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Discover Another World

WHITE WATER • RIVER • SEA • MULTISPORT • FISHING • LAKES


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NZ Distributors: Southern Extreme Ltd. Ph 03 360 2550 Fax 03 360 2499 e-mail thule@irl.co.nz

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Issue 40 Front cover photo: Martyn Smit Photo by: Pete Townend

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Sea-kayak Fiji’s wild side: Kadavu Island

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Photo Essay - Whangaroa Harbour

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ANZAC Day exploration

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Muriwai Beach surfin’

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Kayak fishing classic

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Queen Charlotte Sound Kayak Trip February 2007

Product available - Buy online

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22

Product release

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Report on Urupukapuka trip

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Winged paddles (or propeller blades)

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Two days with a pirate

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Competitive fisherman? Who..me?!

Questions - Test you knowledge

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I would be mad not to Capsize off the bays Two-Stroke - Cairns to Papua New Guinea

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Cambridge to Hamilton Kayak Race

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Canoe racing New Zealand

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Finally!

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Remembering the Whanganui River

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NZ Kayak Magazine Buyers Guide

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Photo by Nathan Pettigrew

Tui Excel A versatile, go anywhere kayak

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Tasman Express Anexcep exceptionalperformance sea kayak

Dusky Bay Classic Leisurely cruise, open ope waters, or a kayak kayaking adventure

A tried and true design just got better

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For information on our complete range and stockist, visit www.q-kayaks.co.nz or phone 06 326 8667


EDITOR: Peter Townend Ph: 0274 529 255 Fax [09] 421 0663 Email: pete@canoeandkayak.co.nz DESIGN & PRODUCTION: Breakthrough Communications PO Box 108050 Symonds St, Auckland Ph: [09] 303 3536 • Fax [09] 303 0086 Email: kayak@graphics.co.nz Website: www.graphics.co.nz PUBLISHER: Kayak NZ Magazine is published four times per year by Canoe & Kayak Ltd. 6 Tavern Road, Silverdale, Auckland PRINTING: Brebner Print DISTRIBUTION: IMD SUBSCRIPTIONS: New Zealand – 6 Issues = $30 Overseas – 6 Issues = $50 Payment to: Canoe and Kayak Ltd, 6 Tavern Road, Silverdale, Auckland Ph [09] 421 0662 • Fax [09] 421 0663

Recently in Napier, I had the opportunity to attend a movie release by local white water enthusiast, Josh Neilson. It was the usual amazingfootageoftheyoungandthefearless flyingthoughthewaterandairintinykayaks. The white water looks damned scary on the screenandonecanonlyimaginewhatitfeels like to be committing yourself to rapids of that magnitude. The thing that set this evening apart from many others, was the focus that Josh had on others. We arrived a little late and were warmly welcomed by a chap on the door and informed it had only just started and directed to seating. Josh was talking about the start of the trip and where they went. He then talked patiently on the plight of the African countries he had visited in regards to malaria and the huge number of deaths caused by it. He moved on to talk about the individuals he had met and the hopes and aspirations of them. He wound up by telling thestoryofanAmericanWhitewaterpaddler who, as a doctor, has started up a clinic to help the locals by subsidising and teaching the use of mosquito nets as the best way to prevent malaria.

Overseas subscribers can make payment via credit card number on subscription form.

The evening finished with refreshments andlotsofpeoplechattingenthusiastically about the evening. Josh’s enthusiasm for his adventures, his ability to organize and to motivate others to help and his obvious concern for the less fortunate of this world is refreshing and I hope we will be able to keep you all informed of Josh’s adventures in the future.

Paddling to the max I am still yawning and it is over a week from gettingbackfromtheAnnualWhanganui Yakity Yak trip. What a great bunch of clubbies, great food and weather. Seven days of camping, eating, paddling and singing around the campfire. The best trip ever! Enjoy this Issue and send in your photos and stories so others can be motivated by your adventures too. Cheers Peter Townend



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Report on Urupukapuka trip On Friday Afternoon 16th 11 Kayaks left the beach at Rawhiti to spend a few days paddling around the Bay of Islands based at the DOC camp at Cable Bay Urupukapuka Island. Saturdaywasovercastbutfinewithlittlewind.Wepaddleddowntheeastern side of Urupukapuka Island and stopped for a coffee at the Zane Grey Resort. From Urupukapuka Island we crossed to Motukiekie Island, on to Moturua Island before lunch and snorkeling at Roberton Island. We split into two groups. One returned to camp down the southern side of the island, while the other went around thenorthernandoceanside.It was a great day’s paddle. Sunday was fine but windy so there was only a short paddle out and back around the shelteredpartofUrupukapuka. Intheafternoonwewalkedthe islandtracks(someonlygotas far as the resort for mud cake andcoffee)beforereturningto camp for dinner. On Monday it was back to our cars on a lovely day with no cloud and little wind. This is a fantastic place for paddling.There is a good DOC camp on the island. The waters are crystal clear for lots of rock gardening. Everyone on the paddle had a very enjoyable time.

Award Scheme The NZKI Award Scheme was formed in response to a growing need in the Kayaking Industry to have more peoplewithKayakingqualifications,toencouragemore kayakerstowardsexpandingtheirskillsandknowledge and to continue to increase the safety of our sport. The NZKI Award Scheme is structured around the assessmentofskillsandknowledgethatarerequiredfor the type of activity to be undertaken by the Instructor or Guide. A star is awarded for each level achieved, starting off withtheNZKIOneStarforpersonalpaddlingskillsand knowledge and moving up to the NZKI Five Star for an Assessor. For more information phone 0508 5292569

www.nzki.co.nz 6

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byGrantMcFarlane


Two days with a pirate byAshleySmith “Five instructors, two teachers, a gaggle of kids and a free weekend. It may sound like a recipe for disaster, or for a witch’s birthday cake, but all had a great time, and the students and I even managed to learn something.”

Our second day was on the Mohaka River. The students again worked hard on all aspects of river paddling in tough eddies, bouncing through huge wave chains and dodging boulders, testing the skills needed to pass their assessments. A quick bite of lunch and it was back into it.With a backdrop of general hilarity the students got more ticks in boxes.

BorrowedfromtheCanoe&KayakHawkesBayCentre,Ijoinedagreatteamof instructorsfromTheTaupoCentretotakeTeArohaCollegestudentsthrough NCEA and NZKI kayaking assessments.

Now as uncommon as it may be, one boat spontaneously developed intelligence, and a love of rocks. Each rapid without fail it charged rocks, preferablysideways,inanattempttogrounditself.Againandagainthefamiliar sound of rock on plastic was followed by a belated scream!The students final testwastocastathrow-ropeagivendistanceaccurately.Boydidthestudents make it look hard!Throw-ropes flew backwards, ropes tangled and a couple asked which end to hold onto.

Ourgrouphadneverbeenonmovingwaterbeforeandintwodaystheywere to paddle grade two white water!They had however all been through a boat confidencecourse,similartotheCanoe&Kayakpoolnights,andsomeknew howtoroll.(Notasinrollupsidedown,that’stheeasypart,thetrickybitcomes in rolling your boat back up the right way). Our first day was on the mightyWaikato River amoungst lots of paddlers and folk having a great day in the sun. However there wasn’t much water in New Zealand’s longest river, perhaps because there wasn’t a whole lot of water in New Zealand’s biggest super volcano. From the control gates to the Reid’s Farmcampsiteknowledgeable,skilledanddownrightgoodlookinginstructors taughtpaddlingskillsincludingeddyinginandoutandthebestwaytosplash eachother.Afterahugedaytheexhaustedyoungsterswentbacktocampfor a much deserved meal and a written exam for dessert. Apparently no-one fended off the sandman much later than 10pm.

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As with all kayaking a quote, a funny event, an experience made the trip special. Toproveapoint,andtoseejusthowgreatmystudentswereateskimorolling,I hadeachstudentbreakoutofaneddyleaningthewrongway.Nowthephysics ofwhyyouleanyourkayakgetsabitcomplicated,it’salljusttorquetome,but withmyscienceexperimentwequicklylearnttheresults.Leaningthewrong way, or not enough, can get you wet. I’m pretty sure my group picked up on that nugget of knowledge after the first few spills. As part of their NCEA standards the students had to complete a set course


withinasettime.Soundssimpleenough,butwith instructorsbeinginherentlyevilwedecidedtoset the course on the Bonecrusher rapid, break out ofthestartingeddyintotheragingtorrent,graba violenteddyonriverleft,beforepunchingoutand makinganevenmoredevilisheddytocompletea roll,oreskimorescue,polishedoffwithanextreme ferryglidetotouchthefinishingrock.Thestudents attitudewasamazing,withplentyofcheeringand students carrying their boats up to the top again and again to see if they could beat that top time. Over the course of the two days the students, and instructors, learnt some valuable lessons. There is one that struck me, and the poor student shall remain nameless. It is the fact that drinking litres of questionable river water isn’t a very good idea. Now most people would be shaking their head at this, especially since the student continued to drink after been told not to, but it can be very tempting to knock back some of the cool clear water. We’ll let the student’s morning of vomiting be testament as to why not to. And now I’ll leave you to with something said to me. “With that moustache, Steve looks like a pirate” – Anon

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Questions - Test your knowledge 1 2 3 4 5

Should you use a BA as a pillow ? On the what is the match or the key located? What are paddle shafts usually made from? Would a dry bag be well suited as a pillow? Do kayak cradles work more efficiently at supporting the kayak? 6 What is the first rule in kayaking? 7 Should you kayak alone? 8 When paddling in wind, does the use of a rudder help directional control? 9 Why is it important to tighten up the lowest strap on your BA? 10 Ifyoustoresomethingunderyourbungycord on a kayak, what else should you do? 11 What is the best stroke to control direction in surf? 12 What is the difference between a BA and a lifejacket ? Answersonpage34

Kodiak fishing boats, Ian off to catch Halibut.

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I would be mad not to These were my thoughts when I finally decided that it was time to buy the Canoe and Kayak Store in Taupo. The time was right, it felt right, I decided to put my money where my mouth was and buy the shop in which we (Freddy and I) had spent the last 3 years building one of the finest kayaking businesses in the whole world!! We decided straight away a more prominent location was required for our busy tourism operation and retail site. We were lucky enough to stumble across, probably, the best known building in town,The Castle. It looks like a tripped out 70’s version of a French chalet, complete with turret!! Inside however it has plenty of nooks and crannies for all the kayaking goodies we stock (and numerous places for Hooba, my Black Lab to sleep). We are a very busy outfit here in Taupo, not only running the retail store, we also run tours to the famous Maori Carvings on Lake Taupo, guided family ‘float trips’ from the very source of the beautiful clear Waikato River, Whanganui multi dayadventuresandMohakaMadnesstours(Grade 2 for complete beginners). Many clients come to us for Sea Kayaking Skills

Courses, Grade 2 instruction to learn the skills needed to paddle the likes of the Waimakariri for the Coast to Coast race, Motu Challenge and Kururau Krusher to name but a few and White Waterinstruction,fromplayboatingtoriverrunning and creeking. Not only that, we also have the Kayakers Lodge accommodationtokeepusbusy.TheLodgeisaself contained 4 bedroom house available to families and sports groups. We can now sleep up to 17 people (and my 2 cats) there, thanks to our new sleep out which is nearly complete. I have never been work shy and always try to do the best at what I am doing simply because that’s wayIam.Nohalfmeasures.In3yearsIhavemoved half way round the world, moved house 4 times, moved shops 3 times, bought a kayaking retail, instruction and tourism business and qualified as anNZKIWhiteWaterandSeaKayakinginstructor.I haveneverbeensobusyinmylife...andIamloving it.Seeingourstudentsgofromcompletekayaking beginners to finishing the Coast to Coast race has got to be the biggest buzz for me. None of the above would be possible without Freddy,ofcourse.Accountant,personalassistant, the real boss, my memory and general all round, hard working, dedicated, lovely (mad) person are a few of her many attributes. Ta mate.

Welcome to the Castle. Thanks to all my existing YakityYakClubbiesforsupportingusandtoallmy customers. If you haven’t been in yet, why not?

Sotoallwhocrossthemoat,overthedrawbridge....

