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ISSUE 138

BIKEBIZ.COM


The diversity issue 33

ISSUE 138

JULY 2017

Three accomplished cycle technicians relate their experiences as women working in the industry, and offer direction on generating female interest in practical roles

Features

30 under 30: the big reveal

11

Competition was steep, but we’ve managed to narrow your list of rising stars down to 30 candidates, hand-picked by our team – find out if you made it in

Regulars BIKEBIZ.COM

Is BMX making a comeback?

27

We speak to Mark Noble about whether a recent trend indicates BMX may be on its way back up, and what retailers can do to stimulate this niche market

66 Industry Opinions 30 Product Insight: Cameras

49 Sector Guides 71 Number Crunching

Laker on inclusivity at work

19

We investigate the reasons that the cycling industry is so white and male, and what can be done to open it up to a more diverse variety of individuals

72 Team Profile: Moore Large 74 Spokesman BIKEBIZ JULY


COMMENT

‘Women, by all accounts, rarely register their interest in these kinds of roles at all’

WELCOME LETTER Slamming the brakes on gender imbalance THIS ISSUE marks my first year as editor of BikeBiz and also presents the delightful opportunity for me to wax political. After this chaotic month, I imagine you don’t want to read about parliament any more than I wish to disclose my own views on the subject. Fortunately, the topic we’ve approached is comparatively less contentious than the state of world politics, and is one that I expect most of the industry recognises is a major concern. We’ve dedicated July’s print magazine to discussing gender diversity in the cycle workplace – a matter that is close to home as a woman working across not one, but two largely male-dominated industries. The cycle trade’s worst-kept secret is its propensity to hire men in workshop mechanic positions. Even consumers acknowledge that in matters pertaining to their bikes, it is predominantly men who assist them. That said, I am of the belief that the industry is not entirely responsible for its apparent gender imbalance, with engagement at equal fault. Women, by all accounts, rarely register their interest in these kinds of roles at all. The job of a hiring manager in any industry – from bikes to biotechnology – is ultimately to find the best person to fulfill the role, and it is self-evident that the pool of women qualified to perform mechanic duties is underserved when you compare it to those qualified in, say, communications work. This smacks of a problem whose source runs deeper than men denying women the opportunity to work at their shops. It seems to me that, even in 2017, girls still don’t see working with intricate, lubricious contraptions like bikes and cars as a viable career choice. This multifaceted difficulty is at least in part down to failings in education. Historically speaking, society has turned women away from both hands-on careers and STEM subjects. This is a problem that is being rectified at a gradual rate, but more can still be done to show school-age girls that there are terrific, practical careers to be had in industries like our own. But it is one thing to identify an issue and another to propose a solution. We’ve presented some ways that the trade can move forward in the magazine, and I think that, working together, we can ensure that the girls of tomorrow have the same opportunities as the boys of today. Hayley E. Ferguson Editor, BikeBiz

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BIKEBIZ JULY 5


OPINION

What could you do to invite more women into your shop? Andrea Sexton, head of copywriting, The Hoxby Collective I’VE BEEN a fan of cycling and triathlon for more than 20 years, and have acquired several clients in the cycling industry since forming my own PR company. My personal sporting background is in equestrian sport, an extremely female-dominated environment, so it was initially a culture shock to be part of such a seemingly male domain. As part of my role in PR, I work with independent bike shops, and am continually thinking up ways to help them boost their businesses against the threat of online discounters. It’s undoubtedly a tricky business in which to be a retailer. As a woman who loves to shop – you can blame my mum for that – much of my time is spent working out how to entice other women into cycle retailers. Many women tell me that they feel uncomfortable going into bike shops; this is something I’d love to change. At Bristol-based store Bike Science Ltd, I set about creating a new environment where women are happy to shop. The first step was to establish a focus group of women consisting of cyclists with varied levels of experience and ability. We spent an evening in-store, discussing the bikes and accessories on offer, and looking at the general shop layout to see whether anything could be improved. We talked about what shops these women liked to go into, and why that might be. Much of the discussion surrounded what makes boutiquestyle shops pleasant to enter and browse. One of my own favourite shops is Anthropologie, an upmarket women’s clothing retailer. The Regent Street store is light and airy, and its eclectic

6 BIKEBIZ JULY

‘It helps to encourage women if there are great female staff members.‘

range of products is a joy both to peruse and purchase. Items are displayed in an interesting way, interspersing artwork, fascinating books, and homewares with the clothing. We discussed how setting up an apparent ‘ladies’ area’ in the shop could work, and concluded that the simple rearrangement of accessories could help make the initial view of a cycle shop more inviting. If you have windows that can be used for display, it’s important to make sure they are enticing to both genders. It may sound obvious, but if you want to get women into your store, you need to be stocking products that they want to buy. If

you’re not certain what those might be, you need to ask your target audience. You could, for example, survey a local club about their favourite products. None of the retailers I work with have female shop staff – not for want of trying, I might add. It helps to encourage women if there are great female staff members – as long as your existing employees are really well-trained, polite and aware that bike shops can be scary places, then you will be fine. However, I would encourage you to seek out women for open positions wherever you can. Try your local college or sixth form centre; apprentices can be a great place to start. Women are most likely to come into your shop with friends. In Bristol, we’ve set up several ladies’ nights through the autumn and winter. We invite an inspirational speaker or two, and serve some tea and cake whilst chatting about cycling. It’s great fun, and although it may not lead to immediate sales, it’s certainly a good way to get some like-minded ladies into your shop. The personal shopping experience is very popular in boutiques, designer shops and department stores. Many independent shops work on a booking system for services. If you don’t already use this, it may be something you could introduce. According to my focus group research, if you want to encourage more women to use this kind of service, it would work best with a female staff member. While this is by no means a conclusive list, it should give you some food for thought. Good luck with attracting women into your shop, and happy selling!

BIKEBIZ.COM


OPINION

What practices can you change to attract female employees? GENDER INEQUALITY is often in the news; especially with pay gaps and equal rights. It’s an issue seen in many “traditionally male” industries such as tech, IT, construction and engineering. Where there are still many barriers to women entering traditionally “male” careers including social, cultural and emotional considerations. The cycling industry, too, has a problem with gender inequality. Look around you. Whether it’s your customers, your colleagues, your club members or your board, chances are that it will be a male-dominated environment. Achieving gender equality isn’t just a tick-box exercise. Gender balance leads to greater productivity, increased performance, an enhanced ability to attract and retain employees, and a better reputation. As a business, you will relate better to your own customers, whoever they may be. So how do we recruit more women into cycling? When it comes to attracting more women into cycling as a sport, several excellent programmes already exist and there are a growing number of ‘ladies only’ cycling clubs and teams. The women’s sport at the top level continues to develop and to attract more sponsorship and media coverage. This can only help our industry when looking at the genders taking up the various careers on offer. Most of what will attract women into an industry is the same as for men. There is no need for flashy perks, just for fair working conditions, paid leave and a clear career progression. Flexible working practices are as important for men as they are for women. Think about how you can be flexible as a company, set

BIKEBIZ.COM

‘Think about how you can be flexible as a company, set guidelines, and stick to them’

guidelines and stick to them. How often do you hear a story of someone being offered flexible working at the recruitment stage and then finding out on starting the job that it’s not so easy? When you are advertising, do you make a conscious effort to reach male and female audiences? If you are advertising on a website with a readership dominated by men, you may struggle to reach women at all. You should also think about the wording you use in adverts – is the

wording gender-neutral? There are several online guides you can use to check this, and if you’re unsure, you should ask for proofreading assistance from colleagues of both genders. When people look into your company, think about what they see. Does your website and your marketing material show a diverse environment? Put yourself in the candidate’s place; are they going to be put off by the image you are portraying? A famous example is a BBC video made for recruitment featuring the people behind Newsnight which features white males. Not a great advert for diversity. Cycling industry leaders also have a big part to play. They can make efforts to ensure that the sector as a whole is projecting itself in a positive way to both men and women. That might mean starting early and looking at where young people get their information about the cycling industry and the careers it offers. It could mean forging links with schools, cycling clubs, parents groups and across social media. Engineering and tech industries are leading the way with initiatives to encourage girls to consider careers in their sectors. Young Engineers is an excellent charitable organisation that promotes engineering through the practical application of science to all UK students ages seven to 19. When you view their website, it only takes a moment to see the benefit of encouraging all genders to take part in their programmes. Is this something we can emulate in the cycling industry? I think so. This contributor wished to remain anonymous. She is currently working on the recruitment side of the industry.

BIKEBIZ JULY 7


LETTER

DEAR BIKEBIZ Is something grinding your gears?

FOR OVER 17 years, my shop, Gainsborough Cycles, has supported National Bike Week. Each year, we promote six events: a sponsored cycle ride which raises about £25,000 for The Lincolnshire & Nottinghamshire Air Ambulance, Pedaling Picnic, Five Mile Race, Dr. Bike Safety Check, Bike2Work and leisure rides. This year, we found we were unable to list some of our events under the “cycle shop” category. A certain major retailer is dominant on the National Bike Week website, which lists all its shops with the same information. It appears to be working with Cycling UK, British Cycling and National Bike Week, and is claiming to be the UK’s number one in cycle retail. I run a small business, assisted by part-time employee Daniel Nicholson, an accredited cycle training instructor. The shop carries an extensive range of parts, accessories, and cycles, has a well-equipped workshop for servicing and repairing cycles, and offers training too. For the last 19 years, I have made discounts available to all sports club members, British Cycling, Cycling UK (CTC), as well as triathletes and runners. We look after our customers well. Because of that, I am angry with the way that the majors poach trade from the independent sector of the cycle industry. Small businesses often are looked upon as being more expensive than larger retailers. A lot of potential customers don’t even come through the door, though we can often match the prices of major cycle outlets, and even offer better advice and value for money. As far as I’m aware, majors are not paying for the advertisement with Cycling UK, British Cycling or National Bike Week. Gainsborough Cycles offers similar discounts to all members, but gets no free advertisement. This may be down to the size and power of the chains. Independent cycle shops have little power to stop the larger multiples from doing this. This kind of conduct has a number of repercussions on small businesses. Some try competing by slashing big discounts on current stock items in the hopes of retaining or 8 BIKEBIZ JULY

recovering lost trade; however without the footfall this rarely sees profit increasing. In the past – before the internet – we had a similar issue with catalogue companies. This was a different situation, however, because they lacked the power of advertising and reaching out to millions of customers that the internet now offers via social media. If this problem escalates, I can imagine cycle retailers becoming almost exclusively large multiples. This will ultimately become an issue for consumers who require solid advice or custom-made products. Lots of small businesses in Gainsborough are facing similar threats from larger multiples. A small independent traders’ group was set up in our area, which works together to stimulate trade in the town centre. Small retailers can encourage cycling

enthusiasts to spend in the smaller shops by offering similar discounts, and price-matching where possible. In our shop, many items are fitted to the customer’s requirements after advice has been given. Before we sell new cycles, we always make sure the customer gets the correct type of cycle for their use, and allow customers to test-ride their bike. We can respond to this threat most effectively by offering service that is superior to the multiples. Trevor Halstead, Gainsborough Cycles Opinions in published letters may not reflect those held by members of the BikeBiz team.

BikeBiz is keen to publish your opinions, whether you send them via email, Facebook, Twitter, BikeBiz.com or post… BIKEBIZ.COM


Fresh Retail Solutions Working Class Heroes’ owner, Tom Bowden (Right), out for an early evening ride with his colleagues, Adam (Left) and Rob (Centre). Photo taken by Edd @ Working Class Heroes

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30 UNDER 30

We asked – you well and truly delivered. We’ve had submissions in for marketing execs, PR managers, customer service advisors, cycle technicians, brand founders, IBD owners, website administrators, content creators, heads of design, and many more. BikeBiz presents 30 of the cycle industry’s up-and-coming influencers, nominated by the trade, and all under the age of 30

Honourable Mention ADAM BIGGS

30

“Adam Biggs returned to Moore Large last year as head of division for Forme Bikes, the brand he created in 2010. This is a leading role that covers sales, product and marketing. Biggs has been responsible for the Tailor Fit and Tailor Build programmes, driving the brand’s IBD strategy within the UK and supporting bricks and mortar retailers by highlighting their advantages.”

BIKEBIZ.COM

ALEX EVANS

30

“Alex Evans is features editor at MBUK. He coordinates, commissions and writes feature content, tests product, and heads up all MBUK’s social media. It takes a certain skill to juggle all the logistics of MBUK’s feature pool, but Al handles it with confidence and clarity. Plus he’s fast become one of the team’s most trusted testers and demonstrates his race pedigree every time he rides.”

BIKEBIZ JULY 11


30 UNDER 30

ALEX JONES

29

AMY THOMAS

“Alex recently joined the Silverfish team as social and digital marketing assistant. After trying his hand at running his own online cycling retail and distribution business, he’s brought his skills to Silverfish to help grow social media and email. Prior to his work in the cycling market, Alex had a successful motorsport career, rising up through karting, Formula Ford and culminating in racing Indy Lights in the USA.”

ANDREW SYME

23

BEN STOWE

27

DAN SMITH XXXXXXXXX 28 “Dan joined Altura from Berghaus in 2016 XXXXXXX

BRUCE DALTON

24

“Bruce is leaving Upgrade Bikes imminently to start a new adventure managing his own business, 4Season Collective, which will is a content marketing company. Upgrade will continue to use Dalton’s services for Kinesis Bikes’ marketing, photo and video production. Good luck to Bruce – he’s been a great rider and employee of Upgrade, and is a talent emerging in the bicycle industry.”

DAVE HICKS XXXXXXXXX 29 “Dave has used his cycling passion and XXXXXXX

and quickly became a key of the Xxxxx xxx xxxx xx xxxxx xxpart xx xxx xxxx team,xxxxxxx playingxx a major rolexxxxxx in the xxx xxxx xxxxxxxx development the Altura design ethos. xxxxxxxx xxxxof xxxxxxx xx xxx xxx xxxxxx Dan creates innovative products using the xxxxxxxx xx xxxx, xxxxxx xxxxxxx xx xx very latest technologies and aesthetics. xxxxxx xxxx xxxxx x xxxxxx xxxxxx x xx His inspiration stems from his experience xxxxxxx xxxxx xx xxx xxx xxxxxxx xx xxxx as an endurance athlete, and he regularly xxx xxx. Xxxxx xxxxxxx xxxx xx xxxxxx xx competes in MTB events, which ensures he understands the importance of quality xxxxxx xxxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxx xxxxxxx xx kit in achieving yourxxx goals.” xxxxxxxx xx xxxxxx xxxxxx xxxxx.

marketing skill set at Godfrey Xxxxx xxx xxxx xx xxxxx xx xx Bikewear, xxx xxxx wherexxxxxxx he quickly established himself xxxx xx xxxxxxxx xxxxxx xxx as a key person in the business, leading new xxxxxxxx xxxx xxxxxxx xx xxx xxx xxxxxx product development, growing sales xxxxxxxx xx xxxx, xxxxxx xxxxxxx xx xx through direct contact with customers, xxxxxx xxxx xxxxx x xxxxxx xxxxxx x xx He and securing high-profile partnerships. xxxxxxx xxxxx xx xxx xxx xxxxxxx xxxx recently caught the eye of RutlandxxCycles, xxx xxx. xxxxxxx xxchallenge xxxxxx xx where heXxxxx now takes on xxxx a new leading content andxxxxxxxx CRM as their online xxxxxx xxxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxx xx marketing xxxxxxxx xxmanager.” xxxxxx xxx xxxxxx xxxxx.

