Issuu on Google+

C 0

H 6

R 2

0

I 6

6

S 3

LEE

//

WHOYOUKNOWWHATYOUDO

W

H

O

Y

O

U

K

N

O

W W Y D

H

A O O

T U .


H 6

P. 001 /

0

R 2

I 6

6

S 3

WHOYOUKNOW.WHATYOUDO.

C 0

L

E

E


3

INTRODUCTION | Defining the question

L E T S G E TA C A D E M I C A L 7

5

| Good & the Bad

INTERVIEW

| J e s s i c a L a p p i n g / G r a p h i c s & Ill u s t r a t i o n s t u d e n t a t UCA

D E S I G N E R S AV O I D NITTY GRITTY

THE

13

11

| Networking & MarketinG

INTERViEW

INTERVIEW

| D i c k S t e e l / S t e e l M c N e i lR o g e r s

21

19

| M i k e L e e / C o m pa n y D i r e c t o r & M a r k e t i n g G u r u

design on the b rain

Which

25

s i d e o f t h e b r a i n m a k e s a m o r e s u c e s s f u ll g r a p h i c d e s i g n e r ?

INTERVIEW

27

| E va n g e l i a T h o m a da k i s / E va n g e l i a T h o m a da k i s Lo n d o n

THE BIG QUESTION

| W h a t i s m o r e i m p o r t a n t, w h o y o u k n o w o r w h a t y o u d o ?

P. 002 /


INTRODUCTION

/

WHAT IS MORE IMPORTANT WHO YOU KNOW OR wHAT YOU DO? T he question I’ ve been investi -

freelance on a very small scale

and intended to use this project to gain experience from those who are much more established in the indus try .

It

soon became apparent to me

that it was far more challenging to find the right people to talk to .

KNOW?

>

ECHNOLOGY

P. 003 /

YOU

SYCHOLOGY

WHO

ARKETING ETWORKING HOKNOWSYOU?

find a work experience placement .

I

AKING FRIENDS + INFLUENCING PEOPLE

gating arose from initially trying to

/


/

CADEMIC VS SELF TAUGHT ORTFOLIO. HE DESIGN PRESS + FAME HAT IS A DESIGNER?

OWGOODAREYOU? BILITY + MEASURES

DEFINING

<

THE

WHAT

T his

QUESTION

YOU

//

DO?

was a good opportunity to in -

vestigate an area of graphic design

I

often overlook because

concerned

with

the

I

am more

work .

N ow

would be a good time to understand in more detail , how the link between what

I’ ve

learnt in terms of skill

connects with who it might be done for .

S ubsequently , I asked myself – ‘W hat ’ s more impor tant , who I know or what I do ?’. the question

P. 004 /


P. 005 /

GOOD,

THE

BAD

&

/LETSGETACADEMICAL.

THE

THE

UGLY.

//

ACADEMIC NURTURE + MISSED OPPORTUNIES: Throughout dered that you

this

whether work

I’ve

investigation

university

you

nurtures

produce

enjoy

rather

In

each brief

I’ve

ies

I’ve

than

should what

is

I

idea

be

work

required.

completed so far in my stud-

tailored my outcome towards what

and what

won-

the

think looks good.

On

I

enjoy

occasions

I’ve

put myself outside my comfort zone in order to force myself to learn a new skill or challenge my creativity.

However, I

have been given free reign

otherwise to create what

I

want within each brief

compared to the restrictions

I

have and would

imagine consistently encounter in the industry.

Be

that as it may university is a place as

I

see

it that needs to allow room for freedom of creativity while still setting guidelines within the briefs.

I

would imagine it is a difficult balance

to achieve.

Being an establishment people choose

to come to in order to prepare themselves for the creative industry, creativity is going to have to be developed and strict guidelines would not fully allow this.

Without

exploring our own

creativity we will not be able to explore client briefs creatively or therefore, effectively.

For

that reason, university can give us better ability as a designer and make us a more creative

(bet-


ter) designer resulting in greater success when we make connections with people in the industry.

Studying has the advantages of providing you with a set of recognized skills taught by professionals and it gives you a recognized qualification so there is hard-evidence of the skills you say you have.

I

do feel though, that university is a

place where students, myself included, miss the opportunity

stubbornness,

through

ignorance

etc. to make certain links that are going to benefit them in their career.

This

being said, being

at university you will make connections with people without even knowing

friends, tutors.