Steve, Freddy and Hooba

See you for a cuppa

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Capsize off the bays This is from Denis Railey who almost got into difficulty on the 18 March. Because of his training and having correct equipment, things turned o u t f i n e. I t co u l d h ave b e e n very different. I arrived at Takapuna beach for the planned paddle to Browns Bay reef. Not surprisingly the trip had been cancelled as 25kts NE winds were predicted.

ThefishingrodandflagwereinthewaysoIpulled myselfontopofthekayakonthewrongsideofthe paddle-float and managed to scramble in. Onehandonpaddle-float,Ipumpedthewaterout with the other, I balanced and removed the float from the paddle. Still broadside to another gust of wind my brace didn’t work. The paddle had slipped in the connector and was vertical instead of horizontal. I was in the water again. This was a bit difficult! I called the Coast Guard.

Well. They took the effort to be there so I said “yes.” Wespentabout5minutestyingaropetothekayak andmuckingabout.Iwouldhavebeenclosertothe shore if I had kept paddling. The Coastguard arrived and took over. I was medically checked (and passed fit). The kayak was pulled on board. At the time I forgot my wallet was in the front compartment with my Coastguard ID.

I thought I should be OK close to shore with wind behind me on my return.

“Mayday-mayday-mayday. This is WASP (forgot “Zulu-Mike-Sierra 5066”)

TheCoastguardtookmewithin200metresofthe beach;Igotinthekayak,thankedtheCoastguard, and paddled to shore.

Having paddled to the south end of Castor Bay I met 3 North Shore kayakers. One paddled with me to the north end of Castor Bay and I continued on to the reef.

“CapsizedbetweenCastorBay&BrownsBayabout a km offshore. In need of HELP”.

The Castor Bay Lifeguards escorted me back to Milford Beach. Thank you.

After the call I could see my pump 8 metres away and decided it was safe to swim to recover it.

The wind picked up from the west with sudden squalls.

Back at the kayak I had a look around. No boats coming. Got wetsuit on, temperature warm. Rangitoto looked closer!

Ihavehandledrougherconditionsthanthisbefore but maybe I was too scared to make mistakes there!

Although the water looked choppy, as the better option I paddled directly to the reef rather than stick to the shoreline. Iferriedbroadsidetothewavesinthelullsbetween gusts. NearerthereefthegustsgrewstrongerandItipped out while bracing on the wrong side! If only I had eyes in the back of my head! Oh dear, underwater. Oh well, let’s go for the roll. First roll didn’t work, second roll didn’t work. Wet Exit!!

I didn’t feel comfortable with my legs dangling downforsharknibblessohadanother,successful, go at a self-rescue. Pumping out the cockpit got boring; wish I had an electric pump. I had difficulty balancing and fitting the skirt so I left it off and paddled against the waves towards shore. I’d been paddling for about a minute when the rubber-ducky from Castor Bay Lifeguards arrived.

Blownbroadsidetothewaveswiththecockpithalf flooded made flipping the hull tricky.

“See a capsized kayak?”

Oh well, blow up the paddle-float and do a selfrescue.

“Do you want a tow?”

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“Yes it was me.”

Ilearnedsomethingabouthowtohandlethiskind of situation. I need to improve my rolling skills and use the Pawlata Roll more often. If it doesn’t work on one side, try the other side more positively than I think I managed on Sunday. NexttimeIwillpulltherudderuptopointthekayak upwind, and have less water in the cockpit. Therescueservicesworkedwell.The10-15minute wait was worth it. Check weather forecast immediately before I go out. Not the day before! HavingaCoastguardmembershipandaVHFradio goes a long way to being safe on the water.


Two-Stroke - Cairns to Papua New Guinea Anthony Malloch was born with a never ending quest for adventure. Forthepast20yearshehaschallengedhisenduranceagainstwhatevernature can throw at him. HisnextchallengeisTwo-Stroke-A1000kmsolokayakpaddlefromCairnsin Far North Queensland Australia to Papua New Guinea. “Whileequipmentwillprovideincreasedprotection,strengthandperformance, this trip challenges my own fears,” said Anthony. The 6-8 week journey is an extreme test of courage and determination. On the remote route only one food drop will be possible. In tricky seas and fickle weather there will be crocodiles and sharks to look out for. Aged45AnthonyisbasedontheGoldCoastAustralia.Heisafoundingmember of the Queensland Sea Kayaking Club and President of the Australian Sea Kayaking Club.

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Finally!

Neverless... relentlessly they kept at me.“You can do it... you’re good enough... we’ll look after you”. OK, ALLRIGHT! SHUTUP! And last week I did... and it was BRILLIANT.What a laugh... just like Grade 2 but a bit bouncier... don’t knowwhatallthefusswasabout!!IsayHAtograde 3. Must admit the drops on the Rangataiki above Anaphenuawereabitmoretricky...somethinghad to knock me down a peg though... I’d have been unbearable!! Guess I’ll have to go again now so I can do it with style.

Just when I think I’ve got to learn crossstitch and how to make dumplings... at the grand age of 43 I’ve finally made it onto Grade 3 White Water. Tobehonest...I’mfarhappierdanglingfromsome crimp 30 metres up a rhyolite slab... but I had to do it! I work in a kayak shop for gods sake. And in Taupo... home of the white water dude.

Chomp

I am positively young compared with one of my mentors,so being an old lady with a broken back and cyber spine was not working for me as an excuse. But since I’ve been paddling in myTrigger I’ve not neededanexcuse.Itispossibletobepain-freeand to retain the feeling in the legs in a boat with good adjustablefittings.Gettingcomfortablereallyhas made all the difference.

I’ve realised the other guys and gals damage themselvesbecausetheyareasuchcrazybunch... pushingthelimits...runningriversinflood...doing an even bigger waterfall on some even more obscurecreek,hungryfortheadrenaline.Butreally, you don’t have to hurt yourself... (I was beginning to think it compulsory) just get your skills up and gowithsometrustedmateswho’lllookoutforyou and help you pick your line. Ialsothinkyouhavetopullamonkeyface.Itworks for me. Oo.

Spit

Check out my gnarly snaps.

I’ve spent the last 3 years listening to tales of carnage... of‘down-time’,‘rocks’,‘holes’... Richard’s brokennose,Kerryn’sdislocatedshoulder,Elliot’s black eye, Mad Dog’s water on the brain... in fact nearlyeverytimeJohncamehomehehadtodoso via outpatients and a bunch of stitches.

Oh... and thanks Steve, River Ron, Andy Copper and ‘Young Bradlet’. Can’t wait for our next adventure...

Grade2Icouldcopewith...thatwasfine.Buttaking the next step was making me super nervous... I like my eyes the colour they are. I’ve got lovely shoulders and I’ve enough scars to already last me a lifetime.

PS.Ifyoufancygettingintosomewhitewateritjust so happens I know where you can get excellent instruction...andtheopportunitytodemothelatest range of boats from Blisstick... Canoe and Kayak Taupo - 07 378 1003 talk to Steve or Freddy

Rangataiki

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Freddy Age 42 and three quarters

Monkey facing

Photos courtesy of the legendary River Ron.


Winged paddles (or propeller blades)

by James Fitness

I have often been asked about winged paddles. So I asked Bernard Fletcher of Descente Paddles. 1. Are winged paddles more efficient? Figures vary. Of course it depends on the person. AtOlympiceventtrialstheincreaseinspeedwasonly1%,butwhencruising and into the rhythm you could achieve a maximum of 3%.The increases we quote relate to speed for the amount of effort put in, coupled with correct technique. Bad technique will take away any advantage. 2. How do I choose the shape and size of the paddle? The formula is still very much the same as a standard paddle. Itdependsonwhatyouintendtodo.Fora500metresprint,alargebladegains maximum speed quickly. It will be hard work. You will be sitting higher in a sprint kayak, so the paddle will need to be longer than for multisport. Range for guys about 216 – 226cm Whencruising,ordoingtheCoasttoCoast,youaresittinglowersowillneed a shorter paddle with a smaller blade . With this you will not pull so much paddlethroughthewater(asinadoptingalowergear)andnotwearyourself out as quickly. Range for guys about 212 – 220cm. For a wider cruising kayak you may require a longer paddle to comfortably reach the water with the whole blade.

4. When is a standard paddle better than a winged paddle? A winged paddle is not so good when you need a variety of strokes. Draw strokes and reverse strokes are not efficient, and can be scary to use with a wing paddle.

Withaseakayak,severalschoolsofthoughtexistontheidealbladeandlength of paddle. Generally, the narrower the blade the longer the whole paddle. Angles vary from 0 to 80 degrees offset, with the general norm around 60 degrees. Range from 214 – 240cm at the extremes.

Inveryturbulentwater,orwhitewaterwhereyouarehoppinginandoutof eddies,astandardpaddleisbetter. Verystrongwindcanmakeawingpaddle difficult to control, a point worth considering in some areas of New Zealand !

As a rule of thumb, use small blades for a heavy slower kayak and you can paddle all day without being completely knackered in the first hour.

OntheCoasttoCoast,whereyouareinturbulentwater,withnointentionof stopping, a winged paddle will be more efficient. Again the stroke needs to be regular and smooth to gain the most from your paddle, in panic situations steering is best done with big sweep strokes rather than reverse strokes.

3. Is the stroke for wing paddles the same as for a flat blade? No–Ifyoudon’tusethecorrectpaddlestroke,you’llfeeluncomfortablewith the paddle, and it will let you know. Thewingedpaddlemustglideoutwardslikeapropellerpullingthroughthe water.Ontheleftthebladerotatesclockwiseandontheright,anticlockwise. You are the pivot point, or centre point. As the propeller turns the blades push the kayak forward.

5. When is a winged paddle better than a standard paddle?

In conclusion, a winged paddle will increase your speed when you get the stroke right. If you are spending $450 - $500 on a paddle, it is surely worth getting some instruction on how to best use it. Also it may be worth leaving that cask of wine behind to increase your speed. Although perhaps NOT.

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Competitive fisherman? Who..me?! by Nathan Pettigrew

A few weeks back I had the pleasure of meeting a really great couple who had moved out from the U.K a few months prior. Neil and Gail came into the shop (Canoe and Kayak, Mt Maunganui) looking for a ‘his and her’ set-up that they could both enjoy for a bit of coastal cruising, fishing, and a little fun in the surf. Basically, a good all around kayak for each. After a few options and a few laughs along the way (yes, they were laughing WITH me!!) we came to the conclusion that the ‘QK’ Escapade for him and the Escapee for her would offer the best value for money in all these areas. Neil also mentioned that he enjoyed fishing back in the U.K so I stored that information in my mind and stored his cell phone number in my phone for a later date with some hungry snapper. For the moment though, the surf was too good to pass on so I invited them down for a play in the waves. When we arrived at the beach, the swell rolling in was absolutely awesome. The wind was coming directly off shore creating some real dumping waves. We talked about safety and covered the typeofwavesbeforeus,andwhatwecouldexpect once actually on the waves. As I was slightly concernedforGail(yeah,I’macaringtypeoffella!), I thought it best that she sit this one out and watch from the shoreline, which she was happy to do. There is nothing worse than selling a kayak only to scare the ba-jeebas out of someone by taking them out in the wrong conditions. So I jumped on my Cobra Strike, Neil on his Escapade, put our helmetsonandheadedout.Neildidexceptionally well, he did come off a few times but for a guy not generally into sport, who had not been on a kayak before, I thought he did brilliantly. Neilabsolutelylovedit,Ididn’tneedtoaskbecause itwasplainlyobviousfromthehappyexpressions onhisface.Withproudwifeyjumpingupanddown on the beach with the camera, you know it was a good day. The only hiccup for the day was when Neil came off a wave and was on the beach side of the kayak. Of course the next wave came and pickeduphisEscapadewhichcareeredstraightinto

