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NewBridge Strategic Plan: 2019-2021 PREPARED BY:

SEPTEMBER 2018


NewBridge extends its most sincere appreciation to McKinsey & Company for helping us to envision our future!


Nonprofits face challenges when trying to grow and scale

Challenges Lack of ownership/equity

 Difficult to attract managerial talent, e.g. can’t offer deferred compensation packages  No financial incentive to scale  No incentive structures to encourage M&A

Nonalignment between funding & service

 Product users are not always the same people as the revenue providers – social service beneficiaries are typically not funders

Bias against investment growth

 Norms push nonprofits to fund programs rather than operations, limiting organizational growth  Bias among funders to fund programs that have direct, immediate impact

Grant funding structure

 Grants typically go to programs that target a particular funding issue over a limited period of time

 Finding piecemeal funding is taxing on nonprofit resources SOURCE: “What’s Your Endgame?”, Stanford Social Innovation Review, Winter 2015

3


To combat these challenges, studies of 12 high-performing nonprofits identified 6 characteristics of organizations that have scaled their impact

Practice

Description

Serve and advocate

Expedite and maximize impact by informing relevant policy advocacy with grassroots service delivery experience

Make markets work

Enable powerful, self-interested partnerships in addition to relying on philanthropy as a basis for funding

Inspire evangelists

Create emotional connections and create long-term supporters to create stronger communities of support and inspire viral marketing

Nurture non-profit networks

Help peers succeed instead of viewing them as competition in order to more quickly advance the field and catalyze impact

Master the art of adaptation

Be dynamic and innovate according to changing circumstances and external cues in order to sustain impact

Share leadership

Distribute leadership across the organization and throughout networks; build enduring leadership teams for continuity To ensure these 6 characteristics are met, this document will define NewBridge’s distinctive value proposition and identify the strategic direction to carry the organization through FY 2021

SOURCE: Grant and Crutchfield, “Creating high impact nonprofits”, Stanford Social Innovation Review

4


NewBridge will actively seek additional funding to increase both our mission and organizational reach

NewBridge was formed by five key community organizations:  The Cleveland Foundation  Key Bank  Cleveland Clinic  University Hospitals  Kelvin & Eleanor Smith Foundation

NewBridge Seeks an active customization of the national Manchester Bidwell model to the local market

NewBridge will secure additional funding to expand the mission and relative impact. We are working to:  Develop a comprehensive strategic plan  Understand the concerns of local funders  Effectively address the community’s needs

5


NewBridge’s core values are framing our overall strategic planning process

As a community-based organization we can be a catalyst for social change and economic justice

All individuals and communities rely on services, and NewBridge can be an unparalleled service provider

We have a unique reach into neighborhoods of disparity

We understand systematic and structural barriers to success

We are receptive to new ideas and approaches with the aim of always improving our outcomes

6


We will use our Strategic Plan to maximize the impact within our neighborhoods and communities

1

Complete the plan with Strategic Planning Experts and obtain staff and board support and buy-in

2

Ready the organization for authentic community engagement - using the strategic plan to inform the community about services and plans for growth

3

Partner with community stakeholders to provide highquality services that maximize outcomes

4

Collaborate with community stakeholders to ensure effective and efficient services that are coordinated and have collective impact

5

Create structures that lead to systems-level change

7


Contents

1

Youth program mission and objectives

2

Adult program mission and objectives

3

Analysis of program separation

4

Equitably serving a broad community

5 Measurement of program impact 6

Funding NewBridge’s expanding impact

7

Appendix

8


1 How NewBridge’s youth programs accomplish the organization’s mission

SEL Youth Programs

Customizable SEL Programs

CLE|LEAD

1 Develop  Six-month SEL Leadership Development Program  SEL education, reinforced through arts-infused curriculum 2 Practice  Six-week leadership training  Paid job experience 3 Teach  Students return as peer mentors to lead activities and support Teaching Artists  Fosters positive community and learning at NewBridge and school