26

“Dee is responsible for all design requirements at Tandem Group Cycles, joining the team in January 2016. Coming from outside the industry, Dee brought a fresh pair of eyes to the product design at TGC. Working on product and packaging artwork, websites, flyers, email campaigns and imagery, Dee’s most notable project to date is the Squish lightweight kids bike range, with all bike graphics starting life on Dee’s sketchpad.”

12 BIKEBIZ JULY

26

“With experience as a key member of the Silverfish internal sales team, as well as in bike stores at the start of his career, Antonio’s understanding and contacts across the IBD network are invaluable as retail marketing manager, where his focus is on communication, in-store marketing and a major visual merchandising project. When he’s not visiting bike shops, he can be found styling it up on the Southwest’s trails on his EVIL Wrekoning.”

“Ben joined Fisher Outdoor in 2014 as a telesales executive, quickly rising to team leader before accepting his current position as brand manager when ZyroFisher was formed in 2016. Ben has huge enthusiasm for the bike industry and is respected both at ZyroFisher and by the brands he represents, including OTE and Vittoria. Outside of the office, Ben is a strong bike rider, racing time trials and road races across the country.”

DEE NAZRAN

“Before starting at C and N Cycles, Amy was knocked off her bike – the length of her recuperation sadly lost her a place at university. But, this inspired her to want more. Amy is now a qualified Cytech technician, passing with the highest grades on her course! Quick and hungry to learn, with her enthusiasm for everything cycling, leads new customers to quickly evolve into faithful regulars; a tonic for any small business.”

ANTONIO FIORE

“This young, dynamic upstart has already made his mark, strongly influencing product design at Muc-Off with an attention to detail that sets him apart from his industry peers. A former category one racer, Andrew is able to draw upon his experience in cycling to provide real-life design solutions that benefit our industry as a whole. And in addition to all that, he has impeccable manners and a strong work ethic.”

21

ED CLEMENTS

23

“Ed joined the Chicken CycleKit sales team in 2016 as an account support manager. He handles internal sales processes and customer service queries. Ed is a successful road racer who rides for the Chicken CycleKit-sponsored Spirit Tifosi RT and has already racked up an impressive number of wins this year. He has played a crucial role in the R&D of the latest Tifosi bikes and provides valuable feedback to many of our suppliers.”

BIKEBIZ.COM


30 UNDER 30

ED THOMSETT

28

“Having worked on MBUK for just over a year in his first publishing role, Ed throws himself wholeheartedly into every new challenge. His riding skills are wild, so he can confidently ride with top pros on feature shoots, and he won his class at Peaty’s Steel City DH in May. He easily transfers his passion for riding onto the pages of MBUK every issue and is producing great content that continues to grow MBUK’s social media following.”

EMILY CHILDS

25

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21

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“Grace has been with SweetSpot Group since 2013, joining straight out of university. She works across the Tour of Britain and Tour Series, and leads the PR and marketing campaign for Britain’s biggest women’s race, the Women’s Tour. A keen cyclist herself, Grace is tireless in her work and attention to detail, particularly when it comes to the design and implementation of marketing campaigns and digital assets.”

industry’s success After Xxxxx xxx latest xxxx xx xxxxx stories. xx xx xxx xxxx unfortunately being sacked from his xxxx xxxxxxx xx xxxxxxxx xxxxxx xxx general position at axxx local shop xxxxxxxxmanager xxxx xxxxxxx xx xxx xxxxxx in 2014, he set up his own small store, xxxxxxxx xx xxxx, xxxxxx xxxxxxx xx xx growing the business into new premises, xxxxxx xxxx xxxxx xxxxxx xxxxxxseveral x xx and employing fourx staff. Despite xxxxxxx xxxxx xx xxx xxx xxxxxxx xx xxxx setbacks, he has continued to drive the xxx xxx. Xxxxx xxxxxxx xxxxlocal xx xxxxxx business forward and serve and xx national cyclists, along with supporting xxxxxx xxxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxx xxxxxxx xxa few charities on the xxx way.” xxxxxxxx xx xxxxxx xxxxxx xxxxx.

21

“Starting as a shy trainee, aged 16, Jamie was bringing in all the medals on his downhill race team. Since working at Global Bike, his confidence and knowledge has grown immensely. Now Cytech Level 3 and workshop manager, Jamie has an excellent manner with all the customers and is always helpful, friendly and brilliant at solving problems. He always goes the extra mile to make sure everyone gets a high level of service.”

BIKEBIZ.COM

GRACE METCALF

JAMES WAGNER XXXXXXXXX 24 “James has developed into one of the XXXXXXX

expanding team, is on assist Xxxxx xxx xxxx xxIzzy xxxxx xx hand xx xxxtoxxxx Bikmo customers. Her bikexxxxxx geekery xxxx xxxxxxx xx xxxxxxxx xxx combined withxxxxxxx five years’ experience in xxxxxxxx xxxx xx xxx xxx xxxxxx the cycle retail trade make for invaluable xxxxxxxx xx xxxx, xxxxxx xxxxxxx xx xx customer service on bike valuations and xxxxxx xxxx xxxxx x xxxxxx xx claim replacements. A keenxxxxxx roadie xand xxxxxxx xxxxx xx xxx xxx xxxxxxx xx xxxx CX’er, Izzy sits on the NWCCA xxx xxx. Xxxxx xxxxxxx xxxx xx xxxxxx xx committee, helping organise league races. passion for all things cyclingxx xxxxxxHer xxxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxx xxxxxxx are a major toxxx the xxxxxx Bikmo xxxxx. team.” xxxxxxxx xxasset xxxxxx

JAMIE RIGBY

“Emily is one of ZyroFisher’s rising stars, progressing rapidly at Zyro, where she was appointed manager of customer services in 2013. Since the merger, Emily has doubled the size of her team, ensuring customers were supported during integration. Her positive, can-do attitude is invaluable, and she continues to develop her team through best practice customer service functions from outside of the cycling industry.”

“Gemma Goshawk joined the Silverfish team at the end of last year in the role of website administrator. Hers is a key position as the business finalises its work on a new website to better serve B2B customers and to promote the Silverfish brands to UK consumers. Gemma combines her tech smarts with e-commerce web skills, creative experience and a fantastic level of attention to detail.”

“Georgia looks after the MTB PR at Specialized UK. She lives and breathes MTB, and is an amazing rider. Having worked at Specialized for a year and a half, she’s been a huge part of the team, rising from demo test fleet coordinator to mountain bike PR specialist in just over a year. With almost 3K followers on Instagram and counting, Georgia is quickly becoming one of the biggest women influencers of the MTB world.”

IZZY COOK XXXXXXXXX “The newest member to join the XXXXXXX

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GEMMA GOSHAWK 24

“Unphased by the MAMIL domination in the cycling industry, Emily has taken the bull by the horns and totally smashed the ball out of the park. She has taken the lead on Attacus’ marketing campaigns, PR and comms. Without her, Attacus would not be the brand that it has become. With a press journalism and digital media background, she’s able to approach the Attacus brand with a unique level of insight.”

GEORGIA LESLIE

EMILY CANN

MARTHE JANSEN

26

“Starting as a marketing assistant last year, Marthe quickly added immeasurable value to Boardman’s digital output. Through a targeted and creative approach, she has grown its digital presence, helping it reach a wider audience across ever expanding touch points. 12 months in and Marthe is now in charge of the marketing plan, which sees her working closely with specialist press, sponsored teams, and SEO experts.”

BIKEBIZ JULY 13


30 UNDER 30

MATT EDWARDS

28

“Since joining Boardman in July 2016, Matt has hit the ground running. With a design background, his role is varied and sees him tackling a multitude of tasks, including supporting the marketing team with photography and artwork for print, digital and social marketing. Matt works closely with the brand manager to ensure that all communications fall in line with core values, assisted by his passion for cycling and attention to detail.”

ROB MITCHELL

23

28

STEVE LARKING XXXXXXXXX 29 “Steve joined Hotlines after cutting his XXXXXXX

STAVROS SUMNER

26

“PR guru for VOLT Bikes Stavros Sumner generates most of the PR from the press page. In his time with the company, he’s been able to secure great press with The Daily Mail, T3 Magazine, City AM, Stuff Magazine, The Gadget Show and many more. Stavros is a credit to the e-bike industry as a whole.”

TERRY ROLLESTON 29 XXXXXXXXX “Terry started off in telesales at Fisher XXXXXXX

teeth After number of Xxxxxon xxxcycle xxxxretail. xx xxxxx xxaxx xxx xxxx yearsxxxxxxx in sales,xx hexxxxxxxx moved across xxxx xxxxxxtoxxx marketing. Steve communicates xxxxxxxx xxxx xxxxxxx xx xxx xxxbrand xxxxxx information across a number of different xxxxxxxx xx xxxx, xxxxxx xxxxxxx xx xx platforms and audience types. He’s a xxxxxx xxxx xxxxx x xxxxxx xxxxxx x xx proactive and innovative employee, xxxxxxx xxxxx xx xxx xxx xxxxxxx handling a vast workload. Most xx xxxx xxx xxx. Xxxxx xxxx xx importantly, hexxxxxxx understands thexxxxxx needs xx of the retailer, ensuringxxxxxxxx the Hotlines xxxxxx xxxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxx xx portfolio customers.” xxxxxxxx benefits xx xxxxxx xxx xxxxxx xxxxx.

Outdoor, Muc-Off Xxxxx xxxbefore xxxx xxbecoming xxxxx xx xx xxx xxxx merchandiser, where he represented xxxx xxxxxxx xx xxxxxxxx xxxxxx xxx the brand at axxxx variety of events across the UK xxxxxxxx xxxxxxx xx xxx xxx xxxxxx and managed the Muc-Off offering xxxxxxxx xx xxxx, xxxxxx xxxxxxx xx xx in-store. He has recently been promoted xxxxxx xxxx xxxxx xxxxxx xxxxxx x xx to LOOK bike salesx and promotions xxxxxxx xxxxx xx xxx xxx xxxxxxx xx xxxx manager, where his infectious positive xxx xxx. really Xxxxxgoes xxxxxxx xxxxxx attitude the xxxx extraxx mile to xx effectively representxxxxxxxx the LOOK brand xx xxxxxx xxxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxx with ZyroFisher’s customer-base.” xxxxxxxx xx xxxxxx xxx xxxxxx xxxxx.

25

“Tom has turned around the Space for Cycling campaign at Cycling UK. He has reinvigorated it with a road show that has been through England, Scotland and Wales introducing the campaign at a local level. In the coming weeks he will also launch new tools to help would-be campaigners make a difference in their local patches. His enthusiasm is infectious and his success record to date speaks for itself.”

BIKEBIZ.COM

24

“MBUK technical writer Seb’s testing is not only analytic, it’s pushed into real-life test conditions, and then extended into high-level race scenarios to fully explore the limits of what he’s doing. Some of the more unexpected findings are now coming to fruition in the marketplace. More mainstream brands are now getting their product lines in this space ready, showing that not only was Seb ahead of the curve, he was right!”

“Joining Tandem Group Cycles as product manager in March 2016, Shuvo gathered his extensive production experience for a major bicycle supplier in his home country of Bangladesh. Shuvo has made huge improvements on TGC’s supplier relationships. Taking on MY2018 specifications for Dawes, Claud Butler and British Eagle, the fruits of Shuvo’s labour will quickly become apparent when new ranges are revealed.”

TOM GUHA

25

“In 2010, Nathan was spending his summers cycling the hills of Yorkshire. To his frustration, climbs were spoiled by one thing: broken pedal straps. There was nothing on the market strong enough to withstand the forces of everyday riding. So Nathan made his own. From these small beginnings, Restrap has gone from strength to strength, with its Carry Everything Saddlebag winning 2016 Interbike innovation award.”

SEBASTIAN STOTT

“Despite having come virtually straight from college, Rob Mitchell took on the high-pressure job of designing Singletrack Magazine without breaking stride. In addition to daily magazine and web design duties, Rob has thrown himself into learning new skills, like video editing and studio photography. He even tops the office charts with his cappuccino skills. All this while still being too young to drive the Singletrack van.”

SHUVO DEV

NATHAN HUGHES

TORI GLOVER

28

“Tori handles the queries and claims at Bikmo, looking after the ambassadors and fortnightly newsletter. Changing the perception of insurance agents, her friendly manner puts customers at ease after an incident, and her knowledge gets them back in the saddle. When not out riding the Welsh lanes, she can be found volunteering for SweetSpot at the Tour Series and Tour of Britain, where she helps keep the races running smoothly.”

BIKEBIZ JULY 15


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WORKFORCE DIVERSITY

How the cycling industry can improve workforce diversity... Laura Laker addresses the cycling industry’s shortage of not only women, but also individuals from minority backgrounds, in its workforce, and offers some solutions to this multifaceted predicament

WHAT CYCLE BRANDS CAN DO “For young women, there are very few visible positive role models. For the Conference we wanted something that looked natural but reflected a diverse involvement of women of different backgrounds, ages, mums, daughters, and so on. We couldn’t find any imagery like this; I think this needs to change.” Heather Esiri, Women and Cycling Conference organiser. “We work with Juliet Elliott and other female models, to represent women in the brand as they should be represented, as the men are represented. It’s important for the business to work with females, to get our point of view. “There need to be women involved in that product from design to sale; a huge part of that is the consumer buying from someone they feel comfortable buying from and can give them a well-informed opinion.” Dalany Watkins, Assos. BIKEBIZ.COM

“Have [diversity] reflected in your brand identity. For young girls, or women, starting out in cycling, whatever background they come from, never underestimate the importance of having everyday women and all groups represented; that could be the make or break – for a young woman or an older woman. If you aren’t seeing that reflected in the industry, you might think: ‘That’s somewhere I don’t belong’. “It is quite disappointing that we are still looking at an industry and something that is a big thing among women and they are not being represented higher up the food chain. “It does need to be tackled now from high up. It’s people who already have those positions of authority and power who need to make changes that are visible so other companies see and follow suit.” Jools Walker, Cycle Style blogger, speaker, and soon to be author.

