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Annual Report 2013 Newbury Elementary School

Annual  Report  2013   For  the  Period  of  July  1,  2012  through   June  30,  2013  


Newbury Elementary School

Annual Report 2013

A NNUA L R E P O R T O F T H E B O A R D O F SCH O O L D I R E CT O R S For The

T O W N SCH O O L D I ST R I CT Of

NE W B UR Y , V E R M O NT

Year  Ending  June  30,  2013  

The Newbury Board of School Directors ensures equal employment, educational opportunities, and affirmative action regardless of race, color, creed, handicap, national origin, age, or sex in compliance with all federal laws.

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Newbury Elementary School

Annual Report 2013

TABLE OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS .................................................................................................................................................... 2 FAST FACTS ........................................................................................................................................................................ 4 NEWBURY ELEMENTARY SCHOOL ................................................................................................................................................................. 4 NEWBURY SCHOOL DISTRICT BOARD OF DIRECTORS ............................................................................................................................... 4 WARNING ........................................................................................................................................................................... 5 NEWBURY TOWN SCHOOL DISTRICT ........................................................................................................................ 6 ANNUAL MEETING ......................................................................................................................................................... 6 STAFF EDUCATION ......................................................................................................................................................... 7 SUPPORT STAFF EDUCATION ...................................................................................................................................... 9 SCHOOL DIRECTORS REPORT .................................................................................................................................... 10 SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS REPORT ............................................................................................................. 14 OESU OFFICE PERSONNEL .......................................................................................................................................... 16 PRINCIPAL REPORT ....................................................................................................................................................... 18 TWO YEAR SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLAN ............................................................................................................ 21 STRATEGIC PLAN ............................................................................................................................................................23 KINDERGARTEN .............................................................................................................................................................26 GRADE 1 .............................................................................................................................................................................27 GRADE 2 .............................................................................................................................................................................28 GRADE 3 .............................................................................................................................................................................30 GRADE 4 .............................................................................................................................................................................32 GRADE 5 .............................................................................................................................................................................34 GRADE 6 .............................................................................................................................................................................36 HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION .....................................................................................................................37 THE ARTS (MUSIC, VISUAL ART, DRAMA) .................................................................................................................38 SPECIAL EDUCATION DEPARTMENT .......................................................................................................................39 READING RECOVERY AND READING INTERVENTION COACH .......................................................................40 ENRICHMENT PROGRAM .............................................................................................................................................42 STUDENT COUNCIL .......................................................................................................................................................44 CLIF GRANT -“THE YEAR OF THE BOOK” ...............................................................................................................45 GUIDANCE ........................................................................................................................................................................46 SCHOOL NURSES.............................................................................................................................................................48 MATH COACHING ...........................................................................................................................................................49 JOHN SANBORN LIBRARY & TECHNOLOGY ........................................................................................................... 51 SCHOOL LUNCH ROOM ................................................................................................................................................53 FRIENDS OF NEWBURY ELEMENTARY SCHOOL ..................................................................................................54

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Newbury Elementary School

Annual Report 2013

NES FACILITIES COMMITTEE .....................................................................................................................................56 NECAPS ..............................................................................................................................................................................57 ANNUAL TOWN SCHOOL DISTRICT MEETING MINUTES ...................................................................................65 NEWBURY SCHOOL DISTRICT ENROLLMENT .......................................................................................................68 NEWBURY ELEMENTARY SCHOOL ...............................................................................................................................................................68 OXBOW HIGH SCHOOL ..................................................................................................................................................................................68 FOOD SERVICE REPORT ...............................................................................................................................................69 CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT REPORT ............................................................................................................................70 WELLS SCHOLARSHIP FUND ....................................................................................................................................... 71 CONSOLIDATED FEDERAL PROGRAM FY13 ............................................................................................................72 2011-2012 FUND BALANCE ..............................................................................................................................................73 EXPENDITURE BUDGET...............................................................................................................................................74 ESTIMATED TAX WORKSHEET ...................................................................................................................................85 THREE PRIOR YEARS COMPARISON .........................................................................................................................86 COMPARATIVE DATA FOR COST -EFFECTIVENESS ..............................................................................................87 EXPENDITURE BUDGET SUMMARY ..........................................................................................................................88 REVENUE & EXPENSE REPORTS ...............................................................................................................................89 LOCAL AUDITORS REPORT ..........................................................................................................................................90

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Newbury Elementary School

Annual Report 2013

FAST FACTS Newbury Elementary School 214 Pulaski Street PO B0x 68, Newbury VT 05051 Phone: 802-866-5621 / Fax 802-866-3345 Web Site: www.nesvt.org Principal

Chance Lindsley

Secretary

Nikki Tomlinson

School Nurses

Casey Doerner Carla Horniak

Special Educators

Miriam Ainsworth Theresa Bonasera Heather Prest Elizabeth Nadeau

Guidance Counselor

Sara Wilmot

Newbury School District Board of Directors Paul Jewett (Chairman)

Danielle Corti

Heather Fischer

719 Old School House Road

2794 Snake Road

371 Old School House Road

South Ryegate VT 05069

Newbury VT 05051

South Ryegate VT 05069

802-584-3088

802-274-4279

802-584-3305

Orange East Supervisory Union Don Johnson, Superintendent PO Box 396 Bradford VT 05033

Phone: 802-222-5216 / Fax: 802-222-4451

Lunch Program Costs for 2012-2013 Breakfast Lunch Milk

Full- $1.25 Full-$2.50 $.35

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Reduced-$.30 Reduced-$.40 (No Reduced Price for Milk)


Newbury Elementary School

WARNING

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Annual Report 2013


Newbury Elementary School

Annual Report 2013

NEWBURY TOWN SCHOOL DISTRICT ANNUAL MEETING Newbury Village Hall Thursday, May 2, 2013 7:30PM BUDGET INFORMATIONAL MEETING Newbury Village Hall Tuesday, April 30th, 2013 6:00PM VOTING BY AUSTRALIAN BALLOT Articles Town Office Building Thursday, May 2, 2013 10:00AM - 7:00PM NEWBURY TOWN SCHOOL DIRECTORS NEWBURY

OXBOW

Paul Jewett 2014

Vicky Carson 2013

Danielle Corti 2015

Bill Ellithorpe 2014

Heather Fischer

Kathleen Damon 2015

2013 (appointed to finish out Janet Mitchell’s term)

AUDITORS

MODERATOR

TREASURE

Jane Labun 2013

Scott Labun

Mary Collins

Stephen Gale 2014 Marvin Harrison 2015

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Newbury Elementary School

Annual Report 2013

STAFF EDUCATION Superintendent

Don Johnson

B.S.

Boston University

M. Ed.

Lesley College

M.B.A

Plymouth State College

B.A.

Eastern Nazarene College

M.Ed.

Johnson State College

Professional Staff Special Educator

Miriam Ainsworth

Second Grade

Jennifer Barber

B.A.

Castleton State College

Special Educator

Theresa Bonasera

B.A.

Potsdam College

M.Ed.

University of Southern NH

First Grade

Andrea Dennis

B.S.

Lyndon State College

Nurse

Casey Doerner

B.S.

Norwich University

Fifth Grade

Jeffrey Goodell

B.S.

Lyndon State College

Math Coach

Nancy Goodrich

B.A.

University of New Hampshire

Enrichment

Kimberly Goody

B.S.

Univeristy of New Hampshire

M.Ed.

Antioch University

Nurse

Carla Horniak

A.D.N.

Castleton State College

Third Grade

Kelley Houde

B.S.

Green Mountain College

M.Ed.

University of Southern NH

B.S.

University of New Hampshire

M.Ed.

University of New Hampshire

B.S.

Keene State College

M.Ed.

Plymouth State College

B.A.

Purdue University

M.Ed.

Valparaiso University

B.S.

Lyndon State College

B.S.

University of Maine

B.S.

Plymouth State College

Literacy Art/Music Principal Special Educator P.E./Health

Amy Kinder Carol LeBarron Chance Lindsley Elizabeth Nadeau Cameron Prest

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Newbury Elementary School

Speech Pathologist

Language Heather Prest

Annual Report 2013

M.Ed.

University of Southern NH

B.S.

Elmira College

M.Ed.

College of Saint Rose

Librarian/Technology

Laura Storm

B.A.

Saint Cloud State University

Sixth Grade

Pamela Taylor

B.A.

Boston University

M.Ed.

University of Vermont

Kindergarten

Lisa Ulrich

B.S.

Lyndon State College

Fourth Grade

Neil White

B.A.

Johnson State College

Guidance Counselor

Sara Wilmot

B.A.

Johnson State College

First Grade Team

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Newbury Elementary School

Annual Report 2013

Support Staff Education Special Education Aide

Jennifer Allen

Special Education Aide

Mary Lou Boyce

Hot Lunch Agent

Dorothy Dodge

Special Education Aide

Walter Fischer

Assoc.

Lebanon College

LNA

Riverbend Technical Center

Classroom Aide

Roberta Jewett

B.S.

Bridgewater State College

Enrichment Aide

Ruth Kennedy

B.A.

Wilson College

Special Education Aide

Cynthia "Dee Dee" Leete

Custodian

David Longmoore

Special Education Aide

Cathy Munkelwitz

Special Education Aide

Philip Munkelwitz

Classroom Aide

Elizabeth Nadeau

B.A.

Lyndon State College

Hot Lunch Assistant

Susan Redmond

Special Education Aide

Nancy Rhoads

Special Education Aide

Connie Smith

Secretary/Registrar

Nikki Tomlinson

Assoc.

Champlain College

Special Education Aide

Julia Trask

Special Education Aide

Jessica Tuttle

Special Education Aide

Audrey Villarreal

Special Education Aide

Sandra Wassell

Special Education Aide

Joi Winchell

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Newbury Elementary School

Annual Report 2013

SCHOOL DIRECTORS REPORT The Board feels that this is an excellent opportunity to celebrate the past, present and future of Newbury Elementary School. This year (2013) represents the confluence of two major events in the history of the town- the 250th anniversary of the incorporation of the town of Newbury and the 100th anniversary of the elementary school. As board members, we believe that our association with N.E.S. comes at a very special time in its history. The students coming through the front door every day are receiving the benefits of an outstanding principal, staff, facility and grounds. Through the guidance of a thoughtful and comprehensive team vision, Chance Lindsley leads the staff in addressing the “whole person” while helping all children meet their potential. The teaching staff at N.E.S. has done a tremendous job of expanding their attributes to reach all students through a variety of teaching/learning methods. Children have gained a greater appreciation of why they are learning and how to apply this for greater and long lasting results. The state of Vermont has signed on to begin a new student learning standard tool called “Common Core” which will begin in year 2014. These standards will be used throughout the United States, and will replace the N.E.C.A.P testing, that has previously been used in New England, with the S.B.A.C. (Smarter Balance Assessment Consortium). The good news is that the blue print for the Common Core assessment, the S.B.A.C., has many similarities to the N.E.C.A.P. testing. This will shorten the learning curve for both teachers and students alike. One aspect of concern for N.E.S is that the assessment has to be taken on the computer. This presents two basic problems that need addressing in the near future: buying the necessary computers, and insuring all students are prepared to use them. Though these requirements are coming from Washington D.C., the funding for their implementation is not! Principal Lindsley and the board are struggling to come up with the necessary funding to address these issues. Affording very expensive technology in the classroom that is a real value to both the teachers and students is a major task. Combine this with technology’s very short shelf life due to the constant changing and upgrading in the industry, the board quickly realized the need for a comprehensive technology plan. Principal Lindsley, Laurie Storm, selective staff members of N.E.S. and Orange East Supervisory Union are collaborating on a regular basis to meet this challenge and make recommendations to the board.

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Newbury Elementary School

Annual Report 2013

Other budget challenges the board is facing this year are as follows: 1.

A 10% cut in combined federal programs grant funding, which represents

approximately $31,000. These funds have been used in the areas of math and literacy to help ensure that all students are keeping up with rigorous educational requirements. 2.

Health insurance premium costs have risen 10.7% over last years.

3.

Special Education costs exceeded the budget by approximately thirty thousand

dollars, due to the discovery of additional students’ needs after the 2012/13 budget was voted on. 4.

The contractual salary increase of 2% for both the teachers and Para educators.

As a result of the audit for the Newbury School District ending 6/30/2012, a surplus of $128,904.00 has been reported. After much discussion by the Board and the finance committee, the decision has been made to put the amount of $113,904.00 to reduce taxes and the rest to cover the lunch program deficit. These actions will result in an overall 1.55% increase in expenditures (after the surplus has been applied). Special thanks*A heartfelt thanks goes out to Janet Mitchell for her dedication, wisdom countless efforts and hours as a board member from May 2001 until June 2012! Janet’s ability to charter N.E.S. through some difficult financial storms was invaluable. Her desire to ensure that all students receive a well-rounded and positive educational experience at N.E.S. will long be remembered by those who had the pleasure of working with her. * The voters of Newbury who have had the fortitude and commitment to support our educational institution that enables all children to be the best they can be. This trust must be highly valued by all who work at N.E.S. *Principal Chance Lindsley has done an outstanding job in his second year in the position. His strong leadership, which is derived from a solid base of trust, professionalism, and compassion is paving the way for great things at N.E.S. for many years to come. *The staff at N.E.S. –Thank you for the spectrum of efforts you make every day to ensure a safe, nurturing and challenging learning environment, also for your understanding, flexibility and creativity

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Newbury Elementary School

Annual Report 2013

to meet the challenges in education. *The Special Education staff for there “Herculean effort” to manage scheduling and time studies for special education students at N.E.S. *Friends of Newbury Elementary School (F.O.N.E.S.) Group- whose efforts of compassion and organization show through in all of the many functions, fundraisers and much more that they do. Thank you F.O.N.E.S members: Karen & Karl Nueubauer, Allison Andrews, Ann Fredella, Barbara & Michael Heffernan, Ashley Battis, Eileen McKnelly, Beate & Kevin Kane, Liz Craig, Laurie Glaude, Liz Drugach, Penny Taylor, Danielle Corti, and Susan Goodell! *The Maintenance Committee- The committee was formed at the suggestion of attendees at the school’s annual meeting to focus on a comprehensive plan for upkeep and repairs over the next 10 years. The Board would like to thank the following members for their time and effort over the last year: Craig Hervey, Claude Phipps, Dan Corti and Chance Lindsley. *The Common Committee- the Board would like to express its gratitude to the following individuals for their time and energy: Jeff Page, Jane Labun, Ken Rower, Chance Lindsley, Paul Fredella, Martha Griswold and Dave McKnelly. The Future direction/mission of the Common Committee is being discussed between the school board and common members. *The Finance Committee-the Board is very grateful for the time, thoughtful questions, ideas and historic perspective generated by this group. Figuring out the complex path of school financing these days, is a daunting task made much easier to understand by the following individuals: Janet Mitchell, Marvin Harrison, Fred Clements, Lynn Carpenter, Don Johnson, Chance Lindsley, and Mary Collins. *Parents of N.E.S. students- We need your continued help and support to assure that your child is ready to come to school each day prepared to be engaged in a safe and collaborative learning community. PLEASE take an ACTIVE INTEREST in what and how your child is doing in school and don’t hesitate to contact N.E.S is you have any questions, ideas or concerns. *Orange East Supervisory Union, O.E.S.U. - The board would like to thank Don Johnson and his staff at O.E.S.U. for their support of N.E.S. In particular we appreciate the efforts of Beth Cobb (Strategic Planning and Common Committee) and Katrina Meigs (Para agreements).

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Newbury Elementary School

Annual Report 2013

As you have read the above report, you can see countless good things are happening on a daily basis at N.E.S. The school and all who is a part of it hold a special place in the hearts and minds of the town of Newbury. Looking back for 100 years there were many accomplishments, challenges and memories. We all look forward to many more in the future.

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Newbury Elementary School

Annual Report 2013

SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS REPORT

Town of Newbury School District Don Johnson As the Superintendent of Schools for the Orange East Supervisory Union (OESU), I continue to embrace the challenges and opportunities found in a multi-district rural supervisory union. This past year, we were all devastated by the tragic news from a public school in Connecticut. Our hearts and prayers are with the children, families, staff and community impacted by this senseless event. In response to this recent school shooting, and the arrest of a teacher at Oxbow High School this past fall, we have all focused our attention on school safety.

Administrators, teachers, parents, and

community need to work together to ensure the social, emotional and physical well-being of each and every student. It is critical that students feel safe when they enter our schools. I want to invite anyone with concerns related to the safety of our students in the OESU community to meet with me and share those concerns, or to ask any questions. While we continue to confirm that we are doing all we can to ensure safety issues, our primary focus and purpose will continue to be addressing all of the educational needs of our students. We have continued to provide professional development for our staff which supports their collaborative work as Teacher Learning Communities, and have provided skills and knowledge that will assist our teachers in improving the learning environments of our students and help them address the new national Common Core Standards. This year we have begun to stabilize the staffing at the OESU to best serve the district. Our newest team members include a Business Administrator, receptionist and staff accountant. As we did last year, we have included expanded OESU information in your annual report including a list of the OESU staff. The top priority goal remains that to assure an efficient, transparent and stable financial management system. It continues to be a true pleasure to serve the students, teachers, and community of Newbury. I have been asked, “What motivates someone to take on a superintendency?� For me, it has been the

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Newbury Elementary School opportunity to collaborate with a community of teachers and learners.

Annual Report 2013

Overseeing the positive

continuing evolution of the OESU and our students from pre-K classrooms through high school is an honor. As I work to overcome the continual challenges and staggering tasks faced each day, especially during these economically and socially challenging times, I glean satisfaction from seeing the encouraging results of our great learning communities every day in every classroom. Respectfully submitted, Don Johnson Superintendent

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Newbury Elementary School

Annual Report 2013

OESU OFFICE PERSONNEL FTE NAME

Position

Don Johnson

Superintendent

Beth Cobb Sandra Stanley Lynne Carpenter Katrina Meigs Lucy Geising Sherry Hoyt

Assist. Superintendent Director of Student Services Business Administrator Director of Human Resources

FTE

(Full Time Funded by FTE Funded Equivalent) Assessment Grants or other 1.0 1.0 1.0

.12

.23 Title I .65 Title IIA

1.0

.35

.65 IDEAB

1.0

1.0

.85

.85 1.0 21st Century Grant

21st Century 1.0 Program Director Administrative Assistant

1.0

1.0

Grants Administrative Audrey Conrad

Assistant

.18 CFP Grant .67

.49 Indirect Funds

Assistant Director of Jen Andrews

Student Services

.55

.11

Jenn Chaffee

Staff Accountant

1.0

1.0

Marge Audet

Staff Accountant

1.0

1.0

Rose Harris

Staff Accountant

1.0

1.0

TBD

Staff Bookkeeper

.5

.5

Linda Eggleston

Medicaid Clerk

.5

.44 IDEAB

.5 Medicaid

Receptionist, Student Karen Schwarz

Services Support

1.0

.84

.16 IDEAB .40 IDEAB

Sharon Beaufait

ECP Teacher

by

1.0

.40

.20 CFP Grant .50 CFP Grant

Kristen Cosgrove

ECP Teacher

1.0

.25

.25 IDEAB

Erin Pellegrino

ECP Teacher

1.0

.60

.40 IDEAB

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Newbury Elementary School

Annual Report 2013

.30 CPF Grant Hope Hutchins

ECP Teacher

.6

Roberta Kaplow

ECP Teacher

1.0

.30 IDEAB .50

.50 IDEAB

.80 BES Corrie Rilling

SLP

1.0

.20 WRVS .20 BES .20 NES

Rowell, Robin TOTALS

ELL Teacher

0.55

.15 OHS

19.22

12.07

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Newbury Elementary School

Annual Report 2013

PRINCIPAL REPORT Chance Lindsley Bob Dylan said it best when he sang, “The times they are a changing”! And wow, are they ever! Education is in the midst of several changes that are both frustrating and exciting at the same time. I would like to tip my hat to the staff here at NES for keeping a balanced, student-centered perspective as the Federal and State governments wrestle with their policies. I would also like to acknowledge the staff for their incredible focus, work ethic, commitment, and perseverance. They do an amazing job balancing immediate student needs with high quality professional practices around curriculum, assessment, and instruction. They never lose sight of what’s most important, children. The teachers work hard to build a solid culture of kindness, respect, and safety in their classrooms and you can see it through student attitudes. Every morning, the children run into the school with smiles and excitement for the warm classroom climate and engaging lessons that their teachers have planned. While we are very proud of our students and our warm culture of respect, we are working hard to improve our test scores. We are looking at our present systems of assessments and working to better align ourselves to the new standards, called “The Common Core”. We are also focused on how to better prepare our students for the new on-line state assessment, called the “SBAC” (Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium). The “Smarter Balanced Assessment” will not only replace NECAPS in 2015, but will also be taken on-line. We’re doing everything in our power to ensure that the kids are prepared and, at the same time, keep costs minimal. The teachers have been working hard to stay informed, adjust their instruction, and be present for the children on a daily basis. We have continued attending Common Core workshops and we’re keeping up with information about the SBAC as it is released. As we work toward these goals, we are taking care to keep respect and kindness at the center of all our decisions. After all, the curriculum, assessments, and technology will continue to change but the basics of humanity and working together endure.