Train the Trainer Programs

SEL programming to meet the needs of diverse organizations

Programs range from 3 hours to 12 weeks, all focused on developing and teaching elements of SEL education

Broad, communitybased SEL education

Raise awareness of SEL programming and best practices

Trained over 100 practitioners last year (FY 18)

Delivered through ceramics, photography, and graphic arts education strengthened by positive social interactions and pro-social behaviors

9


1

Distinguishing characteristics of all of NewBridge’s existing SEL programming

NewBridge has provided Cuyahoga county-based youth programming for 7 years

Strong staff focus on modelling positive social behaviors

Students in need of SEL are referred to NewBridge by school staff

Culture focused on empathybuilding and collaboration amongst students

~175 students are currently engaged in NewBridge’s Youth Programs

Student reach, voice, and empowerment

SOURCE: McKinsey interviews with NB employees, McKinsey perspective of Cuyahoga County peer organizations

10


1 Staff approach towards modelling youth actions and care

Restorative approach: Foster a non-punitive environment to repair trauma caused in community

Transparency with youth: Manage emotions and set a level emotional playing field; make room for mistakes if you can repair them and take responsibility

Complete connectedness: Staff speaks to and genuinely knows every student in the program. Intentional acknowledgement of existence to empower student interactions and experience

SOURCE: McKinsey interviews with NB employees, McKinsey perspective of Cuyahoga County peer organizations

11


1

Culture focused on building empathy

Restorative Circles Ownership of mistakes: students causing harm must determine how to restore relationships with peers and faculty

Connection circles Activities to foster an understanding of the deep biases students hold, and the stereotypes that drive their actions, helping to repair community trust

Active staff engagement and cooperation 100% of staff interactions focus on meaningful empathy development. Staff maintain active efforts to introduce conversations that bring forth understandings of social perspectives and actions SOURCE: McKinsey interviews with NB employees, McKinsey perspective of Cuyahoga County peer organizations

12


1

CLE:LEAD: Student reach, voice, and empowerment

Foster entrepreneurship Students are given opportunities to lead, plan, and organize events of interest

Palace of Opportunity Ceramics, photography, and graphic design allow students to explore teamwork and collaboration while also building arts-based skills. Failure-based processes help build resilience within each student

Student employment Student leaders are given opportunities to develop learning curriculums for subsequent years

Professional working artists Students interested in the arts are afforded opportunities to regularly collaborate with working professionals to develop their crafts SOURCE: McKinsey interviews with NB employees, McKinsey perspective of Cuyahoga County peer organizations

13


1 Customizable Fee for Service SEL Programs

SEL Criteria offered:

Existing NewBridge Programs:

Emotion Management

UH Health Scholars

Empathy Building Open Doors Academy Initiative Team Work Problem Solving Mission

Cleveland Metropolitan School District Open Doors Academy

Arts-based learning

Beyond Identities Community Center

Emotional Critique and Appreciation

Esperanza

Personal goals SOURCE: McKinsey interviews with NB employees, McKinsey perspective of Cuyahoga County peer organizations

14


1 Youth Program Growth Plan

Expected reach: ~735 students (175 students currently enrolled) 2018

2019

Phase 2 (FY ’20): deliver customized SEL service

Phase 3 (FY ’21): Fully developed and tailored SEL solutions

▪ Seek schools underserved by other

▪ Secure 2-3 initial partners and

▪ Service students in schools not

▪ ▪ ▪

# of people served

2021

Phase I (FY ’19): maximize current program

New Hires

2020

arts organizations (Cleveland Education Arts Consortium) Develop relationship with new CMSD art committee & proactively target non-school based collaborative partners with captured student population for SEL education Increase student cohorts served Double summer employment opportunities Work with strategic partners to provide camp counseling opportunities

▪ Hire new youth SEL coordinator to assist Director with program duties

~3971

▪ ▪

earn revenue as a customized training provider with expertise in SEL working in the City of Cleveland Increase the awareness of SEL and of NewBridge Curate/engage in a city wide dialogue about SEL, trauma informed care, and restorative justice models

