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Guide to Angling

TURN YOUR ANGLING TALES INTO LEGENDS


WELCOME TO THE START OF SOMETHING LEGENDARY ONE OF THE LAST GREAT WILDERNESS AREAS in the world, Newfoundland and Labrador is the ultimate angling destination. Whether you’re fishing for wild Atlantic salmon, trophy brook trout, or large Arctic char, you’ve come to the right place. Here you’ll find pristine waters set against a rugged landscape, plenty of breathing room, and an abundance of trophy-sized species. The province is home to some of the friendliest, most

knowledgeable guides on the planet. And they have what it takes to turn a great angling experience into the stuff of legends. So visit NewfoundlandLabrador.com/angling for a sampling of our finest outfitters and angling packages. The adventures they offer, including exclusive fly-ins to remote, untouched areas, are some of the best in North America. ARE YOU READY TO TURN YOUR ANGLING TALES INTO LEGENDS?


THERE ARE LEGENDARY RIVERS. AND THEN, THERE ARE RIVERS FULL OF LEGENDS. Wild Atlantic Salmon AT LEAST, that’s the case in a destination like Newfoundland and Labrador. Where you’ll find more than 60% of North America’s best wild Atlantic salmon rivers – nearly 200 unspoiled

rivers in all. Some with annual runs in excess of 30,000, with trophies that can weigh up to 30 pounds. Which means, you’ll never have to exaggerate again.


WELCOME TO THE BIG STAGE. FOR THE PASSIONATE SALMON ANGLER, all roads eventually lead to Newfoundland and Labrador, where the Atlantic salmon angling of your dreams waits for you.

For those of you lucky enough to have already fished here, your hope is that the secret doesn’t get out. The truth is the province is so vast and unspoiled that the fishing experience here is virtually unchanged since I first visited 35 years ago. Communication has gotten better, and travel has gotten safer and more predictable, but the things that drew me north in the first place remain the same. It is still a place where the only sound you hear while fishing is nature, where moose emerge soundlessly from the forest, where your mornings start with the smell of coffee and bacon, where the accents of the guides are musical as they dispense advice and lore collected over generations.


Greig Cranna ~ Commercial Photographer and Journalist As a photographer, I was initially entranced by the visual beauty of salmon angling here. Against the backdrop of mountains, forests, rapids, and waterfalls, I was mesmerized by the light playing off lines snaking over pristine pools. I was intrigued by the arcane art of fly tying, captivated by the beauty of the rods, and thrilled by the sound of a big fish stripping line from a fly reel. I watched as anglers fished patiently for hours, fought a fish, landed it, and then to my disbelief, lovingly released it back into the river. I saw that contented, faraway look on angler’s faces after an amazing day of fishing. As the world shrinks and life gets more complicated, it’s hard to find a way to leave it all behind, to reconnect with

yourself and find that inner peace that a day on the river brings you. The magic of Atlantic salmon fishing in Newfoundland and Labrador is not just about the abundance of big fish, but where the pursuit of these fish takes you. It’s the feeling of shedding

the world as you drive farther down remote roads, motor up wilderness rivers, or watch as the last roads disappear beneath your floatplane. The life you left behind becomes a dim memory as the daily pursuit of fish becomes the only thing you think of or care about. I’ve experienced many places that most people can only dream about, but Newfoundland and Labrador will always hold a special place in my memories. Incredible fish, incredible beauty, incredible people. All the components of the perfect fishing experience are waiting for you here. It’s time to think of all the salmon fishing you’ve been doing up to now as the dress rehearsal. IT’S TIME TO STEP UP TO THE BIG STAGE.


GO A FEW ROUNDS WITH SOME OF OUR GREATEST FIGHTERS. Trophy Brook Trout SURROUNDED BY PRISTINE WILDERNESS AND UNSPOILED WATERS,, there’s not much more an angler could ask for. Except, perhaps, an abundance of wild and ready brook trout. And that’s exactly what you’ll find in this legendary angling destination. Where 5- to 7-pounders are common, and trophies can weigh more than 10 pounds. With heavyweights like these, no wonder they call it the best brook trout angling on the planet.