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Newbury Elementary School

Annual Report 2013

Here’s A Snap-Shot Of What We’ve Been Up To: *First, we’ve been rehearsing and improving our safety measures by practicing evacuation and lock-down drills, firming up our visitor pass/ sign-in/out system, and communicating about scenarios. Thanks to our Crisis Committee and Dan Martin, NES is a safer place. *Second , the staff has developed and implemented NEST, the Newbury Educational Support Team, to make sure no kids fall through the cracks academically, behaviorally, or emotionally. Because of this system and the teachers’ hard work, every single student who is struggling has a specific plan in place. *Third , Our Special Ed Teachers have done an amazing job tightening our schedules to make sure we’re serving the kids to the best of our ability without having any extra time unaccounted for. In fact, the director of Special Ed, Sandy Stanley, made a special point of complimenting us on our thoroughness and focused eyes in regards to our use of paraprofessional support for kids with high needs. *Fourth , the Para-professionals have been shining their light on Responsive Classroom throughout the school. Besides for helping guide the kids throughout the day, they’ve also been meeting bi-weekly and leading the charge for their own professional development. They’ve held book studies, created presentations, and presented to each other as a group. Because of their collaboration with teachers and each other, communication in the school has improved, which helps us better serve the kids. *Fifth , we’re actively researching and discussing multi-age classrooms.

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Newbury Elementary School

Annual Report 2013

*Sixth , we continue to collaborate with FoNES, the incredible parent group who is the wind beneath our wings. Not only do they do incredible things for NES, but the manner in which they volunteer makes our school a brighter place. Their smiles, positive, flexible attitudes, and light-hearted humor help everything run more smoothly. They’re always in search of more volunteers so please stop by if you’re interested. *Seventh , we have several committees in process, which include; the arts committee, the wellness committee, professional development committee, technology committee, financial committee, facilities committee, crisis committee, and our sunshine committee. *Eighth , the school board has, again, worked tirelessly to keep everything in check. They’ve sat for countless hours reviewing the budget, asking difficult questions, and making sure we’re all doing our best to keep costs as low as possible while serving students to the best of our ability. This is a very difficult balance at times and I would like to thank them for all of the time and support they provide for NES. The list goes on and on but we’ve certainly taken big steps along the path of our Strategic Plan and should be proud of our school and community. Next year, Beth Cobb, with support from the administrative team and staff feedback, is leading us deeper into Project-based learning, Service learning, and Backward by Design. We’re all excited about this shift because it will help us all get our hands dirty, connect even more to the community, and increase our academic rigor. In spite of the changes and turbulence throughout our educational system, Newbury Elementary is shining bright because of you, your kids, and this incredible staff. Again, call or stop by if you have any questions, concerns, or compliments about NES. Respectfully, Chance Lindsley NES Principal

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Newbury Elementary School

Goal 1

Annual Report 2013

TWO YEAR SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLAN

Implement and use research based instructional strategies to improve student learning and achievement. According to current math NECAP assessment data 47% of our 3 – 6 meet the standard; we will increase this by 10%. According to current reading NECAP assessment data 59% of 3 – 6 meet the standard: we will increase this by 10%. Objectives: 1.1 Supervisory Union will provide Assessment for Learning PD opportunities to all teachers (22 hours). Teachers will continue learning assessment strategies and refining instruction through monthly Teacher Learning Communities. 1.2 Supervisory Union will provide Assessment for Learning Teacher Leader training throughout the year. 1.3 Principal will support teachers with the new learning. 1.4 Peer observation will focus on assessment for learning strategies. 1.5 Continue and assure the continuity with responsive classroom strategies. Goal 2 To improve student achievement we will develop and implement a clearly defined curriculum and assessment plan that is vertically aligned According to current math NECAP assessment data 47% of our 3 – 6 meet the standard; we will increase this by 10%. According to current reading NECAP assessment data 59% of 3 – 6 meet the standard: we will increase this by 10%. Objectives: 2.1 To develop common core awareness among the staff at NES. 2.2 Define mathematic essential learning expectations at each grade level K – 6. 2.3 Implement benchmark literacy assessments 3 – 6. 2.4 Implement benchmark assessments in mathematics K-6. 2.5 Ensure continuity and equitable instruction in the area of literacy. 2.6 Supervisory Union will offer an Early Numeracy Course Winter/Spring 2012.

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Newbury Elementary School

Annual Report 2013

Goal 3 To improve student achievement NES will provide opportunities for parents and community members to engage in the teaching and learning process According to current math NECAP assessment data 47% of our 3 – 6 meet the standard; we will increase this by 10%. According to current reading NECAP assessment data 59% of 3 – 6 meet the standard: we will increase this by 10%. Objectives: 3.1 NES will work with PIRC through the Supervisory Union membership to make a plan on how to better engage parents develop a partnership between the families, community and the school. 3.2 To involve parents and community in the school’s mission of creating a culture of life-long learning: Over the course of 5 years increase parent involvement to 50%. 3.3 Strengthen communication of student achievement, curriculum and assessments. 3.4 Educate parents on literacy and math strategies so that they can support their children at home. Goal 4 To improve student achievement teachers will use student data and evidence of learning to plan and implement math and literacy interventions. According to current math NECAP assessment data 47% of our 3 – 6 meet the standard; we will increase this by 10%. According to current reading NECAP assessment data 59% of 3 – 6 meet the standard: we will increase this by 10%. Objectives: 4.1 NES will implement a school-wide data team to look at student data on a regular basis. 4.2 NES will develop and implement and an assessment plan in the areas of math and literacy. 4.3 NES will implement an intervention for students in need K – 6. 4.4 NES will use Vermont Comprehensive Assessment Tool (VCAT) as a progress monitoring tool. 4.5 NES will extend the learning day to offer tutoring, afterschool enrichment, summer school and vacation school.

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Newbury Elementary School

Annual Report 2013

STRATEGIC PLAN 2011-2016 Strategic Plan Goal #1:

Establish high-quality, research-based teaching and learning

practices to continually improve achievement for all learners *Instructional decisions and early intervention based on regular on-going assessment *Create an inquiry based culture that engages the full range of learners and is based on a solid foundation of basic skills and concepts *Target professional development based on Best Practices and assessed needs *Implement the Common Core Standards and aligning them to the curriculum *Explore and research multiage classroom Strategic Plan Goal #2:

To get parents and community involved in the school’s mission of

creating a culture of life-long learning (Within 5 years increase parent involvement to 50%) *Teachers and Friends of Newbury Collaborate to increase parent and community involvement. *Increase communication with community/families/school *Increase volunteerism *Parental trainings: academics and parenting skills

Strategic Plan Goal #3:

Increase opportunities in diversity and cultural experiences

through the performing arts program. *Form an active arts committee consisting of staff, parents, and community members *Research and inquire about sharing performing arts staff with school in the OESU Strategic Plan Goal #4:

The principal, school board and OESU Central Office

Administrators work as a team to provide leadership for continuous growth that is transparent, transformative and effective. *Provide mentoring for new principal, teachers or to teachers when moving to a new grade

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Newbury Elementary School

Annual Report 2013

*Effective goal setting between superintendent and principal that is shared with board and when appropriate shared with parents and community *OESU business office will keep accurate records, in a timely manner, while being transparent *Continue Finance committee with NES and OESU *Central Office will actively pursue all funding sources *Re-establish credibility and good communication between all stakeholders

Strategic Plan Goal #5:

Provide students and staff with increased and relevant

opportunities to access technology that enhances current and life-long learning *Create an active Technology Committee *Provide professional development opportunities for staff in the area of technology and implement a system to check for understanding and comfort level of teachers. *Research funding opportunities for technology needed *Increase access and availability of technology (inventory what is current and what is needed and create a technology plan) *Personnel- trained and highly skilled- upkeep (equipment updates) *Implement a technology curriculum across grade levels K-6 (technology GE’s and skills)

Strategic Plan Goal #6: Promote student and family health, wellness, and fitness. *Collaborate with the recreation department *Provide or be a resource for families *Provide more physical fitness time for the students

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Newbury Elementary School Strategic Plan Goal #7:

Annual Report 2013

Provide financially and educationally sound strategies that

include best practices to best meet the needs for our diverse population. *Co-teaching *Goals aligned with standards (understand the Grade Level Expectations and Common Core Standards) *Have a special education audit done for Newbury (para vs. professionals serving students) *Prepare for centralizing services *Provide opportunities for paraprofessional trainings *Revisit the process of referrals prior to interventions, Educational Support Teams, etc.‌ *Define/find the alternatives when inclusion is not appropriate *Look at other special education models in Vermont *Have a clear understanding of how Special Education funding works and why (Are we getting full potential of funds?) *Research additional funding sources.

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Newbury Elementary School

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KINDERGARTEN Mrs. Ulrich’s

Children are sponges and they learned an incredible amount of knowledge through our many themed units of study. To engage our minds and our interests, each month (or thereabouts) we center our learning on a particular theme. For example, one of our themes was ‘apples’. We learned apple vocabulary words, how many different kinds of apples there are, and the different kinds of things you can make with them, did apple crafts, and made applesauce… yum!. The children especially love it when our songs and books connect to our themes. Themed units of study have proven to engage student learning and focus my teaching while simultaneously hitting all curriculum areas. These youngsters have worked so hard to move through our various learning opportunities this year and music and movement has been key in our learning and development. The connection between music and learning is essential to young minds and there has been no shortage of fun songs this year. Literacy time begins with an interactive read-aloud followed by stations in which students complete focused tasks pertaining to the story at their own learning pace. During math workshops, children rotate simultaneously through differentiated math activities at their developmental math stage. Throughout the year, students are curious about learning. I enjoy the challenge of making learning fun, engaging, and giving students something to connect their learning to. Being a model of life-long learning and creating memories for students has been a focus for this year to which the students experienced many opportunities to build the foundation of their educational experience.

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Newbury Elementary School

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GRADE 1

Andrea Dennis

Fantastic, funny, first grade friends spend much time fulfilling their dreams and building a strong foundation. First Grade is a place of learning, exploring, and soaring. We spend our day reading stories, sharing our thoughts, and making connections. We have met many great authors and have learned about their craft. We learned from Lois Ehlert about nature and from where authors get their ideas. We learned about history and strong beginnings from Patricia Polacco. Eric Carle taught us about sequencing, beginning, middle, and end. Tomie de Paola showed us parts of a story. We learned foreshadowing from Jan Brett. Pamela Duncan Edwards taught us about alliteration. M&M (Matthew the Mathematical Monkey) visits us during math class. Each day he learns a new number and that is the only number he can say. It is the students’ job to come up with number sentences that go with that number. We count, play games, and learn how numbers go together and how they can be taken apart. We are all mathematicians. We work on explaining our thinking to others and building our knowledge as learners. As Newbury’s 250th Birthday approaches, we are learning how to square dance. Mrs. Boyce is sharing her knowledge with us as we learn about our history. We also are learning old time games that our grandparents or great grandparents might have played. procedures to share with others. First grade is fundamental! (And Fun)

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We will learn how to write


Newbury Elementary School

Annual Report 2013

GRADE 2 Jen Barber

Second grade has had a busy year! In Reading, students completed weekly station sheets with learning intentions that reviewed skills like capitalization, parts of speech, comprehending non-fiction text, and creative writing. Guided reading groups were pulled during station work. This year, the small groups focused on strong book introductions, vocab discussions, comprehension conversations, and fluency. In Writing, second graders learned about different forms of writing, including poetry, narratives, informational reports, creative stories, and responses to literature. They used graphic organizers and adult support to create each of these writing pieces. Students practiced implementing correct grammar and went through the entire drafting process, down to typing up their responses to literature comparing the same fairytale. In Math, second graders have done a tremendous amount of thinking and hard work. We have had to change the depth of our curriculum as we get ready for the shift to Common Core Standards. We moved from working with numbers up to 100, to adding and subtracting within 1,000! Throughout the year, second graders have also expanded their understanding, flexibility, and automaticity with addition and subtraction combinations. Students practiced these combinations in number strings and story problems. They worked with 2-digit and 3-digit numbers. They solved addition and subtraction problems with counting cubes, sticker models, the hundred chart, and an open number line. Other math units focused on were studying two-dimensional and 3-dimensional shapes, fractions, measurement, and different types of graphs. In Science, the four main topics second grade learned about were plants, space, and weather. In our plant unit, students learned about the life cycle of a plant, how plants make food, and why plants are important. In our space unit, second graders defined what a solar system was and studied each of the planets. They kept a logbook of all their information and reported out in groups about one planet. For weather, they learned about different kinds of precipitation and weather extremes (such as blizzards and tornadoes). In Social Studies, our class learned about the community of Newbury. It was a special year, with the town turning 250 years old! We took a walking tour to learn more about the history and businesses of our town. As a culminating project, we put everything we had learned into a Newbury

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Newbury Elementary School

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timeline. Come see it up in the hallway by the gym! In addition to community, second graders also practiced their map reading skills, and learned about famous people who changed the world. The students studied George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, Martin Luther King Jr., and Benjamin Franklin. They broke into groups, and made a poster for one specific person to hang on the classroom bulletin board. Along with academic subjects, second graders have been growing socially as well. They have been good helpers and active thinkers this year!

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Newbury Elementary School

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GRADE 3 Kelley Houde

If you were to poke your head into the third grade classroom at Newbury Elementary, you might catch a glimpse of students reading and discussing literature, children working at stations independently or in pairs to solve math problems, or the class taking part in a morning meeting. Throughout each of these activities the students are learning both socially and academically. While academics are key, community building is critical prior to any learning that takes place in the classroom. . Through the use of “Responsive Classroom Methodology�, things such as daily morning meetings, team building games, and student created rules for the classroom help students learn to take responsibility for their actions as well as their academic success. Academically, third grade is a year where students are expected to become more self-disciplined and independent in their learning. It also requires them to practice time management and cooperation as they work together to complete projects. These are all life long skills. In math some of the key academic concepts are using place value to solve multi-digit arithmetic, representing and solving problems related to multiplication and division, developing an understanding of fractions, representing and interpreting data and understanding the concepts of area and perimeter. Our Literacy blocks are comprised of whole group, small group and independent reading, word study skills, grammar, spelling, writing, and weekly vocabulary. This year’s science lessons have focused on biomes, six main systems of the human body, magnets and electricity and recycling. The recycling unit is directly related to preparing the students for fourth grade where recycling for the school is a community service project. In Social Studies, students have become world travelers. After learning to identify the 7 continents and 4 major oceans, the class has been learning about the culture, language, customs, and food that are unique to each of the 7 continents. Technology has played a large role in our learning as well. Due to the increase in technological support our class has been able to use computers to complete research, type word documents and support classroom curriculum through educational sites on line. This year in addition to our daily academics, the CLIF (literacy) grant has provided our class with some unique opportunities. The third grade has created a book trailer with a professional film crew, written poetry under the guidance of Vermont poet, Leland Kinsley, and we are currently working with Vermont author Natalie Kinsey-Warnock on researching family stories. The enthusiasm, growth and final products from these studies are amazing!

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Newbury Elementary School

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It has been exciting to watch this third grade class blossom both individually and as a whole. Overall this group is eager to learn, they welcome new challenges, and they take advantage of all that is offered to them here at Newbury Elementary. It has been a pleasure to teach and learn with them all this year.

Continent Poster Projects

Team Building Games

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Newbury Elementary School

Annual Report 2013

GRADE 4 Neil White

The year spent in fourth grade marks a turning point in a child’s educational career as they make the change from primary to intermediate education. Fourth grade students are asked to be responsible for, and independent in their learning. In order to do this, the students are required to express their thinking and ideas, both in a written and a verbal manner. Fourth grade curriculum places a strong emphasis on literacy and mathematics, and as a whole, requires the students to delve deeper with thought and exploration. To foster these analytical and critical skills, I strive to create a sense of community and security in the fourth grade classroom to help the students feel confident in making their ideas and thoughts known; whether those ideas are about book/movie comparisons or the way in which the Vermont landscape has changed over time. In a visit to the fourth grade classroom, you could find the students engaged in inquiry- based learning where they observe, make predictions, and conduct experiments to test for the presence of specific minerals in granite. You may also see the students using archaeological relics to make comparisons between tools used in the Paleo-Indian period to tools used in the 1860’s. Fourth grade marks a real shift in how students receive mathematical information. Problems move from numeric to word based. The “Investigations” math program encourages student discovery and requires the students to prove their understanding of a concept by explaining their reasoning to the class. The literacy curriculum is differentiated in order to meet the specific needs of the individual student. For all students, literacy work involves writing, grammar, and spelling; as well as whole group, small group, and individual reading. We link our literacy work to other subjects like our close reads of science-related nonfiction texts, and our whole class involvement in a Reader’s Theater play based on an Abenaki legend. The fourth grade develops a sense of community service as they undertake the task of recycling for the whole school. This responsibility also links to our units in science and social studies.

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Newbury Elementary School

Annual Report 2013

Student progress is monitored through the use of formal assessments for every subject area, daily check-ins, and through annual state testing. This helps with curriculum planning on an individual, and whole class basis, to ensure that the students are ready for the next stage in their educational career.

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Newbury Elementary School

Annual Report 2013

GRADE 5 Jeff Goodell

Greetings from the land of fifth grade! As I reflect back on the year so far, trying to summarize what’s been happening, I keep coming up with the same word, “Busy!” It has been an incredibly busy year. I know we are not the only ones feeling this way because much of what’s made this year so busy to date has involved the whole school. In the midst of our busy and sometimes hectic schedule, there have been a few shining pearls gleaned from our experiences that are particularly noteworthy. In the beginning, August and September, we find ourselves mixing the mortar to build the classroom foundation that will support us throughout the year. This mortar consists of learning kindness in the way we approach and deal with each other through greetings, games, and activities. We also set up respectful guidelines to live by so we can all learn as much as possible. Well, in the gales of November on a chilly but sunny day, our class laid a few bricks on our foundation by simulating what Lewis and Clark might have experienced on their miraculous journey. The class, led by a group of peer leaders, portaged a canoe over a distance of a half-mile, including a tremendous hill (up and down). While there was groaning, huffing and puffing, and possibly a few complaints, the group succeeded and returned to school with broader understandings. They could write more accurately about what the explorers may have felt and experienced, but could also articulate what it was like to “take orders” and have to listen to each other. They realized that it took the whole team to accomplish their goal, with everyone playing a part. What a great analogy for other learning experiences and projects we face in our daily lives. Adding to our busyness, we tackled a CLiF “Year of the Book” event that created a book trailer about a favorite story we had shared in class (Frindle by Andrew Clements). From the outside this project may have appeared chaotic, and perhaps at times it was. But not only did the kids “analyze” the book, something we attempt to do with many books in other ways, by planning the trailer, they also pulled together for a common goal, shared responsibilities, and got to swell with pride as people clapped for them following the showing. Alas, out of the clamor comes authentic learning, real tasks that reinforce many skills and engage children. I think it was even fun! While the above only highlights a few of the events for fifth graders this year, they bring to light important ideas about learning. Engagement and student ownership, especially as students get older,

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Newbury Elementary School

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is one major key to success. We also continue to pursue reading, writing, social studies, science and, math knowledge on a daily basis. We are slowly learning, as teachers, how to integrate and contend with a changing set of standards, The Common Core. Little by little, daily lessons are being altered to meet the demands of how students will be assessed on the national level. Having engaged students can only bring positive results. With changes and busy schedules, it is important for us all to keep in mind what’s most important in our children’s education. Watching fifth graders work together and be excited about what they were learning has helped me keep my focus about this “Most important” piece. It may be busy, but the faces show it all. We are fortunate to be in this community with these students and our dedicated NES staff. Thank you! Sincerely, Jeff Goodell – Fifth Grade Teacher Phillip Munkelwitz and Connie Smith – Fifth Grade Para Professionals

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Newbury Elementary School

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GRADE 6 Pam Taylor

6th grade is such an exciting year! It always feels like a privilege, to take each class down the road of their last year at Newbury and deliver them to their first year of high school. Fraught with mixed emotions, they fluctuate between excitement and apprehension as the year barrels on towards that inevitable “ready or not” finish line! I feel their pain while observing the academic hurdles they encounter: more homework, juggling sports with homework and the ownership of their learning from previous grades. However, their gradual social growth and maturity provide a balance and sense of accomplishment, as they conquer each rough moment. In time, the measure of their confidence goes hand in hand with the measure of their ability as they realize their capabilities. Before long, they exhibit an open mind to taking on just about any task. It is always hard to see them go, but at the end of the year, it seems quite natural for each class. Socially, it’s time to branch out and meet new people and academically, they need to diversify: more teachers, a variety of classrooms, more responsibility, and time to sharpen their time management and organizational skills. It often seems as if they never look back, but I have a sense that they never forget the love and support they felt at Newbury Elementary School. They show it in their eyes when they stop in to visit!

