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September 2018

Streeterville Proud Locals explain what it means to be a “Streetervillian”.

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SOAR to honor first responders

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Gabriel Argumedo From deckhand to boat captain Page 13

Hidden gems of Streeterville Page 15 Page 12

Look inside Chicago Tribune’s new office space

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Haute dog fashion show helps Canine Companions

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New Eastside News launches Streeterville paper Page 5 Doorperson of the Month Adam Traore, Lake Point Tower

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How to Contact Us

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Editor: Elaine Hyde elaineh@neweastsidecommunity.com Staff Writers: Tom Conroy Elizabeth Czapski Angela Gagnon Taylor Hartz Stephanie Racine Jesse Wright Copy Editors: Ben Kowalski Vivien Lee Layout/Design: Mark Coleman Community Contributors: Jon Cohn New Eastside News is published monthly by Eastside Enterprises LLC. New Eastside News uses and values community writers and contributors. Views expressed by community contributors are their own. New Eastside News does not take responsibility for third-party announcements or events. New Eastside News is independently owned and operated. Copyright Š2018. All rights reserved.

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For advertising inquiries, contact Elaine Hyde at Info@ NewEastsideCommunity.com or call (312) 690-3092 August photo winner announced. Jamie Moncrief is the winner of the August photo contest. Details on page 17. On the cover: Dillion Johnston. Photo by Elizabeth Johnston

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info@neweastsidecommunity.com / (312) 690-3092 Nominate your teacher for Best Teacher Award

This month, for our back-to-school issue we’re asking our New Eastside neighbors as well as our new friends in Streeterville to nominate their favorite teacher. Please submit detailed nomination letter by Oct. 20, 2018 to info@neweastsidecommunity.com.The winner will be announced in November and will receive two tickets to a Joffrey Ballet production.


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Reilly unveils revised designs for Lakeshore East meeting was that residents can expect to see a larger park area developed and one less tower. Initially the master plan called More green space and three towers are for four towers, and hotel space. Now the planned for the I, J, K and L sites in Lakehotel is scrapped in favor of condominium shore East. space. The space will include up to 1,700 A year after the initial proposal was unveiled for the Lakeshore East development, residential units and 30,000 square feet of Alderman Brendan Reilly (42nd Ward) and retail. The buildings will be approximately between 80 and 45 stories tall. developers met in August with members Tom Weeks, a representative for the of the community and the New Eastside development team at Lendlease, said he Association of Residents (NEAR) for an inbelieves the new plan is an improvement. formal discussion of revisions and updates “I think we have a better plan tonight,” on the project. he told the audience. “Had you asked me The project will develop land parcels that a year ago, I would have been skeptiI, J, K and L, which are located from 197 cal of that. ” to 302 N. Harbor Drive and from 452 to The plan includes 27 percent more 500 E. Waterside Drive. Representatives green space and the elimination of a grand from the Lendlease Development Inc. and staircase, to be replaced with a meandering Lakeshore East LLC development teams path. Developers said the plan is currently were present. By Jesse Wright Staff Writer

The key announcement from the

Turn to IJKL, Page 4

The Lakeshore East development will feature public walking and biking ways, intended to facilitate thoroughfare in the area. Rendering courtesy of bKL Architecture

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Upgrades coming to Lakeshore East Park

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| NEWS |

Gabby Hart, the director of planning and development for Reilly’s office, confirmed the plans. “Plans are in place for full reAfter complaints of graffiti, vandalism placement of the playground surface and and general wear and tear at Lakeshore upgrades to the playground equipment are East Park, repairs are finally coming. planned as well,” Hart said. According to a letter from the Office of Hart said the tot lot will be closed when Alderman Brendan Reilly, Magellan Devel- repairs are being made, but will otherwise opment Group, the park’s developer, have remain open throughout the project. long term improvements planned. These Repairs to the surface area are already include replacing the play area surface underway. The other improvements are material in the tot lot and new playground expected to take place over the next few equipment that will offer more activities for months and be completed by the end of the year. children of all ages. By Angela Gagnon Staff Writer

Workers repairing the tot lot’s play surface in mid August. Photo by Angela Gagnon

“If we have to say no, I’ve failed in my job because I’ve failed to find the middle ground and move the project forward.” – Alderman Brendan Reilly

Alderman Brendan Reilly unveiled updates for the Lakeshore East development plans. The new designs include one less tower and more green space. Rendering courtesy of bKL Architecture

IJKL, from Page 3 about half green space and that should improve pedestrian and bike traffic through the area. The green space will be developed and maintained by private developers but it will be a public park, similar to Lakeshore East Park. “We wanted it to be universal access. We wanted it to be universal to all,” said Tom Kerwin, an architect from bKL

Architecture. For the most part, residents’ concerns and complaints were focused on traffic and safety, both of which Alderman Reilly said the development group would continue to address. Upon news of the larger green space, several residents complained of people using illicit substances and homelessness

in nearby parks. Reilly suggested residents call 911 and be willing to make an official complaint if they see illegal activity in parks. The proposed green space will have a camera system and a funnel to direct pedestrians through surveillance areas, he said. “You’ll be able to get eyes east and west,” Reilly said. “We will know who’s going through the neighborhood.” Last summer Reilly introduced construction plans to the NEAR group and since then, his office has been receiving feedback. Reilly has not signed off on the project and the meeting was intended to show how resident feedback has been incorporated into the designs. “Negotiations have been many, many, many hours long,” Reilly told the audience at the start of the meeting. Those negotiations, he said, stemmed from community concerns. “I don’t know if you’ve read, but there’s a story about the municipal race and it’s suggested there’s a habit that I drive developers crazy,” Reilly said. “And while I cringed a little bit, I realized it’s part of doing my job.” Reilly told the audience he must also

work for business interests. “If we have to say no, I’ve failed in my job because I’ve failed to find the middle ground and move the project forward,” he said. One objection he would not entertain was that of residents who complained the new development would block views. “I can’t protect your view,” Reilly told a resident. “That’s not the role of an alderman and that’s not how development works in a big city. If you want me to protect your view, I’m not your guy.” Another concern involved pedway development. Several residents asked about forcing developers to build an underground pedestrian walkway but Reilly said that wasn’t going to happen. “I don’t have the jurisdiction to assign a $10 million dollar obligation for a pedway system,” he said. Following the meeting, Reilly said he thought the discussion went well and while he does not expect to have any more public meetings on the development, his office is still taking resident concerns. Alderman Brendan Reilly can be contacted via his website, ward42chicago.com


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New Eastside News CAPS meeting dominated launches Streeterville paper, by noise complaints Streeterville News By Jesse Wright Staff Writer

Staff Report

VOL. 6 NO. 8

The New Eastside News, a free monthly Chicago neighto honor first ud SOARresp onders Pro iltole borhood paper, is launching a rv eeainte n”. villia Str eter ns be a “Stre Locals expl what it mea Streeterville paper this month. Since 2012, the New Eastside News has been providing boat Summer job to hyperlocal news to New captain at g zin Eastside and the Lakeshore Starga the Adler East neighborhood. Publisher s New Eastside News start Streeterville paper Elaine Hyde, a former resident th Mon the of rson Doorpe ion Haute dog fash Adam Traore, of New Eastside, said she plans w helps Canine er ago sho Tow Chic t de Poin insi e k Lak Loo Companions ce Tribune’s new office spa to continue that tradition with a Streeterville print newspaper and website. “We provide news so relevant and useful to the local reader they just have to read our paper CAPS reporting, business profiles, reader to know what’s going on around them,” contests and neighborhood news. The free Hyde said. “It’s not the sensationalist click publication will be distributed in resibait we see so often now.” dential mailrooms, grocery stores, retail The Streeterville News will be an upbeat establishments and hotels. source of information for newcomers, “It’s time Streeterville got a dedicated introducing them to area bars, restaurants local news source,” Hyde said. and entertainment. Local news coverFor information about New Eastside age will also provide value to longtime News and Streeterville News, contact residents. Elaine Hyde at 312-690-3092 or elaineh@ The newspaper will include popular features such as Doorperson of the Month, neweastsidecommunity.com Got a story tip or

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East end of Riverwalk to see $10 million makeover By Taylor Hartz Staff Writer The east end of the Chicago Riverwalk will be getting a $10 million makeover, according to Mayor Rahm Emanuel. The improvements should be completed by 2020. In August, the mayor hosted a press conference announcing plans to revitalize sections of the Riverwalk east of Michigan Avenue to Lake Shore Drive. The city will focus on improving older sections of the Riverwalk. “The Riverwalk changed the way people

interact with the Chicago River, transforming the waterfront into the city’s next recreational frontier,” Emanuel said in a statement. “The riverfront investments we are making will make the entire 1.25 mile stretch inviting to residents and visitors, increase recreational opportunities and continue to promote economic growth.” According to the mayor’s office, the Lake Shore Drive entrance for the Ellen Lanyon Gateway will get improved landscaping, outdoor public seating and a viewing area for Ellen Lanyon murals.

