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Humanities to Go Catalog of Programs and Presenters

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Welcome to

Humanities to Go! New Hampshire Humanities has been connecting people to culture, history, places, ideas and one another for four decades. We bring the thrill of learning and the power of ideas to people of all walks of life, in all corners of the state. No matter what the topic, our goal is to spark open-ended questions of meaning and value. Essential questions. Ones that are important, and timeless, and can’t be answered with a yes, a no, or a fact. How each of us answers essential questions is what makes us who we are. New Hampshire Humanities’ most accessible and far-reaching program is our speakers bureau, Humanities to Go. It enables nonprofit organizations and community groups to offer free, high-quality cultural programs to the public at minimal cost to the host. Humanities to Go presenters include faculty members at our state’s colleges and universities as well as spoton performers of living history, engaging teachers, and dynamic community-based scholars. Each has translated in-depth knowledge about a topic into a single, compelling presentation with built-in time for questions and discussion. Our presenters are an important part of the intellectual capital of our state. You and your audiences are, too! Explore the catalog and our website www.nhhumanities.org. On the Humanities to Go page, you’ll find a checklist for scheduling and hosting programs and a form to use to apply for New Hampshire Humanities support. Be sure to check our online calendar for other New Hampshire Humanities events in your community or region. Enjoy! Humanities to Go receives generous support from:

AND FROM PEOPLE LIKE YOU. Make your gift to support lifelong learning and thoughtful conversation at

www.nhhumanities.org

Thank you! 2


American History From Guns to Gramophones: Civil War and the Technology that Shaped America Rosie’s Mom: Forgotten Women of the First World War The Capital Crime of Witchcraft: What the Primary Sources Tell Us

Table of Contents Carrie Brown

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Carrie Brown

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Margo Burns 11 Pleasures of the Parlor: Playlists from a Victorian iPod Marya Danihel 11 New England Lighthouses and the People Who Kept Them Jeremy D'Entremont 12 Oil, Ice and Bone: Arctic Whaler Nathaniel Ransom Helen Frink 12 Discovering New England Stone Walls Kevin Gardner 12 Abby Hutchinson's Sweet Freedom Songs: Songs and Stories for Abolition and Women's Suffrage Deborah Anne Goss 12 Returning North with the Spring: Retracing the Journey of Naturalist Edwin Way Teale John Harris 13 The Founding Fathers: What Were They Thinking? Richard Hesse 13 Lafayette and the Farewell Tour: An American Idol Alan Hoffman 13 Lafayette: Symbol of Franco-American Friendship Alan Hoffman 13 African-American Soldiers and Sailors of NH During the American Revolution Glenn Knoblock 14 African-American Submariners of World War II and Beyond Glenn Knoblock 14

Robert Rogers of the Rangers - Tragic Hero

George Morrison

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Benedict Arnold: Patriot and Traitor? George Morrison 15 A Walk Back in Time: The Secrets of Cellar Holes Adair Mulligan 15 The Connecticut: New England’s Great River Adair Mulligan 15 New England Utopia: Transcendental Communities Pontine Theatre 15 Colonial Stories: The Tangled Lives of Native Americans and English Settlers Jo Radner 15 Wit and Wisdom: Humor in 19th-Century New England Jo Radner 16 Collecting John Paul Jones: America’s First Action Hero J. Dennis Robinson 16 All Eyes Are Upon Us: Racial Struggles in the Northeast, from Jackie Robinson to Deval Patrick Jason Sokol 16 Poor Houses and Town Farms: The Hard Row for Paupers Steve Taylor 16 Indian Wars of New England Michael Tougias 17 George Washington Spied Here: Spies and Spying in the American Revolutionary War (1775-1783) Douglas Wheeler 17 All Aboard the Titanic

Ted Zalewski

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Ancient History Sports, Meritocracy, and Democracy in the Ancient and Modern Worlds

Paul Christesen

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Caesar: The Man from Venus

Sebastian Lockwood

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Homer's Odysseus

Sebastian Lockwood

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The Epic of Gilgamesh

Sebastian Lockwood

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How Did the Greeks Believe their Myths?

R. Scott Smith

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Rome and Pompeii: Discovering and Preserving the Past

R. Scott Smith

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Anthropology and Archaeology Spirit of Place: Native Lands and Cultures of the American Southwest

Patrick D. Anderson

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Digging into Native History in New Hampshire

Robert Goodby

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12,000 Years Ago in the Granite State

Robert Goodby

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J. Dennis Robinson

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Treasure from the Isles of Shoals: How New Archaeology is Changing Old History

Art, Architecture and Film

Movie Mavericks: Filmakers who Challenge the Hollywood System

Patrick D. Anderson

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Understanding the Movies: The Art of Film

Patrick D. Anderson

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Sennett, Chaplin, Keaton, and the Art of Silent Film Comedy

Patrick D. Anderson

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Cristina Ashjian

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Exemplary Country Estates of New Hampshire From Mickey to Magoo: The Golden Age of American Animation

Margo Burns

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Imperial Russian FabergĂŠ Eggs

Marina Forbes

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Russian Iconography: 1,000 Years of Tradition

Marina Forbes

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Russian Lacquer Boxes: From Craft to Fine Art

Marina Forbes

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Traditional Matryoshka Nested Doll Making: From Russia to New England

Marina Forbes

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Television: The Art and Ethics of Manipulation Big House, Little House, Back House, Barn: The Connected Farm Buildings of New England New Hampshire on High: Historic and Unusual Weathervanes of the Granite State

John Gfroerer Thomas Hubka Glenn Knoblock

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Chartres Cathedral: Philosophy and Theology as Art

William "Ty" Perry

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The Grand Resort Hotels of the White Mountains: Architecture, History, and the Preservation Record

Bryant Tolles, Jr.

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New England's Colonial Meetinghouses and their Impact on American Society

Paul Wainwright

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New England Quilts and the Stories They Tell Wild and Colorful: Victorian Architecture in New Hampshire

Pamela Weeks Richard Guy Wilson

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Ethics, Philosophy and Law

Granite Gallows: The Origin of New Hampshire's Debate Over the Death Penalty

Chris Benedetto

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Margo Burns

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A Conversation with John Marshall

Richard Hesse

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Civil Liberties vs. National Security

Richard Hesse

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The Founding Fathers: What Were They Thinking?

Richard Hesse

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Alan Koop

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Kent McConnell

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Leslie Pasternack

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The Quest for Happiness

Maria Sanders

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Introducing Children to Philosophy—and Why it Matters

Timm Triplett

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Douglas Wheeler

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The Capital Crime of Witchcraft: What the Primary Sources Tell Us

Only in America: History and Health Care in the United States War, Justice, and Non-Violence: Perspectives and Paradoxes Speaking of War: Staging the Voices of Veterans in Post-9/11 Theatre

Spies in Time

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Table of Contents

Language and Literature Comics in World History and Cultures Unlaunch'd Voices: An Evening with Walt Whitman

Marek Bennett Stephen Collins

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The Use of Hiphop Rhetoric to Combat the Criminalization of Black, Brown, and Red Youth Marcos Del Hierro

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Grail Mania: 21st-Century Retelling of 12th -Century Heresy

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Antione de Saint-ExupĂŠry: the Man Who Wrote The Little Prince Strange Terrain: How Not to "Get" Poetry and Let it Get You Instead

Diana Durham Scott Eaton

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Alice B. Fogel

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Familiar Fields: The Power of Community in the Work of Sarah Orne Jewett

Pontine Theatre

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Pretty Halcyon Days, on the Beach with Ogden Nash

Pontine Theatre

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Silver Lake Summers: An E.E. Cummings Revue

Pontine Theatre

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Rudyard Kipling Revisited

Jackson Gillman

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A Woman's Take on Courtly Love: The Lais of Marie de France

Clia Goodwin

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J.R.R. Tolkien and the Uses of Fantasy

Clia Goodwin

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The Arthurian Revival in New England: The Clash of the Ideal and the Real

Clia Goodwin

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Not in Front of the Children: The Art and Importance of Fairy Tales

Ingrid Graff

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The Case of the Detective Who Refused to Die: Arthur Conan Doyle and Sherlock Holmes

Ingrid Graff

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Evolving English: From Beowulf and Chaucer to Texts and Tweets

Karolyn Kinane

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Calvin Knickerbocker

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Ann McClellan

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Faith and Fantastic Fiction

Maren Tirabassi

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Sitting Under a Fig Tree: Spiritual Autobiography, Augustine to Lamott

Maren Tirabassi

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Motivating the World War II Home Front via Magazine and Radio Advertising (Not So) Elementary, My Dear Watson: The Popularity of Sherlock Holmes

Living History Meet Lucy Stone: Enter the Antebellum World of the Abolition and Women's Rights Movements

Judith Black

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Liberty is Our Motto! Songs and Stories of the Hutchinson Famliy Singers

Steve Blunt

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The Old Country Fiddler: Charles Ross Taggart, Traveling Entertainer

Adam Boyce

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Unlaunch'd Voices: An Evening with Walt Whitman

Stephen Collins

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Galileo Galilei, the Starry Messenger

Michael Francis

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Rudyard Kipling Revisited

Jackson Gillman

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Deborah Anne Goss

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Abby Hutchinson's Sweet Freedom Songs: Songs and Stories for Abolition and Women's Suffrage A Conversation with John Marshall

Richard Hesse

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Caesar: The Man from Venus

Sebastian Lockwood

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Homer's Odysseus

Sebastian Lockwood

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The Epic of Gilgamesh

Sebastian Lockwood

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A Visit with Queen Victoria

Sally Mummey

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Mary Todd Lincoln: An Unconventional Woman

Sally Mummey

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Mary Todd Lincoln: Wife and Widow

Sally Mummey

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Living History (continued) I Can't Die But Once - Harriet Tubman's Civil War

Gwendolyn Quezaire-Presutti

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"If I am Not For Myself, Who Will Be for Me?" George Washington's Runaway Slave

Gwendolyn Quezaire-Presutti

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A Soldier's Mother Tells Her Story

Sharon Wood

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A Tribute to Sarah Josepha Hale

Sharon Wood

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Abraham and Mary Lincoln: The Long and the Short of It

Steve and Sharon Wood

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Our National Thanksgiving: With Thanks to President Lincoln and Mrs. Hale

Steve and Sharon Wood

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Steve Wood

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A Visit with Abraham Lincoln

Music History and Appreciation

Global Banjar: International Voices in Antebellum Banjo Music

Marek Bennett and Woody Pringle

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Rally 'Round the Flag: The American Civil War Through Folksong

Marek Bennett and Woody Pringle

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Old Time Rules Will Prevail: The Fiddle Contest in New Hampshire and New England Pleasures of the Parlor: Playlists from a Victorian iPod

Adam Boyce Marya Danihel

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The Use of Hiphop Rhetoric to Combat the Criminalization of Black, Brown, and Red Youth Marcos Del Hierro

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Abby Hutchinson's Sweet Freedom Songs: Songs and Stories for Abolition and Women's Suffrage

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A Night with Two Old Friends

Deborah Anne Goss Emery Hutchins and Jim Prendergast

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Your Hit Parade: Twenty-five Years Presenting America's Top Popular Songs

Calvin Knickerbocker

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Wacky Songs that Made Us Laugh

Calvin Knickerbocker

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Dudley Laufman

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Contra Dancing in New Hampshire Then and Now The Guitar in Latin America: Continuities, Changes, and Bicultural Strumming

JosĂŠ Lezcano

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Crime and Punishment on the Isles of Shoals: The Ballad of Louis Wagner

John Perrault

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Poems on the Edge of Song

John Perrault

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The Ballad Lives!

John Perrault

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Lucie Therrien

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Jordan Tirrell-Wysocki

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Banjos, Bones, and Ballads

Jeff Warner

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Music in my Pockets: Family Fun in Folk Music

Jeff Warner

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Songs of Old New Hampshire

Jeff Warner

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The Music History of French-Canadians, Franco-Americans, Acadians and Cajuns Songs of Emigration: Storytelling Through Traditional Irish Music

Nature and Adventure New Hampshire on Skis

Harnessing History: On the Trail of New Hampshire's State Dog, the Chinook New England Lighthouses and the People Who Kept Them Oil, Ice and Bone: Arctic Whaler Nathaniel Ransom Discovering New England Stone Walls

E. John B. Allen Bob Cottrell

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Jeremy D'Entremont

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Helen Frink

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Kevin Gardner

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Table of Contents

Nature and Adventure (continued) Returning North with the Spring: Retracing the Journey of Naturalist Edwin Way Teale

John Harris

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Darby Field and the "First" Ascent of Mount Washington

Allen Koop

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The White Mountain Huts: Past and Future

Allen Koop

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Hal Lyon

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Fatal Forecast: An Incredible True Tale of Disaster and Survival at Sea

Michael Tougias

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The Finest Hours: The True Story Behind the US Coast Guard's Most Daring Sea Rescue

Michael Tougias

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Dan Billin

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Angling in the Smile of the Great Spirit

New Hampshire History Abolitionists of Noyes Academy In the Evil Day: Individual Rights, Town Government, and the Crime that Stunned the Nation Pleasures of the Parlor: Playlists from a Victorian iPod New England Lighthouses and the People Who Kept Them

Richard Adams Carey

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Marya Danihel

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Jeremy D'Entremont

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A House on the Bay: Life on 17th-Century New Hampshire's Coastal Frontier

Neill DePaoli

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Astride Two Worlds: The Odd Adventures of John Gyles

Neill DePaoli

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Teddy Roosevelt's Nobel Prize: New Hampshire and the Portsmouth Peace Treaty

Charles Doleac

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Discovering New England Stone Walls

Kevin Gardner

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John Winant: New Hampshire Man of the World

Richard Hesse

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African-American Soldiers and Sailors of New Hampshire during the American Revolution

Glenn Knoblock

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Brewing in NH: An Informal History of Beer in the Granite State from Colonial Times to the Present

Glenn Knoblock

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Covered Bridges of New Hampshire

Glenn Knoblock

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New Hampshire Cemeteries and Gravestones

Glenn Knoblock

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New Hampshire on High: Historic and Unusual Weathervanes of the Granite State

Glenn Knoblock

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Allen Koop

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Town by Town, Watershed by Watershed: Native Americans in NH

John and Donna Moody

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A History of Native Burial Looting, Destruction and Protection in NH

John and Donna Moody

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Vanished Veterans - NH's Civil War Monuments and Memorials

George Morrison

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Having a Fine Time in Manchester: Vintage Post Cards and Local History

Robert Perreault

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Putting Human Faces on the Textile Industry: The Workers of the Amoskeag Manufacturing Company

Robert Perreault

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A Taste of the Old Country in the New: Franco-Americans of Manchester

Robert Perreault

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Stark Decency: New Hampshire's World War II German Prisoner of War Camp

The Making of Strawbery Banke

J. Dennis Robinson

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Who Won the War of 1812? New Hampshire's Forgotten Patriot Pirates

J. Dennis Robinson

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New Hampshire's Long Love-Hate Relationship with its Agricultural Fairs

Steve Taylor

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New Hampshire's One-Room Rural Schools: The Romance and the Reality

Steve Taylor

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New Hampshire Roads Taken - Or Not

Steve Taylor

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Poor Houses and Town Farms: The Hard Row for Paupers

Steve Taylor

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Darryl Thompson

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The Shaker Legacy

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Hampshire History in Film

Powerful as Truth

John Gfroerer

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Rights & Reds

John Gfroerer

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World War II New Hampshire

John Gfroerer

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Uprooted: Heartache and Hope in New Hampshire

Whitney Howarth, John Krueckeberg, or Sara Withers

Meetinghouse: The Heart of Washington, New Hampshire

Ron Jager

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Oral History, Storytelling and Writing Family, Memory, Place: Writing Family Stories

Martha Donovan and Maura MacNeil

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Marina Kirsch

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Flight of Rememberance: World War II from the Losing Side and the Dream that Led to Aerospace Engineering Oil, Ice and Bone: Arctic Whaler Nathaniel Ransom

Helen Frink

Speaking of War: Staging the Voices of Veterans in Post-9/11 Theatre

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Leslie Pasternack

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Family Stories: How and Why to Remember and Tell Them

Jo Radner

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Yankee Ingenuity: Stories of Headstrong and Resourceful People

Jo Radner

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That Reminds Me of a Story

Rebecca Rule

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Crosscut: The Mills, Logging and Life on the Androscoggin

Rebecca Rule

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Moved and Seconded: Town Meeting in New Hampshire

Rebecca Rule

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Jordan Tirrell-Wysocki

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Songs of Emigration: Storytelling Through Traditional Irish Music

Technology and Society Galileo Galilei, The Starry Messenger

Michael Francis

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John Gfroerer

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Allen Koop

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Rebecca Noel

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Jo Radner

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Maria Sanders

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Personal Privacy in Cyberspace

Herman Tavani

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Ethical Aspects of Converging Technologies

Herman Tavani

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Intellectual Property Disputes in Cyberspace

Herman Tavani

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Television: The Art and Ethics of Manipulation Only in America: History and Health Care in the United States Beware the Chair: The Medieval Roots of School Exercise (and Your Standing Desk) Yankee Ingenuity: Stories of Headstrong and Resourceful People The Quest for Happiness

World History, Cultures and Religions

Comics in World History and Cultures Global Banjar: International Voices in Antebellum Banjo Music

Marek Bennett Marek Bennet and Woody Pringle

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An Introduction to Sufism, the Spiritual Path to Islam

Mohamed Defaa

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The Middle East

Mohamed Defaa

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Big and Small Players in the New Great Game: Afghanistan and its Region A Short Course on Islam for Non-Muslims

Rachel Lehr Charles Kennedy

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Table of Contents

World History, Cultures, and Religions (continued) Flight of Rememberance: World War II from the Losing Side and the Dream that Led to Aerospace Engineering

Marina Kirsch

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The Guitar and the Devil: Music, Magic, and Ritual Among Ecuadorian Indians

JosĂŠ Lezcano

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Perspectives on Arab Culture and the Influence of Islam

Nabil Migalli

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Beware the Chair: The Medieval Roots of School Exercise (and Your Standing Desk)

Rebecca Noel

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God, the Early Years: A Brief History of God in the Rise of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam

Nicole Ruane

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World War II Hero of Conscience: The Sousa Mendes Story Douglas Wheeler Presenter Directory

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Note: On the program description pages, the number listed below each presenter's name in the left or right margin refers to the page on which that particular presenter's bio and contact information may be found.

To book a Humanities to Go program, visit the Humanities to Go page of our website: www.nhhumanities.org. There you will find the necessary forms, instructions for submitting an application, and a catalog searchable by program or by presenter name.

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American History

See additional programs in New Hampshire History

From Guns to Gramophones: Civil War and the Technology that Shaped America

Carrie Brown p. 77

Carrie Brown explores the technological triumph that helped save the Union and then transformed the nation. During the Civil War, northern industry produced a million-and-a-half rifles, along with tens of thousands of pistols and carbines. How did the North produce all of those weapons? The answer lies in new machinery and methods for producing guns with interchangeable parts. Once the system of mass production had been tested and perfected, what happened after the war? In the period from 1870 to 1910 new factory technology and new print media fueled the development of mass consumerism. While this program tells a broad, national story, it focuses on the critical and somewhat surprising role of Vermont and New Hampshire in producing industrial technology that won the war and changed American life.

Rosie’s Mom: Forgotten Women of the First World War

~ New ~

One hundred years ago, a full generation before Rosie the Riveter, American women rolled up their sleeves and entered war industries where they had never been welcome before. They ran powerful machinery, learned new skills, and faced the sullen hostility of the men in the shops. In this illustrated lecture, historian Carrie Brown reveals their courage and their hard work, asks what impact “the Great War” had on their lives, and explores how these women helped shape the work that their more famous daughters would do in the next World War.

The Capital Crime of Witchcraft: What the Primary Sources Tell Us On first impression, the witchcraft trials of the Colonial era may seem to have been nothing but a free-for-all, fraught with hysterics. Margo Burns explores an array of prosecutions in 17th–century New England, using facsimiles of primary source manuscripts, from first formal complaints to arrest warrants, indictments of formal charges to death warrants, and the reversals of attainder and rescinding of excommunications years after the fact, demonstrating how methodically and logically the Salem Court worked. This program focuses on the Salem witchcraft trials of 1692 and 1693, when nineteen people were hanged and one crushed to death, but also examines a variety of other cases against women in New Hampshire, Massachusetts, and Connecticut.

Pleasures of the Parlor: Playlists from a Victorian iPod The music we listen to every day says a lot about us and about our society—and so it was with our Victorian forebears. Their favorite songs reveal much about their inner lives while also reflecting developments in the culture at large. Marya Danihel discusses and performs songs middle-class Victorians sang for pleasure at home in New England, further illustrating her social and music history with 19th-century artwork and memoirs. Melodious, witty, and touching, this music includes parlor songs, Civil War songs, and selections by Stephen Foster and his contemporaries.

Facing page: Every girl pulling for victory - Victory Girls United War Work Campaign Edward Penfield, (1866-1925) Published 1918 Lithograph, color ; 70 x 56 cm.

Margo Burns p. 77

Marya Danihel p. 78

Note: On the program description pages, the page number listed below each presenter's name in the left or right margin refers to the page on which that particular presenter's bio and contact information may be found.

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American History Jeremy D’Entremont p. 79

Helen Frink p. 80

Kevin Gardner p. 80

Deborah Anne Goss p. 81

~ New ~ New England Lighthouses and the People Who Kept Them Everyone knows that there's "something about lighthouses" that gives them broad appeal, but their vital role in our history and culture is little appreciated. Our early nation was built on maritime economy, and lighthouses were part of the system that made that possible. Due to automation, traditional lighthouse keeping is a way of life that has faded into the past. Jeremy D'Entremont tells the history of New England's historic and picturesque lighthouses primarily focusing on the colorful and dramatic stories of lighthouse keepers and their families.

~ New ~ Oil, Ice, and Bone: Arctic Whaler Nathaniel Ransom In January 2016, the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association announced the discovery of the wreckage of two sunken whale ships off the Alaskan coast. Oil, Ice, and Bone tells the story of these vessels and how they came to be lost in the greatest whaling disaster in American history. Arctic whaler Nathaniel Ransom served as third mate of one of the ships abandoned in 1871. In 1860, as a fourteen-year-old, he followed his five older brothers into the dank forecastle of a whaling vessel. For fifteen years he hunted seventy-ton bowheads in Arctic waters for the many uses of “bone.” Blades of flexible baleen from the leviathan’s enormous jaw raised its value, even as petroleum gradually replaced whale oil as a source of lighting. In 1871 Ransom survived the loss of thirty-two whaling vessels in the frigid waters off Alaska’s Icy Cape. He kept a journal – and held onto it as he and his shipmates jettisoned weapons and warm clothing to save their very lives. His eyewitness account of whaling’s brutal slaughter and sudden losses is enriched by presenter Helen Frink’s affection for an ancestor she discovered through his journals a century after his death.

Discovering New England Stone Walls Why are we so fascinated with stone walls? Kevin Gardner, author of The Granite Kiss, explains how and why New England came to acquire its thousands of miles of stone walls, the ways in which they and other dry stone structures were built, how their styles emerged and changed over time and their significance to the famous New England landscape. Along the way, Kevin occupies himself building a miniature wall or walls on a tabletop, using tiny stones from a five-gallon bucket.

~ New ~ Abby Hutchinson’s Sweet Freedom Songs:

Songs and Stories of the Struggle for Abolition and Woman Suffrage Deborah Anne Goss appears as Abby Hutchinson Patton, recalling mid-19th-century U.S. and New Hampshire history and performing rousing anthems, heartfelt ballads, and humorous ditties sung during anti-slavery and early women’s rights struggles. In the 1840s and 1850s the Hutchinson Family Singers strongly influenced the opinions of the era with their popular songs promoting healthy living and social justice—most prominently the abolition of slavery. Participants are encouraged to join in the singing on several choruses or read a poem or political diatribe of the time.

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American History Returning North with the Spring: Retracing the Journey of Naturalist Edwin Way Teale

~ New ~

John Harris p. 81

In 1947, Edwin Way Teale, the most popular naturalist in the decade between Aldo Leopold and Rachel Carson, followed the progress of spring over four months from the Everglades to the summit of Mount Washington. His best-selling book North with the Spring recounts the epic journey he and his wife Nellie undertook. In 2012, John Harris set out to retrace Teale’s route, stopping at unfamiliar wild places on the same calendar date on which Teale visited. Using Teale’s journal notes and photographs, Harris examined and compared changes in the flora, fauna, and lives of the people along the way. His account documents the losses, details the transformations, and celebrates the victories, for a remarkable number of east coast refuges have grown wilder during the intervening years.

The Founding Fathers: What Were They Thinking? In 1787, delegates gathered in Philadelphia to address a wide variety of crises facing the young United States of America and produced a charter for a new government. In modern times, competing political and legal claims are frequently based on what those delegates intended. Mythology about the founders and their work at the 1787 Convention has obscured both fact and legitimate analysis of the events leading to the agreement called the Constitution. Richard Hesse explores the cast of characters called “founders,” the problems they faced, and the solutions they fashioned.

Lafayette and the Farewell Tour: An American Idol General Lafayette, born the Marquis de Lafayette in Auvergne, France, was truly an American Idol in the 19th century. One proof is that more than 80 American counties, cities, towns, and countless roads were named in his honor, from Lafayette Road in Portsmouth to Mount Lafayette in Franconia. Lafayette’s extraordinary reputation was based on his military record in the Revolution, his friendship with George Washington, his continued support of American interests, his storybook life, and perhaps most importantly, his Farewell Tour of America when he visited all 24 states and Washington D.C. as the last surviving major general of the Continental Army. Alan Hoffman uses Lafayette’s visits to New Hampshire, to Portsmouth in 1824, and to Concord in 1825, to illustrate the adulation with which the American people greeted Lafayette on his Farewell Tour.

Richard Hesse p. 82

Alan Hoffman p. 82

Lafayette: Symbol of Franco-American Friendship Alan Hoffman explores the role Lafayette played as a symbol of Franco-American friendship both during his lifetime, principally from 1777 to 1792, and after his death. To the extent the American people remember Lafayette, they recall his role in our Revolution and his activities on behalf of American interests in the 1780s. Hoffman explores this initial period of Franco-American friendship but focuses on Lafayette’s posthumous symbolic role: as the inspiration for the Statue of Liberty, as a facilitator of America’s entry into and participation in the Great War in 1917, and as the emblem of the current thaw in Franco-American relations.