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Newbury Elementary School

Annual Report 2013

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION Cameron Prest

This past year has been very busy. The students worked hard to show off their skills in an all school Circus performance this last spring. The FONES was a big part of its success and a big thank you to this group!! A wellness group was developed last year and offered many opportunities to the staff and community through a grant. Pilates, yoga and a relaxation of grounding were a few of the things offered. This year we have focused on the students as they have developed a group run by students called “Fuel up to Play 60”. We ran a Turkey Trot before thanksgiving with all students running a mile or mile in a half and all received rewards. They are currently setting up a food drive called “The Souper Bowl”. The idea is to have all students bring in one can of soup to donate to the local food shelf. The schedule for PE/Health is now in blocks. Two weeks of PE and one week of Health. This helps students retain the health information better as they have it 3 times that week instead of once a week. We have covered nutrition, dental hygiene, Peer pressure, how we are unique, puberty, fire safety, goal setting, decision-making, and tobacco units so far this year. In PE we have worked on our fitness, cooperation, loco-motor movement, team and individual activities, and lifelong skills. Our jump rope club has many students involved this year. As always you are welcome to come and visit the classroom or gym at any time!

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Newbury Elementary School

Annual Report 2013

THE ARTS (Music, Visual Art, Drama) Carol LeBarron

Creativity abounds with the students of Newbury Elementary. How lucky they are to be in a place where the arts are valued by the community and school. The December concert audience enjoyed songs sung by the students about winter and the holiday. The catchy tunes are written specifically for the voice range of elementary students and appropriately designed for learning about music. I begin each song with the sheet music in everyone’s hands. This way they learn how to read the music (theory) while at the same time learn the words, rhythms, melody, nuances of the voice and how to follow a conductor. Phew, there’s a lot that goes into learning a song! The children love singing them. Art has seen work in texture, color theory, line, space, portraits and the two favorites: felting and clay. As they build on their skills each year, it is a pleasure to see them incorporate skills from the previous years into their work. Drama is always an exciting time for the students. The grades each do something that integrates with something going on in the classroom. For example, the second graders are just beginning to create a play about their science topic, the solar system. To finish up the year, the focus will be creating visuals and music about the 100th year of the school building and the 250th year of the town. It’s a pleasure to teach the arts at Newbury Elementary. When I ask adults about their fondest memories of school, the arts always jump out with the same excitement as when they experienced it as a child. Be it singing, dancing, or playing an instrument in front of an audience the arts stay with us. Whether creating something visual with one’s very own hands, or performing in a play the arts are continually enjoyed by us. I’m so happy we live in a world with color, drama, dance and music. Please feel free to stop in to see your children busy using their imaginations. Carol LeBarron

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Newbury Elementary School

Annual Report 2013

SPECIAL EDUCATION DEPARTMENT M. Ainsworth, T. Bonasera, B. Nadeau, H. Prest

The Special Education Department is comprised of two full-time Special Educators, one parttime Special Educator and one part-time Speech/Language Pathologist. We also contract with an Occupational Therapist. The two full-time Special Educators and the Speech/Language Pathologist have a caseload of students who are on Individual Educational Plans (IEPs) and are responsible for all that entails. Included in our case management are such activities as collaboration between regular educators, Para-educators, consultants, and parents. Other responsibilities include conducting comprehensive evaluations, constructing IEPs, facilitating meetings, supervising Para-educators, Medicaid paperwork, and providing support to our colleagues regarding accommodations and supplemental programs for students on IEPs. The entire department provides direct instruction to students individually and in small groups. We also perform time studies twice a year to ensure we are using our Paraprofessional support for children as efficiently as possible. These studies have verified that the time our Paras are working with children is accounted for by state reimbursement guidelines. We have no time unaccounted for, which means we are receiving the maximum reimbursement possible, and that is something we want to celebrate. The Special Education Department also includes a core, competent group of Para-educators who help us meet the needs of students on a daily basis. Support is given in the areas of math, writing, reading, and behavioral modifications. In order to keep up with best practices to support the students and staff at Newbury, we attend individual trainings and/or graduate-level courses, as well as monthly district wide Special Educator meetings. These meetings provide time for collaboration, guest speakers related to specific needs, and a forum for us to stay updated on changes in state or federal regulations. Although it is a challenge to balance all aspects of the job, we truly enjoy having the opportunity to work with such a wonderful group of children.

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Newbury Elementary School

Annual Report 2013

READING RECOVERY AND READING INTERVENTION COACH Amy Kinder

It has been my pleasure to continue in the role of Reading Recovery/Literacy Interventionist and Literacy Coach this Year. I feel very fortunate to work with the wonderful staff of Newbury Elementary and love the daily interactions between teachers, children and all staff. We are very fortunate to be benefitting from the Children’s Literacy Foundation grant and “The Year of the Book.” It’s exciting to see the many rich literacy connections happening throughout the year and throughout the grades. Newbury Elementary School is buzzing with literacy excitement! I continue in my role as a certified Reading Recovery teacher. Reading Recovery is a literacy intervention program for first grade students who need an extra boost in literacy skills. Students in the program receive daily one-to-one differentiated instruction of 30 minutes for 12-20 weeks.

The

program provides a daily double dose of literacy instruction and close collaboration between the Reading Recovery teacher, classroom teacher, and school teams. The majority of children in the program reach grade level standards in just 12-20 weeks.

Reading Recovery offers accelerated

learning that allows students to catch up with their peers. Early intervention is key to literacy success and we continue to also offer Level Literacy Intervention (LLI) to small groups of children in grades kindergarten- 2nd grade. LLI is a small group intervention designed to accelerate the literacy processing skills needed to pull print off the page and make meaning of what is being read. Students meet daily for 30 minutes in this accelerated, small group intervention. LLI works closely with Reading Recovery practices and provides rich language, writing, phonics and literacy processing skills daily. The goal is to have students meet grade level standards within 18-20 weeks. We currently have LLI groups meeting daily in kindergarten, first grade, and 2nd grade. Another important role that I fill consists of organizing and administering the Primary Observation Assessment (POA) and Benchmark Assessment three times a year. The testing windows are September, December and May. The POA is an observation assessment that closely monitors individual early literacy progress. We carefully observe what students know and areas that need strengthening in the early literacy areas. This data is graphed and used to help organize our Reading Recovery students, LLI groups and other Guided Reading groups. We use this data and student observations to drive our instruction and form plans on how to meet the literacy needs of our students.

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Newbury Elementary School

Annual Report 2013

Our weekly literacy meetings have been a wonderful sharing of literacy information this year. We have spent much time looking closely at the Common Core State Standards. These meetings have provided rich sharing opportunities on many curriculum topics, clarifying opportunities and meaningful conversations on literacy happenings within the grade levels. This has been a time to share, learn together, reflect, question, and look for resources together. Our “Book Room” continues to be space used to house multiple copies of leveled books. Teachers come to choose books on various levels and topics within their classroom curriculum studies. My role is to keep the books in order, find books that are needed and offer suggestions for appropriate titles of interest and level. I find much enjoyment in seeing the “Book Room” used to it’s fullest potential. I feel privileged to work at Newbury Elementary School. The community, children and staff make this a wonderful school! I welcome literacy questions, observers, or visitors anytime. Sincerely, Amy Kinder

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Newbury Elementary School

Annual Report 2013

ENRICHMENT PROGRAM Kim Goody & Ruth Kennedy

It is with pleasure that we continue to implement the Newbury Elementary School Enrichment Program this year. This program was created in 2009 to promote six educational objectives: increase learning for all students, enrich curricular goals, improve quality standards in student work, differentiate learning opportunities, create greater collaboration among teachers, and increase student engagement. During intensive, 7 week “rotations”, we work closely with K-6th grade teachers to deepen and enrich the goals of a particular area of their curriculum. We plan extensively with classroom educators prior to each rotation, using local, state, and the new, upcoming Common Core standards to guide our planning and programming.

We use the district-embraced teaching techniques from Keeping

Learning on Track, (KLT), an initiative in its second year, which was adopted to address the need for formative assessment to be used on an ongoing basis in the classroom. We then provide teaching support by modeling lessons and team-teaching, using best teaching practices, while immersing students in an in-depth study within their grade-level curriculum. This year, the new practices and teaching standards of the Common Core have been introduced, which have allowed for deepening the content learning even further. Engagement is enhanced by creating project or service-based learning opportunities that allow the curriculum to be explored more deeply, creatively, and meaningfully. We reinforce the goal of “high quality work standards” by coaching students to identify their best efforts using rubrics, checklists, exemplars, assessments, and other tools to help them set appropriate and high standards for themselves and their work. Student interest and choice play roles in the projects that they do.

Projects may include creating books, maps, time-lines, art, writing, performance,

experiments, and others. By using traditional and other methods such as technology, art, building, performance and movement, students are encouraged to “think outside the box” when planning for what they will do to satisfy project goals. This year, with the expertise and talents of Laurie Storm, our new Media/Technology Specialist, students are using more technology than ever to support their research and projects.

Using a variety of methods and choice allow for a greater potential for

engagement in all types of learners, and gives each an opportunity to show aptitude and success with hard work and creative thinking. Following each rotation, we debrief the study with each teacher and solicit student feedback in order to improve instruction the next time.

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Newbury Elementary School

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This year, a special focus with students has been to create projects that are curriculum-based, and crafted to teach about Newbury’s history and significance given that we celebrate Newbury’s 250th anniversary.

In May, each class will be part of a “Newbury Museum of Living History”, and

enrichment projects showcasing this topic will be open to the community to visit and experience. Other projects we’ve worked on this year include a literacy unit with first graders, a Newbury timeline with second graders, a biomes unit with third graders, Abenaki studies with fourth graders, election year study with sixth graders, and perhaps, if you were looking out your window, you saw fifth graders, led by none-other than Lewis and Clark, Sacajawea and the entire Corps of Discovery, portaging a heavily-laden canoe down Romance Lane! Students so often “learn best by doing” and so we make special effort to present projects that get them involved not only cognitively, but also physically and emotionally as well. The learning that results tends to be richer, deeper, and “sticks” with them as they continue to learn and grow. With all of these units of study, we create lesson plans and materials that we pass on to teachers so that they have a growing arsenal of resources that they can use to address their curricular goals each year.

So,

collaboration is strengthened by not only planning and facilitating together, but in the sharing of resources. Teaching can be a potentially isolating profession, and it has been invigorating to work with all of the talented teachers and staff at our school. The collaboration that has resulted from the enrichment program and other carefully orchestrated planning sessions between teachers in the areas of literacy and math, have promoted more conversation about quality instruction. It is a wonderful experience for us to support teachers in the excellent work that they do, and to have the opportunity to share what we can with their students. Please plan to come visit anytime, and especially in May for our “Newbury Museum of Living History”, so that we can show you first-hand the exceptional work the students and teachers are doing in our school through this continuing collaborative approach to teaching and learning.

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Newbury Elementary School

Annual Report 2013

STUDENT COUNCIL Kim Goody & Ruth Kennedy

Each school year, four students each from grades four, five and six, seek election to the Newbury Elementary Student Council. Members of each of the three classes vote for their Student Council representatives and from then on, once a week, the Student Council meets with their advisors to plan and execute educationally sound and inspired service-based activities to contribute to the greater good of the school and community. The Student Council works together all year to accomplish goals in the following areas: •

School, local and global community service activities

Create “school spirit” days once a month that merge learning and fun

Build leadership skills

Serve as role models for their peers

Raise funding for special projects

and

a year-end gift to the school •

Participate in one or two School Board meetings with our NES School Board

The Student Council represents the best that NES can offer in terms of responsible, motivated, and service-oriented students. These young leaders take every opportunity to assist their peers and the staff in a myriad of ways. The Student Council acts as a bridge between the school and the greater community by cultivating relationships with the elders at Atkinson Residence, local businesses, and community members. They host fund drives for the local food shelf and raise money for other initiatives: saving rain forest land, helping to put an end to global hunger, or to help save endangered species. It is our pleasure to work with such a motivated and enthusiastic group of young people. Please don’t hesitate to contact us if there is anything the Student Council could help you with.

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Newbury Elementary School

Annual Report 2013

CLIF GRANT -“THE YEAR OF THE BOOK” Kim Goody & Ruth Kennedy

This year, NES is the grateful recipient of a literacy grant from the Children’s Literacy Foundation. CLiF is a nonprofit based in Waterbury Center, VT that works to inspire a love of reading and writing in children across New Hampshire and Vermont. As coordinators of the grant, we have enjoyed planning for many programs that our school has participated in. These programs include offering 10 new, free books to every child in Newbury over the course of the year, and hosting Vermont authors Leland Kinsey, Natalie Kinsey-Warnock, and Jim Arnosky through a variety of author visits and residencies. Additionally, we have hosted a film crew that worked with many of the classes to create book trailers (like movie trailers) to promote favorite books. Teachers applied for literacy “mini-grants” so that they could supplement the literacy materials in their classrooms. All of these activities and programs have been a shot in the arm for bolstering a school-wide focus and love of literacy at NES. Due to the excitement that these programs have generated, we are finding that students are enjoying reading and writing more, and are discovering that they have skills and talents never realized before as they work to create a poem, research and then write family stories, and act in front of a film crew to promote a favorite book! Our unique situation of celebrating Newbury’s 250th anniversary and our school’s 100th birthday this year helped us to secure this amazing grant. These two major milestones have helped us to shape the projects and programs we have selected, and have sharpened the focus on literacy in our school. In conclusion, whether we’re supporting teachers and classes with the enrichment program, allowing students to become strong citizens and leaders through the Student Council, or coordinating “The Year of the Book” literacy grant to support the very essential skills of reading, writing and communicating in our school, it is our great pleasure to be able to serve the students, staff, and Newbury community. Respectfully submitted, Kim Goody and Ruth Kennedy

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Newbury Elementary School

Annual Report 2013

GUIDANCE

Sara Gendal-Wilmot I want to start off by thanking the Newbury community for welcoming me into this school; I am thrilled to be working in such a warm and caring environment with people that value children and education as much as I do. It has been a pleasure getting to know those of you I have met and I look forward to meeting you if our paths have not crossed. As the school counselor I play many different roles, one of which is to provide weekly classroom instruction to all students. I do my best to develop and deliver age-appropriate lessons that are preventative in nature. As a member of the American School Counseling Association, I believe that the three domains that are most important to focus on with children are academic, personal/social and career. All classroom lessons are centered on these domains. I also have the pleasure of supporting students individually and in small groups on social, emotional, academic and/or behavioral concerns; this takes up a significant amount of my time. In addition, I am coordinating the mentor program and am pleased that we currently have eight Oxbow High School students who come into the school on a regular basis to support students. We have seen the benefits of having positive role models in the school and would like to expand the program in the near future. Another large part of what I do is to communicate and consult with teachers, staff, and administration about individual students, programs within the school, and the school climate/culture. I am also the coordinator of NEST, or the Newbury Educational Support Team, which consists of our special educators, the speech and language pathologist, the reading recovery and math specialists, the principal, nurse, and me. Students, who are struggling academically, socially or behaviorally are referred to this team where they then go through a process of steps to determine what supports, if any, are needed. Finally, one of my favorite parts of the position is organizing system-level interventions such as the Character Trait of the Month Program. Each month focuses on a different character trait. I try to do at least one lesson in each classroom on the character trait of the month and then at the end of the month both individuals and classes of the month are presented with awards at our assembly. Teachers and administrators do an exceptional job supporting this program by fostering a community where character education is valued. I am also working closely with the principal on integrating mindfulness practices into the school counseling program as well as the culture of NES.

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Newbury Elementary School

Annual Report 2013

I am excited about the cyber-bullying presentation that we have coming up in March with Officer Frank from Plymouth State University. Also, I am thrilled to be a part of the Girls on the Run program that we will be starting this spring. This is a nationally acclaimed esteem-building program for girls in third through sixth grades. Finally, my hope is to partner with the principal and FONES (Friends of Newbury Elementary School) to develop programs that will bridge the gap between home and school.

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Newbury Elementary School

Annual Report 2013

SCHOOL NURSES

Carla Horniak & Casey Doerner This year we welcomed Carla Horniak RN as our new nurse four days a week. Mrs. Horniak came to NES from Little Rivers Healthcare. The students quickly warmed to her in this new role. Casey Doerner continues to work one day per week, working with the Educational Support Team and serving as the 504 Coordinator. Together we are working hard to keep the students safe, healthy, and ready to learn. Wellness education continues to be a big part of our job. We teach the students about hand washing, dental care, sleep, exercise, and nutrition. We do health screenings for vision and hearing. Again this year, we are helping teach puberty education to the 5th and 6th grade. This is a wonderful time to get to know the students and join them in the class room. This year we have also been very involved with school safety and have been working with the crisis team to make our school safer. This school year we are excited to facilitate several exciting programs through a grant. We have a recess games coordinator who is leading lots of fun winter activities to keep the students moving. We also received funding for a cyber safety class for the older students and are hosting Girls on the Run this spring. This is an exciting running program for girls in 3rd, 4th, and 5th grade. We continue to strive for academic success for all students, some of whom come to us with complicated learning difficulties. Ms. Doerner, in conjunction with Sara Wilmot, is the case manager for the 504 and Student Support Team and is a resource for families. When kids are struggling in school, we can get teachers and parents together to discuss possible accommodations for physical, emotional, or academic difficulties. You may contact us at any time during the school year if you are concerned about your child. Please call the School Nurse with any questions, concerns, or suggestions you might have. We appreciate your ideas for how to keep our students and our community as healthy as possible. Respectfully, Carla Horniak, RN Casey Doerner, RN, BSN

Page 48


Newbury Elementary School

Annual Report 2013

MATH COACHING Nancy Goodrich

A math coach supports the mathematical learning of all students and supports teachers in their teaching of mathematics. New research on the progression of developmental math stages in children coupled with the transition to the national Common Core Standards have necessitated shifts in best practices for teaching mathematics, and teachers are looking closely at ways to improve upon the math program and differentiate learning for their students. Also, more tools are available to assess student understanding and target instruction to address identified needs. There is much that can be done to build a strong conceptual foundation, even when the understanding doesn’t come easily. During the 2012-13 year, I have been privileged to serve the school in the following ways: I. Educator Development: § K-6 teacher conferences and consultation § School liaison with OESU Math Leadership Team, focused upon implementation of the Math CCSS (Common Core State Standards) § Coordination of in-house math professional development and weekly K-6 collaborative planning sessions § Data analysis and interpretation to inform instruction § NEST (Newbury Educational Support Team) math coordination II. Individual Instruction: daily instruction for Grade 1 students recommended for the Math Springboard Program as well as other students designated through the NEST process III. Small Group Instruction: daily math instruction for rotating groups of kindergarten and first grade students, as well as an alternative math program for a group of students in fifth and sixth grade IV.

Assessment/Diagnostic Interviews:

includes PNOA (Primary Number Observation

Assessment) of kindergarten and first grade students three times per year We are encouraged by initiatives we have undertaken to embed numeracy in the primary grades. We have also had great success with an intervention program for upper-grade students, and

Page 49


Newbury Elementary School

Annual Report 2013

are in the process of testing and diagnosing mathematical understanding in our primary students to provide intensive support where needed in the early grades, much as we have done with Reading Recovery.

It is truly exciting to know there are now a number of strategies to build solid

mathematical foundations for all students. Sincerely, Nancy Goodrich

Page 50


Newbury Elementary School

Annual Report 2013

JOHN SANBORN LIBRARY & TECHNOLOGY Laurie Storm

This year saw the creation of a new position at Newbury Elementary, that of Library/Media Tech Coordinator. I am very excited to have been selected to develop that role and to guide, with insight from administration, staff, community, and students, the library and technology programs for Newbury Elementary School. It has been a joy to meet and work with the children of this community and the NES staff.

Retired NES Librarian Cathy Kidder left the NES library in great shape. Before she left, Mrs. Kidder wrote the Year of the Book grant which has led to so many great opportunities for our students and community this year: 10 free books per child, author visits and workshops, and the opportunity for students to work with professional film makers to create book trailers of their favorite books.

The technology program, guided by the vision of the Technology Committee as outline in last year’s annual report, made some strides this year. The upgrade of professional staff hardware and software to the same platform has been instrumental in advancing collaborative work and assessment on behalf of students. Classroom teachers had been using failing equipment that made it challenging, if not impossible, to complete online work as required by the supervisory union and state for both student report cards and curriculum alignment to the new Common Core standards. Those issues are now resolved.

Our next technology challenge is to upgrade our student systems. The need to do this is twofold. First, by the year 2015, students will be expected to take the federal and state mandated annual standardized assessments on computers, and our current netbooks do not meet the minimum standards needed for administering this test. Not only do we need computers and infrastructure that meet minimum test requirements, we need to give our students time to become comfortable with online assessment through exposure and practice.

Second, students and teachers need access to the tech tools that can be used to align curriculum and skills to the expectations of the Common Core standards. While this does not mean our students need

Page 51


Newbury Elementary School

Annual Report 2013

to have the latest in cutting edge technology or that taxpayers need to absorb the cost of a 1:1 program, it does mean we should be striving to create a tech environment that enables collaboration and creativity, is able to take advantage of free and low cost software and apps, and is compliant with federal internet safety guidelines.

While we “officially” find ourselves behind other schools in our area and district when it comes to our technology infrastructure and equipment, we as a community can feel confident that even though there is urgency to “catch up”, NES administration and staff will not lose sight that truly successful learning and growth comes from collaboration with each other in the spirit of kindness and respect. The computer is but a tool.