THINK OF your cycling industry colleagues and you will probably note most of them are white and male. Although we’ve tried – and failed – to find statistics within the industry on this, it is perhaps needless to say we need to up game on inclusion, if we are to become the dynamic, innovative and inclusive industry we could be. From shop floors to board room tables, the voices of people of colour, women, and LGBT people are in a minority at best, entirely absent at worst. Participation in cycling for leisure, sport and transport is part of that picture. According to British Cycling, women still make up just one in three of regular cyclists, and although fear of traffic is a major barrier, it is not the beginning and end of the story. Cycling uptake

among ethnic minority, and underrepresented groups, is still lower than among their white counterparts – in one London survey, 57 per cent of white Londoners say they never cycle, compared with 71 per cent of BME Londoners. The way women and people from minority groups are depicted – if they are at all – impacts whether they feel welcome in the world of cycling in the first place. HOW WOMEN WHO CYCLE ARE PORTRAYED IN THE MEDIA Almost 18 months ago, this journalist sat on an all-female panel at Look Mum, No Hands, as part of the London Bike Kitchen’s WAG (women and gender variant) series, discussing how women are portrayed in the cycling media. BIKEBIZ JULY 19


WORKFORCE DIVERSITY

Having bought a stack of magazines before the event, I was astonished to find hardly any women in them. During the discussion itself, we looked to product advertising. Assos was one that came under fire, for using a model wearing just bib shorts and stilettos – an image more likely to make women feel objectified than empowered and inspired to ride their bikes. Since then, Assos overhauled its women’s strategy, and 50 per cent of its London staff are now women. Dalany Watkins, its PR and marketing manager was part of that transformation. Coming from the female-dominated PR world to cycling was a culture shock. After the “very odd, oldfashioned way of marketing”, Watkins says, “It was important for us in particular to have some women onboard.” “We work with Juliet Elliott and other female models, to represent women in the brand as they should be represented – as the men are represented.” They now also have a women’s strategy team; 20 BIKEBIZ JULY

Watkins is among those feeding back about products in the team. “Our aim is to increase the number of women buying the product,” she says. “You need to think about the steps, from the design to the consumer buying the product, and we need women to be involved in that product.” The wider industry, however, remains stubbornly white and male. “You go to [cycling] events like the Core (check) bike show and other trade events, and it’s 90 per cent men,” says Watkins. Cycle style blogger and presenter, Jools Walker, is a rare black female presence in the cycling world. Walker started her cycle style blog, Velo City Girl, seven years ago, before working for Vulpine. Although she didn’t at first intend to be a voice for women of colour in cycling, she felt compelled to do so. “Vulpine was my first experience of working in the industry. One of the reasons for starting the blog was because I realised there were

“It still feels that it’s something of a rarity, seeing women in cycling and women of colour” Jools Walker, Velo City Girl

no women who looked like me; you weren’t seeing many black women blogging about cycling, or represented in the media. “I saw even less of that in the cycling industry; you didn’t see women that were like me. It still seemed to be dominated by middle-aged white men.” She says although the industry is improving, there is still a long way to go. “It still feels that it’s something of a rarity, seeing women in cycling and women of colour, which is quite disappointing that we are still looking at an industry and something that is a big thing among women and they are not being represented higher up the food chain.” Finding a support network of women in cycling helped Walker, and it is something she feels is key to encouraging more women, and more diversity in the industry. These events can also become a resource for the cycling industry – a way to tap in to different and new customers. This has to be an ongoing conversation, however, BIKEBIZ.COM


WORKFORCE DIVERSITY

© PIC CREDIT : Ian James

Jools Walker, Velo City Girl

not simply a tick-box exercise. “If it’s difficult to break into the industry, it feels like it is a vicious circle, a glass ceiling. That’s what you’re constantly seeing. There are some companies that dabble in terms of representing different women within cycling, and then revert to what they were doing before. We need to keep that conversation going. “It’s so disappointing if you’re going to just ride the crest of that wave when it’s trending. We need to keep that going to encourage participation of women of colour: people from marginalised backgrounds. We are getting our voices heard, but we are still having to fight for that.” BIKE SHOPS Heather Esiri is organiser of the Women and Cycling Conference. She believes cycle shops can play a key role in encouraging and nurturing grassroots groups. “Collaborations between community groups, cycle clubs and cycle shops are really helpful for both sides. Women can get BIKEBIZ.COM

“I think women probably find it quite intimidating going into bike shops, depending on the shop, and the layout and the vibe” Dalany Watkins, ASSOS

support, spaces they can use for meetings; they can also have a relationship with bike suppliers, and both sides can begin to understand more about each other.” “A lot of women who came to the conference with friends, they had their club uniforms on and they wear them with such pride. They aren’t racing cyclists, they are just in a cycle club; some of them are very grassroots and new, but they had something to enable them to identify as a group and it seemed to be really important for them. If cycle shops are prepared to assist them there’s business there for them as well, isn’t there?” Cycle shops that sponsor grassroots organisations, in the same way they sometimes sponsor local clubs, can position themselves as friendly places for new cyclists from diverse backgrounds. Dalany Watkins adds: “I think women probably find it quite intimidating going into bike shops, depending on the shop, and the layout and the vibe.” “A huge part of [changing] that is the consumer buying from

someone they feel comfortable buying from and can give them a well-informed opinion.” Watkins believes more women learning to fix bikes could ultimately lead to more women in the industry, and praises the London Bike Kitchen for its inclusivity. Caren Hartley, award-winning frame builder, first learnt her skills at the London Bike Kitchen. CULTURAL BARRIERS… Cycling clubs can do more to improve diversity and actively encourage women from different communities. Esiri says this is something the Women and Cycling Conference did well, bringing together different voices, to help understand one another. “We need to be creating opportunities where everybody feels: ‘I can have a go at this, and take it to any level I want to, and there are people there who are going to encourage me, women who understand what some of my anxieties and fears might be and can be empathetic’.” BIKEBIZ JULY 21


WORKFORCE DIVERSITY

WHAT CYCLE SHOPS CAN DO “A quick Halfords maintenance course led on to me doing a bike maintenance workshop because I wanted to know more myself. I think things like that help, educating parents as well. Otherwise as soon as they get a puncture the bike goes in the garage.” Mumtaz Khan, Onna Bike “Having woman in a shop to show you around, who can talk about the products in an informative way. Otherwise you’re going on what the brand has told you about.” Dalany Watkins, Assos “Collaborations between community groups, cycle clubs and cycle shops are really helpful for both sides. Women can get support, have good spaces they can use for meetings; they can also have a relationship with bike suppliers, and both sides can begin to understand more about each other” Heather Esiri, Women and Cycling Conference.

“It doesn’t take much to knock your confidence and self-esteem, and you go into a new experience and you have got a smiling welcoming person who you feel wants you there and wants to help and understands where you’re coming from; that’s going to be really encouraging. I think if you continue to have opportunities like the conference it will create new networks where women within that network can say I can really share that experience with people.” “We had a few women from the industry; Islabikes sent a representative. Maybe that’s what we need to look at, positive routes where women feel: ‘I am sure I will be in a supported environment and that will give me the confidence and skills to look for opportunities in the wider industry’.” Mumtaz Khan started Onna Bike after years of experience running a martial arts club, and tapped into her networks to bring cycling to a diverse community in Bradford. Khan learned cycle maintenance initially through Halfords, before going on to a more advanced course. 22 BIKEBIZ JULY

“Even in cycling clubs, the image portrayed is about speed, competition, and clothing. At our club, we just wear normal clothes” Mumtaz Khan, Onna Bike

Khan wanted to disprove the myth Asian women don’t cycle. She decided to arrange a mass ride for the Tour de Yorkshire, and encouraged people – men, women and kids of different ethnicities – to borrow bikes and get involved. On the day, more than 200 people turned up. Some even learned to cycle for the event. She says: “2.5 miles was huge challenge for them, especially in front of everybody; nobody wanted to fall off the bike!” “Some, because of cultural barriers and expectations, they have just not ridden for years; I have a friend who hasn’t ridden for 25 years. Now she’s back on the bike and she loves it.” Khan believes short or long-term bike loans can help get people into cycling, to a point where they know they want to invest. “People aren’t going to be prepared to spend money unless they can see the benefits, and try it out and invest in it, long-term. Even with cycling clubs, the image they portray is about speed, competition, clothing, etc. Our club we just wear normal clothes.”

Jools Walker says: “Even within the black community there is that feeling of ‘this isn’t something we do’.” She points to a group in America, Black Girls Do Bike, a community of women of colour who cycle for a variety of reasons, from racing to leisure rides, and encourage other women to join them. The industry could learn from these women. “I think if [diversity] is visible within the industry, it makes all the difference,” says Walker. “The industry needs to reach out and give women a seat at the table to make those changes. If we have the idea of MAMILs on bikes, it doesn’t feel like the industry we would imagine working in.” As she puts it: “As long as my ass is on a saddle, I’m cycling.” Khan adds the more women from a variety of ethnicities cycle, the more normalised it will become – less the sole domain of the white male. “I would like to think a year down the line there will be a lot more BME women cycling to work, and seeing it as a viable option.” You can read more about women working in the trade on page 33. BIKEBIZ.COM


TRICKS OF THE TRADE

Part exchange on high-end road bikes: are you missing out on a valuable sales tool? Quickly tiring of last season’s highend road bike, wealthy enthusiasts are a prime source for harvested parts. Simon Still explains how a London service can help you capitalise on premium cast-offs IN THE motoring world, part exchange is pretty much the norm. It’s routine for people to own a vehicle for a few years before trading it in against a newer model, but in the cycling world it still remains a rarity. As road cycling has grown in popularity and moved upmarket in recent years, an opportunity has developed to bring this model to the cycling world. Enthusiast riders often have a number of bikes, with their pride and joy saved for summer races and sportives. Many upgrade or change their bikes after only a year of two of riding. Their best bikes don’t get used through winter, don’t cover huge mileage and are well-looked-after, so they’re in good condition with little wear to the drivetrain. Most need to sell their old bike but few want to deal with timewasters and tyre-kickers, nor do they want to sit waiting for a buyer to collect when they could be out riding. Most importantly, unless they’re prepared to be without a bike for a while, there’s uncertainty about how much they will make on their old bike – and the budget for its replacement. Buyers have concerns about the real condition of a used bike and the degree of wear to parts, as well as the risk that a bike might be stolen. Cracked carbon frames are a concern, as these aren’t easy to spot. With a private purchase, it’s very much ‘buyer beware’, with no comeback if something goes awry. A good bike shop can solve problems for both parties. Confirming identity and address for a seller helps to cover theft risk (as well as checking stolen bike registers). The shop mechanic will have much better experience than most consumers in assessing 24 BIKEBIZ JULY

damage and wear on parts consistently and objectively. However, many shops are still reluctant to get involved with part exchange, despite it being a helpful tool in closing sales. The primary concern is reliably assessing the condition and setting the right price for the trade-in. Selling used bikes introduces a conflict for the sales team – whether to spend time on used bikes with variable margin rather than box-fresh, full-margin, in-season bikes. Presentation can be another concern; showroom space is usually limited and unless there is a distinct area set aside with a good stock of used bikes they can detract from the appeal of the new bikes in the showroom. Warranty presents issues since few manufacturers will transfer to a second owner. Road Cycle Exchange in Richmond, London, target the pre-owned performance road bike market. So far they’ve sourced their stock mainly from pro-race teams, distributors and the public. They’re now looking to partner with IBDs to take the risk and hassle out of the part exchange process. The IBD salesperson takes details

‘Many shops are still reluctant to get involved with part exchange, despite it being a helpful tool in closing sales’

of the prospective trade-in and contacts RCE for a buy-price. When the customer collects their new bike and drops off the old, the shop performs a simple, structured, examination. If it’s all as originally described, then the RCE price is guaranteed. The buy price is transparent to the customer and has no impact on the shop margin. There needs to be a viable margin on the used bike, so the trade only works at the higher end of the market. At the moment, that covers carbon or titanium bikes less than three years old, which initially retailed for at least £1,200. With high-end road customers often cash rich and time-poor, making the upgrade process as easy as possible can be a real boon. Whether you develop the skills to trade yourself or partner with a service like Road Cycle Exchange, it’s well worth considering putting some effort into marketing part-exchange to your customers. Unlike other common sales techniques like discounting or finance, this one doesn’t have to hit the bottom line. www.roadcycleexchange.com support@roadcycleexchange.com BIKEBIZ.COM


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BRINGING BACK BMX

Back to the BMX BMX has experienced a drop in popularity over the last five years – but could it be making a comeback? Kieran Howells sits down with BMX guru Mark Noble to discuss its rebirth and the state of the industry FOR MANY young enthusiasts, riding a BMX is a gateway into a greater world of cycling. Much like the appeal surrounding fixies, the bikes are easy to control, versatile and low-maintenance – at least compared to dad’s high-end carbon road bike. Many hundreds of hours in my young life were spent disassembling Hoffman Condors or building up Wethepeople and FitBikeco frames; the rush of riding on componentry that I had fitted myself never got old, and it’s thanks to those happy childhood memories that bicycles remain a central passion in my life. Over the last ten years, the landscape of the BMX market in the UK has changed vastly. Popularity dwindled as the focus of teenagers was concentrated on other things; while a core demographic of BIKEBIZ.COM

passionate youngsters have kept the flag flying, bike shop floor space dedicated to BMX has slowly diminished. There was a widelyheld belief that it would be a long time before BMX stole the spotlight again, but recently, retailers have noted a small push back to bikes. So we have to ask ourselves: is now the time for a big BMX revival? Guru of all things BMX at CSG Mark Noble thinks so. “There is a ton of BMX action going on right now. As riders, we’ve never had so many skateparks, street spots, trails or BMX tracks to ride. Every town has a decent skatepark, street spots are everywhere, BMX racing is in the Olympics, and there’s so much going on. We simply can’t look at sales alone as a barometer for activity, because BMX bikes have never been stronger or more

“If you don’t put effort into your retail experience in-store, then don’t come running to me when your customers simply go online”

durable; as a result, product lasts much longer than ever before. Riders simply don’t need to buy new frames all the time or replace broken parts every few weeks; the product just lasts so long these days, which is awesome if you’re a rider reaping the benefits.” Cycling Sports Group is undoubtedly one of the largest distributors in the country for BMX products. Within its ranks are iconic brands GT Bicycles, Mongoose and rider favourite Wethepeople. Whereas many within the industry would be excited to hear about a surge back to BMX – even if only born of nostalgia – the bottom line for many is sales. So, are sales actually picking up? “We are seeing green shoots of recovery for sure,” comments Noble. “As a company, we’re forecasting more complete BIKEBIZ JULY 27


BRINGING BACK BMX bike sales and we’re working hard on making it happen. It’s not an insignificant share of CSG’s annual turnover; we have the number one-rated BMX brand in Wethepeople, and our brands can turn people into bike riders from an early age. CSG started out as a BMX retailer right at the start of the culture with Hot Wheels, so our roots run deep. It’s in our core and we support it in the UK through thick and thin.” Outside of his professional life, Noble was a devout rider from an early age. As we chat, he cites the original 80s wave of popularity from the USA as a key turning point in his youth. “My dad brought early BMX magazines back from the States and it looked perfect. From the outset I was hooked,” he tells me. Having watched the trends change and brands come and go, I’m keen to discover what brands still impress him. “I’ve got a lot of time for the likes of Fly Bikes, FBM, T1, Deluxe, Sunday and Fit. As ever, John Buultjens at Haro Bikes is doing some amazing work with his retro line and the next-gen GT freestyle bikes are looking great, but as always for me it’s Wethepeople that takes the crown. Harry Schmid’s attention to detail, new product ideas, new bike lines, rider input and belief, plus the sheer quality always shines through. Year-on-year they keep pushing BMX forwards.” Although the brands are putting in the work, don’t expect to see the industry lurch forward in leaps and bounds. As Noble puts it, “It’s more about steady and progressive evolution rather than revolution. In BMX, you don’t get progress purely for commercial gain, which arguably we see elsewhere in cycling with new wheel sizes and whatnot. In BMX, developments such as 25.4 bars and stems, geometry tweaks on frames and tech tricks here and there always keep [it] fresh. BMX product moves so quickly, though it’s vital to keep your product turning over, otherwise it dates really badly. You have to keep BMX fresh, the riders won’t have it any other way.” According to Noble, both the bikes and the growth potential is there, so what is holding the dealers back? “Bike shops just need to be more proactive rather than just expecting customers to wander in with a credit card. It’s 28 BIKEBIZ JULY

“We simply can’t look at sales alone as a barometer for activity”

the same with any good retail operation these days, not just BMX. A good road bike shop organises rides, sportives and gets involved with the local club. A good mountain bike shop sets up demo weekends and sponsors the local MTB races. So, a proper BMX shop should sponsor or set up local BMX jams, help support local riders, host video premières in their store, support the local skatepark and just get involved with it as much as possible. BMX shops should be

embedded in the local scene and help grow it, they should nurture it. Then they can reap the rewards at the till with regular custom. If you run a bike shop that doesn’t do these things and you don’t put effort in to your retail experience in-store, then don’t come running to me when all your customers simply go online and buy from a discount shed somewhere. We’re all in it because we love it and we want to grow BMX, right? So let’s put some effort in. We do!”