NORMAN POTTER .ON .DESIGN .EDUCATION ‘A

design capability proceeds from a fusion of

skills,

knowledge,

nation;

Potter

what

understanding,

consolidated

imagi-

This

is

describes in the chapter on de-

sign eduction in his book

He

and

experience.’

by

continues,

‘We

What

is a designer.

accept a certain minimal com-

petence as the basis of professional self-respect, and as some guarantee of a designer’s usefulness to other people.

Within

limits such a competence

is definable, and will begin to form outlines within a formally structured teaching/learning situation. It is too much to say outright that design ability can be ‘taught’.

As with any other creative

activity, it is a way of doing things that can only be grown into, perhaps

but not necessarily

in the context of a formal design education.

… A skill may be irrelevant to the nature of a prob– in dealing with people – may be grossly uninstructed in necessary tact and discernment. lem, or

… As

for design, there are times when to say

no is a constructive act; to say yes, as a designer looking to the future, is to join social commitment to a mastery of particulars.

In

ed-

ucation, all we can do is make good work possible, and be alert to its coming; never fooling ourselves that all good things come easily.’

What Potter has said does appear to ring true in I have found. Being at university I’ve come

what

to acquire a set of rounded skills more formally that

I

may have had

I

been self taught.

However,

this set of skills will only really be put to the test when

I

graduate and am left to start from

nearly from scratch in terms of how

I am going to

apply this work to my career as a graphic designer.

Certain

aspects of how to cope as a graphic de-

signer in the industry itself can be conveyed at university. the

Some

industry

chances for experience within

are

possible

including

this

in-

vestigation itself and any work and contacts we decide to do and make separate from our study.

Despite

this, as

I

have been told many a

time there is nothing that can emulate or fully prepare you for the actually working in the design industry.

Many

skills that are necessary

and people who you need to know can only be found through experience working in the industry over both short and long periods of time.

P. 006 /


interview

001.

//

j essica lapping

01. / What were the main reason(s) for choosing to study full time over trying to move straight into the creative industry? T he obvious response is that I didn ’ t know enough to just … jump in . T here were loads of factors involved , but mainly it was down to the fact that I wanted to learn and grow as a designer , and accumulate as many skills as I could before entering the industry . 02. / Currently being in the academic world do you see it as something that will benefit you in your career and if so to what extent? W ell . I think there are certainly some very clear benefits from studying at uni , like the things that

I

although

I

have said above ;

do feel that my own personal

development

within

efited from having

my

3

field

to worry too much about what

I

was pro -

ducing as it was not for clients . university experience itself ?

C learly

ben -

mainly

years of not having

I’ m

B ut

the

not sure .

one benefits from receiving feed -

back from tutors , but most of the shit learnt

was

in terms of guess .

It

I’ ve self taught , ironically . B ut benefiting my career , sure . I

provides a platform for a student

to jump from into the industry . naïve sense ,

I

suppose

I

In

a non

am saying its easier

to showcase your work being a student and

therefore , theoretically easier to get a job .

03. / While studying at university important do you consider it to make connections with students, tutors and people on the outside? P retty important . W hich sucks because I’ m a hermit . I do think pester ing should be done in moderation though . 04. / Do you lean towards producing work that you enjoy or work that you think will benefit you most as you develop your career as a designer? B oth . I like to be cause on one hand it ’ s good to try and chal lenge yourself creatively , but on the other , there ’ s no doing it if you don ’ t enjoy it . I guess it depends on exactly what you are doing and how dedicated you are to an idea . 05. / From the impression you are given from university as a whole by lecturers, tutors and students, how important do you view ability in design? V ery important , as long as you aren ’ t a snob about how good you are . E veryone loves a humble person . B eing good at design ing

is

career .

clearly

B ut

going

to

help

you

in

your

then you do have the outsid -

05. / What would you like to do when you leave university or are you undecided? Are you aware of your market? G od . S o much … I can ’ t decide . D efinitely want a studio of some sort . A nd market ? W hat market ?! 06. / How important do you consider producing a portfolio? I t ’ s important , no matter what you end up doing . I f you are pitching to people , trying to get a job , anything like that , it ’ s the only proof you have to demonstrate you can do what you say . 07. / Do you view those studying and teaching you in design as potential competition when you leave? I’ d like to think they aren ’ t . B ut that ’ s mainly because the work I create is totally different to a lot of others on my pathway . I do , however , acknowledge that they proba bly will be fighting for the same jobs as me ! 08. / While at university what do you consider more important who you know or the work you do? M ore the work I do at this time . T hough being in my third year now , the impor tance of who I know is gradually builiding .

er designers , who often do just as well .