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American History Glenn Knoblock p. 83

African American-Soldiers and Sailors of New Hampshire During the American Revolution One of the most interesting aspects of the American Revolution is the role played by African Americans in the fight for independence. Both free African Americans and those that were enslaved were key in manning state militias and Continental Army units, as well as serving on the high seas in the Navy and on privately armed ships. Indeed, their service to the colonies was crucial in a conflict that lasted nearly seven years. Prohibited from serving in military units and largely considered “undesirable elements,” how is it that these African-American soldiers came to fight for the cause of liberty, even when their own personal liberty was not guaranteed? Glenn Knoblock examines the history of African-American soldiers’ service during the war, including how and why they enlisted, their interaction with white soldiers, service on the battlefields, how they were perceived by the enemy and the officers under whom they served, and their treatment after the war.

African-American Submariners of World War II and Beyond African-American soldiers and sailors saw extensive action during World War II in nearly every theatre of operations. Though few in number, African-American submariners played an important role in manning the navy submarines, many built at Portsmouth, which wrought havoc against Japanese naval and merchant vessels. Limited by the U.S. Navy’s segregation policies to service as officers’ stewards, many African-American sailors in fact performed combat duty with great bravery and distinction, including such men as Walter Wilson, the battle-station helmsman aboard the legendary submarine Trigger; Bronze Star medalist George Lytle aboard Drum; and Arthur Brown, who participated in the rescue and care of many refugees liberated from Japanese-held islands while serving aboard Narwhal. Glenn Knoblock’s talk, based on hundreds of interviews with World War II veterans and years of research, leaves the audience with a better understanding of the Submarine Force during World War II and appreciation for America’s undersea warriors.

George Morrison p. 85

~ New ~ Robert Rogers of the Rangers - Tragic Hero On a frontier where individualism flourished, New Hampshire’s consummate woodsman was just the leader to bring his men back safely from deep in dangerous country, even in stormy, freezing weather. The famous "Major Rogers’” renown was such that he became perhaps the single-bestknown American on both sides of the Atlantic. In October 1765, a private audience with young King George III led, eleven months later, to the launching of an expedition to find the long-dreamed-of Northwest passage to the Pacific – forty years before Lewis and Clark. But who was this frontier farmer, raised in Dunbarton? Thirty years after his death in obscurity in May 1795, Rogers' exploits were mined by James Fenimore Cooper for his best-selling novels, and in the 20th and 21st centuries, for other histories, novels, movies, and television. George Morrison takes us along on a journey from colonial North America to the 21st century. A color mezzotint of a representation of American ranger Robert Rogers (1776) (Anne S. K. Brown Military Collection)

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American History Benedict Arnold: Patriot and Traitor? We all think we know the story of Benedict Arnold, the American Revolutionary War general who fought for the Continental Army but then defected to the British. Recalled mainly as a traitor for his 1780 defection, Arnold had risked his life and fortune for American freedom in courageous exploits between 1775 and 1778, when the dream of independence was at its most fragile. As an officer in the Continental Army Arnold ably led American forces in desperate circumstances against impossible odds–in a blinding snowstorm, through a howling wilderness, and against the extraordinary might of the Royal Navy. George Morrison will take you on a journey through New England, Canada, and New York tracing the complex story of this infamous American icon.

A Walk Back in Time: The Secrets of Cellar Holes Northern New England is full of reminders of past lives: stone walls, old foundations, a centuryold lilac struggling to survive as the forest reclaims a once-sunny dooryard. What forces shaped settlement, and later abandonment, of these places? Adair Mulligan explores the rich story to be discovered in what remains behind. See how one town has set out to create an inventory of its cellar holes, piecing together the clues in the landscape. Such a project can help landowners know what to do if they have archaeological sites on their land and help stimulate interest in a town’s future through its past.

George Morrison p. 85

Adair Mulligan p. 86

The Connecticut: New England’s Great River The largest river in New England rises in a small beaver pond near the Canadian border and flows over 400 miles through four states, falling 2,670 feet to the sea through America’s only watershedbased national fish and wildlife refuge. Adair Mulligan leads an armchair tour of this great river in New Hampshire and Vermont, exploring its history and natural beauty through the seasons and among the communities that have sprung up along its banks. Next, the discussion will shift to how the river has influenced the lives of those who live there, and how they, in turn, have affected the river. Much more than a travelogue, this presentation explores the many issues involved in managing the health of this major river, and how citizens from all walks of life have created a vision for its future.

New England Utopia: Transcendental Communities Exploring the legacy of the 19 -century New England Transcendentalists, Pontine Theatre focuses on three influential Massachusetts communities: the circle of philosophers surrounding Ralph Waldo Emerson in Concord; Bronson Alcott’s ill-fated utopian experiment at Fruitlands in Harvard; and the ambitious communal farm founded by George Ripley at Brook Farm in West Roxbury. th

Colonial Stories: The Tangled Lives of Native Americans and English Settlers What kinds of stories shaped New England identities in the 17th and 18th centuries? In this performance, storyteller/historian Jo Radner juxtaposes Native American oral traditions and stories told by her own New England ancestors to reveal a complex colonial “middle ground” in which English settlers and Native peoples saw one another as defenders and trespassers, pursuers and refugees, relatives and aliens, kind neighbors and ruthless destroyers.

Pontine Theatre p. 87

Jo Radner p. 88

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American History Jo Radner p. 88

J. Dennis Robinson p. 88

Wit and Wisdom: Humor in 19th-Century New England Whatever did New Englanders do on long winter evenings before cable, satellite, and the internet? In the decades before and after the Civil War, our rural ancestors used to create neighborhood events to improve their minds. Community members male and female would compose and read aloud homegrown, handwritten literary “newspapers” full of keen verbal wit. Sometimes serious, sometimes sentimental, but mostly very funny, these “newspapers” were common in villages across Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont and revealed the hopes, fears, humor, and surprisingly daring behavior of our forebears. Jo Radner shares excerpts from her forthcoming book about hundreds of these “newspapers” and provides examples from villages in your region.

Collecting John Paul Jones: America’s First Action Hero Everyone knows his name but few know his story. The real John Paul Jones was born in Scotland and spent more than a year in New Hampshire during the American Revolution. A jealous genius, Jones (not his real name) was a complex, self-made naval hero on a quest for glory. J. Dennis Robinson tells Jones’s story, illustrated with images from his own extensive collection of “Jonesiana.” Robinson shows how America rejected Jones, then used his name and image to sell everything from whiskey to cigarettes, to women’s clothing—even to recruit for the U.S. Navy. Captain John Paul Jones, Continental Navy, (1747-1792) Cecilia Beaux (1855-1942), 1906. U.S. Naval Academy Museum, Annapolis, Maryland

Jason Sokol p. 89

~ New ~ All Eyes Are Upon Us: Racial Struggles in the Northeast, from Jackie Robinson to Deval Patrick From Brooklyn to Boston, from World War II to the present, Jason Sokol traces the modern history of race and politics in the Northeast. Why did white fans come out to support Jackie Robinson as he broke baseball’s color barrier in 1947 even as Brooklyn’s blacks were shunted into segregated neighborhoods? How was African-American politician Ed Brooke of Massachusetts, who won a Senate seat in 1966, undone by the resistance to desegregation busing in Boston? Is the Northeast’s history a microcosm of America as a whole: outwardly democratic, but inwardly conflicted over race?

Steve Taylor p. 90

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Poor Houses and Town Farms: The Hard Row for Paupers From its earliest settlements New Hampshire has struggled with issues surrounding the treatment of its poor. The early Northeastern colonies followed the lead of England’s 1601 Poor Law, which imposed compulsory taxes for maintenance of the poor but made no distinction between the “vagrant, vicious poor” and the helpless, and honest poor. This confusion persisted for generations and led directly to establishment of alms houses and poor farms in most of the state’s towns, and later, county institutions. Collectively, this formed a dark chapter in New Hampshire history. Steve Taylor will examine how paupers were treated in these facilities and how reformers eventually succeeded in closing them down.


American History Indian Wars of New England Michael Tougias takes the audience on a historic journey as the Colonists and Native Americans fought for control of New England from the Pilgrims’ first arrival to the closing days of the French and Indian Wars. Using slides of maps, battle sites, roadside history, and period drawings, Tougias covers the Pequot War, King Philip’s War, and the French and Indian Wars. Strategies of Native and Colonial raids are all featured. These include the Rogers Rangers’ raid on the St. Francis Indian village, Lovewell’s Fight in New Hampshire and Maine, the Fort at #4, and Metacom’s uprising in the Connecticut River Valley.

George Washington Spied Here: Spies and Spying in the American Revolutionary War (1775 - 1783)

Michael Tougias p. 91

Douglas Wheeler p. 91

Based on recently discovered historical materials and recent books, this program by Douglas Wheeler is an inquiry into the life and death of America’s first spy, the patriot-martyr Nathan Hale, of Coventry, Connecticut. Wheeler takes audiences on a journey through the spy world of the Culper Spy Ring of New York, Long Island, and Connecticut—the most secret of the American spy rings and the most successful in getting useful intelligence to General George Washington beginning in 1778, two years after Hale’s tragic execution by the British. The Father of our country was also our first Intelligence Chief. The program is illustrated with images of the main places and dramatis personae of this unusual network of patriot secret agents and couriers.

All Aboard the Titanic “All Aboard the Titanic” responds to people’s enduring fascination with this historic, and very human, event. Including and moving beyond the physical facts of the story, Ted Zalewski explores the personal experiences of selected passengers and crew, including those with New Hampshire affiliations, emphasizing examples of individual courage and triumph.

Ted Zalewski p. 92

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Jason and His Teacher Collier's magazine frontispiece and A Wonder Book and Tanglewood Tales interior illustration 1909 Maxfield Parrish (American, 1870 - 1966)

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Ancient History Sports, Meritocracy, and Democracy in the Ancient and Modern Worlds Please see listing in on-line catalog.

Paul Christesen p. 78

(not available 2016-17)

Caesar: The Man from Venus

Sebastian Lockwood

Meet Caesar, descended from the Goddess Venus. This program introduces Caesar as a young boy living with his mother, Aurelia, and his Aunt Julia — two women who shape the boy who will be the most powerful man on earth. Using a rich variety of texts, Sebastian Lockwood shows Caesar as a man who clearly saw his destiny and fulfilled that destiny with the help of remarkable women – Cleopatra amongst them. A poet, historian, linguist, architect, general, politician, and engineer, was Caesar truly of the Populi party for the People of Roma? Or a despot and tyrant? This performance shows Caesar as a remarkable genius who transformed his world in ways that still resonate today.

p. 84

Homer’s Odysseus Using the well known scenes of The Odyssey, Sebastian Lockwood delivers the passion and intensity of the great epic that deserves to be heard told as it was by bards in the days of old. Lockwood says, “The best compliment is when a ten-year-old comes up and says, ‘I felt like I was there.’” That is the magic of the performance that takes students and adults alike back into the text.The following Q&A can focus on translations and the storytelling techniques used by Homer.

The Epic of Gilgamesh This is our earliest epic. It is at least 4,000 years old, but in performance we discover a dynamic and thrilling tale of heroes, friendship, battles with a monster, and death, followed by a journey to the other world to meet Utnapishtin, whom we know as Noah. Gilgamesh will ask him about life and death and he will come home with a great story. In the Q&A after the performance, Sebastian Lockwood can tell the tale of how the tablets were found in Iraq and how scholars broke the code to reveal the story and its Biblical parallels.

How Did the Greeks Believe their Myths?

~ New ~

Greek myth exerted a powerful influence on the Greeks and Romans, and as cultures and circumstances changed, different methods developed to incorporate mythology. Perhaps most notably, says presenter R. Scott Smith, Christians adopted and adapted Greek myths by allegorizing the stories, seeking to uncover the real—and Christian—truths underneath the facade of pagan gods and heroes. Some Greeks tried to rationalize the stories, imagining that they were simply ordinary events that were blown out of proportion. Others saw myth as pseudo-history, or sometimes pseudo-science. This program will investigate the major ways that the Greeks tried to explain and interpret their own mythical past over the course of a thousand years.

R. Scott Smith p. 89

Rome and Pompeii: Discovering and Preserving the Past Rome and Pompeii were part of the “Grand Tour” for upper-class elite from the 17th through 19th centuries, and remain today the primary sites through which we reach back into the Roman Empire’s past. R. Scott Smith explores the archaeological remains of Rome, the “Eternal City,” and Pompeii, the town that was buried by the eruption of Vesuvius in 79 AD, and discusses the problems of preserving these ancient ruins. The latter issue is especially important as the great monuments that symbolize the past have recently been threatened (the Coliseum by frigid temperatures in 2011-12) or completely destroyed (The House of the Gladiator by torrential rains in 2010).

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Anthropology and Archaeology Spirit of Place: Native Lands and Cultures of the American Southwest According to legend, a flute-playing locust led Pueblo ancestors (the prehistoric Anasazi) from the “Third World” into the current one. Patrick Anderson discusses ancient sites such as Mesa Verde, Chaco Canyon, Hovenweep, and Canyon de Chelley, which provide a wealth of material history that reveals a complex culture pieced together by archaeologists and cultural anthropologists.

Digging Into Native History in New Hampshire Abenaki history has been reduced to near-invisibility as a result of conquest, a conquering culture that placed little value on the Indian experience, and a strategy of self-preservation that required many Abenaki to go “underground,” concealing their true identities for generations to avoid discrimination and persecution. Robert Goodby reveals archaeological evidence that shows their deep presence here, inches below the earth’s surface.

Patrick D. Anderson p. 76

Robert Goodby p. 81

12,000 Years Ago in the Granite State The native Abenaki people played a central role in the history of the Monadnock region, defending it against English settlement and forcing the abandonment of Keene and other Monadnock area towns during the French and Indian Wars. Despite this, little is known about the Abenaki, and conventional histories often depict the first Europeans entering an untamed, uninhabited wilderness, rather than the homeland of people who had been there for hundreds of generations. Robert Goodby discusses how the real depth of Native history was revealed when an archaeological study prior to construction of the new Keene Middle School discovered traces of four structures dating to the end of the Ice Age. Undisturbed for 12,000 years, the site revealed information about the economy, gender roles, and household organization of the Granite State’s very first inhabitants, as well as evidence of social networks that extended for hundreds of miles across northern New England.

Treasure from the Isles of Shoals: How New Archaeology is Changing Old History

J. Dennis Robinson p. 88

There is treasure here but not the pirate kind. Scientific “digs” on Smuttynose Island are changing New England history. Archaeologist Nathan Hamilton has unearthed 300,000 artifacts to-date on this largely uninhabited rock at the Isles of Shoals. Evidence proves prehistoric Native Americans hunted New Hampshire’s only offshore islands 6,000 years ago. Hundreds of European fishermen split, salted, and dried valuable Atlantic cod here from the 1620s. “King Haley” ruled a survivalist kingdom here before Thomas Laighton struck tourist gold when his family took over the region’s first hotel on Smuttynose. Laighton’s daughter, Celia Thaxter, spun poetic tales of ghosts and pirates. J. Dennis Robinson, a longtime Smuttynose steward, explores the truth behind the romantic legends of Gosport Harbor in this colorful show-and-tell presentation.

Facing page: Archaeological study in preparation for building of the Keene, New Hampshire Middle School, 2009-2011 Photo courtesy of Robert Goodby

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Art, Architecture and Film Movie Mavericks: Filmmakers who Challenge the Hollywood System Patrick Anderson focuses on contemporary film directors and screenwriters in the United States whose originality, independence, and unconventional approaches to the medium have contributed to the evolution of the industry. The program provides a greater understanding of and appreciation for both the content and form of movies made outside the mainstream Hollywood system. He asks viewers to consider some of the key differences in theme, style, and narrative format between these works and the more conventional fare of so-called “classic cinema.” Among the filmmakers to be examined are Steven Soderbergh, David Lynch, John Sayles, Spike Lee, Quentin Tarantino, the Coen brothers, Wes Anderson, Sofia Coppola, P.T. Anderson, Jim Jarmusch, and Charlie Kaufman. By the end of the session, viewers will be more visually articulate and critically aware of how one “reads” a film.

Patrick D. Anderson p. 76

Understanding the Movies: The Art of Film Film is a powerful medium, generating billions of dollars and untold hours of entertainment around the world. Understanding how film creates and delivers ideas and how it shapes and reflects popular attitudes adds to our appreciation of the cinematic experience. Increase your film vocabulary and have fun discussing movies together with film buff and scholar Patrick Anderson.

Sennett, Chaplin, Keaton, and the Art of Silent Film Comedy Film was birthed in silence during the first three decades of the 20th century. Patrick Anderson shows how the social and cultural history of the United States is reflected in the celluloid strips that captured it, especially as the art was developed by these three filmmakers.

Exemplary Country Estates of New Hampshire

Cristina Ashjian

In the early 20 century, the New Hampshire Board of Agriculture launched a program to boost the rural economy and promote tourism through the sale of abandoned farms to summer residents. After introducing the country house movement, Cristina Ashjian focuses attention on some of the great country estates featured in the New Hampshire program between 1902 and 1913. Which private estates were recognized as exemplary, and who were their owners? Using historic images and texts, Ashjian discusses well-known estates now open to the public such as The Fells on Lake Sunapee, The Rocks in Bethlehem, Saint-Gaudens National Historic Site in Cornish, and she includes local examples when possible. th

From Mickey to Magoo: The Golden Age of American Animation

~ New ~

From the 1920s to the 1960s, adult American theatergoers could anticipate a cartoon before each feature film. From Mickey Mouse to Donald Duck, Popeye, Betty Boop, Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, Tom and Jerry, Mighty Mouse, Casper the Friendly Ghost, and Mr. Magoo, the beloved cartoon “stars” were every bit as memorable as the Hollywood actors who shared the marquee. Many of these cartoons were redistributed as Saturday morning shows for kids of the next generation. Margo Burns offers an introduction to the people and studios that made these films and the changing technology, aesthetics, music, politics, and economics behind them, showing stills, characters, and clips from many of these beautifully hand-drawn films. At the end of her program, participants are treated to one of the classics in its entirety. Facing Page: Saint-Gaudens National Historic Site Aspet House, Pan Garden, and Mt. Ascutney in the distance Photo courtesy of Susan M. Hatem

p. 76

Margo Burns p. 77

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Art, Architecture and Film Marina Forbes p. 80

Imperial Russian Fabergé Eggs This illustrated presentation by Marina Forbes focuses on the life and remarkable work of Russian master jeweler and artist, Peter Carl Fabergé. The program features a photo-tour of Fabergé collections at the Constantine Palace in St. Petersburg and from major museums and private collectors around the world. Explore the important role of egg painting in Russian culture and the development of this major Russian art form from a traditional craft to the level of exquisite fine art under the patronage of the tsars. Forbes also discusses the fascinating history of these eggs, their role in the dramatic events of the last decades of Romanov rule in Russia, and in the years following the Bolshevik Revolution.

Russian Fabergé Enamel Egg-Box

Russian Iconography: 1,000 Years of Tradition Traditional Russian icon painting has been a living and evolving art form for more than 1,000 years. This illustrated presentation by Marina Forbes deals with the spiritual and secular significance of Russian religious art from the 10th century to the present day. Icon-making involves the painting of stylized religious images on wood using traditional natural materials and techniques which are determined by longstanding conventions. Using a slide show and numerous exhibits, including examples of her own work, Forbes examines the history of icon painting in Russia and the unique nature of the icon as a sacred object and a product of an artistic tradition. Participants may bring personal icons for examination and comments.

Russian Lacquer Boxes: From Craft to Fine Art One of the great artistic achievements of Russian culture is the development of unique, exquisite, miniature painting styles on lacquer boxes, an expressive medium deeply rooted in the icon painting traditions of the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries. This beautifully illustrated and interactive presentation is the result of years of research by Marina Forbes in her native Russia. Marina has personally visited the four towns where the great traditions of Russian lacquer box making have flourished for almost 300 years. The presentation focuses on the great care taken in the preparation of the lacquer boxes constructed out of papier-maché as well as the process of miniature painting. Emphasis is on the important role of lacquer box painting in Russian culture and on the unique development of this major Russian art form from traditional craft to fine art.

Traditional Matryoshka Nested Doll Making: From Russia to New England Marina Forbes shares examples of Matroyshka nested dolls, including examples of her own work and from her extensive collection, as she examines the rich, folk tradition and symbolism of the dolls’ appearance. Forbes explores the link between doll-making and other traditional Russian art forms. There will be a quick stop at the 1900 World’s Fair in Paris where Russian nested dolls and Fabergé eggs were made famous, followed by an illustrated tour of a working doll-making factory in rural Russia.

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Art, Architecture and Film Television: The Art and Ethics of Manipulation

~ New ~

John Gfroerer p. 80

John Gfroerer explores the power of television as a communication medium and the ethical implications of manipulating the viewer by means of the choices made behind the camera through the final editing process. By examining the artistic techniques used to persuade, induce, and entice us, Gfroerer considers the extent to which television teaches or simply tantalizes us. Are ethical boundaries crossed by the use of these techniques, and to what extent as media consumers should we care?

Big House, Little House, Back House, Barn: The Connected Farm Buildings of New England

Thomas Hubka p. 82

Through architecture unique to northern New England, this illustrated talk focuses on several case studies that show how farmers converted their typical separate house and barns into connected farmsteads. Thomas Hubka’s research in his award-winning book, Big House, Little House, Back House, Barn: The Connected Farm Buildings of New England, demonstrates that average farmers were, in fact, motivated by competition with farmers in other regions of America, who had better soils and growing seasons and fewer rocks to clear. The connected farmstead organization, housing equal parts mixed-farming and home-industry, was one of the collective responses to the competitive threat.

New Hampshire on High: Historic and Unusual Weathervanes of the Granite State

~ New ~

Glenn Knoblock p. 83

This program offers a fun and engaging look at the historic and unusual weathervanes found on New Hampshire’s churches, town halls and other public buildings from earliest times down to the present. Highlighted by the visual presentation of a representative sampling of the vanes found throughout the state, Glenn Knoblock will trace the history of weathervanes, their practical use and interesting symbolism, as well as their varied types and methods of manufacture and evolution from practical weather instrument to architectural embellishment.

Chartres Cathedral: Philosophy and Theology as Art

William “Ty” Perry

Using Chartres Cathedral as a guide, Ty Perry leads a discovery tour of several examples of the philosophical and theological thought behind cathedral art, in particular, stained glass windows and sculpture. Avoiding the normal art historical approach (the development of styles over time) and avoiding critical evaluations of artistic style or merit, this is an inquiry into the “why” of windows and sculpture of medieval cathedrals, a search for the meaning, sometimes on the surface, sometimes hidden.

North Rose Window, Chartres Cathedral (detail)

p. 87

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Art, Architecture and Film Bryant F. Tolles, Jr. p. 90

~ New ~ The Grand Resort Hotels of the White Mountains:

Architecture, History, and the Preservation Record

Architectural historian Bryant Tolles, Jr. shares the history and architecture of the grand resort hotel phenomenon and hospitality tourism in the White Mountains of New Hampshire from the pre-Civil War era to the present. The primary focus is on the surviving grand resort hotels: The Mount Washington Resort; the Mountain View Grand; the Balsams; the Eagle Mountain House; and, Wentworth Hall and Cottages. Extensive illustrations document these buildings and others no longer in existence.

Paul Wainwright p. 91

New England’s Colonial Meetinghouses and Their Impact on American Society New England’s colonial meetinghouses embody an important yet little-known chapter in American history. Built mostly with tax money, they served as both places of worship and places for town meetings, and were the centers of life in colonial New England communities. Using photographs of the few surviving “mint condition” meetinghouses as illustrations, Paul Wainwright tells the story of the society that built and used them, and the lasting impact they have had on American culture.

Pamela Weeks p. 91

~ New ~ New England Quilts and the Stories They Tell Quilts tell stories, and quilt history is full of myths and misinformation as well as heart-warming tales of service and tradition. Nearly every world culture that has cold weather uses quilted textiles—quilting is NOT just an American art. Pam Weeks weaves world history, women’s history, industrial history and just plain wonderful stories into her presentation. Participants are invited to bring one quilt for identification and/or story sharing. Prompted in part by the material culture at hand, the presenter may speak about fashion fads, the Colonial Revival, quilt-making for Civil War soldiers, and anything else quilt-related she can squeeze in.

Rebecca Palmer. Crazy Quilt, 1884. Silk, velvet, 77 15/16 x 77 3/16 in. (198 x 196.1 cm). Brooklyn Museum, gift of Peter Taylor Sharp

Above: Tamar Horton Harris North. “Quilt (or decorative throw), Crazy pattern” c. 1877. 54 ½ × 55 in. The Metropolitan Museum of Art

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Art, Architecture and Film Wild and Colorful: Victorian Architecture in New Hampshire Visually explore the tremendous legacy of New Hampshire’s architecture from the Victorian period (1820 - 1914). This program looks at exuberant Victorian era architecture across the state in houses, hotels, mills, city halls, courthouses, and churches, with references to gardens, furniture, and other elements of the built environment. Richard Guy Wilson explores elements of visual literacy and points out how architecture can reflect the cultural and civic values of its time and place.

Richard Guy Wilson p. 92

An example of Victorian architecture

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Ethics, Philosophy and Law

Granite Gallows: The Origins of New Hampshire’s Debate Over the Death Penalty

Chris Benedetto p. 76

As one of the last northeastern states with capital punishment still on the books and with its first person on death row since 1939, New Hampshire continues to struggle with this controversial issue. Chris Benedetto examines the history of the death penalty in New Hampshire and the major legal and social issues which challenged our predecessors, revealing that many of them still haunt us today.

The Capital Crime of Witchcraft: What the Primary Sources Tell Us On first impression, the witchcraft trials of the Colonial era may seem to have been nothing but a free-for-all, fraught with hysterics. Margo Burns explores an array of prosecutions in 17th-century New England, using facsimiles of primary source manuscripts, from first formal complaints to arrest warrants, indictments of formal charges to death warrants, and the reversals of attainder and rescinding of excommunications years after the fact, demonstrating how methodically and logically the Salem Court worked. This program focuses on the Salem witchcraft trials of 1692 and 1693, when nineteen people were hanged and one crushed to death, but also examines a variety of other cases against women in New Hampshire, Massachusetts, and Connecticut.