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PRODUCT INSIGHT

Capturing the action With technology seeing steady progression, high-quality action cameras are becoming more affordable than ever. Kieran Howells presents some of the most feature-packed recent models to hit the market IS THERE anything more satisfying than watching a high-quality trails video from the point of view of the rider? Apart from actually riding good trails, obviously. It’s a testament to the modern age that the technology to capture the crisp movement, clean lines and emotion that goes into successfully navigating any kind of ride is almost constantly at our fingertips. There is no doubt that a vast portion of enthusiasts are keen to document their bold experiences on two wheels,

whether that’s for safety, insurance, or simply pure entertainment. GoPro has been the flagship sports action camera to which all others are compared for many years, but recent developments by brands such as Garmin and newcomers Olfi are finally starting to give the brand a run for its money, and it may well be time to expand that ageing collection in-store. So, what do customers look for in an action camera? The main priorities are: Quality – 1080p is still

considered a perfectly adequate resolution, but brands are realising that cutting-edge 4K is where the market is heading and now is time to get onboard. Battery life – This is where a lot of cameras fall short. Sure, it’s wonderful to see Boxhill in stunning quality, but it’s not going to be a masterpiece if that battery only lasts four minutes. Size – Compact dimensions tend to be a given; the latest models are generally able to fasten or clip onto hats, bags or

handlebars without causing much of an issue at all. Ease of use – unless you’re Stephen Spielberg or your subject is Danny MacAskill, you probably don’t want nine million modes – nor do you want to have to tap out Morse code on a singular button just to get it to switch on. I’ve compiled four alternatives to the GoPro that I believe to be at the front line of action filming, and that cater to these main priorities to the highest extent possible.

OLFI ONE.FIVE:

SONY FDR-X300R:

The feature that sets the Olfi One.Five apart from the brand’s other offerings is its ability to shoot in 4K at a rate of 24fps. It also features an Exmore-R gyro-stabilised sensor to balance the shots. On the rear, it sports a full colour LCD screen, meaning you aren’t shooting blind. The camera is waterproof up to 30 metres, which admittedly falls short of the 60 metres depth that cameras like the FDRX300R can withstand.

Sony’s FDR-X300R shoots in 4K, and can also capture time lapses. It features a similar shake-eliminating balanced optical SteadyShot mode as well. A new user interface was designed for the camera, which is simple and easy to operate on-the-go. The camera is waterproof to up to 60 metres depth, so users don’t have to worry about getting the unit wet and muddy.

HTC RE CAMERA:

VEHO K SERIES K2S:

HTC’s RE camera features a unique ‘periscope’ design that some may find easier to hold, but less simple to mount. The camera is crafted for point and shoot simplicity and is activated by simply tapping a large button on the rear. It sports a 16-megapixel sensor in a wide angle 146-degree lens. While it doesn’t have a display, it can connect to a smart phone and be operated by means of an app.

Veho’s K Series K2S sport camera is specifically designed to tackle fast-paced action without lag. Like the RE, it features a 16-megapixel camera and sports a selection of modes including time-lapse, high-speed photo burst and a 180-degree rollover mode. The camera has built in WiFi with a range of up to 60 metres, allowing it to be used close to the action and operated by a smart phone.

30 BIKEBIZ JULY

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WOMEN IN WORKSHOPS

A workshop of one’s own: women in cycle technician careers Why are there so few girls working as cycle mechanics and framebuilders? How do we get them interested in careers as cycle technicians in the first place? And, once they’re hired, how do you keep them long-term? Hayley E. Ferguson attempts to get to the bottom of these million-dollar questions once and for all Bespoke frame builder Liz Colebrook has 30 years of experience in the cycle trade, and makes use of her training as an occupational therapist to fit each client with a bike that meets their requirements

BIKEBIZ.COM

LET’S NOT sugarcoat it. Even in most desk jobs, the UK’s cycling industry is chiefly made up of men. Just a glimpse at the short queues for the ladies’ facilities in a cycling event of any description makes abundantly clear to any attendee that guys dominate both the sport and its corresponding trade. Cycling is hardly the only field that experiences this gender imbalance – only nine per cent of the country’s engineering workforce is made up of women, and worse still, six per cent of registered engineers and technicians. It may be for similar reasons that the retail and mechanic side of the cycle trade is amongst the most deficient in female employees. According to Liz Colebrook, owner of Beaumont Bicycles, the number is growing, but there’s still ground to cover before the imbalance is corrected. “We’re seeing more women in bike shops, but it’s still a ratio of about 1:8.” Joanne Newstead, shop manager at Elmy Cycles, notes that, in a recent batch of interviews, the shop only had one girl apply in a group of seven men. While the ratio is incrementally higher than Colebrook’s estimate, “it’s quite sad,” says Newstead. “You have to ask why [women don’t apply in higher numbers]. I think we have more female applicants than other shops, because they know there’s already a woman here. The industry has a lot of catching up to do.” Newstead believes the disproportionate number of men in mechanic positions may be in part caused by the overall perception of cycling as a sport. “Riding a bike is classed as something a man does. [...] If you come across a company that’s willing to support women, you should use it promote them. If you can build that rapport, and you can use it to bring the women into the shops, then you should.” BIKEBIZ JULY 33


WOMEN IN WORKSHOPS

TLDR: What can you do to make women feel comfortable in your shop? Q Show female cyclists that you understand their experience by promoting products made by companies that support women Q Avoid locker room talk Q Don’t presume that female customers are new to the sport – ask them what level they’re at!

Having previously worked as a PE support technician, Joanne Newstead became shop manager at Elmy Cycles five years ago

“One of the things that really gets me is when a man spends £1,500 on his own bike, and then he buys one for his wife that’s £500. It’s chicken and egg,” says Colebrook. “If you give someone a special offer bike, and they get on it, they’ll ride it once and never again. They’ll think that it was a terrible experience. I’ve never worked in a bike shop with people who didn’t agree that was wrong. I cannot work with anyone who would treat a female customer like she doesn’t know a bike is [poor-quality].” However, Ninon Asuni, owner of The Bicycle Workshop, points out that while modern perceptions may have changed, it’s women who have always cycled at the utility bike level. “Women have always been the first to go shopping or go to work on their bikes,” she says. “But, for people at that level, it’s not about interest. It’s a utility to get around or to keep fit.” On the consumer side, many women report feeling selfconscious in bike shops, which may dissuade them from becoming interested in bikes at all. Newstead tells me: “A lady recently said she’d ordered three different sizes of garment to try on at home. Then BIKEBIZ.COM

she wouldn’t have to feel embarrassed. But why would she feel embarrassed?” So what can be done to make sure women don’t feel out of place in bike shops? Newstead continues: “I did a fitting for a woman who’d had awful problems with her saddle. She was told in another bike shop: ‘It’s like your honeymoon love. The more you use it, the more you get used to it’.” Avoiding locker room talk won’t hurt, but mostly, “[women just] need to be reassured that they’re not going to be made to feel inferior.” But it’s not all bad news. “Things are moving on,” says Asuni. “Women’s racing is getting a lot more coverage. It’s a difficult area to increase involvement in, but the young women coming into cycling, and the involvement of women in the Olympic games, has generated more interest from other young women in the racing side. That’s the way to do it – to get general publicity.” If the number of young women interested in cycling as a pastime, and at a competitive level, were to increase, there would doubtlessly be a surge in female applicants to cycling industry positions. However, the reasons behind the shortage

Q Match women with bikes that really suit their needs Q Plan events that will encourage women to come into your shop, e.g. women-only mechanic workshops; ladies’ rides

“There are lots of women who would like to work with their hands, but they don’t think it’s something they can do” Ninon Asuni, The Bicycle Workshop

of women in the technical work of the trade may be more intricate than just limited female interest in the sport. Colebrook, a bespoke frame builder and qualified occupational therapist with 30 years of experience in the cycle trade, believes the imbalance is in part down to the education disparity of years past, which pushed boys into traditionally ‘male’ subjects at school. “I was born in the 60s, and school in the 70s was not like now. A girl wouldn’t have done woodwork or metalwork. What I’ve had to do now is catch up with welding – but women make great welders. It’s heat management, just like cooking. I still have frustrations, though, and am still discovering little things that a guy might’ve picked up just because he’d done metalwork or woodwork at school. Just tricks of the trade.” “I think it’s a historic thing that goes across many industries,” Asuni speculates. “People are still shocked to see women who are engineers or architects. For some reason, there’s a sense that girls just don’t do jobs like that. There are lots of women who would like to work with their hands, but they don’t think it’s something they can BIKEBIZ JULY 35


WOMEN IN WORKSHOPS do. Yes, there are times where things don’t move and you have to put in a bit of strength, but it’s not heavy work.” “I’ve never really thought that being a woman made that much difference. There are some women who are clumsy, and some men who are clumsy,” she continues. “I don’t think it’s a gender thing – it’s a person thing. Some people are just good at working with tools. I don’t think that’s gender-specific. I’ve taken trainee men on and have had to show them how to hold a spanner, but they’re just absolutely hopeless. They could probably paint beautiful pictures or write beautiful stories, but they couldn’t put a shelf up, or cook, or handle a knife. Everybody has different skills, and that’s what makes the world go round. If we each play to our strengths, we can all make a living in a job that we really enjoy.” To Colebrook, getting more women into mechanic positions begins with inspiring girls to take a practical approach with their work from a young age. “I think great role models, and opportunities, will get more girls into the trade. It’s about going into schools and bringing something tangible with you, like building a wheel in front of a class.” For the women who are already interested in bikes, what can be done on to make work in a cycle shop a more attractive prospect? Male-dominated industries often still function in ways that do not support the need to incorporate work with family obligations. “I couldn’t have done this when my children were small. You have to find someone to look after them. That’s a sticky point for a lot of women who have children – for most of us, that maternal string is just too tight. Kids usually come first, and if you have to leave them behind, that’s really tough,” says Newstead. She feels that introducing job shares might help. “It’s difficult in the bike industry. These tend to be small businesses. We need to encourage people to be happy to take women in job shares. It doesn’t have to be an inconvenience to hire a woman part-time, and have her off for six weeks over the summer.” For the same reason, it’s good to have a clear, flexible plan in place for if an employee requires parental 36 BIKEBIZ JULY

Ninon Asuni started in the cycle industry in the late 70s, and will shortly be launching a new venture exclusively dealing with hub gear repairs

TLDR: What can you do generate interest in technical cycle industry roles from women? Q Start at a young age: form lasting partnerships with local schools. Take the opportunity to speak to young girls about the shortage of women in the industry, and explain the environmental and health benefits of cycling Q Create entry-level opportunities for women to build careers from scratch Q Consider letting female employees work in job shares Q If possible, make your shop’s wage structure explicit at the interview stage, and explain clearly what the career path is for new employees BIKEBIZ.COM


WOMEN IN WORKSHOPS

“I sat and read every catalogue when I started. I wanted to know where everything came from. I felt that was important if I wanted to be taken seriously.”