At the August Community Alternative Policing Strategy (CAPS) meeting in the 001st District, Sgt. Anthony Dombrowski announced new options for homeless residents in the area. Dombrowski said some of the shelters will now admit pets as well as people who are intoxicated and who would otherwise be tossed out of other shelters. One new shelter, operated by the Franciscan Outreach program, is specifically for people on Lower Wacker in the downtown area. Meanwhile, area residents complained about bucket boys and the noise they make, playing buckets for tips from tourists. Dombrowski said if people are bothered by noise, they should call police because regular patrol officers are not always there to enforce noise restrictions without a complaint.

Sgt. Anthony Dombrowski addresses a CAPS meeting in August. Photo by Jesse Wright

“You should call 911 and say that there is a noise disturbance and you want to be a complainant and speak to a police officer [in person], because you can’t be a complainant over the phone.”

Reilly seeks feedback on Aon project By Taylor Hartz Staff Writer Alderman Brendan Reilly (42nd Ward) is looking for feedback on the redevelopment of the highest floor of the Aon Center into an observatory and restaurant. The project will turn the highest floor of the Aon Center—in the heart of New Eastside at 200 E. Randolph St.—into an attraction projected to draw more than two million visitors annually. The proposed space will be accessible by a glass-enclosed external elevator on the Northwest corner. Reilly co-hosted a community meeting with the Chicago Loop Alliance earlier this year at The Mid-America Club to discuss plans with residents. More than 100 community members attended. “Neighbors raised concerns related to increased vehicular and pedestrian

An artist’s rendering of the AON Center. Photo courtesy of the Office of Brendan Reilly

traffic, privacy and safety,” Reilly said in an emailed statement. Anyone interested in sharing thoughts can email Ald. Brendan Reilly at development@ward42chicago.com


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With museum, Chicago gets a slice of the pizza history pie By Jesse Wright Staff Writer Everyone knows pizza has long been big business in Chicago. With dozens of restaurants all through the city and suburbs offering a wide variety of styles and traditions, it is no surprise that Chicago is known as a destination city for pizza aficionados. But now there’s more than pizza. Last month the U.S. Pizza Museum opened at the Roosevelt Collection Shop, 150 Roosevelt Road, adding an important side dish to the meal itself—history. Kendall Bruns founded the museum several years ago as a series of pop-up events at various pizza restaurants. With gathered steam—and funding—he is hoping to make the Roosevelt Collection address a permanent home of his pizza memorabilia. Indeed, the museum itself is less a collection of pizza lore and myth as it is a collection of pop culture ephemera— important to pizza lovers of the late 20th century and a fun trip down memory lane for most people. The space opened Aug. 10 and judging

Bruns describes himself as a pizza agnostic and said the national social media debate about his museum was not intentional. Bruns said he hopes pizza unites more than it divides. “People can get passionate, but it doesn’t have to be this division,” he said. Bruns said any type of pizza can be tasty. “I enjoy all different styles of pizza,” he said. “And everyone should.” He explained that the food should unify Americans because whatever style they grew up eating, the food itself has a special place in most peoples’ memories. “People have this connection to their memories of the pizza they ate growing US Pizza Museum Founder and Director Kendall Bruns shares his impressive collection of pizza up,” he explained. memorabilia which is located in the Roosevelt Collection. Photo by Angela Gagnon Another visitor said good pizza defrom the people waiting to go inside, there City pizza fans who took to Twitter to com- pends less on the region and more on the plain that any pizza museum should belong preparation. are plenty of people who are interested in to New York. “I think any pizza that has a hand-tossed checking it out. “I’m not biased or anything, but Chicago crust, grated mozzarella cheese and home“We’re just here to learn about pizza pizza is the best,” Thasa said. made sauce is good,” said museum visitor and Chicago,” said museum visitor ShaBruns, the founder, has taken pains to Daniel Gulco. heen Thasa. remain neutral in the debate. He displays The pizza museum made national news To find out more about the U.S. Pizza memorabilia from around the United and, maybe predictably, the announcement States and in interview after interview, Museum, its hours and ticket prices, visit uspizzamuseum.com was met with outrage among New York he would not pick a favorite style of pie.

Chicago Gourmet gets set to sizzle going to have it,” Toia said. But, of course, front and center will be the food. With September comes Chicago GourToia said he expects Chicago Gourmet to met, a multi-day celebration of food, the again be the premier food and wine show city and, new this year, music. in the country. This year’s event, set for Sept. 26–30 and Toia said Chicago Gourmet has gotten themed Rock the Fork, is pairing music bigger each year since its start 11 years ago. with the food, said Sam Toia, president and “When we originally started it was kind CEO of the Illinois Restaurant Association, of a smaller event, and each year it keeps and founding producer of the event. getting bigger and bigger, with more ancil“What goes better with food than mulary events,” he said. sic?” Toia asked. Typically, Chicago Gourmet draws more Chicago Gourmet will offer the usuthan 16,000 people. al days of cooking demonstrations and Toia said, “We’re just very happy.” tastings, all of which will be set to the The event this year will feature 250 sounds of DJs, blues, jazz, rock and other restaurants and chefs, along with premier musicians. “From blues to rock to you name it, we’re wines. Area restaurants to be represented By Jesse Wright Staff Writer

Chicago Gourmet offers al fresco dining among celebrity chefs and some of the best food the city has to offer. Photo courtesy of Chicago Gourmet

include III Forks, The Columbus Tap and Mariano’s. Much of the action will be outside, in and around Millennium Park, and Toia said the setting is what makes the event popular.

“That’s one of the reasons we chose the last weekend in September, because historically it’s a very, very nice weekend,” he said. For information about food, the events and tickets, go to chicagogourmet.org


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| PERSPECTIVES |

Waiting at Wildberry: a New Eastside tradition By Jon Cohn Community Contributor Waiting at Wildberry Pancakes and Cafe has become a grand—or maybe Jon Cohn not so grand— tradition at the popular Randolph Street breakfast restaurant, which does not take reservations. If you come early, or maybe right at clos-

ing time, you have a shot at being seated right away. Otherwise, more often than not, it is time for the recreational activity known as “Waiting At Wildberry,” the enticingly long, but highly anticipated wait for your table. And regular Wildberry customers can attest—it is worth the wait. Passersby unfamiliar with the scene may think it is some kind of group Kumbaya gathering or maybe even the latest meeting place for a protest, but look closer and you can see small groups sitting frozen,

Top tips for surviving your fantasy draft By Tom Conroy Staff Writer

wide receivers.

3. Don’t freak out about quarterbacks. You’ve just been invited into your office’s Of course, someone like Tom Brady or fantasy football league. You’re excited to Aaron Rodgers can make a huge differget involved in this camaraderie but there’s ence on your team. Sometimes, somejust one problem—you have no idea what one in your league will jump the gun to do. Sure, you might watch football, but and try to grab one of these elite quarhow can you keep track of who the best terbacks as early as the third or fourth players are across 32 teams? round. If the rest of the league follows We understand your concerns and we their lead and starts drafting quarterhave the answers. In August, the Chicago backs, relax. This is your opportunity to Tribune held a fantasy football draft party snag a great player at another position. for fans at Soldier Field. At the beginning Great quarterbacks like Jared Goff, Deof the event, a special panel of sports shaun Watson and Dak Prescott always writers from Rotowire.com offered their seem to be available later. expertise on how to be successful. 4. Have your lineup for the upcoming 1. Take a running back in round one. week set by Monday or Tuesday. If There are only a handful of elite runyou do this, you will only have to worry ning backs in the NFL—like Todd Gurabout the occasional waiver wire pickley, Le’Veon Bell and David Johnson— up on Wednesday. You don’t want to be so they will go fast. If you pick later in scrambling to finalize your lineup right the first round, and the best running before kickoff on Sunday—especially if backs are off the board, grab a top wide you have someone playing on Thursday. receiver like Antonio Brown. 5. Use the resources at your disposal. 2. Prioritize tight ends over wide Sites like Rotowire, ESPN and Yahoo receivers. The wide receiver position Fantasy Sports offer useful informahas a ton of depth, so don’t be afraid if tion all season so you can stay on top you miss out on the top picks. Howevof injury reports, bye weeks, power er, elite tight ends are scarce, so snag rankings and statistical trends. Don’t someone like Rob Gronkowski or Zach over-complicate your preparations for Ertz in the third round. Most leagues the draft when there are simple soluonly require one starting tight end each tions at the click of a button. week, as opposed to the two starting

clutching their buzzers, waiting for them to signal their table is ready. They all have one goal in mind—breakfast. Wait times can vary, management says, but the busiest times typically are Saturdays and Sundays from early morning through lunchtime. But help is on the way. Wildberry management has installed a no-wait system. Customers can go online, sign up ahead of time and then show up right when your table is about to be ready. To find out more, visit wildberrycafe.com