A Conversation with John Marshall The year is 1835 and John Marshall has been Chief Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court since 1801. He had fought, literally and figuratively, to establish a strong national government, opposed in that effort by powerful politicians including Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, James Monroe, and Andrew Jackson. Although his opponents controlled Congress and the White House for all but four years of Marshall’s tenure on the Court, Marshall prevailed in advancing his views on the law and the Constitution. Richard Hesse portrays Marshall as he reflects on his life and explains his views and fears for the future of our country in this living history program.

Margo Burns p. 77

Richard Hesse p. 82

Civil Liberties vs. National Security As the federal government continues to address new national security issues in the wake of 9/11, the uneasy balance between security and civil liberties is receiving renewed attention. Richard Hesse considers the trade-offs and considerations facing citizens and non-citizens alike.

The Founding Fathers: What Were They Thinking? In 1787, delegates gathered in Philadelphia to address a wide variety of crises facing the young United States of America and produced a charter for a new government. In modern times, competing political and legal claims are frequently based on what those delegates intended. Mythology about the founders and their work at the 1787 Convention has obscured both fact and legitimate analysis of the events leading to the agreement called the Constitution. Richard Hesse explores the cast of characters called “founders,” the problems they faced, and the solutions they fashioned. Facing page: Woman Holding a Balance (1664, detail) Johannes Vermeer 1632 - 1675 National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C.

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Ethics, Philosophy and Law Allen Koop p. 83

Kent McConnell

Only in America: History and Health Care in the United States Allen Koop describes how the troubled, promising, and unique American health care system has been shaped, not only by developments in medicine, but also by by social forces, economic trends, party politics, and by historical surprises. The lecture moves rapidly from Colonial times, through the era of sectarian medicine, then the accomplishments of modern medicine, and concludes in the health care tensions of the 21st century.

~ New ~ War, Justice, and Non-Violence: Perspectives and Paradoxes

p. 85

How and why are wars fought? What exactly is a just war? This program looks at the history of “just war theory,” starting in antiquity and following the development of three major elements of just war thinking: jus ad bellum (the right to war), jus in bello (the laws of war), and jus post bellum (justice after war). Highlighting the work of philosophers Larry May, Michael Walzer, and Richard Norman, Kent McConnell focuses discussion on the philosophical and theological foundations of just war thinking and non-violence.

Leslie Pasternack

~ New ~ Speaking of War:

p. 86

Staging the Voices of Veterans in Post-9/11 Theatre

Theatre historian and director Leslie Pasternack places today’s theatre of war in historical context and introduces audiences to recent theatre productions. Drawing from the works of Sophocles, Shakespeare, R. C. Sherriff, Kate Wenner, Gregory Burke, Quiara Alegría Hudes, and others, Pasternack performs dramatic excerpts and invites audience members to read as well. This combination of discussion and impromptu performance demonstrates the potential of live theatre to bear witness and build bridges in times of conflict and division – including the division between military and civilian society many veterans experience when they come home.

Maria Sanders p. 89

~ New ~ The Quest for Happiness The ancient Greek philosophers defined eudaimonia as living a full and excellent life. In this illustrated talk, Maria Sanders explores how ideas of happiness have changed in Western civilization through the ages, while comparing and contrasting major concepts of well-being throughout the world. Can money buy happiness? To what extent does engaging in one’s community impact happiness? When worldwide surveys of happiness are conducted, why doesn’t the United States make the top ten? Participants will be invited to discuss various definitions; current measures for assessing self-reported levels of happiness; specific findings reported as increasing people’s levels of happiness; and happiness projects undertaken by entire communities —including a town-wide happiness quest in Plymouth, New Hampshire. The School of Athens (detail) Rafael Sanzio de Urbino (1483-1520)

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Ethics, Philosophy and Law Introducing Children to Philosophy — and Why it Matters

~ New ~

Timm Triplett presents a program for parents and teachers designed to help them encourage and sustain children's natural philosophical curiosity. Philosophical discussion with children can occur at home or in school by asking "why questions" of them, or encouraging open-ended reflections about their own "why questions." Such inquiry helps pave the way for critical thinking skills that are important in almost every educational context. Having a philosophical discussion with children does not require special training in philosophy, just an open approach to exploring questions and reflections of broad scope that children readily wonder about, inspired by stories, lessons, play, or ordinary events in their lives at home or in the classroom. A list of resources offering specific suggestions for more directed philosophical discussion with children will be provided.

Spies in Time

Timm Triplett p. 91

Douglas Wheeler

How have spying and intelligence activities influenced the course of history? Investigate case studies of how great powers have used spies in war and peace. This program traces the history of spying from the Dreyfus case in France (1894-1906) to the Aldrich Ames case in the U.S. (1980s and 1990s). Douglas Wheeler focuses the discussion on how human motives, traits, and ideas shape the search for secret information and how that information is used and misused in international affairs. Host may indicate which historical period, episode, or personality on which they might like speaker to focus.

United States Capitol photographed by satellite KH-7 25, February 19, 1966

p. 91

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Language and Literature Comics in World History and Cultures

Marek Bennett

Marek Bennett presents a whirlwind survey of comics from around the world and throughout history, paying special attention to what these vibrant narratives tell (and show) us about the people and periods that created them. Bennett engages and involves the audience in an interactive discussion of several comics representing cultures such as Ancient Rome, Medieval Europe, the Ancient Maya, Feudal and modern Japan, the United States in the early 20th century, and Nazi Germany during World War II. The program explores ways of creating and reading comics from around the world, and what these techniques tell us about the cultures in which they occur.

Unlaunch’d Voices: An Evening with Walt Whitman

~ New ~

This program opens with the elderly Whitman on the evening of his seventieth birthday. The audience is a visitor in his room as he prepares for his birthday celebration. Whitman begins to reminisce during the telling. He transforms into his young vibrant self and we begin to trace back with him the experiences that led to the creation of Leaves Of Grass, his lifetime work. The first part of the performance explores Whitman’s preoccupation with the self and his resolve to write with “free and brave thought…” In the second part of the performance, Whitman’s life is changed forever by the Civil War. It is here that he finds “the most important work of my life,” nursing the wounded soldiers in the hospitals. Through Stephen Collins’ recitation of poetry and readings of actual letters, we experience Whitman’s movement from selfishness toward selflessness and his growth into a mature artist who is at peace about “himself, God and death.”

The Use of Hiphop Rhetorics to Combat the Criminalization of Black, Brown, and Red Youth

~ New ~

p. 76

Stephen Collins p. 78

Marcos Del Hierro p. 78

Hiphop culture grew out of the South Bronx in the 1970s and 1980s when young people of color combined their genius with available materials to produce the four original elements of hiphop: deejaying, graffiti art, breakdancing, and rapping. Since then, young Blacks, American Indians, and Latino/as have used hiphop to reimagine everyday practices, discarded technologies, and public spaces. Marcos Del Hierro will explain and contextualize the role non-Western knowledge plays in developing communicative practices unique to hiphop, as well as how those practices combat systematic oppression. By looking at hiphop culture’s non-Western roots, Del Hierro provides insight into how hiphoppers produce sustainable models for recycling knowledge and technology into art, criticism, and pleasure. Modes of expression like mixtapes, rap songs, ciphers, subway art, and hiphop fashion not only set trends, but also speak about issues such as urban blight, political marginalization, racism, and colonization. This interactive presentation will invite the audience to participate in a “cipher,” or hiphop circle, as a way to experience one example of how knowledge is made in hiphop communities. Young and old audiences are invited to engage with one of the most influential and funky cultural forces of the last forty years.

Blickensderfer 5 Typewriter owned by poet Robert Frost Derry, New Hampshire USA - June 15, 2013 ID 33642596 © Mark Nassal | Dreamstime.com

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Language and Literature Diana Durham p. 79

Scott Eaton p. 79

Grail Mania: 21st-Century Retelling of 12th-Century Heresy The Troubadours sang of it; courtly knights quested for it; Monty Python laughed at it. The Chalice beckons through the mists of pre-history to bind us in its intrigue still. Our fascination with this symbol is alive and well in New Hampshire. In this talk and retelling by Diana Durham, we get to understand why the young knight Perceval’s quest for the grail has as much meaning today as when the story was first told centuries ago. Humour and the rich symbolism of the Middle Ages combine as willing audience members act out a scene from a new dramatic retelling, becoming King Arthur, Merlin, the Grieving Maiden, and other characters as we mix storytelling, acting and discussion.

Antoine de Saint-Exupéry: The Man Who Wrote The Little Prince Scott Eaton examines the life of French aviator and writer Antoine de SaintExupéry (1900-1944) through his books and the ideas which underlie them. Along with The Little Prince, a children's story for adults, Eaton reviews SaintExupéry's other fiction and nonfiction, which was inspired in large part by his experiences in the early French air mail service in the 1920s and 1930s and in the French Air Force in WWII.

Alice B. Fogel

Strange Terrain: How Not to “Get” Poetry and Let it Get You Instead

p. 80

Alice Fogel takes you through seven simple steps, and one hard one, toward understanding and appreciating more elements of poetry than you ever thought you could. In the end you’ll see that you already knew them all along. This workshop is your quick, self-help program for “getting” poems. Fogel helps you develop your own confident relationship with poetry’s shapes, words, images, sounds, emotions, mysteries, and more.

Pontine Theatre

Familiar Fields: The Power of Community in the Work of Sarah Orne Jewett

p. 87

Based on the life and work of the 19th-century New England author Sarah Orne Jewett, this presentation explores issues of community as reflected in Jewett’s stories. Pontine Theatre examines the ways in which her regional portraits speak about the essential New England character and universal experiences of geographic isolation, cultural insulation, and how community shapes individual identity.

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Language and Literature Pretty Halcyon Days, on the Beach with Ogden Nash Ogden Nash and his family spent their summers on Little Boar’s Head, in North Hampton, New Hampshire. Using examples from their original stage work, “Home is Heaven,” Pontine Theatre explores the ways in which Nash’s life on the New Hampshire seashore influenced his poems, giving the reader insight into the man, his character, and his ideas about family, society, and nature. These themes form a rich portrait of the poet and underscore how the intersection of literature and local history can deepen our understanding and appreciation of everyday events in our own backyard.

Pontine Theatre p. 87

Silver Lake Summers: An E.E. Cummings Revue Pontine Theatre’s presentation explores the life and work of American poet and painter Edward Estlin Cummings, a lifelong summer resident of Silver Lake in New Hampshire. The largest collection of Cummings’ papers is housed at Harvard University. These materials, along with his published works, form the basis for Silver Lake Summers. Visual motifs are taken from Cummings’ paintings and the environment at Silver Lake. The structure and tone of the presentation reflect the same inventive and experimental atmosphere of early 20th-century literature and art which influenced Cummings.

Rudyard Kipling Revisited Rudyard Kipling was the most internationally celebrated author of his day. The first four years of his marriage and fatherhood were spent in New England where he built his dream house—Naulakha in Dummerston, Vermont—now preserved as a Landmark Trust property. It was there that he penned The Jungle Book and other classics. These were productive and happy years for the young literary giant, but eventually deeply troubled. Although Kipling was an intensely private individual, Jackson Gillman's sensitive portrayal provides an inside look at the writer's experience in New England and some of the controversy surrounding this complex man. Part lecture, part living history, part storytelling, Jackson's presentation includes a revealing interpretation of how much the “If” poem relates to Kipling’s experiences, and sparkling renditions of some classic Just So Stories.

A Woman’s Take on Courtly Love: The Lais of Marie de France The conventions of courtly love have colored the discourse of romance ever since the Middle Ages. In the Lais of Marie de France, we find adaptations of tales she heard from minstrels or “the folk,” charming love stories with a touch of the supernatural. Clia Goodwin demonstrates that in Marie’s hands they became sophisticated explorations of problems in love relationships; for instance, what to do if one’s lover has a habit of turning into a werewolf.

Jackson Gillman p. 81

Clia Goodwin p. 81

J.R.R. Tolkien and the Uses of Fantasy Fantasy literature is still enjoying a surge of interest sparked by the Harry Potter series, the film version of The Lord of the Rings, and the enormously popular television series The Game of Thrones. While fantasy has always made for popular reading or listening, what accounts for its special appeal? Clia Goodwin explains how the mythic structure of Tolkien’s world reveals much about the human condition.

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Language and Literature Clia Goodwin p. 81

Ingrid Graff p. 81

The Arthurian Revival in New England: The Clash of the Ideal and the Real How did the legend of King Arthur find purchase in America, and how did we make the myth our own? Clia Goodwin explores two New England interpretations: Mark Twain’s A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court and the series of murals by painter Edwin Austin Abbey depicting the quest for the Grail.

Not In Front of the Children: The Art and Importance of Fairy Tales “Once upon a time. . .” is a magical phrase that promises the beginning of a memorable story. Where do our fairy tales come from; what do they tell us about ourselves and our history? Why have they been censored and changed, and how have they retained their currency and popularity today? Ingrid Graff discusses these fascinating tales and why we should keep telling them to our children. Participants are encouraged to bring their favorite fairy tale to the presentation.

The Case of the Detective Who Refused to Die: Arthur Conan Doyle and Sherlock Holmes In one of the most famous reincarnations of all time, Arthur Conan Doyle killed off his worldrenowned detective Sherlock Holmes, only to bring him back to life several years later. What caused Doyle’s disenchantment with his creation and what led to his resurrection? Ingrid Graff discusses Doyle’s life and writings and above all his relationship with Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson. She looks at several of the Sherlock Holmes stories to investigate the intense attraction of the prose, the plots, the places, and especially the undying fascination of the public with the man who became the world’s most famous detective.

Karolyn Kinane p. 83

Evolving English: From Beowulf and Chaucer to Texts and Tweets Karolyn Kinane presents a lively, interactive crash course in the medieval English language, specifically the poetry of Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales. Participants will have the opportunity to read and recite medieval poetry aloud in a fun, relaxed environment. The program includes a brief, illustrated historical overview of the events that sparked linguistic transitions from the Anglo-Saxon and Anglo-Norman eras to the Middle English era, including the Norman Invasion, the Black Death, and the invention of the printing press. Kinane closes by exploring how these medieval events are still embedded in the English we speak today and how modern inventions and events continue to shape language.

Digital photographic copy of the first folio of Beowulf, part of the Cotton MS Vitellius A XV manuscript currently located within the British Library

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Language and Literature Motivating the World War II Home Front via Magazine and Radio Advertising Magazine ads and radio commercials aimed at the home front were used extensively during World War II to explain shortages, encourage support of wartime restrictions, increase bond sales, request recycling of strategic materials, boost morale, and suggest ways to support our troops. Calvin Knickerbocker uses over 50 period magazine ads and radio commercials to illustrate the concerted effort by which the U.S. government fostered these aims. Never before or since has the U.S. used the media so effectively to support a wartime effort.

(Not So) Elementary, My Dear Watson: The Popularity of Sherlock Holmes The recent spate of Sherlock Holmes movies, television shows, and literary adaptations indicate the Great Detective is alive and well in the 21st century. Holmes is the most portrayed literary character of all time, with over 230 film versions alone in several different languages. Over the past century, Sherlockians created societies like the Baker Street Irregulars, wrote articles sussing out the “sources” of Arthur Conan Doyle’s works, and, most recently, developed an entire online world of Holmesian fan fiction. Sherlock Holmes is now a multi-million dollar industry. Why is Sherlock Holmes so popular? Ann McClellan’s presentation explores the origins of Doyle’s famous detective and tracks his incarnations in literature, film, advertising, and modern media in order to crack the case of the most popular detective.

Calvin Knickerbocker p. 83

Ann McClellan p. 85

Second of the four illustrations included in the edition of Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes by Arthur Conan Doyle published in 1894 by A. L. Burt in New York.

Faith and Fantastic Fiction Hobbits? The Hunger Games? Travelers to Narnia, Neverland, Wonderland, the Long Earth? Curious about the religious dimensions of Twilight, The Golden Compass or The Graveyard Book? This discussion with Maren Tirabassi on the connection between fiction and the spiritual imagination touches on classics and bestsellers as participants of all ages are invited to share their reflections and favorite books.

Maren Tirabassi p. 90

Sitting Under a Fig Tree: Spiritual Autobiography, Augustine to Lamott Why do we tell our life stories from a faith perspective? Why is faith most vivid when stories of real people illuminate it? Maren Tirabassi presents anecdotes from the memoirs of poets, athletes, educators, and dissidents as well as the classic reflections of C.S. Lewis, Maya Angelou, Anne LaMott, and Thomas Merton, which provide an overview of spiritual autobiography. What happened at our own kitchen tables will provide insight in a discussion of Passover, Eucharist, and Ramadan.

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Living History Meet Lucy Stone: Enter the Antebellum World of the Abolition and Women’s Rights Movements

~ New ~

Judith Black p. 77

In this first-person interpretive program, Judith Black introduces American Lucy Stone, the first woman hired by the Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society as a public speaker and the “Shining Star” of the Abolition and Women’s Rights Movements. The presenter dispels well-worn platitudes about the antebellum North by interjecting historic and personal truths about these social reform movements. It also paints a dynamic and detailed picture of what it takes to change the world you are born into. Follow Lucy as she makes her case for tax resistance, her challenges to marriage laws and motherhood, her pro-Emancipation response to the Civil War. Go with her to The American Equal Rights Association Convention in May 1869, where she eloquently supports the 15th Amendment, which gave African-American men the vote.

Liberty Is Our Motto! Songs and Stories of the Hutchinson Family Singers

Steve Blunt p. 77

The year is 1876, and New Hampshire’s own John Hutchinson sings and tells about his famous musical family “straight from the horse’s mouth.” Originally from Milford, New Hampshire, the Hutchinson Family Singers were among America’s most notable musical entertainers for much of the mid-19th century. They achieved international recognition with songs advancing social reform and political causes such as abolition, temperance, women’s suffrage, and the Lincoln presidential campaign of 1860. In this living history program, Steve Blunt portrays John Hutchinson. He tells the Hutchinsons’ story and shares their music with lyrics provided. Audience members are invited to sing along on “The Old Granite State,” “Get Off the Track,” “Tenting on the Old Campground,” and more.

The Old Country Fiddler: Charles Ross Taggart, Traveling Entertainer Charles Ross Taggart grew up in East Topsham, Vermont. At the age of 24, he gave his first public performance at the local town hall in 1895, becoming a traveling musical humorist for the next 43 years. His traveling took him all over the U.S. and Canada, including the famous Red Path Chautauqua Bureau of Chicago. A fiddler, pianist, singer, and ventriloquist, he made over 50 recordings of his humorous monologues with the Victor, Edison, and Columbia companies, and appeared in an early “talkie” three years before Al Jolson starred in The Jazz Singer. Adam Boyce portrays Taggart near the end of his career, c. 1936, sharing recollections on his life and career, interspersed with live fiddling, singing, and humorous sketches.

Unlaunch’d Voices: An Evening with Walt Whitman

~ New ~

Adam Boyce p. 77

Stephen Collins p. 78

This program opens with the elderly Whitman on the evening of his seventieth birthday. The audience is a visitor in his room as he prepares for his birthday celebration. Whitman begins to reminisce during the telling. He transforms into his young vibrant self and we begin to trace back with him the experiences that led to the creation of Leaves Of Grass, his lifetime work. The first part of the performance explores Whitman’s preoccupation with the self and his resolve to write with “free and brave thought…” In the second part of the performance, Whitman’s life is changed forever by the Civil War. It is here that he finds “the most important work of my life,” nursing the wounded soldiers in the hospitals. Through Stephen Collins’ recitation of poetry and readings of actual letters, we experience Whitman’s movement from selfishness toward selflessness and his growth into a mature artist who is at peace about “himself, God and death.” Facing page: Michael Francis as Galileo Galilei (see page 40 for program description)

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Living History Michael Francis p. 80

Jackson Gillman p. 81

Deborah Anne Goss p. 81

~ New ~ Galileo Galilei, the Starry Messenger The Starry Messenger, presented by Michael Francis, is a dramatic fun-filled adaptation of Galileo’s short treatise “Siderius Nuncius." Galileo (dressed in 17th-century costume) arrives to present a public lecture on his most recent discoveries made using his newly devised spyglass. As he describes those discoveries, Galileo’s new method of observation and measurement of nature become apparent. Throughout the presentation audience members are actively involved in experiments and demonstrations. After the lecture, Galileo answers questions about his experiments, his life, and his times.

Rudyard Kipling Revisited Rudyard Kipling was the most internationally celebrated author of his day. The first four years of his marriage and fatherhood were spent in New England where he built his dream house—Naulakha in Dummerston, Vermont—now preserved as a Landmark Trust property. It was there that he penned The Jungle Book and other classics. These were productive and happy years for the young literary giant, but eventually deeply troubled. Although Kipling was an intensely private individual, Jackson Gillman's sensitive portrayal provides an inside look at the writer's experience in New England and some of the controversy surrounding this complex man. Part lecture, part living history, part storytelling, Jackson's presentation includes a revealing interpretation of how much the “If” poem relates to Kipling’s experiences, and sparkling renditions of some classic Just So Stories.

New ~ Abby Hutchinson’s Freedom Songs: Songs and Stories of the ~ Struggle for Abolition and Woman Suffrage

Deborah Anne Goss appears as Abby Hutchinson Patton, recalling mid-19th-century U.S. and New Hampshire history and performing rousing anthems, heartfelt ballads, and humorous ditties sung during anti-slavery and early women's rights struggles. In the 1840s and 1850s the Hutchinson Family Singers strongly influenced the opinions of the era with their popular songs promoting healthy living and social justice—most prominently the abolition of slavery. Participants are encouraged to join in the singing on several choruses or read a poem or political diatribe of the time.

Richard Hesse p. 82

40

A Conversation with John Marshall The year is 1835 and John Marshall has been Chief Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court since 1801. He had fought, literally and figuratively, to establish a strong national government, opposed in that effort by powerful politicians including Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, James Monroe, and Andrew Jackson. Although his opponents controlled Congress and the White House for all but four years of Marshall’s tenure on the Court, Marshall prevailed in advancing his views on the law and the Constitution. Richard Hesse portrays Marshall as he reflects on his life and explains his views and fears for the future of our country in this living history program.


Living History Caesar: The Man from Venus Meet Caesar, who is descended from the Goddess Venus. This program introduces Caesar as a young boy living with his mother, Aurelia, and his Aunt Julia—two women who will shape the boy who will be the most powerful man on earth. Using a rich variety of texts, Sebastian Lockwood shows Caesar as a man who clearly saw his destiny and fulfilled that destiny with the help of remarkable women —Cleopatra amongst them. A poet, historian, linguist, architect, general, politician, and engineer, was he truly of the Populi party for the People of Roma? Or a despot and tyrant? This performance shows Caesar as a remarkable genius who transformed his world in ways that still resonate today.

Sebastian Lockwood p. 84

Homer’s Odysseus Using the well known scenes of The Odyssey, Sebastian Lockwood delivers the passion and intensity of the great epic that deserves to be heard told as it was by bards in the days of old. Lockwood says, “The best compliment is when a ten-year-old comes up and says, ‘I felt like I was there.’” That is the magic of the performance that takes students and adults alike back into the text. The Q&A session following the presentation can focus on translations and the storytelling techniques used by Homer.

The Epic of Gilgamesh This is our earliest epic. It is at least four thousand years old, but in performance we discover a dynamic and thrilling tale of heroes, friendship, battles with a monster, and death, followed by a journey to the other world to meet Utnapishtin, whom we know as Noah. Gilgamesh will ask him about life and death and he will come home with a great story. In the Q&A after the performance, Sebastian Lockwood can tell the tale of how the tablets were found in Iraq and how scholars broke the code to reveal the story and its Biblical parallels.

A Visit with Queen Victoria In 1837, teenaged Victoria ascended to the British throne, untrained and innocent. Those who would try to usurp her power underestimated this self-willed, intelligent young woman whose mettle sustained her through her 63-year reign. Using Queen Victoria’s diary and letters, this program reveals the personal details of a powerful yet humane woman, who took seriously her role as monarch in a time of great expansion. She and her husband, Albert, set an example of high moral character and dedication, a novelty in the royal house after generations of scandal. Through her children she left a royal legacy; an era bears her name. Sally Mummey performs this living history in proper 19th-century clothing resplendent with Royal Orders.

Sally Mummey p. 86

Mary Todd Lincoln: An Unconventional Woman Raised in a slaveholding family, Mary Todd Lincoln evolved into an advocate for abolition. The intellectual equal of well-educated men, she spoke her mind openly in an era when a woman’s success in life was measured by marriage and motherhood. Against her family’s wishes, she married the man she loved and partnered with him to achieve their goal of becoming President and First Lady. Sparkling with humor and insight, Sally Mummey as Mary Lincoln shares stories of their life and love; triumphs and challenges; and life in the White House during the tumultuous years of the Civil War.

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Living History Sally Mummey p. 86

Gwendolyn QuezairePresutti p. 88

Mary Todd Lincoln: Wife and Widow Living historian Sally Mummey portrays Mary Todd Lincoln as she muses on her life from her dreams as a girl to her years as First Lady during the Civil War. Mrs. Lincoln shares stories of her life with President Lincoln and the events of that evening in Ford’s Theatre when the assassin’s bullet not only changed the course of the nation but destroyed her life as well. From the opulence of the White House to the dregs of obscurity, Mrs. Lincoln lived out her life struggling with affliction and tragedy. With wit and heartbreak, seasoned with abiding love for her husband and her children, Mrs. Lincoln reveals the passionate humanity of a misunderstood woman.

I Can’t Die But Once–Harriet Tubman’s Civil War Gwendolyn Quezaire-Presutti’s characterization of Harriet Tubman is a lucid, well-researched biography about the remarkable life of an enduring warrior. As Harriet Tubman, she weaves a tale of truth, pain, courage, and determination in the quagmire of racial exploitation. The United States Government enlisted Tubman as a scout and spy for the Union cause and she battled courageously behind enemy lines during the Civil War, but Tubman is best known for her role as a conductor on the Underground Railroad. Though she is one of the most famous women in our nation’s history, we have come to know her life through fictionalized biographies written for school children. QuezairePresutti separates reality from myth to reconstruct a richer and far more accurate historical account of Tubman’s life.