TLDR: What can you do to keep female mechanics in your shop as long-term employees? Q Openly support female employees if they experience sexism on the client side – let the client know that their conduct is inappropriate Q Have a flexible plan in place for maternity leave, just in case the need arises Q Verbally praise young women who are just starting out as mechanics Q Be forgiving of mistakes. Help all staff rectify and learn from errors Q Be vigilant about the way your employees relate to each other, and put a stop to anything that might be considered workplace bullying to someone on the receiving end of it Q Develop a cooperative company culture that encourages staff to help one another solve problems, and to share in each other’s successes BIKEBIZ.COM

leave. And then there’s the dreaded wage gap. “Being paid equally validates you,” says Colebrook. “Having a wage structure that’s explicit is good.” Once they’re in male-dominated occupations, however, many women face unique challenges, and use distinct strategies to enable them to continue on their career paths. “There was another woman when I started. I had a soulmate at work. That really helps,” Colebrook continues. A common thread seems to be the need for supportive colleagues, meaningful friendships, and positive reinforcement at the learning stage. “I can cope with men saying: ‘If you don’t mind, love, I’ll wait for one of the blokes,’ and, I think Steve (Elmy Cycles’ owner) is very good,” says Newstead. If somebody comes in, he’ll say: ‘I don’t know, I just fix the bikes. You’re better off listening to her.’ It’s a bit of a double act, but I do get [treated differently by customers]. Even this week, I’ve had it. It’s fairly normal. I spent all day fitting crash helmets, and when I put this child on a bike, he said that the steering wasn’t working. The dad said: ‘Don’t worry boy, that’s a lady. She probably can’t even ride a bike.’ The guy who I was working with at the time just looked at me and went: ‘Oh that’s a bit much mate, you can’t say stuff like that.’ You have to be much more assertive than the men.” Asuni emphasises that she sees most objectionable conduct “from the customers rather than the rest of the trade.” She feels being a female mechanic is “more of an irrelevance now – I have very few problems in the trade. I don’t get people making a point of it. They’re much more interested in the fact that I go to Eurobike, which small shops don’t usually go to. “It’s the customers walking in through the door and not trusting me, or insisting on speaking to my staff instead of me, because they think I don’t know the answers to their questions. I’ve got great staff who make them talk to me. It can be really funny,” she laughs. “If we get a guy who doesn’t want to talk to me, they still make him do it.” Even if most difficulties for women in workshops originate on the consumer side, the industry is not without its faults. Colebrook reveals the importance of ensuring BIKEBIZ JULY 39


WOMEN IN WORKSHOPS that budding female mechanics don’t feel picked on in the often ‘lad-centric’ environment of a bike shop. “You need a good leader. The boss in the shop has got to say to the guys: ‘Don’t take the piss.’ When I was around 25, we had a new mechanic in the shop where I worked. She was fabulous and enthusiastic – lots of energy. One young lad in the shop took her chainset off and stuck it all on the left-hand side to see if she’d notice. Of course, she left the job. “If we make an issue of things like that [as women], men say: ‘Heavy, I was only joking.’ But it wasn’t a joke,” she says. “It’s designed to remind you of who’s boss. It’s all very subtle. It’s about people worrying that a woman might be better than them. But, we don’t want that at all. We all need to realise that there’s room for two sets of shoulders to go through the doorframe. “I’ve worked with fantastic guys who are totally up for that, and who will say: “No problem, you take the glory on that one.” At the end of the day, there are so many other things a man can take the glory for – they can let go of one. You don’t always have to be competitive.” It’s also important to offer opportunities for training to young women with no experience. Candidates can’t be expected to perform complex tasks when they don’t yet have any knowledge, and those with no background in the industry will, of course, require more investment in training than seasoned mechanics. That’s no excuse to pass up a candidate with the potential to become a longstanding employee. Colebrook remembers her first job interview in the trade. “The first Saturday job I ever applied for, they asked me to take the bottom bracket spindle out and put it on the other way, to see if I could improve the chain line. That’s something that even a mechanic who had been in the trade for five years might not understand fully. I thought I’d be able to do it. So, I took the bottom bracket out and I put the axle down. Then I dropped the ball bearings on the floor, and that was it – I was on my way out the door.” “You’ve got to start at [the stage that] a new employee is at. Starting out in any job, you need to know that you’re okay. You need good 40 BIKEBIZ JULY

“If they’re working with me, the customer has made a decision to pick a woman to build their frame. I like that. I’m a role model for so many women going into engineering.”

feedback, you need to be set achievable goals, and tasks you can gain mastery over. That’s the only way you can improve, and then it grows. You need to be valued and to hear it from your work colleagues. You need to hear your boss praising you, saying things like: ‘She’s absolutely one of the best people in the fitting studio, there’s nothing she can’t sell in there.’ That’s what will bring more women into the trade. “You have to be vocal [about the successes of women you’re managing]. Don’t just assume she’ll know she’s good at her job. Men get the slap on the back and the whole of society tells them they’re better; that’s their prize money. But, does that woman put in any less effort and energy?” Colebrook believes that it’s also important to be empathetic toward female employees who are starting out. When it comes to making mistakes, she feels that confidencebuilding and validation are important to ensure they don’t take a fatal knock to their confidence at the learning stage. “All great inventors, and people who are good at what they do, make mistakes. But, a lot of women find

“We all need to realise that there’s room for two sets of shoulders to go through the doorframe” Liz Colebrook, Beaumont Bicycles

it harder to make mistakes than men do. It’s tricky. You tend to find that men will [joke] about the mistakes they’ve made, but if a woman makes the same mistake, the men seem to think: “What have we done employing her?” That’s why there aren’t so many women.” Fortunately, the interviewees seem to agree unanimously that the industry feels more balanced than ever right now. Because increasing female participation in the mechanic side of cycling is a hot-button issue at the moment, the industry seems ready to make the changes necessary to make it a reality. “It’s improving. We’re seeing more women in bike shops already. And, there are times when we are the best people for the job,” declares Colebrook. To women considering a technical career, she says, “If you’re the only woman, it isn’t necessarily going to be comfortable to begin with, but if you’ve got good guys you work with, it will be great.” Liz Colebrook, Joanne Newstead and Ninon Asuni’s complete interviews, inclusive of thoughtprovoking content unrelated to gender equality, will be published online in the coming weeks!

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CONSISTENCY

Reasonable workspace: I would define this as a reasonable workspace, neat and efficient. The ones sometimes seen in the pages of this magazine and in tool company catalogues are sometimes a little too neat-looking.

Hobgoblins, productivity and unforced errors In another article on improving shop procedures, Mark Hallinger cannot say enough about the value of consistency in shop work

BIKEBIZ.COM

I LIKE consistency. Structure and consistency make life easier. Like having your tools in the same place all the time rather than randomly distributed across the shop’s three workstands. I could do a whole article on the theme of consistency. That intro paragraph is lifted almost directly from the June issue article. That was an article where a brain-freeze led me to refer to tyre bead seat diameter (BSD, often B.S.D. for some reason) as BCD, which everybody knows is bolt circle diameter, a chainring measurement. Ooops. I blame the concussions, and rushing the job so I could go ride. Good mechanics should not rush. There is a big difference between working fast and rushing. But enough on merged, or made-up, acronyms. “A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds,” is a quote from American transcendentalist philosopher and essayist Ralph Waldo Emerson. The actual quote – taken from

Self-Reliance – is of course much longer than that and more complex in meaning. While it is often used to belittle people or good work habits or practices, in reality the quote is more about avoiding conformity and false or foolish consistency. It does not support the concept or habit of inconsistency, and the quote should not excuse random, bad work habits. Emerson died in 1882 at age 78. While he probably saw and was likely intrigued by the Penny Farthing bicycles rolling around in his final years, he may not have realised how important it was to build and maintain those bikes in a consistent manner. And he spoke the language of the philosopher, not a mechanic. He didn’t know what a PW-4 is, or a PE-65000 for that matter. I really do like consistency. On a rolling scale with consistency on one end and artistic creativity on the other, I favour the former. I’m an editor by trade so it bothers me when email/e-mail is used both with BIKEBIZ JULY 43


CONSISTENCY and without a hyphen in an article or magazine. Consistency is my MO in general. I never have an 800-mile riding month anymore, nor an 8,000-mile year. But I have several 500 and 600-mile months, and I rarely ride fewer than 300 in a month. It is consistent – I ride between five and seven days each week, most weeks. I remember providing a quote about myself for a college publication I was featured in, and the quote attributed any academic or athletic success I had to ‘consistently working hard,’ or something like that. In general I succeed through working hard, not natural ability. If I lose consistency, I will likely lose it all. It works for me on many levels, far better than any innate ‘talents,’ I may have. George Lucas is/are a sales guy at the shop where I work. They are actually two 22ish friends at university who are getting into riding and bikes pretty heavily, and they are somewhat attached at the hip. One is actually named George, and the other is named Lucas, and I just refer to them as George Lucas as it amuses me, they both respond to ‘George Lucas,’ so it works, and it’s one less thing for me to remember. I was texting the George of George Lucas fame in January trying to get him to come out over his winter break on a long hilly ride. This was due to self-interest partly – it is good for me to train with people who are half my age who weigh only slightly more than my left thigh. He replied that he hadn’t ridden in two months but he’d start training soon. I need to teach him the value of training consistently when he starts up working and riding with the shop ride again. So consistency matters to me, obviously. The unkind would say it is OCD or anal retentiveness. I would not want to have anyone who thinks this way build a bike that I would ride fast down a hill. So to it then, and I’ll make a break from past articles and won’t discuss something obscure, something Big Picture, something practical, something esoteric and something amusing that pertains to a good mechanic shop. That’s inconsistent, but the subject of consistency stands on its own really, as a ‘Big Picture’ item. 44 BIKEBIZ JULY

It is appropriate to keep a Band-Aid/ adhesive bandage/plaster in your tool bag or box. It is never a good idea to use one as a patch, as seen here.

‘There is a big difference between working fast and rushing’

BIG PICTURE: BUILD AND REPAIR STANDARDS It is always better to err on the side of quality and consistency in bike builds and repairs. That being said, shop standards will and probably should vary a bit. I have worked at a shop where every tyre had to be installed with tyre talc when mounted, the wheel quick releases had to be at exactly the same angle, and woe be it to any mechanic who left three inches of cable after the brake cinch bolt rather than the mandated two inches. I’ve also worked at a shop where nobody seemed to care that one of the builders was putting the lever of the front quick release on the right side of the bike, seats on new builds would be tilted up or down but rarely level, and for puncture repairs if the tyre logo lined up with the valve (as it should!) it was mere coincidence. Your shop will likely be somewhere between these two extremes, and management personnel should determine

standards and convey how important these are to mechanics and bike builders. Have a meeting and discuss! What matters to my personal level of consistency? I can think of half a dozen practices I see again and again that bother me. Like failing to line up the logo on the tyre with the valve as seen when viewing the bike from the drive/ right side of the bike. I’ve heard even long-term mechanics dismiss this, surprisingly. It is the standard. Aside from just looking good, it also has the very real benefit of helping a mechanic determine where a puncture is located on a flat tyre. If the hole is about six inches from the valve, look for a flint or an errant rim strip about 6 inches from the tyre logo. I assumed every mechanic knew this little bit of consistency, but newbies need to learn this, and wild-raised, self-taught mechanics may have never learned this simple practice. Do it to look professional if nothing else, good bike people will judge. I will. BIKEBIZ.COM


CONSISTENCY

Sloppy: no valve cp, logo not centred on the valve, valve at a nasty angle.

What else? I’ve occasionally put up a list of shop practices that seem second nature to me, but are often just not maintained by people who should know better. Q Air in the tyres on all repairs. I don’t care if the bike came in for a brake adjustment, fill the damned tyres and let the customer know you did it. Ask them if they have a pump at home and stress how important tyre pressure is – this is a selling opportunity that could make the shop some money and will make the customer’s cycling experience better. Q Valves straight on tube installs, valve caps on valves. Valves should be straight and it is as simple as that. While valve caps are not critical, customers notice when one is missing. Don’t make them ask for one. That being said, I never use caps on my own presta valves, unless it’s for fashion’s sake on one of my silly theme bikes. I kind of like the fact that the valve caps are white and the BIKEBIZ.COM

Good tube install: valve straight and capped, tyre logo centred over valve. If you think the letter ‘A’ should be over the valve rather than the ‘R,’ remember that it is bike mechanics, not brain surgery.

cable ends are red on my bleu, blanc et rouge Peugeot. Q Speaking of cable ends, don’t forget them – I don’t care if you crimp them properly with the crimp option on most good cable cutters or just with a pair of pliers, but use them. And on new bike builds and test ride checks, don’t let the cables stick out where they might hit the rider’s leg if it’s a rear V-brake, or hit the crank or tyre for a front derailleur cable. Tuck them in a bit. An errant cable that hits the customer’s thigh is enough of a reason to not buy the bike for some. Q With the exception of thru-axles, the lever part of the quick release should always be on the non-drive side of the hub/bike. “But it doesn’t matter,” one builder told me, and he liked putting the front wheel lever on the right (wrong!) side because it was an expression of his creativity or something. I explained to him that having the lever in the same place all the time helps speed

wheel changes in race situations. That’s the impetus behind that standard, or so I’ve been told. More importantly, you’re making our shop look bad if you put the lever on the wrong side! And yes, I know that .00001 percent of our customers will ever get a wheel change from the wheel van in a race, but just be consistent.

‘Management should determine standards and convey how important these are to mechanics and bike builders’

Q Here’s one of my personal favourites that people just ignore, ignore, ignore. All bikes leaving the shop should be in the middle chainring and a middle gear on the rear cluster. Why send a customer out on a test ride in top gear, as I so often see, or in the silly 24 x 11 combo we tell them not to use? Think. Q Seats must be level and more or less centred in the rails – you will lose sales if the customer does not like the seat pointed up 15 degrees on a test ride bike he or she would otherwise love. Because I work at a recreational/beginner/intermediate kind of shop, stems should be high BIKEBIZ JULY 45


CONSISTENCY and bars tilted back a bit on road bikes so customers new to the road position can adapt. When I tilt road bars up and back just a bit from the extreme downward position a bad builder has left them in, the customer almost always says it feels like a different, better bike. I’ve seen plenty of lost sales because the salesperson was not aware enough or too rushed or wasn’t really a cyclist. If a seat is in a bad position or the handlebars are set down and out of reach, the person running the test ride needs to fix that. Ideally, the bike builder should have done it right from the start. Come up with your own list. I could write a book, or at least fill a whole issue of BikeBiz. Beyond this I have all sorts of rules about everything that makes a shop run more efficiently. I have rules and practices about taking out the garbage and how to properly break down a bike box. So many that I annoy people. I annoy people who will take an old, dry-rotted tyre and just squeeze it in to a garbage can, making life harder for the person who actually has to tie and dispose of that bag at day’s end, which is often me as I am an evening shift kind of guy. Take a second and fold the tyre over on itself, and zip tie it so it just falls to the bottom of the can. There’s a proper way to break down bike boxes – pay attention to somebody who does it well and mimic them, consistently. Yes, there is a proper way to manage cardboard and garbage. In a high volume shop, it can make the difference between a shop that is chaotic in appearance and function versus one that is rightly busy organized chaos. If you open it, close it. If you take a component out of the case or off the display but don’t use, put it back. Don’t leave your garbage behind for somebody else to clean up. These are rules of life, really! And I’ve not actually even mentioned the importance of a neat workstand and bench. That can wait. I’ve recently started to have issues where I work with an area that is becoming very inconsistent in maintaining the proper arsenal of tools at each workstation. On some days, all the 15 mm open-end wrenches and chain tools are missing or lying together on a bike 46 BIKEBIZ JULY

Bad Bench: at a glance this may appear to be organised, but where are the most commonly used open-end wrenches? Where is a threeway Y hex/allen tool? Where are reasonable screwdrivers? Why have two 12-inch adjustables on the same wall? And if I pull off that pedal wrench in a hurry, the hammer could come tumbling off and fall in to a vat of grease, creating a nice mess.

box in the corner. This adds steps to most repairs – wildly inefficient. I’ve developed my own workaround, an appropriately-labelled (see picture) tool bag that I just take everywhere. Every tool, including the all-important spokes sharpened at the grinder, is at hand all the time. But maintaining a proper repair stand is worthy of its own article.

‘I would not want to have anyone who lacks consistency build a bike I would ride fast down a hill’

As of this writing, Mark Hallinger was less than a week away from strongly contesting for the best-dressed award at the US Brompton World Championships, wearing his Great Uncle George Carl Schmidt’s WWI (US) uniform exactly 100 years after WWI. He is also serving as directeur sportif for the Philadelphia Fliers Brompton racing team at the event, set for Harlem, New York City, on June 18. See www.redbrickbikes.com for more information.

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JOIN OUR WORKSHOP TEAM WOULD YOU LIKE TO WORK FOR THE NUMBER 1 SPECIALIST BIKE SHOP IN THE UK? We want hands-on technically minded individuals who understand the importance of taking care of our customer’s pride and joy, and getting them back on the road quickly and safely. You’ll get your hands on the best of the best, have access to the latest technology and brands with training and development to match. Meet the brands and share your passion and knowledge with like-minded colleagues. With branches all over the UK and new stores opening, the career opportunities are varied and challenging.

