneously, we’re able to create powerful opportunities for cross pollination among and within each of our programs, inspiring interdisciplinarity. In July, this approach took root in a new way during an exciting full-day initiative that took place off-campus at Manchester’s historic Amoskeag Mills complex. Faculty and students collaborated with local businesses, and they could be seen throughout boardrooms, office spaces, museums, and in the hallways in between. Students frequently emerged from the boardrooms into one company’s open workspace—to document

“Imagine a group of artists and writers parading into an insurance acquisition company located in a centuries old mill building and holding workshops in their boardrooms.” Dean Lucinda Bliss designed Mill Day in collaboration with the RiverStone Group and the Millyard Museum. The program took visual arts, photography, and creative writing students out of their discipline-specific critiques, seminars, and lectures in order to work side-by–side in a historic Manchester setting. NHIA’s Master of Fine Arts (MFA) residencies provide students

Winter 2016

Last summer, over 80 students traveled from as far as Los Angeles and Alberta to engage in dialogue and critique with more than 30 faculty and visiting artists as part of our graduate residency season.

their perceptions or, in several cases, to leave a trace of themselves somewhere unexpected. A photographer struck up a conversation with an employee who agreed to pose for a series; an insurance agent ate lunch next to a poet experimenting with surrealism; a painter left a note in the stairwell saying, “Tell me about your work day and I’ll tell you about mine,” with her phone number penciled below; a photographer lectured to a mixed group about Manchester’s immigrant experience and the complexities of French-Canadian identity; a mixed-media artist immersed himself in the river underneath the vast windows of the mill.

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Since launching in the summer of 2012, NHIA’s graduate programs have more than tripled in size. The college originally offered distance graduate coursework in education, expanding the following year to launch four MFA program in photography, visual arts, creative writing, and writing for stage and screen, as well as a Master of Arts in Art Education. Those programs have now been joined by NHIA’s Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) Visual Arts and its five-year BFA/MAT Dual Degree program.


NEXT 100 YEARS

Students agreed that an authentic experience touches the deep nexus of one’s being, and the language of art – whether it’s words, brushstrokes, a lens, a piece of clay, or a collection of objects – is the bridge to find it. The opposite side of the bridge to that deep nexus is likely a location in the world.

Winter 2016

with a toolbox of inspiring ideas, critical frameworks, and faculty and peer suggestions about their work, in order to sustain them through the six months of mentored independent study that follows. But the toolbox also includes a set of questions to get students thinking about how their art responds to the world, and Bliss’ goal for the day was for students to think about their work in terms of its location, regardless of medium or genre. “The overarching motivation is to provide a tactile way for our students to understand social context and to begin to think more richly outside of disciplinary boxes. In the case of the Mill Day, this would take the form of exploring history and place as the genesis of creative work,” Bliss explained.

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The first layer of Mill Day came from the readings Bliss distributed to all students before the July residency, which introduced questions like, where is your artwork situated? Is it in a physical place, or is it part of an idea? Many of the workshops led by MFA instructors had the students responding to the mill spaces through photography, writing, walking, climbing, bookmaking, and mapping. “It is exciting to learn a new skill and to work with my hands, away from the computer screen,” creative writing student Maxine Marshall remarked. The second layer of the Mill Day experience focused on the history of the Amoskeag Mills and Manchester. Students had time to walk through the Millyard Museum and converse with Executive Director John Clayton. The Amoskeag Manufacturing Company inhabited the mills from about 1860-1935, relying on the Merrimack river to provide the power needed to process raw cotton. By 1912, 50 miles of cloth were woven every hour by 15,500 workers, including immigrants and children under sixteen. Some MFA students were fascinated with the history of child labor, as documented by photographer Lewis Hine in the early 20th century, and felt that the museum downplayed the realities of working conditions and labor laws, and instead exhibited a rosy

version of the earlier days in the Queen City. Others were intrigued by the intricacy and precision of the looms. The third layer was a manifestation of opportunities for the three residency programs to come together outside of the curricula of their individual degrees. Students approached their own questions from an alternative vantage point; a writer might benefit from taking photos of a pink stuffed pony on a RiverStone employee’s desk, to later form a character sketch. As Managing Director of Graduate Programs Emily Bradley pointed out, this crosspollination “offers different perspectives from which to see the same problem – so you don’t get stuck.” A painter witnesses a photographer’s work process, and that process might go in her toolbox, to be tried out during the following semester in her studio. At the end of the July residency, students looked back to photos taken on Mill Day, and some recognized the traces the experience left on them and the traces they left behind. They engaged with a piece of Manchester history and connected with a local business using their own language. As visiting writer William Giraldi told students earlier that week, art is not self-expression; it is selfassertion, putting a particular point of view out there in the world. Mill Day served as an opportunity for students to become aware of their own intentionality as artists moving through the spaces of their lives. Meanwhile, a different variety of putting a point of view out into the world was manifesting itself at NHIA’s Peterborough campus, where the students of the Writing for Stage and Screen MFA program were in the process of seeing their words brought to life. The residency was a 10-day explosion of creative storytelling, with 13 full-length scripts—plays, screenplays, and TV pilots—lifted off the page for the first time as student writers from all over the U.S. and Canada gathered in the idyllic village of Peterborough, NH to


At the heart of its program are the new scripts being written by students each semester—at least four full-length works while earning the degree. Students who have completed between one and three semesters are given a closed table reading. Professional actors are cast and given scripts in advance, but there is no rehearsal and no public in attendance. The writer is given the opportunity to discuss roles with the actors before the reading, but the reading itself is what’s known in the profession as a “cold read,” held around a large table. After each reading there is a discussion with the gathered students, faculty, and actors followed by a private critique with the writer and faculty.