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his left leg! It was a real shame because if it had hithisleftANDhisrightlegthenhewouldhavegot 20 points and I would have been really proud of him,butonly10pointstoday. Anyway,jokesaside and a helpful hint: should you come off the kayak either get on the correct seaside of the kayak or get completely out of its way. If you do happen to getonthecorrectsideandyoudomanagetograb ontothekayak,remembertokeepasolidarm(not relaxed)becauseifthenextwavecomesandpicks you up, it can push you face firstinto thekayak. So, not trying to scare anyone, but small safety hints can make a world of difference. And if you think a faceplantintoakayakishardtobelieve,thentrust me, it happens. I know first hand! Neilhasbeenoutafewtimessinceourfirstventure

in the surf and has recently purchased a Cobra Strike for more manoeuverability and will use the Escapade for fishing, and speaking of fishing….. OnEasterMonday,NeilandIheadedouttowardmy usual spot just over a 1km past Rabbit Island. Neil had not caught a fish from a kayak before and his Escapadewasstilllookingshinyandnew.Ithought it was time to incorporate some traditional battle scars, scratches, fish blood and stench of bait, just tonameafew,intotheplastic.Youknow,theusual. Onthewaytothespotwesightedsomebirdsdiving so I threw Neil my favourite saltwater fly, which he quicklyriggedonhisrod,andwegunnedittoward the boil up. It wasn’t long before his rod was bent andthereelbeganscreaming.Thebeautifulsound of ‘….zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz…’is like music to


any fishermans ears! Who needs Mozart when you’ve got a fishing reel and an angry fish! Hepulledinhisfirstfish,anaveragesizedkahawai, which we opted to set free to make musical notes foranotherfishermananotherday. Ipaddledover to him, shook his hand and congratulated him on his first fish on his kayak. I’ll never forget the time I caught my first fish when I was out with my mate GlenB.Healsoshookmyhandandthefeelingyou get when someone shakes your hand and says “Good on ya mate” is priceless. We eventually got to the spot, dropped anchor and threw down some bait. As I’ve mentioned in a previous story, I use mackeral because it is incredibly oily and is almost like burley on a hook. Or for people like me, KFC on a fork! The bait was down for no more than 5 minutes when bang, the rod bent. Now you know it wasn’t a big fish otherwise I would’ve written ‘bang’ in capital letters! Bad joke? Ok. Anyway, I pulled in a nice pan sized snapper and calmly puffed my chest out and looked at Neil with that‘Yep, I’m a fisherman, I know this spot, I know how to fish, I’m the man of the hour, I invented fishing and I own all the fish in the ocean’. And you know the look thatIgotrightback,whenyourmatecatchesafish and you don’t? He had that look in his eyes and it goessomethinglikethis…’Youegg,youprick,you dork…’I best not say anymore. Funny enough, we look at each other with the exact same fake smile the whole time! No, no, no, us fisherman aren’t competitive!? But it’s all in good jest. Neil put some fresh bait on and dropped it to the bottom. It wasn’t down long before BANG (now you know what that means!), he was ripping into a good fish. As his rod was arched over and Mozart had left the building, I found to my astonishment, that the‘I’m the man of the hour’ expressionhadcompletelyvanishedfrommyface! The look had somehow‘morphed’itself through some mysterious transportation machine and was looking right back at me through Neils eyes! He played the fish for about 8 minutes when he finally said out loud‘It’s a monster’, and right then

and there was about the moment I had visions of drillingaholerightthroughthebottomofhiskayak, but wearing a different kind of smile and with a different look in my eye! He landed the snapper and it was a nice one at that. I hooked a nice snapper as well, which had some real fight in it, especially since I’d loosened the drag off quite a bit without Neil knowing!You know, just to see him sweat alittle! I was yelling ‘look mate, look! Look at the rod!’I even switched arms a couple of times with a pained look on my face that my arms were tired from the struggle of such a heaving fish! And I tell you what, if there was an audition for Shortland Street on the water that day, this drama boy would have got the part handsdown.Isn’titfunnythoughthatyourfishing mateNEVERsaysanything.Theyjustremainsilent! Silent until they see if it’s bigger than the one they justhauledinornot.Neilwaslucky…thistime!But strictly for the purposes of this story, I will tell you thatmyfishwasbigger.Nomeasuringwasactually conducted at the time! Hey, it’s my story! Straight after he landed the big snapper, which I personally would have put back due to‘fairness on friends’reasons, he casually pulled out a flask of coffee and sat back. Now, if that’s not rubbing salt in the wound, I don’t know what is! I mean heck, why not turn theTV on and put your feet up while you’re at it!? Obviously I didn’t say anything because I was dying for a coffee!

We landed 2 nice snapper each before pulling up anchor and heading back. About 300 metres off shore, I stood up on my Cobra Fish’n’Dive and jumpedoffforaswim.Thewaterwasbeautifuland clear and we were lucky to have no wind while we were out there. It was just a terrific day with a mate on the water. Now I don’t want to get all emotional on all you readersbutonamoreseriousnoteImustsaythere areafewthingsinlifethatmeaneverythingtome. My partner Charlotte is one of them, and another is seeing the smile on people’s faces when they’re onthewaterhavingfunthroughsurfingorfishing or just being out there. I’ve been allowed to play a part in putting those smiles on your faces, and THAT is what is priceless, for me. I’d like to thank all the guys (and girls) that have joined me in surfing andfishingexpeditionsandformakingmehappy in the thought that you are all having fun. You all know who you are. Neil, if you’re reading this mate, I had a great time onthewaterandwe’llhavetodoitagainsometime! Because,fromoneabsolutelygenuinefisherman to another, I haven’t got a flask and I’d really like a coffee the next time I go out! Happy fishing people and keep safe and warm this winter.

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Photo Essay by Pru Fry These photos are of a trip by North Shore Yakity Yak club to Whangaroa Harbour, on February 23 – 24, 2007. The Sunday was the most exiting, but the Saturday was beautiful.

Pretty little bays on the north side of the harbour. Somehavestreams.Nocampinghere,justpossum damage. Fun rock formations to paddle through.

Round the corner from the Duke’s Nose is Lane Cove, where the track begins. There’s a DOC hut here, for guests only. It’s accessible after a 2 hour hike from Totara North, or by sea – but the sea runs out at low tide. That’s why we’re camped at Tauranga Bay. Day visitors can use the fancy vermicast toilets.

The briefing. Not a chart, a topographical map! This is a trip to inspect the spectacular volcanic formations up the West Arm of the Harbour (Pekapeka Bay) as much as to have fun kayaking. Into the volcanic canyon, and up to the end of the West Arm.Water’s getting fresh here. Paint on the rocks from boats navigating the stream when the tide’s out too far! That rock in front of us is the Duke’s Nose! (Kairara Rock.)Anoptionforthetripistoclimbit.Wedecide we’rekayakers,notwalkers,eventhoughwemeet someAmericantouristswhosayitonlytookthem 26 minutes to climb up.The notice says 45.That’d be us! We want to explore the water! We have to get to the top of the harbour before the tide starts going out…. Paddling past the ‘Haystack” (Takahi Point). Whangaroa village in the far distance. They say (whoever‘they are’) that the water is so deep here thatasubmarinecanentertheharbourundetected. Those volcanic cliffs go straight down!

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Must be the end. And must be lunchtime!There’s one more hour of rising tide, so choose your spot carefully!


Spot of water ballet in the pool for lunchtime entertainment?

That’s it for today. We can’t drag our boats any further. Unless there’s a tsunami, they’ll be fine there.ArrowRocks(usedtobehauntsforcrayfish, fished out now) and Stephenson’s Island in the background. Only two kayaks tipped up trying to land through the beachbreak!

And how about this one? Three chambers, one cave. Ian went in…. And came out another entrance.Then Greg…. OK.They’ve chased away the taniwha…. Scarey, but must be possible.

After the surge, GO! Out through the mangroves. Who can find the twistiest route? Who can put the most scratches on their kayak? Sundaymorning.That’swherewe’reheaded,that tunnel visible behind the launch.

Round.Wait for a small surge to negotiate the big, pink rocks in there. Now paddle! Up the surge! Bit wet!

Out the entrance of the canyon under another of Whangaroa’s volcanic peaks. The canyon has only a trickle of water at low tide, but the current is carrying us nicely downstream now

Ho!Thisiscool!Asmallsurge,andaslightfollowing breeze, and everybody gets through the tunnel. Use your stern rudder – and your‘real’rudder! In fact,somegobackformore,andmore,andmore…. Careful! This could be addictive! And out! And again And again And again….

ChocolaterestandregroupintheshadeatKingfish Point before exiting the harbour.

Mmmm! This one’s a lot longer, and quite narrow. Easy to scratchyourkayak!Watersurgesinthroughvents in the side right along it! Don’t get too close to the edge….

And all good things come to an end.Too bad! We might go again next summer.

.

Calm conditions Tim goes looking for white water

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Muriwai Beach surfin’

byTonyBarrett

Take one scorching hot February day, mix with the crisp white curling breakers of Auckland’s west coast Muriwai Beach, add four Canoe & Kayak instructors in sea kayaks, and you have the recipe for a whole lot of fun. Four of us had gathered from Hamilton, Auckland and Hawkes Bay to run through some instructor training and upskilling under PeterTownend’s the watchful eye of. Part of the challenge was to demonstrate skills in a surf zone, on Auckland’s mighty West Coast. We unloaded kayaks and equipment, at the foot-boiling sandy car park, had a safety briefing and Peter notified the lifeguards what the crazy people in kayakswereupto.Theseawasimpressive.Breakersfaroffshore,andastrong sideways current fed an unseen rip further down the beach. Afteravaluablelearningopportunityhereareafewobservationstohelpthe next time you’re in surf…. Combining the weight of a sea kayak and paddler, with the force of a large amount of moving water can produce a very nasty collision!Whenever a sea kayak is upstream in the surf zone, it’s possible that it will come rapidly back tomakeyouracquaintance.Onceapowerfulbreakergrabsandpushesyour kayak, despite your best effort, there may be no quick escape. I received a firm nudge to the ribs by a Penguin (kayak) to remind me. Watchwhenenteringandexitingthewater.Ensurekayaksenteratoneplace and exit at another! Tieeverythingondeck.Bungiesarejustnotgoodenoughinasurfzone.Even doubledover,twistedaround,wrapped-up-tightbungiesaren’tgoodenough! Weexperiencedpaddlefloatstrailingoffdecks,andpumpsworkingtheirway loose.FormyexpeditionpaddlingIintendtosecureeverythingondeckwith a safety lanyard as well as bungies and avoid losing important gear.

Good technique is better than brute force.When the white water of a broken waveovertakesyouittendstoforcethesternaroundinabroach.Liftthesideof theboatnearesttheshoresoyourkayakskipssidewayswithoutitsdownstream edgedigginginandcapsizing.Atthesametimeasthisishappening,thepaddler needs to have a low brace out to the seaward side. My tendency at first was to put too much emphasis on the supporting paddle, but after a bit of coaching, I discovered that this was not necessary. Just balancing the kayak on the right angle did the job without relying on a strong brace stroke. Confidence comes with practice, and having a few helpful pointers along the way sure speeds the learning along. Takingandcatchingwavesatanangleisoftenbest.Buryingyourkayak’snose intoanoncomingfoampilemakesforanimpressivesubmarinephotoshot,but increases the chance that you’ll surf backward. In a longer kayak this may be thefirststepbeforebeingpitch-poledoverontoyourback.Similarly,dropping down a wave face, pearling into the bottom and doing a forward somersault looksgreatfromshore,butyou,anend-loopingpaddler,mayhaveadifferent opinion! Effective and early use of a stern rudder stroke to get a better angle to the wave can avoid this situation.

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Queen Charlotte Sound Kayak Trip February 2007 by Sarah Indrelid The trip away for Sue, Ken, Adam, Peter, Sarah, Joanna, Murray, Mark and Brendan (Our fabulous trip-leader) started, as most trips from Taranaki, with a long Journey. GettingoffthePictonferry,Ilearnedthehardwaythatyouneedtobalancethe kayakwellonthetrolley,oryourarmjustaboutdropsoffasyouwheelit500m over to the other ferry.We stocked up on last minute stuff at the supermarket and loaded onto the Endeavour Express, driven by the friendly Glenn who helped us hoist heavily loaded kayaks onto the roof.The water taxi dropped us off by the Furneaux Lodge in Endeavour Inlet, and the proper part of the trip(self-propelled)startedwithagentlepaddlerock-gardeningourwayalong the 8km to Tawa Bay in the sunshine. This is what we came for! We were somewhat surprised to find a DOC campsite with no facilities (and in fact, some of us are still wondering if we were really in the right place). The only slightly camp-site-like feature of Tawa bay was that it was flat, but we had to stomp down the shoulder high grass before we could pitch our tents. But what it lacked in facilities it made up in rural charm.The birds were extremely interactive. Cheeky wekas stole a whole heap of stuff including a bagofbread,aplate,aknife,andmyhalf-finishedbeer(whichisreallynoton!) Meanwhile,Joannaprovedherhardinessbygoingforacooleveningsnorkel, and Pete fished up a flounder. We sat around a small fire on the beach. The fresh flounder was delicious. And Joanna produced a fantastic birthday cake for Murray.We sang really badly. And some loved-up people (mentioning no names)managedtoproduceanun-squashedroseonthepillowforValentines Day too. Sweet.