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SECTOR GUIDE

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Womenspecific products From competitive to cutesy, we’ve got products aimed at women coming out our ears this month. Stock up on a wide variety of products to bring an equally wide variety of women into your shop 2

DISTRIBUTOR: Direct to retailer

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CONTACT: infouk@assos.com

DISTRIBUTOR: Bike Belle CONTACT: marketing@bikebelle.pl

BRAND: ASSOS

BRAND: Bike Belle

BRAND: Canyon

PRODUCT: Chamois crème women

PRODUCT: Mermaid Valve Caps

PRODUCT: WMN Road Disc Collection 2017

Produced using natural ingredients, the ASSOS Chamois Crème is designed to offer optimal comfort during long rides and has been specifically designed to meet the needs of the female rider. Applied directly to skin after a shower or to the chamois of your shorts, the crème protects against friction and irritation in this sensitive area. The soothing, cooling effect will leave you feeling revived and ready to tackle that next climb in comfort.

This whimsical set of handmade valve caps in the shape of mermaid’s tail is suitable for schrader valves (or adapters for presta). Set of two comes in a gift box.

Canyon have launched three distinct new models designed and engineered 100 per cent around female riders: the Endurace WMN AL, Endurace WMN CF SL and the Ultimate CF SLX. From geometry and handling, to construction and aerodynamics, the new Canyon WMN models go a step further than anything done before to truly deliver better performance for female riders. Optimised geometries make it more natural for women to achieve riding positions previously developed around male riders.

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DISTRIBUTOR: Canyon

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CONTACT: uk@canyon.com

DISTRIBUTOR: Oneway Bike Industry

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CONTACT: marketing@cube-bikes.nl +31 10 3403504 BRAND: CUBE PRODUCT: CUBE Bikes Teamline WLS Outfit The contoured and highly athletic cut of the jersey adapts itself to the athlete’s body like a second skin without restricting movement. The breathable fabrics are used to maintain an optimum body temperature, even at maximum intensity. With a waterproof zippocket at the back and reflective elements, you can ride any time of day. All in typical CUBE design.

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01772 459 887 t.co.uk

www.bob-ellio

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Distributors of great brands across the UK Find your Local stockist at: www.bob-elliot.co.uk or contact us on: sales@bob-elliot.co.uk Tel: 01772 459 887


SECTOR GUIDE

DISTRIBUTOR: Direct to retailer

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DISTRIBUTOR: Georgia in Dublin

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CONTACT: euinfo@dakine.com

CONTACT: info@georgiaindublin.com

BRAND: Dakine

BRAND: Georgia in Dublin

PRODUCT: Aura Glove

PRODUCT: D1 Style Vest

The Aura Glove is constructed with lightweight moisture wicking four-way stretch polyester mesh on the back and vented silicone mesh on the palm, providing maximum breathability and fit. It features 3mm gel pads, an adjustable hook and loop tab for closure and a microfleece thumb wipe. It is also touchscreen compatible.

A high visibility vest and wind-cheater ideal over a base layer for summer cycles and over bulkier clothing when the cold sets in. It comes with a pocket in the front panel and the fabric is waterproof and breathable. Available in S, M, L, XL or as a Bib and Bell (a-line) shape.

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DISTRIBUTOR: Hotlines

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CONTACT: steve.larking@hotlines-uk.com 0131 319 1444 BRAND: Wilier PRODUCT: Luna The Luna has women-specific geometry and some subtle styling changes, but it still has Wilier Triestina’s unmistakable road bike flair. Designed to offer a great all-round ride for those just starting out on a road bike, the Sora groupset with wide-range cassette and compact chainset are great whatever the distance or terrain you’re tackling.

DISTRIBUTOR: Madison

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CONTACT: sales@madison.co.uk BRAND: Ridley PRODUCT: Liz SL Based around the same frame as the popular Fenix SL, the Liz SL is Ridley’s bike for women who want speed, stability and comfort. With Shimano, SRAM and Campagnolo groupset options, it’s a versatile bike for riders who are after one that’s as comfortable for all-day rides as it is ready to race. Cranks, bars, stem and saddle are women-specific, while the geometry retains every bit of the racing pedigree that makes the Fenix SL so popular with riders on the Lotto Soudal and the Liz SL – already a favourite with Lotto Soudal ladies.

BIKEBIZ JULY 51


SECTOR GUIDE

DISTRIBUTOR: 1 Direct to retailer CONTACT: met@met-helmets. com BRAND: MET PRODUCT: MET Strale The MET Strale is a versatile road helmet. The retention system is ponytail-compatible for a comfortable fit. Available in a wide range of colours, it’s a good choice for women seeking a light (255g, M size), ventilated (using the Venturi effect to pull hot air out) and aerodynamic helmet.

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DISTRIBUTOR: Moore Large

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CONTACT: www.formebikes.co.uk BRAND: Forme PRODUCT: Buxton 1 FE From the reputable Bosch 250W motor used to guarantee a smooth and silent ride, to the confidenceinspiring frame geometry and braking systems, to the full-length mudguards, kickstand and carrier for everyday luggagecarrying capability, the Buxton series offer the machine to help rekindle a customer’s love for cycling. This female-specific model retails at £1000.

DISTRIBUTOR: Osprey Europe

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CONTACT: Vicky Swyer: 01202 413920 / 07718 648496 BRAND: Osprey Europe PRODUCT: Raven 14 Featuring a womenspecific fit, the Raven 14 and integrated 3 litre Hydraulics reservoir ensure that you can carry all the required gear and liquid to perform your personal best. Keep hydrated on the toughest of rides with easy access to the reservoir via an asymmetrical zip for quick and easy refills.

DISTRIBUTOR: 2x2

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CONTACT: kyle@reidbikes.co.uk BRAND: Reid PRODUCT: Ladies Esprit The Vintage Ladies Esprit is the future of Vintage Sports Bikes. That stylish, retro feel with modern components and agile design. The Vintage Esprit is a vintage-style bike that’s built to ride with purpose. Minimalist construction makes for a quick and nimble bike. For the vintage lover who aspires for retro style but needs a bike with lightweight performance.

DISTRIBUTOR: ISON Distribution

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DISTRIBUTOR: Avocet

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CONTACT: stewart.stabik@rohloff. de

CONTACT: Dawn.fryer@ avocetsports.com

BRAND: Rohloff

BRAND: Ryedale

PRODUCT: Speedhub 500/14

PRODUCT: Ryedale

This 14-speed internal gear hub won’t be right for all women, but it is ideal for anybody more interested in riding their bicycle than fixing it. It covers a 526 per cent gear ratio offering evenly-spaced 13.6 per cent increments. Durable, adjustmentfree and lowmaintenance. One, two or all 14 gears can be shifted in one smooth movement using just one shifter.

Avocet’s Ryedale bikes come in seven different models and a range of colours. They feature a low step-over top tube, fully-lined wicker basket, colourcoordinated front and rear mudguards and carriers, double wall rims with shaded tyres, non-slip pedals and a pump. Designed for comfort, and available in single speed as well as six and seven-speed Shimano gears.

BIKEBIZ.COM


TO ADVERTISE For more details and to advertise, contact Richard Setters on 0207 354 6028 or email rsetters@nbmedia.com

THE CATEGORIES RETAILERS, WORKSHOP AND MAIL ORDER DISTRIBUTION AND WHOLESALE

GET LISTED Email your updated details NOW to khowells@nbmedia.com

MANUFACTURER, STANDALONE BRANDS, FRAMEBUILDERS AND AGENTS SERVICES AND TRAINING E-COMMERCE AND EPOS EVENT ORGANISERS, EVENT HOSTING, HOLIDAY AND HIRE MEDIA AND PUBLISHING MARKETING, PR AND CONSULTANCY ORGANISATIONS, CHARITY AND ASSOCIATIONS

View the current BikeBiz Directory online: www.bikebiz.com/bikebiz-directory


11TH â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 13TH JULY 2017 STONELEIGH PARK, WARWICKSHIRE, CV8 2LG

HUNDREDS OF REASONS TO BE THERE


SECTOR GUIDE

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DISTRIBUTOR: 1 Direct to retail CONTACT: Jacob@echoscomm. com / 503-964-4864

DISTRIBUTOR: Silverfish UK Ltd

CONTACT: antonio@silverfish-uk. com

CONTACT: kevin.burton@simplon. com

BRAND: Showers Pass

BRAND: SDG

BRAND: Simplon

CONTACT: sales@ tandemgroupcycles. com

PRODUCT: Women’s Refuge Jacket

PRODUCT: Allure Women’s Saddle, Limited Edition Steffi Marth

PRODUCT: Kiaro

BRAND: Dawes

The Simplon Kiaro is a carbon fibre road bike made for long days in the saddle. It features VIBREX damping technology which helps cancel out tiring road buzz and increases rider comfort. There are various standard specs available, but every one can be tailored to the rider’s needs before being delivered to your shop for handover. Prices start at £2149 RRP.

PRODUCT: Duchess

The Women’s Refuge Jacket is designed for versatile outdoor use. From the bike lane, to the trail, to the mountain, it blocks wind while providing superior waterproof breathable protection.

BIKEBIZ.COM

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Developed with women in mind, the Allure relieves pressure. It starts with a durable nylon fibre base material, and softens up with the anatomically shaped cut-out. The lightweight LPU foam blends with cut-out and supportive platform in the optimal ridable area (ORA). Complete with plush microfibre top material.

DISTRIBUTOR: Simplon

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DISTRIBUTOR: Tandem Group Cycles

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Revamped for 2017, the Dawes Duchess is now available with either steel or alloy frames, and 26” or 700C wheel platforms. All options come with a colourcoordinated rear carrier, twin front basket, sprung comfort saddle, cork grips and high quality components from Tektro and Shimano.

DISTRIBUTOR: Wildoo Limited

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CONTACT: info@wildoo.co.uk BRAND: VeloPac PRODUCT: PhonePac2 & RidePac This UK-designed and manufactured range offers two solutions to keep a phone safe and dry in your pocket whilst cycling. PhonePac2 (RRP £8.00) is a waterproof zip seal pack with clear windows to permit in-situ touchscreen and camera use. RidePac (RRP £32.00) is a premium water-resistant padded case. Available in ALLEZ! Girl & Queen of the Mountain – no pink it and shrink it here!

DISTRIBUTOR: ZyroFisher

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CONTACT: www.zyrofisherb2b. co.uk BRAND: Selle Italia PRODUCT: SLR Lady Flow TI316 This saddle is designed to showcase the versatility and commitment of the modern female rider with a multi-form design that artfully combines comfort with lightweight construction in a dependable design for riding both on and off-road.

BIKEBIZ JULY 55


ANOTHER EXCLUSIVE BRAND FROM GREYVILLE The latest “C” series wireless computers are part of Italian based Velomann’s range including lights using Cree LED’s, a selection of bike stands and hometrainers. All available on our easy to use B2B ordering system. Why not check out our website?

GREYVILLE ENTERPRISES

0845 1661983

www.greyville.com

sales@greyville.com


SECTOR GUIDE

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Cycle lights These sprawling summer evenings won’t last forever, sadly. Get your shop ready for gloomier weather with this range of cycle lights 3

DISTRIBUTOR: Bob Elliot & Co

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CONTACT: sales@bob-elliot.co.uk 01772 459887 BRAND: Ravemen PRODUCT: PR1200 USB Rechargeable DuaLens Optical Design for road biking mode provides a broad, closed-range flood light with anti-glare low beam for commuting, no dazzle and glare for oncoming traffic. The HiLo Beam System for mountain biking and emergency modes offers light similar to automotive headlight with a far-reaching high beam and low beam. Micro USB charging port, compatible with most phone chargers’ USB output port to charge other USB-powered digital devices.

BIKEBIZ.COM

DISTRIBUTOR: ZyroFisher

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DISTRIBUTOR: Direct to retailer

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CONTACT: www.zyrofisherb2b.co.uk

CONTACT: sales@cycl.bike

BRAND: Cateye

BRAND: Cycl, WingLights

PRODUCT: VOLT 400

PRODUCT: Mag Silver

Simply double click to turn the light on and press once to change between different light modes. You have the choice between flashing, hyper constant, high, medium or low. Depending on the flash mode you are using, the battery can last between three (400 lumens) and 60 hours (50 lumens). Once the light has completely run out of battery, it should be left on charge for six hours.

These LED direction indicators provide visibility and safety to cyclists in urban areas. They attach magnetically to mounters that screw directly into handlebars. Their patented mounting system allows them to be fitted on any handlebars with a diameter between 19 and 22 mm. Thanks to their aluminium body, WingLights are both shockproof and waterproof. Furthermore, when not in use, the lights can be carried away on a carabiner keyring for safe storage.

DISTRIBUTOR: Ultimate Sports Engineering

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DISTRIBUTOR: Greyville Enterprises Ltd.

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CONTACT: service@use1.co.uk

CONTACT: www.greyville.com

BRAND: Exposure Lights

BRAND: Velomann

PRODUCT: Strada Range

PRODUCT: VLS35 LUX Front Light

Tailored for tarmac the Strada range sets the pace for any road ride. Its bespoke lenses precisely shine 1200 lumens in an optimised wide and flat beam pattern to give you exceptional vision while helping to avoid dazzling oncoming road users.

Features on this light include a shaped beam to illuminate the road without dazzling oncoming traffic and excellent cornering safety due to the 160-degree light output. The VLS35 retails at £49.95, comes with rechargeable batteries and conforms to German StVZO regulations.

BIKEBIZ JULY 57


for the DIGITAL – PRINT – EVENTS GAMING – MUSIC – AV – PRO AUDIO – CONSUMER ELECTRONICS VIDEO & BROADCAST – EDUCATION

Global

www.newbaymedia.com LONDON – NEW YORK


SECTOR GUIDE

DISTRIBUTOR: Silverfish

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DISTRIBUTOR: Ledco Limited

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CONTACT: richie@silverfish-uk. com

CONTACT: 01344 876 222 mail@ledco.co.uk

BRAND: Knog

BRAND: Ledlenser

PRODUCT: Knog PWR

PRODUCT: XEO19R

This range of bike lights, from 450 to 1000 lumens, uses a power bank as a battery. From the PWR Commuter (RRP £49) to the PWR Trail (RRP £109), these offer world-first tech. Programmable modes, multiple high-tech mounts, and modular elements save space, weight, and importantly, cash, when you want to upgrade either battery or lighthead.

This light is supplied with a host of accessories and mounts that enable easy configuration into a helmet light, a headlamp or a handheld torch. For emergencies, it has a ten-lumen setting on which up to 400 hours run time can be achieved. A handy integrated USB on the battery means you can charge your mobile whilst the light is in use.