Page 52


Newbury Elementary School

Annual Report 2013

SCHOOL LUNCH ROOM Dot Dodge

Another year is passing and we are watching the children grow up fast. It has been a year of many changes from rules of the U.S.D.A. Our fair share for food is $3351.76. This figure is determined by taking our total number of reimbursable lunches served during the previous year and multiplying that number by the current commodity rate (.2275). This year we received a lot of cheese, two canned meats each month, frozen vegetables and canned fruit, flour, rice and oil. In January 2012, the U.S.D.A. published a final rule to promote the health of America’s school children. The rule establishes new, science-based nutrition standards for the National School Lunch and Breakfast Programs. The new standards identify the healthy ranges of food, fruits, vegetables, grains, meats and or meat alternative and milk, as well as the healthy ranges for total calories, saturated and trans fat, and sodium. The records require minimum and maximum qualities for total calories. This rule has required several meetings and loads of paper work. We are doing our best to serve healthy meals that children enjoy. Children are still enjoying a healthy fresh fruit and vegetable snack in the morning. We are trying to serve a variety of snacks which are in season. This program is financed by a grant. Thank you for your contribution toward helping to feed our children so they learn and may become the President of the United States someday. Respectfully submitted, Your Hot Lunch Agent, Dot Dodge and the lunch gang

Page 53


Newbury Elementary School

Annual Report 2013

FRIENDS OF NEWBURY ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (FoNES)

Is a group of parents who are working to increase community involvement and investment in the Newbury Elementary School students and its educational programs. This group has been working to build connections between the school and the community by incorporating teachers, parents, community members and volunteers into the fabric of NES. We try to raise awareness of school activities, aid teachers when needed and provide support to create a fun learning environment. Objectives of this group are: •

Identify and enlist volunteer resources in the community.

Build connections between the community and the school.

Demonstrate community investment in the school and in student learning.

Inform the community about the school programs.

Develop a core of volunteers willing to help the Newbury Elementary School in a variety of ways.

Enhance the educational experience of the students by raising money for special programs, equipment and materials that would not otherwise be available through the operating budget.

Aid teachers and staff when needed We are an all-volunteer organization and could use your help! The amount of good we are able to do will depend on the number of parents and community members we have to help us.

Look for

information in the Friday Flash about meeting dates for the FoNES. You may also call the school directly to find out how you can help and other ways you can participate. We have a page on the NES web site you can check us out there too!

Page 54


Newbury Elementary School

Annual Report 2013

Previous activities: Booth at the Cracker Barrel, staff appreciation lunch, bags for Kindergarteners library books, Halloween Howl, support crew and apples/oranges for the Turkey Trot, bake/popcorn sales at school events, decorations for holiday concert, pie social, and Open Mic night. Upcoming activities: Parent appreciation night, helping with the schools celebration of the towns 250th Anniversary day of events (Parade, Art show, Living Museum, and other activities) and Cracker Barrel booth. Thank you very much and we look forward to seeing you at the next meeting! Sincerely, FoNES

Page 55


Newbury Elementary School

Annual Report 2013

NES FACILITIES COMMITTEE Recently a committee of several community members was established to develop a system in which a facility plan and maintenance schedule could be established for the Newbury Elementary School. Once this document is developed it can then become a living, accurate history of the entire facility. Members of the committee are: Chance Lindsley, Claude Phipps, Craig Hervey, Paul Jewett, and Dan Corti. The first step in this process includes obtaining a complete set of building plans. Those plans will then be used to establish a room numbering system which will facilitate the easy identification of any space within the building. Each space will then have all of the systems within that space identified and documented. From this information a routine maintenance schedule can easily be established and documented. This information will also be extremely helpful in the budgeting process and in the future planning of the Newbury Elementary School.

Page 56


Newbury Elementary School

Annual Report 2013

NECAPS

Fall 2012 - Beginning of Grade 3 NECAP Tests

School: District: State: Code:

Grade 3 Students in 2012-2013

Mathematics Results Proficient with Distinction (Level 4) Student’s problem solving demonstrates logical reasoning with strong explanations that include both words and proper mathematical notation. Student’s work exhibits a high level of accuracy, effective use of a variety of strategies, and an understanding of mathematical concepts within and across grade level expectations. Student demonstrates the ability to move from concrete to abstract representations. (Scaled Score 353–380) Proficient (Level 3) Student’s problem solving demonstrates logical reasoning with appropriate explanations that include both words and proper mathematical notation. Student uses a variety of strategies that are often systematic. Computational errors do not interfere with communicating understanding. Student demonstrates conceptual understanding of most aspects of the grade level expectations. (Scaled Score 340–352) Partially Proficient (Level 2) Student’s problem solving demonstrates logical reasoning and conceptual understanding in some, but not all, aspects of the grade level expectations. Many problems are started correctly, but computational errors may get in the way of completing some aspects of the problem. Student uses some effective strategies. Student’s work demonstrates that he or she is generally stronger with concrete than abstract situations. (Scaled Score 332–339)

Enrolled

NT Approved

NT Other

Tested

N

N

N

N

N

%

N

%

N

%

N

%

Mean Scaled Score

19 13 16

0 2 0

0 0 0

19 11 16

0 2 2

0 18 13

8 4 8

42 36 50

7 3 2

37 27 13

4 2 4

21 18 25

338 343 342

48

2

0

46

4

9

20

43

12

26

10

22

341

105 94 106

0 2 0

2 0 3

103 92 103

14 14 14

14 15 14

48 36 55

47 39 53

28 25 20

27 27 19

13 17 14

13 18 14

342 342 343

305

2

5

298

42

14

139

47

73

24

44

15

342

6,238 6,188 6,243

103 134 17

67 112 100

6,068 5,942 6,126

1,318 1,191 1,122

22 20 18

2,772 2,727 2,874

46 46 47

1,170 1,186 1,208

19 20 20

808 838 922

13 14 15

344 344 344

18,669

254

279

18,136

3,631

20

8,373

46

3,564

20

2,568

14

344

School 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 Cumulative Total District 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 Cumulative Total State 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 Cumulative Total

Subtopic

Total Possible Points

Numbers & Operations

74

Geometry & Measurement

21

Functions & Algebra

21

Data, Statistics, & Probability

21

Level 4

Newbury Elementary School Orange East SU Vermont SU027-PS202 Level 3

Level 2

Level 1

Percent of Total Possible Points 0

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90 100

l School p District u State Standard Error Bar

Substantially Below Proficient (Level 1) Student’s problem solving is often incomplete, lacks logical reasoning and accuracy, and shows little conceptual understanding in most aspects of the grade level expectations. Student is able to start some problems but computational errors and lack of conceptual understanding interfere with solving problems successfully. (Scaled Score 300–331) Page 5 of 6

Page 57


Newbury Elementary School

Fall 2012 - Beginning of Grade 3 NECAP Tests

School: District: State: Code:

Grade 3 Students in 2012-2013

Reading Results Proficient with Distinction (Level 4) Student’s performance demonstrates an ability to read and comprehend grade-appropriate text. Student is able to analyze and interpret literary and informational text. Student offers insightful observations/assertions that are well supported by references to the text. Student uses range of vocabulary strategies and breadth of vocabulary knowledge to read and comprehend a wide variety of texts. (Scaled Score 357–380) Proficient (Level 3) Student’s performance demonstrates an ability to read and comprehend grade-appropriate text. Student is able to analyze and interpret literary and informational text. Student makes and supports relevant assertions by referencing text. Student uses vocabulary strategies and breadth of vocabulary knowledge to read and comprehend text. (Scaled Score 340–356) Partially Proficient (Level 2) Student’s performance demonstrates an inconsistent ability to read and comprehend grade-appropriate text. Student attempts to analyze and interpret literary and informational text. Student may make and/or support assertions by referencing text. Student’s vocabulary knowledge and use of strategies may be limited and may impact the ability to read and comprehend text. (Scaled Score 331–339) Substantially Below Proficient (Level 1) Student’s performance demonstrates minimal ability to derive/construct meaning from grade-appropriate text. Student may be able to recognize story elements and text features. Student’s limited vocabulary knowledge and use of strategies impacts the ability to read and comprehend text. (Scaled Score 300–330)

NT Approved

NT Other

Tested

N

N

N

N

N

%

N

%

N

%

N

%

Mean Scaled Score

19 13 16

0 2 0

0 0 0

19 11 16

3 2 1

16 18 6

9 6 10

47 55 63

4 2 3

21 18 19

3 1 2

16 9 13

343 346 345

48

2

0

46

6

13

25

54

9

20

6

13

344

105 94 106

0 2 0

2 0 2

103 92 104

15 13 13

15 14 13

55 49 56

53 53 54

21 16 22

20 17 21

12 14 13

12 15 13

345 345 344

305

2

4

299

41

14

160

54

59

20

39

13

345

6,238 6,188 6,243

115 78 29

59 110 100

6,064 6,000 6,114

903 1,185 883

15 20 14

3,457 3,178 3,305

57 53 54

984 913 1,155

16 15 19

720 724 771

12 12 13

345 346 345

18,669

222

269

18,178

2,971

16

9,940

55

3,052

17

2,215

12

345

District 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 Cumulative Total State 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 Cumulative Total

Newbury Elementary School Orange East SU Vermont SU027-PS202

Enrolled

School 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 Cumulative Total

Total Possible Points

Subtopic

Word ID/Vocabulary

Level 4

Annual Report 2013

Level 3

Level 2

Level 1

Percent of Total Possible Points 0

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90 100

43

Type of Text

l School

Literary

47

Informational

40

p District u State Standard Error Bar

Level of Comprehension Initial Understanding

53

Analysis & Interpretation

34 Page 3 of 6

Page 58


Newbury Elementary School

Fall 2012 - Beginning of Grade 4 NECAP Tests

School: District: State: Code:

Grade 4 Students in 2012-2013

Mathematics Results Proficient with Distinction (Level 4) Student’s problem solving demonstrates logical reasoning with strong explanations that include both words and proper mathematical notation. Student’s work exhibits a high level of accuracy, effective use of a variety of strategies, and an understanding of mathematical concepts within and across grade level expectations. Student demonstrates the ability to move from concrete to abstract representations. (Scaled Score 455–480) Proficient (Level 3) Student’s problem solving demonstrates logical reasoning with appropriate explanations that include both words and proper mathematical notation. Student uses a variety of strategies that are often systematic. Computational errors do not interfere with communicating understanding. Student demonstrates conceptual understanding of most aspects of the grade level expectations. (Scaled Score 440–454) Partially Proficient (Level 2) Student’s problem solving demonstrates logical reasoning and conceptual understanding in some, but not all, aspects of the grade level expectations. Many problems are started correctly, but computational errors may get in the way of completing some aspects of the problem. Student uses some effective strategies. Student’s work demonstrates that he or she is generally stronger with concrete than abstract situations. (Scaled Score 431–439)

Newbury Elementary School Orange East SU Vermont SU027-PS202

Enrolled

NT Approved

NT Other

Tested

N

N

N

N

N

%

N

%

N

%

N

%

Mean Scaled Score

16 20 12

0 0 0

0 0 0

16 20 12

1 0 0

6 0 0

7 13 5

44 65 42

5 4 2

31 20 17

3 3 5

19 15 42

439 440 428

48

0

0

48

1

2

25

52

11

23

11

23

437

87 101 94

0 0 1

0 0 2

87 101 91

17 13 10

20 13 11

42 49 44

48 49 48

19 22 14

22 22 15

9 17 23

10 17 25

444 441 440

282

1

2

279

40

14

135

48

55

20

49

18

442

6,315 6,160 6,157

92 124 29

37 102 81

6,186 5,934 6,047

1,280 1,421 1,397

21 24 23

2,727 2,712 2,705

44 46 45

1,349 986 1,074

22 17 18

830 815 871

13 14 14

444 445 445

18,632

245

220

18,167

4,098

23

8,144

45

3,409

19

2,516

14

445

School 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 Cumulative Total District 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 Cumulative Total State 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 Cumulative Total

Total Possible Points

Subtopic

Numbers & Operations

68

Level 4

Annual Report 2013

Level 3

Level 2

Level 1

Percent of Total Possible Points 0

10

20

30

40

50 60

70

80

90 100

l School p District

Geometry & Measurement

27

Functions & Algebra

21

Data, Statistics, & Probability

21

u State Standard Error Bar

Substantially Below Proficient (Level 1) Student’s problem solving is often incomplete, lacks logical reasoning and accuracy, and shows little conceptual understanding in most aspects of the grade level expectations. Student is able to start some problems but computational errors and lack of conceptual understanding interfere with solving problems successfully. (Scaled Score 400–430) Page 5 of 6

Page 59


Newbury Elementary School

Fall 2012 - Beginning of Grade 4 NECAP Tests

School: District: State: Code:

Grade 4 Students in 2012-2013

Reading Results Proficient with Distinction (Level 4) Student’s performance demonstrates an ability to read and comprehend grade-appropriate text. Student is able to analyze and interpret literary and informational text. Student offers insightful observations/assertions that are well supported by references to the text. Student uses range of vocabulary strategies and breadth of vocabulary knowledge to read and comprehend a wide variety of texts. (Scaled Score 456–480) Proficient (Level 3) Student’s performance demonstrates an ability to read and comprehend grade-appropriate text. Student is able to analyze and interpret literary and informational text. Student makes and supports relevant assertions by referencing text. Student uses vocabulary strategies and breadth of vocabulary knowledge to read and comprehend text. (Scaled Score 440–455) Partially Proficient (Level 2) Student’s performance demonstrates an inconsistent ability to read and comprehend grade-appropriate text. Student attempts to analyze and interpret literary and informational text. Student may make and/or support assertions by referencing text. Student’s vocabulary knowledge and use of strategies may be limited and may impact the ability to read and comprehend text. (Scaled Score 431–439) Substantially Below Proficient (Level 1) Student’s performance demonstrates minimal ability to derive/construct meaning from grade-appropriate text. Student may be able to recognize story elements and text features. Student’s limited vocabulary knowledge and use of strategies impacts the ability to read and comprehend text. (Scaled Score 400–430)

NT Approved

NT Other

Tested

N

N

N

N

N

%

N

%

N

%

N

%

Mean Scaled Score

16 20 12

0 0 0

0 0 0

16 20 12

2 2 1

13 10 8

8 10 3

50 50 25

4 6 5

25 30 42

2 2 3

13 10 25

443 443 435

48

0

0

48

5

10

21

44

15

31

7

15

441

87 101 94

0 0 0

0 0 1

87 101 93

20 12 13

23 12 14

41 52 45

47 51 48

21 21 18

24 21 19

5 16 17

6 16 18

447 443 441

282

0

1

281

45

16

138

49

60

21

38

14

444

6,315 6,160 6,157

110 86 41

31 101 82

6,174 5,973 6,034

1,312 1,377 1,219

21 23 20

2,999 2,882 2,992

49 48 50

1,175 1,026 1,089

19 17 18

688 688 734

11 12 12

446 446 445

18,632

237

214

18,181

3,908

21

8,873

49

3,290

18

2,110

12

446

District 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 Cumulative Total State 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 Cumulative Total

Newbury Elementary School Orange East SU Vermont SU027-PS202

Enrolled

School 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 Cumulative Total

Subtopic

Total Possible Points

Word ID/Vocabulary

Level 4

Annual Report 2013

Level 3

Level 2

Level 1

Percent of Total Possible Points 0

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90 100

42

Type of Text

l School

Literary

43

Informational

45

p District u State Standard Error Bar

Level of Comprehension Initial Understanding

50

Analysis & Interpretation

38 Page 3 of 6

Page 60


Newbury Elementary School

Fall 2012 - Beginning of Grade 5 NECAP Tests

School: District: State: Code:

Grade 5 Students in 2012-2013

Mathematics Results Proficient with Distinction (Level 4) Student’s problem solving demonstrates logical reasoning with strong explanations that include both words and proper mathematical notation. Student’s work exhibits a high level of accuracy, effective use of a variety of strategies, and an understanding of mathematical concepts within and across grade level expectations. Student demonstrates the ability to move from concrete to abstract representations. (Scaled Score 554–580) Proficient (Level 3) Student’s problem solving demonstrates logical reasoning with appropriate explanations that include both words and proper mathematical notation. Student uses a variety of strategies that are often systematic. Computational errors do not interfere with communicating understanding. Student demonstrates conceptual understanding of most aspects of the grade level expectations. (Scaled Score 540–553) Partially Proficient (Level 2) Student’s problem solving demonstrates logical reasoning and conceptual understanding in some, but not all, aspects of the grade level expectations. Many problems are started correctly, but computational errors may get in the way of completing some aspects of the problem. Student uses some effective strategies. Student’s work demonstrates that he or she is generally stronger with concrete than abstract situations. (Scaled Score 533–539)

Newbury Elementary School Orange East SU Vermont SU027-PS202

Enrolled

NT Approved

NT Other

Tested

N

N

N

N

N

%

N

%

N

%

N

%

Mean Scaled Score

16 20 22

2 0 0

0 0 0

14 20 22

3 3 1

21 15 5

5 11 4

36 55 18

3 1 8

21 5 36

3 5 9

21 25 41

541 541 536

58

2

0

56

7

13

20

36

12

21

17

30

539

111 84 105

2 0 0

0 0 1

109 84 104

19 14 13

17 17 13

46 44 36

42 52 35

17 10 26

16 12 25

27 16 29

25 19 28

542 543 540

300

2

1

297

46

15

126

42

53

18

72

24

542

6,308 6,327 6,229

91 141 22

26 122 104

6,191 6,064 6,103

1,221 1,175 1,302

20 19 21

2,832 2,814 2,675

46 46 44

1,001 994 977

16 16 16

1,137 1,081 1,149

18 18 19

544 544 544

18,864

254

252

18,358

3,698

20

8,321

45

2,972

16

3,367

18

544

School 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 Cumulative Total District 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 Cumulative Total State 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 Cumulative Total

Total Possible Points

Subtopic

Numbers & Operations

73

Level 4

Annual Report 2013

Level 3

Level 2

Level 1

Percent of Total Possible Points 0

10

20

30

40

50 60

70

80

90 100

l School p District

Geometry & Measurement

33

Functions & Algebra

31

Data, Statistics, & Probability

25

u State Standard Error Bar

Substantially Below Proficient (Level 1) Student’s problem solving is often incomplete, lacks logical reasoning and accuracy, and shows little conceptual understanding in most aspects of the grade level expectations. Student is able to start some problems but computational errors and lack of conceptual understanding interfere with solving problems successfully. (Scaled Score 500–532) Page 5 of 8

Page 61


Newbury Elementary School

Fall 2012 - Beginning of Grade 5 NECAP Tests

School: District: State: Code:

Grade 5 Students in 2012-2013

Reading Results Proficient with Distinction (Level 4) Student’s performance demonstrates an ability to read and comprehend grade-appropriate text. Student is able to analyze and interpret literary and informational text. Student offers insightful observations/assertions that are well supported by references to the text. Student uses range of vocabulary strategies and breadth of vocabulary knowledge to read and comprehend a wide variety of texts. (Scaled Score 556–580) Proficient (Level 3) Student’s performance demonstrates an ability to read and comprehend grade-appropriate text. Student is able to analyze and interpret literary and informational text. Student makes and supports relevant assertions by referencing text. Student uses vocabulary strategies and breadth of vocabulary knowledge to read and comprehend text. (Scaled Score 540–555) Partially Proficient (Level 2) Student’s performance demonstrates an inconsistent ability to read and comprehend grade-appropriate text. Student attempts to analyze and interpret literary and informational text. Student may make and/or support assertions by referencing text. Student’s vocabulary knowledge and use of strategies may be limited and may impact the ability to read and comprehend text. (Scaled Score 530–539) Substantially Below Proficient (Level 1) Student’s performance demonstrates minimal ability to derive/construct meaning from grade-appropriate text. Student may be able to recognize story elements and text features. Student’s limited vocabulary knowledge and use of strategies impacts the ability to read and comprehend text. (Scaled Score 500–529)

NT Approved

NT Other

Tested

N

N

N

N

N

%

N

%

N

%

N

%

Mean Scaled Score

16 20 22

2 0 0

0 0 0

14 20 22

3 2 1

21 10 5

6 13 10

43 65 45

2 1 6

14 5 27

3 4 5

21 20 23

543 543 540

58

2

0

56

6

11

29

52

9

16

12

21

542

111 84 105

2 0 0

0 0 1

109 84 104

19 16 9

17 19 9

59 45 54

54 54 52

21 15 26

19 18 25

10 8 15

9 10 14

546 546 543

300

2

1

297

44

15

158

53

62

21

33

11

545

6,308 6,327 6,229

93 91 26

25 116 103

6,190 6,120 6,100

1,251 1,152 1,135

20 19 19

3,236 3,119 3,237

52 51 53

1,137 1,195 1,137

18 20 19

566 654 591

9 11 10

546 545 546

18,864

210

244

18,410

3,538

19

9,592

52

3,469

19

1,811

10

546

District 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 Cumulative Total State 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 Cumulative Total