“If I am Not For Myself, Who Will Be for Me?” George Washington’s Runaway Slave Oney Judge Staines, according to the Constitution, was only three-fifths of a person. To her masters, George and Martha Washington, she was merely “the girl.” All she wanted was the freedom to control her own actions, but her account of escaping the Executive Mansion in Philadelphia, fleeing north and establishing a life in New Hampshire is not a typical runaway story. Portrayed by Gwendolyn Quezaire-Presutti, Oney’s tale provides an alternative perspective on the new nation’s social, political, and economic development, from one whose personal experience so contradicted the promise of the principles embodied in the nation’s founding documents.

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Living History A Soldier’s Mother Tells Her Story Speaking as Betsey Phelps, the mother of a Union soldier from Amherst, New Hampshire, who died heroically at the Battle of Gettysburg, Sharon Wood offers an informative and sensitive reflection on that sacrifice from a mother’s perspective. Wood blends the Phelps boy’s story with those of other men who left their New Hampshire homes to fight for the Union cause and of the families who supported them on the home front.

Sharon Wood p. 92

A Tribute to Sarah Josepha Hale A native of Newport, New Hampshire, America’s first female editor, Sarah Josepha Hale, made Godey’s Lady’s Book the most influential women’s magazine of its time. She is also known as the author of the poem “Mary’s Lamb” and for her efforts over three decades to have Thanksgiving decreed a national holiday. In this living history set in 1866, Sharon Wood portrays Ann Wyman Blake, a resident of West Cambridge, Massachusetts, speaking of her admiration for Hale. As Blake, Wood shares stories of Hale’s many accomplishments while living in Boston, including an editorial career that spanned five decades.

Abraham and Mary Lincoln: The Long and the Short of It Distinctly different paths led Abraham Lincoln and Mary Todd to Springfield, Illinois, where they met, married, and began a family. The years that followed their move to the White House were filled with personal and national crises. Steve and Sharon Wood portray President and Mrs. Lincoln in this living history program, telling stories of their early lives and the challenges they faced during this turbulent time in our country’s history.

Steve and Sharon Wood p. 92

Our National Thanksgiving: With Thanks to President Lincoln and Mrs. Hale Sarah Josepha Hale, a Newport, New Hampshire native, tells the story of her 30 year effort to have Thanksgiving declared a national holiday. President Abraham Lincoln enters at the end of her tale to read his 1863 Thanksgiving proclamation. Sharon Wood portrays Hale and Steve Wood portrays Lincoln in a living history presentation following background about their characters and the times.

A Visit with Abraham Lincoln Abraham Lincoln, portrayed by Steve Wood, begins this program by recounting his early life and ends with a reading of the “Gettysburg Address.” Along the way he comments on the debates with Stephen Douglas, his run for the presidency, and the Civil War.

Steve Wood p. 92

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Music History and Appreciation Global Banjar: International Voices in Antebellum Banjo Music

~ New ~

The Hardtacks (Marek Bennett and Woody Pringle) deliver an engaging overview of global politics prior to the American Civil War through the lens of early banjo music. Between 1820 and 1860, the banjo transformed from a slave instrument found only on Southern plantations to an international pop phenomenon: songs and playing techniques carried far and wide in the emerging global economy, from the streets of New York’s Five Points slum to the gold fields of California and the elite drawing rooms of London, from the battlegrounds of Nicaragua to official diplomatic receptions in Japan. How did this African-derived, slave-borne folk instrument come to symbolize all the best and worst of a young United States of America? (Please contact Woody Pringle to book this

Marek Bennett Woody Pringle p. 76 and 88

program.)

Rally ‘Round the Flag: The American Civil War Through Folksong Woody Pringle and Marek Bennett present an overview of the American Civil War through the lens of period music. Audience members participate and sing along as the presenters explore lyrics, documents, and visual images from sources such as the Library of Congress. Through camp songs, parlor music, hymns, battlefield rallying cries, and fiddle tunes, Pringle and Bennett examine the folksong as a means to enact living history, share perspectives, influence public perceptions of events, and simultaneously fuse and conserve cultures in times of change. Showcasing numerous instruments, the presenters challenge participants to find new connections between song, art, and politics in American history. (Please contact Woody Pringle to book this program.)

Old Time Rules Will Prevail: The Fiddle Contest in New Hampshire and New England

Adam Boyce p. 77

Fiddle contests evolved from endurance marathons to playing a set number of tunes judged by certain specific criteria. Whether large or small, fiddle contests tried to show who was the "best," as well as preserve old-time fiddling and raise money for local organizations. In recent years, the fiddle contest has declined significantly in New England due to cultural changes and financial viability. The greatest legacies of these contests were recordings made during live competition. Audience members become fiddle contest judges, listening to vintage recordings of actual fiddle contestants and choosing the winners. Some live fiddling is also included by the presenter, Adam Boyce.

Pleasures of the Parlor: Playlists from a Victorian iPod The music we listen to every day says a lot about us and about our society—and so it was with our Victorian forebears. Their favorite songs reveal much about their inner lives while also reflecting developments in the culture at large. Marya Danihel discusses and performs songs middle-class Victorians sang for pleasure at home in New England, further illustrating her social and music history with 19th-century artwork and memoirs. Melodious, witty, and touching, this music includes parlor songs, Civil War songs, and selections by Stephen Foster and his contemporaries.

Marya Danihel p. 78

Facing page: New Hampshire Humanities "Humanities in Action" Contra Dance led by caller-musician-dance historian Dudley Laufman Photo courtesy of Cheryl Senter

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Music History and Appreciation Marcos Del Hierro p. 78

~ New ~ The Use of Hiphop Rhetorics to Combat the Criminalization of

Black, Brown, and Red Youth

Hiphop culture grew out of the South Bronx in the 1970s and 1980s when young people of color combined their genius with available materials to produce the four original elements of hiphop: deejaying, graffiti art, breakdancing, and rapping. Since then, young Blacks, American Indians, and Latino/as have used hiphop to reimagine everyday practices, discarded technologies, and public spaces. Marcos Del Hierro will explain and contextualize the role non-Western knowledge plays in developing communicative practices unique to hiphop, as well as how those practices combat systematic oppression. By looking at hiphop culture’s non-Western roots, Del Hierro provides insight into how hiphoppers produce sustainable models for recycling knowledge and technology into art, criticism, and pleasure. Modes of expression like mixtapes, rap songs, ciphers, subway art, and hiphop fashion not only set trends, but also speak about issues such as urban blight, political marginalization, racism, and colonization. This interactive presentation will invite the audience to participate in a “cipher,” or hiphop circle, as a way to experience one example of how knowledge is made in hiphop communities. Young and old audiences are invited to engage with one of the most influential and funky cultural forces of the last forty years.

Deborah Anne Goss p. 81

~ New ~ Abby Hutchinson’s Sweet Freedom Songs: Songs and Stories of the Struggle for Abolition and Woman Suffrage Deborah Anne Goss appears as Abby Hutchinson Patton, recalling mid-19th-century United States and New Hampshire history and performing rousing anthems, heartfelt ballads, and humorous ditties sung during anti-slavery and early women's rights struggles. In the 1840s and 1850s the Hutchinson Family Singers strongly influenced the opinions of the era with their popular songs promoting healthy living and social justice—most prominently the abolition of slavery. Participants are encouraged to join in the singing on several choruses or read a poem or political diatribe of the time.

Emery Hutchins Jim Prendergast p. 82 and 87

A Night of Music with Two Old Friends Over the centuries immigrants from the British Isles have come to the Americas bringing with them their musical styles and tastes as well as their instruments. With the concertina, bodhran, mandolin, octave mandolin, guitar, and banjo, Emery Hutchins and Jim Prendergast sing and play this traditional Celtic music, but they also perform American country music in the way it was conceived in the early 20th century. Through stories, songs and instrumental melodies, they demonstrate how old time American mountain tunes are often derived directly from the songs of the Irish, yet are influenced by other cultural groups to create a new American sound. (Please contact Emery Hutchins to book this program.)

Calvin Knickerbocker p. 83

“Your Hit Parade:” Twenty-five Years Presenting America’s Top Popular Songs “Your Hit Parade” aired on radio and then on television from 1935 to 1959. It set the standard for American popular music. Calvin Knickerbocker outlines a quarter century of the show’s history as a “tastemaker” featuring songs inspired by the Great Depression and on through the advent of rock and roll. He explores the show’s relationship with sponsor American Tobacco and Lucky Strike cigarettes and shares stories about the artists the show helped launch and promote, from Frank Sinatra to Elvis.

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Music History and Appreciation Wacky Songs that Made Us Laugh Popular songs with humorous lyrics have kept us laughing since Colonial times. We need comic relief, and songs provide some of the best (sometimes unintentionally). Excerpts from hilarious songs help chart the evolution of musical humor from the 1920s to the 1980s. Selections poke fun at World War II enemies, diets, television, sex, Christmas, summer camp, religion, and many other aspects of life. Laugh as you recall wacky moments from the past and discover new ones with Calvin Knickerbocker.

Contra Dancing in New Hampshire Then and Now Since the late 1600s, the lively tradition of contra dancing has kept people of all ages swinging and sashaying in barns, town halls, and schools around the state. Contra dancing came to New Hampshire by way of the English colonists and remains popular in many communities, particularly in the Monadnock Region. Presenter Dudley Laufman brings this tradition to life with stories, poems and recordings of callers, musicians, and dancers, past and present. Live music, always integral to this dance form, will be played on the fiddle and melodeon. Willing audience members may be invited to dance the Virginia Reel!

The Guitar in Latin America: Continuities, Changes, and Bicultural Strumming José Lezcano presents a multi-media musical program that showcases the guitar in Latin America as an instrument that speaks many languages. Lezcano presents a variety of musical styles: indigenous strummers in ritual festivals from Ecuador, Gaucho music from Argentina, European parlor waltzes from Venezuela, and Afro-Brazilian samba-pagode. He also plays pieces by Villa-Lobos, Brouwer, Lauro, Barrios, Pereira, and examples from his Fulbright-funded research in Ecuador.

Crime and Punishment on the Isles of Shoals: The Ballad of Louis Wagner Louis Wagner was accused of murdering Anethe and Karen Christenson on Smuttynose Island, Isles of Shoals, in March of 1873. He was convicted on the first charge and executed in 1875. Although sentiment against Wagner was at a fever pitch immediately following the murders, time and reflection have generated an ongoing debate as to the fairness of the trial and the validity of the verdict. John Perrault invites you to examine the judgment of Louis Wagner. Perrault weaves his “Ballad of Louis Wagner” through the course of the program with guitar and vocals.

Calvin Knickerbocker p. 83

Dudley Laufman p. 84

José Lezcano p. 84

John Perrault p. 86

Poems on the Edge of Song Once upon a time, poetry and song were inseparable. Something happened—a break up. But they never forgot each other. Now a reconciliation: John Perrault lends guitar and vocals to the lines of some of the most gifted poets in the English language, including Burns, Wordsworth, Dickinson, Whitman, Hopkins, Edna St. Vincent Millay, Langston Hughes, Mary Oliver, Lennon and McCartney, and Bob Dylan. This is a program that engages all ages from which folks walk away snappy and on their toes, humming what they heard, and happy that they came.

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Music History and Appreciation John Perrault p. 86

Lucie Therrien p. 90

The Ballad Lives! Murder and mayhem, robbery and rapine, love that cuts to the bone: American ballads re-tell the wrenching themes of their English and Scottish cousins. Transplanted in the new world by old-world immigrants, the traditional story-song of the Anglos and Scots wound up reinvigorated in the mountains of Appalachia and along the Canadian border. John Perrault talks, sings, and picks the strings that bind the old ballads to the new.

The Music History of French-Canadians, Franco-Americans, Acadians, and Cajuns Lucie Therrien follows the migration of French-Canadians and the evolution of their traditional music: its arrival in North America from France; the music’s crossing with Indian culture during the evangelization of Acadia and Quebec; its growth alongside English culture after British colonization; and its expansion from Quebec to New England, as well as from Acadia to Louisiana.

Jordan Tirrell-Wysocki p. 90

Jeff Warner p. 91

~ New ~ Songs of Emigration: Storytelling Through Traditional Irish Music Through traditional music Jordan Tirrell-Wysocki relays some of the adventures, misadventures, and emotions experienced by Irish emigrants. The focus is on songs about leaving Ireland, sometimes focusing on the reasons for leaving (a man who is driven from his land by English persecution); sometimes revealing what happened upon arrival (an immigrant drafted into the Union army during the Civil War); and sometimes exploring the universal feeling of homesickness of a stranger in a strange land (a factory worker in London missing his home in County Clare). The presenter discusses the historical context of these songs, interspersing their stories with tunes from Ireland that made their way into New England’s musical repertoire, played on his fiddle or guitar.

Banjos, Bones, and Ballads Traditional songs, rich in local history and a sense of place, present the latest news from the distant past. They help us to interpret present-day life with an understanding of the working people who built our country. Jeff Warner performs tavern songs, banjo tunes, 18th-century New England hymns, sailor songs, and humorous stories about traditional singers and their songs highlight this informative program.

Music in My Pockets: Family Fun in Folk Music Singing games, accessible “pocket instruments” like spoons and dancing puppets, tall tales, funny songs, old songs, and songs kids teach each other in the playground are all traditional in that they have been passed down the generations by word of mouth. They will all be seen, heard, and learned as Jeff Warner visits 1850 or 1910 in a New England town, with families gathered around the figurative hearth, participating in timeless, hearty entertainment and, almost without the audience knowing it, teaches how America amused itself before electricity.

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Music History and Appreciation Songs of Old New Hampshire

Jeff Warner

Drawing heavily on the repertoire of traditional singer Lena Bourne Fish (1873-1945) of Jaffrey and Temple, New Hampshire, Jeff Warner offers the songs and stories that, in the words of Carl Sandburg, tell us “where we came from and what brought us along.” These ballads, love songs, and comic pieces, reveal the experiences and emotions of daily life in the days before movies, sound recordings and, for some, books. Songs from the lumber camps, the decks of sailing ships, the textile mills, and the war between the sexes offer views of pre-industrial New England and a chance to hear living artifacts from the 18th and 19th centuries.

p. 91

Harry Von Tilzer. “My Old New Hampshire Home.” New York, 1898 Sheet Music. Music Division, Library of Congress (25c)

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Nature and Adventure New Hampshire on Skis

E. John B. Allen

Take Scandinavian and Austrian immigrants, the Dartmouth Outing Club, the Cannon Mountain Tramway, the muscular Christian, amateur tinkerers, and Professor E. John B. Allen. Cover it with snow and shake, and you have all the makings of a unique New Hampshire history.

Harnessing History: On the Trail of New Hampshire’s State Dog, the Chinook

p. 76

Bob Cottrell p. 78

This program looks at how dog sledding developed in New Hampshire and how the Chinook played a major role in this story. Explaining how man and his relationship with dogs won out over machines on several famous polar expeditions, Bob Cottrell covers the history of Arthur Walden and his Chinooks, the State Dog of New Hampshire. Inquire whether the speaker’s dog will accompany him.

New England Lighthouses and the People Who Kept Them

~ New ~

Everyone knows that there's "something about lighthouses" that gives them broad appeal, but their vital role in our history and culture is little appreciated. Our early nation was built on maritime economy, and lighthouses were part of the system that made that possible. Due to automation, traditional lighthouse keeping is a way of life that has faded into the past. Jeremy D'Entremont tells the history of New England's historic and picturesque lighthouses primarily focusing on the colorful and dramatic stories of lighthouse keepers and their families. The presentation will feature past and present images and videoclips of the lighthouses, and describe present-day preservation efforts.

Oil, Ice, and Bone: Arctic Whaler Nathaniel Ransom

~ New ~

In January 2016, the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association announced the discovery of the wreckage of two sunken whale ships off the Alaskan coast. Oil, Ice, and Bone tells the story of these vessels and how they came to be lost in the greatest whaling disaster in American history. Arctic whaler Nathaniel Ransom served as third mate of one of the ships abandoned in 1871. In 1860, as a fourteen-year-old, he followed his five older brothers into the dank forecastle of a whaling vessel. For fifteen years he hunted seventy-ton bowheads in Arctic waters for the many uses of “bone.” Blades of flexible baleen from the leviathan’s enormous jaw raised its value, even as petroleum gradually replaced whale oil as a source of lighting. In 1871 Ransom survived the loss of thirty-two whaling vessels in the frigid waters off Alaska’s Icy Cape. He kept a journal – and held onto it as he and his shipmates jettisoned weapons and warm clothing to save their very lives. His eyewitness account of whaling’s brutal slaughter and sudden losses is enriched by presenter Helen Frink’s affection for an ancestor she discovered through his journals a century after his death.

Discovering New England Stone Walls Why are we so fascinated with stone walls? Kevin Gardner, author of The Granite Kiss, explains how and why New England came to acquire its thousands of miles of stone walls, the ways in which they and other dry stone structures were built, how their styles emerged and changed over time, and their significance to the famous New England landscape. Along the way, Kevin occupies himself building a miniature wall or walls on a tabletop, using tiny stones from a five-gallon bucket. Facing page: New Hampshire Humanities "Humanities in Action" Hike with author and Appalachian Trail hiker Jennifer Pharr Davis. September 2015. Photo courtesy of Ryan McBride Photography

Jeremy D'Entremont p. 79

Helen Frink p. 80

Kevin Gardner p. 80

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Nature and Adventure John Harris p. 81

~ New ~ Returning North With the Spring: Retracing the Epic Journey of

Naturalist Edwin Way Teale from Florida to Maine

In 1947, Edwin Way Teale, the most popular naturalist in the decade between Aldo Leopold and Rachel Carson, followed the progress of spring over four months from the Everglades to the summit of Mount Washington. His best-selling book North With the Spring recounts the epic journey he and his wife Nellie undertook. In 2012, John Harris set out to retrace Teale’s route, stopping at unfamiliar wild places on the same calendar date on which Teale visited more than half a century earlier. Using Teale’s journal notes and photographs, Harris examined and compared changes in the flora, fauna, and lives of the people along the way. His account documents the losses, details the transformations, and celebrates the victories, for a remarkable number of east coast refuges have grown wilder during the intervening years.

Allen Koop p. 83

Darby Field and the “First” Ascent of Mount Washington For more than 200 years historians believed that Darby Field made the first climb up Mount Washington in 1642. However, in the last several decades, questions have emerged about his use of Native American guides, about the likelihood of prior ascents by Native Americans, about the route Field may have followed on the mountain, and about whether Field actually made the ascent as claimed. Allen Koop examines how historians reconstruct the “truth” when given scant, vague, and even contradictory evidence.

The White Mountain Huts: Past and Future The Appalachian Mountain Club’s Hut System is a unique institution in the White Mountains of New Hampshire. Allen Koop explores how the huts and the people who built, maintain, and use them have formed a world apart, a mountain society with its own history, traditions, and legends.

Hal Lyon p. 84

Michael Tougias p. 91

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Angling in the Smile of the Great Spirit Anyone who ever posted a Gone Fishin’ sign on the door during business hours will appreciate this native fisherman’s glimpse in to the habits, rituals, and lore of some of the more colorful members of the not-so-exclusive “Liars’ Club.” Hal Lyon shares tales, secrets, folklore, and history of fishing in New Hampshire’s big lakes—especially Lake Winnipesaukee which translates into “Smile of the Great Spirit.”

Fatal Forecast: An Incredible True Tale of Disaster and Survival at Sea What happens when a monster wave hits two 50-foot boats 200 miles out to sea in November? Using slides, Michael Tougias tells the story based on his book, Fatal Forecast: An Incredible True Tale of Disaster and Survival at Sea. Ambushed by the storm at Georges Bank off the New England coast, the crews of the Sea Fever and Fair Wind battled 90-foot waves and hurricane force winds. Captain Peter Brown on the Sea Fever (his father owned the Andrea Gail chronicled in The Perfect Storm) did his best to ride out the storm. Tougias details the harrowing hours as the crew of one boat attempts to rescue a man overboard and keep the boat from capsizing, and one crewman fought to stay alive in the rampaging ocean for the next two days.


Nature and Adventure Ten Hours Until Dawn During the height of the Blizzard of 1978 the pilot boat Can Do, with five men onboard, set out from Gloucester to assist a lost Coast Guard boat and an oil tanker that was in a Mayday situation. Ten Hours Until Dawn tells the story of what happened on that awful night when the seas were producing monstrous waves of 40 feet and the wind was screaming at 100 miles per hour.Using slides of the boats, the men involved, and photos of the storm, Michael Tougias will take the viewer through this incredible night where many lives hung in the balance. With the aid of maps Tougias lets the audience see the progression and location of these boats off the Massachusetts coast, and explains what happened and why.

Michael Tougias p. 91

The Finest Hours: The True Story Behind the U.S. Coast Guard’s Most Daring Sea Rescue On February 18, 1952, an astonishing maritime event began when a ferocious nor’easter split in half a 500-foot long oil tanker, the Pendleton, approximately one mile off the coast of Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Incredibly, just twenty miles away, a second oil tanker, the Fort Mercer, also split in half. On both tankers men were trapped on the severed bows and sterns, and all four sections were sinking in 60-foot seas. Thus began a life and death drama of survival, heroism, and a series of tragic mistakes. Of the 84 seamen aboard the tankers, 70 would be rescued and 14 would lose their lives. Michael Tougias, co-author of the book and Disney movie The Finest Hours, uses slides to illustrate the harrowing tale of the rescue efforts amidst towering waves and blinding snow in one of the most dangerous shoals in the world.

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New Hampshire History Abolitionists of Noyes Academy

Dan Billin

In 1835, abolitionists opened one of the nation’s first integrated schools in Canaan, New Hampshire, attracting eager African-American students from as far away as Boston, Providence, and New York City. Outraged community leaders responded by raising a mob that dragged the academy building off its foundation and ran the African-American students out of town. New Hampshire’s first experiment in educational equality was brief, but it helped launch the public careers of a trio of extraordinary African-American leaders: Henry Highland Garnet, Alexander Crummell, and Thomas Sipkins Sidney. Dan Billin plumbs the depths of anti-abolitionist sentiment in early 19th-century New England, and the courage of three young friends destined for greatness.

In the Evil Day: Individual Rights, Town Government, and the Crime That Stunned the Nation

~ New ~

p. 76

Richard Adams Carey p. 77

On August 19, 1997, in little Colebrook, New Hampshire, a 62-year-old carpenter named Carl Drega, a man with long-simmering property rights grievances, murdered state troopers Scott Phillips and Les Lord at a traffic stop in a supermarket parking lot. Then Drega stole Phillips's cruiser and drove downtown to settle some old scores. By the end of the day three more were dead, Drega among them, and four wounded. Occurring on the eve of America's current plague of gun violence, this tragic event made headlines all over the world and shocked New Hampshire out of a previous innocence. Touching on facets of North Country history, local governance, law enforcement, gun violence, and the human spirit, Richard Adams Carey describes a community that was never a passive victim but rather a brave and resilient survivor.

Pleasures of the Parlor: Playlists from a Victorian iPod

Marya Danihel

The music we listen to every day says a lot about us and about our society—and so it was with our Victorian forebears. Their favorite songs reveal much about their inner lives while also reflecting developments in the culture at large. Marya Danihel discusses and performs songs middle-class Victorians sang for pleasure at home in New England, further illustrating her social and music history with 19th-century artwork and memoirs. Melodious, witty, and touching, this music includes parlor songs, Civil War songs, and selections by Stephen Foster and his contemporaries.

New England Lighthouses and the People Who Kept Them

~ New ~

Everyone knows that there’s “something about lighthouses” that gives them broad appeal, but their vital role in our history and culture is little appreciated. Our early nation was built on maritime economy, and lighthouses were part of the system that made that possible. Today, traditional lighthouse keeping is a way of life that has faded into the past with automation. Jeremy D’Entremont, author and lighthouse historian, will present an overview of the history of New England’s historic and picturesque lighthouses with the primary focus on the colorful and dramatic stories of lighthouse keepers and their families. The presentation will feature past and present images of the lighthouses, as well as video clips. There will also be discussion of the present-day lighthouse preservation efforts of the American Lighthouse Foundation and other organizations.

p. 78

Jeremy D'Entremont p. 79

Facing page: Portsmouth Harbour Lighthouse Stairs Photo courtesy of Jeremy D'Entremont

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New Hampshire History Neill DePaoli p. 79

A House on the Bay: Life on 17th-Century New Hampshire’s Coastal Frontier One of the Great Bay’s most prominent families during the latter part of the 17th century was the Wiggin family. Recently, a team of archaeologists discovered the home of Thomas Wiggin, Jr. Neill DePaoli demonstrates how bay residents on the periphery of Anglo-American settlement were far less isolated and bereft of the comforts of the more “civilized” world than traditionally portrayed.

Astride Two Worlds: The Odd Adventures of John Gyles Neill DePaoli tells the story of former Indian captive John Gyles who became one of provincial Massachusetts’ leading interpreters and a player in negotiations between the English and Indians of Maine and New Hampshire. Gyles was a “culture broker,” parlaying his knowledge of his own and other cultures as Europeans and Native Americans struggled to bridge the cultural divide that separated them from one another.

Charles Doleac p. 79

Teddy Roosevelt’s Nobel Prize: New Hampshire and the Portsmouth Peace Treaty Teddy Roosevelt chose Portsmouth to be the site of the 1905 peace treaty negotiations between Russian and Japanese delegations to end the Russo-Japanese war. Charles Doleac’s program first focuses on Roosevelt’s multi-track diplomacy that included other world powers, the Russian and Japanese delegations, the U.S. Navy, and New Hampshire hosts in 30 days of negotiations that resulted in the Portsmouth Peace Treaty and earned Roosevelt the 1906 Nobel Peace Prize. The program then explores how ordinary people from throughout New Hampshire positively affected the Portsmouth negotiations. The presenter customizes each presentation to the program site’s local history at the time of the treaty to encourage audiences to join the annual statewide commemoration of “Portsmouth Peace Treaty Day” on September 5.

Kevin Gardner

Discovering New England Stone Walls

p. 80

Why are we so fascinated with stone walls? Kevin Gardner, author of The Granite Kiss, explains how and why New England came to acquire its thousands of miles of stone walls, the ways in which they and other dry stone structures were built, how their styles emerged and changed over time and their significance to the famous New England landscape. Along the way, Kevin occupies himself building a miniature wall or walls on a tabletop, using tiny stones from a five-gallon bucket.