BIKEBIZ.COM

DISTRIBUTOR: Moore Large

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CONTACT: 0044 1332 274200 sales@moorelarge. co.uk

DISTRIBUTOR: Oneway Bike Industry

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CONTACT: marketing@cubebikes.nl

BRAND: Vizy

BRAND: CUBE Bikes

PRODUCT: Vizy Light

PRODUCT: Light Set Pro

The Vizy Light projects 360 degrees of radial 60-lumen light on the ground around a bike, creating a bright circle to safeguard riders in low-visibility conditions. It features a rear-facing LED light with five modes for long-range visibility, and a built-in rechargeable Li-polymer battery (1000 mAh) that can easily be charged by Micro-USB.

This StVZO road traffic regulations-approved set offers the latest in LED and battery technology, ensuring maximum energy efficiency. The lens has been designed for glare-free illumination. The simple screw-on mount system for the front light and the angled design of the rear light offer various options for mounting.

DISTRIBUTOR: Oxford Products

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DISTRIBUTOR: ZyroFisher

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CONTACT: 01993 862300 info@oxprod.com

CONTACT: www.zyrofisherb2b. co.uk

BRAND: Oxford

BRAND: Cateye

PRODUCT: Commuter X4

PRODUCT: Duplex

This wearable, fibreoptic rear light can be worn on backpacks up to 35L. The distinct shape with multiple focus points helps road users judge distance, width and speed. Fibreoptics create a side profile at junctions and help HGV drivers see you more clearly. The central projective light provides 30 or 70 lumens with multiple flash and fade settings.

Cateye’s range now features lower price across front lights, rear lights and high-powered rechargeables and significantly longer run times on key Volt XC front lights. Cateye has also totally overhauled packaging for an easy-to-merchandise solution strengthening brand identity.

BIKEBIZ JULY 59


UK DISTRIBUTOR WANTED


SECTOR GUIDE

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Chains, gears and cranks We explore the market’s numerous options offering optimum pedal power with these chains, gears, and cranks 3

DISTRIBUTOR: Bob Elliot & Co

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DISTRIBUTOR: Chicken CycleKit

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CONTACT: sales@bob-elliot.co.uk 0177 245 9887

CONTACT: alex.rowling@ chickencyclekit.co.uk

BRAND: Zefal

BRAND: Campagnolo

PRODUCT: Crank Armor

PRODUCT: Cantaur groupset

The Zefal Crank Armour provides minimalistic and effective end-piece protection. It protects cranks against impacts and stones and can be mounted quickly. Weight: 20g/pair

Campagnolo is re-releasing its Centaur aluminium groupset for 2018 with a complete overhaul, using technology trickled down from the higher-end ranges.

BIKEBIZ.COM

DISTRIBUTOR: Greyville Enterprises Ltd

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DISTRIBUTOR: Ison Distribution Ltd

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DISTRIBUTOR: Madison

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CONTACT: www.greyville.com BRAND: Stronglight

CONTACT: 0135 366 2662

CONTACT: 0208 385 3465

BRAND: Gusset

BRAND: Shimano

PRODUCT: Impact Chainsets

PRODUCT: GS Chains

PRODUCT: Dura-Ace r9100

A traditional silver finish tapered chainset available in a wide selection of ring sizes as a Triple, Double, Compact, Tandem or Rohloff. The French-based Stronglight company has a long history of supplying quality chainsets, chainrings and headsets and this ever-popular Impact design is a classic that has stood the test of time. Compact retails at £87.95 and Triple at £108.95.

Gusset Components has come to be known for its GS chains, offering dependable performance and value. With excellent dealer margins, available in eight, nine, ten and 11-speed compatible options, and supplied with easy to install quick link, there’s no reason not to give them a try.

As the top-line road groupset from Shimano, the Dura-Ace r9100 is an evolution on the widely-respected 9000 group. It improves braking, adding in a shadow design rear derailleur with direct-mount compatibility, shortening lever throw, redesigning the front derailleur, and changing to a sleeker, stealthier visage. Added to that, the the r9120 and r9170 hydraulic groupsets move disc brakes into a new generation, slimming down the hoods to look and feel more like their rim brake compatriots.

BIKEBIZ JULY 61


SECTOR GUIDE

DISTRIBUTOR: Silverfish UK

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CONTACT: antonio@silverfish-uk. com BRAND: Race Face

DISTRIBUTOR: ZyroFisher; Raleigh Bike Parts

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CONTACT: www.zyrofisherb2b. co.uk

DISTRIBUTOR: Oxford Products

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CONTACT: info@oxprod.com 01993 862300 BRAND:

www.raleighb2b.co.uk

Taya Chains

PRODUCT: CINCH Power Meter

BRAND: SRAM

PRODUCT: Onze Alloy Chain

Protected in your BB shell, the CINCH Power Meter allows you to gauge your training and push your boundaries. Thanks to the adaptable spindle, you can pick your poison from the NEXT SL G4 to our Turbine R cranks, and with our CINCH App and both ANT+ and Bluetooth, you can hook it up to your favourite head unit and be on your way to the wattage cottage in no time.

PRODUCT: RED chain

Taya Onze Alloy Grey 11 Speed Chain is currently the lightest 11-speed chain on the market at 238g for 116 links. The DHT treatment forms a deep, hardened layer, and stops the chain from stretching, with 5000km of smooth gear shifting. The treatment does not affect the life of cassettes or chainsets.

62 BIKEBIZ JULY

With heavily chamfered outer plates for improved shifting and quieter running, the RED chain’s other advancements include a new inner plate finish plus chrome-hardened pin construction, both for longer chain life. The HollowPin construction of SRAM’s 11-speed chain provides smooth, precise shifting.

DISTRIBUTOR: Direct to retailer

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CONTACT: sales@thecycledivision. com 0845 0508500 BRAND: Sunrace PRODUCT: Wide Ratio Cassette Available in 10sp or 11sp, in 11/40T, 11/42T, 11/46T and 11/50T (11sp only) ratios, either metallic or black finish. The spacers, spider and lockring are all alloy. The weights of the cassettes range from 378g to 512g. They are all Shimano-compatible.

DISTRIBUTOR: Windwave

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CONTACT: sales@windwave.co.uk BRAND: FSA PRODUCT: SL-K Adventure Modular 386Evo crankset The adaptable BB386EVO 30mm spindle will fit a wide variety of frames with a range of BB standards. Available in 48/32 or 46/30 chain ring combinations, suited to gravel or adventure use. The crankset uses hollow carbon fibre arms for reduced weight and added stiffness.

DISTRIBUTOR: ZyroFisher

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CONTACT: www.zyrofisherb2b. co.uk BRAND: Izumi PRODUCT: Standard Chain Gold Black The Izumi Standard Chain is a firm favourite for urban riding, where a durable gold and black chain promises to stand out from the crowd.

BIKEBIZ.COM


ROADCYCLEEXCHANGE PRE-OWNED PERFORMANCE BICYCLES

OFFER PART EXCHANGE TO YOUR CUSTOMERS We specialise in used bikes and can offer a part exchange service for your customers that will LQFUHDVH\RXUVKRS·VQHZELNHVDOHV *XDUDQWHHGSULFHIRU\RXUFXVWRPHU·VFXUUHQWELNHH[GHPRDQGVXUSOXVVWRFNÂ&#x2021;5HPRYHVDPDMRU EDUULHUWRQHZVDOHVÂ&#x2021;1RLPSDFWRQ\RXUPDUJLQÂ&#x2021;4XLFNVLPSOHSURFHVVDQGLQVWDQWSD\PHQW :HWUDGHLQ5RDG77DQG&\FORFURVVELNHV&RQWDFWXVWRMRLQRXUSDUWQHUSURJUDP phone / 0208 546 8289 HPDLOPDWW#URDGF\FOHH[FKDQJHFRP ZHEURDGF\FOHH[FKDQJHFRP store / 139 Richmond Rd, Kingston, KT2 5BZ


In association with

2pure 46c Bavelaw Road, Balerno, Edinburgh, EH147AE Tel: 0844 811 2001 Web: www.2pure.co.uk

Fibrax Ltd Queensway, Wrexham. LL13 8YR Tel: +44 (0)1978 356744 Web: http://www.fibrax.com

Moore Large and Co Ltd Grampian Buildings, Sinfin Lane, Derby, Derbyshire. DE24 9GL Tel: 01332 274200 Web: www.moorelarge.co.uk

Bob Elliot and Co Ltd Unit C4 Binary Court, Matrix Park, Western Avenue, Buckshaw Village, Chorley, PR7 7NB Tel: 01772 459 887 Web: www.bob-elliot.co.uk

Jungle Products Ltd Unit 3, The Cedar, New York Mills, Summerbridge, HG3 4LA Tel: 01423 780088 Web: www.jungleproducts.co.uk and www.santacruzbikes.co.uk

North Sports 38 Kingston Avenue, Neilston, Glasgow, East Renfrewshire, G783JG Tel: 07746 933795 Web: www.northsports.co.uk

Continental North Parade, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales, SY23 2JR Tel: 01970 626777 Web: www.conti-tyres.co.uk

EBCO 5 Pegasus House, Olympus Ave, Warwick, CV34 6LW Tel: Tel +01926 437700 Web: www.ebco-ebikes.co.uk

EDCO Components North Parade, Aberystwyth, Wales, SY23 2JR Tel: 01970 626777 Web: www.edco-wheels.co.uk

M & J Distributors Ltd Unit A, Hanix Buildings, Windmill Lane, Denton, Manchester, M34 3SP Tel: 0161 337 9600 Web: www.mjdist.co.uk

Pitbitz Ltd Unit 6 Thorpe Drive, Thorpe Way Industrial Estate, Banbury, Oxon, OX16 4UZ Tel: 01295 269333 Web: www.gazeboshop.co.uk and www.thebikeboxcompany.co.uk

Mealor-Clarke Cycle Spares Ltd Unit 1, Eastlands Road, Leiston, Suffolk, IP16 4LL Tel: 01728 830 055 Web: www.mealorclarkecyclespares.co.uk

Raleigh UK Ltd Church Street, Eastwood, Nottingham, NG16 3HT Tel: 01773 532600 Web: www.raleigh.co.uk and www.cyclelife.com and www.diamondback.co.uk

Met Helmets / Bluegrass 22-24 Ely Place, London, EC1N6TE Tel: 0207 1937 496 Web: www.met-helmets.com

Reece Cycles plc 100 Alcester Street, Birmingham, B12 0QB Tel: 0121 622 0180 Web: www.reececycles.co.uk

The BikeBiz Directory 2017 is out now, providing the industry with a must-have guide to the UK’s retailers, distributors, manufacturers and related businesses. If you’d like to find out more or require additional copies please contact rsetters@nbmedia.com or call him on 020 7354 6028


DISTRIBUTION AND WHOLESALE

E-COMMERCE AND EPOS

EVENT ORGANISERS, HOSTING, HOLIDAY AND HIRE

Schwalbe Tyres UK Ltd Schwalbe Centre, Hortonwood 30, Telford, Shropshire, TF1 7ET Tel: 01952602680 Web: www.schwalbe.co.uk

Silverfish UK Ltd Unit 3C and 3B Woodacre Court, Saltash Parkway Industrial Estate, Burraton Road, Saltash, Cornwall, PL12 6LY Tel: 01752 843882 Web: www.silverfish-uk.com

Stolen Goat Unit C1E Threshold Way, Fairoaks Airport, Woking. GU24 8HU Tel: 01483 361146 Web: www.stolengoat.com

The Cycle Division Unit 27 Gatehouse Enterprise Centre, Albert Street, Lockwood, Huddersfield, West Yorkshire, HD1 3QD Tel: 01484 456137 Web: www.thecycledivision.com

ZyroFisher Ltd Roundhouse Road, Faverdale Industrial Estate, Darlington, DL3 0UR Tel: 01325 741200 Web: www.zyrofisher.co.uk / www.zyrofisherb2b.co.uk

MANUFACTURERS

MARKETING, PR AND CONSULTANCY

MEDIA AND PUBLISHING

ASSOS 57 Farringdon Road, London, EC1M 3JB Tel: 0203 621 1555 Web: www.assos.com

Buffera Limited Cranbourne House, Cranbourne Road, Potters Bar, Hertfordshire, EN6 3JN Tel: Tel +01920 460754 Web: www.buffwear.co.uk

Met Helmets / Bluegrass 22-24 Ely Place, London, EC1N6TE Tel: 0207 1937 496 Web: www.met-helmets.com

ORGANISATIONS, CHARITIES AND ASSOCIATIONS

RETAILERS, WORKSHOPS AND MAIL ORDER

SERVICES AND TRAINING

Weldtite Products Ltd Unit 9 Harrier Road, Humber Bridge Industrial Estate, Barton-on-Humber, Lincs, DN18 5RP Tel: 01652 660000 Web: www.weldtite.co.uk

700c Cycle Shop Insurance Plough Court, 37 Lombard Street, London. EC3V 9BQ Tel: 0333 433 0827 Web: www.700cinsurance.co.uk

Cycleguard Insurance Southgate House, Southgate Street, Gloucester, GL1 1UB Tel: 0333 004 3444 Web: www.cycleguard.co.uk

Oneway Distribution BV PO BOX 12, 3000 AA Rotterdam Tel: 0031 10345 3510 Web: shop.o-w-d.nl PowerBar UK The Hive, 51 Lever St, Manchester. M1 1FN Tel: +44 (0)161 641 0056 Web: www.active-nutrition-international.com Pinhead Components Inc Jasper Ave, Edmonton, Alberta. Canada. T6K OK6 Tel: 1-780 465530 Web: www.pinheadlocks.com Red Industries Borough House, Berkeley Court , Borough Road Newcastle-under-Lyme, Staffordshire ST5 1TT Tel: 01782 824026 Web: www.redindustries.co.uk

Bike Rental Manager c/o H W Fisher & Co Acre House, 11-15 William Road, London. NW1 3ER Tel: +33 4 66 03 14 32 Web: www.bikerentalmanager.com

Citrus-Lime Limited Lantern House, The Ellers, Ulverston, LA12 0AA Tel: 01229 588 628 Web: www.citruslime.com

Rozone Limited Queen Street, Darlaston, Wednesbury West Midlands. WS10 8JB Tel: 0121 526 8181 Web: www.rozone.co.uk Oxford Products Ltd De Havilland Way, Range Road, Witney, Oxon. OX29 0YA Tel: 01993 862 300 http://www.oxfordproducts.com/bicycle

Visijax Cotesbach House, The Precinct, Main Street, Cotesbach, Leicestershire, LE17 4HX Tel: 07810 838934 Web: www.visijax.com

The BikeBiz Directory 2017 is available to view online at

www.bikebiz.com


MARKETPLACE

TO ADVERTISE IN THESE PAGES PLEASE CONTACT rsetters@nbmedia.com or call 0207 354 6028

BIKES & ACCESSORIES

TOUCH

I T. F E E L I T. L O V E I T.