NEXT 100 YEARS

celebrate their art with professional actors, directors, designers, producers, and public audiences.

NHIA boasts a faculty of established and nationally recognized writers and other visiting theatre and film professionals who teach classes and workshops, who closely mentor and advise students throughout each of their four semesters.

For more information about Graduate Programs visit nhia.edu/GraduatePrograms @NHIAGraduatePrograms

Both Mill Day and the Writing for Stage and Screen MFA readings took learning out of the classroom and into the world in powerful ways. “In each of our programs, rather than having our students work within a disciplinary silo, toward a predetermined definition of success, we encourage them to use the residency experience as a catalyst for creative expression—to make unexpected connections and use them to move their work into new territory,” Bliss said. ◊

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What makes the program nationally unique is its commitment to having every student create a substantial beginning body of work that serves as a launching pad for their career. NHIA’s faculty refine the craft and skill of their student writers and realistically prepare them for the rigors of entering the professional writer’s arena. To do this successfully is to recognize that scripts of any sort, by their very nature, are a means to an end and not an end in themselves. Screen and stage writing, as a field, is totally collaborative, a combination of all the arts, which is why NHIA’s program is committed to giving writers the opportunity to experience their work being initially lifted off the page by the other artists. That’s a trademark with a proven track record of success, as the program’s growing list of alumni and their achievements makes clear.

Winter 2016

Students in their final semester write their thesis script. This work is given a concert reading. The script is assigned a professional director, then performed in a public reading. Each writer gives a talk about his or her writing process and artistic philosophy.


Winter 2016 New Hampshire Institute of Art

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OUR PLACE IN HISTORY by Sara Ceaser, Alumni and Membership Coordinator

FOR OVER 100 YEARS, NHIA HAS BEEN A KEY PART OF MANCHESTER’S CULTURAL LANDSCAPE, SO IT’S NO SURPRISE THAT WE HAVE A DEEP

RESPECT FOR THE CITY’S HISTORY. OUR CAMPUS WAS ESTABLISHED IN 1898, AND SITS AT THE HEART OF A VIBRANT CULTURAL COMMUNITY CENTERED AROUND MANCHESTER’S VICTORY PARK.


COMMUNITY

Victory Park, Manchester’s first park, was created in 1838 by the Amoskeag Manufacturing Company. The park was used as a common space for vegetable gardening and grazing animals owned by the company’s workers. It was purchased in 1848 by the city of Manchester for $1.00 on the condition that the city make it into a park. It was named Victory Park following World War I. In 1929, a monument to the city’s soldiers designed by Lucien Gosselin was erected. The park is the center of cultural life in Manchester, ringed by historic gems. The Carpenter Memorial Library, erected in 1914 and designed by Edward Tilton, was donated to the city by Frank Carpenter in memory of his wife. NHIA’s own French Hall was designed by the Boston architect William Rantoul and given to the college by Emma Blood French in 1916. The Manchester Historical Association Building and a building which formerly housed a U.S. Post Office were also designed by Edward Tilton and border the park. In order to preserve and promote this vibrant area and the businesses that call it home, NHIA and six other non-profit organizations formed the Manchester Cultural District Coalition in March 2015. The goal of the coalition is to spark economic development in the neighborhood by emphasizing art, design and creative place-making.

“Our students and faculty are really excited to provide high quality visual statements to the city that can aesthetically excite, enrich and add to the new, young, tech-focused vibe of Manchester.” Patrick McCay, Chair of Fine Arts

The most exciting part of this campaign is the coordinated effort of various businesses to plan cultural and civic activities in the park starting in spring 2017. The park already hosts the Manchester Farmer’s Market, free yoga classes and a variety of musical performances. A piano, donated by InTown Manchester and decorated by local artists, has been placed in the park for passers-by to play as part of the “Keys to the City” program.

Winter 2016

To kick start the campaign, the city is investing $300,000 for physical improvements in Victory Park. To date, over 750 plants and flower have been planted by students, staff and members of the community. NHIA has also initiated a series safety measures to increase security in the park.

New Hampshire Institute of Art

27 Another asset of this cultural district in the heart of Manchester is a building that serves as one of NHIA’s most popular residencies. Hampshire House, originally named The Hampshire, was owned by the Settlement Association of New Hampshire, a non-profit which operated the property as a 27-room house for women in 1911.


COMMUNITY

During the summer of 2016, this historic jewel was given a face lift. With a large population of NHIA students in the LGBTQ community, it made sense to reinvent The Hampshire to suit their needs with gender neutral bathrooms. In addition, the residence has a new lounge and bedroom furniture, renovated dining and television area, commercial kitchen appliances, freshly painted bedrooms, porch renovations, and a new laundry area. The studio space is now furnished and air conditioned. NHIA’s creative impact is also becoming visible in the community through the efforts of our mural class. The most recent mural was painted in the summer of 2016 for the Dupont Splash Park on the west side of Manchester. Four other murals have been created to date. They are located at Firefly Restaurant, the Palace Theatre and Dyn, an Internet performance management company located in the Manchester Millyard. The murals an important part of the college’s efforts to beautify the city, but also a vital learning tool. Students learn how to work with clients in an architectural setting, design and then paint the large-scale mural, meet deadlines, and budget for materials.

The summer of 2016 also brought revitalization of downtown Manchester’s traffic signal boxes through the “Think Outside the Box” public art project, which was created by InTown Manchester, Manchester’s board of mayor and aldermen, the highway department and the Studio 550 Art Center in an effort to help beautify the city and deter graffiti. Five artists, including NHIA adjunct faculty member James Chase, submitted designs to InTown Manchester, with Chase’s work “Flux” eventually selected as part of the project. NHIA students Jacob Estevez and Alyssa Woods assisted Chase with painting his winning design. Chase says, “By involving students in civic engagement, it is my goal to integrate service and volunteering with their BFA curriculum so it becomes part of who they are as future artists and leaders.”