Newbury Elementary School Orange East SU Vermont SU027-PS202

Enrolled

School 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 Cumulative Total

Subtopic

Total Possible Points

Word ID/Vocabulary

Level 4

Annual Report 2013

Level 3

Level 2

Level 1

Percent of Total Possible Points 0

10

20 30

40

50

60 70

80 90 100

25

Type of Text

l School

Literary

49

Informational

56

p District u State Standard Error Bar

Level of Comprehension Initial Understanding

52

Analysis & Interpretation

53 Page 3 of 8

Page 62


Newbury Elementary School

Fall 2012 - Beginning of Grade 6 NECAP Tests

School: District: State: Code:

Grade 6 Students in 2012-2013

Mathematics Results Proficient with Distinction (Level 4) Student’s problem solving demonstrates logical reasoning with strong explanations that include both words and proper mathematical notation. Student’s work exhibits a high level of accuracy, effective use of a variety of strategies, and an understanding of mathematical concepts within and across grade level expectations. Student demonstrates the ability to move from concrete to abstract representations. (Scaled Score 653–680) Proficient (Level 3) Student’s problem solving demonstrates logical reasoning with appropriate explanations that include both words and proper mathematical notation. Student uses a variety of strategies that are often systematic. Computational errors do not interfere with communicating understanding. Student demonstrates conceptual understanding of most aspects of the grade level expectations. (Scaled Score 640–652) Partially Proficient (Level 2) Student’s problem solving demonstrates logical reasoning and conceptual understanding in some, but not all, aspects of the grade level expectations. Many problems are started correctly, but computational errors may get in the way of completing some aspects of the problem. Student uses some effective strategies. Student’s work demonstrates that he or she is generally stronger with concrete than abstract situations. (Scaled Score 633–639)

Newbury Elementary School Orange East SU Vermont SU027-PS202

Enrolled

NT Approved

NT Other

Tested

N

N

N

N

N

%

N

%

N

%

N

%

Mean Scaled Score

16 17 19

0 2 0

0 0 0

16 15 19

3 3 0

19 20 0

8 6 11

50 40 58

4 3 4

25 20 21

1 3 4

6 20 21

645 642 640

52

2

0

50

6

12

25

50

11

22

8

16

642

96 107 89

2 2 0

2 2 0

92 103 89

18 20 14

20 19 16

43 51 46

47 50 52

12 12 14

13 12 16

19 20 15

21 19 17

643 645 643

292

4

4

284

52

18

140

49

38

13

54

19

644

6,506 6,313 6,349

62 170 18

38 45 101

6,406 6,098 6,230

1,607 1,565 1,450

25 26 23

2,702 2,535 2,770

42 42 44

1,040 920 950

16 1,057 15 1,078 15 1,060

17 18 17

644 645 644

19,168

250

184

18,734

4,622

25

8,007

43

2,910

16

17

644

School 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 Cumulative Total District 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 Cumulative Total State 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 Cumulative Total

Total Possible Points

Subtopic

Numbers & Operations

64

Level 4

Annual Report 2013

Level 3

Level 2

Level 1

3,195

Percent of Total Possible Points 0

10

20 30

40

50 60 70

80 90 100

l School p District

Geometry & Measurement

41

Functions & Algebra

32

Data, Statistics, & Probability

25

u State Standard Error Bar

Substantially Below Proficient (Level 1) Student’s problem solving is often incomplete, lacks logical reasoning and accuracy, and shows little conceptual understanding in most aspects of the grade level expectations. Student is able to start some problems but computational errors and lack of conceptual understanding interfere with solving problems successfully. (Scaled Score 600–632) Page 5 of 6

Page 63


Newbury Elementary School

Fall 2012 - Beginning of Grade 6 NECAP Tests

School: District: State: Code:

Grade 6 Students in 2012-2013

Reading Results Proficient with Distinction (Level 4) Student’s performance demonstrates an ability to read and comprehend grade-appropriate text. Student is able to analyze and interpret literary and informational text. Student offers insightful observations/assertions that are well supported by references to the text. Student uses range of vocabulary strategies and breadth of vocabulary knowledge to read and comprehend a wide variety of texts. (Scaled Score 659–680) Proficient (Level 3) Student’s performance demonstrates an ability to read and comprehend grade-appropriate text. Student is able to analyze and interpret literary and informational text. Student makes and supports relevant assertions by referencing text. Student uses vocabulary strategies and breadth of vocabulary knowledge to read and comprehend text. (Scaled Score 640–658) Partially Proficient (Level 2) Student’s performance demonstrates an inconsistent ability to read and comprehend grade-appropriate text. Student attempts to analyze and interpret literary and informational text. Student may make and/or support assertions by referencing text. Student’s vocabulary knowledge and use of strategies may be limited and may impact the ability to read and comprehend text. (Scaled Score 629–639) Substantially Below Proficient (Level 1) Student’s performance demonstrates minimal ability to derive/construct meaning from grade-appropriate text. Student may be able to recognize story elements and text features. Student’s limited vocabulary knowledge and use of strategies impacts the ability to read and comprehend text. (Scaled Score 600–628)

NT Approved

NT Other

Tested

N

N

N

N

N

%

N

%

N

%

N

%

Mean Scaled Score

16 17 19

0 2 0

0 0 0

16 15 19

3 4 2

19 27 11

10 7 11

63 47 58

2 2 6

13 13 32

1 2 0

6 13 0

650 647 647

52

2

0

50

9

18

28

56

10

20

3

6

648

96 107 89

2 2 0

2 2 0

92 103 89

18 25 5

20 24 6

49 56 64

53 54 72

15 17 15

16 17 17

10 5 5

11 5 6

647 649 646

292

4

4

284

48

17

169

60

47

17

20

7

647

6,506 6,313 6,349

68 98 23

37 45 94

6,401 6,170 6,232

1,178 1,502 1,009

18 24 16

3,584 3,141 3,568

56 51 57

1,062 1,014 1,083

17 16 17

577 513 572

9 8 9

647 648 647

19,168

189

176

18,803

3,689

20

10,293

55

3,159

17

1,662

9

647

District 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 Cumulative Total State 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 Cumulative Total

Newbury Elementary School Orange East SU Vermont SU027-PS202

Enrolled

School 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 Cumulative Total

Total Possible Points

Subtopic

Word ID/Vocabulary

Level 4

Annual Report 2013

Level 3

Level 2

Level 1

Percent of Total Possible Points 0

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90 100

25

Type of Text

l School

Literary

49

Informational

56

p District u State Standard Error Bar

Level of Comprehension Initial Understanding

46

Analysis & Interpretation

59 Page 3 of 6

Page 64


Newbury Elementary School

Annual Report 2013

ANNUAL TOWN SCHOOL DISTRICT MEETING MINUTES

Page 65


Newbury Elementary School

Page 66

Annual Report 2013


Newbury Elementary School

Page 67

Annual Report 2013


Newbury Elementary School

Annual Report 2013

NEWBURY SCHOOL DISTRICT ENROLLMENT 2011-2012 2012-2013 Projected

Newbury Elementary School

K

2013-2014 18

16

16

1

13

23

21

2

17

14

19

3

14

19

15

4

21

14

16

5

20

21

12

6

17

20

22

Total

120

127

121

Oxbow High School

2011-12 2012-2013 Projected 2013-2014

7

14

17

15

8

19

16

17

9

20

20

26

10

17

20

20

11

25

18

18

12

17

25

21

Total

112

116

117

Page 68


Newbury Elementary School

Annual Report 2013

FOOD SERVICE REPORT Newbury Elementary School Food Service Report 2011-2012 Balance - 6-30-11 - Audited

(15,094.00)

Revenues Food Service Sales to Students Food Service Adult Sales Food Service A La Carte State Lunch Match State Breakfast Breakfast Adjustment FF&V Grant Part 1 FF&V Grant Part 2 Federal School Lunch Federal Breakfast Donated USDA Commodities Total Revenues:

(14,792.92) (482.80) (817.70) (683.98) (269.20) (89.40) (1,012.92) (5,725.66) (26,348.76) (11,620.86) (2,960.00) (64,804.20)

Expenditures Food Service - Salaries FFVP - Part 1 Salaries FFVP - Admin Salaries Food Service - Substitutes Food Service - Benefits Food Service - FICA FFVP - Part 1 FICA FFVP - Admin FICA Food Service - Retirement/Annuities Food Service - Workers Comp FFVP - Part 1 Worker's Comp FFVP - Admin Worker's Comp Food Service - Supplies FFVP - Part 1 Supplies FFVP - Part 2 Supplies Food Service - Food Donated USDA Commodities FFVP - Part 1 Food FFVP - Part 2 Food Food Service - Propane Gas Food Service - Equipment Miscellaneous Exp. Total Expenditures: Surplus/(Deficit) for FY 2012 Fund Transfer from General Fund Ending Fund Balance at 6/30/12 - Audited:

Page 69

31,424.36 498.30 2,865.66 759.96 13,150.33 2,362.09 38.11 226.10 1,037.75 1,203.63 18.66 110.83 640.26 110.96 516.39 17,925.23 2,960.00 346.89 2,006.68 921.70 106.95 260.16 79,491.00 (14,686.80) 40,000.00 10,219.20


Newbury Elementary School

Annual Report 2013

Capital Improvement Report NEWBURY$ELEMENTARY$SCHOOL CAPITAL$IMPROVEMENT$REPORT 2011,2012 May$2012$Vote$,$ Capital$ Improvement Fund$Balance$,$6/30/11$,$Audited

90,807

Revenues Interest Transfer-from-General-Fund-per-May-2012-vote Transfer-from-Capital-Improvement-per-May-2010-Vote Transfer-from-capital-Improvement-per-May-2011-Vote Transfer-from-capital-Improvement-per-May-2012-Vote *Total$Revenues:

392

90,000 90,392*

Expenditures Legal-Services-from-Bond Interest Repair-of-interior-stairwell Floor-Replacement Total$Expenditures:

16,334 16,334

Surplus/(Deficit)$for$Year:

74,058*

Ending$Fund$Balance$at$6/30/12$,$Audited:

164,865

*Includes$funds$transferred$in$from$the$General$Fund

Page 70


Newbury Elementary School

Annual Report 2013

Wells Scholarship Fund

NEWBURY%ELEMENTARY%SCHOOL Wells%Scholarship%Fund 2011.2012

Fund%Balance%.%6/30/11%.%Audited Audit&Adjusstment Revenues Interest %%%Total%Revenues: Expenditures Scholarship&Award &&&Total&Expenditures: Surplus/(Deficit)%for%Year: *Ending%Fund%Balance%.%6/30/12%.%Audited

Wells% Scholarship. General 758.88

Wells% Scholarship%.% Engineering 1,141.89

Total 1,900.77

74.61 74.61

75.52 75.52

150.13 150.13

0.00

0.00

0.00

74.61

75.52

150.13

833.49

1,217.41

2,050.90

*This&does&not&include&the&investment&account.&&Fund&Balance&at&6/30/12&(for&both&funds& combined)&L&including&the&investment&account&is&$21,901.

Page 71


Newbury Elementary School

Annual Report 2013

Orange East Supervisory Union Consolidated Federal Program FY13

OESU strategies that benefit all five schools, including NES Early Childhood Program - Pre-school

65,000.00

Services for Independent Schools - Supplemental Reading 10,950.00 Assessment for Learning Professional Development

15,000.00

Implementation of CCSS Professional Development

14,241.00

Northeast Kingdom School Development

6,800.00

Curriculum Director

77,996.00

Literacy Consortium

2,200.00

Early Numeracy Course

3,000.00

Parental Engagement

7,562.86

Homeless Funds

1,000.00

Leadership Team Professional Development

5,000.00

VCAT Monitoring System

3,000.00

Vermont Mathematics Initiative

14,652.00

Supplemental Educational Services School Improvement

25,000.00

Total OESU Strategies

$251,401.86

Page 72


Newbury Elementary School

Annual Report 2013

2011-2012 FUND BALANCE NEWBURY TOWN SCHOOL DISTRICT 2011-12 FUND BALANCE General Fund Elementary Budget

Beg. Balance $275,556.80

Revenue $2,168,857.00

Expenditures $2,199,611.00

End. Balance $244,802.80

$74,473.92

$0.00

$0.00

$74,473.92

$6,333.56

$0.00

$0.00

$6,333.56

$10,000.00

$0.00 $90,392.00

$0.00 $16,334.00

$10,000.00 $74,058.00

$90,807.48

$90,392.00

$16,334.00

$164,865.48

Special Revenue Fund OESU Medicaid OESU CFP Schoolwide OESU Title I ARRA OESU IDEAB Education Job Funds Bailey Commons Diversity Career Friends of Newbury OESU VEHI Wellness Future Exp. Reserve Farm Totals

Beg. Balance $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $80.00 $187.30 $313.75 $0.00 $0.00 $125.55 $706.60

Revenue $15,802.38 $142,328.48 $253.75 $7,677.83 $27,261.29 $8,000.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $118.32 $45,000.00 $0.00 $246,442.05

Expenditures $15,802.38 $142,328.48 $253.75 $7,677.83 $27,261.29 $2,277.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $118.32 $0.00 $0.00 $195,719.05

End. Balance $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $5,723.00 $80.00 $187.30 $313.75 $0.00 $45,000.00 $125.55 $51,429.60

Trust Fund Abe Wells ScholarshipNonexpendable Helen Wells ScholarshipNonexpendable Wells Scholarship Expendable Wells Engineering ScholarshipExpendable Totals

Beg. Balance

Revenue

Expenditures

End. Balance

$10,000.00

$0.00

$0.00

$10,000.00

$10,000.00 $758.88

$0.00 $74.61

$0.00 $74.61

$10,000.00 $758.88

$1,141.89 $21,900.77

$75.52 $150.13

$75.52 $150.13

$1,141.89 $21,900.77

Enterprise Fund Food Service

Beg. Balance ($15,094.69)

Revenue $104,804.50

Expenditures $79,491.00

End. Balance $10,218.81

Subtotal

$373,876.96

$2,610,645.68

$2,491,305.18

$493,217.46

Debt Fund VT Municipal Bond Bank-Addition VT Municipal Bond Bank-Roof Teacher Retirement Totals

Beg. Balance $165,000.00 $250,000.00 $0.00 $415,000.00

Revenue $0.00 $0.00 $91,117.00 $91,117.00

Expenditures $55,000.00 $0.00 $0.00 $55,000.00

End. Balance $110,000.00 $250,000.00 $91,117.00 $451,117.00

Agency Fund Student Activities

Beg. Balance $14,996.90

Revenue $0.00

Expenditures $0.00

End. Balance $14,996.90

Capital Improvement Fund Construction/Roof Project FY 2010 Capital Improvement per May 2010 vote FY 2011 Capital Improvement per May 2011 vote FY 2011 Capital Improvement per May 2011 vote Totals

Independent Financial Audit for FY 2011-2012 will be available at the office of the superintendent by March 31, 2013.

Page 73


Newbury Elementary School

Annual Report 2013

Expenditure Budget

Newbury Town School District FY 2013- 14 Expenditure Budget FY 11-12 Budget

Account Number / Description

100 General Fund 051 EEE Program 1200 Special Education 100-051-1200-556000-00 EEE PreSchool Sped - Tuitions

FY 11-12 Actual

FY 12-13 Adopted FY 2012-13 FY 13-14 Proposed Budget Spent/YTD Est.

Increase (Decrease)

Percentage Change Budget to Budget

7/1/2011 - 6/30/2012 7/1/2011 - 6/30/2012 7/1/2012 - 6/30/2013 7/1/2012 - 6/30/2013 7/1/2013 - 6/30/2014

$1,107.00

$3,252.00

$10,000.00

$5,458.00

$7,000.00

($3,000.00)

-30.00%

TOTAL 1200 Special Education 2142 Psychological Evaluations 100-051-2142-533000-00 EEE - Purchased Psychological Services

$1,107.00

$3,252.00

$10,000.00

$5,458.00

$7,000.00

($3,000.00)

-30.00%

$1,000.00

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

0.00%

TOTAL 2142 Psychological Evaluations 2150 Speech/Language 100-051-2150-533000-00 EEE - Purchased Speech/Lang. Services

$1,000.00

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

0.00%

$1,785.00

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

0.00%

TOTAL 2150 Speech/Language 2420 Special Education Administration 100-051-2420-533100-00 OESU EEE/ECP Assessment

$1,785.00

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

0.00%

$25,249.00

$25,248.00

$24,121.00

$24,121.00

$26,152.00

$2,031.00

8.42%

TOTAL 2420 Special Education Administration

$25,249.00

$25,248.00

$24,121.00

$24,121.00

$26,152.00

$2,031.00

8.42%

$29,141.00

$28,500.00

$34,121.00

$29,579.00

$33,152.00

($969.00)

-2.84%

$401,285.20 $29,285.00 $0.00 $7,000.00 $0.00 $27,095.00 $79,820.90 $32,939.00 $0.00 $412.45 $3,916.24 $1,556.25 $0.00 $3,660.00

$415,375.67 $46,885.89 $0.00 $8,010.00 $1,046.61 $0.00 $96,821.83 $34,748.87 $72.05 $365.89 $4,175.75 $1,688.72 $138.71 $3,986.31

$404,098.40 $45,556.92 $10,000.00 $7,000.00 $2,500.00 $32,987.04 $93,049.92 $36,815.05 $191.25 $394.20 $4,695.84 $1,616.64 $415.68 $3,810.17

$261,320.77 $27,134.70 $7,325.70 $5,640.00 $0.00 $36,952.38 $83,032.16 $23,591.39 $0.00 $341.82 $4,369.89 $1,702.65 $84.31 $2,686.71

$459,202.13 $20,748.21 $10,000.00 $8,380.00 $2,500.00 $36,952.38 $98,321.28 $40,078.58 $191.25 $502.99 $5,258.40 $2,112.51 $0.00 $4,715.13

$55,103.73 ($24,808.71) $0.00 $1,380.00 $0.00 $3,965.34 $5,271.36 $3,263.53 $0.00 $108.79 $562.56 $495.87 ($415.68) $904.96

13.64% -54.46% 0.00% 19.71% 0.00% 12.02% 5.67% 8.86% 0.00% 27.60% 11.98% 30.67% -100.00% 23.75%

TOTAL 051 EEE Program 101 Grades K - 6 1100 Regular Instruction 100-101-1100-511000-00 Direct Instruction-Salaries-Professional 100-101-1100-511100-00 Direct Instruction - Salaries - Paras 100-101-1100-511103-00 Direct Instr-Salaries-Para-Inelig SpecEd 100-101-1100-511200-00 Direct Instruction - Substitutes 100-101-1100-511300-08 Direct Instruction - Homebound Tutor Sal 100-101-1100-515000-00 Early Retirement Incentive Buyout 100-101-1100-521000-00 Direct Instruction - Health Insurance 100-101-1100-522000-00 Direct Instruction - FICA 100-101-1100-522000-08 Direct Instruction-Homebound Tutor-FICA 100-101-1100-523100-00 Direct Instruction - Life Insurance 100-101-1100-523500-00 Direct Instruction - Dental Benefits 100-101-1100-523600-00 Direct Instruction - LTD Insurance 100-101-1100-524000-00 Direct Instruction - Retirement/Annuitie 100-101-1100-525000-00 Direct Instruction - Worker's Comp

Page 74


Newbury Elementary School

Annual Report 2013

Newbury Town School District FY 2013- 14 Expenditure Budget FY 11-12 Budget

Account Number / Description

FY 11-12 Actual

FY 12-13 Adopted FY 2012-13 FY 13-14 Proposed Budget Spent/YTD Est.