▪ Additional instructor to deliver customized SEL education offering ~5192

located near NewBridge

▪ Continue expanded place-based youth program

▪ Programs can be tailored for ▪

specific topics, length, cost, or population Secure consistent partner pipeline for SEL education, through CMSD and other organizations

▪ 3 full-time school instructors: formalize community SEL service offering ~7353

1. CLE leads hosts 72 students, partner contracts host 125, and 200 through professional development for youth-focused adult programs 2. 50 additional students in the professional development program, and an additional CLE Lead program of 72 students 3. 3 additional CLE Leads programs of 72 students each McKinsey & Company

15


Contents

1

Youth program mission and objectives

2

Adult program mission and objectives

3

Analysis of program separation

4

Equitably serving a broad community

5

Measurement of program impact

6

Funding NewBridge’s expanding impact

7

Appendix

16


2 Proposed future structure of NewBridge Adult program

NewBridge has provided Cuyahoga county-based adult programming for 7 years

Full service training admissions, training, job placement, and retention

~200 adults are currently served each year through NewBridge’s Adult Programs

Incumbent worker wage-progression

Adult programming focuses on entry-level positions, primarily in healthcare through Phlebotomy, STNA, and Culinary

Short-term training interventions and collaborations

SOURCE: McKinsey interviews with NB employees

17


2 NewBridge plays a critical role in supporting under-employed adults across the spectrum of personal development and wage progression

 NewBridge’s programs work together to help individuals reach economic self sufficiency.  Programs adapted to the individual

1

Full-service training programs develop the foundational skills for adults to find meaningful occupations in their communities

$10-20 / hour

2

Incumbent worker wage-progression programs build on the vital skills generated through the full-service program to promote self-sufficiency and long-term success

$25-30 / hour

3

There is significant growth opportunity for short-term training interventions due to an ability to serve more students at a lower costs with less administrative requirements. For example, GED recovery programming and Employee Assistance Programs addressing Trauma Contagion

Low cost per student (i.e. student reimbursement model)

SOURCE: McKinsey interviews with NB employees

18


2 Full Service Training: Admissions, job-placement, and retention staffing model

Online outreach and application

1

Applications received from ~600 members for ~175 training spots 

Process involves reading and math aptitude tests and interviews Candidates taken through drug test and criminal background checks

Selection of candidates

2

Program selection

3

~175 adults accepted for Phlebotomy, Culinary, and STNA education1

Graduation from program

4

~80% of students graduate from the program and complete the job search process 

Long-term retention

5

NewBridge maintains contact with candidates for at least two years after placement Additional job opportunities identified when necessary for graduated students

SOURCE: McKinsey interviews with NB employees1 Culinary program currently on hold, pending additional funding

19


2

Incumbent worker wage-progression

Progression on pathway to economic self-sufficiency (~$25-30 dollars / hour)

New technical skills that layer onto current knowledge base

Open to individuals chosen by employer who have been employed for at least one year

Job shadow and job coaching before admission to determine aptitude and interest

Significantly less case management needed

New positions should include increased wages, increased responsibility, and increased professionalism

Employer culture already established

Building on known employer culture, policies and procedures and addressing employers need for internal promotions and retention

SOURCE: McKinsey interviews with NB employees

SOURCE: McKinsey interviews with NB employees

20


2 Adult Program Growth Plan: Expected each ~375 students (200 students currently enrolled)

2018

2019

2020

Fiscal Year ‘19

Fiscal Year ‘21

Phase 2 fund and deliver more service lines

Phase 3 Fully operational expanded portfolio

Seek populations underserved by the present programmatic offerings Expand relationships with community organizations, faithbased organizations, and other stakeholders to increase regional impact Evaluate current employment needs and geographic footprint – align with desired future offerings Explore more service lines – including service lines geared towards Cleveland’s strengths in skilled manufacturing

Identify a network of key partners to assist with programmatic support and student recruitment Seek increased financial support from current funding sources, and identify new funding opportunities Increase awareness of NewBridge and its programming Roll out an expanded portfolio of community responsive service lines