Winter 2016

Other initiatives that are in the works include NHIA’s participation in designing wayfinding signs in the city, a city flag design contest, development of cultural district banners and a variety of other public art projects.

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The college firmly believes that more public art will lead to greater pride in Manchester while also providing a valuable outlet for students to learn and grow, using their talents to make their world a better place. ◊


Winter 2016

COMMUNITY 29 New Hampshire Institute of Art

Mia Stendahl, Aline Lotter, Susan Roston, Robert Seaman, Carolyn Rordam, Pamela Frankel, Robert Holt, Ann Nihal, Barbara A. Cambell, Dale Carlisle, Dawn Randall, Barbara Faucher, Martha Munroe, Loring Cheney, Connie Gray, Anne Stevenson, Malcolm Holt, David Holmander, Amy McGregorRadin, Carol Russell, Wen Redmond, Jacquelyn O’Hare, Frankie Brackley-Tolman, Mary Cornog, Christine Falcone, Shirley Chodin, Sheila King, Holly Harmon-Morse, Barbara, Clinkenbeard, Marci Smoger, Julia Luteran, Phyllis Rogers, Debora Ash, Elly Miles, William Schnute, Brianna Graves, Wendy Christensen, Marcy Pope, Edith Tuttle, Sean Jameson, Sheila Hoglund, Matt Patterson, Rebecca Welsh, Judy Unger-Clark, Thomas Borden, Mark Hatcher, Soosen Dunholter, Joan Barrows, Ann Dillon, Robert Berry, Anna Marie Ottaviano, Steven Christensen, Lee Dunholter, Mary Iselin, Tafi Brown, Jessie Pollock, Scott McGovern, Dorothea Ottaviano, Sally Bomer, Barbara Danser, Rosemary Conroy, Dominique Boutaud Mia Stendahl, Aline Lotter, Susan Roston, Robert Seaman, Carolyn Rordam, Pamela Frankel, Robert Holt, Ann Nihal, Barbara A. Cambell, Dale Carlisle, Dawn Randall, Barbara Faucher, Martha Munroe, Loring Cheney, Connie Gray, Anne Stevenson, Malcolm Holt, David Holmander, Amy McGregor-Radin, Carol Russell, Wen Redmond, Jacquelyn O’Hare, Frankie BrackleyTolman, Mary Cornog, Christine Falcone, Shirley Chodin, Sheila King, Holly Harmon-Morse, Barbara, Clinkenbeard, Marci Smoger, Julia Luteran, Phyllis by Lauryn Welch, Gallery Assistant, Sharon Arts Center Rogers, Debora Ash, Elly Miles, William Schnute, Brianna Graves, Wendy Christensen, Marcy Pope, Edith Tuttle, Sean Jameson, Sheila Hoglund, Matt Patterson, FOR Rebecca Welsh, Judy Unger-Clark, SEVENTY YEARS, NHIA’S SHARON ARTS Thomas Borden, Mark Hatcher, Soosen Dunholter, CENTER HAS BEEN CELEBRATING THE Joan Barrows, Ann Dillon, Robert Berry, Anna Marie MULTIFACETED TALENTS OF ITS MEMBERS Ottaviano, Steven Christensen, Lee Dunholter, Mary WITH AN ANNUAL EXHIBITION. THIS YEAR, THE Iselin, Tafi Brown, Jessie Pollock, Scott McGovern, 70TH ANNUAL MEMBERS EXHIBITION TOOK Dorothea Ottaviano, Sally Bomer, Barbara Danser, PLACE IN THE NEWLY RENOVATED GALLERY Rosemary Conroy, Dominique Boutaud Mia Stendahl, OF OUR DOWNTOWN PETERBOROUGH Aline Lotter,EXHIBITION Susan SPACE, Roston, Robert Seaman, Carolyn AND INCLUDES A TWIST— Rordam, Pamela Frankel, Robert Holt, Ann Nihal, FOR THE FIRST TIME, THE EXHIBITION WAS Barbara A. Cambell, Dale Carlisle, Dawn Randall, JURIED AND FREE TO ENTER. Barbara Faucher, Martha Munroe, Loring Cheney, Connie Gray, Anne Stevenson, Malcolm Holt, David Holmander, Amy McGregor-Radin, Carol Russell, Wen Redmond, Jacquelyn O’Hare, Frankie BrackleyTolman, Mary Cornog, Christine Falcone, Shirley Chodin, Sheila King, Holly Harmon-Morse, Barbara,


COMMUNITY

The Sharon Arts Center was founded by William and Ruth Young in

Since its conception, the Members Exhibition has swelled to include

1947 with the help of David Campbell, the Director of the League of

several hundred pieces per show from all stages of artists and in

New Hampshire Arts and Crafts (now known as the League of NH

a variety of mediums. Traditionally, the exhibition has been hung

Craftsmen). Its mission was “to stimulate, encourage, and provide

salon style in order to include every entry in the limited space.

education in the theory and practice of the arts and crafts through instruction, exhibitions, and marketing assistance.” Located in

The jurors of this year’s exhibition, Sam Trioli, Lulu Fichter, and

Sharon, NH, the Sharon Arts Center was the first arts organization

Mia Mead, all have strong ties with both NHIA and the regional

of its kind in Southern New Hampshire and quickly grew from a few

arts community. Lulu Fichter and Mia Mead live and work in

classes taught in the Youngs’ house to become a beacon for New

Peterborough, NH, and teach community education classes at NHIA.