Increase (Decrease)

Percentage Change Budget to Budget

7/1/2011 - 6/30/2012 7/1/2011 - 6/30/2012 7/1/2012 - 6/30/2013 7/1/2012 - 6/30/2013 7/1/2013 - 6/30/2014

100-101-1100-525000-08 Direct Instr Homebound Tutor Worker Comp 100-101-1100-543000-00 Direct Instruction - Equip Maintenance 100-101-1100-553000-00 Direct Instruction - Communications 100-101-1100-558000-00 Direct Instruction - Staff Travel 100-101-1100-558001-00 Direct Instructn Homebound Tutor Travel 100-101-1100-561000-00 Direct Instruction- Supplies 100-101-1100-561000-31 Direct Instruction - Supplies -Music/Art 100-101-1100-561000-32 Direct Instruction - Supplies - P.E. 100-101-1100-564000-00 Direct Instruction - Books 100-101-1100-566000-00 Direct Instruction-Manipulatives 100-101-1100-573000-00 Direct Instruction-Equipment 100-101-1100-573000-31 Direct Instruction-Equipment-Music/Art

$0.00 $2,000.00 $0.00 $500.00 $0.00 $17,000.00 $1,700.00 $0.00 $3,600.00 $750.00 $1,400.00 $0.00

$7.93 $0.00 $0.00 $168.72 $355.20 $13,711.37 $1,628.89 $51.23 $1,764.75 $100.00 $1,484.98 $0.00

$0.00 $2,000.00 $500.00 $500.00 $0.00 $17,500.00 $1,700.00 $0.00 $3,600.00 $750.00 $1,400.00 $0.00

$0.00 $1,140.48 $0.00 $84.75 $0.00 $17,281.88 $2,075.40 $1,556.37 $3,625.37 $0.00 $81.32 $86.00

$22.50 $2,000.00 $500.00 $500.00 $0.00 $17,500.00 $3,064.00 $1,500.00 $3,600.00 $750.00 $1,400.00 $0.00

$22.50 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $1,364.00 $1,500.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00

100.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 80.24% 100.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

TOTAL 1100 Regular Instruction 1400 Student Activities 100-101-1400-530000-00 Student Activities - Field Trips Fees

$613,920.04

$632,589.37

$671,081.11

$480,114.05

$719,799.36

$48,718.25

7.26%

$0.00

$1,343.53

$1,000.00

$711.00

$1,000.00

$0.00

0.00%

$0.00

$1,343.53

$1,000.00

$711.00

$1,000.00

$0.00

0.00%

$44,050.40 $8,787.24 $3,369.85 $43.80 $352.08 $175.92 $374.43 $0.00 $100.00 $426.00

$44,962.90 $10,445.93 $3,221.25 $43.80 $342.60 $175.02 $382.17 $90.00 $483.91 $24.85

$27,952.80 $12,192.00 $2,138.39 $43.80 $665.04 $176.16 $237.60 $0.00 $1,000.00 $300.00

$16,860.49 $9,428.12 $994.80 $29.20 $0.61 $71.92 $143.25 ($45.00) $321.35 $0.00

$28,503.20 $13,249.56 $2,180.50 $50.40 $0.00 $131.16 $256.53 $0.00 $500.00 $300.00

$550.40 $1,057.56 $42.11 $6.60 ($665.04) ($45.00) $18.93 $0.00 ($500.00) $0.00

1.97% 8.67% 1.97% 15.07% -100.00% -25.54% 7.97% 0.00% -50.00% 0.00%

$57,679.72

$60,172.43

$44,705.79

$27,804.74

$45,171.35

$465.56

1.04%

$40,687.80 $3,000.00 $8,787.24 $3,112.62 $43.80

$41,040.28 $780.00 $8,923.38 $2,815.23 $51.10

$41,814.00 $3,000.00 $9,094.80 $3,198.76 $43.80

$20,854.56 $90.00 $9,385.64 $1,320.54 $29.20

$34,410.20 $3,000.00 $9,883.68 $2,861.88 $50.40

($7,403.80) $0.00 $788.88 ($336.88) $6.60

-17.71% 0.00% 8.67% -10.53% 15.07%

TOTAL 1400 Student Activities 2100 Guidance 100-101-2100-511000-00 Guidance - Salaries 100-101-2100-521000-00 Guidance - Health Insurance 100-101-2100-522000-00 Guidance - FICA 100-101-2100-523100-00 Guidance - Life Ins 100-101-2100-523500-00 Guidance - Dental Benefits 100-101-2100-523600-00 Guidance - LTD Insurance 100-101-2100-525000-00 Guidance - Worker's Comp 100-101-2100-559000-00 Guidance - Testing 100-101-2100-561000-00 Guidance - Supplies 100-101-2100-564000-00 Guidance - Books TOTAL 2100 Guidance 2130 Health/Nurse's Office 100-101-2130-511000-00 Health - Salaries 100-101-2130-511200-00 Health - Substitutes 100-101-2130-521000-00 Health - Health Insurance 100-101-2130-522000-00 Health - FICA 100-101-2130-523100-00 Health - Life Insurance

Page 75


Newbury Elementary School

Annual Report 2013

Newbury Town School District FY 2013- 14 Expenditure Budget FY 11-12 Budget

Account Number / Description

100-101-2130-523500-00 Health - Dental Benefits 100-101-2130-523600-00 Health - LTD Insurance 100-101-2130-525000-00 Health - Worker's Comp 100-101-2130-543000-00 Health - Equipment Maintenance/Repairs 100-101-2130-561000-00 Health - Supplies 100-101-2130-573000-00 Health - Equipment TOTAL 2130 Health/Nurse's Office 2160 Occupational Therapy 100-101-2160-533000-00 K-6 OT Services Total 2160 Occupational Therapy 2190 Physical Therapy 100-101-2190-533000-00 K-6 PT Services Total 2190 Physical Therapy Services 2210 Professional Development 100-101-2210-527000-00 Professional Development-Tuition Reimbur 100-101-2210-530000-00 Professional Development-In Service Spls TOTAL 2210 Professional Development 2220 Library/Media 100-101-2220-511000-00 Library - Salaries 100-101-2220-511200-00 Library - Substitutes 100-101-2220-521000-00 Library - Health Insurance 100-101-2220-522000-00 Library - FICA 100-101-2220-523100-00 Library - Life Insurance 100-101-2220-523500-00 Library - Dental Benefits 100-101-2220-523600-00 Library - LTD insurance 100-101-2220-525000-00 Library - Worker's Comp 100-101-2220-561000-00 Library - Supplies 100-101-2220-564000-00 Library - Books 100-101-2220-565000-00 Library - Audio/Visual 100-101-2220-567000-00 Library - Software 100-101-2220-573000-00 Library - Equipment TOTAL 2220 Library/Media

FY 11-12 Actual

FY 12-13 Adopted Budget

FY 2012-13 FY 13-14 Proposed Spent/YTD Est.

Increase (Decrease)

Percentage Change Budget to Budget

7/1/2011 - 6/30/2012 7/1/2011 - 6/30/2012 7/1/2012 - 6/30/2013 7/1/2012 - 6/30/2013 7/1/2013 - 6/30/2014

$705.84 $163.44 $345.85 $100.00 $700.00 $300.00

$686.88 $129.68 $320.99 $0.00 $1,019.64 $0.00

$686.88 $167.28 $355.42 $100.00 $700.00 $300.00

$832.51 $70.40 $221.44 $0.00 $819.35 $0.00

$1,026.72 $117.36 $336.69 $50.00 $800.00 $350.00

$339.84 ($49.92) ($18.73) ($50.00) $100.00 $50.00

49.48% -29.84% -5.27% -50.00% 14.29% 16.67%

$57,946.59

$55,767.18

$59,460.94

$33,623.64

$52,886.93

($6,574.01)

-11.06%

$6,000.00 $6,000.00

$0.00 $0.00

$1,000.00 $1,000.00

$0.00 $0.00

$0.00 $0.00

($1,000.00) ($1,000.00)

0.00% 0.00%

$500.00 $500.00

$0.00 $0.00

$0.00 $0.00

$0.00 $0.00

$0.00 $0.00

$0.00 $0.00

0.00% 0.00%

$6,440.00 $2,000.00

$5,440.00 $371.00

$8,800.00 $2,100.00

$5,862.00 $1,082.88

$15,200.00 $2,100.00

$6,400.00 $0.00

72.73% 0.00%

$8,440.00

$5,811.00

$10,900.00

$6,944.88

$17,300.00

$6,400.00

58.72%

$28,491.00 $0.00 $0.00 $2,179.56 $43.80 $240.00 $73.68 $242.17 $400.00 $2,110.00 $500.00 $0.00 $250.00

$29,108.50 $120.00 $0.00 $2,235.88 $40.15 $342.60 $104.50 $237.72 $445.68 $2,029.49 $216.88 $495.00 $81.48

$18,798.00 $0.00 $7,620.00 $1,438.05 $21.90 $415.68 $75.18 $159.78 $400.00 $2,110.00 $500.00 $500.00 $250.00

$9,835.28 $0.00 $1,927.84 $725.91 $14.59 $166.51 $44.96 $113.85 $694.65 $1,118.68 $0.00 $495.00 $0.00

$17,192.50 $0.00 $3,142.56 $1,315.23 $25.20 $177.12 $79.08 $154.73 $500.00 $2,110.00 $500.00 $500.00 $250.00

($1,605.50) $0.00 ($4,477.44) ($122.82) $3.30 ($238.56) $3.90 ($5.05) $100.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00

-8.54% 0.00% -58.76% -8.54% 15.07% -57.39% 5.19% -3.16% 25.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

$34,530.21

$35,457.88

$32,288.59

$15,137.27

$25,946.42

($6,342.17)

-19.64%

Page 76


Newbury Elementary School

Annual Report 2013

Newbury Town School District FY 2013- 14 Expenditure Budget FY 11-12 Budget

Account Number / Description

2225 Technology 100-101-2225-511000-00 Technology-Salaries 100-101-2225-521000-00 Technology - Health Insurance 100-101-2225-522000-00 Technology-FICA 100-101-2225-523100-00 Technology-Life Insurance 100-101-2225-523500-00 Technology-Dental Insurance 100-101-2225-523600-00 Technology-LTD Insurance 100-101-2225-525000-00 Technology-Worker's Comp 100-101-2225-533000-00 Technology - Contracted Services 100-101-2225-543000-00 Technology-Repairs/Maintenance 100-101-2225-561000-00 Technology-Supplies 100-101-2225-565000-00 Technology - Software 100-101-2225-573000-00 Technology-Equipment

FY 11-12 Actual

FY 12-13 Adopted FY 2012-13 FY 13-14 Proposed Budget Spent/YTD Est.

Increase (Decrease)

Percentage Change Budget to Budget

7/1/2011 - 6/30/2012 7/1/2011 - 6/30/2012 7/1/2012 - 6/30/2013 7/1/2012 - 6/30/2013 7/1/2013 - 6/30/2014

$0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $3,000.00 $0.00 $0.00 $1,000.00

$0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $637.50 $2,706.39 $2,548.43 $0.00 $0.00

$18,798.00 $7,620.00 $1,438.05 $21.90 $415.68 $75.18 $159.78 $8,000.00 $0.00 $1,000.00 $0.00 $10,000.00

$10,037.91 $1,927.84 $741.53 $14.61 $157.04 $44.96 $85.30 $4,854.00 $0.00 $251.82 $112.00 $9,308.36

$17,192.50 $3,142.56 $1,315.23 $25.20 $177.12 $79.08 $154.73 $9,840.00 $1,000.00 $1,000.00 $0.00 $10,000.00

($1,605.50) ($4,477.44) ($122.82) $3.30 ($238.56) $3.90 ($5.05) $1,840.00 $1,000.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00

-8.54% -58.76% -8.54% 15.07% -57.39% 5.19% -3.16% 23.00% 100.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

TOTAL 2225 Technology 2310 School Board 100-101-2310-511000-00 School Board-Salaries/Stipends 100-101-2310-522000-00 School Board-FICA 100-101-2310-525000-00 School Board - Worker's Comp 100-101-2310-538500-00 School Board - Legal Services 100-101-2310-538800-00 School Board - Auditing Services 100-101-2310-553000-00 School Board-Communications 100-101-2310-554000-00 School Board-Advertising 100-101-2310-555000-00 School Board-Printing 100-101-2310-561000-00 School Board-Supplies 100-101-2310-581000-00 School Board-Dues and Fees

$4,000.00

$5,892.32

$47,528.59

$27,535.37

$43,926.42

($3,602.17)

-7.58%

$5,820.00 $375.00 $0.00 $5,000.00 $6,000.00 $600.00 $2,000.00 $2,200.00 $600.00 $1,600.00

$5,364.95 $402.41 $44.73 $0.00 $14,700.00 $338.80 $1,271.29 $2,065.20 $143.38 $1,025.00

$5,820.00 $445.23 $49.47 $5,000.00 $9,500.00 $600.00 $2,000.00 $2,200.00 $600.00 $1,600.00

$2,375.00 $181.69 $20.19 $1,012.00 $9,200.00 $0.00 $640.25 $0.00 $305.62 $1,133.00

$6,120.00 $468.20 $96.20 $5,000.00 $10,000.00 $600.00 $2,000.00 $2,400.00 $600.00 $1,600.00

$300.00 $22.97 $46.73 $0.00 $500.00 $0.00 $0.00 $200.00 $0.00 $0.00

5.15% 5.16% 94.46% 0.00% 5.26% 0.00% 0.00% 9.09% 0.00% 0.00%

TOTAL 2310 School Board 2318 School Board Negotiations 100-101-2318-533000-00 School Board-Negotiation Services

$24,195.00

$25,355.76

$27,814.70

$14,867.75

$28,884.40

$1,069.70

3.85%

$0.00

$27.83

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

0.00%

$0.00

$27.83

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

0.00%

$70,921.00 $1,553.00 $7,218.00

$70,921.00 $1,553.00 $10,464.40

$87,191.00 $1,725.00 $10,068.74

$85,268.00 $1,553.00 $11,943.18

$90,843.00 $1,701.00 $11,633.00

$3,652.00 ($24.00) $1,564.26

4.19% -1.39% 15.54%

TOTAL 2318 School Board Negotiations 2320 Superintendent's Office 100-101-2320-533100-00 OESU Administrative Assessment 100-101-2320-533101-00 OESU - Arts Assessment 100-101-2320-533102-00 OESU English Language Learner Assessment

Page 77


Newbury Elementary School

Annual Report 2013

Newbury Town School District FY 2013- 14 Expenditure Budget FY 11-12 Budget

Account Number / Description

FY 11-12 Actual

FY 12-13 Adopted Budget

FY 2012-13 FY 13-14 Proposed Spent/YTD Est.

Increase (Decrease)

Percentage Change Budget to Budget

7/1/2011 - 6/30/2012 7/1/2011 - 6/30/2012 7/1/2012 - 6/30/2013 7/1/2012 - 6/30/2013 7/1/2013 - 6/30/2014

TOTAL 2320 Superintendent's Office 2410 Principal's Office 100-101-2410-511000-00 Principal's Office-Principal-Salary 100-101-2410-511100-00 Principal's Office-Support Staff-Salary 100-101-2410-521000-00 Principal's Office-Health Insurance 100-101-2410-522000-00 Principal's Office-FICA 100-101-2410-523100-00 Principal's Office - Life Insurance 100-101-2410-523500-00 Principal's Office - Dental Insurance 100-101-2410-523600-00 Principal's Office-LTD Insurance 100-101-2410-524000-00 Principal's Office - Retirement/Annuity 100-101-2410-525000-00 Principal's Office-Worker's Comp 100-101-2410-527000-00 Principal's Office - Professional Dev 100-101-2410-543000-00 Principal's Office-Repairs 100-101-2410-554000-00 Principal's Office-Advertising 100-101-2410-558000-00 Principal's Office-Travel 100-101-2410-561000-00 Principal's Office-Supplies 100-101-2410-567000-00 Principal's Office - Software 100-101-2410-581000-00 Principal's Office-Dues and Fees

$79,692.00

$82,938.40

$98,984.74

$98,764.18

$104,177.00

$5,192.26

5.25%

$64,000.00 $25,332.00 $14,724.60 $6,834.00 $43.80 $952.92 $234.00 $0.00 $760.00 $1,000.00 $1,000.00 $800.00 $125.00 $1,500.00 $0.00 $900.00

$64,225.71 $26,208.93 $15,421.68 $6,758.87 $160.60 $650.64 $246.86 $0.00 $759.94 $1,495.00 $0.00 $0.00 $109.89 $1,093.61 $0.00 $1,105.00

$65,600.00 $26,112.00 $11,251.44 $6,893.56 $87.60 $650.64 $255.96 $0.00 $765.95 $1,000.00 $500.00 $800.00 $200.00 $1,000.00 $1,800.00 $1,200.00

$49,330.97 $19,638.26 $9,626.20 $5,211.45 $146.00 $542.20 $213.29 $1,025.00 $586.23 $189.00 $0.00 $134.95 $0.00 $533.07 $1,924.00 $0.00

$68,224.00 $26,624.00 $12,354.60 $7,255.88 $201.48 $672.72 $313.80 $1,705.68 $853.64 $2,500.00 $500.00 $800.00 $200.00 $1,200.00 $1,800.00 $1,200.00

$2,624.00 $512.00 $1,103.16 $362.32 $113.88 $22.08 $57.84 $1,705.68 $87.69 $1,500.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $200.00 $0.00 $0.00

4.00% 1.96% 9.80% 5.26% 130.00% 3.39% 22.60% 100.00% 11.45% 150.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 20.00% 0.00% 0.00%

TOTAL 2410 Principal's Office 2490 Other Support Administration 100-101-2490-553000-00 Communications-Telephone, Postage, etc. 100-101-2490-573000-00 Equipment Purchases/Leases

$118,206.32

$118,236.73

$118,117.15

$89,100.62

$126,405.80

$8,288.65

7.02%

$7,500.00 $5,000.00

$5,858.01 $6,041.99

$6,500.00 $5,250.00

$7,823.23 $2,212.24

$10,000.00 $5,250.00

$3,500.00 $0.00

53.85% 0.00%

TOTAL 2490 Other Support Administration 2520 Fiscal Services 100-101-2520-511000-00 Treasurer-Salary 100-101-2520-522000-00 Treasurer-FICA 100-101-2520-531000-00 Treasurer-Contracted Services 100-101-2520-561000-00 Treasurer-Supplies 100-101-2520-581000-00 Treasurer-Dues and Fees 100-101-2520-583500-00 FISCAL - Interest Expense

$12,500.00

$11,900.00

$11,750.00

$10,035.47

$15,250.00

$3,500.00

29.79%

$1,000.00 $75.00 $0.00 $500.00 $500.00 $7,000.00

$0.00 $0.00 $1,000.00 $0.00 $0.00 $645.19

$1,000.00 $76.50 $0.00 $500.00 $500.00 $8,000.00

$0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00

$2,000.00 $76.50 $1,000.00 $500.00 $500.00 $8,000.00

$1,000.00 $0.00 $1,000.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00

100.00% 0.00% 100.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

$9,075.00

$1,645.19

$10,076.50

$0.00

$12,076.50

$2,000.00

19.85%

$33,871.60 $2,000.00

$32,596.40 $4,018.26

$33,411.31 $3,000.00

$25,040.40 $4,121.44

$34,054.95 $4,200.00

$643.64 $1,200.00

1.93% 40.00%

TOTAL 2520 Fiscal Services 2600 Facilities Maintenance 100-101-2600-511100-00 Facilities-Salaries 100-101-2600-511200-00 Facilities-Temporary Help

Page 78


Newbury Elementary School

Annual Report 2013

Newbury Town School District FY 2013- 14 Expenditure Budget FY 11-12 Budget

Account Number / Description

100-101-2600-522000-00 Facilities-FICA 100-101-2600-525000-00 Facilities-Worker's Comp 100-101-2600-533000-00 Facilities - Purchased Services 100-101-2600-541100-00 Facilities-Water/Sewer 100-101-2600-542100-00 Facilities-Mowing/Rubbish Removal 100-101-2600-542200-00 Facilities-Plowing and Sanding 100-101-2600-543000-00 Facilities-Repairs and Maintenance 100-101-2600-546000-00 Facilities - Grounds Improvement 100-101-2600-552100-00 Facilities-Property/Liability Insurance 100-101-2600-558000-00 Facilities-Travel 100-101-2600-561000-00 Facilities-Supplies 100-101-2600-562200-00 Facilities-Electricity 100-101-2600-562400-00 Facilities-Fuel Oil 100-101-2600-573000-00 Facilities-Equipment

FY 11-12 Actual

FY 12-13 Adopted Budget

FY 2012-13 FY 13-14 Proposed Spent/YTD Est.

Increase (Decrease)

Percentage Change Budget to Budget

7/1/2011 - 6/30/2012 7/1/2011 - 6/30/2012 7/1/2012 - 6/30/2013 7/1/2012 - 6/30/2013 7/1/2013 - 6/30/2014

$2,591.17 $1,270.19 $10,000.00 $5,250.00 $5,000.00 $6,500.00 $17,000.00 $0.00 $17,494.63 $50.00 $12,000.00 $30,000.00 $33,000.00 $2,000.00

$2,800.88 $1,373.10 $9,990.51 $3,687.55 $5,910.00 $1,695.00 $32,845.21 $1,935.00 $15,548.09 $0.00 $10,577.87 $29,494.25 $30,141.00 $2,158.00

$2,555.96 $1,252.92 $10,000.00 $5,250.00 $5,000.00 $6,500.00 $17,000.00 $0.00 $20,255.00 $50.00 $12,000.00 $27,000.00 $33,000.00 $2,000.00

$2,230.85 $1,093.62 $6,146.00 $1,634.64 $4,744.00 $2,380.00 $16,569.34 $275.77 $19,088.61 $0.00 $11,084.81 $21,187.63 $25,497.57 $334.95

$2,605.21 $1,345.17 $10,000.00 $5,250.00 $5,000.00 $6,500.00 $17,000.00 $300.00 $18,000.00 $50.00 $14,000.00 $27,000.00 $33,000.00 $2,000.00

$49.25 $92.25 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $300.00 ($2,255.00) $0.00 $2,000.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00

1.93% 7.36% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 100.00% -11.13% 0.00% 16.67% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

TOTAL 2600 Facilities Maintenance 2700 Transportation 100-101-2700-551300-00 Tranportation - Contracted 100-101-2700-551301-00 Transportation - Fuel Increase 100-101-2700-551500-00 Transportation - Field Trips

$178,027.59

$184,771.12

$178,275.19

$141,429.63

$180,305.33

$2,030.14

1.14%

$84,395.00 $10,000.00 $5,785.00

$92,139.80 $211.86 $2,713.30

$76,894.00 $10,000.00 $5,785.00

$53,417.70 $100.59 $1,531.35

$80,000.00 $5,000.00 $5,785.00

$3,106.00 ($5,000.00) $0.00

4.04% -50.00% 0.00%

TOTAL 2700 Transportation 5100 Debt Service 100-101-5100-583500-00 Debt Service - Bond Interest - Addition 100-101-5100-583500-01 Debt Service - Bond Interest - Roof 100-101-5100-591000-00 Debt Service - Bond Principal - Addition 100-101-5100-591000-01 Debt Service -New Bond Principal - Roof

$100,180.00

$95,064.96

$92,679.00

$55,049.64

$90,785.00

($1,894.00)

-2.04%

$7,770.00 $0.00 $55,000.00 $8,736.00

$7,790.75 $0.00 $55,000.00 $8,736.00

$4,674.45 $8,736.00 $55,000.00 $0.00

$3,116.30 $4,368.00 $55,000.00 $0.00

$1,558.15 $8,736.00 $55,000.00 $0.00

($3,116.30) $0.00 $0.00 $0.00

-66.67% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

TOTAL 5100 Debt Service 5300 Funds Transfers 100-101-5300-590000-00 Funds Transfer - OUT

$71,506.00

$71,526.75

$68,410.45

$62,484.30

$65,294.15

($3,116.30)

-4.56%

$10,000.00

$10,000.00

$10,000.00

$10,000.00

$10,000.00

$0.00

0.00%

TOTAL 5300 Funds Transfers 5400 Depreciation 100-101-5400-590000-00 Prior Year Expenditure

$10,000.00

$10,000.00

$10,000.00

$10,000.00

$10,000.00

$0.00

0.00%

$0.00

($16,057.58)

$0.00

($56.61)

$0.00

$0.00

0.00%

$0.00

($16,057.58)

$0.00

($56.61)

$0.00

$0.00

0.00%

TOTAL 5400 Depreciation

Page 79


Newbury Elementary School

Annual Report 2013

Newbury Town School District FY 2013- 14 Expenditure Budget FY 11-12 Budget

Account Number / Description

FY 11-12 Actual

FY 12-13 Adopted Budget

FY 2012-13 FY 13-14 Proposed Spent/YTD Est.