Customers wait outside Wildberry Pancakes and Cafe restaurant. Photo by John Cohn

Unbearable: The best jerseys to troll Bears fans of animosity because he’s the Packers quarterback (and he boasts a 16-4 record When I first got against the Bears). I was surprised to hear from so many Bears fans about the Patrito Milwaukee, I ots QB. “The problem with Brady is that received strange looks whenever I he’s a great player on a great team with a wore my favorite great system and still he cheats,” said Jesse football jersey be- Patton, Jr., referring to the “Deflategate” Tom Conroy cause of the name scandal of 2015 when Brady was suspend“FAVRE” stitched ed for four games for allegedly tampering on the back. Little did I know that students with the air in the footballs. on campus, most of whom were Packers Rex Grossman: Grossman has the disfans, were still bitter about Brett Favre tinction of being the only Bears alumnus going back on his retirement following the 2007 season to play for the Jets. This expe- that came up. After all, he is blamed for Chicago’s loss to the Indianapolis Colts rience made me wonder about how other in Super Bowl XLI. Considered to be the teams’ fans felt when they saw certain weakest link on the team during the 2006 players’ jerseys, so I asked some Chicago season, Grossman threw for only 165 Bears fans what would incite their rage. Brett Favre: Packers fans may have been yards with one touchdown and two interupset with Favre for a few years, but Bears ceptions in the 29-17 Super Bowl loss. fans will probably hate Favre forever. Fans Players linked to controversies: always feel the strongest about divisional There were several players who came up rivals, and the Hall of Fame quarterback based on incidents off the field. Bears posted a 22-10 career record against the fans mentioned Ray Rice because of his Chicago Bears. “I would rip their Favre assault of his then-fiancée that was caught jersey off,” joked Adam Ruff of Crown on video, while Colin Kaepernick came Point, Indiana. up because of his kneeling during the Aaron Rodgers and Tom Brady: Nanational anthem. The takeaway: Avoid the tionwide, these two share the distinction of being hated because of their dominance jerseys of players whose actions off the as the two best quarterbacks in the league. field are discussed more than their performance on field. Like Favre, Rodgers is an easy target By Tom Conroy Staff Writer


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The Chicago Tribune moves into a new digital ‘space’ age more organic conversation,” she said of the open floor layout. The editorial department has five offices The Chicago Tribune’s move from the reserved for senior staff while everybody Tribune Tower to Prudential Plaza was else, including multimedia editors, mostly not just a change of address for the storied digital natives, work shoulder to shoulder, paper, it was a change in the corporate she said. Those editors help shape reportorganism itself. ers’ stories as they’re written to better delivWith the move, newspaper leadership er the news to specific digital platforms. used the opportunity to shake up the news“As we pursue different ways we tell room and reconfigure the layout, transstories, we’re not just driving everything forming a legacy newspaper into a 21st toward the printed product and we want century media player, active online and in the people who understand those platprint with its reporters feeding stories into forms best to be part of the conversation,” myriad digital platforms. Taylor said. Christine Taylor, managing editor of auIn this way, the journalism giant hopes diences, explained how the new newsroom to compete with digital-only news outlets, layout—devoid of a lot of offices and cubi- like Buzzfeed, that operate across social cles—is improving how the staff reports the media platforms in order to maximize exnews. “We can move quicker to facilitate a posure to a younger, tech-savvy audience, she said. Taylor said the Tribune will not sacrifice quality for clicks. “I try to understand why [readers] tend to gravitate toward [digital] storytelling and then ask how do we participate in that space,” Taylor said. “How do we sell stories on those platforms and get those readers to interact with us?” If that is the main question facing legacy news outlets, Tribune leaders believe the Prudential Plaza could provide the answer. Without walls to divide the newsroom, the operation works like a hive—each reporter working on his or her story, toward a common goal of greater readership. At the center of the newsroom, reporters have access to digital metrics, scorecards that track how well stories are performing and connecting with readers. 3 “One of the ideas around the restructuring was to put the audience at the center of By Jesse Wright Staff Writer

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1. Reporters hard at work in the new Tribune newsroom.

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2. An original Chicago Tribune press machine. 3. The old Chicago Tribune editorial board table, around which presidents have been seated, still has a home at the new Tribune offices. 4. The view of the New Eastside from One Prudential’s 11th floor observation deck.


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“As we pursue different ways we tell stories, we’re not just driving everything toward the printed product and we want the people who understand those platforms best to be part of the conversation.” – Christine Taylor, Managing Editor, Audience everything we do,” Taylor said. It’s a new way of reporting, in a new location, and Facilities Director Lynne Allen said the move was rough, especially on long-time employees who felt a personal connection with the old tower. “It was hard for people,” Allen said. “It’s an iconic building.” For nearly a century, that iconic building was home. The Tribune moved into the Tower on July 6, 1925. Within those walls, presidents visited with editors, Ann Landers, Mike Royko and Gene Siskel banged out innumerable columns and hundreds of reporters pursued leads, called up sources and did the work that earned the paper 25 Pulitzer Prizes. Despite the move, that history is far from forgotten in the Tribune’s new home in Prudential Plaza. In one corner, two couches, relics from Ann Landers’ office, sit ready for reporters to use during a break. Historic front pages, etched in glass and illuminated from behind, line hallways. Quotes, taken from Tribune Tower’s front lobby now glisten in new shiny steel, old relics and artwork juxtaposed against a sleek modern day office interior. A historic wooden editorial board table, with chairs so worn that the leather has split, are given prominent positions in the the office

landscape. “If we had good furniture, we tried to reuse it,” Allen said. In the middle of it all, a broad highway of a staircase connects the Tribune’s three floors. Allen calls them the “town hall stairs,” designed to accommodate staff for all employee meetings. The staircase also opens up the space, unifying the separate floors. Eastlake Studio designed the space, and Allen said adding the wide staircase through the heart of their property in Prudential Plaza was no small feat. “This was probably the most ambitious part of the project,” she said. “The stairs interconnect our space and make everything make sense.” This, Allen explained, is a big difference from Tribune Tower. “The Tower was a dark space with small windows,” she said. Floor to ceiling windows surround the office space at The Prudential Plaza. “Here, it’s nice to look out over Millennium Park all day long,” Allen said. She said the newspaper looked at several properties but Prudential Plaza was the best. “We couldn’t have ended up at a better place,” she said.

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5. A wall is decorated with hundreds of classic Chicago Tribune photos. 6. Among the historic furniture pieces in the Tribune offices are two couches, from the offices of longtime Tribune columnist Ann Landers. 7. Chicago Tribune Facilities Director Lynne Allen. 8. Inside the lobby of the old Tribune Tower, the walls were engraved with quotes from statesmen and writers. Some of the staff’s favorite quotes now decorate the walls of the new Tribune offices. Photos by Jesse Wright


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| BACK TO SCHOOL |

Change it up: The best study spots in the city By Elizabeth Czapski Staff Writer With the start of school comes not only old friends, new school supplies and exciting learning opportunities, but also quizzes, exams and essays. Luckily, there are plenty of places in and around New Eastside to turn on that study playlist and hit the books. 1. Chicago Cultural Center, 78 E. Washington St. The ground floor of the Chicago Cultural Center features a communal space perfect for sitting and working quietly. The building is over 120 years old and once served as Chicago’s first public library. If people need a study break, head upstairs to one of the free art exhibitions or marvel at the world’s largest Tiffany dome. 2. The Mid-America Club, 200 E. Randolph St. On the 80th floor of the Aon Center,

the Mid-America Club is full of quiet spaces. Choose a large conference room for group projects or a smaller space for individual work. The Mid-America Club is exclusive to members and their guests. 3. Two Zero Three Coffee & Wine Bar, 203 N. Wabash Ave. Two Zero Three is a cozy café located in Virgin Hotels Chicago. Perfect for studying alone or with friends, the café serves Dark Matter Coffee, pastries and other food. At night, it turns into a wine bar. Sit at the bar, at a table or on a comfy leather couch and get to work. 4. Lake Shore East Park, 450 E. Benton Place Study outside while the nice weather lasts! With park benches and peaceful fountains abound for a serene study space, this quiet park is surrounded by beautiful high-rises, with a nearby Mariano’s to keep your brain fueled.

Back-to-school products for the trendy student

By Elizabeth Czapski Staff Writer

Bentgo Kids Brights 5-Compartment Bento-Style Kids Lunch Box Available in three bright colors, this lunch box from Bentgo will make school lunch even more fun for kids. Modeled after the Japanese culinary tradition of preparing and arranging meals in bento boxes, this lunch box has five compartments that separate different foods so that the fruit and vegetables don’t mix with dessert. Lunch time has never been so organized. Find it at bentgo.com for $27.99.