HUGE TROPHY BROOK TROUT IN THE LABRADOR WILDERNESS.

MY FIRST NATIVE BROOK TROUT AS A YOUNG BOY AT AGE SEVEN WAS THE MOST BEAUTIFUL CREATURE I HAD EVER SEEN‌ even to a colour-blind boy. At age 77, I am now finally complete with brook trout having caught the biggest and most beautiful ones in my life in Newfoundland and Labrador. Seeing the spawning colours of a late fall brookie is enough to stimulate this colour-blind man back to full normal vision. One may see hundreds of small lakes and rivers all full of virgin fish swimming in the cold clear water, most of whom have never seen an artificial fly


Dr. Harold C. Lyon, Jr. ~ Author of Angling in the Smile of the Great Spirit - Professor of Medical Education and never before angled by humans. What a wilderness feeling of unique isolation from humanity. Not a house, a person, or any trace of civilization for hundreds of miles in all directions. The only creatures in this extreme wilderness are the wild ones. I landed and released forty huge brookies, from 3 to 6 pounds, on home-tied streamer flies. These are the biggest native brook trout I’ve ever caught. Excellent fly rods were furnished with reels with excellent drags, much needed for these large trophy fish, with each having a tapered sinking line and tapered leader. Many hand-tied flies proved to be a winner.

I cast my fly toward shore, let it sink a few seconds and began an erratic retrieve. Bang! A heavy hit followed by a line-ripping run, some splashing

on the surface and a 4-pounder came to a skillful glove, was quickly photographed, and released. The action kept up one after another for 4 hours. The first and most beautiful fish I ever caught when I was seven years old – a 7-inch beautiful fish – and now these huge wild brookies all blessed in spawning colours make this majestic fish complete for me as an angler. What once in a lifetime angling thrills I had packed into one week in the spectacular wilderness of Labrador. YOU CAN ALSO MAKE IT HAPPEN ALONG WITH MEMORIES YOU’LL NEVER FORGET.


TRUST US, YOU MIGHT NEED A STRONGER ROD. Large Arctic Char THAT IS, IF YOU WANT TO TRY YOUR LUCK with the legendary Arctic char. A northern cousin to the brook trout, char can weigh a hefty 15 pounds or more. Rumour has

it that the wild Arctic char of Labrador may break the record for the largest in the world, weighing in at more than 26 pounds. Or, a mere 13 pounds per arm.


THE ARCTIC CHAR OF LABRADOR.


Bill Spicer ~ F.F.F. Master Certified Casting Instructor and Host of The New Fly Fisher Television Show THE ARCTIC CHAR IS BOTH A FRESHWATER and saltwater fish in the Salmonidae family, native to Arctic, sub-Arctic lakes, and coastal waters. Most of the waters in Newfoundland and Labrador fall into this category. With many characteristics of both salmon and trout, its close relatives, individual fish can reach 20 pounds or better, with the average fish in the 4–6 pound range. By mid-August migrating arctic char are found in some interior lakes near river mouths and reefs in large numbers. During this time the flanks of male fish take on a bright red hue that is quite breathtaking to observe. During a recent trip into the interior of Labrador, I had the pleasure of fishing one of these beautiful interior lakes with outstanding success. I waded

to the end of a sandbar and fly-fished a ledge at the mouth of a stream. The successful fly this trip was a bead head Prince Nymph. I allowed the fly to sink to near the bottom and slowly retrieved it until I felt the fish hit. I lost count at the number of fish that I hooked into.

The fight of the Arctic char matches any other trout species I have encountered. Both spin fishing and fly-fishing are effective during this time, with spoons and spinners working best for spinning rods. For fly-fishing, the flies to use would be bright coloured minnow patterns with lots of flash, and bead head Prince Nymphs. The equipment to bring would be medium action spinning rods with 10-pound test line, or 6- to 8-weight fly rods, with sinking tip lines or sinking leaders. The absolute beauty of the interior of Newfoundland and Labrador had me wanting to pinch myself to make sure I was actually there. This is a reason, along with the incredible fishing, that makes me come back to Newfoundland and Labrador time and again.