Richard Hesse

John Winant: New Hampshire Man of the World

p. 82

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John G. Winant, three-time governor of New Hampshire went on to serve the nation in several capacities on the national and international scene. In the process he became a hero to the British in World War II and to the common man throughout the developed world. His life, marked by highs and lows, ended tragically in his mansion in Concord. This program by Richard Hesse examines Winant's life and measures his impact at home and abroad.


New Hampshire History African-American Soldiers and Sailors of New Hampshire During the American Revolution

Glenn Knoblock p. 83

One of the most interesting aspects of the American Revolution is the role played by African Americans in the fight for independence. Both free African Americans and those that were enslaved were key elements in manning state militias and Continental Army units, as well as serving on the high seas in the Navy and on privately armed ships. Indeed, their service to New Hampshire, as well as the other New England colonies, was crucial in a conflict that lasted nearly seven years. Prohibited by existing laws from serving in military units and largely considered “undesirable elements” by southern patriots and even many in New England, how is it that these AfricanAmerican soldiers came to fight for the cause of liberty, even when their own personal liberty was not guaranteed? Glenn Knoblock examines the history of African-American soldiers’ service during the war, including how and why they enlisted, their interaction with white soldiers, service on the battlefields, how they were perceived by the enemy and the officers under whom they served, and their treatment after the war.

Brewing in New Hampshire: An Informal History of Beer in the Granite State from Colonial Times to the Present Glenn Knoblock explores the fascinating history of New Hampshire’s beer and ale brewing industry from Colonial days, when it was home- and tavern-based, to today’s modern breweries and brew pubs. Unusual and rare photos and advertisements document this changing industry and the state’s earliest brewers, including the renowned Frank Jones. A number of lesser-known brewers and breweries that operated in the state are also discussed, including the only brewery owned and operated by a woman before the modern era. Illustrations present evidence of society’s changing attitudes towards beer and alcohol consumption over the years. Whether you’re a beer connoisseur or a “tea-totaler," this lecture will be enjoyed by adults of all ages.

Covered Bridges of New Hampshire Covered wooden bridges have been a vital part of the New Hampshire transportation network, dating back to the early 1800s. Given New Hampshire's myriad streams, brooks, and rivers, it's not surprising that 400 covered bridges have been documented. Often viewed as quaint relics of a simpler past, they were technological marvels of their day. It may be native ingenuity and New Hampshire's woodworking tradition that account for the fact that a number of nationally-noted covered bridge truss designers were New Hampshire natives. Glenn Knoblock discusses covered bridge design and technology, and their designers, builders, and associated folklore.

New Hampshire Cemeteries and Gravestones Rubbings, photographs, and slides illustrate the rich variety of gravestones to be found in our own neighborhoods, but they also tell long-forgotten stories of such historical events as the Great Awakening, the Throat Distemper epidemic, and the American Revolution. Find out more about these deeply personal works of art and the craftsmen who carved them with Glenn Knoblock, and learn how to read the stone “pages” that give insight into the vast genealogical book of New Hampshire.

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New Hampshire History Glenn Knoblock p. 83

~ New ~ New Hampshire on High: Historic and Unusual Weathervanes

of the Granite State

This program offers a fun and engaging look at the historic and unusual weathervanes found on New Hampshire's churches, town halls, and other public buildings from earliest times down to the present. Highlighted by the visual presentation of a sampling of the vanes found throughout the state, Glenn Knoblock’s program will trace the history of weathervanes, their practical use and interesting symbolism, as well as their varied types and methods of manufacture and evolution from practical weather instrument to architectural embellishment.

Allen Koop p. 83

Stark Decency: New Hampshire’s World War II German Prisoner of War Camp During World War II, 300 German prisoners of war were held at Camp Stark near the village of Stark in New Hampshire’s North Country. Allen Koop reveals the history of this camp, which tells us much about our country’s war experience and about our state.

John and Donna Moody p. 85

Town by Town, Watershed by Watershed: Native Americans in New Hampshire Every town and watershed in New Hampshire has ancient and continuing Native American history. From the recent, late 20th-century explosion of local Native population in New Hampshire back to the era of early settlement and the colonial wars, John and Donna Moody explore the history of New Hampshire’s Abenaki and Penacook peoples with a focus on your local community.

A History of Native Burial Looting, Destruction, and Protection in New Hampshire The history of Native American site desecration and looting in the Americas is well known. New Hampshire has its share of similar stories, but the valuing and protection of these historic sites in New Hampshire did not just begin with the passage of a Native burial protection law in the early 1990s. In the 1820s the “giant by the lake” (the remains of an Abenaki man found in Melvin Village on Lake Winnipesaukee) was carefully reburied near his original burial location. John and Donna Moody explore the history of burial and site destruction, repatriation, and site protection in the Granite State.

George Morrison p. 85

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Vanished Veterans - New Hampshire's Civil War Monuments and Memorials New Hampshire towns did not erect monuments to prior wars, but the emotional and family toll, unprecedented in American history, drove the decision to honor our local soldiers and sailors of the War of Rebellion. From Seabrook to Colebrook, Berlin to Hinsdale, along Main Streets and 19th-century dirt roads, in city parks and on town greens, in libraries and town halls, and in cemeteries prominent and obscure, George Morrison located, inventoried, and photographed the fascinating variety of New Hampshire’s Civil War memorials. He shares his discoveries, from the earliest obelisks, to statuary and artillery, to murals, cast iron, stained glass, and buildings from the 1860s through the 1920s.


New Hampshire History Having a Fine Time in Manchester: Vintage Post Cards and Local History

Robert Perreault p. 87

Post cards have many a story to tell about the built landscape, disastrous events such as fires or floods, daily folk customs, and the identity of place. During the golden age of the post card, before telephones, personal messages could contain anything from the mundane: "Having a fine time, wish you were here" to more profound reflections on family life or colorful portraits of towns and cities from the perspective of newly-landed immigrants. Vintage post cards of Manchester offer a lively, nostalgic adventure through a major industrial center, home to people from around the world.

Putting Human Faces on the Textile Industry: The Workers of the Amoskeag Manufacturing Company Daily life for the Amoskeag Manufacturing Company’s textile worker was not easy. Robert Perreault sheds light on how people from a variety of European countries as well as from French Canada made the transition from an agrarian to an industrial society and how that change affected families, cultures, the nature of work, and relationships among workers themselves.

A Taste of the Old Country in the New: Franco-Americans of Manchester Manchester is one example of the many industrial cities that attracted immigrants from Quebec in numbers large enough to warrant the creation and maintenance of an infrastructure of religious, educational, social, cultural, and commercial institutions that helped preserve this community’s language and traditions. Robert Perreault shares stories about life in one of America’s major Franco-American centers.

The Making of Strawbery Banke Local legend says Strawbery Banke Museum began when a Portsmouth librarian gave a rousing speech in 1957. The backstory, however, is richly complex. This is a dramatic tale of economics, urban renewal, immigration, and historic architecture in New Hampshire’s only seaport. J. Dennis Robinson, author of an award-winning “biography” of the 10-acre Strawbery Banke campus, shares the history of “America’s oldest neighborhood.” Tapping into private letters, unpublished records, and personal interviews, Robinson explores the politics of preservation. Using colorful and historic illustrations, the author looks candidly at mistakes made and lessons learned in this grassroots success story.

J. Dennis Robinson p. 88

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New Hampshire History J. Dennis Robinson p. 88

Steve Taylor p. 90

Who Won the War of 1812? New Hampshire’s Forgotten Patriot Pirates When was the War of 1812? That’s a trick question, but if you don’t recall America’s “Forgotten War” with England, you are not alone. Two hundred years ago, with only 17 armed ships, a youthful United States declared war on the world’s largest navy (over 1,000 warships). Then we invaded Canada. That didn’t go well. In retaliation the British burned Washington, D.C. to the ground. So how come we think we won? J. Dennis Robinson offers an upbeat, often irreverent, slideshow on New Hampshire’s reluctant role in “Mr. Madison’s War” with special emphasis on the bold privateers who swarmed out of the state’s only seaport.

New Hampshire’s Long Love-Hate Relationship with its Agricultural Fairs The first agricultural fair in North America was held in what is now Londonderry in 1722, and it would become a wildly popular event lasting for generations until it came to be so dominated by gambling, flim-flam, and other “scandalous dimensions” that the legislature revoked its charter in 1850. But fairs have always had strong supporters and eventually the state came around to appropriating modest sums to help them succeed. Temperance groups and others would continue to attack the fairs on moral grounds and their close connection to horse racing was a chronic flashpoint. Steve Taylor will discuss the ups and downs of the fairs through the years and how public affection for rural traditions helps them survive in contemporary times.

New Hampshire’s One-Room Rural Schools: The Romance and the Reality Hundreds of one-room schools dotted the landscape of New Hampshire a century ago and were the backbone of primary education for generations of children. Revered in literature and lore, they actually were beset with problems, some of which are little changed today. The greatest issue was financing the local school and the vast differences between taxing districts in ability to support education. Other concerns included teacher preparation and quality, curriculum, discipline, student achievement, and community involvement in the educational process. Steve Taylor explores the lasting legacies of the one-room school and how they echo today.

~ New ~ New Hampshire Roads Taken—Or Not Following World War II, New Hampshire embarked on an extensive program of constructing new highways and improving existing roads to accommodate explosive growth in passenger vehicles and the need for better infrastructure to accommodate commercial traffic. Hundreds of millions in federal, state, and local tax dollars would be expended on this initiative over the second half of the 20th century and road construction would become an enduring part of the state's economy. Decisions about when and where highway projects would be undertaken were often driven by political considerations as well as by policy dictated from Washington. Frequently, choices not to build or improve certain roads would generate as much conflict and controversy as would the proposals that would eventually be implemented. Either way, decisions about highways would come to have profound and lasting impacts upon communities and entire regions of the state. In this program, Steve Taylor reviews some of New Hampshire's most significant highway choices in the 20th century, followed by discussion of the economic, social, and cultural changes that followed decisions to build or not to build.

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New Hampshire History Poor Houses and Town Farms: The Hard Row for Paupers From its earliest settlements New Hampshire has struggled with issues surrounding the treatment of its poor. The early Northeastern colonies followed the lead of England’s 1601 Poor Law, which imposed compulsory taxes for maintenance of the poor but made no distinction between the “vagrant, vicious poor” and the helpless, and honest poor. This confusion persisted for generations and led directly to establishment of alms houses and poor farms in most of the state’s towns, and later, county institutions. Collectively, this formed a dark chapter in New Hampshire history. Steve Taylor will examine how paupers were treated in these facilities and how reformers eventually succeeded in closing them down.

The Shaker Legacy In their more than two and a half centuries of existence, members of the United Society of Believers in Christ’s Second Appearing, commonly known as Shakers, made ingenious contributions to diverse fields: agriculture, industry, medicine, music, furniture design, women’s rights, racial equality, craftsmanship, social and religious thought, and mechanical invention and improvement. Darryl Thompson explores some of these contributions in his lecture and shares some of his personal memories of the Canterbury Shakers.

Steve Taylor p. 90

Darryl Thompson p. 90

Jacob Skeen (1887) A two-sheet religious chart intended to further Shaker education: Genealogical Chronological And Geographical Chart. Embracing Biblical And Profane History Of Ancient Times From Adam To Christ 1887 (80cm x 112 cm if joined) Cornell University Library, Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections

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New Hampshire History in Film Powerful As Truth This documentary and discussion, facilitated by John Gfroerer, tells the story of William Loeb, publisher of the Manchester Union Leader. It traces Loeb’s rise to be one of the most influential voices in New Hampshire. Through interviews, archival material, and news footage, it documents his influence on the state. The documentary also chronicles the history of New Hampshire from 1950 to 1985, bringing to life such figures as Governors Walter Peterson, Wesley Powell, and Meldrim Thomson.

John Gfroerer p. 80

Rights & Reds Rights & Reds tells the story of New Hampshire’s investigation of “subversive activities” during the 1950s. John Gfroerer facilitates this discussion of his documentary that explores the story of a confrontation between people who thought they were protecting the Bill of Rights and people who thought the Bill of Rights should protect them. Most importantly, it is the story of people who had the courage to stand up for what they believed.

World War II New Hampshire This documentary tells the story of life in New Hampshire during the Second World War. Through interviews, historic news film, photos, and radio reports from the battlefields, this documentary and discussion facilitated by John Gfroerer chronicles how a nation, a state, and the citizens of New Hampshire mobilized for war.

Uprooted: Heartache and Hope in New Hampshire Uprooted is a 30-minute documentary based on interviews conducted by the UNH Center for the Humanities during New Hampshire Humanities' Fences & Neighbors initiative on immigration. It tells the story of five refugees who escaped from war-torn countries to resettle in New Hampshire. The film explores what it means to be a refugee and how it feels to make a new life in a strange place, often without English language skills, family, a job, or community contacts. The film leaves us pondering questions of belonging and citizenship. What does it mean to be an American? Once a refugee, are you destined always to be a refugee? What are our responsibilities toward one another?

Whitney Howarth John Krueckeberg Sara Withers p. 82, 84, 92

(Select one of the following facilitators: Whitney Howarth, John Krueckeberg, or Sara Withers; information can be found in the Presenter Directory beginning on page 76.)

Meetinghouse: The Heart of Washington, New Hampshire This 55-minute documentary features the classic meetinghouse in Washington, a small, rural town in the Monadnock region. The film explores the concept of a town “meetinghouse” as a uniquely New England historical and architectural phenomenon, common to nearly every New England town in the 18th and early 19th centuries. This particular building, the frame of which was erected on July 4, 1787, has been integral to the civic and religious life of its community for well over two centuries. Ron Jager presents the film and leads a post-film discussion.

Ron Jager p. 82

Facing page: Child laborers at Amoskeag Manufacturing in Manchester (1909) Photo by Lewis Hine

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Humanities to Go presenter Jo Radner "Family Stories: How and Why to Remember and Tell Them"

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Oral History, Storytelling and Writing Family, Memory, Place: Writing Family Stories What family stories do you carry with you? What story do you tell over and over? What landscape do you cherish the most? One of the deepest human instincts is to tell our life stories, to figure out who we are and what it means to be human. This interactive workshop led by Martha Andrews Donovan and Maura MacNeil explores how the landscapes of our lives shape the stories that we tell. Participants explore the themes of family, memory, and place through sample narratives and a series of short writing exercises, gaining a deeper awareness of how their stories can preserve personal, generational, and communal history.

Flight of Remembrance: World War II from the Losing Side and the Dream that Led to Aerospace Engineering

~ New ~

Martha Donovan Maura MacNeil p. 79, 85

Marina Kirsch p. 83

Flight of Remembrance is the true story of the speaker's family before, during, and after World War II in Latvia, occupied Poland, and Germany. None were members of the Nazi Party or Hitler supporters, but Marina Kirsch’s father and grandfather, both technically skilled, were forced to serve in the German military after fleeing from Latvia to Germany before the first Soviet takeover of the Baltic States. By giving a face and name to "the enemy," this presentation offers a seldomshared perspective on the most devastating world conflict of all time, and sheds light on what life was like for a German family during the war. Centering on the speaker's parents, Rolf and Lilo, Flight of Remembrance is a love story, a story of survival, and the story of Rolf's lifelong dream of a career in aeronautical engineering that expanded, after he immigrated to the United States, to a leadership role in the emerging U.S. Space Program.

Oil, Ice, and Bone: Arctic Whaler Nathaniel Ransom

~ New ~

In January 2016, the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association announced the discovery of the wreckage of two sunken whale ships off the Alaskan coast. Oil, Ice, and Bone tells the story of these vessels and how they came to be lost in the greatest whaling disaster in American history. Arctic whaler Nathaniel Ransom served as third mate of one of the ships abandoned in 1871. In 1860, as a fourteen-year-old, he followed his five older brothers into the dank forecastle of a whaling vessel. For fifteen years he hunted seventy-ton bowheads in Arctic waters for the many uses of “bone.” Blades of flexible baleen from the leviathan’s enormous jaw raised its value, even as petroleum gradually replaced whale oil as a source of lighting. In 1871, Ransom survived the loss of thirty-two whaling vessels in the frigid waters off Alaska’s Icy Cape. He kept a journal – and held onto it as he and his shipmates jettisoned weapons and warm clothing to save their very lives. His eyewitness account of whaling’s brutal slaughter and sudden losses is enriched by presenter Helen Frink’s affection for an ancestor she discovered through his journals a century after his death.

Speaking of War: Staging the Voices of Veterans in Post-9/11 Theatre

~ New ~

Helen Frink p. 80

Leslie Pasternack p. 86

Theatre historian and director Leslie Pasternack places today's theatre of war in historical context and introduces audiences to recent theatre productions. Drawing from the works of Sophocles, Shakespeare, R. C. Sherriff, Kate Wenner, Gregory Burke, Quiara Alegría Hudes, and others, Pasternack performs dramatic excerpts and invites audience members to read as well. This combination of discussion and impromptu performance demonstrates the potential of live theatre to bear witness and build bridges in times of conflict and division – including the division between military and civilian society many veterans experience when they come home. 65


Oral History, Storytelling and Writing Jo Radner p. 88

Family Stories: How and Why to Remember and Tell Them Telling personal and family stories is fun – and much more. Storytelling connects strangers, strengthens links between generations, and gives children the self-knowledge to carry them through hard times. Knowledge of family history has even been linked to better teen behavior and mental health. In this active and interactive program, storyteller Jo Radner shares foolproof ways to mine memories and interview relatives for meaningful stories. Participants practice finding, developing, and telling their own tales.

~ New ~ Yankee Ingenuity:

Stories of Headstrong and Resourceful People Jo Radner shares a selection of historical tales—humorous and thought-provoking—about New Englanders who have used their wits in extraordinary ways to solve problems and create inventions. The stories are engaging and entertaining, but also may raise some profound questions about our admiration of ingenuity and about the ethics of pursuing discoveries without taking their potential outcomes into account. The performance will include discussion with the audience, and may introduce a brief folktale or a poem about inventiveness and problem-solving.

Rebecca Rule p. 89

That Reminds Me of a Story Stories speak to us of community. They hold our history and reflect our identity. Rebecca Rule has made it her mission over the last 20 years to collect stories of New Hampshire, especially those that reflect what’s special about this rocky old place. She’ll tell some of those stories—her favorites are the funny ones—and invite audience members to contribute a few stories of their own.

Crosscut: The Mills, Logging, and Life on the Androscoggin Using oral histories, Rebecca Rule recreates the voices of North Country people and uses new and vintage photos to tell the story of logging, the Berlin Mills, and life in the Androscoggin Valley, from the beginnings of the logging industry in the 1800s, through the boom years of the Brown Company and subsequent mill owners, and on to the demolition of the stacks in 2007. Audience members will be invited to share their own stories and discuss the logging and paper industries and the special place north of the notches. John Rule assists with a PowerPoint presentation of photos and information from his own research into the history of the Brown Company as an archivist at the New Hampshire Historical Society.

Mills of the Brown Paper Company in Berlin, New Hampshire, on the Androscoggin River Charles Steinhacker (1937- ) Photographer U.S. National Archives and Records Administration

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Oral History, Storytelling and Writing Moved and Seconded: Town Meeting in New Hampshire

Rebecca Rule

Drawing on research from her book, Moved and Seconded: Town Meeting in New Hampshire, the present, the past, and the future, Rebecca Rule regales audiences with stories of the rituals, traditions and history of town meeting, including the perennial characters, the literature, the humor, and the wisdom of this uniquely New England institution.

Songs of Emigration: Storytelling Through Traditional Irish Music

~ New ~

p. 89

Jordan Tirrell-Wysocki p. 90

Through traditional music Jordan Tirrell-Wysocki relays some of the adventures, misadventures, and emotions experienced by Irish emigrants. The focus is on songs about leaving Ireland, sometimes focusing on the reasons for leaving (a man who is driven from his land by English persecution); sometimes revealing what happened upon arrival (an immigrant drafted into the Union army during the Civil War); and sometimes exploring the universal feeling of homesickness of a stranger in a strange land (a factory worker in London missing his home in County Clare). The presenter discusses the historical context of these songs, interspersing their stories with tunes from Ireland.

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ID 12711135 © Landd09 | Dreamstime.com


Technology and Society

Galileo Galilei, the Starry Messenger

~ New ~

Michael Francis

The Starry Messenger, presented by Michael Francis, is a dramatic fun-filled adaptation of Galileo’s short treatise “Siderius Nuncius." Galileo (dressed in 17th-century costume) arrives to present a public lecture on his most recent discoveries made using his newly devised spyglass. As he describes those discoveries, Galileo’s new method of observation and measurement of nature become apparent. Throughout the presentation audience members are actively involved in experiments and demonstrations. After the lecture, Galileo answers questions about his experiments, his life, and his times.

p. 80

Television: The Art and Ethics of Manipulation

~ New ~

John Gfroerer explores the power of television as a communication medium and the ethical implications of manipulating the viewer by means of the choices made behind the camera through the final editing process. By examining the artistic techniques used to persuade, induce, and entice us, Gfroerer considers the extent to which television teaches or simply tantalizes us. Are ethical boundaries crossed by the use of these techniques, and to what extent as media consumers should we care?

Only in America: History and Health Care in the United States

p. 80

Allen Koop

Allen Koop describes how the troubled, promising, and unique American health care system has been shaped, not only by developments in medicine, but also by by social forces, economic trends, party politics, and by historical surprises. The lecture moves rapidly from Colonial times, through era of sectarian medicine, then the accomplishments of modern medicine, and concludes in the health care tensions of the 21st century.

Beware the Chair: The Medieval Roots of School Exercise (and Your Standing Desk)

John Gfroerer

~ New ~

p. 83

Rebecca Noel p. 86

Becky Noel explores the sometimes alarming, sometimes hilarious history of the idea that the scholarly life makes people sick. It’s a problem that came to afflict more people as education expanded during the Enlightenment and became nearly universal in the 1800s. Whether the culprit was lack of movement, seated posture, blood rushing to the head, tuberculosis, or digestive woes, physicians have fretted over the health of scholars since at least Plato’s day. Tracing this idea from Europe to the United States, from scholars to children, and from boys’ to girls’ education, the presentation shows how durable the fear has remained. The (optional) interactive aspects of the presentation will include audience testing of historic exercise schemes, some done in pairs. The program concludes with audience discussion of the relevance of this problem to our own times— like the Enlightenment, a moment in history when suddenly many more people live the sedentary lives once limited to a few scholars.

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Technology and Society Jo Radner p. 88

~ New ~ Yankee Ingenuity: Stories of Headstrong and Resourceful People Jo Radner performs an evening of historical tales – humorous as well as thought-provoking – about New Englanders who have used their wits in extraordinary ways to solve problems and create inventions. The stories are engaging and entertaining but also raise real questions about our admiration of ingenuity. Whether about a woman who protected her neighbors by outwitting a wily peddler; or the workers who tried to preserve the Old Man in Franconia Notch; whether about a woman who preserved her Abenaki nature through strategic relationships; or the career of the man who built Lucknow, the “Castle in the Clouds,” Radner’s stories both inform listeners and explore the ethics of pursuing discoveries without taking their potential outcomes into account.

Lucknow Estate (also known as "Castle in the Clouds") Moultonborough, NH Photo courtesy of the Castle Preservation Society

Maria Sanders p. 89

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~ New ~ The Quest for Happiness The ancient Greek philosophers defined eudaimonia as living a full and excellent life. In this illustrated talk, Maria Sanders explores how ideas of happiness have changed in Western civilization through the ages, while comparing and contrasting major concepts of well-being throughout the world. Can money buy happiness? To what extent does engaging in one’s community impact happiness? When worldwide surveys of happiness are conducted, why doesn’t the United States make the top ten? Participants will be invited to discuss various definitions; current measures for assessing self-reported levels of happiness; specific findings reported as increasing people’s levels of happiness; and happiness projects undertaken by entire communities—including a town-wide happiness quest in Plymouth, New Hampshire.


Personal Privacy in Cyberspace Many Americans feel their privacy is threatened by information technology and favor stronger privacy legislation. At the same time, people support the use of information technology to serve them quickly and efficiently in various ways. In this program, Herman Tavani explores whether we can have it both ways and the serious ethical dilemma that arises if not.

Herman Tavani p. 89

Ethical Aspects of Converging Technologies Information technology, biotechnology, and nanotechnology are converging in ways that were not easily anticipated. We now have distinct new fields such as bioinformatics, computational genomics, nanocomputing, and ubiquitous computing. These converging and emerging technologies also introduce a cluster of ethical problems that were not easy to predict or anticipate. Herman Tavani examines a range of issues – from privacy and informed consent to autonomy and freedom to property rights involving the ownership of genetic information that resides in databases.

Intellectual Property Disputes in Cyberspace Can we frame a policy that will preserve the “information commons� while protecting intellectual property rights at the same time? Although the digitization process has made information sharing much easier, controversial intellectual property regimes and recent legislation also make much of that information less accessible than it was in the pre-digital era. In this program, Herman Tavani discusses this paradox with respect to our ability to share information in the digital age.

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World History, Cultures and Religions Comics in World History and Cultures

Marek Bennett

Marek Bennett presents a whirlwind survey of comics from around the world and throughout history, paying special attention to what these vibrant narratives tell (and show) us about the people and periods that created them. Bennett engages and involves the audience in an interactive discussion of several comics representing cultures such as Ancient Rome, Medieval Europe, the Ancient Maya, Feudal and modern Japan, the United States in the early 20th century, and Nazi Germany during World War II. The program explores ways of creating and reading comics from around the world, and what these techniques tell us about the cultures in which they occur.

p. 76

Global Banjar: International Voices in Antebellum Banjo Music~ New ~

Marek Bennett Woody Pringle

The Hardtacks (Marek Bennett and Woody Pringle) deliver an engaging overview of global politics prior to the American Civil War through the lens of early banjo music. Between 1820 and 1860, the banjo transformed from a slave instrument found only on Southern plantations to an international pop phenomenon: songs and playing techniques carried far and wide in the emerging global economy, from the streets of New York’s Five Points slum to the gold fields of California and the elite drawing rooms of London, from the battlegrounds of Nicaragua to official diplomatic receptions in Japan. How did this African-derived, slave-borne folk instrument come to symbolize all the best and worst of a young United States of America? (Please contact Woody Pringle to book this

p. 76, 88

program.)