Yoobi Backpack

Yoobi’s most popular backpack is the “Good Vibes” pack, and the name definitely

delivers. Its pastel color scheme and fun design, plus the fuzzy pineapple keychain (pictured) hanging off the front pocket, will make your student the most stylish in school. For every item purchased, Yoobi donates an item to a classroom in need. Get the Good Vibes Backpack at yoobi. com for $29.99.

SHAVA Night Light Bluetooth Speaker This speaker from SHAVA isn’t your standard Bluetooth speaker. It also functions as a lamp or nightlight. Touch control allows you to change its color and brightness by tapping the top of the speaker with your fingers, so you can unwind to soothing colors and your favorite music after a long day in class. Get the SHAVA speaker on amazon.com for $16.99.

The place to go when you want to put a lid on it By Elizabeth Czapski Staff Writer Wherever there are sports teams, there is passion—and for the passionate, there are hats. For New Eastside sports fans, Lids, 175 N. Michigan Ave., is the place to go. Based in Indianapolis, Lids sells hats in more than 1,000 locations throughout the U.S. and Canada. The clientele at this Lids location is diverse, said assistant manager Justin Gordon. “We get a lot of international shoppers, and then we have a lot of residents from the South Side and West Side of Chicago,” Gordon said. He added it’s also a favorite of locals. Gordon said there’s often a morning rush, with a line outside a half hour before the store opens. He said the most popular items are fitted Cubs and Sox hats. “People

love those. Those always are flying off the racks, and we always have to replenish them,” he said. With fall just around the corner, Gordon said customers have been looking for bucket hats and beanies. When the Cubs won the World Series in 2016, demand for Cubs gear soared sky-high. “This store got really good numbers off the Cubs,” Gordon said. “Any place that was selling Cubs anything was packed. It was crazy.” Lids also offers custom embroidery with anything from Chicago stars to a favorite player’s name and number, Gordon said. Lids can also add kingpins to the hats, with numerous design options available. A White Sox and Bears fan himself, Gordon said he has about 300 hats from Lids. Ryan Kaul, from Beaver Dam, Wiscon-

Ryan Kaul and J.T. visited a Lids recently. The national chain, located in the New Eastside, gets visitors from all around the world. Photo by Elizabeth Czapski

sin, was visiting Chicago with his family and bought a Durham Bulls hat to add to his collection. His younger brother J.T. bought a Brewers hat. “I collect hats, and it’s an easy, good way to bring something back to Wisconsin from Chicago not Cubs-related,” Kaul said. Yvonne Fernandes, who is from Australia and lives in the U.K., was in Chicago

because her husband was attending a conference. “I was sent by my children to go look for hats, for Cubs hats, apparently,” she said as she searched through the Lids displays for the perfect hat to take home. When asked if the Cubs are popular in the U.K., Fernandes said, “I have no idea. I just do as I’m told.”


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| BACK TO SCHOOL |

Ditch the daze: Return to school without the drama By Elizabeth Czapski Staff Writer The start of school may bring stress for many students and parents, but luckily, there are ways to cope with the anxieties of a new academic year. Dr. Stephanie Grunewald, a licensed clinical psychologist at Restorative Counseling at 155 N. Michigan Ave., said that two of the biggest school stressors for kids are “the ambiguity of what to expect” and getting back into a routine. Bullying also stresses kids out, whether it’s “overt bullying” like physical aggression and name-calling or “social pressure to feel like [the students] fit in a certain way,” Grunewald said. “Depending on the age group, what they’re stressed about tends to change,” she said. Younger children might worry about finding their classroom or what school will be like; middle schoolers are dealing with

bodily changes and developing new friendship groups; high schoolers often face academic pressure from parents and teachers and worry about getting into college. She warned that students might not say outright that they’re stressed. “They will just sort of say that they’re having a hard time. Little ones will sometimes just say that they don’t feel good about it,” Grunewald said. Grunewald said that signs of stress vary depending on the child. “Your child might seem like they’re either just completely shutting you off or shutting down,” she said. “They’re so overstimulated at school that when they come home… they might just not speak as much.” On the other hand, some children may talk more. “Instead of seeming like they’re excited, it can feel overwhelming with how much they’re conveying,” Grunewald said. Sometimes, kids start acting out and becoming more defiant, she said. All of these

behaviors can be indicators of stress. Parents aren’t immune to back-to-school anxiety either, Grunewald said. Getting back into a routine can be hard for them too, and many parents feel pressure to have their child perform at a certain level in school. One key coping mechanism that Grunewald recommends is taking downtime as a family. “A big thing is really being mindful of your schedule and not taking on too much, really prioritizing time together and checking in with one another, and just making sure that each day there’s some wind down time where no electronics are present, no expectations are set,” she said, adding that many families use dinnertime to do this. For parents, keeping things organized, like putting backpacks in a certain spot and having things laid out for the next morning, can help establish a routine, Grunewald said. When it comes to perfor-

mance pressure, she said that she works with parents “on how to accept their child for who they are, rather than feeling that they need to compare.” Teachers can also help alleviate anxiety through meet-and-greets, where students can meet the teacher and find their locker and classroom before the first day, Grunewald said. “That really helps decrease a lot of the anxiety because there aren’t so many unknowns,” she said. “Most people become anxious when there’s ambiguity and uncertainty, and so the more you can take that away, the better it is for the students.” Finally, Grunewald said that it’s important for students to know that feeling anxiety about the new school year is normal. “That way they don’t feel like something is wrong with them for feeling the way that they feel,” she said.

Connecting Students to The Future Through coding and robotics, an integrated STEAM program, daily world-language instruction and a global curriculum, GEMS prepares young people to transform the world.

Take a Tour Today! www.gemschicago.org

1-312-809-8910 | admissions@gemschicago.org

Select spots available, preschool through high school.


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| STREETERVILLE LIFE |

Streeterville residents say neighborhood is convenient and community-oriented

to herself as “Streeterville’s biggest fan.” The five-time president of the Streeterville Organization of Active Residents Bordered by Rush Street to the west, (SOAR), has lived in the neighborhood Oak Street to the north, the Chicago Rivfor 22 years. She is also on the Streeterer to the south and Lake Michigan to the ville Chamber of Commerce board, was east, Streeterville is a bustling commuon the board of the Magnificent Mile nity encompassing one of the city’s most Association and is vice chair of the Lights popular stretches of road—the MagnifiFestival parade. cent Mile. Spreen said she loves Streeterville’s In the 1800s, before the area was proximity to the lake and feels visitors to developed, there was no Michigan Avthe neighborhood bring a “really posienue, there were no high-rises and no tive energy.” restaurants. There was, however, a man New Eastside, she said, is quieter and named Captain George Wellington “Cap” has fewer retail options, and River North Streeter. According to Chicagology.com, has an energetic nightlife. But for her, Streeter had dreams of running a water Streeterville is just perfect. passenger service, but one of his boats “People see each other, they recognize ended up wrecked on a sandbar east of each other, there’s community events that Michigan Avenue. Streeter and his wife go on that really make it feel like you live Maria used the ship as a houseboat. Over time, Streeter convinced develop- in a neighborhood,” Spreen said. “It’s neat ers to dump debris along his sandbar and because you would never think that you could create this community feeling in that fill gave birth to Streeterville. the downtown urban environment. And Today, residents of Streeterville laud the neighborhood’s convenience as well as you really can.” Phyllis Mitzen, President of Skyline its community. Village Chicago, a membership organizaGail Spreen, president and owner of tion for older adults, agreed. Streeterville Properties Group, referred By Elizabeth Czapski Staff Writer

From left to right: Hannah Puvalowski, Eleni Iglesias, Sarah Miklius, Laura Wiley and Grace Girardot prepare for the Loyola Black Party at Loyola’s Water Tower Campus. Photo by Elizabeth Czapski

“We lived in Evanston, and I loved Evanston … but when I walk down the street here, I almost invariably see somebody I know and we stop and chat,” she said. Mitzen has lived in Streeterville for 20 years and said the convenience and proximity to museums and good transportation make it a wonderful place for older adults and “an extraordinary community for intergenerational living.” Donna Dugo, membership director at The Magnificent Mile Association and resident of Streeterville for more than 20 years, said she likes the community. “I love the fact that I’m steps away

from Navy Pier, the lakefront and now the newly developed Riverwalk. I mean, I can be at all of these places in a five-to-10 minute walk,” Dugo said. Streeterville is more than just the people. Pets are a powerful connecting force. Amy Cherner, marketing and leasing coordinator for North Water Apartments, said she and her fiancé walk their dog around the neighborhood each night. “We’ve gotten to the point where a lot of the faces are familiar, which is definitely kind of cool to have that in the middle of the city, and then really recognize your neighbors,” she said.