Thursday15thcamearoundwithmorebeautifulsunandmorerockgardening along to Resolution Bay. I’m not supposed to mention that we went for the deluxe option and stopped for fresh coffee and some of the world’s best muffins at the lodge because somehow this may make us seem not-serious kayakers. But after our night roughing it, we deserved it.We continued onto ShipCovedisplacingmanyanervousshag,andwithonlyminorlossofplastic oversurprisinglyshallowrocks.ShipCoveisthesiteofamonumenttoCaptain Cook,aswellasthestartoftheQueenCharlottetrack.Weweresurprisedtofind the Spirit of New Zealand anchored in the cove, she lent a suitably historical note to the scene. Having read the monument’s stories of Captain Cook and the Maori history of the area, we hiked up a lovely shady trail to the waterfall, which had marvellously fresh cold water, and sat on the beach for lunch.We spenttheafternoonpaddlingtoCannibalCove.Itwas(thankfully)muchmore welcoming than its name, with a well set-up campsite presided over by two hugemacrocarpas.Brendan,Murray&MarkvisitedMotuaraforapre-dinner nosey, and Pete had a rather unsuccessful fishing trip.The rest of us guarded our beers from yet more wekas.While the clouds gradually lowered around us, Ken cooked up a fine meal of pasta and ham. Brendan,Pete&Markcouldn’tresistyet morepaddlingfirstthinginthemorning, a6kmdetournorthtoKaikanohibefore breakfast. They didn’t quite beat the rainsquallbacktothebeach.Therestof uslistenedtotheweatherforecastand discovered they’d changed the wind speedestimateupwardovernight.We were looking at a cross-sound paddle into a 35-knot headwind. We revised our route to a nice morning paddle back along the coast, via some extremely playfulseals,toResolutionBay.Overalonglunch-breakwemistakenlyhoped that the forecast was right and the wind would die down. This was another opportunity for weka theft. My cup disappeared while I hiked up to the saddle overlooking Ship Cove & Resolution Bay. Meanwhile Pete made friends with tame shag. We’renotsureifitwasthe same one that followed him around for half the afternoon. Th e l a t te r p a r t o f the afternoon was a tough paddle into the continuing headwind.

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Thankfullyitwasgustyenoughforus,occasionally, to catch our breath. Waves broke over my head a couple of times - which was refreshing, so I should begrateful.Weprobablycouldhavedoneabetter job of sticking together but we all had our heads down (very literally) trying to get into the shelter of Blumine Island as soon as we could.Thankfully none of us fell in – I wasn’t looking forward to any extra upwind paddling.We regrouped in the shelteroftheislandandenjoyedthelastpartofthe paddle. Just as we reached the campsite another groupofkayakerscameroundtheheadlandfrom theotherdirectionwithsailsup!Itturnedoutthey were from the army. We forgave them the sails when we heard what they’d been doing earlier in the day: stress-testing! Blumine Island is a nature reserve and the place was full of wonderful bird song – lots of bellbirds in particular. The beautiful beaches offered rock pools full of red anemones, and masses of kina shells. Joanna found her first pink kina. The geologists in our group also noticed the cool stripy rocks. Joanna excelled herself at dinner with brandy snaps and fresh cream, and the port alsocameout,tomakethephosphorescencethat much more mesmerizing. And to top it off we had

birthday cake for Joanna’s birthday (well OK – it was toffee pops with a candle on!) Saturdayfounduscruisingthecoastoftheisland, where Joanna & Brendan found half a mauled conger eel. The sun had re-joined us, and the trip back across the north shore was thankfully much easier than the previous day.We had some nicesurfingopportunitiesonthenowmuchmore reasonablysizedwaves.Asweheadedwestalong the Sound we met a large pod of big Bottlenose dolphins coming the other way. What would anyone do but turn around and join them?! It was justfantastictobesurroundedbythesewonderful creatures. And through the clear water of the Sounds you could see the dolphins looking up at you,astheydartedtoandfrobetweenthekayaks. A real 10-out-of-10, treasure-forever moment. Reluctantlywehadtoadmitthatwecouldn’tkeep up with them indefinitely (though Brendan had a good go) and turned back to resume our rockgardening paddling to the Bay of Many Coves, where we bemoaned the ugly clear cut forest. In thenicerpartofthebaywehadfantasiesofowning flash baches.We stopped for lunch on a fabulous sunny beach, overlooked by steep punga-clad greenslopesreflectinginthatoh-so-clearwater.It

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wasvisuallygorgeous.Wecontinuedaroundthemanycoves,beforesplitting into two groups. One made a beeline for the campsite; the other detoured to check out the best DOC site we’d seen - at Ratimera in Ruakaka Bay. It is definitelytoberecommended.RuakakaBayalsofeaturedsealstryingtobreak into a fish farm (let me in, darn it!) After a long day (I reckon about 36km) we relaxed on the beach at Kumutota Bay, in sight of Picton. Serenaded the previous night by bellbirds we now had ‘Smokeonthewater’andothermetalclassicsthankstoanearbyyacht.Itdidn’t preventenjoymentofthefluorescenceandanabsolutelyclearnight-sky,which putonstunningdisplays.Andtherewassomethingmagicalaboutthecheesy rice with salmon menu too – how often do you get that? We spent the first hour of our last day in denial, picking our way between the rocks,hangingovera5ftstingray,andplayingwithsometotallyunfazedseals. ThenBrendanbroughtusbacktorealitybymentioningthatwemightneedto pick up the pace if we wanted to catch the ferry. Peter & Murray took that very literally and disappeared over the horizon while the rest of us followed the mother ship (Ken & Sue) back south over the sound and in to Picton. There was a slight moment of stress when our trolleys weren’t there, but they soon showed up and it wasn’t long before Adam was shouting us all beers in the ferry bar (thanks!)

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Cambridge to Hamilton Kayak Race By Peter Townend

Lots of people and lots of different Kayaks and Canoes took part in this the 30th annual Cambridge to Hamilton Kayak Race. There were Out Rigger Canoes, K2 Racing Kayaks, Single and Double Skis, Sea Kayaks, Open Canoes along with a myriad of little sit on tops and kayaks. Ages ranged from 4 years old to the not recently retired. The weather was fine and warm and racing serious and casual All in all something for everyone and lots of spot prizes and food at the finish. My family, along with two other families entered in the cruising division and took a large chilli-bin full of goodies for lunch along the way. We did come in last, but were all very happy with the day. Thanks to the organises and see you next year.

No. 325 316 152 151

Cambridge to Hamilton Kayak Race - 6/05/2007 Narrows Cruising - Kayak 11km RESULTS Name Boat Time Rob Haworth / Sam Howarth 56:20 Murray Alllen Perception Flow 1:05:11 Fiona Edwards Largo 1:14:05 Merv Edwards Viking Fishing 1:24:38 Results by Solex Systems Ltd. PO Box 15 1031, New Lynn, Auckland 1007, Ph 021 648 085

Cambridge to Hamilton Kayak Race - 6/05/2007 Cruising - Kayak 23km RESULTS No. 61 40 115 44 155 203 204 177 72 83 314 166 182 195 113 233 255 165 82 241 18 156 173 41 6 112 99 270 114 17 103 35 104 70 96 168 167 265 81 139 217 216 282 290 118 97 324 136 47 48 49 317 170 249 250 No. 247

Name Boat Time James Allan / Paul Milanovic Seabear II 2:02:42 Stan Lemmon Tasman Express 2:10:31 Taree Taree Sequel 2:18:18 Graham Cox / Anne Cox Eco Tandem 2:18:33 Peter Florence Cobra Fish & Dive 2:19:07 Roy Hutchins Ranger 2:20:46 Craig Hutchins Ranger 2:20:46 Laura Hall / Roger Hall Prijon Excursion 2:21:20 Grant Hamilton SK???? 2:21:24 Christo Swart Prowler 4.5 2:22:15 Andrew Goodson Contour 2:23:16 Greg Wiechern Tasman Express 2:24:00 Peter Bunning Contour 450 2:25:03 Charlie Czepanski Cobra Tourer 2:25:17 Jacqui Knight Tui 2:26:05 Trevor Alborough Cirrus (Ply) 2:30:08 Garry Eaton EcoBezhig 2:31:28 Barbara Raabe Tasman Express 2:31:37 Jason Crerar Prowler 4.5 2:32:00 Ken Lynch Tasman Express 2:34:02 Gary Hodge Tasman Express 2:36:51 Sonja Florence Shearwater 2:39:04 Robin Clark / Tony Clark Seabear II 2:39:19 Wendy Mather Sequel 2:39:53 Marianne Goudswaard Contour 2:40:37 Karen Prendiville Tui 2:40:51 Jude Kauika 2:42:43 Michelle Baird Squall 2:43:46 Emmy Brouwers Penguin 2:46:34 Chris Brooks Tui 2:48:29 Ray Pamment Swing 2:50:01 Gill Stonelake Puffin 2:50:02 Bev Pamment Swing 2:50:04 Natalie Hansby Acadia 2:50:06 Heather Martin Puffin 2:50:08 Nicholas Wiechern Penguin 2:51:33 Mathew Wiechern Penguin 2:51:46 Anette Sabor Beachcomber 2:52:17 John Stuart 2:55:09 Ben Kershaw 2:55:10 John Van Stipriaan Swing 2:55:25 Lorraine Van Stipriaan Swing 2:55:27 Sara Wheeler Swift 2:57:00 Jenny Davis Sit-on 2:58:15 Silvia Martino Venturer 2:58:49 Annabel Gooder Acadia 570 2:59:51 Aaron Joines Frenzy 3:00:10 Marianne Anderson Venturer 3:00:30 John Dixon 3:05:59 Hannah Charan-Dixon Gillemot Little Auk 3:05:59 Lucy Dixon Gillemot Little Auk 3:05:59 Lorraine Jones Scrambler 3:13:17 Aidan Knight / Chris Knight Cabo 3:23:28 Tighe McCarthy / John McCarthy Cabo 3:23:32 Moya McCarthy / Kathy McCarthy Cabo 3:23:47 Name Boat Time Peter Townend / Bryn Townend Canoe 3:24:26 Results by Solex Systems Ltd. PO Box 15 1031, New Lynn, Auckland 1007, Ph 021 648 085

Cambridge to Hamilton Kayak Race - 6/05/2007 Narrows Race - Kayak 11km RESULTS No. Clas Class Pl Name Cat Boat Time Pl 87 MS 1 Catherine Crofts OW Intrigue 59:18 1 89 MS 2 Taryn Kramer JW Swallow 1:02:06 2 Results by Solex Systems Ltd. PO Box 15 1031, New Lynn, Auckland 1007, Ph 021 648 085

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New Zealand’s Best Kept Secret

The Yakity Yak

Many of the articles you are reading in this magazine are about trips organized by the Yakity Yak Club. Interested in Joining up?

treasurers. We just discuss where to go next and who is coming. These trips are viewed on www.canoeandkayak.co.nz and booked at your local Canoe & Kayak Centre

Well read on and get involved

Join the club. You will get a weekend skills course to teach you techniques and safetyskillsandayear’smembership. Ifyouarekeentolearnmorethereisabunch ofcoursestoteacheverythingfromEskimoRollingtobecominganinstructor. At no cost is the Leader’s Training Course, ten weeks part time for those who have the urge to put something back into the club.

“Too old”you say or“not fit enough”or“don’t like clubs because of the working bees and committee meetings”. Well guess what, our oldest member is 80 plus and started paddling in the last two years. Can you walk? well then you can paddle, in fact that’s not correct we have had members with a missing leg or two, but you get the picture.The only committee meetings we have are a wine and cheese evening once a month to arrange trips. There are no secretaries or

So what does joining the club cost? Only $299 for the first year including the weekend course and then only $45 per subsequent year thereafter.