Increase (Decrease)

Percentage Change Budget to Budget

7/1/2011 - 6/30/2012 7/1/2011 - 6/30/2012 7/1/2012 - 6/30/2013 7/1/2012 - 6/30/2013 7/1/2013 - 6/30/2014

TOTAL 101 Grades K - 6 211 Special Education Expenditures 1200 Special Education 100-211-1200-511000-00 Special Ed-Salaries-Teachers 100-211-1200-511100-00 Special Ed-Salaries-Paraprofessionals 100-211-1200-511200-00 Special Ed - Substitutes 100-211-1200-511400-00 Special Ed - Bus Monitor Salary 100-211-1200-521000-00 Special Ed-Health Insurance 100-211-1200-522000-00 Special Ed - FICA 100-211-1200-523000-00 Special Ed-Life Insurance 100-211-1200-523100-00 Special Ed- Life Insurance 100-211-1200-523500-00 Special Ed - Dental Benefits 100-211-1200-523600-00 Special Ed- LTD Insurance 100-211-1200-524000-00 Special Ed - Retirement/Annuities 100-211-1200-525000-00 Special Ed - Worker's Comp 100-211-1200-533000-00 Special Ed- Educational Purch. Services 100-211-1200-543000-00 Special Ed-Repairs 100-211-1200-558000-00 Special Ed- Staff Travel 100-211-1200-561000-00 Special Ed- Supplies 100-211-1200-564000-00 Special Ed-Books 100-211-1200-565000-00 Special Ed-Audio/Visual 100-211-1200-573000-00 Special Ed-Equipment

$1,386,398.47

$1,382,442.87

$1,484,072.75

$1,073,545.93

$1,539,208.66

$55,135.91

3.72%

$125,773.00 $164,940.00 $2,000.00 $0.00 $70,546.30 $22,240.00 $0.00 $131.40 $1,540.68 $497.28 $2,390.00 $2,471.00 $5,700.00 $0.00 $500.00 $700.00 $500.00 $200.00 $1,000.00

$124,412.52 $172,858.18 $4,080.00 $3,292.46 $67,810.46 $22,816.74 ($0.67) $104.20 $1,393.53 $460.17 $2,094.51 $2,616.37 $4,472.50 $65.00 $0.00 $1,707.37 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00

$133,845.65 $182,005.60 $2,000.00 $0.00 $62,080.78 $24,162.59 $0.00 $111.69 $1,404.75 $535.30 $2,462.45 $2,684.76 $0.00 $0.00 $500.00 $1,000.00 $500.00 $200.00 $1,000.00

$77,594.76 $122,131.15 $1,884.19 $96.60 $63,914.95 $14,877.61 $0.00 $81.62 $1,103.61 $365.44 $1,096.27 $1,912.66 $1,907.50 $0.00 $0.00 $683.01 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00

$135,348.00 $228,613.44 $4,340.00 $3,300.00 $95,085.78 $28,175.07 $0.00 $151.20 $1,026.96 $622.56 $2,269.74 $3,314.70 $0.00 $0.00 $500.00 $1,000.00 $500.00 $200.00 $1,000.00

$1,502.35 $46,607.84 $2,340.00 $3,300.00 $33,005.00 $4,012.48 $0.00 $39.51 ($377.79) $87.26 ($192.71) $629.94 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00

1.12% 25.61% 117.00% 100.00% 53.16% 16.61% 0.00% 35.37% -26.89% 16.30% -7.83% 23.46% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

TOTAL 1200 Special Education 2140 Behavior Specialist Puch Services 100-211-2140-533000-00 Special Ed - Behavioral Spec Purch Servc

$401,129.66

$408,183.34

$414,493.57

$287,649.37

$505,447.45

$90,953.88

21.94%

$17,000.00

$1,322.50

$17,000.00

$0.00

$10,000.00

($7,000.00)

-41.18%

TOTAL 2140 Behavior Specialist Puch Services 2142 Psychological Evaluations 100-211-2142-533000-00 Special Ed-Psychological Evals/Testing

$17,000.00

$1,322.50

$17,000.00

$0.00

$10,000.00

($7,000.00)

-41.18%

$5,000.00

$4,565.00

$5,000.00

$0.00

$5,000.00

$0.00

0.00%

TOTAL 2142 Psychological Evaluations 2143 Psychological Counseling 100-211-2143-533000-00 Special Ed - Counseling Purch. Services

$5,000.00

$4,565.00

$5,000.00

$0.00

$5,000.00

$0.00

0.00%

$7,500.00

$16,707.50

$7,500.00

$2,975.00

$5,000.00

($2,500.00)

-33.33%

$7,500.00

$16,707.50

$7,500.00

$2,975.00

$5,000.00

($2,500.00)

-33.33%

TOTAL 2143 Psychological Counseling

Page 80


Newbury Elementary School

Annual Report 2013

Newbury Town School District FY 2013- 14 Expenditure Budget FY 11-12 Budget

Account Number / Description

2150 Speech/Language 100-211-2150-511000-00 Special Ed-Speech/Lang Path.- Salaries 100-211-2150-521000-00 Special Ed-Speech/Lang.Path.- Health Ins 100-211-2150-522000-00 Special Ed-Speech/Lang Path. - FICA 100-211-2150-523100-00 Special Ed-Speech/Lang Path. - Life Ins 100-211-2150-523500-00 Special Ed-Speech/Lang Path.- Dental Ben 100-211-2150-523600-00 Special Ed-Speech/Lang. Path- LTD Ins 100-211-2150-525000-00 Special Ed-Speech/Lang Path-Worker Com 100-211-2150-533000-00 Special Ed-Speech/Lang. Path. Purch. Ser

FY 11-12 Actual

FY 12-13 Adopted Budget

FY 2012-13 FY 13-14 Proposed Spent/YTD Est.

Increase (Decrease)

Percentage Change Budget to Budget

7/1/2011 - 6/30/2012 7/1/2011 - 6/30/2012 7/1/2012 - 6/30/2013 7/1/2012 - 6/30/2013 7/1/2013 - 6/30/2014

$35,921.90 $14,724.60 $2,748.43 $43.80 $668.64 $143.16 $305.34 $975.00

$35,921.61 $16,151.21 $2,646.15 $38.30 $727.50 $143.77 $305.34 $0.00

$42,064.00 $11,959.68 $3,217.90 $43.80 $831.36 $164.16 $357.54 $0.00

$25,185.84 $12,166.63 $1,771.84 $34.97 $766.94 $134.31 $214.11 $0.00

$42,892.00 $16,561.92 $3,281.23 $50.40 $1,026.72 $197.28 $386.03 $0.00

$828.00 $4,602.24 $63.33 $6.60 $195.36 $33.12 $28.49 $0.00

1.97% 38.48% 1.97% 15.07% 23.50% 20.18% 7.97% 0.00%

TOTAL 2150 Speech/Language 2160 Occupational Therapy 100-211-2160-533000-00 Sped Ed-Occupational Therapy-Purch Srv 100-211-2160-533000-88 SPED ESY - Purchased OT Services

$55,530.87

$55,933.88

$58,638.44

$40,274.64

$64,395.58

$5,757.14

9.82%

$0.00 $26,810.00

$2,580.00 $0.00

$26,810.00 $0.00

$3,180.00 $0.00

$10,000.00 $0.00

($16,810.00) $0.00

-62.70% 0.00%

TOTAL 2160 Occupational Therapy 2420 Special Education Administration 100-211-2420-533100-00 OESU Spec Ed Assessment

$26,810.00

$2,580.00

$26,810.00

$3,180.00

$10,000.00

($16,810.00)

-62.70%

$7,878.00

$7,878.00

$7,548.00

$7,548.00

$7,732.00

$184.00

2.44%

TOTAL 2420 Special Education Administration 2700 Transportation 100-211-2700-551300-00 Spec Ed-Student Travel

$7,878.00

$7,878.00

$7,548.00

$7,548.00

$7,732.00

$184.00

2.44%

$6,000.00

$1,610.48

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

0.00%

$6,000.00

$1,610.48

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

0.00%

TOTAL 211 Special Education Expenditures 813 Small Schools Grant 1100 Regular Instruction 100-813-1100-561000-00 Small Schools Grant - Supplies

$526,848.53

$498,780.70

$536,990.01

$341,627.01

$607,575.03

$70,585.02

13.14%

$47,423.00

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

0.00%

TOTAL 1100 Regular Instruction 2410 Principal's Office 100-813-2410-567000-00 Small Schools Grant - Software

$47,423.00

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

0.00%

$0.00

$1,879.00

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

0.00%

$0.00

$1,879.00

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

0.00%

$0.00

$21,892.43

$0.00

$7,641.63

$0.00

$0.00

0.00%

TOTAL 2700 Transportation

TOTAL 2410 Principal's Office 2600 Facilities Maintenance 100-813-2600-533000-00 Small Schools Grant Energy Proj. Pur Ser

Page 81


Newbury Elementary School

Annual Report 2013

Newbury Town School District FY 2013- 14 Expenditure Budget FY 11-12 Budget

Account Number / Description

100-813-2600-561000-00 Small Schools Grant Energy Proj Supplies

FY 11-12 Actual

FY 12-13 Adopted Budget

FY 2012-13 FY 13-14 Proposed Spent/YTD Est.

Increase (Decrease)

Percentage Change Budget to Budget

7/1/2011 - 6/30/2012 7/1/2011 - 6/30/2012 7/1/2012 - 6/30/2013 7/1/2012 - 6/30/2013 7/1/2013 - 6/30/2014

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

$2,637.37

$0.00

$0.00

0.00%

$0.00

$21,892.43

$0.00

$10,279.00

$0.00

$0.00

0.00%

$47,423.00

$23,771.43

$0.00

$10,279.00

$0.00

$0.00

0.00%

$1,989,811.00

$1,933,495.00

$2,055,183.76

$1,455,030.94

$2,179,935.69

$124,751.93

6.07%

$0.00 $0.00 $0.00

$0.00 $0.00 $0.00

$4,337.98 $331.86 $36.87

$4,337.98 $331.86 $36.87

$0.00 $0.00 $0.00

($4,337.98) ($331.86) ($36.87)

0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

$0.00

$0.00

$4,706.71

$4,706.71

$0.00

($4,706.71)

0.00%

$0.00

$27,261.29

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

0.00%

$0.00

$27,261.29

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

0.00%

$0.00

$27,261.29

$4,706.71

$4,706.71

$0.00

($4,706.71)

0.00%

$0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00

$5,131.99 $1,990.50 $381.95 $5.50 $103.86 $20.40 $43.63

$0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00

$0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00

$0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00

$0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

TOTAL 2150 Speech/Language

$0.00

$7,677.83

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

0.00%

TOTAL 226 IDEA-B 250 Title I 1100 Regular Instruction

$0.00

$7,677.83

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

0.00%

TOTAL 2600 Facilities Maintenance TOTAL 813 Small Schools Grant TOTAL 100 General Fund 300 Special Revenue Fund 101 Grades K - 6 1100 Regular Instruction 300-101-1100-511000-97 Education Jobs Fund - Salaries-Prof 300-101-1100-522000-97 Education Jobs Fund - FICA 300-101-1100-525000-97 Education Jobs Fund - WC TOTAL 1100 Regular Instruction 2318 School Board Negotiations 300-101-2318-511000-97 Education Job Fund Salaries-Professional TOTAL 2318 School Board Negotiations TOTAL 101 Grades K - 6 226 IDEA-B 2150 Speech/Language 300-226-2150-511000-00 IDEAB Salaries-Professional Speech/Lang 300-226-2150-521000-00 IDEAB Health Insurance Speech Language 300-226-2150-522000-00 IDEAB - FICA Speech/Language 300-226-2150-523100-00 IDEAB Life Insurance Speech/Language 300-226-2150-523500-00 IDEAB Dental Benefits Speech/Language 300-226-2150-523600-00 IDEAB LTD Insurance Speech/Language 300-226-2150-525000-00 IDEAB - Worker's Comp Speech/Language

Page 82


Newbury Elementary School

Annual Report 2013

Newbury Town School District FY 2013- 14 Expenditure Budget FY 11-12 Budget

Account Number / Description

300-250-1100-511000-99 Title I - Salaries - ARRA 300-250-1100-522000-99 Title I - FICA - ARRA 300-250-1100-525000-99 Title I - Worker's Comp - ARRA TOTAL 1100 Regular Instruction TOTAL 250 Title I 481 Medicaid 2101 Planning Room 300-481-2101-511100-00 Planning Room-Salaries 300-481-2101-521000-00 Planning Room-Health Insurance 300-481-2101-522000-00 Planning Room-FICA 300-481-2101-524000-00 Planning Room - Annuities 300-481-2101-525000-00 Planning Room-Worker's Compensation 300-481-2101-561000-00 Planning Room-Supplies TOTAL 2101 Planning Room 2220 Library/Media 300-481-2220-511000-00 Medicaid - Librarian Salary 300-481-2220-521000-00 Medicaid - Library Health Ins 300-481-2220-522000-00 Medicaid - Library FICA 300-481-2220-523100-00 Medicaid - Library Life Insurance 300-481-2220-523500-00 Medicaid - Library Dental Benefits 300-481-2220-523600-00 Medicaid - Library LTD Insurance 300-481-2220-525000-00 Medicaid - Library WC TOTAL 2220 Library/Media 2225 Technology 300-481-2225-511000-00 Medicaid - Technology Salary 300-481-2225-521000-00 Medicaid - Technology Health Insurance 300-481-2225-522000-00 Medicaid - Technology FICA 300-481-2225-523100-00 Medicaid - Technology LIfe Insurance 300-481-2225-523500-00 Medicaid - Technology Dental Ins. 300-481-2225-523600-00 Medicaid - Technology LTD Ins. 300-481-2225-525000-00 Medicaid - Technology WC 300-481-2225-573000-00 Medicaid - Technology - Equipment TOTAL 2225 Technology

FY 11-12 Actual

FY 12-13 Adopted Budget

FY 2012-13 FY 13-14 Proposed Spent/YTD Est.

Increase (Decrease)

Percentage Change Budget to Budget

7/1/2011 - 6/30/2012 7/1/2011 - 6/30/2012 7/1/2012 - 6/30/2013 7/1/2012 - 6/30/2013 7/1/2013 - 6/30/2014

$0.00 $0.00 $0.00

$233.87 $17.89 $1.99

$0.00 $0.00 $0.00

$0.00 $0.00 $0.00

$0.00 $0.00 $0.00

$0.00 $0.00 $0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

$0.00

$253.75

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

0.00%

$0.00

$253.75

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

0.00%

$9,715.00 $5,558.00 $743.00 $289.00 $83.00 $0.00 $16,388.00

$4,815.93 $5,210.10 $326.45 $196.80 $40.99 $19.99 $10,610.26

$333.93 $235.04 $23.56 $9.58 $2.83 $200.00 $804.94

$231.09 $199.78 $15.45 $6.51 $2.02 $0.00 $454.85

$3,037.39 $2,544.88 $232.36 $91.12 $27.34 $0.00 $5,933.09

$2,703.46 $2,309.84 $208.80 $81.54 $24.51 ($200.00) $5,128.15

89.00% 90.76% 89.86% 89.48% 89.64% 0.00% 86.43%

$0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00

$0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00

$7,025.22 $481.96 $539.32 $3.66 $28.56 $11.24 $45.93

$702.52 $0.00 $51.85 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $5.97

$0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00

($7,025.22) ($481.96) ($539.32) ($3.66) ($28.56) ($11.24) ($45.93)

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

$0.00

$0.00

$8,135.89

$760.34

$0.00

($8,135.89)

0.00%

$0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00

$0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00

$7,025.22 $481.96 $539.31 $16.61 $28.55 $11.24 $74.48 $12,759.59

$702.52 $0.00 $51.86 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $5.97 $2,764.83

$0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $19,860.00

($7,025.22) ($481.96) ($539.31) ($16.61) ($28.55) ($11.24) ($74.48) $7,100.41

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 55.65%

$0.00

$0.00

$20,936.96

$3,525.18

$19,860.00

($1,076.96)

-5.14%

Page 83


Newbury Elementary School

Annual Report 2013

Newbury Town School District FY 2013- 14 Expenditure Budget FY 11-12 Budget

Account Number / Description

2410 Principal's Office 300-481-2410-511100-00 Medicaid Admin-Salary 300-481-2410-521000-00 Medicaid Admin-Health insurance 300-481-2410-522000-00 Medicaid Admin-FICA 300-481-2410-524000-00 Medicaid Admin-Retirement/Annuities 300-481-2410-525000-00 Medicaid Admin-Worker's Comp

FY 11-12 Actual

FY 12-13 Adopted Budget

FY 2012-13 Spent/YTD Est.