Haute Dogs to help Canine Companions

Schulz, the public relations and marketing coordinator for Canine Companions.“We really wanted to find a way to combine the A different breed of fashion show is comfashion industry and that fantastic … culing to Chicago on Sept. 20 at the Peninsula ture of Chicago with Canine Companions,” Chicago Hotel, 108 E. Superior St. Schulz said. A Haute Dog fashion show took Haute Dog, a fashion show wherein both place in Columbus, Ohio earlier this year. This year’s models include Ravi Baichwal human and canine models walk the runway, from ABC 7 Chicago and Natalie Bomke will support Canine Companions for Infrom Fox 32 Chicago, among other notable dependence, an organization that provides names. The human models will be accomassistance dogs free of charge to adults, panied on the runway by their own dogs or children and veterans with disabilities. by a puppy from Canine Companions. Haute Dog began as a costume contest Members of the Greater Chicagoland in Los Angeles, but three years ago, Canine Chapter of Canine Companions will volCompanions expanded to Chicago and unteer at the event, assisting dog recipients and their canines. Shultz said the volunchanged the format, according to Molly By Elizabeth Czapski Staff Writer

teers will be there to “mingle and talk to people so they can really hear about our mission firsthand from the people that we serve.” Tails in the City, 1 E. Delaware Place, a luxury pet boutique, will provide all of the hound-some clothing for the dog models, Schulz said. Designers for the humans include Alice + Olivia, Contessa Bottega, Vince and Burdi. All proceeds from the event will benefit Canine Companions for Independence. In addition to the fashion show, cocktails, hors d’oeuvres and a silent auction will be available for guests, making for a paw-sitively un-fur-gettable event.

Amy Chally and Canine Companions Service Dog Portland at last year’s Haute Dog Event. Photo by Marcin Cymer

More information and tickets are available at cci.org/hautedogchicago.com


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Cruising from summer job to boat captain By Elizabeth Czapski Staff Writer When Gabriel Argumedo was 15, he got a summer job with Chicago’s First Lady Cruises and Mercury Cruises as a deckhand, taking tickets, cleaning bathrooms and acting as a lookout for the captain. “When I started down here, I didn’t even know that Chicago had a river,” said Argumedo, who is originally from Barrington, Illinois. “That’s how green I was.” Now 30, he has risen to the rank of captain, piloting vessels on the Chicago River and Lake Michigan for tours and private events. He also works as director of vessel operations and runs the maintenance department during the winter off-season. Argumedo’s brother, David, works as a captain as well. A typical day for Argumedo begins around 7:30 a.m., giving him and his crew time to prepare for the first river cruise at 9 a.m. They run safety drills first and then set up the boat and check that everything is working and ready to go. Then the tours begin—three to six each per day. Argumedo offers several tours, including a Chicago Architecture Foundation river cruise and a river and lake tour, the latter being Argumedo’s favorite. “I never get tired of that view of the city from the lake.” He said his favorite moments on the lake are at sunset or at night. When he does private events like corporate parties or weddings, Argumedo said he sometimes works late into the night. Piloting for private charters takes more skill and is, “more involved with the customer one-on-one, and you’re doing more custom routes and making a lot more decisions,” Argumedo said. Argumedo said he loves his job because it changes every day and he’s constantly meeting new people. “If you’re a social butterfly, this is definitely the job for you,” he said. Argumedo said he just likes being out on the water. Some of his most exciting moments have involved rescuing other boats and

Bob Johnson, a member of the SOAR board of directors, stands with Deborah Gershbein, the president of SOAR at an annual SOAR First Responders Appreciation Day in a previous year. Photo by Sean Kennedy

SOAR serving lunch to first responders, Streeterville meal could be tricky, especially if a fire broke out. “The firefighters never got a chance Once again, the Streeterville Orgato attend the event because they’d walk nization of Active Residents (SOAR) is preparing for its annual First Responders in, get a bite of food and then get called Appreciation Day. The event will be held out,” he said. However, Johnson said the event is for Sept. 13, from 11 a.m.–2 p.m. at the Chithe community and not just for first recago Fire Department Engine Company sponders.“Just show up,” he said. “Come 98, 202 E. Chicago Ave. as you are.” Bob Johnson, chairman of the safety Johnson said that while a local alderand sound management taskforce for man or congressman might stop in, the SOAR, said the event is a way to give lunch is less a political event as it is a way back to the men and women who keep to build community. the neighborhood safe. “We just think it would be nice for “The organization wanted to give our first responders to get to know our thanks to our firefighters and our police people and for our people to get to officers and our paramedics who serve the community,” he explained. “We think know them.” they do a terrific job.” Johnson said the lunch has been an In addition to the public luncheon, event for years, and is something of a SOAR will deliver sandwiches from tradition in Streeterville. Timothy O’Toole’s Pub to the 18th Pre“I think it was done shortly after the cinct District at 10 p.m. to recognize the 9/11 [ceremonies], as a way to remember overnight shift workers. the 343 firefighters killed in 9/11,” he This year, the event moved from the said. “It’s a time of year we think of them Lakeshore Field House to a fire station more so than during the rest of the year.” two blocks west. Johnson said in prior For more information, visit the SOAR years, getting the firefighters to go to an website, soarchicago.org offsite location and then sit down for a By Jesse Wright Staff Writer

Gabriel Argumedo worked his way up from summer employee to tour captain along the Chicago River. Photo by Elizabeth Czapski

meeting celebrities, he said. But being a boat captain does come with challenges—namely, dealing with river traffic. “While there is plenty of room for everybody to be on [the river], the most difficult part is just getting the education out there of how to maneuver on the river,” Argumedo said. He said the boating industry is always looking for good people to hire. “I think most people are unaware that this opportunity or this industry even exists,” he said. He said it’s possible for a boat lover to make a career out of it—and a fun one, at that. Argumedo said that because he enjoys what he does, “it really doesn’t feel like work most of the days.”


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| STREETERVILLE LIFE |

Doorperson of the Month: Adam Traore To commemorate our new Streeterville paper, this month our Doorperson of the Month hails from Streeterville. By Jesse Wright Staff Writer Adam Traore has worked at the residential high-rise, Lake Point Tower, 505 N. Lakeshore Dr. for more than two years. The person who nominated Traore complimented his passion for his job, and said he is “energetic, friendly, enthusiastic, helpful and he always greets you with a smile.” Traore said he appreciates and is thankful for the nomination. “I like helping the people, when people come in and they need information to go to a restaurant. I am very happy to help them to find a restaurant or give them information about the beaches,” he said. And the residents really take care of me and that helps me do my job.” Traore said he previously worked as a hotel security guard, and then found his way to working the door. Traore works the afternoon and evening shift, from 3 p.m. to 11 p.m. He said most of the job is helping people, whether they are residents or outsiders. “Most of the day people come in and they ask to see their friends and family in the building, and so you make phone calls and they go up,” Traore said. “Or the residents come in from work and they have groceries and you help them take it upstairs.” Traore said he would recommend the job to someone who is outgoing and a people person. “I would tell them and go ahead and become a doorman,” Traore said. “There’s nothing difficult about it. It’s a great job in Chicago. You get to know a lot of people. You get to know different people and you get to know people with different backgrounds and it gives you a lot of experience in life.” When he is not working, Traore said

The annual EXPO CHICAGO will unveil hundreds of top art pieces for audiences at Navy Pier. Photo courtesy of EXPO CHICAGO

EXPO CHICAGO brings top international art to Navy Pier what is happening in the world today,” Karman said.“That is what I always look forward to.” Artists, critics, collectors and connoisThis year, the EXPO will feature four seurs will converge on Chicago this month sections of exhibits. for the seventh annual EXPO CHICAGO The “Exposure” section will give new at the Navy Pier. artists a chance to shine with exhibits that The international Exposition of Contemporary and Modern Art will run Sept. will feature presentations from galleries that have been around for eight or fewer 27–30 and will showcase the work of years. The “Profile” exhibits will focus artists from 63 cities in 27 countries. on more established galleries and will The international work was chosen by world-renowned gallerists including Chi- present solo booths, focusing on major projects artists. The “Editions and Books” cago’s own Kavi Gupta, Rhona Hoffman, exhibit will showcase limited editions and John Corbett and Jim Dempsey. Eleven publications by established and emerging Chicago galleries will be included, alongside art from cities like Seoul, Cape Town, artists. The “Special Exhibitions” will focus on non-profits based locally, nationally Paris, Athens and Singapore. and internationally, including 11 Chica“With over 3,000 international artists represented, there will be a wide variety of go-based organizations, like the Hyde Park Art Center and the University of Chicago artwork for sale at EXPO CHICAGO this Department of Visual Arts. year,” said Tony Karman, President and Karman said the Profile section of solo Director of the EXPO. artists projects will be a definite highlight “Most importantly, the artwork is always this year, along with the curated programprovocative. Whether it is evocative of matic sections In/SIitu and EXPO Video. sheer beauty or challenging in its content, The EXPO will be open from 11 a.m. to the artwork presented at this year’s fair will 7 p.m. on Sept. 27–30 and and 11 a.m. to do what contemporary artwork has always 6 p.m. Sept. 30. done—capture the moment and reflect By Taylor Hartz Staff Writer Adam Traore is the Doorperson of the Month for September. Photo by Stephanie Racine

he has several hobbies, but mostly likes watching sports. “In my spare time I mostly watch TV and a lot of sports,” he said. “I watch soccer and baseball and American football. And I go around, like a tourist, checking different places and places I’ve never been.” Traore said he’s been in Chicago for 17 years, but that doesn’t mean he’s seen everything the city has to offer. “There is always something new in Chicago,” he said. ‘There’s always something to see. You’ll never know everything about Chicago.” Gotten great service lately? Let us know and nominate your doorperson at info@ neweastsidecommunity.com and if they’re profiled, they could win a $25 gift card.