Net reduction due to program reduction

~2 FTE: conversion of incumbent worker instruction and program expansion

▪ ▪

# of students served

Fiscal Year ‘20

Phase I maximize current program

New Hires

2021

2001

▪ ▪

~3252

Effectively serve adults with a wide variety of perspectives, backgrounds, and past experiences Build capacity to serve more interested students and improve outcomes for participating students Maintain robust and diversified network of funding sources Implement feedback process for continuous programmatic improvement and responsiveness to regional employment needs ~0.5 FTEs: accommodate increased program size across platform ~3753

1. Reduction in STNA and Phlebotomy programs, removal of culinary pending additional funding, and addition of a new, full service worker program 2. Assumes growth in culinary, full service, STNA, and phlebotomy programs 3. Assumes growth in incumbent worker and STNA programs

McKinsey & Company

21

21


Contents

1

Youth program mission and objectives

2

Adult program mission and objectives

3

Analysis of program separation

4

Equitably serving a broad community

5

Measurement of program impact

6

Funding NewBridge’s expanding impact

7

Appendix

22


3 NewBridge has a clear path to restructure the organization for funding optimization

Current Legal Structure Legal entity

Shared across adult and youth programs Future Considerations

Board

Shared across adult and youth programs

Working Shared across adult and youth team programs

P&L

In the process of separating program (budget has been separated by program)

Venue

In the process of separating by program (Youth program will be moved to a UH sponsored facility in 2019)

This legal structure should be revisited in the next strategic plan as there are still legitimate opportunities and concerns that should be investigated Changes occurring at Manchester Bidwell with new leadership should also be monitored

SOURCE: Stakeholder interview, McKinsey team analysis

23


Contents

1

Youth program mission and objectives

2

Adult program mission and objectives

3

Analysis of program separation

4

Equitably serving a broad community

5

Measurement of program impact

6

Funding NewBridge’s expanding impact

7

Appendix

24


4 NewBridge is committed to running a diverse, impact-oriented organization through metrics

▪ Focused on tracking organizational performance to maximize the value of funding received

▪ Success across key metrics, with a determination to improve where necessary

▪ Commitment to align the organization to the requirements and needs for implementing our strategic plan

SOURCE: NewBridge management team interview, Team analysis

25


4 Diversity: We have developed scorecards and surveys to track and improve organizational KPIs. Findings will be presented to donors.

Philosophy of Diversity

We, NewBridge CLE|CAT, have created a community, where we intentionally welcome all. We foster a climate of purposeful inclusion, an environment where all can feel safe, valued and cared for. We cherish the diversity of humanity, which includes differences in sex, age, race, ethnicity, and national origin, range of abilities, sexual orientation, gender identity, financial means, and education. These beliefs and practices apply to all of the activities of our organization; they inform all of our decisions.

26


4 Diversity: We have developed scorecards and surveys to track and improve organizational KPIs. Findings will be presented to donors.

Current Profile Gender Identity

100% =

14

21

562

33

Female

71

87

67

Male

29 Employees

13 Board

Adult Students

 NewBridge is a diverse organization, deeply committed to racial equity and student and staff empowerment across varied domains  NewBridge is focused on reporting outcomes data by gender to highlight the impact of these programs on populations often biased by wage, hiring, and job retention

27


4 Diversity: We have developed scorecards and surveys to track and improve organizational KPIs. Findings will be presented to donors.

Current Profile Race

100% = Person of color

14

36

21

562

24 84

Person of non-color

64

76 16

Employees

Board

Adult Students

 NewBridge is a diverse organization, deeply committed to racial equity and student and staff empowerment across varied domains  NewBridge is focused on reporting outcomes data by race to highlight the impact of these programs on populations often biased by wage, hiring, and job retention

28


4 Diversity: We have developed scorecards and surveys to track and improve organizational KPIs. Findings will be presented to donors.