SAY GOODBYE TO PEACE AND QUIET. Record Landlocked Salmon AND SAY HELLO TO OUR FEISTY LANDLOCKED SALMON. As lightning-fast swimmers and acrobatic jumpers, reeling in a legend like this is not a tranquil pursuit. But it’s certainly worth the fight.

Record-sized landlocked salmon are alive and well here. In a place where they’ve tipped the scales at nearly 23 pounds, the only question that remains is – will it be you that lands the next big one?


CATCH THE ONE THAT GOT AWAY. LANDLOCKED SALMON, ALSO REFERRED TO AS OUANANICHE, are one of the incredible species to angle for in Newfoundland and Labrador. Found principally in both rivers and lakes, landlocked salmon grow very, very large here.

In fact, this pristine wilderness playground is teeming with record-setting salmon, just waiting to be caught. Most landlocked salmon are in the 2–8 pound range but it is not uncommon to catch them over 10 pounds. Though they don’t grow as large as their sea-run brethren, landlocked salmon are prized because of their exceptionally aggressive nature. It is one of the reasons why I love to fish for them.They will readily slam a fast retrieved streamer, and then give you an acrobatic performance that is second to none. Their colouring is magnificent with hues of silver, brown, and gold. And many mistake them for brown trout. In the vast wilderness of Newfoundland and Labrador, landlocked salmon are abundant, and outfitters have developed excellent access to some of the best waters for flyfishers.


Colin McKeown ~ Producer and Host of The New Fly Fisher Television Show You can cast for them from both a boat or while wading. They can be caught from June through to September. I have learned a lot about this outstanding game fish after numerous trips. Some tips to consider: Bring fullsinking and sink-tip lines for casting streamers to help get your fly down in the current. Use a very fast retrieve with your streamers (it seems to incite violent strikes that will jar your arm). Don’t forget to try traditional Atlantic salmon dry flies – they love to hit a waking bomber or other dry fly. Some streamer patterns include the Ballerina, Zoo Cougar, Scottys McFly, Cats Ass, and Muddler. For topwater, large Stimulators, Bombers, and even mice patterns all work well. Best of all, when you are casting large surface flies for landlocked salmon, you are often surprised and delighted to catch

a massive brook trout as well. One recommendation about fishing Labrador landlocked salmon – bring heavy gear. They are exceptionally strong fish and tireless fighters that will truly test your equipment. Fast action fly rods in 6 and 7 weight are ideal coupled to large arbor reels with quality drag systems. Don’t

forget to bring quality leader and tippet in the 0x to 3x sizes. A big landlocked salmon will easily break light terminal tackle so use set-ups that are similar to those for sea-run Atlantic salmon. Excellent places to find landlocked salmon include in front of and behind large rocks and boulders, defined seams between differing current speeds, points, drop-offs, and ledges are all good bets. Fly-fishing for landlocked salmon is one of the strongest arguments for why you should come to Newfoundland and Labrador. In the same waters where you will cast for them you will also usually catch massive brook trout, lake trout, and northern pike. THERE IS NO PLACE IN THE WORLD THAT I KNOW OF THAT HAS SUC H I NCR E DI BL E AND DIVERSE FLY-FISHING IN UNSPOILED WATERS.


LEGENDARY ADVENTURE AWAITS Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada’s easternmost province, offers anglers some of the best and most rewarding outdoor adventures on the continent. This is where you’ll find wild Atlantic salmon, trophy brook trout, lake trout, record landlocked salmon, large Arctic char, northern pike, and whitefish. Plus a whole lot more: • Home to 60% of North America’s wild Atlantic salmon rivers – some with record annual runs in excess of 30,000 where salmon can grow up to 30 pounds. • Many call this place the best wild brook trout fishing on the planet, where 5- to 7-pounders are common, 10-pounders have been released, and the giants love dry flies.

• Large Arctic char, weighing upwards of 15 pounds, can only be found in pristine, remote waters – just like ours. • Looking for the next world-record landlocked salmon? Consider Labrador, where one lucky angler came close, landing a 22 pound, 11 ouncer. All this is close by, and it’s among friends and neighbours. The outfitters here speak your language, and they’re only too willing to tell you about high catch rates and remote lodges located in places so captivating you won’t want to leave. Enjoy your adventure.