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Uncovering Streeterville’s hidden gems By Stephanie Racine Staff Writer With so much to see and do around Streeterville, even longtime residents may not know of all the hidden gems the neighborhood has to offer. Here is a list to highlight just a few:

Ezza Nails, 240 E. Illinois St.

Boasting a modern nail experience. Ezza Nails is a cashless business, meaning they only take plastic, though patrons have an option to tip after they pay. Appointments can be made online. Ezza Nails focuses on nail health, carries organic nail polishes and offers LED lights for gel manicures, in lieu of possibly harmful UV lights. Every nail service comes with a complimentary La Croix. Make an appointment and see more details at ezzanails.com

Art of Dr. Seuss Gallery, 835 N. Michigan Ave. (Second floor)

Although the Water Tower-based gallery opened in 2014, it is always being updated. The gallery features work that spans the illustrious career of Dr. Seuss. Currently, the gallery is showcasing never-before-seen works and rare items. The exhibit will continue through December. For more information, visit drseussgallery.com

Tuesdays on the Terrace, The Museum of Contemporary Art, 220 E. Chicago Ave.

Through Sept. 25, The Museum of Contemporary Art showcases jazz artists on its terrace on Tuesdays, from 5:30–8 p.m. Attendance is free and there is a variety of food and drink for purchase. Lawn chair rentals are available for $5, or free for museum members. Outside food and drink are prohibited. For more information on catering for large parties, including seating for eight to 25 people, call 312-397-3805. For general information, visit mcachicago.org/Programs/Music/

Jazz musician Ari Brown presents a tribute to Chicago jazz icon Muhal Richard Abrams to a crowd on Tuesdays on the Terrace, Aug. 28. Photo by Stephanie Racine

Tuesdays-On-The-Terrace

Ramen Misoya, 213 E. Ohio St. Authentic ramen is easy to find in Streeterville. Ramen Misoya is a franchised ra-

men shop that originated in Chiba, Japan. Its focus is on its Miso broth ramen. Miso is a paste made from fermented soybeans and is a traditional Japanese seasoning. For more information, visit ramen-misoya.com

Out and About

Streeterville Summer Breeze Soiree at the Peninsula Hotel Chicago Photos by Jesse Wright

US Rep. Christian Mitchell addresses the crowd at a Streeterville Chamber of Commerce soiree alongside chamber President Mable Buckner-Payton

Kerry Bowler and Mark Shouger were out in August at the Streeterville Chamber of Commerce’s soiree.

From left, Emma Waterman, Mollie Foley and Meghan O’Malley


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| NEWS BREAK |

The Palmer House gives guests a glimpse into historic Chicago

Jumble NOICLCA EKSE RORHOR SEREAT DAARPE NIGHKT Hint: It’s a great day for a walk in the…

Where am I? If you’re the first to

figure out where this iconic column is in the New Eastside, you could win a $25 Mariano’s gift card. Email us at info@neweastsidecommunity.com. Good luck!

Heard on the Street

Desserts is stressed spelled backward.

On a sign at the Atwood Restaurant, 1 W. Washington St.

Submit jokes and quotes to info@ neweastsidecommunity.com

The winner of our “Best Balcony View” August photo contest is... Jamie Moncrief took advantage of the 60th Annual Chicago Air and Water Show on Aug. 19 to snap a photo of the U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds on the north side of the Navy Pier. Moncrief will win a $25 Mariano’s gift card and the envy of all in the New Eastside. Email photos to info@neweastsidecommunity.com Good luck and good shooting!

Photo by Jamie Moncrief

Palmer House’s director of publicity and resident historian Ken Price stands next to some local history. Photo by Elizabeth Czapski

takes names and dates and weaves them into enthralling narratives, giving life to One of the oldest hotels in America sits historical figures. The Palmer House became a social right outside of New Eastside, at 17 E. hotspot over the years, attracting famous Monroe St. The Palmer House Hilton was guests from all over the world including intended as a wedding gift from Potter many U.S. presidents, Charles Dickens and Palmer, an innovative businessman and Buffalo Bill. Musicians like Frank Sinatra, the hotel’s namesake, to his new, much younger wife, Bertha, an educated socialite Ella Fitzgerald and Liberace have performed in the hotel’s Empire Room. who was a champion for women and The hotel was advertised as the first the arts. fire-proof hotel in the world, and the first The hotel first opened in 1871, but was to install lighting and telephones. Potter destroyed by the Great Chicago Fire just Palmer also invented an early version of two weeks later. It was rebuilt across the the elevator, Price said. street, re-opening in 1873, according to Perhaps most importantly, one of the the Palmer House’s director of publicity most popular sweet treats in America was and resident historian Ken Price. invented at the Palmer House—the brownPrice has been with the Palmer House ie. The kitchen still serves brownies made since 1983 and leads a guided tour of with the original Palmer House recipe. the hotel called “History is Hot!” ParticIt isn’t necessary to stay at the Palmer ipants eat lunch in the hotel’s Lockwood House to experience its historic beauty. Restaurant & Bar, and visit the PalmJust pop in the lobby for a drink to expeer House’s one-room museum, which rience the Grecian frescos on the ceiling, opened in 2010. 24-karat gold chandeliers and bronze The history Price teaches doesn’t rely angel statues. on timelines and dry facts. Rather, he By Elizabeth Czapski Staff Writer


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| STREETERVILLE EVENTS | Schedules are subject to change. Call venues to confirm event information. Submit events to info@neweastsidecommunity.com September 5

The Future of Social Security This educational forum and networking reception hosted by The National Academy of Social Insurance will feature a presentation on Social Security by Henry Aaron, a Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution. 3 p.m., free and open to the public, Gleacher Center, 450 North Cityfront Plaza Drive, (202) 4528097, nasi.org

September 6

Poochie Portraits Stop in to Juniper Spirits & Oysters, a restaurant and bar in the lobby of Claridge House Chicago, to have professional portraits taken of you and your dog. There will also be a puppy menu and gift card drawings. Proceeds will benefit PAWS Chicago. 5–8 p.m., Juniper Spirits & Oysters, 1224 N. Dearborn Parkway, (312) 416-5811, juniperspiritsandoysters.com

September 8

Run Mag Mile Run down Chicago’s famous Magnificent Mile as part of this all-ages race. Choose from the 5k or 10k course based on your running ability. Participants receive a goodie bag. Recommended arrival time 5:45 a.m., start time 7 a.m., $49 for the 5k run, $64 for the 10k run, Grant Park, (847) 243-8500, runmagmile.com

12–Nov. 14. AMC River East 21, 322 E. Illinois St.

September 13

Driehaus 10th Anniversary Gala The Driehaus Museum celebrates its 10th anniversary with a black-tie gala honoring award-winning Chicago architect and preservationist Joseph Antunovich. The gala marks the opening of the Driehaus Museum’s fall exhibition, “Beauty’s Legacy: Gilded Age Portraits in America.” Proceeds will support the museum. 6–9 p.m. $1,000, Driehaus Museum, 40 E. Erie St., (312) 482-893, driehausmuseum.org

September 12

Asian Pop-up Cinema The seventh season of the multilingual, Pan-Asian film festival is back, running through mid-November. Acclaimed films and actors such as “Adulthood” and “One Cut of the Dead” will be present. Sept.