Current Profile LGBTQ Diversity

Intentional practices have allowed students and staff to feel comfortable revealing their gender identities and sexual orientation when appropriate. 2018 Outcomes: Students – 17% of the NewBridge student population self-identified as LGBTQ Staff – 7% of the NewBridge staff self-identified as LGBTQ

 NewBridge is a diverse organization, deeply committed to racial equity and student and staff empowerment across varied domains  NewBridge is focused on reporting outcomes data by LGBTQ diversity to highlight the impact of these programs on populations often biased by wage, hiring, and job retention

29


4 Org performance: Key performance indicators will allow NewBridge to self-assess its health and growth progression

Indicator

Current levels

Rationale

How to measure

20-30% year over year increase in students served

Realizing potential of mission requires serving more students Interest currently outpaces availability

▪ ▪

Open new service lines Count students enrolled

Consistent scores of 85%+ for quality among stakeholders

Strong feedback suggests quality programming Students and funders will support future endeavors

Employ anonymous surveys Track results over time

Funding is essential to operation and expansion Diverse funding streams promote financial resilience

▪ ▪

Funding

Adequate funding for programs through donor support and monetizing a private, SEL-based, care offering

Regional leadership will increase impact External recognition validates work for students and donors

External recognition

Broadly known regionally and recipient of competitive national awards

Students served

Feedback

Log funding sources Compare revenue year over year Continue diversifying sources

Pursue placement in regional publications Identify awards that are good fits and pursue them

30


4 Performance: NewBridge will begin assessing KPIs quarterly, displayed through scorecards

Current Actions taken

▪ Management prioritizes cohesion across key stakeholders ▪ Management prioritizes open communication with employees given common Management and Board engagement

non-profit difficulties in retaining talent, an ongoing understanding of employee sentiment is vital to organization success Employee engagement will be measured with a formal assessment given quarterly and will include indicators such as, excitement to work at NewBridge, perceived recognition and support from management, and transparency of management plans NewBridge will work on improving Board involvement and attendance and will include staff on Board Committees to foster communication and engagement

▪ Measure and report student’s involvement in actively recruiting peers to join the NewBridge organization

▪ Highlight’s student passion about NewBridge, showcasing their interest in Student activation

giving back to the organization long-term

▪ Investigate graduate Advisory Boards ▪ Investigate Annual Fund specifically for graduates ▪ Successful student activation will increase NewBridge’s long-term ability to source new students into the different programs

31


4 Feedback: Executive team will solicit stakeholder feedback to assist NewBridge in evaluating its performance and optimizing future offerings

Description

▪ Detailed student feedback on specific Students

programmatic elements, instructors, and locations Anonymous survey format feedback to increase comfort delivering feedback

▪ Broad opportunities for major funders (both Funders

individual and institutional) to share feedback Deliberate efforts from NewBridge staff to have ongoing dialogues with major funders to keep communication lines open and seek new funding

▪ Regular “town hall” style opportunities for Staff

staff to share their insights into program performance and opportunities for improvement Yearly OHI style survey to gather staff feedback

▪ Have an open, off record, portion of each Board

board meeting for discussion and feedback Establish a regular cadence of structured, anonymous, board feedback opportunities

Example Students could complete an emailed exit survey immediately prior to completion of each course Organization leaders might seek one-on-one meetings with major funders to ensure open lines of communication and share NewBridge’s successes Regular completion of the OHI could provide insight into how the staff members perceive the success of growth and transformation Regular board feedback, both in meetings and anonymously ensures alignment between community leaders and NewBridge staff

SOURCE: Expert Interviews, Team analysis

32


4 Proposed cadence for implementing trackers for future KPIs

Cadence

Mechanism of delivery

Existing

Future

 Diversity: 1 survey per year  Performance: 1 survey per year  Feedback: Once per month or as needed

 Diversity: 2 surveys per year  Performance: 1 survey per quarter  Feedback: Once per month or as needed

 Surveys  Information conversations with employees  Town Halls

 Purchased software to administer, research-backed staff sentiment surveys  Regular employee town halls with occasional BOD presence

Results of the following metrics will be delivered quarterly to BOD members.