Get Outfitted Your outfitter will be your primary contact and source of information for your angling adventure in Newfoundland and Labrador. If you have any questions regarding your

trip or your angling experience, feel free to give them a call. For a sampling of outfitters and angling packages, visit: NewfoundlandLabrador.com/angling

Things You Need To Know How do I get there? Where do I stay? Find everything you need to help plan your angling adventure in Newfoundland and Labrador right here: • Salmon and trout fishing information. • General information about the province. • Travel information. Still have a few more questions? Visit our website for more trip planning information: NewfoundlandLabrador.com/angling Here you’ll find links to official


websites of Provincial and Federal departments where you can obtain the latest detailed information on regulations covering angling, customs, and passports.

Booking a Package Fishing lodges and camps are located throughout the province in areas close to fish populations. Your Atlantic salmon licence, which may or may not be part of your package, includes tags for each river classification. Check with your outfitter for angling licences (this includes both Atlantic salmon and brook trout).

How to Get Here You can reach the island of Newfoundland by air or superferry, and Labrador by air, sea, road, or rail. The airlines listed fly regularly scheduled or charter flights to and within the province.

By Air Air Canada aircanada.com 888-247-2262 (Canada/U.S. Toll-free) 0871-220-1111 (London) 69-2711-5111 (Frankfurt) Partners include United Airlines, Lufthansa, Scandinavian Airlines, and all Nippon Airlines.

Air Labrador airlabrador.com 800-563-3042 (Toll-free) 709-896-6730 (Local)

United Airlines united.com 800-864-8331 (Toll-free) Service from Newark, NJ, to St. John’s, NL.

Provincial Airlines provincialairlines.com 800-563-2800 (Atlantic Canada Toll-free) 709-576-1666 (Outside Atlantic Canada)

WestJet westjet.com 888-937-8538 (Toll-free)

Porter Airlines flyporter.com 888-619-8622 (Toll-free) 416-619-8622

Service from Canadian and U.S. destinations including Toronto, Ottawa, Montreal, Halifax, Newark, Boston, and Chicago.


By Rail Tshiuetin Rail tshiuetin.net Rail service between Sept-Îles, Québec and Western Labrador. Passengers must make arrangements to be picked up and dropped off at Emeril Siding, 60 kilometres east of Labrador City where Route 500 meets the rail line. 866-962-0988 (Toll-free) 418-962-5530

By Sea Marine Atlantic marine-atlantic.ca

Marine Atlantic operates year-round superferry service between North Sydney, Nova Scotia, and Channel-Port aux Basques in southwest Newfoundland. Crossing time is about five hours in summer, and seven hours in winter.

There is also a summer service between North Sydney and Argentia on Newfoundland’s Avalon Peninsula from mid June to late September. Advance reservations are essential in summer, and recommended the rest of the year. For more information, please contact Marine Atlantic Reservations at: 800-3417981 (toll-free). Information on sailing times is available on the website.

By Road To catch the ferry to Newfoundland, follow the Trans-Canada Highway (TCH) through Nova Scotia and Cape Breton to North Sydney. The TCH is Route 104 in Nova Scotia, and becomes Route 105 in Cape Breton. You can drive to western Labrador along Québec Route 389 from BaieComeau, Québec. Most of this road is paved. It connects with Route 500 (a mainly paved road) that crosses Labrador from Wabush and Labrador City in the

west, through Churchill Falls, to Happy Valley-Goose Bay in east-central Labrador on huge Lake Melville. A new gravel road, an extension of Route 510, connects the Lake Melville area with Cartwright and other communities on Labrador’s southeast coast as far as L’Anse-au-Clair on the Labrador-Québec border. Five kilometres from L’Anse-au-Clair in Blanc Sablon, Québec, is a seasonal ferry to St. Barbe on Newfoundland’s northwest coast. In winter, an icestrengthened ferry operates between Blanc Sablon and Corner Brook on Newfoundland’s west coast.