September 21

Midnight Circus at Lake Shore Park Midnight Circus brings circus performances to parks all around the city of Chicago. Founded in 2007, the organization has a special focus on activism. Also Sept. 22–23. 7 p.m., $22, Lake Shore Park, 808 N. Lake Shore Drive, (312) 343-4955, midnightcircus.net

September 14–16

Foundations Weekend Training The Wright Foundation, a life and career-coaching center, says this weekend training session “is the first step in starting to work on your social and emotional intelligence and growth, on a path to unlocking your full potential.” $800, Wright Foundation, 445 E. Ohio St., Suite 400, (312) 645-8300, foundationsweekendtraining.com Mag Mile Association 2018 September Membership Connection ABC 7 food reporter Steve Dolinsky, Sonat Birnecker, founder of KOVAL Distillery, and James Beard award-winning chef Takashi Yagihashi will come together to talk about the Chicago food scene. 9–11 a.m., $30, UNIQLO, 830 N. Michigan Ave., (312) 642-3570, themagnificentmileassociation.com Tuesdays on the Terrace at the MCA: Maggie Brown Enjoy modern art and listen to Chicago jazz performers at the Museum of Contemporary Art’s annual summer concert series in the museum’s Anne and

will also receive an annual HRC membership. 11 a.m.–2 p.m., $50, Pinstripes, 435 E. Illinois St., hrcpridechicago@gmail. com, hrcchicago.org

September 26

Streeterville Chamber 10th Anniversary Celebration The Streeterville Chamber of Commerce will be honoring president and CEO Mable Buckner Payton, who celebrates 10 years with the chamber this year. 5:30–8:30 p.m., $50 for members, $75 for non-members., Chez Chicago, 247 E. Ontario St., (312) 664-2560, streetervillechamber.org

September 27

Mag Mile Association’s Fall Membership Luncheon Tom Ricketts, Chairman of the Chicago Cubs, will talk about his goals for the team and the city. 11:15 a.m.–1:15 p.m., members $95, non-members $110, Holiday Inn Chicago Mart Plaza, 350 West Mart Center Drive, (312) 642-3570, themagnificentmileassociation.com

Photo courtesy of driehausmuseum.org

September 18

Photo courtesy of themagnificentmile.com

John Kern Terrace Garden. Will feature Maggie Brown, whom the Tribune called “one of the most fiercely committed artists in Chicago.” Every Tuesday June– September, 5:30–8 p.m., free for Illinois residents, Museum Of Contemporary Art Chicago, 220 E. Chicago Ave., (312) 2802660, mcachicago.org

September 28-30

Photo courtesy of midnightcircus.net

September 22

360 Sky Yoga: For Runners! 360 Sky Yoga is a yoga class with a view! Taught on the 94th floor of the John Hancock Center, this special 360 Sky Yoga class will focus on loosening areas of the body that can become tight from running or training. Classes sell out quickly, so make sure to register well in advance. Every Saturday from 9–10 a.m. $15, 360 CHICAGO, 875 N. Michigan Ave., 94th Floor, (888) 875-8439, 360chicago.com

September 23

Human Rights Campaign Chicago’s “Pin Down Equality!” Human Rights Campaign Chicago’s bowling events includes three hours of open bowling and brunch. Participants

Korean Adoptees of Chicago (KAtCH) Convention Korean Adoptees of Chicago (KAtCH) and the International Korean Adoptee Associations (IKAA) are hosting the KAtCH 10th Anniversary & IKAA Annual Convention. IKAA provides resources to adult Korean adoptees around the world. Late registration ticket $229, Hyatt Centric Chicago Magnificent Mile, 633 North Saint Clair St., KAtCH10@ katchicago.com, ikaa.org

September 29

One Day University Talks starring The Nations’ Greatest Professors - Sheraton Grand Do you love to learn? Not to pass a test but simply for the fun of it? One Day University creates fascinating days of learning designed to invigorate your mind. Starring the nation’s greatest professors. 9:30 a.m.–1:15 p.m. Sheraton Grand Chicago, 301 E. North Water St. Call 800-300-3438 or visit OneDayU.com


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| NEW EASTSIDE EVENTS | Schedules are subject to change. Call venues to confirm event information. Submit events to info@neweastsidecommunity.com September 4

SOAR Farmer’s Market Support local farmers and producers by visiting the Streeterville Organization of Active Residents (SOAR) on the Museum of Contemporary Art (MCA) plaza. The market offers fresh fruit, vegetables, cheeses, baked goods and drinks as well as cut and potted flowers. Tuesdays until Oct. 30, 7 a.m.–2 p.m., free, Museum of Contemporary Art, 220 E. Chicago Ave., (312) 280-2660, mcachicago.org

September 5

Sommelier for a Day III Forks invites you to a wine tasting led by sommelier Anton Licko. Sample six different white, red and rosé selections from throughout the state of Oregon, paired with an array of hors d’oeuvres by executive chef Hans Aeschbacher. 5–7 p.m., $25, III Forks, 180 N. Field Blvd., to RSVP call (312) 938-4303, 3forks. com/chicago

September 7

Leinenkugel’s End of Summer Bash Wrap up your Summer 2018 with live music and fireworks in Navy Pier’s Miller Lite Beer Garden. This free event features music by Rebel Soul Revival and Gravity (a John Mayer tribute band) and concludes with a 15-minute fireworks display over Lake Michigan. 6–10:15 p.m., free, Navy Pier, 600 E. Grand Ave., (312) 5957437, navypier.org Jacqueline Woodson Double Book Release National Book Award winner Jacqueline Woodson will appear at the American Writers Museum for the release of two new books, “Harbor Me” and “The Day You Begin.” Woodson is best known for her award-winning memoir “Brown Girl Dreaming” and her numerous books for children. Free for members, $12 non-members, (or free with admission) 6:30 p.m., American Writers Museum, 180 N. Michigan Ave., americanwritersmuseum.org

September 8

Donut Fest at the Zoo Taste the best donuts in Chicago in one of the city’s greatest attractions—The Lincoln Park Zoo. Pair your donut with

wine, beer or a mimosa—if you’re of age—while enjoying the zoo’s animals and gardens. Admission to Donut Fest at the Zoo also includes live entertainment, giveaways, and access to the Penguin Cove, Bird House and more. 11 a.m.–3 p.m., $20–45, Lincoln Park Zoo, 2001 N. Clark St., (312) 742-1000, lpzoo.org

September 9

John Zorn at the Art Institute Composer and multi-instrumentalist John Zorn will lead 12 ensembles in 12 different galleries of the Art Institute. With each performance starting 30 minutes after the last, Zorn will be performing throughout the day. 11 a.m.–5 p.m., free with museum admission, Art Institute of Chicago, 111 S. Michigan Ave., (312) 443-3600, for a full schedule of performances see artic.edu Magellan Rewards Festival Enjoy food, drinks and fitness at the 12th annual Magellan Rewards Festival in Lakeshore East Park. Sessions include “Yoga,” “Fat Burn Sweat” and “Fun for the Kids.” Musical guests include Jeremy Gentry, Julia Cole and Phillip-Michael Scales. 11 a.m.–2 p.m., free, Lakeshore East Park, 450 East Benton Place, (312) 469-8100, for a full schedule visit magellandevelopment.com

September 10

Democracy’s Crisis of Identity In the current political climate, the concept of identity has become a central focus point, but what is driving this focus? Can identity be molded in a way that supports democracy? Author Francis Fukuyama will discuss this and more at this Chicago Council on Global Affairs event. Registration closes the day of the event. 5:30–6:30 p.m. (doors open at 5:15), $20 ($10 for members), Chicago Council on Global Affairs Conference Center, 130 E. Randolph Ave., (312) 7263860, thechicagocouncil.org

September 11

Great Moments in Vinyl: The Jimi Hendrix Experience Chicago radio personality William Lindsey Cochran and Great Moments in Vinyl will present performances of Jimi

Hendrix’s landmark albums “Are You Experienced?” and “Axis: Bold As Love.” Throughout the night, Cochran will tell stories about the records and the musicians who created them. The band for the night will consist of Cochran (bass), Bill Grady (guitar), Jonathon Reed (drums) and multi-instrumentalist Jeremy Peters. 8–10:30 p.m. (doors open at 6), $12 (in advance) or $15 (day of the event), City Winery, 1200 W. Randolph St., (312) 7339463, citywinery.com

September 12

Rooftop Beer Yoga—The Last of Summer ’18 at Lakeshore Sport and Fitness Let Lakeshore Sport & Fitness–Illinois Center help you get over that mid-week hump and gear up for the weekend ahead as you take in views of the city and a beer with Rooftop Beer Yoga! First timers and experienced yogis welcome! One beer or glass of wine included with class ticket purchase of $10. Additional beer & wine available for $5! 5:15–6:15 p.m. 211 N. Stetson Ave., guests can purchase a ticket at rooftopbeeryoga18.eventbrite.com CAPS Meeting (Beat 111–113) New Eastside residents are invited to meet with local beat police to discuss issues in the community. CAPS meetings help establish a connection between police, business owners, community leaders and residents. 6:30 p.m., free, 400 E. Randolph St., (312) 321-0600

September 13 Lake Shore East Book Club Open to anyone in the Lake Shore East community, the LSE Book Club meets at The Tides. This month, the book club will be discussing “Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet” by Jamie Ford. For the October meeting, the club will discuss “A Gentleman in Moscow” by Amor Towles. Second Thursday of each month, 6 p.m., free, The Tides, 360 E. South Water St. (16th Floor), (312) 540-0400