An Introduction to Sufism, the Spiritual Path in Islam Sufism is the inner dimension of Sunni Islam. Taking its source in the Quran and the Prophetic tradition, it has often been defined as “the science of spiritual states.” Proficiency in this practice should enable the initiated to overcome his ego to achieve the knowledge and contemplation of God. Basically, the Sufi aspires to draw from the spiritual influx (baraka) of the Prophet Muhammad, handed down for centuries from master to disciple, to fight against the passions and delusions that beset him. This talk by Mohamed Defaa will highlight the universality of Sufism, and explain how, over the centuries, the great teachers have adapted the doctrines and practices of initiation to the transformations of the Muslim world. It will also show why Sufism plays an increasing role as an antidote against fundamentalism and radicalism.

Mohamed Defaa p.78

The Middle East The term “Middle East” is a changing geopolitical concept. Throughout recent history, this term referred to a political, a cultural, and a geographical region with no clear boundaries. Moreover, this concept serves to generate stereotypes and misunderstanding. This multimedia presentation by Mohamed Defaa provides an analytical framework to understand the histories, social identities, and cultures behind this complex concept of “Middle East.”

Facing page: Circular piece of silk with Mongol images, Iran or Iraq, early 14th century (1305) Silk, cotton, and gold. Original size: diam. 69 cm.

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World History, Cultures and Religions

Rachel Lehr p. 84

Big and Small Players in the New Great Game: Afghanistan and its Region This lecture provides a view of Afghanistan and the surrounding region through visual images and the stories of individuals who live there. Throughout the presentation Rachel Lehr illustrates how ordinary lives and people are impacted by international politics and economics. Her personal experiences and research expertise afford a rare view of this misunderstood and complex region.

Charles Kennedy

A Short Course on Islam for Non-Muslims

p. 83

The foundation of Western civilization rests on three monotheistic faiths - Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. The interaction between and among these systems of belief continues to impact events in daily life and politics on the world stage. Following an outline of Islamic beliefs and practices, Charles Kennedy examines how Islam is practiced in the United States.

Marina Kirsch

~ New ~

p. 83

Flight of Remembrance: World War II from the Losing Side and the Dream that Led to Aerospace Engineering Flight of Remembrance is the true story of the speaker's family before, during, and after World War II in Latvia, occupied Poland, and Germany. None were members of the Nazi Party or Hitler supporters, but Marina Kirsch’s father and grandfather, both technically skilled, were forced to serve in the German military after fleeing from Latvia to Germany before the first Soviet takeover of the Baltic States. By giving a face and name to "the enemy," this presentation offers a seldomshared perspective on the most devastating world conflict of all time, and sheds light on what life was like for a German family during the war. Centering on the speaker's parents, Rolf and Lilo, Flight of Remembrance is a love story, a story of survival, and the story of Rolf's lifelong dream of a career in aeronautical engineering that expanded, after he immigrated to the United States, to a leadership role in the emerging U.S. Space Program.

José Lezcano p. 84

The Guitar and the Devil: Music, Magic, and Ritual Among Ecuadorian Indians Music and ritual belief in supernatural forces play key roles in the eight-day festivities associated with the summer solstice and annual corn harvest in Ecuador. For example, the guitarist makes a pact with the “diablito” in order to gain strength to play and dance without tiring. This program, illustrated with slides, recordings, and live performance by José Lezcano, explores the connections among ritual, music, and the supernatural, especially among indigenous Andean peoples.

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World History, Cultures and Religions

Perspectives on Arab Culture and the Influence of Islam

Nabil Migalli

It is an understatement to say that current events have sparked curiosity about Arab culture and renewed interest in Arab-American relations. Nabil Migalli, originally from Egypt, discusses the cultures of the Middle East, especially the influence of Islam on various nations and people, with an emphasis on developments in Egypt. Learn more about the status of Arab-American relations both at home and abroad, and explore the impact of the Arab Spring.

Beware the Chair: The Medieval Roots of School Exercise (and Your Standing Desk)

~ New ~

p. 85

Rebecca Noel p. 86

Becky Noel explores the sometimes alarming, sometimes hilarious history of the idea that the scholarly life makes people sick. It’s a problem that came to afflict more people as education expanded during the Enlightenment and became nearly universal in the 1800s. Whether the culprit was lack of movement, seated posture, blood rushing to the head, tuberculosis, or digestive woes, physicians have fretted over the health of scholars since at least Plato’s day. Tracing this idea from Europe to the United States, from scholars to children, and from boys’ to girls’ education, the presentation shows how durable the fear has remained. The (optional) interactive aspects of the presentation will include audience testing of historic exercise schemes, some done in pairs. The program concludes with audience discussion of the relevance of this problem to our own times— like the Enlightenment, a moment in history when suddenly many more people live the sedentary lives once limited to a few scholars.

God, the Early Years: A Brief History of God in the Rise of Judaism, ~ New ~ Christianity, and Islam

Nicole Ruane p. 89

Do the three major monotheistic religions worship the same deity? Nicole Ruane traces the rise of the deity who comes to be known as The Lord, God the Father, and Allah from his earliest form as a young god (known as Yah, Yahu or Yahweh) in the area of Syria-Palestine, later merging with the father deity of the local pantheon known as El. Judaism, Christianity, and Islam spread knowledge of this deity, in his various forms, throughout the world. The program will end by examining the question of whether these three religions worship the same deity or whether their understandings of the divine are sufficiently different that they refer to different gods.

World War II Hero of Conscience: The Sousa Mendes Story Until recently, one of the greatest rescuers and heroes of conscience of World War II remained unknown and dishonored, and was, in effect, a prophet without honor in his own country. In 1940, Portuguese Diplomat Aristides de Sousa Mendes (1885-1954) was Portugal’s Consul at Bordeaux, France when thousands of desperate refugees fled the German army’s invasion and sought sanctuary. By signing thousands of visas which allowed refugees, including many Jews, to escape France and reach neutral Spain and Portugal, Sousa Mendes saved countless lives. But in doing so he destroyed his career as a diplomat and threw his family into poverty and eventual exile. Saving many more Jews than Oskar Schindler, Sousa Mendes was not honored until 1967 when Israel declared him a Righteous Gentile, and righteous among nations. Douglas Wheeler shares the story of the difficult rehabilitation of this extraordinary humanitarian which began only in the 1980s, and he’ll probe the reasons for Sousa Mendes’ ordeal.

Douglas Wheeler p. 91

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Presenter Directory E. JOHN B. ALLEN

CHRIS BENEDETTO

Professor Emeritus of History at Plymouth State University, John Allen was awarded the International Skiing History Association’s Lifetime Achievement Award in 2009. He serves as historian for the New England Ski Museum in Franconia, and is the author of several books, including From Skisport to Skiing: One Hundred Years of an American Sport, The Culture and Sport of Skiing from Antiquity to World War II, and A Historical Dictionary of Skiing. Allen has served as a consultant to several ski history documentary films.

Chris Benedetto has taught history courses at Granite State College since 2009. He has published numerous articles on New Hampshire history and co-authored the book Union Soldier of the American Civil War: A Visual Reference. In 2013, Benedetto was presented with a "Good Steward" Award from the Campus Compact for New Hampshire for his continuing contributions to community education and historical preservation. He has also been a member of various American Revolution and Civil War re-enactment organizations for over twenty years.

Contact: PO Box 23, Rumney, NH 03266 Home: 603-744-8076 (June-Sept) Work: 603-786-9207 (Oct-May) • jallen@plymouth.edu

Contact: PO Box 704, Rollinsford, NH 03869 Home: 603-343-1407 • chrsbenedetto@yahoo.com

Program: New Hampshire on Skis (p. 51)

PATRICK D. ANDERSON Patrick D. Anderson, Gibney Distinguished Professor at Colby-Sawyer College, is a cultural historian who teaches American studies, film, and Native American studies courses. His research on indigenous peoples has taken him to the Pacific Northwest and Alaska, the American Southwest, Central and South America, and New Zealand. Anderson has also written about Hollywood filmmaking and the Academy Awards and hosted a televised film review program, "Reel Talk." He has degrees from the University of Notre Dame and the University of Michigan. Contact: PO Box 493, South Sutton, NH 03273 Home: 603-927-4708 • panderso@colby-sawyer.edu Work: 603-526-3639 Programs: • Spirit of Place: Native Lands and Cultures of the American Southwest (p. 21) • Movie Mavericks: Filmmakers Who Challenge the Hollywood System (p. 23) • Sennett, Chaplin, Keaton, and the Art of Silent Film Comedy (p. 23) • Understanding the Movies: The Art of Film (p. 23)

CRISTINA ASHJIAN Cristina Ashjian is an art historian and an independent scholar based in Moultonborough, where she is presently the chair of the Moultonborough Heritage Commission. Her current research focuses on late 19th- and early 20th- century country estates. Ashjian holds an MA in the History of Art from the Courtauld Institute of Art, University of London and a PhD in Modern Art and Architecture from Northwestern University. Contact: 361 Old Mountain Road, Moultonborough, NH 03254 Home: 603-476-8446 • cristina.ashjian@gmail.com Program: Exemplary Country Estates of New Hampshire (p. 23)

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Program: Granite Gallows: The Origins of New Hampshire's Debate over the Death Penalty (p. 29)

MAREK BENNETT Marek Bennett teaches music and comics in New England and the world beyond. He holds an MEd in Curriculum and Instruction from Keene State College, and is a rostered teaching artist with the New Hampshire State Council on the Arts. His publications include the graphic novel The Civil War Diary of Freeman Colby and the history webcomic Live Free and Draw. His historical band The Hardtacks received a 2016 "Best of NH" award from NH Magazine. Contact: 93 Bennett Road, Henniker, NH 03242 Home: 603-428-7049 • marek@marekbennett.com Programs: • Comics in World History and Cultures (p. 73) Contact Woody Pringle (p.88) to book: • Global Banjar: International Voices in Antebellum Banjo Music (p. 45) • Rally 'Round the Flag: The American Civil War Through Folksong (p. 45)

DAN BILLIN Raised in the Lakes Region, Dan Billin earned a BA in Communications from Brigham Young University. He worked as a newspaper reporter for the Valley News in Lebanon, New Hampshire for seventeen years. Billin's passion for history and nose for a story led him to uncover a wealth of detail about the shocking and largely forgotten tale of the birth and death of Noyes Academy. Contact: 91 Mascoma Street, Lebanon, NH 03766 Home: 603-448-1769 • danbillin@hotmail.com Program: Abolitionists of Noyes Academy (p. 55)


Presenter Directory JUDITH BLACK Judith Black’s historic tales, commissioned by the US Dept. of the Interior, NPR, Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities, the USS Constitution Museum and many others, have received standing ovations at the Smithsonian Institution and Storytelling Festivals worldwide. She has keynoted the National Interpreters Conference: a standing ovation met her address on discerning truths from exploring multiple vantage points on our national history. One of America’s finest storytellers, she was inducted into the National Storytelling Network’s Circle of Excellence “ For exceptional commitment and exemplary contribution to the art of storytelling" in 2001. Contact: c/o Ellen Weiner, 2411 Bay Road, Sharon, MA 02067 Work: 781-784-6394 • elweiner@comcast.net Program: Meet Lucy Stone: Enter the Antebellum World of the Abolition and Women's Rights Movements (p. 39)

STEVE BLUNT Steve Blunt is an award-winning musician and storyteller with over 20 years experience in education and the arts. He has been selected seven times as a grant-funded artist for the NH State Library's "Kids, Books, and the Arts" program and is committed to sharing traditional folklore and history with audiences of all ages. He holds an MA in Teaching of English from Teachers College at Columbia.

CARRIE BROWN Carrie Brown holds a PhD in American Literature and Folklore from the University of Virginia. She is an independent scholar who also works as a freelance history curator for museums in New England. She has curated two exhibitions on the Civil War for the American Precision Museum, as well as exhibitions on the history of aviation, the early years of the automobile, and the bicycle. The author of two books and many articles and exhibit catalogs, Brown delights in finding connections between changing technology and the evolution of popular culture. Contact: 96 King Road, Etna, NH 03750 Home: 603-643-4950 • csb@carrie-brown.com Programs: • From Guns to Gramophones: Civil War and the Technology that Shaped America (p. 11) • Rosie’s Mom: Forgotten Women of the First World War (p. 11)

MARGO BURNS Margo Burns is the 10th-generation greatgranddaughter of Rebecca Nurse, who was hanged in Salem in 1692 on the charge of witchcraft. She is the project manager and an associate editor of Records of the Salem Witch-Hunt, published in 2009 by Cambridge University Press. This work is the definitive collection of transcriptions of the legal records of the episode. Burns currently works at St. Paul's School, where she is the director of The Language Center. (See online bio for more)

Contact: 12 Burnett Street, Nashua, NH 03060 Home: 603-888-3866 • steveblunt@comcast.net

Contact: 42 Candia Road, Manchester, NH 03109 Home: 603-669-4942 • margoburns@gmail.com

Program: Liberty Is Our Motto! Songs and Stories of the Hutchinson Family Singers (p. 39)

Programs: • The Capital Crime of Witchcraft: What the Primary Sources Tell Us (p. 11) • From Mickey to Magoo: The Golden Age of American Animation (p. 23)

ADAM BOYCE Adam Boyce, a 10th-generation Vermonter and lifelong student of history, has been a popular Humanities to Go presenter since 2005. Beginning in 1991, when Boyce started dancing, fiddling, calling and playing the piano, he has made a study of nearly every aspect of traditional New England dancing and music history. Boyce has also been a regular on fiddle contest circuits as a judge, piano accompanist, and as a competitor. Contact: 1076 Rush Meadow Road, Reading, VT 05062 Home: 802-484-7719 • adamrboyce@juno.com Programs: • The Old Country Fiddler: Charles Ross Taggart, Traveling Entertainer (p. 39) • Old Time Rules Will Prevail: The Fiddle Contest in New Hampshire and New England (p. 45)

RICHARD ADAMS CAREY Richard Adams Carey is a writer whose byline has appeared in magazines ranging from Alaska to Yankee. He is the author of four award-winning books of literary nonfiction, including Raven's Children: An Alaskan Culture at Twilight (a New York Public Library Book to Remember) and Against the Tide: The Fate of the New England Fisherman (the New Hampshire Literary Prize for Nonfiction). A Connecticut native, Harvard graduate, and long-time New Hampshire resident, he has taught school in the Alaskan Bush, oddjobbed on a Western ranch, worked on fishing boats, tracked caviar smugglers, served as president of the New Hampshire Writers' Project, and now teaches in Southern New Hampshire University's MFA in Fiction and Nonfiction program. Contact: PO Box 118, Center Sandwich, NH 03227 Home: 603-284-7064 • r.carey@snhu.edu Cell: 603-937-0926 Program: In the Evil Day: Individual Rights, Town Government, 77 and the Crime That Stunned the Nation (p. 55)


Presenter Directory PAUL CHRISTESEN (not available 2016 - 2017) Paul Christesen holds a BA in History and Classics from Dartmouth College and an MA and PhD in Ancient History from Columbia University. He is an associate professor in the Department of Classics at Dartmouth College, where his teaching and scholarship center around social history, with a particular focus on athletics and economics. Christesen has written two books, Ancient Greek History and Olympic Victor Lists, and twenty articles. He is currently coediting (with Donald Kyle) the Wiley-Blackwell Companion to Sport and Spectacle in Greece and Rome. Contact: See Humanities to Go online catalog for more information Program: Sports, Meritocracy, and Democracy in the Ancient and Modern Worlds (p. 19)

STEPHEN COLLINS Stephen Collins is a Shakespearean trained actor with 40 years of theatrical experience under his belt. He has performed as Walt Whitman over 1,000 times and been met with rave reviews. Mr. Collins’ performance does not just deliver the poetry; he brings the poet to life on the stage. The show conveys an understanding of the impact and the reactions of the characters to their respective times, giving the audience not just a performance, but an experience. Contact: 30 Leonard Road, Boxboro, MA 01719 Cell: 978 853 0710 • walt978@aol.com Work: 508-481-7118 Programs: Unlaunch'd Voices: An Evening with Walt Whitman (p. 33)

BOB COTTRELL Bob Cottrell holds an MA from the Winterthur Program in Early American Culture in Delaware. The founding director of the Remick Country Doctor Museum in Tamworth, he is now the Curator of the Henney History Room at the Conway Public Library, a Board member at the Conway Historical Society, and President ex-officio of the Tamworth Historical Society. He serves as an independent history and museum consultant. Contact: 124 Tewksbury Drive, PO Box 58, Chocorua, NH 03817-0058 Cell: 603-323-3359 • chinook1618@gmail.com Work: 603-447-5552 Program: Harnessing History: On the Trail of New Hampshire's State Dog, the Chinook (p. 51)

MARYA DANIHEL Marya Danihel has long been fascinated with the window afforded on 19th-century life by popular songs of the era. As a singer and actress, she also revels in their charming melodies, heartfelt poetry, and wry humor. Her lecture/concerts have been featured at many of New England’s historic houses and museums, including the Longfellow National Historic Site, Boston’s Old South Meeting House, and Strawbery Banke Museum. As a singer, she has appeared with many regional organizations, including New England Light Opera, the American Repertory Theatre, and the Tanglewood Festival Chorus. Contact: 55 Gates Street, Portsmouth, NH 03801 Cell: 603-682-9862 • mdanihel@vinvoices.com Program: Pleasures of the Parlor: Playlists from a Victorian iPod (p. 11)

MOHAMED DEFAA Mohamed Defaa is certified by the International Center for Educational and Cultural Consulting in Lyon, France. He earned an MA in Communication and Expression at the University Mohamed V in Rabat, Morocco, and a BA in French Language and Literature from the University Ibn Tofail in Kénitra, Morocco. Defaa has served as an assistant professor of Communication and Cultural Expression at the University Hassan the Second in Casablanca, Morocco, and a college instructor in New Hampshire and Massachusetts. He is a French and Arabic teacher at Merrimack High School, and an Arabic instructor at Southern New Hampshire University. Contact: 30 Lamson Drive, Merrimack, NH 03054 Cell: 603-930-9765 • mdefaa@gmail.com Work: 603-424-6204 Programs: • The Middle East (p. 73) • An Introduction to Sufism, the Spiritual Path in Islam (p. 73)

MARCOS DEL HIERRO Marcos Del Hierro is an Assistant Professor of English at the University of New Hampshire. He received his PhD from Texas A&M University in 2014. His research focuses on intersections among Rhetoric and Composition, Race and Ethnic Studies, and Hiphop Studies. He is interested in how Black, Latina/o, and Indigenous cultures influence hiphop rhetorics and technologies. His essay, “Fighting the Academy One Nopal at a Time,” appeared in El Mundo Zurdo: Selected Works from the Meetings of The Society for the Study of Gloria Anzaldúa in 2012. He is currently working on his first monograph, Homegrown Critique Through Hiphop Rhetorics. Contact: 6 Washington Street, Newmarket, NH 03857 Cell: 832-349-6815 • marcosdelhierro@gmail.com Program: The Use of Hiphop Rhetorics to Combat the Criminalization of Black, Brown, and Red Youth (p. 73)

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Presenter Directory JEREMY D'ENTREMONT Jeremy D'Entremont has written more than a dozen books and 300 articles on lighthouse history and other maritime topics. He is the official historian of the American Lighthouse Foundation and the founder of Friends of Portsmouth Harbor Lighthouses. D'Entremont has lectured and narrated cruises from Maine to California, and his photographs have appeared in many books and magazines. He is also editor of the website "New England Lighthouses: A Virtual Guide" at www. newenglandlighthouses.net. He emphasizes the rich human history of lighthouse keepers and their families in his presentations. Contact: 125 Bluefish Blvd., Portsmouth, NH 03801 Home: 603-431-9155 • nelights@gmail.com Cell: 603-828-9243 Program: New England Lighthouses and the People Who Kept Them (p. 12)

NEILL DePAOLI Neill DePaoli earned a PhD from the University of New Hampshire and has more than 30 years experience in the study of the history and historical archaeology of New England. Contact: 116 Wilson Road, Kittery, ME 03904 Home: 207-703-2955 • ndppquid@yahoo.com Programs: • House on the Bay: Life on 17th-Century New Hampshire's Coastal Frontier (p. 56) • Astride Two Worlds: The Odd Adventures of John Gyles (p. 56)

CHARLES DOLEAC Charles Doleac is an attorney with Boynton, Waldron, Doleac, Woodman and Scott in Portsmouth. He creates seminars on East/West comparative cultures and professional ethics, and is president and co-founder of the Japan America Society of NH. The author of An Uncommon Commitment to Peace: Portsmouth Peace Treaty 1905, he created the treaty's authoritative website and its 100th anniversary museum exhibit. In 2011, Doleac received Japan's imperial decoration, the Order of the Rising Sun Gold Rays with Rosette, for his efforts in promoting the treaty as a model for citizen involvement in multilateral diplomacy's conflict resolution.

MARTHA ANDREWS DONOVAN Martha Andrews Donovan has been teaching at the secondary and college level for over thirty years. Donovan's writing has appeared in numerous publications. The author of the chapbook Dress Her in Silk, she is working on a memoir, Dangerous Archaeology: A Daughter's Search for Her Mother (and Others). Donovan's research and writing are driven by her discovery of letters, diaries, photographs, and other artifacts and ephemera from her mother's childhood in rural South India where she was the daughter of missionaries. Donovan and her co-presenter Maura MacNeil have long taught students to tell their stories and look forward to working with public audiences. Contact: See listing for Maura MacNeil for information Program: Family, Memory, Place: Writing Family Stories (p. 65)

DIANA DURHAM Diana Durham tells the story of our times through the grail myth and poetry. She is the author of The Return of King Arthur: Completing the Quest for Wholeness; two poetry collections, Sea of Glass and To the End of the Night; and an audio-play retelling of the grail legend entitled "Perceval & the Grail." She earned an MA in English Literature from University College, London and was Visiting Research Associate at the Women's Studies Research Center at Brandeis University in 2010 and 2011. Contact: 15 Thornton Street, Portsmouth, NH 03801 Home: 603-433-0150 • diana-durham@earthlink.net Cell: 603-380-8658 Program: Grail Mania: 21st-Century Retelling of 12th-Century Heresy (p. 34)

SCOTT EATON A staff attorney for the New Hampshire legislature for more than 30 years, Scott Eaton earned his BSE in aerospace engineering from the University of Michigan and his JD from the Franklin Pierce Law Center. Eaton's abiding interest in history, including the history of World War II and of flight, led to his fascination with the life and work of aviator and author Antoine de SaintExupéry. Contact: 118 Hollis Street, PO Box 3402, Manchester, NH 03105 Home: 603-625-4827 • sfeavocat@aol.com Program: Antoine de Saint-Exupéry: The Man Who Wrote The Little Prince (p. 34)

Contact: 82 Court Street, Portsmouth, NH 03801 Work: 603-436-4010 • cdoleac@nhlawfirm.com Program: Teddy Roosevelt's Nobel Prize: New Hampshire and the Portsmouth Peace Treaty (p. 56)

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Presenter Directory ALICE B. FOGEL Alice B. Fogel is the New Hampshire State Poet Laureate. Her poetry collections include Interval: Poems Based on Bach’s “Goldberg Variations,” which won the Nicholas Schaffner Award for Music in Literature, and Be That Empty, a national poetry bestseller, among others, and she is also the author of Strange Terrain, a reader's and teacher's guide to appreciating poetry without necessarily “getting” it, based on her Humanities To Go program. Nominated for Best of the Web and eight times for the Pushcart Prize, Fogel’s poems have appeared in many journals and anthologies, including Best American Poetry. She has received a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts, among other awards. Contact: PO Box 1044, Walpole, NH 03608 Home: 603-499-6783 • alicebfogel@hotmail.com Program: Strange Terrain: How Not To "Get" Poetry and Let It Get You Instead (p.34)

MARINA FORBES Marina Forbes earned an MA in Philology from the University of St. Petersburg, Russia. She is a lecturer, historian and award-winning artist who has written extensively on Russian traditional arts, history, and the rich tapestry of Russian culture. She is licensed with the Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg, and is featured on the New Hampshire State Council on the Arts Rosters for Arts in Education and Traditional Arts. Contact: 16 Hillside Drive, Rochester, NH 03867 Work: 603-332-2255 • marina@marinaforbes.com Programs:

(all programs on p. 24)

• Imperial Russian Fabergé Eggs • Russian Lacquer Boxes: From Craft to Fine Art • Russian Iconography: 1,000 Years of Tradition • Traditional Matryoshka Nested Doll Making: from Russia to New England

MICHAEL FRANCIS By combining science and theatre, Michael Francis has been able to reach audiences to instill an interest in the wonders of our Universe. In addition to his programs in libraries, schools and civic organizations, he has presented at the Space Telescope Science Institute, Carnegie Science Center, the Franklin Institute, the National Air and Space Museum and astronomical conventions. Francis is a member of the Screen Actors Guild - American Federation of Television and Radio Artists and Actors Equity Association. He also belongs to the International Museum Theatre Alliance, the International Planetarium Society, the Mid Atlantic Planetarium Society, and SoloTogether. Contact: 2143 Commonwealth Avenue, Auburndale, MA 02466 Work: 617-861-0743 • mfrancis@mike-francis.com Home: 617-965-5653 Program: Galileo Galilei, the Starry Messenger (p. 40)

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HELEN FRINK Helen Hiller Frink holds a BA in English from the University of New Hampshire and masters and doctoral degrees in German from the University of Chicago. She retired from Keene State College as Professor Emerita of Modern Languages in 2009. She is the author of These Acworth Hills, Alstead Through the Years, Women after Communism: the East German Experience, and Oil, Ice and Bone: Arctic Whaler Nathaniel Ransom. She is descended from two families of Yankee whalers and lives too far from the sea in Acworth, New Hampshire. Contact: 24 Clark Road, South Acworth, NH 03607 Home: (603)-863-4455 • hfrink@keene.edu Program: Oil, Ice, and Bone: Arctic Whaler Nathaniel Ransom (p. 12)