STUDENT.

P. 007 /


â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;

/ I

/

wanted to learn

and

grow

as

a

de -

signer , and accumu late as many skills

I could before en tering the industry . . as

001. //

â&#x20AC;&#x153;

P. 008 /


WHAT THE QUOTE? PART I

P. 009 /


“IMAGINE I WAS MEETING YOU FOR THE FIRST TIME AND I GAVE YOU A HANDSHAKE. IMAGINE I GAVE YOU ONE OF THOSE REALLY LIMP HANDSHAKES. A LITTLE BIT WET, NOT REALLY IMPRESSIVE. IF YOU DIDN’T KNOW ANYTHING ABOUT ME, WOULD YOU EMPLOY ME?” THE TIMES MONDAY MARCH 12, 2007

P. 010 /


NETWORKING

&

M

A

R

K

E

T

I

N

G

AS DESIGNERS A GRITTY. Industry ‘More

Facts:

than a quarter of the

UK’s creLondon’

ative media employers are based in

‘More don

people that

work

any

freelance

other

UK

in

Lon-

region’

‘15% of the UK’s creative media industries workforce is based in the South East region, outside London, exceeding 71,000 people.’

Designer, Interactive Media: design talent; good drawing and diagramming ability; knowledge of relevant design, image manipulation, and asset optimisation software; good interpersonal communication skills, especially

when

dealing

with

specialists

ally nice and helpful’ not

‘really

annoying

and irritating’ or ‘really shy and useless’.”.

Source:

UCA

Careers

Service

2009

“Staying

in the loop with contacts and

in other discipline; ability to manage time,

the industry at large is among the biggest

prioritise tasks and work under pressure.

worries for prospective freelancers.

The

first thing to do is to make sure that the

Web Editor:

good copywriting skills; ex-

cellent proofreading skills; precise atten-

industry knows you’re there, and how extensively you persue this is up to you.

tion to detail; good ability to manage time,

”25%

of those working in these industries

in the

South East

prioritise tasks and work under pressure.

“Don’t Skills

Required

by

Employers:

“‘I

don’t really go in for long chats with

people.

region are freelancers.’ be scared to be cocky

it’s a hard

I like email – you can be quick, blunt Swift, aka Swifty.

and to the point…’” Ian

line to get right sometimes but strike a balance and they’ll remember you as being ‘re-

“You

might even consider advertising your

YES, IT’S BORING BUT YOU’LL MAKE A PRETTY SHIT DESIGNER IF YOU CAN’T DO IT.

P. 011 /


T

H

E

R

E

L

A

T

I

V

E

IMPORTANCE.

//

AVOID THE NITTY services in a magazine or on a website that

design community. Not only will this keep you

ic

covers a field in which you work.

up to date with what’s going on, it will help to

ents there is no great graphic design.”

Brooklyn-based illustrator Tara McPherson has had success with this approach. On top of her clients work, she sells posters and makes prints of her work, and used

Morris, London

to make other merchandise such as snow

ing

globes, button sets and more.

use

She

has

create an awareness of your opinion.”

and

without

demanding

“I’d

be failing in my duty here if i didn’t

stress the importance in all this.

“Go

on is

social.

the

the

tool

most in

‘Social

important

the

whole

network-

yet

game

cli-

Adam

graphic-designer

based

design

Design-

ers tend to be either heroes or doormats.

easy-to-

If

of

will, on occasions, be stepped on…

self

I’m

afraid you

How

advertised her items in magazines and for

promotion.’”

you acquire hero-like status is a matter of

her posters she took out a banner advert

online

personal odyssy and psychological discov-

on

www.gigposters.com.

The

sales

Gavin Strange, Senior designer, Aardman Animations

you are a doormat, then

ery…

came

in, but art directors also picked up on

“Be

seen.

her promos and got in touch with work.”

minded

Go

out

people

to

and

talk

find to.

some

like

‘Never

shows

just have to be contained in the home all of

of

the time.’”

power

Graham Sykes, Teacake Design.

ko,

festivals.’”

or

“Get

up close and personal.

social

networking

of

Kenyon, Source: Computer Arts Projects 114 September 2008: The Freelance Issue

Magomed DojvenDesigner and Illustrator

Graphic

“Initiate

can

No

contact.”