FY 13-14 Proposed

Increase (Decrease)

Percentage Change Budget to Budget

7/1/2011 - 6/30/2012 7/1/2011 - 6/30/2012 7/1/2012 - 6/30/2013 7/1/2012 - 6/30/2013 7/1/2013 - 6/30/2014

$3,886.00 $2,223.00 $573.00 $215.00 $94.00

$3,749.04 $1,140.60 $270.57 $0.00 $31.91

$79.43 $58.76 $5.90 $2.38 $0.56

$49.50 $49.84 $3.56 $1.49 $0.39

$2,024.93 $1,696.58 $154.91 $60.74 $18.22

$1,945.50 $1,637.82 $149.01 $58.36 $17.66

96.07% 96.53% 96.19% 96.08% 96.92%

$6,991.00

$5,192.12

$147.03

$104.78

$3,955.38

$3,808.35

96.28%

$23,379.00

$15,802.38

$30,024.82

$4,845.15

$29,748.47

($276.35)

-0.92%

$96,944.00 $0.00 $0.00 $14,950.00 $121.00 $0.00 $300.00 $0.00 $1,661.00 $10,024.00

$115,384.33 $5,896.74 $9,582.93 $9,171.35 $129.18 $507.94 $459.01 $176.30 $975.05 $0.00

$125,350.00 $0.00 $0.00 $9,593.18 $115.65 $235.54 $449.28 $0.00 $99.95 $0.00

$78,105.97 $0.00 $0.00 $5,975.19 $96.39 $214.12 $374.41 $0.00 $703.44 $0.00

$99,364.97 $0.00 $0.00 $7,601.43 $101.81 $265.68 $457.17 $0.00 $894.28 $0.00

($25,985.03) $0.00 $0.00 ($1,991.75) ($13.84) $30.14 $7.89 $0.00 $794.33 $0.00

-20.73% 0.00% 0.00% -20.76% -11.97% 12.80% 1.76% 0.00% 794.73% 0.00%

TOTAL 1100 Regular Instruction

$124,000.00

$142,282.83

$135,843.60

$85,469.52

$108,685.34

($27,158.26)

-19.99%

TOTAL 812 NES Schoolwide

$124,000.00

$142,282.83

$135,843.60

$85,469.52

$108,685.34

($27,158.26)

-19.99%

$2,137,190.00

$2,126,773.08

$2,225,758.89

$1,550,052.32

$2,318,369.50

$92,610.61

4.16%

TOTAL 2410 Principal's Office TOTAL 481 Medicaid 812 NES Schoolwide 1100 Regular Instruction 300-812-1100-511000-00 CFP Schoolwide Teachers Salary 300-812-1100-511001-00 CFP Schoolwide Paras 300-812-1100-521000-00 CFP Schoolwide-Health Insurance 300-812-1100-522000-00 CFP Schoolwide FICA 300-812-1100-523100-00 CFP Schoolwide Life Insurance 300-812-1100-523500-00 CFP Schoolwide-Dental Insurance 300-812-1100-523600-00 CFP Schoolwide LTD 300-812-1100-524000-00 CFP Schoolwide Annuity 300-812-1100-525000-00 CFP Schoolwide Worker's Comp 300-812-1100-533000-00 CFP Schoolwide Purchsed Services

GRAND TOTAL

Page 84


Newbury Elementary School

Annual Report 2013

Estimated Tax Worksheet Newbury(Town(School(District Estimated(Tax(Worksheet( Budget 2012B13 Estimated(Education(Spending Elementary*Budget Special*Revenue*Funds*E*Grant*E*Education*Jobs Special*Revenue*Funds*E*Grant*E*IDEA*B Special*Revenue*Funds*E*Medicaid Special*Revenue*Funds*E*CFP

Special*Article*E*Food*Service* Special*ArticleE*Facilities*Reserve Special*Article*E*Future*Expense*Reserve Special*Article*E*Capital*Improvement Special*Article*E*Food*Service*Transfer Total(Estimated(Expenditures Less(Anticipated(Receipts State*and*Local*Revenues*for*General*Fund*Elementary*Budget Prior*Year*General*Fund*Balance Special*Revenue*Funds*E*Grant*E*Education*Jobs*Funds Special*Revenue*Funds*E*Grant*E*IDEA*B Special*Revenue*Funds*E*Medicaid Special*Revenue*Funds*E*CFP Capital*Improvement*Reserve*Funds*per*vote Total(Estimated(Receipts Estimated(Education(Spending

** ***

Change

$2,054,184 $4,707 $7,070 $26,006 $155,284 $2,247,251

$2,179,936 6.12% $0 $0 $29,749 $108,685 $2,318,370

$30,000 $90,000 $45,000 $10,000 $0 $2,422,251

$0 $0 $0 $0 $15,000 $2,333,370

$286,722 $275,556 $4,707 $7,070 $26,006 $155,284 $10,000 $765,345 $1,656,906

$377,930 $128,904 $0 $0 $29,749 $108,685 $645,268 $1,688,101

Equalized*Pupils* Estimated*Education*Spending*per*Equalized*Pupil

126.22 $13,127

123.54 E2.12% $13,664

Excess*spending*penalty Less*net*eligible*construction*costs*per*equalized*pupil Less*share*of*Special*Ed*Costs*excess*of*$50,000*two*yrs*prior Net*Education*Spending*per*Equalized*Pupil*for*Excess*Spending Excess*Spending*Threshold

0.00% $542 $0 $12,585 $14,841

0.00% $529 $0 $13,135 $15,456

$0.00 $13,127

$0.00 $13,664 4.09%

Adjustment*for*Spending*above*Base*Per*Pupil Base*Homestead*Equalized*Tax*Rate**

147.730% $0.89

149.322% $0.94 5.62%

Estimated(Homestead(Tax(Rate,(Equalized %*Elementary*Pupils***

$1.3148 47.61%

$1.4036 6.76% 48.29%

Estimated*Elementary*Component*of*Homestead*Tax*Rate,*Equalized Estimated*Common*Level*of*Appraisal****

$0.626 98.59%

$0.678 100.24%

Adjusted*Estimated*Elementary*Component*of*Homestead*Tax*Rate*****

$0.635

$0.676

Adjusted*Estimated*Secondary*Component*of*Homestead*Tax*Rate*****

$0.696

$0.724

Estimated*Homestead*Tax*Rate*****

$1.331

$1.400

Base*NonEResidential*Equalized*Tax*Rate**

$1.380

$1.440

Estimated*NonEResidential*Tax*Rate

$1.400

$1.437

Est.(Excess(Spending(Penalty(Above(Average(Statewide Total(Estimated(Education(Spending(Per(Pupil

*

Proposed 2013B14

Equalized*pupils*are*preEkindergarten*to*Grade*6*average*daily*membership*averaged*over two*years*and*weighted*for*poverty*factors,*and*English*proficiency. As*recommended*by*Tax*Commissioner*and*pending*legislative*action. Under*Act*130,*effective*in*FY*2008E09,*elementary*and*secondary*schools*calculate spending*per*pupil*and*equalized*education*tax*rates*separately*and*are*proErated*by*%*of equalized*pupils*to*towns.

**** Common*Level*of*Appraisal,*as*determined*by*the*state,*adjusts*for*property*values*reported*at*less*than*fair*market*value. ***** Tax*rate*is*estimated*per*$100*of*equalized*value.**One*cent*on*tax*rate*equals*approx.*$10*on*$100,000*value.

Page 85


Newbury Elementary School

Annual Report 2013

Three Prior Years Comparison

District:

Newbury

9,151

Orange East

FY2011

Expenditures Budget (local budget, including special programs, full technical center expenditures, and any Act 144 Sum of separately warned articles passed at town meeting

FY2014

$2,413,251

$2,179,936

1.

+

-

-

-

$15,000

2.

-

$2,272,012

$2,137,190

$2,413,251

$2,194,936

3. 4.

-

-

-

$2,272,012

$2,137,190

$2,413,251

$2,194,936

7.

-

-

-

$138,062

8. 9.

$506,834

10.

plus

3. 4.

minus

5.

plus

Obligation to a Regional Technical Center School District if any

+

6.

plus

Prior year deficit reduction if not included in expenditure budget

+

Gross Act 68 Budget

7.

FY2013

$2,137,190

2.

Act 144 Expenditures, to be excluded from Education Spending Act 68 locally adopted or warned budget

FY2012

0.94

$2,272,012

expenditures)

8. 9.

Enter your choice for Enter your choice for FY14 estimated homestead base base education amount. rate for FY2014. See note at See note at bottom of page. bottom of page.

T136

County: Orange

1.

ESTIMATES ONLY

Three Prior Years Comparisons - Format as Provided by DOE

PRELIMINARY

5. 6.

S.U. assessment (included in local budget) - informational data Prior year deficit reduction (if included in expenditure budget) - informational data Revenues

10.

$417,741

$497,171

$755,346

11.

plus

Local revenues (categorical grants, donations, tuitions, surplus, etc., including local Act 144 tax revenues) Capital debt aid for eligible projects pre-existing Act 60

+

-

-

-

12. 13.

plus

Prior year deficit reduction if included in revenues (negative revenue instead of expenditures) All Act 144 revenues, including local Act 144 tax revenues

+ -

-

-

Total local revenues

$417,741

$497,171

$755,346

$506,834

14.

Education Spending

$1,854,271

$1,640,019

$1,657,905

$1,688,102

15.

130.47

126.65

126.22

123.54

16.

$14,212.24

$12,949.22

$13,135.04

$13,664

$114.97 -

$68.98 -

$541.99 -

$529

17. 18. 19.

-

-

-

20.

-

-

-

21. 22.

minus

14.

15. Equalized Pupils (Act 130 count is by school district)

16.

17. 18. 19. 20.

21.

Education Spending per Equalized Pupil minus minus minus

minus

22. 23.

minus

24.

minus

minus

Less ALL net eligible construction costs (or P&I) per equalized pupil Less share of SpEd costs in excess of $50,000 for an individual Less amount of deficit if deficit is SOLELY attributable to tuitions paid to public schools for grades the district does not operate for new students who moved to the district after the budget was passed Less SpEd costs if excess is solely attributable to new SpEd spending if district has 20 or fewer equalized pupils Estimated costs of new students after census period Total tuitions if tuitioning ALL K-12 unless electorate has approved tuitions greater than average announced tuition Less planning costs for merger of small schools

-

plus

Excess Spending per Equalized Pupil over threshold (if any) Per pupil figure used for calculating District Adjustment

-

NA

-

NA

NA

+

District spending adjustment (minimum of 100%)

27.

11. NA

12. 13.

-

-

($13,664 / $9,151)

NA

threshold = $14,549

25. 26.

NA

threshold = $14,733

$14,212 166.342% based on $8,544

N/A

-

threshold = $14,841

$12,949 151.559% based on $8,544

24. threshold = $15,456

$13,135 150.579% based on $8,723

$13,664

25. 26.

149.322%

27.

based on $9,151

Prorating the local tax rate 28.

Anticipated district equalized homestead tax rate to be prorated (149.322% x $0.940)

$1.4305 based on $0.86

$1.3186 based on $0.87

$1.3402 based on $0.89

$1.4036

28.

based on $0.940

29.

Percent of Newbury equalized pupils not in a union school district

45.830%

46.100%

47.610%

48.29%

29.

30.

Portion of district eq homestead rate to be assessed by town

$0.6556

$0.6079

$0.6381

$0.6778

30.

100.24%

31.

$0.6762

32.

(48.290% x $1.40) 31.

Common Level of Appraisal (CLA)

32.

Portion of actual district homestead rate to be assessed by town ($0.678 / 100.24%)

86.86% $0.7548 based on $0.860

99.90% $0.6085 based on $0.87

98.59% $0.6472 based on $0.89

based on $0.94

If the district belongs to a union school district, this is only a PARTIAL homestead tax rate. The tax rate shown represents the estimated portion of the final homestead tax rate due to spending for students who do not belong to a union school district. The same holds true for the income cap percentage.

33.

Anticipated income cap percent to be prorated (149.322% x 1.80%)

Portion of district income cap percent applied by State

34.

(48.290% x 2.69%) 35.

Percent of equalized pupils at Oxbow UHSD

36.

2.99% based on 1.80%

2.73% based on 1.80%

1.37% based on 1.80%

1.26% based on 1.80%

2.69%

2.71% based on 1.80%

1.29% based on 1.80%

1.30%

Prior Years Comparison

Page 86

34.

based on 1.80%

54.17%

53.90%

52.39%

-

-

-

51.71%

- Following current statute, the base education amount would be $9,151 That would require base education tax rates of $0.94 and $1.43. The tax commisioner has suggested allowing one year of inflation, resulting in a base amount of $8,915 and base tax rates of $0.92 and $1.41. The administration also has stated that tax rates could remain flat at $0.89 and $1.38 if statewide education spending is level and the base education amount is set at $8,915. Final figures will be set by the Legislature during the legislative session and approved by the Governor. - The base income percentage cap is 1.80%.

DOE/School Finance/bcj

33.

based on 1.80%

Macintosh HD:Users:donweisburger:Downloads: File PriorYrsLEA

35. 36.


Newbury Elementary School

Comparative Data for Cost -Effectiveness

Page 87

Annual Report 2013


Newbury Elementary School

Annual Report 2013

Expenditure Budget Summary Newbury Town School District FY 2013- 14 Expenditure Budget Summary

Function / Description

FY 11-12 Budget

FY 11-12 Actual

FY 12-13 Adopted Budget

FY 2012-13 Spent/YTD Est.

FY 13-14 Proposed

7/1/2011 - 6/30/2012

7/1/2011 6/30/2012

7/1/2012 6/30/2013

7/1/2012 6/30/2013

7/1/2013 6/30/2014

Budget to Budget Variance

Budget to Budget % Change

General Fund Expenditures

TOTAL 1100 Regular Instruction TOTAL 1400 Student Activities Total Direct Instruction - Reg. Ed.

613,920.00 0.00 613,920.00

632,589.37 1,343.53 633,932.90

671,081.11 1,000.00 672,081.11

480,114.05 711.00 480,825.05

719,799.36 1,000.00 720,799.36

48,718.25 0.00 48,718.25

TOTAL 2100 Guidance TOTAL 2130 Health/Nurse's Office TOTAL 2160 Occupational Therapy TOTAL 2190 Physical Therapy TOTAL 2210 Professional Development TOTAL 2220 Library/Media TOTAL 2225 Technology TOTAL 2310 School Board TOTAL 2318 School Board Negotiations TOTAL 2320 Superintendent's Office TOTAL 2410 Principal's Office TOTAL 2490 Other Support Administration TOTAL 2520 Fiscal Services TOTAL 2600 Facilities Maintenance TOTAL 2700 Transportation Total Support/Central Services

57,679.72 57,946.59 6,000.00 500.00 8,440.00 34,530.21 4,000.00 24,195.00 0.00 79,692.00 118,206.32 12,500.00 9,075.00 178,027.59 100,180.00 690,972.43

60,172.43 55,767.18 0.00 0.00 5,811.00 35,457.88 5,892.32 25,355.76 27.83 82,938.40 118,236.73 11,900.00 1,645.19 184,771.12 95,064.96 683,040.80

44,705.79 59,460.94 1,000.00 0.00 10,900.00 32,288.59 47,528.59 27,814.70 0.00 98,984.74 118,117.15 11,750.00 10,076.50 178,275.19 92,679.00 733,581.19

27,804.74 33,623.64 0.00 0.00 6,944.88 15,137.27 27,535.37 14,867.75 0.00 98,764.18 89,100.62 10,035.47 0.00 141,429.63 55,049.64 520,293.19

45,171.35 52,886.93 0.00 0.00 17,300.00 25,946.42 43,926.42 28,884.40 0.00 104,177.00 126,405.80 15,250.00 12,076.50 180,305.33 90,785.00 743,115.15

465.56 (6,574.01) 0.00 0.00 6,400.00 (6,342.17) (3,602.17) 1,069.70 0.00 5,192.26 8,288.65 3,500.00 2,000.00 2,030.14 (1,894.00) 10,533.96

1.04% -11.06% 0.00% 0.00% 58.72% -19.64% -7.58% 3.85% 0.00% 5.25% 7.02% 29.79% 19.85% 1.14% -2.04% 1.44%

TOTAL 051 EEE Program TOTAL 5100 Debt Service TOTAL 1200 Special Education TOTAL 2140 Behavior Specialist Purch Services TOTAL 2142 Psychological Evaluations TOTAL 2143 Psychological Counseling TOTAL 2150 Speech/Language TOTAL 2160 Occupational Therapy TOTAL 2420 Special Education Administration TOTAL 2700 Transportation TOTAL 1100 Regular Instruction TOTAL 5400 Prior Year Exp.

29,141.00 81,506.00 401,129.66 17,000.00 5,000.00 7,500.00 55,530.87 26,810.00 7,878.00 6,000.00 47,423.00 0.00

28,500.00 81,526.75 408,183.34 1,322.50 4,565.00 16,707.50 55,933.88 2,580.00 7,878.00 1,610.48 23,771.43 (16,057.58)

34,121.00 78,410.45 414,493.57 17,000.00 5,000.00 7,500.00 58,638.44 26,810.00 7,548.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

29,579.00 62,484.30 287,649.37 0.00 0.00 2,975.00 40,274.64 3,180.00 7,548.00 0.00 0.00 10,279.00 10,279.00

33,152.00 75,294.15 505,447.45 10,000.00 5,000.00 5,000.00 64,395.58 10,000.00 7,732.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

(969.00) (3,116.30) 90,953.88 (7,000.00) 0.00 (2,500.00) 5,757.14 (16,810.00) 184.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

-2.84% -3.97% 21.94% -41.18% 0.00% -33.33% 9.82% -62.70% 2.44% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

66,499.72 124,751.93

10.24% 6.07%

Total Special Education/EEE/ECP Total Newbury Elementary General Fund

684,918.53 1,989,810.96

616,521.30 1,933,495.00

649,521.46 2,055,183.76

454,248.31 1,455,366.55

716,021.18 2,179,935.69

Special Revenue/Grant Expenditures Consolidated Federal Program Grants Education Jobs Grants Medicaid Program Home School Coord. Medicaid Program Planning Room Medicaid Administration Medicaid Program EPSDT PreSchool Program PreSchool Enterprise Program IDEA B Special Education Total Grant Funded Programs

124,000.00 0.00 0.00 16,388.00 6,991.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 147,379.00

142,536.58 27,261.29 0.00 10,610.26 5,192.12 0.00 0.00 0.00 7,677.83 193,278.08

155,284.24 4,707.00 0.00 18,633.00 7,373.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 7,070.00 193,067.24

51,497.38 4,706.71 0.00 454.85 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 56,658.94

108,685.34 0.00 0.00 19,860.00 9,888.47 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 138,433.81

2,137,190.00

2,126,773.08

2,248,251.00

1,512,025.49

2,318,369.50

2,137,190.00

2,126,773.08

2,248,251.00

1,512,025.49

2,318,369.50

Total Elementary School Budget *Adjustment - Prior Year Deficit Total Adjsuted Elementary School Budget

*Prior Year Deficitg repayments are shown as adjustments, rather than "expenditures" under accounting guidelines

Page 88

(46,598.90) (4,707.00) 0.00 1,227.00 2,515.47 0.00 0.00 0.00 (7,070.00) (54,633.43)

7.26% 0.00% 7.25%

-30.01% -100.00% 0.00% 6.59% 34.12% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% -100.00% -28.30%


Newbury Elementary School

Annual Report 2013

REVENUE & EXPENSE REPORTS Newbury Town School District Revenue and Summary Expense Report FY 2011-2012 Budget Revenues: General Fund Revenues Property Taxes: Education Spending

FY 20112012 Actual

FY 20122013 Budget

FY 20132014 Proposed

Budget to Budget % Change

"Education Spending"

1,640,019 1,640,019

1,640,019 1,640,019

1,657,905 1,657,905

1,708,102 1,708,102

3.03% 3.03%

Other Local Revenues: Interest Earned Donations Facility Rent/Fees Surplus Revenue Carry Forward Transfers In *Miscellaneous Other Local Revenues

1,200 0 1,200 0 0 0 2,400

679 0 2,200 0 0 26,788 29,667

800 0 1,200 110,557 0 0 112,557

250 0 1,200 113,904 0 0 115,354

-68.75% 0.00% 0.00% 3.03% 0.00% 0.00% -2.48%

State and Federal Sources: Special Ed - Mainstream Block Grant Special Ed - Intensive/State Placed Reimb. Special Ed - EEE Programs State Placed Student Reimbursement Transportation Aid Small Schools Grant State and Federal Revenues Total General Fund Revenues

41,809 200,000 16,240 0 42,427 47,423 347,899 1,990,318

41,809 223,772 16,157 39,457 39,436 47,423 408,054 2,077,740

39,206 188,659 15,383 0 41,474 0 284,722 2,055,184

42,488 244,277 14,910 0 35,000 39,805 376,480 2,199,936

8.37% 29.48% -3.07% 0.00% -15.61% 100.00% 32.23% 7.04%

Special Revenue/Grant Revenues: Consolidated Federal Program Grants Education Jobs Grant Medicaid VEHI Wellness Grant Bailey Commons Fund IDEAB Federal Total Special Revenue/Grant Revenues

124,000 0 22,872 0 0 0 146,872

142,582 27,261 15,802 118 8,000 7,678 201,441

155,284 4,707 26,006 0 0 7,070 193,067

108,685 0 29,749 0 0 0 138,434

-30.01% -100.00% 14.39% 0.00% 0.00% -100.00% -28.30%

TOTAL REVENUES

2,137,190

2,279,181

2,248,251

2,338,370

4.01%

Expenditures Expenditures - General Fund Expenditures - Special Revenue/Grants TOTAL EXPENDITURES

1,989,811 147,379 2,137,190

2,108,495 201,441 2,309,936

2,055,184 193,067 2,248,251

2,179,936 138,434 2,318,370

6.07% -28.30% 3.12%

EXCESS(DEFICIT) for year Less Grant Revenue Restricted Plus Grant Revenue Restricted Excess/(Deficit) for Year in General Fund Plus Prior Year General Fund Surplus Surplus/(Deficit) **Non-spendable fund balance Fund Balance Applied to FY 13 Revenues FY 12 Spendable Fund Balance

(30,755) (201,441) 201,441 (30,755) 275,558 244,803 (5,341) (110,558) 128,904

*Miscellaneous Expense includes funds transfers and refunds of prior year expenditures. **$5,341 of the Fund Balance Surplus is designated for prepaid expenditures.

Page 89


Newbury Elementary School

Annual Report 2013

LOCAL AUDITORS REPORT The local auditors met with the treasurer to review the systems and the financial reports of the district.

The professional audit draft for FY’12 was completed and made available to us for review.

There do not appear to be any findings of significant concern. The board and administration have responded to the recommendations with reasonable plans for addressing the minor issues. We continue to provide a representative to the finance committee, which met several times this year, to review reports and discuss issues as they arise.

With yet another new OESU business manager

getting oriented and ‘up to speed’, there have been some challenges, but it seems that systems of reporting, access and communication are more than adequate. Former board member Janet Mitchell is also serving on the finance committee and has been the source of invaluable information and has helped to sort out issues resulting from years past. It appears there is a surplus in the $130,000 range and we believe the board has decided to use it to offset most of the small proposed budget increase. This seems to make sense to us, given the increase in the statewide property tax and the fact that a significant amount of last year’s deficit was used to build the capital improvement fund and also for a small ‘rainy-day-fund.’ We understand that longtime treasurer, Mary Collins, has decided to leave her position with the district and we thank her for her years of valuable service. Thank you, Mary…. You will be missed. Respectfully submitted,

Marvin Harrison Jane Labun Steve Gale

Page 90


Newbury Elementary School

Page 91

Annual Report 2013


NES Annual Report