England residents interested in the arts.

Lulu Fichter is a potter who studies the organic forms of plants and animals as the basis of her work. Mia Mead is a watercolor artist

Over the years, the Sharon Arts Center expanded its curriculum

inspired by the rich landscapes of New England. Sam Trioli is the

to include weaving, jewelry-making, photography, painting,

gallery director at NHIA and is co-director and curator at Launch,

design, children’s classes, musical events, and performances. The

a contemporary art gallery in Peterborough, NH.

Left: Loring Cheney, Elinor and Her Pet Basket, Raku Stoneware Above: Amy McGregor-Radin, Bobbin Girl, White Line Woodcut

Young’s donated a plot of land and several buildings, which housed

This year, the 70th Annual Members Exhibition featured more than

the school, store, and gallery. In 2000, the current school and

a hundred pieces by over 50 artists, spread across both the Main and

administration building in Sharon replaced the original structures,

Community Galleries. The media ranged from traditional charcoal

and the downtown Peterborough location for the gallery and store

and watercolor painting to glass sculpture and woodcarving, and

was added.

continues a tradition of celebrating art and community that has flourished for the better part of a century.

This past March, NHIA funded a huge initiative to renovate the gallery to current professional standards. The building was outfitted to be wheelchair accessible, complete with a ramp and an elevator. The columns running through the upstairs gallery were taken out,

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and the store and lower gallery were separated to create a beautiful

New Hampshire Institute of Art

Winter 2016

The 70th Annual Members Exhibition featured more than 100 pieces by over 50 artists, spread across both the Main and Community Galleries. The media ranged from traditional charcoal and watercolor painting to glass sculpture and woodcarving, and more.

wood flooring, and the lighting was upgraded to state-of-the-art

and polished space. Additionally, the carpeting was replaced with electrical equipment to better display the artwork. The Members Exhibition originated as an annual event for those who took classes at the Sharon Arts Center to display and potentially sell their work. The store sold items created by local artists, but these pieces were carefully juried by a panel of specialists in partnership with the League of NH Craftsmen.

All NHIA exhibitions are free and open to the public. For more information visit nhia.edu/Exhibitions


Detail: Frankie Brackley-Tolman, Magical Forest, Acrylic on Canvas

COMMUNITY

PROPOSAL DEADLINES

Spring Fall Proposal Deadline: February 1 September 1 Notification of Decision: On or before April 1 On or before November 1 PROPOSAL FORMAT

Full information is available at www.nhia.edu/exhibitions SELECTION PROCESS

Gallery Director, Sam Trioli, works with the NHIA Exhibitions Advisory Board to finalize selections. The decision will be based on how well the proposal fits within the galleries’ missions and the exhibitions already planned in our calendar. Exhibitions are reviewed on an ongoing basis. Notification will be provided within 60 days of review. If you have any questions please email exhibitions@nhia.edu ◊

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At NHIA, we encourage artists from across the country to submit exhibition proposals to show their work in our galleries. We have two proposal deadlines per year for open exhibition slots. Please note the following dates:

Winter 2016

EXHIBITION PROPOSAL GUIDELINES


THE CITY IS OUR LAB

AT NHIA, THE CITY IS OUR CANVAS, OUR MUSE, AND OUR LAB. IT’S A RELATIONSHIP THAT BENEFITS BOTH MANCHESTER AND OUR STUDENTS, RIFE WITH OPPORTUNITIES FOR LEARNING AND ARTISTIC GROWTH. by Suzanne Canali, Director of Art Education Chris Archer, Associate Dean of Community Education


The MAT degree is for aspiring art educators, allowing them to earn a BFA and MAT in as little as five years, saving an entire year of graduate school tuition. A portion of the curriculum pairs NHIA art education students with mentor teachers at Manchester district schools, or employs them as staff in our Youth Arts program, which offers after school arts programs to the city’s kids. The Youth Arts program is founded on two central tenets. First is the belief that today’s educational practices need to shift toward more project-based, collaborative, student-centered models that develop STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, and Math) competencies. Second is an understanding that fostering young people’s creativity and facilitating experiential learning through

But our work to build a new generation of artists and art educators doesn’t end there. Our Pre-College program gives students interested in the arts a chance to go deeper. Participants spend two weeks in a living and learning environment that offers high-school students a first-hand glimpse of the college experience, both academically and socially, while they build a college-level portfolio and earn college credit.

COMMUNITY

One example of how our connection to the community benefits both the college and city can be seen in the launch of our new Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) Visual Arts program, which works heavily with NHIA’s Youth Arts program.

The central focus of the program is geared toward advancing students’ technical, compositional, and contextual skills as they developed work that was professionally photographed for their portfolios. Both in and out of the studios, the program is tailored to pique creative thought and exploration. The students work with materials and techniques that are often unfamiliar, ranging from traditional Coptic stitch bookbinding to dance and movement exercises, conceptual self-portraits, and 3-D installations.

Right now, offering a comprehensive, integrated arts education curriculum to all students at all grade levels is a challenge for the Manchester school district. Isolated programs like STEAM Ahead New Hampshire have demonstrated improvements in student academic achievement and conduct, but their success has been limited to only a handful of schools. NHIA’s Youth Arts program will provide teens throughout Manchester and the surrounding communities the chance to enjoy the many benefits of a hands-on arts education experience. It also means that NHIA will be educating a new generation of teachers able to marry this experiential, project-based philosophy of arts education with Common Core and National Core Arts Standards in their teaching.