Creative

director,

your own projects.

Source: Adrian Shaughnessy, How

to be a

graphic designer, without losing your soul.

amount

replicate

human

seen designers acquire it over

hesi-

tate to attend exhibition launches, award

“‘A typographer we once met once told us that he had day passes for a number of local attractions, and that he would take his clients to the zoo or a museum. The office doesn’t

I’ve

time, and it’s a beautiful thing to witness.”

the

Jonathan Vault49 Don’t

just

complain about being unable to do the type

“The

difference between a good designer

– do some– you don’t need permission.” Jarvis, Creative partner, Young

of work you want to be doing

and a successful designer is self-promo-

thing about it

tion.

Peter

Churning

out innovative, high-quality

work is important, but making sure the right people take notice of it and remember who it’s by is even more crucial.”

“Get

your

ister

name

your

name.”

Nick

lights.Reg-

in

name

as

Defty,

your

domain

Director,

“Target your audience. It’s no good getting a database of random design firms and sending them all an email. People need to feel special, and that requires some research on your part.” Johanna Basford, Illustrator

YCN Source:

“Keep them coming back. Your website needs to look good.” Johanna Basford, Illustrator

“What “Speak 1000

Computer Arts 169, De2009, Promote Yourself

cember

should

words. It is essential you are

your

portfolio?

able to communicate effectively through

want

to

some

medium

other

than

the

good work.

Give

of

freedom,

projects

type

up

doing’”

of

include work

in you

David Carson

Source: Computer Arts 84, May 2006, Perfect

Projects Portfolios

your time, skills and

work free for charitable causes. types

always

‘The

visual.”

Sarah Trounce, Project Manager, YCN “Do

end

you

enable

won’t

more

These

creative

“Wherever

possible, it is worth devoting

time and energy to developing clients.

What

reputa-

does this mean in practice? It means taking an

a good job

interest in their affairs, and it means show-

at-

ing initiative. It means keeping keeping a line

parties.”

of communication open so that they are able

Peter Jarvis, Creative Partner, Young

to share their thinking and plans with you.”

“Engage

“Without

and

harm

tion or your conscience. here

and…

tention

of

it

might

with others.

Do

bring

financially

Get

your you

liquid

the

involved with the

clients

there

is

no

graph-

P. 012 /


interview

002.

//

mike lee

01. / How would you suggest a going about building a client base? First of all you need to identify your target market, who you are designing for. You can go about this two ways. The classic marketing approach is to define the market you want to operate within (determined by your skills, preferences, interests, knowledge etc.) and then to match what you have to offer to that market or a segment of that market. The most important point is to understand your potential clients needs or requirements in detail.

ents, their location and finally, what resources

The

lar segment of that larger market whether it be

other is to have a set of skills, principles,

interests, styles etc. and effectively hawk them round the market.

For

you have

(i.e

money, time).

So

for example, if

there are a dozen prospective clients in don

(small

Lon-

number, tightly concentrated), then

it’s likely to lend itself to one to one, personal marketing.

If

it’s a large number of prospec-

tive clients dotted across the country you are likely to be further towards the mass marketing.

Your

resources are going to be more of a fac-

tor here because you may not be able to afford to reach them all in a satisfactory way.

If

geographical or further refined in their needs.

are creating a product for a chosen market then the opportunity to change is in theory unlimited.

information do you give them that will make them

like them. To illustrate this further a larger sized model may be determind that that is the shape and size they are going to use

(their USP

Selling Proposition). There

or

Unique

is a limit to how

much they can change themselves whereas if you

02. / Once you’ve matched your market to your service, how do you reach them? At one extreme is it one to one, at the other is it mass marketing or is it inbetween. Which one of those it is is going to be determined by the numbers of potential cli-

peoples perceptions of a product.

Think

permarkets. on

Apple

Think

of the iconic graphic style

products.