NORTH SHORE

AUCKLAND

SILVERDALE

MANUKAU

WAIKATO

Unit 2/20 Constellation Drive (off Ascension Place), Mairangi Bay, Auckland

502 Sandringham Rd

DISTRIBUTION CENTRE

Sandringham

6 Tavern Road, Silverdale

710 Great South Road, Manukau

The corner Greenwood St & Duke St, State Highway 1 Bypass

PHONE: 09 815 2073

PHONE: 09 421 0662

PHONE: 09 262 0209

Hamilton

PHONE: 09 479 1002

PHONE: 07 847 5565

For up coming Yakity Yak trips 26

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Kayak Club Proudly Supported byYour Local

Now you say “They must charge for each club trip”. My friend you would be wrong. There is no participation charge for club trips.

but we know you will find a bunch of like minded mates to enjoy our wonderful little paddling paradise.

The Yakity Yak Kayak Club was set up by a bunch of enthusiastic instructors. After spending much time teaching people how to paddle we found a few months later that they had not carried on with paddling. They said there was no one to paddle with, or they were a bit shy, or they did not have a boat, or they lacked confidence to go on trips where they did not know the area or the people.

So get on the phone to one of the Canoe & Kayak Centres (see advert on the back page) and join the Yakity Yak Kayak Club. You will be welcome. Welcome aboard Peter Townend One of the founding Yakers

So we said enough is enough and the Yakity Yak Kayak Club was formed. Wecannotguaranteeyouwillgetonlikeahouseonfirewitheveryclubmember

JOIN NOW! PHONE 0508 5292569

BAY OF PLENTY

TAUPO

HAWKE’S BAY TARANAKI

WELLINGTON

3/5 Mac Donald Street

77 Spa Road,

15 Niven Street

Unit 6, 631 Devon Road

2 Centennial Highway

Onekawa, Napier

Waiwhakaiho, New Plymouth Ngauranga, Wellington

Mount Maunganui (off Hewletts Rd) Taupo

PHONE: 07 574 7415

PHONE: 07 378 1003 PHONE: 06 842 1305

PHONE: 06 769 5506

PHONE: 04 477 6911

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Cambridge to Hamilton Kayak Race 23km - 6/05/2007

RESULTS No. 294 272 2 278 311 304 254 238 199 60 154 284 237 286 292 260 236 263 283 37 288 59 276 303 287 14 310 1 56 157 36 179 50 75 54 77 62 3 45 63 145 79 268 296 209 91 273 101 25 102 305 149 312 231 306 No. 93 29 239 141 299 148 242 225 86 302 43 42 122 9 78 123 200 256 127 150 222 84 190 258 140 208 95 108 32 39 67 277 26 117 33 28 10 20 223 68 274 253 92 160 94 53 128 111 176 85 285 19 322 31 12 246 142 197 38 15 230 313 163 158 198 144 259 5 74 51

28

Class Ski II Ski Ski MS MS Ski Ski ADV II MS MS Ski K1 Ski MS ADV II ADV II MS K2 K1 Ski MS Ski Ski MS Ski II MS Ski MS MS MS OC1 OC1 Ski Ski MS Ski ADV II Ski SKII MS MS MS Ski MS OC1 MS MS MS MS MS Ski Ski MS OC1 MS Class MS MS MS MS MS Ski MS TK1 MS Ski MS Ski SK MS MS ADV II SKII MS Ski MS MS MS MS MS Ski MS Ski MS MS MS MS SK-P Touring SK MS SOTop MS MS MS MS MS K1 MS SK SK-P MS SK-P MS SK SK-P SK-P SK SK SK MS MS SKII MS MS MS MS MS MS SK-P Ski SK-P SK-P SK-P Ski SK

Class Pl 1 1 2 1 2 3 4 1 3 4 5 1 6 5 2 3 6 1 2 7 7 8 9 8 2 9 10 10 11 12 1 2 11 12 13 13 4 14 1 14 15 16 15 17 3 18 19 20 21 22 16 17 23 4 24 Class Pl 25 26 27 28 29 18 30 1 31 19 32 20 1 33 34 5 2 35 21 36 37 38= 38= 40 22 41 23 42 43 44 45 1 1 2 46 1 47 48 49 50 51 3 52 3 2 53 3 54 4 4 5 5 6 7 55 56 3 57 58 59= 59= 61 62 6 24 7 8 9 25 8

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Name Grant Heim / Oskar Stielau Paul Wilford Tim Grammer Rob Nichol Gordon Blythen Tamas Pinter Gerard Callebaut Darren Donnelly / Michael White Paul Gillard Andy Fuller Joe Cornforth Sam Newlands Wayne Patterson Vaughan Reed MikePage / Daniel Waters Wayne Stachurski / Richard Townshend Grant Clifford Jason Chandler / Adam Fraser Terry Newlands Brendon Davey Jim Davidson Mike Hall David Gunn Russell Smith Stephen Newman / Georgia Newman Steve McSweeney Tom Jacka Phil Oster Craig Watkins David Sleep Paul McGrath Steve Culhane John Land Duncan Buchanan Peter Melling Anthony Blyth Rich Willis / Vicky Willis David Loughlin Lloyd Harris / Mike Massey Vaughan Judkins Cameron Clow Nathan Livingstone Chris Piggott Blake Finegan Shane Kelly Michael Kramer Adrian Davis Ian Scott Bill Hayes Anton Wesselink Pierre Chemaly Andrew Ross Rosemary Parkin Vaun O’Callaghan Mike Sage Name Greg Fournier Stephen Ng Anne Mortimer Phil Ison Simon Bush Iain McIntyre Chris Humble Bruce Robinson Dave Crofts Warren Smith Bryan Hodkinson David Hodkinson Steve Oosterdijk Judine Fitness Steve Tarrant Ross MacKenzie / Ron Oosterdijk Guy Folster / Neil Watson Miles Regal Luuk Van Basten-Batenburg Craig Brighouse Andrew Tucker Dave Sherwood Luke Marchant Greg Hall David Williams John Quirk Rod Griffith Darren Steel Rachel Ball Brendon Waddy Richard Matthews Al Rose Steve Horne Karl Tucker David Maidment Eddie Harris Norm Crummer Craig Greenwood Louise Mark Christopher Tse Rosemary Davis Andrew Wilson Lyndell McGregor Graeme White Dennis Dickey Craig Rawlinson Josh Donnell Sue Lancaster Kevin O’Donnell Paul Smith Denis Railey Mark Thomson Urban Camenzimb Gavin Palmer Bryan Tourell Sam Sherrard Ian Johnston / Julie McCullough Jane Sherrard Paul Neave Mark Moores Teresa Carroll Cameron Mumby Pam Morris Brendan Hartigan Joanna Perry Bronnie Van Lith Cornelius Boerjan Neil Tonks Fraser Buchanan Richard Walker

Cat OM VM VM VM OM OM OM OM VM OM OM JM VM OM VM OM VM OM VM OM VM OM VM OM MXII VM JM VM OM OM OM VM MM JM VM VM VXT VM SK II OM OM VM VM VM VM JM VM VM MM OM VM VM OW VM VM Cat VM VM VW VM OM VM VM VM OM OM VM OM VM OW VM VM VM OM VM OM VM MM VM VM VM VM VM VM OW OM OM VM VM JM VM MM VM OM OW OM VW VM OW VM MM OM OM MW VM OM VM OM VM OM MM OM MXII OW VM VM OW OM VW VM VW OW VM VM VM VM

Boat Double Ski V10L Epic V10L Advantage UFO Ski Mako 6 Duet JKK UFO QK Ultimate Fenn Mako K1 Fenn JKK UFO Duet Insomniac F1 K2 K1 Fenn Evo Edge Fenn Mako 6 Fenn Total Eclipse Double Ski Gladiator ski Maximus Swallow AM Pinnacle Seahawk Outrigger OC1 Fenn ski Brainwave Saracen Ultra Fenn Mako 6 Insomniac Fenn Mako 6 Mirage 730 Double Opus Wildabout Ghost UFO Fenn XT Total Eclipse OC1 Firebolt UFO Swallow Maximus Opus Ski Spectrum UFO OC1 Firebolt Boat Eclipse Eclipse Arrow Rebel Vok 20 Ski UFO Mirage Opus Ski Total Eclipse Fenn Mako XT Beachcomber Opus Total Eclipse Duet Packhorse 1:58:42 Tomahawk Scout Opus Swallow Gladiator Sisson Espirt Swallow Ski Evo Classic Old one Opus Swallow Wildabout Ghost Gladiator EcoBezhig Ranger Cutlass Saracen X Cobra Eliminator Saracen X Gladiator Opus VOK Sprinter Arrow Hurricane Mk2 Opus Seabear Tui Swallow EcoBezhig Trident Breaksea Penguin Sequel Razor Billed Auk Barracuda Mirage 580 Tribear Gladiator 2:05:54 Ocean Eclipse Swallow Eclipse Eclipse U2 Tribear Penguin Ski XT Eco Bezig Penguin Squall Sonic X-Factor

Time 1:32:32 1:33:16 1:35:55 1:37:35 1:39:22 1:40:38 1:40:39 1:41:43 1:42:29 1:42:30 1:42:41 1:42:45 1:42:47 1:43:37 1:43:45 1:45:14 1:45:38 1:46:00 1:46:05 1:46:09 1:46:51 1:47:19 1:47:51 1:47:57 1:48:18 1:48:52 1:48:58 1:49:07 1:49:21 1:49:23 1:49:29 1:49:42 1:49:50 1:50:04 1:50:06 1:50:08 1:50:52 1:51:31 1:51:39 1:52:08 1:52:22 1:52:24 1:52:44 1:52:50 1:53:31 1:53:55 1:53:58 1:54:01 1:54:31 1:54:36 1:54:42 1:54:58 1:55:14 1:55:15 1:55:35 Time 1:56:05 1:56:13 1:56:14 1:56:28 1:56:33 1:56:34 1:56:56 1:56:58 1:57:25 1:57:29 1:58:03 1:58:05 1:58:08 1:58:15 1:58:29 1:58:35 1:58:41 73 1:58:45 1:58:47 1:58:56 1:59:18 1:59:18 1:59:29 1:59:36 1:59:42 1:59:44 1:59:49 2:00:00 2:00:05 2:00:06 2:00:09 2:00:20 2:00:31 2:00:47 2:01:14 2:01:28 2:01:30 2:01:43 2:02:00 2:02:03 2:02:17 2:02:55 2:03:07 2:03:10 2:03:16 2:03:35 2:03:54 2:04:03 2:04:28 2:04:38 2:04:54 2:04:58 2:05:30 2:05:38 2:05:44 112= 2:05:54 2:05:59 2:06:05 2:06:05 2:06:08 2:06:23 2:06:28 2:06:44 2:06:47 2:07:00 2:07:01 2:07:07 2:07:16

Pl 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 Pl 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 74 75 76 77= 77= 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112= 114 115= 115= 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125


Cambridge to Hamilton Kayak Race 23km - 6/05/2007

RESULTS No. 11 234 243 147 13 275 106 323 116 124 129 171 135 133 143 107 23 266 27 178 131 8 146 174 132 280 30 252 257 240 307 244 289 90 264 138 64 212 219 120 57 227 192 291 218 184 65 180 235 185 16 7 340 66 205 110 73 119 193 52 169 162 183 161 130 22 4 202 98 301 196 228 308 211 153 194 226 206 251 245 215 76 175 315 137 232 121 159 71 134 271 109 58 69 224 164 297 261 125 88 295 80 186 293 55 309 262 189 269 207 213 191 229 210 187 188 279 267 281 34

Class SK Ski SK-P SK-P SK-P MS SK-P Touring SK MS SK-P Touring SK-P SK-P SKII-P SK-P MS MS SK-P SOTop SK-P SK SK-P SK-P SK-P SKII SK-P SK SK SKII OC1 SK-P SK-P MS MS SK-P SK-P SK-P Canoe SK-P SK-P SK-P SK-P SK SK-P MS MS SK-P SK-P SK-P MS SK SK-P MS SK-P SK-P MS SK SK-P SK-P SK-P MS SK MS SK-P SK-P SK SK-P SK-P SK-P SK-P SK-P SK-P SK-P SOTop MS SK-P SK-P SK SKII-P SOTop SK-P SOTop SK-P SK SK-P SK-P SK-P SOTop Canoe MS SK-P Touring SK-P SK-P SK-P SK-P SK SK-P SK-P SK-P SOTop SK-P SK-P SK-P SK-P SK-P SK-P SK-P SK-P SK-P SK-P SK-P SK-P Touring Touring SK-P SK-P SK-P MS