To round out the experience and provide real-world examples of life in the arts, professional artists lead conversations about choosing and sustaining a life in the arts. The students also work with NHIA’s gallery staff to curate and set up a pop-up exhibition. Throughout the program, faculty encourage students to use personal experiences to articulate their creative voices. In each Pre-College Program, students demonstrate an impressive level of engagement, commitment, and talent. It is also apparent that they built a strong community amongst themselves and lasting friendships. ◊

For more about the Pre-College program or our MAT degree visit nhia.edu/PreCollege nhia.edu/MAT

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the arts has a knock-on effect in every other subject area, helping teens become better learners and providing them with a broad range of skills.

Winter 2016

“Education is in a constant state of change, and must be nimble and responsive to outside factors such as changes in society, economy, and politics; but even more so to communities and individuals in those communities.”


COMMUNITY

WHERE ARE

THEY NOW?

STUDENTS AND ALUMNI Sarah Burns (BFA Illustration, ’14) and Shannon Murphy (BFA Illustration, ’16) will have work featured in the upcoming graphic novel, Dirty Diamonds All Girl Anthology. James Chase (BFA Interdisciplinary, ’10, BFA Fine Arts Faculty) recently worked “On The Map,” a Juried Exhibition by Christopher French at 3S Artspace Gallery in Portsmouth, NH. He also exhibited two works in the celebration of print media as part of the “1000 prints” exhibition at The Blue House Gallery in Dayton, Ohio. James was judge for the 11th Annual National Arts Program exhibition displayed at “Art on the Wall at City Hall” in Manchester, NH. His work was selected and commissioned by the City of Manchester and the Manchester Arts Commission as part of the “Think Outside the Box” public art project campaign to create art for five traffic signal boxes in the city. (1)

Winter 2016

A.J. DeLauder (MFA Writing for Stage and Screen, ’16) was one of six playwrights chosen to participate in The Barter’s Festival of Appalachian Plays and Playwrights. As part of the festival, his play The People at the Edge of Town will receive a professional reading at Barter Theatre, the state theater of Virginia. A.J. was also named a finalist for the Ohio University-Chillicothe Playwriting Competition and received an Honorable Mention for the Joe McCabe Memorial Scriptwriting Competition, presented by West Virginia Writers, Inc.

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Becky Field’s (CT Photography, ’14) book of photographs of New Hampshire’s immigrant and refugee communities recently received two national awards. Her book, Different Roots, Common Dreams: New Hampshire’s Cultural Diversity contains 130 of her photographs as well as an introduction by New Hampshire Governor, Maggie Hassan, a forward by John Isaac, former United Nations photographer and six stories by immigrants about their experiences of coming to the U.S. Ms. Field received a Silver Multicultural Benjamin Franklin Book Award and a silver medal in the Multicultural Non-Fiction Adult category at the Independent Publisher “IPPY” Awards. (2) Nikki Gregory (BFA Design, ‘15) has joined the marketing department at NHIA as their in-house designer, working on everything from catalogs, to clothing, to magazine design. Caitlin Gomes (BFA Illustration, ’15) accepted a job through AmeriCorps for a teaching artist program called TTAP run through City Arts in Providence, RI.

Alexis Groulx’s (BFA Creative Writing, ’16) work has been published in Adanna Literary journal, Blue Lyra Review, Bridge Eight, The Missing Slate, and Off the Coast. She has been a Spotlight poet on The Missing Slate’s website. She also received a job with NH JAG at MCC, and has been accepted into the MFA program at Vermont College of Fine Arts where she will study Poetry and Prose. Craig Holland (BFA Illustration, ’14) has spent the last few months creating a portfolio for comic book conventions. He’s already attended two conventions, Halfway to Granitecon in Concord, NH and Massive Comic Con in Worcester, MA. In September, Keegan Currier (BFA Illustration, 2013) and Craig attended Granitecon in Manchester, NH to sell prints. In December 2016, they will be attending Northeast Comic Con in Wilmington, MA. (3) Ali Keller (BFA Painting & Printmaking, ’14) participated in several juried shows during the summer of 2016 throughout New England including The Library Arts Center of Newport, NH, The Newburyport Art Association, and most recently, 3S Artspace in Portsmouth, NH. Keller’s work was selected for publication with Studio Visit Magazine (vol. 34) and will be featured in the forthcoming issue of Paint Pulse Magazine. Keller’s work will return to The Library Arts Center of Newport in February 2017 as a winner of their annual Selections Competition. (4,5) Sam Kelly (BFA Fine Art, ’16) started working for a non-profit organization called Art and Dialogue that focuses on public participation installations that explore the relationship between environmental, political and social issues. Sam also has pieces in the I/D:2016 exhibition hosted by Derryfield School in Manchester and exhibited work in the Words|Matter Exhibition in Chicago, in October 2016. Steven McBride’s (MFA Photography, ’16) thesis exhibition, Big Ivy, was on exhibition at Mars Hill University, Weizenblatt Gallery, Mars Hill, NC during the fall of 2016. Shannon Murphy (BFA Illustration, ’16) spent Spring 2016 working on personal autobiographical comics which led to a four comic run on the entertainment website The A.V. Club. She was also included in an all women comic anthology and completed several other small freelance projects. She is currently working on comics and zines for both her senior exhibition and Small Press Expo and Massachusetts Independent Comics Expo. (6)