Much

of

graphic design is subconcious.

the

In

effect

of

other words

people aren’t aware of the impact that it has.

feel good about what you have to offer. (see fig. 1)

06. / What would you say is more important Who You Know or What You DO? You need to match one with the other. There is do

no

point

isn’t

in

knowing

relevant

to

people

them

and

if

what

there

is

you no

point in doing something that isn’t relevnat to potential clients

You can way, who Assuming knows

look

-

that is just a hobby!

that

question

in

another

knows you and how good are you. what

you

timately,

at

you

carries

that

is

do much

the

is

good

more

most

then

important

04. / So is that it? No. It has to be planned and implemented. Monitor and adjust as neccesary and go through the whole cycle. (see fig. 2)

guru

who

weight.

marketing

P. 013 /

of the

impact graphic design has on packaging in su-

were case you might have to focus on a particu-

03. / If I know my market and what I’m offering how do I convert them to clients? Simply, you have to a find the best means of communicating. What is the medium and what is the content of your message. For example, a phone call, what do you say?, an email, what do you write? How do you present yourself? What

studio or magazine to magazine to find people that

of marketing because the impact design has on

this

example, models who may

take their particular look, shape from studio to

05. / What is the role of graphic design in marketing? It is absolutely critical. Arguably the most critical aspect

U l-

thing.


can look at that question

in another way, who knows you and how good are you.

Assum-

ing what you do is good then who knows you carries much more weight.

Ultimately,

that

is the most important thing.

/

There

/

is no point in knowing

people if what you do isn’t relevant to them and there is no point in doing something that isn’t

relevnat

clients

002. //

You

-

to

potential

that is just a hobby!

P. 014 /


S

I

M

P

fig

L

1.

E

//

//

MARKETING

R

ADJUST

^

MONITOR

+

E

A

S

E

A

R

C

H

//

>

S I M P L E M A R K E T I N G C Y C L E for designers

EVALUATE

PLAN

<

I

//

M

P

L

E

M

E

N

T

COMMUNICATIONS + PROTOTPES RAPID: MAKING / TRYING / SHOWING / DOING T R A N S L A T I O N [ O U T P U T ]

[ M U L I D E DESIGN

T A

I

P T

L I

E

S ] O N HUNCH

D P W

E S I G N R A C T I C E H I R L P O O L

* { R -

R E

E

S L

E E

A V

INSEMINATION R C H ] A N C E THEMOTIC CONTEXT METAPHORIC THEORETICAL NOTION VISUAL IDEOLOGICAL

* OCCURS AFTER DISSECTING THE BRIEF

P. 015 /


GOT IT, YEAH?

fig

2.

//

S I M P L E M A R K E T I N G M A T R I X for designers

S N

C O N C E N T R A T E D L O C A T I O N

D I S W I

P E D

R E

S

E L

D Y

M U

£ D I [ P E V I

A M

E

L R

L N

C N A T

T L }

£ £ MASS 1 2 [REGIONAL - POSTERS P R E S S

£ 1 }

£ £ £ M A S [DESIGN PRESS W E B S I T E

£ S ]

L B

R E R S O S I

£ £ R E M O T E [1 2 1 VIA MAIL - PHONE E M A I L ]

A U

R M

G B

E R

E

P. 016 /


WHAT THE QUOTE? PART II

P. 017 /


“‘A TYPOGRAPHER WE MET ONCE TOLD US THAT HE HAD DAY PASSES FOR A NUMBER OF LOCAL ATTRACTIONS, AND THAT HE WOULD TAKE HIS CLIENTS TO THE ZOO OR A MUSEUM. THE OFFICE DOESN’T HAVE TO BE CONTAINED IN THE HOME ALL OF THE TIME” GRAHAM SYKES, TEACAKE DESIGN COMPUTER ARTS PROJECYS 114 / SEPT 2008 / THE FREELANCE ISSUE

P. 018 /


interview

D S

003.

//

T

01. / Were you self taught or schooled? Art College graphics course.

I

C

E

produce work speculatively, if that’s what you mean, mainly because you can’t really produce a piece of work until you know what problem (that is, design communication issue) the client needs

02. / What made you decide to freelance/work for a studio or collaboration? A graphics course alone isn’t enough, it only scratches the surface of all the skills, not to mention the experience, you need to be an effective and successful designer. It’s important, therefore to build up your experience by working for others first.

you to solve and that in turn is a question of having a proper brief.

Large

advertising agencies

04. / Is it more the case that you have to go and find the work or the work finds you? Design is a business like any other. You have to market and sell yourself. Eventually, you will get a reputation and people will come to you, but only because you have proved yourself.