Class Pl 9 26 10 11 12 63 13 2 10 64 14 3 15 16 1 17 65 66 18 2 19 11 20 21 22 4 23 12 13 5 5 24 25 67 68 26 27 28 1 29 30 31 32 14 33 69 70 34 35 36 71 15 37 72 38 39 73 16 40 41 42 74 17 75 43 44 18 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 3 76 52 53 19 2 4 54 5 55 20 56 57 58 6 2 77 59 4 60 61 62 63 21 64 65= 65= 7 67= 67= 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 5 6 79 80 81

Name Grant Millar Pip McKay Philip Maree Malcolm Dunning Ron Pinkham Ian McCrae Ian Cheesman Gary Allis Greg Tucker Lee Laughton Nigel Donnell Alan Taylor Russel Troy John Hesseling Daniel Van Lith / Peter Van Lith / Ariana Van Lit Peter Wolfkamp Ian Hintz Sally Roberts Paul Stephens Stu Golding Karen Budd Jef Wright Murray Nicholson Robbie Assink Mike Hesseling Peter Brock / Chauncen Brock Richard Saysell Lance Smith Charles Barker Eddie Hughes / Ted Hughes Myles McInnes Bren Dorman Phil Goldsmith Katalla Kramer Sean Peake Dean Burns Sue Wood Russell Williams Marcel Bogers / Bradley Harden Paddy Matthews Brad Sayer Jamie Bridger Piet Strulik Tony Barrett Roy Breeze Karel Kuper Dianne Kowalewski Barry Waters Kit Gordon Karl Brown Andrew Gordon Hilton Hopkins Tony King Keith Goodwin Philip Stretton Hennie Roux Valerie Henderson Des Matthews Colin McGrath Mark Robbins Bevan Marquand Phyllis Sneddon Ian Calhaem Jim Sneddon Graeme Cleaver Scott Walters Simon Hatcher Hugh Tomlinson Rod Waugh Norman Thomson Ross Percy Kylie Bridger Matt Russell Larraine Williams Todd Fisher / Dean Fisher Scott McGrath Ross Whale Philip Tavener Damien Gardiner Glenis O’Donnell / Alison Quirk Mark Williams Peter Beadle Adrian Edge Georgina Greville Val Wallace Keith Pyle Lin Anderson Joanna Greig Ian Willers Jane Faulkner / Keith Hill David Hedley Dianne Scoones Derek Hosie Bridgit Bretherton-Jones Jeannine Wardley Mike Lipscombe Warren Strand Chris La Pine Harvey Indyk Jenenne Kramer Brett Kirkland Mani Pereira / Matthew Esdale Uri Schlafrig Greta Halberg Pauline Herbst Laura Russell Joshua La Pine Mary Modrich Nicky Lowrie Jackie Evans Greg Evans Pamela Strong Christine Fryer Olga Thijsse Lynne Puckrin Jim Guthrie Nancy Auty Merle Ward Diana Emmerson Catherine Maidment

Cat VM OW VM VM MM VM VM VM VM VM VM VM VM VM OM VM VM OW VM VM VW VM VM VM VM VM MM VM MM JM OM VM VM JW JM VM VW VM VM VM VM JM OM VM VM VM VW MM VM VM VM VM VM VM OM VM OW VM VM VM OM MM MM MM VM OM VM VM MM VM MM JW OM VW OM JM MM VM VM VW OM MM OM VW VW MM MW VW VM VX VM VW VM OW VW MM VM VM VM VM VM OM OM VW OW VW JM VW VW VW OM VW VW OW VW VM VW MM VW JW

Boat Raider X Ski Squall Contour Tasman Express Supernova 2:08:18 Ranger Challenge 5 Arrow EcoBezhig Ranger Beachcomber Mirage 580 Eco Niizh EcoBezhig Supernova Swallow Eco Bezig Scupper Pro Tasman Express Albatross Shearwater Mirage 580 EcoBezhig Dobbe Tuart Shearwater Sea Bear Challenge 5 Packhorse OC1 EcoBezhig Kyook Swallow Swallow Storm Contour Sequel Allagash Storm Beachcomber Puffin Tasman Express Euro X Penguin Tribear Tribear Tasman Express EcoBezhig Penguin Tribear Tasman Express Beachcomber Tribear Penguin Sequel Esprit Sisson Euro X Penguin Storm Penguin Swallow 2:19:22 Swallow Sequel Eco Bezig Seabear Sequel Puffin Shearwater Storm Shearwater Caffyn Express Sequel 2:25:01 Sprinter Sequel Eco Bezhig Tasman Express Eco Niizh Viking Esprit Sequel Scambler Shearwater Euro X Shearwater 2:29:59 Penguin Prowler 13 17’ Canoe Swallow Penguin Ranger Sequel or Storm Penguin Penguin Tasman Express Selkie Sequel Tour Yak Sequel Cabo Sequel Sequel Breeze Breeze Storm Sequel Squall 2:52:26 2:52:30 Pacifica Sequel Sequel Acadia Acadia Tasman Express Sequel Sequel Eclipse

Time 2:07:30 2:07:38 2:07:39 2:07:45 2:07:58 2:08:03 132= 2:08:18 2:08:24 2:08:27 2:08:41 2:09:07 2:09:20 2:09:40 2:09:40 2:09:46 2:09:58 2:10:01 2:10:02 2:10:26 2:10:45 2:10:52 2:11:05 2:11:16 2:11:24 2:11:41 2:11:51 2:12:40 2:12:45 2:12:47 2:12:49 2:13:18 2:13:59 2:14:19 2:14:21 2:14:42 2:14:46 2:14:52 2:15:18 2:15:21 2:15:35 2:15:39 2:15:41 2:15:54 2:16:05 2:16:10 2:16:22 2:16:48 2:16:53 2:16:56 2:17:16 2:17:17 2:17:21 2:17:40 2:17:46 2:17:49 2:17:56 2:18:03 2:18:20 2:18:50 2:19:01 2:19:08 188 2:19:30 2:19:42 2:20:00 2:20:03 2:22:31 2:22:43 2:22:46 2:23:47 2:23:59 2:24:13 2:24:29 200 2:25:04 2:25:57 2:26:17 2:26:23 2:27:27 2:27:38 2:28:25 2:28:27 2:29:04 2:29:14 2:29:29 212 2:30:19 2:30:26 2:32:59 2:33:25 2:33:58 2:34:11 2:34:12 2:35:03 2:37:45 2:39:05 2:39:53 2:40:27 2:41:38 2:41:38 2:42:23 2:42:45 2:42:45 2:43:54 2:43:58 2:44:53 2:48:13 2:52:16 235 236 2:53:54 2:53:57 2:54:31 2:58:41 2:58:46 3:00:15 3:08:48 3:17:46 DNS

Pl 126 127 128 129 130 131 132= 134 135 136 137 138 139= 139= 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225= 225= 227 228= 228= 230 231 232 233 234 237 238 239 240 241 242 243 244

Results by Solex Systems Ltd. PO Box 15 1031, New Lynn, Auckland 1007, Ph 021 648 085

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Remembering the Whanganui River by Larraine Williams The Yakity Yak Club’s annual adventure down the Whanganui River from Ohinepani was a trip to remember.

We gave the ‘Brown Squirrel’ Haka farewell to Maoristudentswemet.Theywatched,astonished, beforebreakingoutinlaughterwhenwe‘wagged our bushy tails’ at them.

Around a camp fire, under a perfect star-filled sky -Martynstrummedontheguitar;Harveydrummed with great style on the cargo barrel; Mary & Jude banging 2 rocks together (named thereafterThe Rocketts);HughshakingthehalffilledPringlescan; weplayedthespoons;andbangedanythingelseto make a noise - singing our hearts out and making great music! Well, enthusiastic music, anyway.

Doesanyonewanttotrytoclaimsalvagerightson acarbon-fibrepaddle?Gregorcantellyouexactly where to find one - however, it is underwater jammed in the rocks. Good luck.

Welistenedenrapturedtotheadventuresof‘Flick the Little Fire Engine’by Pete, the chorus gustily sung by the rest of us; and ‘Bad Jelly the Witch’. Wecontributedthesoundeffects,withadditional guitarmusic.TouristsfromGermanyandHolland didn’t quite know what to make of us. How many professionals does it take to mend a guitar?Three - a surgeon, Jane, to do the primary examination; knot-tying by Sue a tennis racquet specialist; and Harvey a classical guitarist to tune it.Unfortunatelydespiteextensivesurgery,Martyn just had to play with 5 strings. I don’t think the rest of us really noticed.

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Hugh, now officially known as‘Tippy’because a large bag of potatoes loaded into the end of his kayak destabilized him so much he fell out 3 times in one morning. Once the problem was identified he was fine, but the name stuck. It was so cold on the last morning that we dipped our hands in the 12 degree water to warm them up. We know it was 12 degrees because Nick had a thermometer with him - only a man who takes Petanque on a kayak trip would have a thermometer. ThestandingwaveatAutaputerrifiedandthrilled us. It completely hid a 5.5m kayak as it plunged through.Whenapaddlerstayedupright,everyone cheered,otherwiserescuersdashedintoaction.At times3-4rescuesgoingonatatime.Thiswavetook out 30% of the group!


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After surviving Autapu, Martyn and Mary turned theircanoeintoasubmarine-theywerestillsitting in it, paddling, but it was completely submerged. And the food - what can I say? Roast chicken; chocolateandbananafritters;cheesescones-how is it possible to cook such things over a fire? Come along next year and find out.You’ll see the world through different eyes - and in six wonderful days cover over 120km and nearly 150 rapids. Many thanks to Pete, who outdid himself. He organized everything; was always teaching and guiding us; and feeding and caring for us with boundless energy and humour.

Kiwi Association of Sea Kayakers N.Z. Inc. (KASK) KASK is a network of sea kayakers throughout New Zealand KASK publishes a 200 page sea kayaking handbook which is free to new members: the handbook contains all you need to know about sea kayaking: techniques and skills, resources, equipment, places to go etc. KASK publishes a bi-monthly newsletter containing trip reports, events, book reviews, technique/equipment reviews and a ‘bugger’ file. KASK holds national sea kayaking forums.

Website: www.kask.co.nz Annual subscription is $35.00.

Kask PO Box 23, Runanga 7841, West Coast

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Sea-kayak Fiji’s wild side: Kadavu Island Each day of the week a 45-minute flight connects Fiji’s Nadi International Airport with remote Kadavu Island. Once there, travellers find an environment quite unlike most other tourist destinations throughout the Pacific. Nolargeresorts,golfcourses,restaurantsornightclubs;nojetskisorbusyboat

lanes; no large towns or paved roads; not even a single swimming pool! What Kadavu Island offers is simple, natural Pacific beauty. Kadavu(pronounced:Kan-da-vu)issurroundedbytheGreatAstrolabeReef, oneofthelargestcoralreefsintheworld.Withinthereefliemanyuninhabited islets, lagoons, bays and beaches. The main island is mountainous, and still with 75% of the original rainforest cover intact. A small number of eco-lodges and dive resortsprovideaccommodationandscubadivingpackagesfortravellersfromaround the world. It’s in this pristine environment that New Zealand adventure travel company Tamarillo Tropical Expeditions leads sea-kayaking tours. Expedition options range from leisurely 5-day resort-toresort adventures, to challenging 10-day circumnavigations of the entire island. As well as sea-kayaking,TamarilloTropical Expeditions include snorkelling in marine reserves,visitsandovernightstaysinsmall resorts and traditional villages, treks to waterfallswithintherainforest,andtimeto relax on quiet, undeveloped beaches. A short movie outlining the expeditions can be viewed at: www.tamarillo.co.nz/fiji <http://www.tamarillo.co.nz/fiji> For full details see: www.tamarillo.co.nz

Grade Two River Certificates Ask anybody who has competed in a multisport race and they will say

One or two weekends training Is just NOT ENOUGH!!! We believe our comprehensive Grade 2 Training & Certification is the best you can get. To gain the skills to confidently paddle on white water, you need at least 3 weekends on the water with an instructor.