KEVIN GARDNER Kevin Gardner is a writer, teacher, tradesman, and a lifelong resident of Hopkinton, New Hampshire. He has been a stone wall builder for forty years and is the author of The Granite Kiss: Traditions and Techniques of Building New England Stone Walls, as well as poetry, songs, and essays. For 25 years, Kevin was an award-winning performance critic, feature writer, and producer for New Hampshire Public Radio. He's also a longtime professional actor, director and teacher of theatre. He is a regular Guest Director at Plymouth State University, and has been a performance evaluator for the New Hampshire State Council on the Arts. He has taught at the New Hampton School, the New Hampshire Institute of Art, and at St. Paul's School's summer Advanced Studies Program. Kevin's stone wall presentation is available throughout the year except for a six-week stretch from the third week of June through the month of July. Contact: 114 Brockway Road, Hopkinton, NH 03229 Home: 603-225-1782 • kgardner@mcttelecom.com Program: Discovering New England Stone Walls (p. 12)

JOHN GFROERER John Gfroerer is a documentary producer and owner of Accompany, a video production company based at the Capitol Center for the Arts in Concord. He has produced over 40 documentaries, ranging from profiles of towns along the Maine Coast to a history of the New Hampshire Presidential Primary. Gfroerer's work has been aired on public television stations, The History Channel, and many other venues. Contact: Accompany, 44 South Main Street, Concord, NH 03301 Home: 603-224-0364 • accompanyu@aol.com Work: 603-226-3130 Programs: • Television: The Art and Ethics of Manipulation (p. 25) • Powerful As Truth (p. 63) • Rights & Reds (p. 63) • World War II New Hampshire (p. 63)


Presenter Directory JACKSON GILLMAN Jackson Gillman's storytelling career started with Rudyard Kipling's stories in 1978. Since then he has been featured four times at the National Storytelling Festival and has thrice been Tellerin-Residence at the International Storytelling Center. Since 2000, Jackson has portrayed "Rudyard-in-Residence" at Kipling's historic Vermont home for a week each year. In 2014, Gillman was invited to bring a dramatic performance of "The Magic of Rudyard Kipling: 'Just So'" to Off-Broadway as part of the United Solo Theatre Festival. Of the 130 shows from around the world, it received the Best Educational Award. Contact: PO Box 41, Onset, MA 02558 Home: 508-295-0886 • jxsong@comcast.net Program: Rudyard Kipling Revisited (p. 35)

ROBERT GOODBY Robert Goodby is an associate professor of Anthropology at Franklin Pierce University in Rindge. He holds a PhD in anthropology from Brown University and has spent the last thirty years studying Native American archaeological sites in New England. He is a past president of the New Hampshire Archeological Society, a former Trustee of the Mount Kearsarge Indian Museum in Warner, and serves on the New Hampshire Commission on Native American Affairs. In 2010, he directed the excavations of four 12,000 year old Paleoindian dwelling sites at the Tenant Swamp site in Keene. Contact: 40 University Drive, Rindge, NH 03461 Home: 603-446-2366 • goodbyr@franklinpierce.edu Work: 603-899-4362 Programs: • Digging Into Native History in New Hampshire (p.21) • 12,000 Years Ago in the Granite State (p. 21)

CLIA GOODWIN Clia Goodwin became interested in humanities as an undergrad and took her MA in interdisciplinary study in the medieval and modern periods. After earning her PhD in Comparative Medieval Literature from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, she taught English literature and humanities courses for more than 20 years, most of those at the University of New Hampshire. Goodwin is a member of the Medieval Academy of America. Contact: 43 Hough Street, Dover, NH 03820-3035 Home: 603-742-7438 • cmdg@comcast.net Programs: • A Woman's Take on Courtly Love: The Lais of Marie de France (p. 35) • J.R.R. Tolkien and the Uses of Fantasy (p. 35) • The Arthurian Revival in New England: The Clash of the Ideal and the Real (p. 35)

DEBORAH ANNE GOSS Deborah Anne Goss is originally from Brattleboro VT and has a BFA in Acting from Boston University’s College of Fine Arts Theatre Division. She has studied and taught singing and voice production as well as performing on stage in both dramatic and musical roles since the 1970s. Since 1994, as one half of the duo “The Proper Ladies” with Anabel Graetz, she has toured on both coasts and performed throughout New England with their a cappella arrangements of popular songs of 19th-century America, highlighting the culture, social movements and personalities of our nation’s past. Historical projects have always been a favorite part of her career and for several years Goss has performed her ‘History in Word and Song’ programs as concerts, as lectures, and in character as 19th-century women at museums, historic sites, and libraries. Contact: Lexington, MA 02420 Home: 339-970-5024 • dgossinger@yahoo.com Program: Abby Hutchinson’s Sweet Freedom Songs: Songs and Stories of the Struggle for Abolition and Woman Suffrage (p. 12)

INGRID GRAFF Ingrid Graff has been a long-time speaker for New Hampshire Humanities and is a recipient of the William L. Dunfey Award. She has lectured for many different organizations, including The Jane Austen Society of North America and Road Scholar, and has taught classes for Granite State College. Graff was the school librarian for Gorham, New Hampshire for 10 years and won the NHEMA Award for Excellence in Library Services in 2007. Contact: 272 Randolph Hill Road, Randolph, NH 03593 Home: 603-466-5736 • ingridpgraff@gmail.com Programs: • Not In Front of the Children: The Art and Importance of Fairy Tales (p. 36) • The Case of the Detective Who Refused to Die: Arthur Conan Doyle and Sherlock Holmes (p. 36)

JOHN HARRIS John R. Harris is currently Projects Coordinator for the Monadnock Institute of Nature, Place and Culture at Franklin Pierce University. He holds a PhD in British and American literature from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and has taught courses in nature writing, environmental literacy, regional history, American literature and composition at Franklin Pierce University. In addition, he has organized and helped to edit two regional anthologies— Where the Mountain Stands Alone and Beyond the Notches: Stories of North Country New Hampshire. Contact: 711 Route 63, Westmoreland, New Hampshire 03467 Home: 603-399-7748 • harrisjr@franklinpierce.edu Work: 603-899-4010 Program: Returning North With the Spring: Retracing the Epic Journey of Naturalist Edwin Way Teale from Florida to Maine (p. 52) 81


Presenter Directory RICHARD A. HESSE Professor Emeritus at the UNH School of Law, Richard Hesse has published on a variety of legal and ethical topics. He served as a community lawyer in Philadelphia, heading a police community relations project before moving to Boston to head a national project focused on the rights of consumers. His academic concentration is on state and federal constitutional law and international human rights. Hesse has been an advocate for civil and human rights for more than 50 years and was twice awarded the Bill of Rights Award by the New Hampshire Civil Liberties Union. Contact: 438 Putney Hill Road, Hopkinton, NH 03229 Home: 603-746-4708 • dickatlaw@gmail.com Programs: • A Conversation with John Marshall (p. 29) • Civil Liberties vs. National Security (p. 29) • The Founding Fathers: What Were They Thinking? (p. 29) • John Winant: New Hampshire Man of The World (p. 56)

THOMAS HUBKA Thomas Hubka earned his Bachelor's in Architecture from Carnegie-Mellon University and Master's from the University of Oregon. His publications include Big House, Little House, Back House Barn: The Connected Farm Buildings of New England; Resplendent Synagogue: Architecture and Worship in an 18th Century Polish Community; Houses without Names: Architecture Nomenclature and the Classification of America's Common Houses. His forthcoming book is entitled The Transformation of Working-Class Houses and Domesticity, 1890-1940: Improved Homes for a New Middle Class. Hubka's research primarily interprets the historic development and relationships between architecture/buildings and culture/ people. Contact: 7339 SE 31st Avenue, Portland, OR 97202 Home: 971-279-2097• thubka@uwm.edu Cell: 414-336-5478 (while traveling in New Hampshire) Program: Big House, Little House, Back House, Barn: The Connected Farm Buildings of New England (p. 25)

ALAN R. HOFFMAN

EMERY HUTCHINS

Alan R. Hoffman obtained his BA in History from Yale College and JD from Harvard Law School. He "discovered" Lafayette in 2002 and spent two years translating Auguste Levasseur's Lafayette in America in 1824 and 1825, the firsthand account of Lafayette's Farewell Tour of America, which is now in its Third Printing and available as an e-book. President of the American Friends of Lafayette and the Massachusetts Lafayette Society, Hoffman has lectured in 22 of the 24 states that Lafayette visited on the Farewell Tour.

Emery Hutchins and James Prendergast are musicians who play and sing a unique combination of Celtic and American country music. In their performances they seek to show the connection between the two genres. Hutchins is a renowned performer of a variety of different styles of acoustic music ranging from traditional Irish tunes to vintage American country music songs. Prendergast worked for thirty years in the recording studios and orchestra pits of Nashville, Tennessee. Producer of CMH Record's Celtic Tribute series, Jim now specializes in producing traditional music at his Mill Pond Music Studio in Portsmouth, New Hampshire. Music preservationists and performers, their program demonstrates that to understand the music of a culture is to understand the heart of a culture.

Programs: • Lafayette and the Farewell Tour: An American Idol (p. 13) • Lafayette: Symbol of Franco-American Friendship (p. 13) Contact: 45 Hardy Road, Londonderry, NH 03053-2872 Cell: 603-490-3950 • arhoffman@lynchbrewer.com

WHITNEY HOWARTH Plymouth State University Associate Professor Whitney Howarth holds a PhD in World History from Northeastern University. Whitney will focus on the language, place/home, identity, and "cultural encounter" aspects of the Uprooted story. As a world historian who teaches about genocide, global conflict, cultural assimilation, and international exchange, Howarth can guide discussion beyond local issues to related national and international topics of interest to the audience. Contact: 17 High Street, Plymouth, NH 03264-1595 Work: 603-535-3204 • wbhowarth@plymouth.edu Program: Uprooted: Heartache and Hope in New Hampshire (p. 63)

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Contact: PO Box 663, York, ME 03909 Home: 207-363-7391 • ehutchins@maine.rr.com Cell Phone: 207-240-4024 Program: A Night of Music with Two Old Friends (p. 46)

RONALD JAGER Ronald Jager is a former professor of philosophy at Yale University. In recent years he has been an independent scholar and writer living in Washington, New Hampshire. Besides publications in philosophy, Jager has written books on New Hampshire history and on farming and rural life. Among the latter is Last House on the Road, The Fate of Family Farming, and his memoir Eighty Acres. Contact: 1412 Half Moon Pond Road, Washington, NH 03280 Home: 603-495-3618 • rjager@gsinet.net Program: Meetinghouse: The Heart of Washington, New Hampshire (p. 63)


Presenter Directory CHARLES A. KENNEDY Charles Kennedy earned a PhD from Yale University's Department of Near Eastern Languages and Literatures. He is Professor Emeritus at Virginia Polytechnic Institute. Kennedy has published widely on the subject of the Bible and early Christian life and taught adult-education classes at Colby-Sawyer College on such varied topics as Islam, religions in America, and vaudeville. Kennedy is an ordained minister in the United Church of Christ. Contact: 149 East Side Drive #141, Concord, NH 03301-5410 Home: (603) 223-0731 • chask@myfairpoint.net Program: A Short Course on Islam for Non-Muslims (p. 74)

KAROLYN KINANE Karolyn Kinane, PhD, has been teaching, lecturing, and publishing on medieval English literature and culture for fourteen years. She has won awards for her work on female saints and she is the author of End of Days: Essays on the Apocalypse from Antiquity to Modernity. Kinane is a Professor of English at Plymouth State University and specializes in Arthurian legends, Chaucer, and how the "medieval" is recycled and repackaged into our contemporary culture. Contact: 17 High Street, Plymouth, NH 03264 Work: 603-535-2402 • kkinane@plymouth.edu Program: Evolving English: From Beowulf and Chaucer to Texts and Tweets (p. 36)

MARINA DUTZMANN KIRSCH Marina Dutzmann Kirsch is the author of Flight of Remembrance: A World War II Memoir of Love and Survival. The book was a finalist award winner in the 2012 USA Best Book Awards in the narrative non-fiction category. She has provided Flight of Remembrance presentations at almost eighty venues across seven states since early 2012. Born in Switzerland on the brink of her family's immigration to the U.S., Kirsch is a graduate of Oakland University in Rochester, Michigan, with a major in Russian Language and Literature. Contact: 5 Hudson Drive, Kensington, NH 03833 Cell 978-270-3523 • mdkirsch5@gmail.com Home: 603-580-1355 Programs: Flight of Remembrance: WWII from the Losing Side and the Dream that Led to Aerospace Engineering (p. 65)

CALVIN KNICKERBOCKER Calvin Knickerbocker is an independent scholar with a degree in electrical engineering from Union College and thirty years experience in marketing and education at IBM. He developed and delivered a dozen courses on American musical history for Rivier Institute for Senior Education (RISE) and has presented in retirement communities, senior centers and other venues in New Hampshire and New York. He has taught over 20 different courses to senior citizens at Rivier University since 1999 and given Humanities To Go presentations since 2004. Contact: 12 Crestview Terrace, Nashua, NH 03060 Home: 603-579-0603 • calknick2@juno.com Programs: • Motivating the WW II Home Front via Magazine and Radio Advertising (p. 37) • Your Hit Parade: Twenty-five Years Presenting America's Top PopularSongs (p. 46) • Wacky Songs that Made Us Laugh (p. 47) •

GLENN A. KNOBLOCK Glenn Knoblock is an independent scholar and author of fifteen books and over 100 articles. He is also the author and historian on projects relating to Northern New England bridges, New Hampshire cemeteries, and brewing history, and African-American military history. Knoblock has served as the main military contributor to Harvard and Oxford University's landmark African American Biography Project. He holds a BA in History from Bowling Green State University. Contact: Wolfeboro Falls, New Hampshire 603)-569-9209 • glennknob1@gmail.com Programs: • African-American Soldiers and Sailors of New Hampshire During the American Revolution (p. 14) • African-American Submariners of World War II and Beyond (p. 14) • Brewing in New Hampshire: An Informal History of Beer in the Granite State from Colonial Times to the Present (p. 57) • New Hampshire Covered Bridges (p. 57) • New Hampshire Cemeteries and Gravestones (p. 57) • New Hampshire on High: Historic and Unusual Weathervanes of the Granite State (p. 25)

ALLEN KOOP Allen Koop earned a PhD from the University of Pennsylvania. Koop currently teaches European and American history at Dartmouth College and has published books and articles on New Hampshire and American history including Stark Decency: German Prisoners of War in a New England Village. Contact: PO Box 1014, New London, NH 03257 • allen.koop@dartmouth.edu Programs: • Only in America: History and Health Care in the United States (p. 30) • Darby Field and the "First" Ascent of Mount Washington (p. 52) • The White Mountain Huts: Past and Future (p. 52) 83 • Stark Decency: New Hampshire's World War II German Prisoner of War Camp (p. 58)


Presenter Directory JOHN KRUECKEBERG

JOSÉ LEZCANO

Plymouth State University Professor of History John Krueckeberg teaches U.S. history and other courses. His research into the life and times of Raymond Swing served as his introduction to the history of immigration and refugee flights to the U.S. in the World War II era, specifically the Emergency Rescue Committee that saved thousands from Nazioccupied France. Krueckeberg uses this to contextualize current immigration and refugee issues related to the documentary Uprooted. Krueckeberg and a colleague coordinate the National History Day competition for New Hampshire high school students.

José Lezcano earned a PhD from Florida State University. He is Professor of Music at Keene State College. Lezcano is a twice Grammy-nominated Cuban-American guitarist, composer, folklorist, and music educator and has published articles on South American, Caribbean, and Afro-Cuban music and musicians. Lezcano has captivated audiences on four continents. His programs of Latin American music, his own original compositions, and classical repertory have taken him from Carnegie Recital Hall to important festivals and venues in Cuba, Spain, Brazil, Germany, China, Peru, the Czech Republic, Ecuador, and Colombia.

Contact: 48 Vista Lane, Plymouth, NH 03264 Work: 603-535-2332 • jkrueckeberg@plymouth.edu

Contact: 47 Taylor Street, Keene, NH 03431 Work: 603-358-2180 • jlezcano@keene.edu

Program: Uprooted: Heartache and Hope in New Hampshire (p. 63)

Programs: • The Guitar in Latin America: Continuities, Changes and Bicultural Strumming (p. 47) • The Guitar and the Devil: Music, Magic, and Ritual Among Ecuadorian Indians (p. 74)

DUDLEY LAUFMAN Dudley Laufman received the highest honor for traditional artists, the National Heritage Fellowship, in 2009. He received the 2001 NH Governor's Arts Award for Lifetime Achievement. In 1999, Laufman and Jacqueline Laufman presented at the Smithsonian FolkLife Festival in Washington, DC. Laufman has been playing fiddle and calling for contra and square dances for 64 years. With Jacqueline Laufman, he authored Traditional Barn Dances and recorded several CDs. Under Laufman's leadership the Canterbury Orchestra produced five recordings. Contact: PO Box 61, Canterbury, NH 03224 Home: 603-783-4719 • jdlaufman@comcast.net Program: Contra Dancing In New Hampshire: Then and Now (p. 47)

RACHEL LEHR A visiting scholar at Dartmouth College, Rachel Lehr founded Rubia, Inc., a non-profit that supports rural women in Afghanistan through education and the promotion of economic independence. Lehr’s scholarship has focused on dialects of Persian spoken in Iran, Tajikistan, and Afghanistan. She has served as a cultural consultant for the State Department and the military while completing her doctorate in linguistics at University of Chicago. Her dissertation focuses on Pashai, an endangered language spoken in Darrai Nur, a rural mountain community in eastern Afghanistan. Contact: c/o Frumie Selchen, Arts Alliance of Northern New Hampshire, PO Box 892, Littleton, NH 03561 Work: 603-323-7302 • frumie@aannh.org Program: Big and Small Players in the New Great Game: Afghanistan and its Region (p. 74)

SEBASTIAN LOCKWOOD Storyteller and teacher Sebastian Lockwood tells the great epics: Gilgamesh, Odysseus, Caesar, Beowulf and Monkey. His studies in Classics and Anthropology at Boston University and Cambridge University in the UK laid the foundation for bringing these great tales into performance. Lockwood’s performances are designed to take complex texts and make them accessible and exciting for audiences from 5 to 95. Lockwood has tutored and taught classes in higher education for 25 years. He now concentrates on performance, workshops, and studio recording. Lockwood lives under Crotched Mountain with his wife, jazz singer and storyteller Nanette Perrotte. Contact: 415 East Road, Greenfield, NH 03047 Home: 603-860-1573 • sebastianlockwood88@gmail.com Programs: • The Man from Venus (p. 19) • Homer’s Odysseus (p. 19) • The Epic of Gilgamesh (p. 19)

HAL LYON Hal Lyon is a graduate of West Point, a former Ranger-paratrooper officer, former US Director of Education for the Gifted, and a project officer for the development of Sesame Street. He has served on the faculties of several universities including the Universities of Massachusetts and Munich, where he currently teaches physicians to be more effective teachers. An award winner in film and television festivals, Lyon is also the author of seven books and more than 150 articles. His book, Angling in the Smile of the Great Spirit, won the New England Outdoor Writers Association “Best Book of the Year Award.” Contact: PO Box 452, Meredith, NH 03253 • halclyon@yahoo.com

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Program: Angling in the Smile of the Great Spirit (p. 52) Note: Not available in December, January, April, or July.


Presenter Directory MAURA MacNEIL Maura MacNeil is the author of the poetry collections Lost Houses and A History of Water. Her writing has been published in numerous journals over three decades and anthologized in The Poet Showcase: An Anthology of New Hampshire Poets, The Breath of Parted Lips: Voices from the Frost Place, Volume II and Shadow and Light: A Literary Anthology on Memory. Her current memoir project titled Sugar explores family illness. Professor of Arts and Humanities at New England College, MacNeil and her co-presenter Martha Andrews Donovan have long taught students to tell their stories and look forward to working with public audiences. Contact: 98 Bridge Street, Henniker, NH 03242 Cell: 603-748-3585 • mmacneil@nec.edu Program: Family, Memory, Place: Writing Family Stories (p. 65)

ANN McCLELLAN A dedicated Anglophile, Ann McClellan has a PhD in English Literature and has more than fifteen years experience of college-level teaching. As a specialist in 19th- and 20th-century British literature, McClellan’s work explores the complex relationships between literature and culture, with published research ranging from fictional representations of British women intellectuals to her current project on fan culture and the popularity of Sherlock Holmes. Contact: 17 High Street MSC 40, Plymouth, NH 03264 Work: 603-535-2683 • akmcclellan@plymouth.edu Program: (Not So) Elementary, My Dear Watson: The Popularity of Sherlock (p. 37)

KENT McCONNELL For much of his professional career, Dr. Kent A. McConnell has explored subjects related to questions of ethics and warfare. A historian of American culture in the 19th century and the American Civil War in particular, Dr. McConnell's research has examined how violence perpetrated on the human body has shaped the psychophysical experience of Americans. As the nation sought to recover from their "trial by fire," ethical questions emerged about the nature and meaning of the conflict that drew upon ancient thought, philosophy, and scientific thinking. The response of 19th-century Americans to this tragic event in their nation reveals the broad contours of just war theory that has shaped the West. Contact: 20 Main Street, Exeter, New Hampshire 03833 Cell: 603-686-2436 • kmcconnell@exeter.edu Work: 603-772-3831 Program: War, Justice, and Non-Violence: Perspectives and Paradoxes (p. 30)

NABIL MIGALLI Nabil Migalli is a graduate of Cairo University, National Center for Social and Criminological Research, and the Institute of National Planning. He serves as president of the Arab-American Forum in New Hampshire and is a recipient of the Martin Luther King Award for New Hampshire. Migalli’s scholarly interests include diversity, immigration, and Arab and Islamic cultures. Contact: 87 Rochelle Avenue, Manchester, NH 03102-4737 Home: 603-669-6253 • migalli@comcast.net Cell: 603-361-0251 Program: Perspectives on Arab Culture and the Influence of Islam (p. 75)

DONNA MOODY Donna Roberts Moody is a Tribal Elder in the Abenaki Nation and Director of the Winter Center for Indigenous Traditions. She has a PhD in Anthropolgy from the University of Massachusetts/Amherst.

JOHN MOODY John Moody is the Ethnohistorian and Project Coordinator for the Winter Center for Indigenous Traditions. He earned a BA in Native American Studies and Anthropology at Dartmouth College. Contact: PO Box 147, Sharon, VT 05065 Work: 802-649-8870 • winter.center.for.indigenous.traditions@valley.net Programs: (co-presented by Donna and John Moody) • A History of Native Burial Looting, Destruction & Protection in NH History (p. 58) • Town by Town, Watershed by Watershed: Native Americans in NH (p. 58)

GEORGE MORRISON George Morrison earned a BA in History at the University of New Hampshire He served for 27 years as a high school teacher. A long-time researcher of unpublished primary sources, Morrison has contributed to the work of numerous aviation historians and artists in several countries. He is a life-long photographer, historian, and motorcyclist. Morrison has already traveled over 18,000 miles in the course of researching monuments and memorials, an interest sparked by a puzzling 1918 monument inscription. Contact: 37 Dunbarton Center Road, Bow, NH 03304 Home: 603-774-3834 • morrison_gr@live.com Programs: • Robert Rogers of the Rangers - Tragic Hero (p. 14) • Benedict Arnold: Patriot and Traitor? (p. 15) • Vanished Veterans - NH's Civil War Monuments and Memorials (p. 58)

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Presenter Directory ADAIR MULLIGAN Adair Mulligan has a runaway curiosity about the natural and cultural history of northern New England. Author of The Gunstock Parish, A History of Gilford, New Hampshire, she has also contributed to Proud to Live Here in the Connecticut River Valley; Where the Great River Rises: An Atlas of the Upper Connecticut River; and Beyond the Notches: Stories of Place in New Hampshire's North Country. Executive Director of the Hanover Conservancy, she served for 20 years as Conservation Director of the Connecticut River Joint Commissions. Mulligan holds an MA degree from Smith College. Contact: 175 Dorchester Road, PO Box 117, Lyme Center, NH 03769 Home: 603-795-3155 • adair.mulligan@nhvt.net Programs: • A Walk Back in Time: The Secrets of Cellar Holes (p. 15) • The Connecticut: New England’s Great River (p. 15)

SALLY MUMMEY For more than twenty years Sally Mummey has brought First Lady Mary Todd Lincoln to life for hundreds of audiences throughout the eastern U.S. Using storytelling and a good dash of humor, she engages audiences of all ages in dynamic, interactive, first-person portrayals. Mummey’s passion for the history of the 19th century has led to extensive research into powerful and prominent women in a male-dominated society. Her interest in Queen Victoria was sparked when she read letters between the Queen and Mrs. Lincoln, which revealed striking parallels in their lives. Mummey is an award-winning lifetime member of the Association of Lincoln Presenters. She is also a member of the Auxiliary to the Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War, the Society of Europe, the Victorian Society, and the Surratt Society, as well as Solo Together, a New England-based organization of re-enactors who portray political figures from 19th- and 20th- century America. Contact: PO Box 669, Seabrook, NH 03874 Home: 603-474-5620 • spraff@comcast.net Programs: • A Visit With Queen Victoria (p. 41) • Mary Todd Lincoln: An Unconventional Woman (p. 42) • Mary Todd Lincoln: Wife and Widow (p. 42)

REBECCA NOEL Rebecca R. Noel is Associate Professor of History at Plymouth State University. She holds an MA and PhD in American and New England Studies from Boston University and a BA in History from Yale University. She teaches history courses on American medicine, childhood, intellectual history, the Civil War era, and the American West. In addition to articles about the history of childhood and education, her book in progress is Save Our Scholars: The Mandate for Health in Early American Education. Contact: 17 High Street, Plymouth, NH 03264 Work: (603) 535-3203 • rrnoel@plymouth.edu Program: Beware the Chair: The Medieval Roots of School Exercise (and Your Standing Desk) (p. 69)

LESLIE PASTERNACK Leslie Pasternack holds her PhD in Theatre History from the University of Texas at Austin and is a graduate of the Dell'Arte School of Physical Theatre. She is the director of Make Sure It's Me, a theatre outreach event series addressing Traumatic Brain Injury in the military and based on a play by novelist Kate Wenner. Leslie is a freelance director and acting instructor with specialties in Mask and Clown. Her solo show, Clean Room, won the 2012 Seacoast Spotlight awards for Best Actress and Best Original Script. Leslie received the 2014 Ellen Hayes award from the Brain Injury Association of New Hampshire for her work on Make Sure It's Me. Contact: Durham, NH 03824 Cell: (603) 321-8550 • leslie.pasternack@gmail.com Home: (603) 659-8112 Program: Speaking of War: Staging the Voices of Veterans in Post-9/11 Theatre (p. 30)