E

08. / Do you stay aware of competitors in the design industry or do you not view them as competition? We try to be aware of what’s going on in design terms – the solutions that are being produced – rather than regarding anyone as a competitor.

often work speculatively when invited to make a pitch for an account, but that’s because they have large resources to throw at winning what would be an even larger prize.

At

our level, in

short, speculative work devalues the processes and expertise involved in coming up with an effective design solution, which is what the client pays for.

03. / How important do you consider having a portfolio of work, if at all? The work is the proof of the pudding. It’s essential.

K L

06. / Do you have a regular client base? Yes, That’s where most of the work comes from. The first place to look for new business is from existing clients. We also do what are ostensively one-off projects which can turn into long-term relationships.

09. / How have networking/blogging sites such as LinkdIn and Twitter benefited you, if at all? Not at all, but that’s probably something we could exploit, and will be exploited more and more by others. 010. / From your experience what is more important who you know or the work you do? What you do. Contacts are important, but long term, it’s the effectiveness of the work you produce, and therefore your reputation that will build a meaningful contact base.

07. / As far as you are aware, are any of your clients networked to each other? No, they tend to be in differ-

Of

course, there’s

no substitute for being in the right place at the right time, but that’s something you can’t legislate for.

ent market sectors and their paths are unlikely to cross.

05. / Do you produce personal work in order to gain interest from potential clients? We don’t

I

certainly don’t think they network

due to having a design source in common.

GRAPHIC DESIGNER

P. 019 /


A

graphics course alone isn’t

enough, it only scratches the surface of all the skills, not to mention the experience, you need to be an effective and successful designer. It’s important, therefore to build

/”/

up your experience by working for others first.

There

is no point in knowing

people if what you do isn’t relevant to them and there is no point in doing something that isn’t

relevnat

003. //

clients

-

to

potential

that is just a hobby!

P. 020 /


P

S

Y

C

H

O

L

O

G

Y

LEFT

The

OR

mind should be androgynous but the whole

movement suggested here is towards the aspects of what we believe to be right brain functioning.

Financial Times: “Any job English-based in markets such as the U.S., the U.K. and Australia can be done in India.” Pink continues to explain how ‘rightbrained’ data driven jobs which were once high paying (e.g. coding) are more and more being

He

uses a quote from

that is

BOOK STUDY

outsourced to other countries where it can be done cheaper than it can over here.

Although

this is not a new idea, it is the fact

that this shift is becoming more apparent on a bigger scale and continually cheaper. subsequently, this is leading to less demand for people trained with linear driven, left brained

PINK Having

skills and more demand for a more creative,

read the book a whole new mind: why

right brainers will rule the future some time ago and thought about it’s relevance to my design question.

Newsweek

described the book,

“Long

on read-

able analysis exercises to build [right brain] skills.

For

soon-to-be liberal-arts grads, it’s an

encouraging graduation gift.”

To

summarise the left/brain differences it can

be said that the left is factual, direct, computative and the right approximate, wholistic,

MIND

emotional.

Obviously

the two sides cannot be divided as

simply as this.

However,

in the book

Pink

uses

the left and right sides separately to describe a shift in culture, working practices and so on.

A

P. 021 /

WHOLE

NEW


R

I

G

H

T

holisitic approach to work.

BRAIN

thinking.

?

This

WHICH

DO

WE

USE?

shift could also mean that the de-

signer is less and less the ‘do-it-all designer at

From

my reading this suggests several positive

the desk’ but more the directors of the design.

points toward both sides of my questions:

Who You Know: If

the idea of moving towards

a more ‘right-brained’ culture is true it’s going to important to network better. the more people we know the more people we can outsource work to. It is also important to maintain a holisitic view in a variety of contexts, for example when dissecting the brief.

The Work You Do: In

graphic design, work is

going to have to concentrate even less on the traditional nature of design and venture further into the realm of ideas generation and holistic

H.

PINK

DESIGN ON THE BRAIN//

DANIEL

P. 022 /


WHAT THE QUOTE? PART III

P. 023 /


”WHAT SHOULD ALWAYS BE IN YOUR PORTFOLIO? ‘THE TYPE OF WORK YOU WANT TO UP DOING’” DAVID CARSON COMPUTER ARTS PROJECYS 84 / MAY 2006 / PERFECT PORTFOLIOS

P. 024 /


interview

E T

004.