Getting Around All the main highways on the island of Newfoundland are paved. There are only a few short gravel sideroads, and these are well maintained. In Labrador, Route 510 is paved from L’Anse-au-Clair to Red Bay, and is gravel


beyond that to Cartwright/Happy ValleyGoose Bay. The majority of Route 500 from Happy Valley-Goose Bay to Churchill Falls and Labrador City/Wabush is paved.

Charter Aircraft Many remote lodges can be reached only by float plane or helicopter. Discuss this with your outfitter, who can either fly you in their own aircraft, or recommend a company. Space in these small planes and helicopters is limited, so keep your gear to only what’s required.

Newfoundland and Labrador Tourism NewfoundlandLabrador.com/angling 800-563-6353 (Canada/U.S. Toll-free) 709-729-2830 contactus@NewfoundlandLabrador.com YouTube.com/fishingNL For the latest angling packages and trip planning information, sign up for our enewsletter at: NewfoundlandLabrador.com/enews

2013 Photo Credits Roth and Ramberg, Dale Spartas, Coopers’ Minipi Camps, Gabriel Cavallaro, Destination Labrador, Greig Cranna, Dr. Harold C. Lyon, Jr., Bill Spicer, and Colin McKeown. Newfoundland and Labrador Tourism has made every effort to ensure that the information contained in this guide is complete and accurate at the time of printing. For the most up-to-date listings and information contact 800-563-6353, NewfoundlandLabrador.com, or visit one of our Visitor Information Centres while in the province. The information listed in this guide by the provincial government is for the convenience of visitors and does not imply liability for injury, damage, loss, or accidents.


Distance Chart Deer Lake

St. John’s

Happy Valley-Goose Bay

Miles

KM

Flying Time

Miles

KM

Flying Time

Miles

KM

Flying Time

190

306

2:20

207

333

0:45

783

1260

1:41

CANADA Gander, NL Halifax, NS

526

847

1:38

923

1485

1:30

1211

1950

3:46

Montreal, QC

1177

1895

4:32

1574

2533

2:26

1105

1778

5:56

Toronto, ON

1514

2438

4:22

1912

3077

2:58

1448

2330

6:36

Vancouver, BC

4223

6797

8:18

4619

7433

8:23

4157

6689

12:51

Atlanta, GA

2135

3436

6:23

2532

4075

8:58

2319

3732

8:51

Boston, MA

1065

1714

5:37

1461

2352

6:28

1345

2164

7:56

Chicago, IL

2028

3263

6:07

2423

3900

7:20

1961

3155

8:36

Cleveland, OH

1698

2732

5:18

2093

3369

7:52

1690

2720

8:06

Dallas, TX

2821

4540

9:35

3216

5175

9:29

2866

4612

10:01

Denver, CO

3015

4852

8:36

3411

5489

9:22

2948

4744

21:27

Detroit, MI

1738

2797

5:51

2134

3434

6:48

1671

2689

7:18

Los Angeles, CA

4025

6479

8:43

4422

7116

9:52

3959

6372

13:50

Minneapolis, MN

2438

3924

6:13

2830

4555

8:42

2367

3810

9:31

Miami, FL

2548

4101

8:38

2944

4738

8:23

2729

4391

10:06

Newark, NJ

1284

2066

5:49

1679

2702

5:57

1462

2352

8:31

Raleigh, NC

1759

2831

7:27

2156

3469

7:49

1940

3122

11:01

UNITED STATES

Note: Actual flying times may vary depending on connecting flights and routings.


Provincial Airport

Labrador

Major City Happy ValleyGoose Bay

Canada

Blanc Sablon St.Barbe

Labrador Cit Cityy/ y/Wabush

Town/City

St. Anthony

Newfoundland

Ferry Route

Gander Deer Lake Stephenville

St. John’s

Air Route

Argentia

Channel-Port aux Basques North Sydney

Halifax Montreal

Canada

USA Toronto

Boston New w YYork Newark

USA


NewfoundlandLabrador.com/angling

Guide to Angling Outfitters in Newfoundland and Labrador  

Find everything you need to plan your angling adventure in Newfoundland and Labrador.

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