Susan Révy (MFA Photography, ’16) had work on view this past summer at the Houston Center for Photography, The Center for Fine Art Photography in their Portfolio Showcase group show in Fort Collins, CO, at the Danforth Art annual juried show. She won second place in the Fitchburg Art Museums 81st Annual Regional Art and Craft exhibition. During Fall 2016 she will have work in a curated group show at the Griffin Museum of Photography and at the University of the Arts 1401 Gallery for the Photo Review Annual Competition show. (9) Jan Robbins (MAAE, ’16) Has a show at the Miri Gallery, in Salt Lake City Utah, named “Welcome to My World: Metal Health Awareness Through Art.” It will be on display September 16 - October 7th. (10, 11) Owen Robertson (MFA Writing for Stage and Screen, ’16) launched his own theater company, Lab Theater Project, in Tampa Florida in July 2015. To date, Mr. Robertson

Matt Smigel (BFA Illustration, ‘11) is handling illustration and comic work on various Cartoon Network properties for their official comic line. He regularly illustrates for Adventure Time, Regular Show, Clarence, Uncle Grandpa, Over the Garden Wall, to name a few. He’s also signed on to multiple graphic novels for Boom! Studios. In addition, he has been doing character design for animation projects at FableVision, and he’s the designer/ illustrator/copywriter for Yogibo Bean Bags.

William C. Turner (BFA Painting, ’06, MFA Visual Arts, ’15) participated in a semi-solo exhibition at the WREN Gallery, Bethlehem, NH, June 2016. His work was also on view in a solo exhibition at Jaffrey Civic Center during. Fall 2016, and he will participate in a group exhibition at Monadnock Hospital, Peterborough, NH, November-December 2016. (17) Vanessa Ware’s (BFA Illustration, ’14) work consists primarily of portraiture and wildlife drawings in pastels and colored pencil. Having grown up next to an animal sanctuary, Vanessa has always been surrounded by nature. She draws inspiration from her own pets, as well as wildlife she encounters while walking outdoors. Like many people, Vanessa has always considered her pets as part of her family. Through her portraits, she works to portray the unique personalities of her subjects, creating vibrant, life like images of the animals in her life. (18) ◊

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Massachusetts-based independent filmmaker Jennifer Potts (MFA Writing for Stage and Screen, ’16) is in development for her first feature film project: The Extraordinary World of Cecily Blinkstop. Jennifer wrote The Extraordinary World of Cecily Blinkstop in 2014 as part of the Writing for Stage and Screen MFA program. Set in 1974 rural New England, this engaging story sees the world through the eyes of Cecily, a 7-year old girl who, following the death of her baby sister, lives in a world with no music, no color, no laughter, no love—that is, until a magical friend shows up and joins Cecily on the quest to save her family from the grief that is destroying them. Filming is scheduled to begin during the summer of 2017 and Jennifer is committed to filming entirely in New England, enlisting at least 80 percent of her cast and crew from the New England region, and building a crew with at least 50 percent women. (8)

Selections from Richella Simard’s (BFA Photography, ’07, MFA Photography, ’15) graduate series Persuasive Repulsion were exhibited at the SE Center for Photography in Greenville, SC; Texas Woman’s University in Denton, TX; and Carole Calo Gallery at Stonehill College in Easton, MA, where she was asked to join an artist panel. Her work, Natural Refinement and Small Truths, study food in our culture. Her piece “Untitled #3” was shown at the NHIA Alumni Exhibition in September 2016. Her most recent work is about investigating the surroundings of nature at home. She is paralleling Anna Atkins studies of British Algae to that of her gardens. Richella is using a large format camera to photograph this work and is printing Cyanotypes framed with documentation. She is also exploring past and present with old family negatives she unearthed in Manchester, NH. Richella spent her summer teaching at NHIA’s Art Educators Summer Retreat and Pre-College Summer Programs. (14, 15)

musician GRiZ and his label All Good Record’s Residency at Electric Forest. Additionally, he is collaborating with companies on clothing lines, posters, and accessories based on festival culture. He plans to team up with Chicago-based company Sloth Steady to unleash a new line of clothing and paint a mural for their Wicker Park location grand opening. (16)

Emily Smith (BFA Creative Writing, ’16) is currently a contributing blogger for the literary magazine Ploughshares and is the Managing Editorial and Communications Intern for the Cambridge Writers’ Workshop. Her creative work has appeared and/or is forthcoming in The Rumpus, Bustle, Brevity and others. Joshua Stewart (BFA Illustration, ’16), who works under the name KOOZ, has been traveling to music events from Colorado, to Minnesota live painting and selling his work. He has also created original work for

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Jenny Pagé (BFA Interdisciplinary, ’07) recently created figurative plaster sculptures to be cast in bronze in editions of five. Her piece “Semi Reclined Seated Woman” has been displayed at The Lakewood Heritage and Cultural Center Galleries in Lakewood, CO; and in the exhibition The Sculptural Precedent: Raiding the Art History Sculpture Closet, from Arp to Zadkine. (7)

has produced two of the works created during his graduates studies: Vicki Peterson’s (MFA Writing for Stage and Screen, ’15) play Cleave and Stephen Ashworth’s (MFA Writing for Stage and Screen, ’15) play Rocket Science. Next up for Mr. Robertson is a production of his own work, Toby’s Game, that will open November 3, 2016. The connection will continue in 2017 as he presents the work of Jared Eberlein (MFA Writing for Stage and Screen, ’15) and his play Precious Thieves as well as a Judy Zocchi (MFA Writing for Stage and Screen, ’16) play Plaid Skirts. (12, 13)

COMMUNITY

Dori Ottaviano (MFA Photography, ’18) provided photographs for Jeopardy Surface by Sheri Leigh Horn’s website, due to be published in March of 2017. The author has asked Dori to create some advertising photoweaves to provide clues to the crime which is the subject of the book.