September 14

Shoreline Sightseeing & Wine Tasting Cruises This 21-and-over cruise allows guests to sample wines from Lynfred Winery, Illinois’ oldest and largest family-owned winery. Alongside a short wine course with Lynfred’s acclaimed staff, guests can enjoy light refreshments and a nightview of the Chicago skyline. The cruise will depart from Shoreline’s dock at Polk Bros Park, southwest corner of Navy Pier. 7:30–9 p.m. (boarding begins at 7:15 p.m.), $49, Navy Pier, 600 E. Grand Ave., (312) 222-9328, shorelinesightseeing.com

September 15

Free Admission Day at the Field Museum The Field Museum of Natural History offers free admission today for Illinois residents. Check out exhibits like “Inside Ancient Egypt,” “Maximo the Titanosaur,” and the Crown Family PlayLab free of charge. Proof of residency required. 9 a.m.–5 p.m., Field Museum of Natural History, 1400 S. Lake Shore Drive, (312) 922-9410, fieldmuseum.org

Photo courtesy of visittheusa.com

September 15

VibeUp Yoga Fit Fest Grab your yoga mat and head to Navy Pier! This yoga fest on the performance lawns of the Pier’s Polk Bros Park is open to all ages and experience levels. Rejuvenate with fitness workshops and yoga classes set to serene music. 9:30 a.m.– 1 p.m., free, Navy Pier, 600 E. Grand Ave., (312) 595-7437, navypier.org

September 16

Sunday Science: Birds Explore and learn about the birds of Lurie Garden in this all-ages, drop-in program. Discover the science behind the natural beauty of this garden, close to home in


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| NEW EASTSIDE EVENTS | New Eastside. No registration is required. 2–3 p.m., free, Lurie Garden, E. Monroe St. between Columbus Drive and Michigan Ave., (312) 228-1004, luriegarden.org

September 20

21 & Upward You’re invited to enjoy rock climbing, food and drinks at this 21-and-over event, sponsored by Arc’teryx Chicago. First-time climbers can attend a top rope orientation class at 5:30 p.m., 6:15 p.m. or 7 p.m., while experienced climbers need only pass a quick belay check before climbing. 5:30–8:30 p.m., $10 (in advance) or $15 (at the door), Maggie Daley Park, 337 E. Randolph St., register at maggiedaleypark.com Concert for Chicago The Chicago Symphony Orchestra (CSO) and Riccardo Muti will perform a free Millennium Park concert, along with the Civic Orchestra of Chicago, which is celebrating the start of its 100th season this year. 6:30 p.m., free, Millennium Park, 201 E. Randolph St., (312) 294-3000, cso.org

September 21

Midnight Circus in the Parks Join the wild ensemble of acrobats and eccentrics inside the Little Big Top for their latest creations. Performing intimate, world-class circus acts to communities since 2007, the Midnight Circus crew believes in the power of community, and makes all its performances affordable and accessible. Also Sept. 22–33 (2 p.m. and 5 p.m.), 7–9 p.m., $22, Lake Shore Park, 808 N. Lake Shore Drive, (312) 7422001, chicagoparkdistrict.com

September 22

Creative Youth Festival This Millennium Park festival will display the work of hundreds of young, Chicago artists from dozens of Chicago cultural organizations. Artists will showcase their work in dance, theatre, spoken word, music and visual arts. Rapper Desiigner—a.k.a. Panda—will headline the event, with opening act Ravyn Lenae. 11 a.m.–7:30 p.m., free, Millennium Park, 201 E. Randolph St., (312) 742-1168, for festival updates visit cityofchicago.org Cortadito 2018 Witness the Gene Siskel Film Center’s first-ever short film showcase, featuring the best submissions by Chicago-based

Latinx and Afro-Latinx filmmakers. Presented by the Center’s Panorama Latinx outreach initiative, this compilation features work by filmmakers from Cuba, Mexico, Puerto Rico, Venezuela, Colombia, Argentina and more. 7:15 p.m., Gene Siskel Film Center, 164 N. State St., (312) 846-2800, tickets available soon at siskelfilmcenter.org

September 23

Illustrations: A Gallery Concert Throughout its history, opera has celebrated great singers who can move audiences to tears. The Goodman Theatre kicks off its Chicago Opera Theater season with this program, celebrating the contributions of African American singers to opera. Led by visual artist and opera singer Luther Lewis, the concert also features singers Vince Wallace, Carl Alexander and Joelle Lamarre, and pianist Keith Hampton. 3 p.m. and 7 p.m., $20, Goodman Theatre, 170 N. Dearborn St., (312) 443-3800, goodmantheatre.org World Music Festival meets World Dumpling Festival The World Dumpling Festival celebrates diverse cultures throughout the world with cultural performances, art and—of course—dumplings. Now partnered with the World Music Festival, Dumpling Festival will present an all-ages festival at Chicago’s Navy Pier. Performance highlights include music from the Congo, Guadeloupe and China. Vendors will have art, food and other cultural goods will be available for purchase. 1–7:30 p.m., Navy Pier’s Polk Bros Park, free admission, 600 E. Grand Ave., (312) 5957437, chicagoculturalalliance.org

Opera Insider: La boheme Are you new to opera? Do you want to know more about the opera you love? Join opera expert and music historian David Buch at the Civic Opera House to discuss the creation of opera. Participants also get behind-the-scenes information from a member of the Lyric’s Technical Department. See the set, costume design and stagecraft of the Lyric’s coming season up close! 10 a.m., $45, Civic Opera House, 20 N. Wacker Drive, (312) 8275600, lyricopera.org

September 27

The Whisky Extravaganza The Whisky Extravaganza has been working to spread a broad appreciation of whisky and its complexities by connecting consumers to new brands. Attend whisky tastings and masterclasses led by current industry experts. 5:30–10 p.m., $50–175, The Union League Club, 65 W. Jackson Blvd., (312) 427-7800, ulcc.org

September 28

Fall Fest Embrace autumn by picking the perfect pumpkin at Lincoln Park Zoo’s fourth annual Fall Fest. This family-friendly celebration offers a hay mountain to climb, professional pumpkin carvers and musical entertainment. Ticketed attractions include a Ferris wheel, corn maze, and inflatable obstacle course. Fridays– Sundays until Oct. 28, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. (closes at 8 p.m. on Saturday nights), free admission ($3 per ride ticket), Lincoln Park Zoo, 2001 N. Clark St., (312) 7421000, lpzoo.org

SEPTEMBER RACES Get Your Rear in Gear 5K run/walk and kids run 8 a.m., Saturday, September 8 Montrose Harbor Run Mag Mile 10K/5K 7 a.m., Saturday, September 8 Grant Park St Jude 5K run/walk 9:30 a.m., Saturday, September 8 Soldier Field SEA Blue Prostate Cancer walk/run 8 a.m., Sunday, September 9 Lincoln Park Race Judicata 5K run/walk 6:30 p.m., Thursday, September 13 Avery Field Faith and Fitness 5k/10k 9 a.m., Saturday, September 15 Jackson Park 911 Heroes Run 5K/1mile 9:11 a.m., Sunday, September 16 3100 S. Lakeshore Drive MMRF 5K 9 a.m., Sunday, September 16 Montrose Beach Ready to Run 20 miler 6:30 a.m., Sunday, September 16 Montrose Beach Candy Dash 5K/kids run 8 a.m., Saturday, September 22 Lincoln Park

September 25 Grant Park Advisory Council Organization Meeting Each year, the Grant Park Advisory Council (GPAC) makes decisions about the Park, its event programming and infrastructure initiatives. Chicagoans who are fans of Grant Park and its events can participate in GPAC activities and even run to be on its Board of Directors. 6 p.m., free, Maggie Daley Park, 337 E. Randolph St., maggiedaleypark.com

than $13 million to invest in researching ALS and caring for those living with it. 9:30 a.m., free registration Soldier Field, 1410 Museum Campus Drive, (312) 2357000, register at ALSwalkforlife.org

AIDS 5K/10K run/walk Chicago 10:35 a.m., Sunday, September 23 Soldier Field

September 29

ALS Walk For Life With more than 7,000 participants each year, the Les Turner ALS Foundation’s Walk For Life is one of the community’s largest gatherings. Starting at Soldier Field, walk in teams along the Chicago lakefront while enjoying food, entertainment, and children’s activities. Throughout its 16-year history, it has raised more

Chicago Half Marathon 13.1/5K 7 a.m., Sunday, September 23 Hyde Park Chicago 10 Mile 8 a.m., Saturday, September 29 Grant Park Close the Loop 5K 7 a.m., Sunday, September 30 Lincoln Park


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Streeterville News September 2018  

Hidden Gems of Streeterville, Soar first responders event, Adam Traore Doorperson of the Month, Chicago Tribune new offices, Streeterville P...

Streeterville News September 2018  

Hidden Gems of Streeterville, Soar first responders event, Adam Traore Doorperson of the Month, Chicago Tribune new offices, Streeterville P...

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