JOHN PERRAULT John earned his BA in English at Providence College, an MA in Political Science at the University of New Hampshire, and a JD at the Franklin Pierce Law Center. He taught high school English for ten years in Kittery, Maine, and subsequently practiced law in Portsmouth for thirty years. He is the author of Jefferson’s Dream, Here Comes the Old Man Now, The Ballad of Louis Wagner, and a recent CD compilation of ballads, Rock and Root. His poetry has appeared in Orbis (UK), The Salmon Poetry Anthology Dogs Singing, The Christian Science Monitor, Blue Unicorn, Commonweal, and elsewhere. John was Poet Laureate of Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 2003-2005. Contact: 133 Mill Road, PO Box 329, North Hampton, NH 03862 Home: 603-964-8358 • rockweed@comcast.ne

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Programs: • Crime and Punishment on the Isles of Shoals: The Ballad of Louis Wagner (p. 47) • Poems on the Edge of Song (p. 47) • The Ballad Lives! (p. 48)


Presenter Directory ROBERT B. PERREAULT Robert B. Perreault has worked as a research assistant/oral history interviewer, librarian/archivist, freelance writer, historical tour guide, public speaker, photographer, and conversational French teacher to promote Manchester's history and New England's Franco-American culture since 1973. His works of nonfiction and fiction, written in French, in English or in both languages, include six books and more than 160 articles, essays, and short stories published in the US, Canada and France. Perreault holds an MA in French with specialization in New England Franco-American studies from Rhode Island College and an MFA in Creative Writing/ Fiction from Southern New Hampshire University. In June 2012, Manchester's Centre Franco-Américain named him "Franco-American of the Year." Contact: 187 Warner Street, Manchester, NH 03102-4163 Home: 603-668-5207 • rperreau@anselm.edu Programs: • Taste of the Old Country in the New: Franco-Americans of Manchester (p. 59) • Having a Fine Time in Manchester: Vintage Post Cards and Local History (p. 59) • Putting Human Faces on the Textile Industry: The Workers of the Amoskeag Manufacturing (p. 59)

WILLIAM "TY" PERRY William “Ty” Perry has been infatuated with Romanesque and Gothic art for more than 30 years, applying the discipline of degrees in engineering and history to his studies. He has comprehensively researched the interrelationships between that art and its intellectual origins, Greek philosophy and medieval theology. Perry has photographed thousands of cathedral sculptures and windows throughout France, England, and Italy in order to bring his research to others. Contact: 46 The Flume, Amherst, NH 03031 Home: 603-249-9707 • perry8777@comcast.net Program: Chartres Cathedral: Philosophy and Theology as Art (p. 25)

PONTINE THEATRE Greg Gathers, Co-Artistic Director of Pontine Theatre, holds a BFA from the Cleveland Institute of Art. He has been designing and constructing Pontine’s sets, costumes and props since 1982. Gathers has collaborated with Marguerite Mathews on the research, development, and performance of Pontine’s work since 1984. Marguerite Mathews, Co-Artistic Director and Founder of Pontine Theatre, earned a theater degree in Communications from Michigan State University. She studied with Etienne Decroux at L’Ecole du Mime Corporeal in Paris, France, and with Thomas Leabhart at the University of Arkansas and Valley Studio. Matthews served a four-year term as president of the National Movement Theatre Association and a five-year term as editor of the Movement Theatre Quarterly. Pontine Theatre, which specializes in original works based on the history and literature of New England, has presented performances, workshops and residencies at Keene State, Bates, and Dartmouth Colleges, Plymouth State University, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, the Decordova Museum, and the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, among others. Contact: Pontine Theatre, 959 Islington Street, Portsmouth, NH 03802-1437 Work: 603-436-6660 • info@pontine.org Programs: • New England Utopia: Transcendental Communities (p. 15) • Familiar Fields: The Power of Community in the Work of Sarah Orne Jewett (p. 34) • “Pretty Halcyon Days,” on the Beach with Ogden Nash (p. 35) • Silver Lake Summers: An E.E. Cumming Revue (p. 35)

JAMES PRENDERGAST Jim Prendergast and Emery Hutchins are musicians who play and sing a unique combination of Celtic and American country music. In their performances they seek to show the connection between the two genres. Hutchins is a renowned performer of a variety of different styles of acoustic music ranging from traditional Irish tunes to vintage American country music songs. Prendergast worked for thirty years in the recording studios and orchestra pits of Nashville, Tennessee. Producer of CMH Record's Celtic Tribute series, Jim now specializes in producing traditional music at his Mill Pond Music Studio in Portsmouth, New Hampshire. Music preservationists and performers, their program demonstrates that to understand the music of a culture is to understand the heart of a culture. Contact: See listing for Emery Hutchins for more information Program: A Night of Music with Two Old Friends (p. 46)

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Presenter Directory WOODY PRINGLE Woody Pringle is both a musician and educator teaching at many New Hampshire colleges and organizations. His credentials include a BA in Social Science from Johnson State College and an MBA from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. His music is often aired on NH Public Radio’s Folk Show and many radio stations throughout the country. Contact: PO Box 21, Bradford, NH 03221 Home: 603-938-5742 • bewp@mcttelecom.com Programs: • Rally 'Round the Flag: The American Civil War Through Folksong (p. 45) • Global Banjar: International Voices in Antebellum Banjo Music (p. 45)

GWENDOLYN QUEZAIRE-PRESUTTI Gwendolyn Quezaire-Presutti has combined her expertise in public speaking and interest in conducting historical research with her passion for storytelling and dramatic performance. Quezaire-Presutti studied under Professor Lloyd Barbee at the University of Wisconsin and has been a committed scholar of AfricanAmerican Studies, in particular women of color. She is listed on the Performing Artist roster at the Connecticut Historical Society Museum, the Connecticut Commission on Culture and Tourism, and the Social Theatre with Young Audiences of Connecticut Arts for Learning. She received the Institute of Texan Cultures’ Director’s Award for Excellence, the Greater Hartford Arts Council/ Boston Fund Individual Artist Fellowship, and first place in the International Toastmaster Award competition for Interpretive Reading. Contact: PO Box 380496, Hartford, CT 06138-0496 Home: 860-528-0733 • Cell: 860-212-6129 • woventales6@sbcglobal.net Programs: • I Can’t Die But Once - Harriet Tubman’s Civil War (p. 42) • “If I am Not for Myself, Who Will Be for Me?” George Washington’s Runaway Slave (p. 42)

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JO RADNER Storyteller Jo Radner received her PhD from Harvard University. Before returning to her family home in western Maine as a freelance storyteller and oral historian, she spent 31 years as professor at American University in Washington, DC, teaching literature, folklore, American studies, Celtic studies, and storytelling. She has published books and articles in all those fields, and is now writing a book titled “Performing the Paper: Rural Self-Improvement in Northern New England,” about a 19th-century village tradition of creating and performing handwritten literary newspapers. She is past president of the American Folklore Society and the National Storytelling Network. Contact: PO Box 145, Lovell, ME 04051 Home: 207-925-6244 • jradner@american.edu Cell: 617-512-7545 Programs: • Colonial Stories: The Tangled Lives of Native Americans and English Settlers (p. 15) • Wit and Wisdom: Humor in 19th-Century New England (p. 16) • Family Stories: How and Why to Remember and Tell Them (p. 66) • Yankee Ingenuity: Stories of Headstrong and Resourceful People (p. 66)

J. DENNIS ROBINSON J. Dennis Robinson has published over 2,000 articles on New Hampshire history and culture. His books for young readers include biographies of Jesse James and Lord Baltimore and an overview of child labor exploitation in America. His hardcover histories of Strawbery Banke Museum and historic Wentworth by the Sea Hotel both received honors from the American Association for State and Local History. His most recent books include a study of the tall ship Privateer Lynx, a colorful overview of archaeology at the Isles of Shoals, and a critically acclaimed in-depth look at the infamous Smuttynose ax murders of 1873. Robinson is also a history columnist and editor of SeacoastNH.com, a website about New Hampshire history and culture. Contact: 101 Crescent Way, Portsmouth, NH 03801 Work: 603-427-2020 • dennis@seacoastnh.com Programs: • Collecting John Paul Jones: America’s First Action Hero (p. 16) • Treasure from the Isles of Shoals: How New Archaeology is Changing Old History (p. 21) • The Making of Strawbery Banke (p. 59) • Who Won the War of 1812? New Hampshire’s Forgotten Patriot Pirates (p. 60)


Presenter Directory NICOLE RUANE Nicole J. Ruane teaches in the department of Classics, Humanities and Italian at the University of New Hampshire. Her research and teaching focuses on religion, gender, sacred texts, and religious violence. She holds the PhD and MA from Union Theological Seminary in NYC and is the author of Sacrifice and Gender in Biblical Law (Cambridge University Press, 2013) as well as articles and book chapters. Contact: 315 Murkland Hall, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 nicole.ruane@unh.edu Program: God, the Early Years: A Brief History of God in the Rise of Judaism, Christianity and Islam (p. 75)

R. SCOTT SMITH R. Scott Smith, Professor of Classics at the University of New Hampshire, has been studying and writing about the myths of the Greeks and Romans for the past fifteen years. Following his earlier works on myth (Anthology of Classical Myth 2004; Apollodorus' Library and Hyginus' Fabulae 2007; Writing Myth: Mythography in the Ancient World 2013), he is currently working on The Oxford Handbook of Greek and Roman Mythography, due out in 2017. In addition to his love for all things mythical, he also specializes in the history of Rome, and enjoys taking students each January to the eternal city to see the ancient monuments and partake in the food and culture. In 2014 he published Ancient Rome: An Anthology of Sources. Contact: 301 Murkland Hall, Durham, NH 03824 Work: 603-862-2388 • scott.smith@unh.edu

REBECCA RULE Rebecca Rule gathers and tells stories in New England, mostly New Hampshire. She is the author of eleven books, including N is for New Hampshire out in the fall of 2016 with Islandport Press. Her other titles include: Headin’ for the Rhubarb: a NH Dictionary (well kinda) and Moved and Seconded: Town Meeting in New Hampshire as well as the children’s picture book, The Iciest Diciest Scariest Sled Ride Ever. For ten years she hosted “The New Hampshire Authors Series" on NHPTV. She currently hosts “Our Hometown” also on NHPTV. Contact: 178 Mountain Avenue, Northwood, NH 03261 rebeccarule@metrocast.net Programs: • Crosscut: The Mills, Logging, and Life on the Androscoggin (p. 66) • That Reminds Me of a Story (p. 66) • Moved and Seconded: Town Meeting in New Hampshire (p. 67)

MARIA SANDERS Maria Sanders is a Philosophy professor and coordinates the Philosophy program at Plymouth State University. She is an applied ethicist whose research engages the public in scholarly philosophical dialogue within the areas of medicine, business, education, and law while encouraging thoughtful interaction with existing and emerging technologies in an attempt to create opportunities for civic engagement and reflective living. Dr. Sanders also hosts a weekly radio program on WPCRPlymouth (91.7 FM) entitled Philosophy 4 Life which offers a public forum for philosophical discourse. She also co-hosts a television show, Happiness Quest, on Pemi-Baker Cable TV and is currently leading a town-wide "Happiness Quest" in Plymouth, New Hampshire. Contact: Plymouth State University, MSC 30, Plymouth, NH 03264 Home: (832)-260-1942 • masanders1@plymouth.edu Work: (603)-535-3011 Program: The Quest for Happiness (p. 30)

Programs: • How Did the Greeks Believe their Myths? (p. 19) • Rome and Pompeii: Discovering and Preserving the Past (p. 19)

JASON SOKOL Jason Sokol is an Associate Professor of History at the University of New Hampshire. He is the author of two books: There Goes My Everything: White Southerners in the Age of Civil Rights and All Eyes Are Upon Us: Race and Politics from Boston to Brooklyn. He has held fellowships from Harvard, Penn, and Cornell, and both books have been reviewed in the Washington Post as well as the New York Times. Contact: History Dept., Horton Social Science Center, Durham, NH 03824 Work: 603-862-3024 • jason.sokol@unh.edu Program: All Eyes Are Upon Us: Racial Struggles in the Northeast, from Jackie Robinson to Deval Patrick (p. 16)

HERMAN TAVANI Herman T. Tavani, PhD, is Professor Emeritus of Philosophy at Rivier University and a visiting scholar at the Harvard School of Public Health. The author or editor of more than 100 publications, he has written or edited five books on ethical aspects of information technology, including his textbook Ethics and Technology is now available in a fifth edition. Tavani has presented keynote addresses and scholarly papers at institutions throughout Europe and in Japan, as well as at colleges and universities throughout the U.S. Contact: 3 Erion Drive, Nashua, NH 03062 Home: 603-888-1173 • Work: 603-897-8469 • htavani@rivier.edu Programs: • Ethical Aspects of Converging Technologies (p. 71) • Intellectual Property Disputes in Cyberspace (p. 71) • Personal Privacy in Cyberspace (p. 71)

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Presenter Directory STEVE TAYLOR

MAREN TIRABASSI

Steve Taylor is an independent scholar, farmer, journalist, and longtime public official. With his sons, Taylor operates a dairy, maple syrup, and cheese making enterprise in Meriden Village. He has been a newspaper reporter and editor, and served for 25 years as New Hampshire’s commissioner of agriculture. Taylor was the founding executive director of the NH Humanities Council and is a lifelong student of the state’s rural culture.

Maren C. Tirabassi is the author of eighteen books, most recently Gifts in Open Hands More Resources for the Global Community. She is a former Poet Laureate of Portsmouth and Pastor of the Union United Church of Christ in Madbury. Tirabassi travels throughout the country leading writing workshops on memoirs and poetry. She is involved with other New Hampshirere Humanities initiatives, including the Connections adult literacy program.

Contact: 166 Main Street, PO Box 271, Meriden, NH 03770 Home: 603-469-3375 • stephen.taylor@valley.net

Contact: 271 Lafayette Road, Portsmouth, NH 03801-5433 Home: 603-436-9352 • Cell: 603-674-0886 • mctirabassi@hotmail.com

Programs: • New Hampshire Roads Taken—Or Not (p. 60) • New Hampshire’s Long Love-Hate Relationship with Its Agricultural Fairs (p. 60) • New Hampshire's One-Room Rural Schools: The Romance and the Reality (p. 60) • Poor Houses and Town Farms: The Hard Row for Paupers (p. 16)

Programs: • Faith and Fantastic Fiction (p. 37) • Sitting Under a Fig Tree: Spiritual Autobiography, Augustine to Lamott (p. 37)

LUCIE THERRIEN Lucie Therrien is a songwriter, author, poet, historian, recording artist, visual artist, linguist, film maker and certified teacher. She received a MA in Music History and a BA in Piano from the University of New Hampshire after her fine art studies in Montreal at l’Ecole des Beaux Arts. Therrien has performed on five continents. Among numerous awards she has received, the New Hampshire State Council on the Arts has honored her with four Traditional Master/Apprentice awards, as well as awards in songwriting, film, video, composing and arranging. Contact: 5 Junkins Avenue, #106, Portsmouth, NH 03801 Home: 603-430-9524 • lt@star.net Program: The Music History of French-Canadians, Franco-Americans, Acadians, and Cajuns (p. 48)

DARRYL THOMPSON Darryl Thompson’s father, Charles “Bud” Thompson, founded the museum at Canterbury Shaker Village with three Shaker sisters. Thompson lived among the Canterbury Shakers, grew up to earn a BA and MA in American history at the University of New Hampshure, and was among the consultants used by Ken Burns in his documentary film “The Shakers: Hands to Work, Hearts to God.” Thompson has written articles, lectured widely, taught classes, and served as a tour guide. Contact: PO Box 42, Gilmanton Iron Works, NH 03837 Home: 603-364-7356 • shakersleuth@gmail.com

JORDAN TIRRELL-WYSOCKI Jordan Tirrell-Wysocki is an award-winning fiddler who grew up playing dances and folk festivals around New England. He was first recognized as part of New Hampshire’s culture at the age of 12, when he was the youngest member of the delegation representing the state at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in Washington, D.C. He has toured nationally with bands in various genres, performed across Ireland, and released multiple recordings of Celtic music that can be heard on radio stations around New England. He currently performs over 200 shows each year, mostly with his own band, the Jordan TW Trio. His lifelong passion for history helps bring to life the traditional music around which he has built his career. Contact: Newmarket, NH 03857 Cell: 603-344-0400 • jordan@jordantwmusic.com Program: Songs of Emigration: Story-telling through traditional Irish Music (p. 48)

BRYANT TOLLES, JR. History professor and museum director Bryant Tolles is the author of books on New Hampshire and Salem, Massachusetts architecture, the grand resort, hotels of the White Mountains, the summer cottages of the White Mountains, the resort hotels of the Adirondacks (NY), the resort hotels of the New England seacoast, and college and university architecture in New England before 1860. A graduate of Yale College, he earned his MAT in American Studies at Yale and PhD in American and New England History at Boston University. Bryant has served on the faculty of the University of Delaware, Tufts University, and Harvard University, teaching courses on the history of tourism in America and the history of New England. From 1974-84 he was the executive director of the Essex Institute in Salem, Massachusetts, now part of the Peabody Essex Museum.

Program: The Shaker Legacy (p. 61)

Contact: 39 Dwinell Drive, Concord, New Hampshire 03301 Home: 603-856-7128 • bftolles@udel.edu Cell: 302-373-8908

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Program: The Grand Resort Hotels of the White Mountains— Architecture, History, and the Preservation Record (p. 26)


Presenter Directory MICHAEL TOUGIAS

JEFF WARNER

A graduate of St. Michael’s College, Michael Tougias is a lecturer and award-winning author of 20 non-fiction books published by Simon and Schuster. Several of his books focus on true survival stories including The Finest Hours: The True Story of The Coast Guard’s Most Daring Rescue (now a major motion picture by Disney), Fatal Forecast, and Overboard! His book, Ten Hours Until Dawn: The True Story of Heroism and Tragedy Aboard the Can Do in the Blizzard of 78, was selected by the American Library Association as one of the “Top Books of the Year” and described as “a white-knuckle read, the best book of its kind.”

Jeff Warner connects 21st-century audiences with the music and everyday lives of 19th-century people. He presents musical traditions from the Outer Banks fishing villages of North Carolina to the lumber camps of the Adirondack Mountains and the whaling ports of New England. Warner accompanies his songs on concertina, banjo, guitar and several "pocket instruments," such as bones and Jew's harp. Warner is a Folklorist and Community Scholar for the New Hampshire State Council on the Arts and was a 2007 State Arts Council Fellow. He has toured nationally for the Smithsonian Institution and has recorded for Flying Fish/Rounder Records and other labels.

Contact: 21 Cranberry Road, Plymouth, MA 02360 Home: 508-488-6984 • mtougias@comcast.net

Contact: 25 Franklin Street, Portsmouth, NH 03801 Home: 603-431-3383 • jeff@jeffwarner.com

Programs: • Indian Wars of New England (p. 17) • Fatal Forecast: An Incredible True Tale of Disaster and Survival at Sea (p.52) • Ten Hours Until Dawn (p. 53) • The Finest Hours:The True Story Behind the U.S. Coast Guard's Most Daring Sea Rescue (p. 53)

Programs: • Banjos, Bones, and Ballads (p. 48) • Music in my Pockets: Family Fun in Folk Music (p. 48) • Songs of Old New Hampshire (p. 49)

PAMELA WEEKS TIMM TRIPLETT Timm Triplett is an Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of New Hampshire. He teaches courses on a variety of topics and has published work in ethics, epistemology, and other areas. His 2014 book Morality's Critics and Defenders: A Philosophical Dialogue, concerns how the idea of a universal morality has been criticized and how it might be justified. He has conducted philosophy workshops with elementary school children and has taught a seminar for undergraduates focused on introducing philosophy into the pre-college classroom. Contact: 58 Tremont Street, Woburn, MA 01801 Home: (978)-681-6249 • tat@unh.edu Work: (603)-862-3073 Program: Introducing Children to Philosophy — and Why it Matters (p. 31)

PAUL WAINWRIGHT Artistic photography and a love of history have been long-standing interests of Paul Wainwright, but he was captured by physics in high school and eventually wound up getting a PhD in the field from Yale. Wainwright worked for many years at Bell Labs, with photography being a continuing avocation. Since 2001 he has pursued his love of photography full-time, and is especially drawn to photographing historic structures in very personal and introspective ways. Contact: 134 Maple Avenue, Atkinson, NH 03811 Home: 603-362-6589 • paul@paulwainwrightphotography.com Program: New England’s Colonial Meetinghouses and their Impact on American Society (p. 26)

Pamela Weeks is the Binney Family Curator of the New England Quilt Museum. Author of the book Civil War Quilts and articles on quilt history, she lectures nationally on quilt-making and quilt history. Weeks uses quilts to tell stories of the Civil War, women's history, and industrial history. Contact: Auburn, NH 03032 Cell: (603)-661-2245 • pamela.weeks@gmail.com Program: New England Quilts and the Stories They Tell p. 26)

DOUGLAS WHEELER Douglas Wheeler earned an AB at Dartmouth College and an MA and PhD in History from Boston University. He is Professor of History Emeritus, University of New Hampshire, and an instructor at Granite State College. Wheeler’s research interests include the far-reaching impacts of 20th- and 21st -century intelligence activities; “cultures of espionage” and their expressions, including spy novels, films, and gadgets; government secrecy; and surveillance as a defense against terrorism. Contact: 27 Mill Road, Durham, NH 03824-3006 Home: 603-868-9633 • douglaslwheeler@gmail.com Programs: • George Washington Spied Here: Spies and Spying in the American Revolutionary War (1775 - 1783) (p. 17) • Spies in Time (p. 31) • World War II Hero of Conscience: The Sousa Mendes Story (p. 75)

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Presenter Directory RICHARD GUY WILSON

STEVE WOOD

Richard Guy Wilson is the Commonwealth Professor of Architectural History at the University of Virginia where he has taught since 1976. He has been a summer resident of New Hampshire since 1964. Wilson has lectured widely in the US and abroad and has authored or co-authored 16 books on architecture. Wilson has run the Victorian Society in America’s summer school since 1978 and is considered an expert on architecture from the 18th to the 21st centuries.

Steve Wood, a graduate of the University of Maine, School of Forestry, worked for nearly thirty years with the UNH Cooperative Extension as an Extension Educator in Forest Resources, retiring at the end of 2003. He has been researching and presenting Living History programs as Abraham Lincoln since 1995. Steve is a member of the Association of Lincoln Presenters, the League for the Advancement of New England Storytelling, and the NH Storytelling Alliance.

Contact: 1860 Field Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 Home: 603-267-8280 • Work: 434-924-6462 • rgw4h@virginia.edu

Contact: 43 Centennial Street, Claremont, NH 03743 Home: 603-542-6454 • nh_lincoln@pobox.com

Program: Wild and Colorful: Victorian Architecture in New Hampshire (p. 27)

Programs: • Abraham and Mary Lincoln: The Long and the Short of It (with Sharon Wood) (p. 43) • A Visit with Abraham Lincoln (p. 43) • Our National Thanksgiving: With Thanks to President Lincoln and Mrs. Hale (with Sharon Wood) (p. 43)

SARA WITHERS Sara Withers earned a PhD in Anthropology from Brandeis University and currently lectures on anthropology at the University of New Hampshire. She organized and conducted nearly 40 oral history interviews that served as the basis for the documentary Uprooted: Heartache and Hope in New Hampshire, giving her first-hand knowledge of the experiences of refugee and immigrant newcomers to the state. Withers has also facilitated public presentations and discussions of Uprooted. Her additional cross-cultural experience includes ethnographic research in Mexico, the United States, and Sri Lanka. Contact: 310 Huddleston Hall, 73 Main Street, Durham, NH 03824 Home: 603-888-3866 • sara.withers@unh.edu Program: Uprooted: Heartache and Hope in New Hampshire (p. 63)

SHARON V. WOOD

TED ZALEWSKI Ted Zalewski is a Screen Actors Guild actor, writer, and historian. Ted is a longtime college and secondary school teacher with an emphasis in special education. He is nationally recognized as the foremost interpreter of Theodore Roosevelt. In 2014, Zalewski marked his fifth annual July 4th performance as Roosevelt at the Omni Mount Washington Resort. He is a graduate of the University of Illinois and the Harvard Graduate School of Education. Contact: PO Box 380168, Cambridge, MA 02238 Home: 617-864-2030 • tedzale@cs.com Program: All Aboard the Titanic (p. 17)

Sharon Wood is a graduate of Southern Connecticut State College with a BS in Elementary Education. Her career path led from teaching to working as a public and school librarian, while developing skills as a writer, storyteller and Chautauquan. She is a member of the New Hampshire Storytelling Alliance, the League for the Advancement of New England Storytelling and, with her husband Steve, the Association of Lincoln Presenters. Contact: 43 Centennial Street, Claremont, NH 03743 Home: 603-542-6454 • sharon_wood@pobox.com Programs: • Abraham and Mary Lincoln: The Long and the Short of It (with Steve Wood) (p. 43) • A Soldier’s Mother Tells Her Story (p. 43) • A Tribute to Sarah Josepha Hale (p. 43) • Our National Thanksgiving: With Thanks to President Lincoln and Mrs. Hale (with Steve Wood) (p. 43)

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To book a Humanities to Go program, visit the Humanities to Go page of our website: www. nhhumanities.org. There you will find the necessary forms, instructions for submitting an application, and a catalog searchable by program or by presenter name.


Humanities to Go Catalog of Programs and Presenters

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I to app s it be ro ev fo nd pri er im r e a ca po an th te ic us rt s e? an t

NEW HAMPSHIRE HUMANITIES

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W ha an som t m ag eff eon ake ch en ect e s an t o iv ge f e ?

t ha s W ake ry m to e? s u tr a

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Revised 2016

www.nhhumanities.org

fax 603-224-4072

603-224-4071

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117 Pleasant Street, Concord, NH 03301 e th e do hap s a ow s ll H rts we ect e? a fl r as re ltu cu a

Htg catalog final  

Humanities to Go Catalog of Program and Presenters (rev. 2016)

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