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In my new role as Director of Safety and Security, I am directly responsible for the day-to-day operations of the Campus Safety and Security Department including the scheduling and supervision of contracted security officers and the NHIA shuttle. I now coordinate the annual crime statistics, daily crime log, and author the Annual Clery Report. I will be assisting with the implementation of the NHIA crisis management plan. I am also a Deputy Coordinator for Title IX incidents and investigations. Prior to working at the NHIA, I worked in Law Enforcement for 13 years. I was a Police Officer for the Phoenix, AZ and Manchester, NH Police Departments. I have a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Criminal Justice from Kent State University, 1996. I am also an avid skier and soccer player.”

Thomas Devaney’s (BFA Fine Arts Faculty) gallery in Concord, NH, T. Devaney Fine Art was selected as “Best in NH” for Arts and Culture by New Hampshire Magazine.

On July 24, Dr. Karen Hillson (BFA Art History Faculty) gave a presentation, “A Day in the Country with Manet and the Impressionists” at LaBelle Winery in Amherst. She also taught Art Appreciation and a Jazz Dance Workshop for NHIA’s Pre-College Summer Program. In the past year, Dr. Hillson has viewed major art collections in Philadelphia, New York City, Los Angeles, Seattle, Denver, and Minneapolis. At the Minneapolis Institute of Art, she visited the exhibition, “Delacroix’s Influence: the Rise of Modern Art from Cézanne to Van Gogh” as part of her research on the great Romantic painter’s relationship to modernism.

Ryan O’Rourke’s (BFA Illustration Chairperson) book, Bella Up, Up, and Away was recently published by Harper Collins. He is working on three additional books entitled Mouseling’s Words by Shutta Crum and published by Clarion, Up! Up! Up! Skyscraper by Anastasia Suen and published by Charlesbridge and Read! Read! Read! By Amy Ludwig Vanderwater and published by Boyds Mills Press. (21) Rich Pelligrino (BFA Illustration Faculty) Has been fortunate to work with properties such as TOMB RAIDER, Lucasfilm, Warner Bros., AMC, and many others through his galleries and illustration. In 2014 filmmaker, Wes Anderson commissioned him to create a painting featured in the Oscar winning The Grand Budapest Hotel. Most recently, his work was featured on Blue Moon beer bottles.

Tim Horvath (BFA Creative Writing Faculty) recently had a new story of his, “The Ship of Theseus Sextet,” appear in the latest issue of Harvard Review, #49. John Klossner (BFA Illustration Faculty) is a regular contributor to the New Yorker. (20) Patrick McCay (BFA Fine Arts Chairperson) has won the first place ‘Hibbard’ Painting Prize at the Whistler Museum in Lowell, MA. At the invitation of publisher’s Rowan and Littlefield, he provided a testimonial for author Michael Jones latest book ‘Art Law’A guide for Artists, Curators and Art Educators. His latest ‘New England Icons’ series was recently on view at Milbrook Gallery and Sculpture Garden, in Concord, NH.

Winter 2016

“Since 2014, I have planned, monitored and evaluated NHIA’s Campus Safety and Security Department’s activities to ensure the safety of all NHIA students, staff, faculty, guests, visitors and physical assets. I also oversaw the Department’s response to all emergencies and calls for service on campus.

Adeline Goldminc-Tronzo (CT Painting Faculty) recently led a group on a tour of museums in Paris, France and taught an “En Plein Air” painting workshop in Provence, France.

Ernest Montenegro (BFA Fine Arts Faculty) is presently working on his tenth public commission. The sculpture, a large bronze for the town of Greenfield, MA, will be installed next June. Two years ago he completed a fifty-three foot steel sculpture for the city of Claremont, NH. He also was privileged to show his sculpture series “flatmensquared” at the NHIA alumni owned gallery, Chase’s Garage in York, ME.

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Kevin Covey joined NHIA as the Director of Safety and Security on July 15, however he has worked as the NHIA security supervisor (as a contractor) since 2014. What he enjoys most about NHIA is working with the faculty, staff and students. He is always amazed how hardworking the students are. He enjoys seeing young people so dedicated to their chosen career paths.

Paul Durham (BFA Professional Practices Faculty) recently joined the faculty to teach Artist as Entrepreneur class. Paul is an awardwinning novelist whose books for young readers are published by HarperCollins and Crown Books for Young Readers (Penguin Random House). Awards for the books in his debut trilogy, The Luck Uglies, include being named a 2015 ALA Notable Children’s Book, a New York Public Library Top Book for Reading and Sharing, the 2014 Cybils Award Winner for Middle Grade Speculative Fiction, an ALA Booklist Top Ten First Novel for Youth, and a Kansas City Star/Kansas City Public Radio Best Book of the Year. (19)

COMMUNITY

FACULTY AND STAFF


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A further advantage to joining the college is proximity to his youngest son who is currently a student at Bennington College. Bennington is much closer to Manchester than to Seattle, Washington! His other three sons are currently in Michigan and Illinois so they too are closer. Jonathan is looking forward to leading the recruitment efforts at NHIA and already feels at home here.

Patricia Schappler (BFA Fine Arts Faculty) participated in the 3 Winners Show exhibition at TSG gallery in Taunton, MA in the summer of 2016. She also had work exhibited in, Sunlight Seduction at Art 3 in Manchester, NH and participated in Painting the Figurative Life at Bowersock Gallery in Provincetown, MA. She became a signature member of the Pastel Society of America. (27, 28) S Stephanie (BFA Creative Writing Faculty) participated in some community readings during the summer of 2016. The focus of these readings was to raise awareness of the importance of independent bookstores (such as one in Dover, NH which hosted one of the readings), and helping a poet in Sierra Leone raise funds and books for an orphanage he is building there for children who lost their parents to Ebola. She was also part of the annual Beat Night Shakespeare celebration in Portsmouth, NH. She was also part of a panel discussion at the annual NH Poetry Festival which is held annually at NHIA. Craig Stockwell (MFA Fine Arts Faculty) has had work accepted to the deCordova New England Biennial 2016 at the deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum in Lincoln, MA. The exhibition will be on view until March 2017.