PHONE NOW0508 5292569 OR CALL IN TO YOUR LOCAL CANOE & KAYAK CENTRE FOR MORE DETAILS AND COURSE DATES

2007 Multisport Package $895 includes instruction and accommodation in Taupo

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Answers 1

Of course not. You may hole it.

2

ThePaddle.Itshowsthepositionofthepaddleinrelationtoyour hands.

3

Plastic, fibreglass, carbon, alloy or wood.

4

Of course not. Again, you may hole it.

5

Yes, by spreading the load around the hull. If you can position them on a bulkhead, all the better.

6

Always wear your BA. Nuff said!

7

No.Notunlessyouhavetheexperienceandextrasafetymeasures in place.

8

Definitely yes.

9

ThispreventstheBAfromslippingoveryourheadwhilstyouare in the kayak. You must ensure your BA fits you well.

10 Clip it onto your deck lines, especially in surf (Ay Tony!) 11 The Stern Rudder. Get your rudder up so you don’t break it! It’ll be out of the water half the time anyway. 12 A Buoyancy Aid will not support your head while you are in the water,asithasno‘neckpiece’.Otherwisetheyarethesame.ABA is more suitable because it is less restrictive, and shorter, better for sitting in/on your kayak.

ANZAC Day exploration Peter and Bronnie van Lith of New Plymouth Canoe & Kayak have a great view of the North Taranaki coast from their Waitara home. And the sight of the Ensco-56 off-shore drilling platform, which is developing the Pohokura gas field off NorthTaranaki, was always going to be a huge temptation. So, it had to be done.

on its spindly legs. But an hour and a half later we were greeted by the crew of the tender vessel the Pacific Runner and cheers from crew high up on the rig. Itwasanawesomesighttoseesuchahugestructureperchedaboveus.There wasalsoavoicefromaboveboomingoveraloudspeakertoreminduswehad drifted within the 500 metre restricted zone around the platform.

ANZAC Day 2007 brought perfect conditions. A group of twelve clubbies headedoutfromtheWaitaraRivermouthtotacklethe20kilometreroundtrip. Whenwesetofftherigappearedtobestandingupfrombeyondthehorizon

ThewestcoastoffTaranakimayhaveareputationforroughconditionsattimes, but there’s still plenty of good paddling if you pick your days. And where else in the world can you take a leisurely paddle to an off-shore oil rig!

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Kayak fishing classic The weather was going to be a cracker for the comp and many yak fishers entered in the last week. Friday nights registration brought the total number to about 65. Waiting for the briefing, teams were formed with false information leaked to put possible followers off the trail. I fed data into the computer and ran tests to ensure success at the first weigh in, hit the sack at 12.30am. I was up again at 3.00. Our leaving time had been brought forward an hour to 4.00 am as a few yak fishers were hot on the trail of our spot. Others took a more laid back approach and arose at 10.00 am (probablyduetothefactthatthepreviousnighthadbeenspenttestingbeer to confirm that all glasses tasted the same). My team arrived atWC (White Cliffs) at about 4.45 am and paddled for about 1/2 an hour with head lights creating a halo around each yak. We discussed “where the f@#k are we”and a team name change to“The Fucarwee Tribe”. WondaboyassuredusthatwewereonthecorrectcourseaccordingtotheGPS. “Just head for that star”.“Do you mean the one that’s moving?”I exclaimed. My eyesight is not exactly 20/20. Even with a head light, I couldn’t see much past the end of my yak so the only way that I was going to find the target buoy was to hit it. Theshoutwentout“it’soverthere”.Shortlyafterwardsanchorsweredropped andandtheday’sfishingbegan.Themorningprovedtobebounteous.Team Naki binned snapper up to 15lb with gurnard and kahawai thrown in. We packed up at 1.00 pm to set up the computer for the weigh in. We reached the beach only moments before theTaranakiTerrors.The show and tell began and even though the Terrors were, as some considered,

the best dressed, Team Naki brought home the bacon and took out the bragging rights. Thescalesclockedourbiggestsnapperat7.22kg,followedbya6.745kg.2nd& 3rd behind a 7.57kg snaps landed by Aaron Farley of the BBK local team. TeamNakitoppedtheteamsleaderboard,theTaranakiTerrorstrailedby100 points closely followed by the Naki Boys. A total of 162 fish were weighed in on the first day, with kingis and john dory being the only absent species. Most anglers had a beer in their hand, a smile on their face and a story to tell, secretively planning their next day’s adventure. We enjoyed a succulent roast pork buffet meal followed by a well narrated andillustratedpresentationbyMarkJonesoftheAdventurePhilosophyteam on circumnavigating South Georgia Island. Thanks very much to Peter and Bronnie from Canoe & Kayak for organizing this and for their sponsorship of the event. I hit the sack again at 12.30, and wakened when the alarm radio burst into life at 3.00 am. We adopted the same routine as the previous day, however the paddle out was much quieter and less enthusiastic. The fishing was slower and pannies the order of the day. Squid played with our baits as they sank to the depths, I was reeling in a pannie snap, when a squid shot up from the deep and grabbed my fish. Reeling in slowly, I grabbed the squid and threw it my bin. The squid, once the predator, was now in the bin to be used for snapper bait.The news had got out about our spot and another 5 yaks joined us, including ¾ of the Taranaki Terrors. A fizz boat screamed in and tied up to the buoy just metres in front of Wondaboy. Under a hail of abuse from the surrounding yakers.The boaties sent line after line to the depths and shortly showed the results of their catch, Adams anchor!

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ANubeewithhisnewMarauderpaddledinfromfurtherout.Withrodssticking out in all directions and a vibrant green flag flying at the back; it appeared to be a float from the last Mardi Gras Parade. A commotion stirred behind me and I reeled to see Dogfish going head to head with a Mollymawk in a fight for his stray line. At One o’clock I headed in with a lesser catch than the previous day; some pannie snaps, a kahawai or two and some gurnard. I weighed my fish and punched data into the computer.The crowd became noiseywhenAndrewWrightfromTeamBucketslappeda12.88kgsnapperon the scales, “what a monster”. Stephen Tapp also came in with a smile on his face. He had landed a 6kg albacore tuna, a personal first . Well done!!! Fishermen grilled their day’s catch on a barbecue supplied by Butlers Bar & Cafe. Withbelliesfulltheprizegivingcommenced.RodneyLangtontooktheearly bird prize, the Cobra Marauder went to Andre van der Eist (wookie); biggest snapperat12.88kgtoAndrewWright(joe90);johndoryat1.56kgtoJasonBond; trevallyat2.91kgtoRogerWitts;gurnardat1.03kgtoDerekMeyer;bluecodat 1.21kgtoSteveMcEwen&kahawaiat2.65kgtoDavidLeatherby.Nokingfish waslanded.Oh,andyesTeamNakitookouttheteam’seventwith2025points, one very small snapper ahead of theTaranakiTerrors. Many spot prizes were received before tired and weary anglers headed for a well earned sleep. Many thanks to all who participated and to all who helped, and a special thanks to all our sponsors. Peter Florence (Naki Man)

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Products available in store or order at MICRO DRY STUFF SACKS We’ve tested these little beauties in the field! Used to protect our mobile phones, we’ve put them in our B/A pockets and gone paddling! We’re talking rolling and surfing. The three roll closure system is more than the labelled splash poof. Constructed in 70D Hex rip stop nylon, they’ve proved to behardwearingandreliable.Withtheclearwindowonthefront, you can easily operate your MP3, phone or digital camera. At $29.90, a great phone bag at a great price.

OPTI DRY BAGS Tired of looking for gear in one of six black dry bags.The Opti Dry Stuff Sack is super tough and super clear. Made of heavy duty clear vinyl with an abrasion resistantbottom.Youcanseewhatyou’relooking for! Alsousedbythefishingfraternityasawaterproof cover for those vulnerable electronics. Put it over your fish-finder. Clearly a bargain at these prices.

DECK BAGS You can never have too much storage! Just the place to stow the camera for quick and easy access for that elusive shot. With a high profile, there is plenty of room for all the other stuff you may need at hand. Adjustable straps give complete flexibilityformountingthisbagonyour kayak. And there are even more straps on top to allow storage of more gear. Made of heavy duty vinyl, this bag will stand up to even the roughest treatment. Only $149.00

THIS IS THE SEA 3 ‘This is the sea 3’ is a DVD made by sea kayakers, for sea kayakers. Presented by Lendal. Starring our very own Steve Knowles, surfing at the Mount. Followotherpaddlersaroundtheworldforsomeofthebestfootageof kayakingI’veseen.Theperfectwatchforthosecomingcoldwetwinter Sundays. Over 2 hours of footage. Just $49.95 Available in store, or order by e-mail. info@canoeandkayak.co.nz.

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10 litre $29.90 / 21 litre $34.90 / 41 litre $44.90


info@canoeandkayak.co.nz GUIDE BOOKS NEW ZEALAND WHITE WATER New Zealand White Water – Revised Edition Thelongawaitedwhitewaterbible.Thisupdatedversionhasmany of the best river runs throughout New Zealand. With descriptions of each run and their grade. Don’t leave home without it. $34.99 UPPER NORTH ISLAND / SOUTH ISLAND Upper North Island / South Island Tick your trip off in one of these two books, as you work your way around the country. Theseexcellentguidesgiveyoudetailsonmostofthetripsavailable inthespecifiedarea,manyofwhich,youmaynothavethoughtof.A great accessory for theYakityYak Club trip. If you’ve not been there before, read about it and go with someone who has. Great books for planning and dreaming. Upper North Island $35.00 / South Island $29.99 SEAMANSHIP FOR KAYAKERS Seamanship for Kayakers – Getting Started ThisisthefirstinaseriesofseamanshipvideostobehostedbyJohn Dowd.Thisonefollowstheprogressofagroupofbeginnerpaddlers on their first kayak trip as well as a skilled but motley crew headed for a spot of trouble. The video outlines the skills & knowledge neededforsafekayakingonthesea.Boat-handling&recoveryskills arecoveredwithspecialemphasisontheimportanceofnavigation, oceanography,weather&coastal-campingsavvy,allofwhichwillbe subjects of later, in-depth videos. Your host is John Dowd, author of Sea Kayaking -- A Manual for Long-distance Touring and the founding editor of Sea Kayaker Magazine.Thisisanintroductoryvideofilledwithinformation,shot in a viewer-friendly style and based loosely upon the leadership program developed in British Columbia by seasoned instructors John Dawson & Dan Lewis. Length: 60 Minutes

$49.90

Seamanship for Kayakers – Navigation This is the second video in the series hosted by John Dowd, this one introduces the essence of practical navigation for kayakers. Emphasizing sound judgment, it includes kayak-specific piloting techniques,understandingcharts,navigationalequipment,basic compasswork,navigatinginreducedvisibility,openwatercrossings, &compensationforwind,current&tides.Alsocovered:rules“ofthe road,” GPS use & misuse, & night navigation. YourhostisJohnDowd,authorofSeaKayaking--AManualforLongdistanceTouringandthefoundingeditorofSeaKayakerMagazine. BasedonprogramsdevelopedbyJohnDawsonandDanLewis.Kayak-specificpilotingtechniques, understandingcharts,navigationalequipmentbasiccompasswork,crossings,reducedvisibility, wind, current and tides, etc. Length: 60 Minutes

$49.90

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Product release PRORACK CRADLES An exciting new upgrade to the already popular Kayak Cradle from Prorack. This cradle has always been popular for the acute angles available to suit even the narrowest multisport boat.The flexible rubber pads mould to the shape of your hull to cradle your kayak perfectly. Thepivotingheadsallowevenpressuredistributionacrossthesurfaceofthepad. In addition, the cradle pad flips over for easy side loading. Thenewcradleisnowdesignedtofitthestandard25x20mmbarandcanbeslid into the ‘T’ groove in most aerofoil bars. If you have that‘odd ball’roof rack – Prorack have come up with a set of extra fittings to allow fitting to almost any roof rack. Tie down points are incorporated into the base of the cradle.Tie down straps that incorporate a cam-lock buckle for speedy tightening, are also included in this kit. Tough and built to last, these cradles are the ultimate solution for transporting your kayak. Designed in New Zealand to fit New Zealand spec’d cars.