V H

//

A N G E L I O M A D A K I

01. / Were you self taught or schooled? I wasn’t self taught; I went to university obtaining BA (Hons), 1 MA AND 1 Postgraduate Certificate. The advantage of per-

er having a portfolio of work, if at all? The portfolio is the “id” of each designer, it

suing academic studies is that it gives you the

the future upon certain requirements. The portfo-

platform from which you build a knowledge and

lio needs to be updated every

understanding of the fundamental elements that

to be in tune with the current forecast trends.

have an influence on fashion or a subject.

On

gives the opportunity to an interviewer or a client

6-8 months in order

rience and they develop their skills via practise.

build their awareness through industry expe-

In

my case was very important to have the

make all the chasing in the start and use every

academic knowledge because it gave me the op-

single opportunity to promote your work via

portunity to develop my research in different

work experience because you always meet new

fields and later on to apply it into work expe-

people. always have in mind that

rience which enhances theoretical knowledge.

a job is to have very good tion skills.

02. / What made you decide to freelance/work for a studio or collaboration? Since I graduated from my MA my target was to establish my own fashion label. to achieve that I had to experience the different

Also

PR

80%

of getting

and communica-

use online advertising to ad-

vertise your design services.

Approach

them are out of your reach because experience is required.

That

X

years of

will build your job

awareness and also will prepare you for future interviews.

Eventually

the right job will come to

you but until then you have to do all the work.

will lie the best.

Always

started first approaching po-

grab whatever opportunity comes to you.

sitions as a freelancer in order to get experience, firstly

I

Hav-

05. / Do you produce personal work in order to gain interest from potential clients? I will always offer to do a

years

small trial project for a client and if they like it

decided that was the right time

I will carry on with the commission, if they don’t I keep it as portfolio sample because at the end of the day you produced a piece of work for a client.

I

built a very good portfolio reflecting the different market levels that

I

had worked in.

ing built a market awareness and

I

08. / Do you stay aware of competitors in the design industry or do you not view them as competition? Of course there is competition; at the end of the day designing is great but you also want to establish sales. 09. / How have networking/blogging sites such as LinkdIn and Twitter benefited you, if at all? I haven’t used any of them, the only one I have is a group page of my company which I created on Facebook. Because friends have friends who have friends and you don’t know who may see it. Any form of free advertisement is beneficial.

started with very small projects

and eventually one job brought another and

experience

07. / As far as you are aware, are any of your clients networked to each other? Of course - this is how you build contacts, by networking with each other.

as many

interviews as you can, even knowing that some of

market levels and to see where my handwriting

I

06. / Do you have a regular client base? It’s something that eventually is created by experience, promotion, hard work and time.

to view of your work and what you can deliver in

04. / Is it more the case that you have to go and find the work or the work finds you? Ideally you have to

the other hand individuals who are self taught

4.5 – 5

to go solo and launch my own fashion label.

03. / How important do you con sid-

010. / From your experience what is more important who you know or the work you do? Both, because you need contacts and knowing people can open doors.

FASHION DESIGNER

P. 025 /

A S


always have in mind that

80%

of

getting a job is to have very good

PR Also

and

communication

skills.

use online advertising to ad-

vertise your design services.

Ap-

proach as many interviews as you can, even knowing that some of

/â&#x20AC;?/

them are out of your reach because

X

years of experience is required

There

is no point in knowing

people if what you do isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t relevant to them and there is no point in doing something that isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t

relevnat

004. //

clients

-

to

potential

that is just a hobby!

P. 026 /


the

P. 027 /

YOU

question

/

50

WHO

big

KNOW?

>

WHAT IS MORE WHO YOU KNOW DO? T o answer th I t is 50/50, half tie , no more one o

k

a

so depending on may

become

more

the other but as

the research cove my conclusion is green

circles .

W

other simply cann

most a science wh

world are a chem

both elements are

one another to pr a d

e

s

i

g


E IMPORTANT W OR WHAT YOU he question simply . f and half , a dead than the other . a y , the context one

e

important

than

whole , looking at

ered in this book , whats in the big

W ithout

one

not exist .

It

the

is al -

hereby you and the

mical reaction and

e as important as

roduce the result :

g

successful n

e

r

.

which

50

so

<

WHAT

is

it

then.

YOU

//

DO?

P. 028 /


WHO

YOU

KNOW?

>

<

WHAT

YOU

DO?


Who You Know What You Do