SOURCE: Expert Interviews, Team analysis

33


Contents

1

Youth program mission and objectives

2

Adult program mission and objectives

3

Analysis of program separation

4

Equitably serving a broad community

5

Measurement of program impact

6

Funding NewBridge’s expanding impact

7

Appendix

34


5 Youth programming is measured across various domains utilizing three assessment tools

Description DESSA (Devereux Students Strengths Assessment)

▪ A standardized, strengths-based

measure of the social and emotional competencies of children in kindergarten through 12th grade Youth will be assessed every 6-8 weeks throughout the CLE|LEAD program

▪ A self-designed survey that will be Pre/Post Test

administered at the beginning and end of the six-month CLE|LEAD program The Pre/Post Survey will measure students’ self-perceived growth across varied SEL dimensions

▪ A validated instrument designed to measure PQA (Program Quality Assessment)

the efficacy of the youth program itself Assessment results will help to determine needs for programmatic adjustment, as well as for staff training needs

Metrics

▪ ▪ ▪ ▪ ▪ ▪ ▪ ▪

Self Awareness Goal-Directed Behavior Self-Management Social Awareness Personal Responsibility Decision Making Relationship Skills Optimistic Thinking

▪ ▪ ▪ ▪ ▪ ▪

Ability to Communicate Creative Expression Self-Confidence Ability to Manage Emotions Awareness of Stereotypes Connectedness to Peers and Adults

      

Safe Environment Supportive Environment Interaction Engagement Youth-Centered Policies High Expectations (Youth/Staff) Access

SOURCE: Expert Interviews, Team analysis

35


5 Analysis of adult student placement after enrollment in training programs reveals that NewBridge has generated ~$9M in annual value to students

Total annual salary earned, $9M 5.5

1.9 1.4

# of students placed

0.3

0.2

Phlebotomy

STNA

Pharmacy Technician

Culinary

Patient Access

195

61

52

14

7

â–Ş Organizations similar to NewBridge identify program impact through the annual incomes earned by students graduating from their programs

â–Ş As proof of program impact for potential donors, NewBridge management is aligned on actively increasing the focus on maintaining relationships with program alumni and successful graduates

SOURCE: Team analysis

36


Contents

1

Youth program mission and objectives

2

Adult program mission and objectives

3

Analysis of program separation

4

Equitably serving a broad community

5

Measurement of program impact

6

Funding NewBridge’s expanding impact

7

Appendix

37


6 NewBridge will require ~$504K of incremental funding by FY 2021 to execute the strategic plan

FY 20191

FY 2018 Youth program funding required3

FY 2020

FY 2021

$712,429

$788,621

$863,963

$1,061,231

# of youth students2

174

397

519

735

Youth FTEs

2.1

3.1

4.1

7.1

$1,024,206

$1,038,556

$1,139,304

$1,239,390

Adult program funding required3

# of adult students

197

201

330

377

Adult FTEs

8.0

6.0

8.0

8.5

$1,736,636

$1,810,269

$2,040,580

$2,240,933

371

598

849

1,112

$4,681

$3,055

$2,404

$2,069

14.1

13.1

16.1

19.6

Total program funding required

Total # of students

Average funding/student

Total FTEs includes 4 FTE Executive Staff

1 FY = Fiscal Year; Example: NewBridge’s FY 2019 runs from July 1, 2018 – Jun 30, 2019 2 Average of growth plan student projections taken 4 Executive team, staff, and operational costs split evenly across programs.