Winter 2016

His interest in higher education and in the arts was spawned by two seminal experiences in college. Jonathan first came to the United States from England as a high school exchange student. He attended Cranbrook School in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, for a semester and traveled the following summer He enjoyed both experiences so much that he decided to attend college in the States rather than in England. It was at National College of Education, just outside Chicago, that he was assigned work study jobs in the Financial Aid Office and the Performing Arts Office. Upon graduating, Jonathan was offered a job in the Financial Aid Office and, several years later, he joined the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Over the years, Jonathan has played various rolls in Admissions, Financial Aid, Finance, IT, Marketing and Student Accounts. He is excited to join NHIA as it looks to move to the next level. Of particular interest to Jonathan is the potential of growing the relationship between the college and the city of Manchester. Manchester offers the college many opportunities and vice versa.

In September, Francine Weiss, PhD (MFA Photography Faculty) will begin work as the Senior Curator of the Newport Art Museum. She also has recently had work in a few exhibitions, “Out of the Blue,” a cyanotype exhibition at Photosynthesis Gallery in Manchester, CT, “The Somerville International Toy Camera Festival” at Nave Gallery in Somerville, MA and the Griffin Museum of Photography’s Juried Instagram Show. ◊

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Jonathan Lindsay recently joined New Hampshire Institute of Art as Vice President of Enrollment Management. While not an artist himself, Jonathan enjoys being around creative people and has spent much of his career on the campuses of art schools including the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, Columbus College of Art & Design and Cornish College of the Arts.

Coni Porter (BFA Design Faculty) has recently created a public art installation which was exhibited on the common in Fitzwilliam, NH. “EVERY 10 MINUTES” is an art installation that uses form, metaphor, and typography to show us the volume of CO2 generated by the average American every 10 minutes. It has been previously installed as part of the environmental art shows “Crossroads” in 2014 outside of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston MA, during “Climate Week ” in 2015 at the Brookline Town Hall in Brookline MA, and for summer 2015 at the Center for Coastal Studies in Provincetown MA. (24, 25, 26)

Erin Sweeney (BFA Printmaking Faculty) has been named to the full-time faculty. She is also the Graduate Admissions Coordinator, and the Parliamentarian on the Executive Committee of the Faculty Senate. She’ll be teaching at the NH Art Educator’s Conference in October and at the Philadelphia Center for the Book in November.

COMMUNITY

Eric Pinder’s (BFA Creative Writing Faculty) newest book How to Share with a Bear, a Ladybug Picture Book Award nominee, was recently translated into Japanese and published in Japan by Iwasaki Publishing Company. A sequel, How to Build a Snow Bear, will be published by Farrar Straus Giroux in September 2016. (22, 23)


“For masterpieces are not single and solitary birth; they are the outcomes of many years of thinking in common, of thinking by the body of the people, so that the experience of the mass is behind the single voice.� ~VIRGINIA WOOLF


NEXT 100 YEARS

CHAIR

Joseph Reilly New Hampshire Regional President, Eastern Bank

VICE CHAIR

Tom Stevens Chief Administrative Officer, KeyCorp, (Retired)

TREASURER

John Mercier Executive Vice President, Senior Loan Officer, Primary Bank

SECRETARY

George Foote, Jr. Former President, Advantec

TRUSTEES

Elias (Skip) Ashooh Nick Bentley Howard Brodsky Suzanne Canali Ellie Cochran Ellen Davis Theresa Dolloff Tom Dougherty Stan Fry Benjamin Gayman Terry Heinzmann Liz Hitchcock Karen Mayeu Maureen Mills David J. Murray Bill Stevens Phyllis Stibler

Consultant CEO, RiverStone Group Chairman and Co-Chief Executive Officer, CGA Global Partners Director, Art Education, New Hampshire Institute of Art Retired Professional Artist Former Marketing Director, Cityside Corporation VP, Corporate Technology and Information Management, Fidelity Investments Chief Executive Officer, Flashpoint Technology Attorney at Law, Devine, Millimet & Branch P.A. Professional Artist Owner, Hitchcock Creations Chair, Design Department, New Hampshire Institute of Art Chair, Ceramics Department, New Hampshire Institute of Art Principal, Clear Eye Photo President, Harvey Construction Corporation Founder and Former President, Stibler Associates LLC

TRUSTEE EMERITUS Maurice Beliveau Barbara Bickford

Artist and Publisher Photographer

CONTACT

This newsletter is published by the New Hampshire Institute of Art. © 2016 New Hampshire Institute of Art. All rights reserved. This publication may not be reprinted or reproduced in any form whole or in part without written permission. While every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained in this publication, we apologize for any errors that do occur. To submit Alumni News or editorial submissions, email alumni@nhia.edu. MANCHESTER CAMPUS 148 Concord Street Manchester, NH 03104 (603) 623-0313 info@nhia.edu www.nhia.edu SHARON ARTS CENTER CAMPUS 457 NH Rte. 123 Sharon, NH 03458 (603) 924-7256 sac@nhia.edu www.nhia.edu/sac

Cover Image Courtesy of Kooz, The Floral Portal, Ink & Digital, 2016 (Joshua Stewart, Illustration class of 2016)

Winter 2016

2016–2017

41 New Hampshire Institute of Art

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NHIA Catalyst  

New Hampshire Institute of Art's college magazine.