BIKES & ACCESSORIES

2PURE/

BIKES & ACCESSORIES

66 BIKEBIZ JULY

BIKES & ACCESSORIES

BIKEBIZ.COM


MARKETPLACE BIKES & ACCESSORIES

BIKES & ACCESSORIES

FREE SHIPPING

on all parts via www.madisonb2b.co.uk

Hangers, BB solutions, Bearing presses, Sealed bearings and Workshop solutions ‹6USPULOHUNLYÄUKLY!www.wheelsmfg.co.uk ‹

BIKES & ACCESSORIES

BIKEBIZ.COM

BIKES & ACCESSORIES

BIKEBIZ JULY 67


MARKETPLACE BIKES & ACCESSORIES

TO ADVERTISE IN THESE PAGES PLEASE CONTACT rsetters@nbmedia.com or call 0207 354 6028

BIKES & ACCESSORIES

2017 RANGE NOW IN STOCK!

U LT I M AT E U S E . CO M BIKES & ACCESSORIES

BIKE BOTTLES & PROMOTIONAL GOODS

WWW.TIGERCYCLES.COM WWW.TCEB2B.CO.UK

The NEW Tiger Classic đ đ đ đ

6061 Alloy Frame 700C Alloy Rims Alloy V-Brakes 3 Colours

đŏăġ,!! ŏ01.)!5ŏ.$!. đŏ!(! ŏ.0.% #!ŏ đŏ 1 #1. /Čŏ!.ŏ..%!.Č ŏŏŏ.!)%1)ŏ%*0#!ŏ/'!0

R.R.P. £399.99 To become a retailer contact us by phone: 01683 220837 by email: info@tigercycles.com

68 BIKEBIZ JULY

BIKEBIZ.COM


MARKETPLACE BIKES & ACCESSORIES

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info@use1.co.uk | 01798 839 300

BIKE FRAMES, LABELS & GENERAL PRINT

BIKEBIZ.COM

FRAME RESPRAY, REPAIR & BUILD SERVICES

BIKEBIZ JULY 69


MARKETPLACE

TO ADVERTISE IN THESE PAGES PLEASE CONTACT rsetters@nbmedia.com or call 0207 354 6028

EPOS & ECOMMERCE

EPOS & ECOMMERCE

EPOS & ECOMMERCE

EPOS & ECOMMERCE

SIMPLE, FAST AND TRANSPARENT.

Affordable.

Citrus-Lime Cloud Pos

Affordable. Cloud POS Basics ........................................................................... £42.50 Cloud POS Pro ..................................................................................... £50

LIVE-QUERY ON AVAILABILITY MORE THAN 3000 ARTICLES INDIVIDUAL CUSTOMER DISCOUNT LOW SHIPPING COSTS New Dealers can register online.

magura-b2b.com

70 BIKEBIZ JULY

Cloud POS Pro+ ................................................................................... £70

www.citruslime.com/what-we-do/pricing Alternatively, call us to discuss your individual needs on 01229 588 628 (MON - FRI, 09.00 to 17.30) Note : All quoted pricing is based on our Yearly Contract Pricing. Optional Hardware priced separately. Terms and Conditions apply.

hello@citruslime.com

www.citruslime.com

BIKEBIZ.COM


OFF TRACK

OFF TRACK

THE TRADE’S ROUND-UP OF STATS, VIEWS AND RANDOMS

NUMBER CRUNCHING 1,350

brands and exhibitors are expected to sign up to the 2018 Eurobike Show

20

Maintaining a bike annually costs 20 times less than maintaining and driving a car

47%

ich cycl tage by wh the percen is ll co ions pedestrian etween d increase b 15 0 20 09 and 2

e/

5.8

average number of kilograms lost in a commuter’s first year of cycling to work

4.6%

ich British tage by wh the percen a week has cycle once people who ver the last year increased o

BIKEBIZ.COM

BIKEBIZ JULY 71


OFF TRACK

TEAM PROFILE

Adam Biggs, head of division (Forme Bikes)

Moore Large The basics about the people you might be dealing with...

DESCRIBE YOUR ROLE AT MOORE LARGE: Bicycle sales team management and head of the Forme Bikes brand.

DESCRIBE YOUR ROLE AT MOORE LARGE: My role involves receiving and resolving any customer concerns.

WHAT’S THE BEST CYCLING EXPERIENCE YOU’VE HAD? Racing through the mountains in Guadeloupe, Caribbean.

WHAT’S THE BEST CYCLING EXPERIENCE YOU’VE HAD? My best experience was cycling after an escaped dog.

WHERE DO YOU LIKE TO RIDE? Anywhere in the Peak District on or off-road.

WHERE DO YOU LIKE TO RIDE? I like cycling on canal paths and woodland trails.

Connor Paterson, customer services assistant manager

DESCRIBE YOUR ROLE AT MOORE LARGE: Our department works with all our major retail customers. We provide a complete supply chain for large retail customers.

DESCRIBE YOUR ROLE AT MOORE LARGE: Custom cycle builds, wheel and fork servicing and anything else spanner-related. WHAT’S THE BEST CYCLING EXPERIENCE YOU’VE HAD? I have had many of my best experiences while working with ML on demo weekends.

WHAT’S THE BEST CYCLING EXPERIENCE YOU’VE HAD? Too many to mention, recently I finished 3rd in the Tour of Cambridgeshire Gran Fondo. Paul Stewart, national accounts director

WHERE DO YOU LIKE TO RIDE? Anywhere in South Derbyshire.

Scott Shaw, workshop manager at Moore Large Technical Service Centre

DESCRIBE YOUR ROLE AT MOORE LARGE: Looking after everything BMXrelated at Moore Large.

DESCRIBE YOUR ROLE AT MOORE LARGE: Day-to-day running of the customer service and warranty departments.

WHAT’S THE BEST CYCLING EXPERIENCE YOU’VE HAD? Winning Ride UK magazines Ride to Glory with the Premium BMX UK crew!

Rob Andrews, BMX brand manager

WHERE DO YOU LIKE TO RIDE? Any good-sized skatepark that has some lines to flow.

WHAT’S THE BEST CYCLING EXPERIENCE YOU’VE HAD? Cycling in Germany with the SR Suntour guys at their Warngau head office.

Darren Hardy, customer service manager

DESCRIBE YOUR ROLE AT MOORE LARGE: Looking after Polygon, O’Neal, Onza and Tern brands at Moore Large.

Joe Poyzer, brand manager

72 BIKEBIZ JULY

WHERE DO YOU LIKE TO RIDE? Mainly local woods, Derbyshire dales, Cannock Chase.

DESCRIBE YOUR ROLE AT MOORE LARGE: Product manager for bikes and accessories (Forme, American Classic, SR Suntour, O’Neal and Onza).

WHAT’S THE BEST CYCLING EXPERIENCE YOU’VE HAD? Riding the Barvarian Alps with the guys from O’Neal on a Polygon Collosus N9. WHERE DO YOU LIKE TO RIDE? Llandegla Trail Centre.

WHERE DO YOU LIKE TO RIDE? Nowadays I like to go on steady rides with my four kids.

WHAT’S THE BEST CYCLING EXPERIENCE YOU’VE HAD? Mega Avalanche. Unfortunately not in the race, though.

Leon Stimpson, product manager

WHERE DO YOU LIKE TO RIDE? Anywhere fast and flowy, to get the adrenaline going.

BIKEBIZ.COM


OFF TRACK

Stephen Holt, commercial director

BANKING ON A CAR-FREE FUTURE CYCLISTS IN central London’s Square Mile have enjoyed safer and quieter journeys over the past month around the formerly-infamous Bank Junction, due to a new car-free traffic scheme devised by the City Council. Under the rules of the new scheme, drivers of cars, vans and other disruptive vehicles have been banned from driving within the hours of 7am and 7pm from Monday to Friday, making way for cleaner, more energy-efficient travel and safer cycling. Since the scheme’s introduction on May 22nd, figures have shown an increase in bicycle usage in the area, which links up with both cycle lanes and the cycle superhighways that follow the route down to Blackfriars and across Southwark Bridge. One regular cyclist told BikeBiz: “It’s been wonderful so far. Deaths on the inner city route are not unheard of, and I’m sure this is going to make other everyday riders like me feel a lot more secure on morning commutes. Navigating London by car is simply not a sustainable vision for the future; bikes are the way forward and this move is a step toward a happier Square Mile for everybody.” After a two-week grace period in which drivers were issued a one-time warning letter, those found flouting the new ban will now receive a hefty £130 fine.

WRONG PLANET; RIGHT IDEA SATIRICAL POLITICAL figure Lord Buckethead threatened to disrupt the political landscape when he stood against Theresa May in the snap election. With a pedal-first agenda that many identified with, Buckethead pledged to give everyone in England a bike as part of his manifesto. Sadly, his procycling message was overshadowed by other, more outlandish, key points of the campaign, such as the nationalisation of Adele, the legalisation of the hunting of fox-hunters, and the promise of strong, but not entirely stable, leadership. Could political leaders learn something from this intergalactic space lord?

BIKEBIZ.COM

SAVE A SPACE IN YOUR STORE FOR CYCLESCHEME THE CYCLE to work scheme has been fantastic for all of us in the industry. Since launch, the scheme has supported existing cyclists, and encouraged hundreds of thousands of new and returning cyclists to take to the saddle. And this figure is constantly growing! But there are still working adults in the UK that have yet to discover the joy of cycle commuting with Cyclescheme. At Cyclescheme we’re always looking for ways to turn potential cyclists into passionate cyclists. That’s where you, our Cyclescheme retailers, step in. You and your store are invaluable, which is why we equip you with the best possible tools to shout about Cyclescheme with. Head to your Cyclescheme B2B area and discover lots of free resources waiting to be used. In-store, you can take advantage of our printready posters. This includes five brand-new designs featuring photography by an awardwinning agency. Simply download, print and display these around your store. Have you got your free copies of the latest Cycle Commuter magazine? This is a great takeaway for the new customers that enter your store; order your copies via the B2B today. You could also enhance your digital presence with our range of web assets including free videos, banners and flyers. All of these tools are ready and waiting for you to use – so don’t miss out! By making a space for Cyclescheme in your store and online, you will stand out from the crowd and attract new customers looking to spend up to £1,000 on a new commuting package.

Stephen Holt is commercial director of Cyclescheme, the UK’s leading provider of tax-free bikes for work. You can reach him on Twitter @cycleschemeltd

BIKEBIZ JULY 73


SPOKESMAN

Busting your butt as a bike mechanic All hail the mighty bicycle mechanic, applauds Carlton Reid OVER IN that there America the National Bicycle Dealers Association has purchased the Barnett Bicycle Institute from its founder, John Barnett. Barnett began teaching classes for cycle mechanics in the 1980s, when he was still a service manager at the Criterium Bike Shop in Colorado Springs. You may know Barnett best for his Barnett Manual, a 1,000-page printed guide to cycle servicing that, since it went online, has mushroomed to some 13,000 pages with over 14,000 high-res photos. The Manual – always bang up to date with the latest tech – costs $169, and has been bought by many UK bicycle mechanics. After all, you can never have too much cycle science. While the US has an influential tech manual, it’s never had a national equivalent to the UK’s Cytech. This might be about the change, with the NBDA likely to make the Barnett Bicycle Institute’s training programme into a national certification scheme. And not before time. The US cycle scene is ahead of the UK’s in many ways, but not in the certification of its cycle mechanics. Cytech is looked on as a gold standard by many countries, and is already available in South Africa, Canada and Australia. At this point I have to stress that Cytech is not the only UK cycle servicing training programme, and that “Cytech” is a brand name, not a qualification. Training companies such as ATG Cycle Systems Academy provide EAL Level 2 and Level 3 training and every student who passes will get the full EAL

‘Time served wasn’t deemed pro enough, and to empower future cycle technicians, the ACT came up with Cytech.’ Qualification Credit Framework Certificate in Engineering for Level 2 and Diploma in Engineering in Level 3. It’s worthwhile remembering where Cytech came from. I’ve no doubt mentioned it before, but it bears repeating. It was the brainchild of bike shop owner Albert Shucksmith, who died in 2001 a few years after the creation of the scheme. I remember sitting in AGMs of the Association of Cycle Traders (when it was an old-school trade org, with Anne Killick as secretary, and Dorchester Cycles’ Peter Robinson as the affable president) where Shucksmith would, year after year, push and push for the creation of a certification programme. The reason was simple. He had

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74 BIKEBIZ JULY

been called as an expert witness in a 1980s court case but, when pressed by a magistrate to state his qualifications, could only answer “I’ve been in the cycle industry for 45 years.” Time served wasn’t deemed “pro” enough, and to empower future cycle technicians the ACT eventually came up with Cytech. And just as Cytech isn’t the only UK cycle mechanics certification, course so the Barnett Bicycle Institute isn’t the only mechanics’ outfit in the US. There’s also the Professional Bicycle Mechanic’s Association, which aims to offer a certification programme too. The association isn’t shop-based – it seems to major on mechanics who wrench for teams (but who also tend to work in bike shops).

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“We are educating the public, the industry, and the sport about the importance of a well-trained and experienced bicycle mechanic to facilitate the enjoyment, safety, and profitability of the sport,” says the association’s website. “We will celebrate the achievements and accomplishments of all mechanics for the greater good of the trade.” And to this end it has a “mechanic of the week” slot on its website. I was particularly taken by the interview with team wrench Josh Boggs of Greenville, South Carolina, who is the sales manager of the town’s Trek Concept Store. “If we want our careers as professional bicycle mechanics to be taken seriously, we have to maintain a higher standard for ourselves,” he said (a sentiment Shucksmith shared). “In the shop where I work, it’s tucked-in shirts, salespeople greeting you at the door (or in the parking lot, if we see you have a bike that needs attention), and a very customer-friendly environment. If we were a BMX-specific shop, you would probably lose all street-cred if you were as well-kept and tucked in as we are.” But, he added, “professionalism can take on many different faces. The thing that ties them all together is consistency with customer service and quality of the work coming out of the shop. If we take a look at mechanics on the race circuit, it’s the same. It’s all about putting in the hard work, taking your work seriously, not cutting corners, and being religious about busting your butt and putting out the best work you can.” Amen to that.

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FOR ALL YOUR CYCLING PRODUCT NEEDS We’re dedicated to providing our dealers a best in industry service, here are a few ways how we do that: Order up to 6pm via our B2B website for next day delivery Custom pallet service for orders over £250 24/7 payment through our B2B site Raleigh Academy – an interactive learning portal On-site experience centre New brands for 2017 including RSP Carbon Wheels, Fixit Sticks, Finn & Race One

Get in touch to find out how you could work with Raleigh Bike Parts sales@raleigh.co.uk www.raleigh.co.uk • facebook/raleighbikeparts


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The SWORD lights from infini utilise Chip On Board (COB) technology, a new generation of LEDs which are brighter yet smaller than ever before, whilst retaining the long lasting performance synonymous with LED lights. Supplied with USB cable, aero mount and standard post mounts. With 5 operating modes (constant high, constant low, flashing 1, flashing 2 and pulsating) the SWORD is the perfect be-seen light for your commute or ride. front/rear ÂŁ34.99 each EHF019/EHF014 front & rear set ÂŁ64.99 EHF018

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BikeBiz July 2017  
BikeBiz July 2017