38


6 Foundations are the major source of fundraising, representing ~64% of the total donation in 2018

NewBridge 2018 donation mix $M

1.66

Donor group

Legacy funders (Foundations)

Foundation

Corporation Individual1 Others

2% (0.03) 15% (0.26) 2018

▪ Core of NewBridge funding ▪ Generous givers and well aligned with mission

▪ Existing strong relationships go beyond funding

64% (1.06)

19% (0.31)

Present contribution

New funding sources (Corporate and individual donors)

▪ Not yet a major part of funding ▪ Identified as underutilized funding streams

▪ Few major relationships exist between major individual and corporate funders and NewBridge

▪ Primarily student reimbursement with Subsidy

negligible governmental support Identified as a supplemental source

To ensure a financially robust future, NewBridge must cultivate a broader funding base, increasing the role of corporate funding and individual donors

1 Individual, Board member SOURCE: NewBridge management team interview, NewBridge 2018 donation data, Team analysis

39


6 To support the strategic mission, NewBridge plans to increase the portion donated by new funding sources and SEL training by 2021

NewBridge target donation mix evolvement Donor group 100%

▪ Continue to provide current levels of Legacy funders (Foundations)

50% Foundation

64%

Individual Others

New funding sources (Corporate and individual donors, SEL Training)

3% Subsidy

1%

2018

▪ Few opportunities for growth in funding ▪ Thought partners on path forward natural fit given job-readiness mission

▪ Individual donors are accessible through current network of board members and stakeholders

▪ NewBridge may leverage existing SEL training to generate key funds

19% 16%

support

▪ Strong pursuit of corporate funding is a

27% Corporation

Future role

20%

▪ Increase governmental funding ▪ Remain a supplemental source

2021

1 Individual, Board member SOURCE: NewBridge management team interview, Grants Plus donor scan report, Team analysis

40


Board vote and decision

The Strategic Plan in its entirety was approved by the NewBridge Board of Directors on Monday, September 10, 2018.

41


Contents

1

Youth program mission and objectives

2

Adult program mission and objectives

3

Analysis of program separation

4

Equitably serving a broad community

5

Measurement of program impact

6

Funding NewBridge’s expanding impact

7

Appendix

42


7a An OHI survey was conducted to assess NewBridge’s organizational health

Who participated?

Sent to all

15

100%

employees

responded

The Organizational Health Index (OHI) was used to assess health The Organizational Health Index (OHI) is a metric that helps leaders integrate organizational health into their long-term business strategy. McKinsey’s proprietary benchmarking survey digs below the surface to understand baseline behaviors, as well as hard elements such as systems and processes, enabling executives to prioritize areas of improvement and develop a road map to sustaining high performance over time. Why does organizational health matter? Across Industries

Within Companies

Healthy companies across industries outperform their unhealthy peers by

Health explains up to

3X

50% of performance variation across units

SOURCE: Team analysis

43


7a The OHI survey assesses 34 underlying practices along 9 dimensions across 3 clusters

OHI survey coverage 3 clusters

9 Dimensions Direction

Alignment

Leadership

Culture & Climate

Accountability

Coordination & Control Execution Capabilities

Motivation

External Orientation Renewal Innovation & Learning

34 practices

▪ ▪ ▪ ▪ ▪ ▪ ▪ ▪ ▪ ▪ ▪ ▪ ▪ ▪ ▪ ▪ ▪ ▪ ▪ ▪ ▪ ▪ ▪ ▪ ▪ ▪ ▪

Shared vision Strategic clarity Employee involvement Consultative leadership Authoritative leadership Supportive Leadership Open & trusting Internally competitive Operationally disciplined Role clarity Performance contracts Consequence management People performance review Financial management Operational management Process-based capabilities Talent development Talent acquisition Inspirational leaders Meaningful values Career opportunities Customer focus Competitor insights Business partnerships Capturing external ideas Top-down innovation Bottom-up innovation

Creative & entrepreneurial

Personal ownership

Professional standards

Outsourced expertise

Financial incentives

Government and community relations

Knowledge sharing

SOURCE: Team analysis

44


7a Survey results indicate opportunities exist across dimensions, especially on accountability

Renewal

Execution

Alignment

Description

Score1 Improvement plan

Direction

Communicating a clear and compelling vision of where the organization is headed, how to get there, and what it means for people

68

Socialize the new vision defined by this strategic planning initiative

Leadership

Using effective leadership styles to shape the actions of people in the organization to drive performance

75

Deprioritize

Culture & Climate

Cultivating a clear, consistent set of values and working norms that foster effective workplace behavior

72

Deprioritize

Accountability

Ensuring individuals understand what is expected of them, have sufficient authority, and feel accountable for delivering results

60

Crystalize position description and codify workflow/ process

Coordination & Control

Consistently measuring and managing business and risk, and acting to address problems when they arise

65

Refine current KPIs and feedback mechanism

Capabilities

Ensuring the institutional skills and talent are in place to execute the strategy and create competitive advantage

74

Deprioritize

Motivation

Developing employee loyalty and enthusiasm, and inspiring people to exert extraordinary effort to perform at their very best

77

Deprioritize

External Orientation

Engaging with important external stakeholders(customers, suppliers, partners, and others) to more effectively create and deliver value

64

Details to follow in the “Growth opportunity” section

Innovation & Learning

Encouraging and harnessing new ideas, including everything from radial innovation to incremental improvement, so the organization can effectively evolve and grow over time

69

Deprioritize

69

NewBridge is in the second quartile among peer organizations in the database

Average

1 % of respondents who selected "agree" or "strongly agree” for Outcomes and “often” or “almost always” for Management Practices SOURCE: OHI survey result, Team analysis

45


7a In addition to aforementioned processes, NewBridge currently has a comprehensive plan in place to ensure success across key metrics

Accountability

Typical improvement driver

Current process/ mechanism

▪ ▪

Clear structure, roles and responsibilities

Clear objectives and formal, explicit performance targets

Linking rewards and consequences to individual performance

Salary raise based on budget and annual performance review

Annual performance review (90day review for new hire) Staff Meetings are held as needed to address changes in staffing, and/or in policies

A strong sense of individual ownership and personal responsibility

Use formal performance assessments, feedback, and tracking to coordinate and control flows of talent

Focus on operational KPIs, metrics and targets to monitor and manage business performance

Focus on financial KPIs and the effective allocation and control of financial resources to monitor and manage performance

Use clear standards, policies and rules to set behavioral expectations and enforce compliance

Identify and mitigate anticipated risks, and respond rapidly to unexpected problems as they arise

Execution

Coordination & Control

▪ ▪

Detailed job description (being further refined) Weekly program meeting aligning on objectives and next steps

One-off feedback/ meeting as needed

SOURCE: OHI survey result, NewBridge management team interviews, Team analysis

46


7b NewBridge CLE|CAT Growth Plan: Executive Summary

Current state

Future State

NewBridge CLE|CAT was founded in 2011 with a budget of $1.6 million and a staff of 13. In its first year NewBridge served 236 participants with youth and adult programming. In fiscal year 2019, NewBridge will serve 598 participants with a budget of $1.8 million; 153% more participants with a relatively flat budget.

To fully actualize the strategic plan developed with McKinsey and Company, NewBridge must grow its budget from $1.8 to $2.25 million and grow its staff from 13 full-time employees to 20 by fiscal year 2021. This growth in capacity and funding will allow NewBridge to serve 1,112 participants, over 370% growth, creating lasting community impact and driving costs per student down.

2,500,000

Budget Progression FY19 – FY21 $1.8MM

$2.0MM

$2.25MM

2,000,000 1,500,000 Youth Budget 1,000,000 Adult Budget Coordination 500,000 & Control

788,621

863,963

1,061,231

1,038,556

1,176,617

1,239,390

FY 19

FY20

FY21

0 Total Students Full Cost Per Student FTEs

598

849

1,112

$3,055

$2,404

$2,069

13.1

16.1

19.6

47


7b Youth Programming

Coordination & Control

48


7b Adult Programming

Coordination & Control

49

Profile for NewBridge Cleveland

NewBridge Strategic Plan  

The Strategic Plan for NewBridge CLE|CAT for 2019 through 2021 Fiscal years.

NewBridge Strategic Plan  

The Strategic Plan for NewBridge CLE|CAT for 2019 through 2021 Fiscal years.

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