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KOKATAT GORETEX WAVE DRYTOP GORE-TEX® WAVE DRY TOP This is the dry top of choice for kayakers aroundtheworldlookingforarticulatedcomfort,long-termdurability and performance. Made of Evolution 3.21 oz. nylon 3-layer GORE-TEX® laminate fabric; adjustable neoprene over-cuffsandcollarprotectthegaskets fromabrasionandUVexposure.Factory sealed seams and latex neck and wrist gaskets provide the most watertight seal available. The neoprene overskirt can be mated with a spray skirt or our Whirlpool Bib. Evolution 3.21 oz. nylon 3-layer GORE-TEX® laminate 6”Smoothskin neoprene overskirt with adjustable“hook & loop” closure GORE-TEX® XCR® inner skirt Latex neck and wrist gaskets with protective over-cuffs and collar Self-draining, zippered chest pocket with key lanyard Factory sealed seams MATERIAL GORE-TEX® IMMERSION® SIZES UNISEX S-XXL COLOUR: RADISH

DAY TWO BUOYANCY AIDS These tried and tested kayaking vests have now been given the seal of approval. LatelastyeartheDayTworangeofBuoyancyAidsreceivedNewZealand Certification.Thisproveswhatwealreadynew.Theyareproducedtoa very high standard and will do the job they are designed to do. The Kiwitea is the entry level B/A. One size fits all and is remarkably comfortable.Itcomeswithahandypocketonthefrontandareflective strip on the back for added safety. Clips on one side allow easy fitting. DayTwo’s cruising/ racing B/A is theTri/Sea.This has 3 pockets on the front (one with a handy clip for those keys) and a pouch on the back for that all important hydro bladder. To make life easy, there is a zip on the front, so you don’t need to adjust the straps every time you put it on. Available in SM,M,L &XL All Day Two B/A’s available in Red, Yellow or Blue Kiwitea retail at $150.00 Tri/Sea retail at $229.50

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Canoe racing New Zealand Canoe racing

the two disciplines, but you generally start off in a wider style boat until you have established good balance and core stability and move onto thesleekerracingstyleboats,whichweighabout 12kg, for flatwater sprint.These sleek style racing boatsarealothardertobalanceandmostpeople spend a bit of time IN the water as opposed to ON it when they make that transition. However, a bit of practice and you’re away! Marathon paddlers also compete in these sleek racing style boats, in a lighter weight version, approximately 7kg. Surf skis are of course a different matter altogether. Yousitontopofthedeckasopposedtoinsidethe enclosed deck of the K1’s used in flatwater sprint and marathon. Surf skis are also a lot heavier than the other boats and are obviously designed for theocean,movingthroughwavesasopposedto across flat water.

Canoe Racing New Zealand (CRNZ) is a high performance,highachieving,highprofile,yettiny OlympicsportinNewZealand.Afewnamesmight ring a bell – Ian Ferguson, Paul McDonald, Alan Thompson,andperhapsmorerecentlyBenFouhy & Steven Ferguson. Undoubtedly, New Zealand CanoeRacingathletesareperceivedbythegeneral public as high achievers, but few would know the behind the scenes of the sport – the what, where and how that makes Canoe Racing one of New Zealand’s most up and coming sports.

The History Since Munich in 1972, New Zealand has had 19 Flatwater Sprint Kayakers compete at Olympic Games. Added to that impressive record there have been at least 5World Champions. For such a small sport this is remarkable.

Where should you start, you say?

The Sport, Its Athletes & Competition

Flatwater sprint kayaking is the one to go for if you’re after an Olympic medal; Marathon is a good option if you’re after an endurance version of the sport and often works well with Multisport disciplines. Surf ski paddling is ideal for those of you who love the ocean and prefer a different kind of challenge. There are both short distance andlongdistanceoptionsinsurfskicompetition. Most athletes in the sport, however, do a bit of everythingastheyarecomplimentarydisciplines. Once you’re into it, you will find many events throughout the year to take part in if you do a bit of everything…until such time of course that you’re Olympic orWorld Champion material and thenyouwillnodoubtpickoneandgohard!.Surf lifesaving clubs around the country are the best place to start if you think surfski is your thing.You cancontactSurfLifesavingNewZealandviatheir website www.surflifesaving.org.nz

Canoe Racing New Zealand represents the three flatwater canoe sports of flatwater sprint racing, marathonracing&surfskiracing.Thereisastrong cross-overfromsurflifesavingasafeedersportfor CanoeRacing,particularlyinthejuniorranks.CRNZ activelyrecruitspromisingsurflifesavingpaddlers to consider canoe racing as a winter option. Most ofthesports’eliteathleteshavecomethisway.Itis hardtogaugetheexactnumbersofathleteswithin thesportastherearealargenumberofmultisport and recreational paddlers over and above the competitive flatwater sprint, marathon and surf ski athletes. Many of the athletes compete across disciplines too, which makes their achievements allthemoreimpressive.Flatwatersprint,marathon and surfski do, however, all have New Zealand representative,selectedsquadswhocompeteboth nationallyandinternationallyeveryyear.Flatwater sprintracingandmarathonhaveannualNational Championships in March and April as well as a numberofregionalregattasscatteredthroughout thecalendaryear.Alldisciplineshaveathleteswho competeinTrans-TasmanRegattas,WorldCups& World Championships each year.

How do I get involved? No matter where you are in New Zealand you are definitely not too far from water, and where there is water, you can paddle! Essentially what you need is a boat, a paddle and a buoyancy aid. That’s the basics anyway. The type of paddling you want determines the boat and paddle you will need, but basically any boat and any paddle will do to start with! FlatwatersprintcompetesinK1(onepersonboat), K2 ( two person boat) and K4 (4 person boat) and marathonpredominantlycompetesinK1andK2. The actual style of boat is somewhat different for

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Photos by David Rowland of One-Image Photography The capacity to dream, the tenacity to achieve

AllCanoeRacingNewZealandmembercanoeand kayakclubsthroughoutthecountryhavecoaches and club members ready and willing to get you started in either flatwater sprint or marathon disciplines. Canoe Racing New Zealand is really keen to focus on the growth of the sport over the next few years and are particularly keen to get youngerathletesinvolved.Developmentevents such as Lake Pupuke in May and at the Blue Lakes in September, along with regular events such as the Blue Lake Regional Regattas in September, FlatwaterSprintNationalsinMarchandMarathon NationalsinAprileveryyearwouldbeagoodway toseethesport.Butforyoupersonally?Allittakes isgettingintouchwithyournearestclubandthey would have you up and paddling in no time! If this all sounds like it could just be you, then don’t hesitate to get in touch with Canoe Racing New Zealand via their email info@crnz.org.nz


CanoeRacingisestablishedinnearlyeveryregionacrossNewZealand through member clubs which include: CLUB REGION Arawa Canoe Club Christchurch Bay of Plenty Canoe Club Tauranga Hawkes Bay Kayak Racing Inc. Napier Karapiro Kayak Racing Cambridge Mana Kayak & Racing Club Wellington Marlborough Multisport Club Blenheim North Shore Canoe Club North Shore, Auckland Otago Canoe & Kayak Club Dunedin Palmerston North Canoe Club Palmerston North Poverty Bay Kayak Club Gisborne Takapuna Boating Club North Shore, Auckland Waikato Kayak Club Hamilton Waitemata Canoe & Multisport Club West Auckland Canoe Racing New Zealand Directory Canoe Racing New Zealand Po Box 36589 Northcote, Auckland Tel: 09 444 0708 Fax: 09 444 0716 Mobile: 021 2769 000 Email: info@crnz.org.nz Web: www.crnz.org.nz (currently seeking sponsor for development) CEO: TBC Chairman: Tim Jago (tim@crnz.org.nz) Commercial Manager: Kirsty Elmiger (kirsty@crnz.org.nz) Sport Manager: TBC Sports Administrator: Kirsty Elmiger (kirsty@crnz.org.nz) Flatwater Sprint Director: Alan Thompson (alan@crnz.org.nz) Marathon Director: Phil Exeter (phil@crnz.org.nz) Surf Ski Director: Darcy Price (darcy@crnz.org.nz)

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Directory: Things To Do

TAUPO Maori Carvings

Waikato River Discovery

Mohaka

Whanganui River Trips

Half day guided trip to the rock carvings, Lake Taupo... only accessible by boat.

2 hour guided kayak trip. Experience the magnificent upper reaches of the mighty Waikato River - soak in the geothermal hotsprings - take in the stunning environment... a perfect trip for all the family...

Needsomeexcitement?Takeakayakdown this wicked Grade II river run... this is a whole day of thrills and fantastic scenery down the Mohaka River.

Interested in a great adventure on this Magnificent River? Give us a call and we will give you a memory of a lifetime. Canoe & Kayak Taupo

$90 per person (bookings essential). Call freephone 0800 KAYAKN for details.

Price: $45 adult $25 children Special group and family rates. Call freephone 0800 KAYAKN for details.

Price: $125 per person. Call freephone 0800 KAYAKN for details. Phone: Taupo 07 378 1003, Hawke’s Bay 06 842 1305

TAUPO Accommodation

Waitara River Tours

Mokau River

Sugar Loaf Island

Accommodation available to Yakity Yak club members and their families... Ideal for sport and school groups... Situated on the banks of the Waikato River our Kayakers Lodge accommodates up to 12 people, is fully furnished, with plenty of parking and a quiet location.

Forthosewhoareslightlymoreadventurousat heart,thisisascenictripwiththeexcitementof grade two rapids. Midway down, we paddle under the historic Betran Rd Bridge where we will stop for a snack.

Enjoy this beautiful scenic river which winds through some of New Zealands lushest vegetation. Camping overnight and exploring some of New Zealands pioneering history. A true Kiwi experience.

Allow 2 hours paddle only. Priced at $50. Phone: 06 769 5506

Two day trips $230.00 or one day $80.00. Phone 06 769 5506

From Ngamutu Beach harbour we head out to the open sea to Nga Motu/Sugar Loaf Island Marine Reserve. View the Taranaki scenic, rugged coastline as we draw closer to the Sugar Loaf Islands. Enjoy the seal colony and experience the thrill of close up views of these fascinating marine mammals.

$25 per person per night. Phone: 0800 529256 for details

Hawkes Bay Harbour Cruise

Okura River Tours

Kayak Hire

A guided kayak trip round the safe waters of the Inner Harbour, while learning about the history of the area. During this stunning trip around the beautiful Napier Inner Harbour of Ahuriri, we stop to share a glass of fresh orange juice, local fruits and cheese platter.

Exploring Karepiro Bay and the Okura Marine Reserve. Enjoy this scenic trip with abundant wildlife and a stop at Dacre Cottage, the historic 1860 settlers’ house, which is only accessible by boat or a long walk.

Taupo - Open for the summer and by appointment. Long Bay, Auckland - by appointment only. Have some paddling fun on the beach or let us run a Tour for you and your friends and explore these beautiful areas.

All this for $40 per person. Phone 06 842 1305

Okura River Kayak Hire Company Phone: 0508 529 2569

Phone Canoe & Kayak on 0508 KAYAKNZ for details

Paddle to the Pub Kayaking to a local pub is a unique way of spendinganevening,bringingyourgroupof friendstogetherbycompletingafunactivity before dinner and making a memorable experience. These trips are available to Riverhead,BrownsBayandDevonportPubs. COST: $59.00 each • GROUP DISCOUNTS AVAILABLE!

Twilight Tours Departs from one of The East Coast Bays beautiful beaches. Enjoy the scenic trip with the sun setting over the cliff tops as you paddle along the coast line. Group discounts available!

Okura River Kayak Hire Company Phone: 0508 529 2569

Okura River Kayak Hire Company Phone: 0508 529 2569

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Price on application.

0800 529256

Allow 3 hours subject to weather. $55.00 per person. Phone 06 769 5506

New Zealand Kayaking Instructors Award Scheme Become a kayaking Instructor and Guide. Get into gear and get qualified! It’s fun and easy to do.

Don’t delay phone 0508 5292569 now

Customized Tours

Join the Yakity Yak Club

• Work Functions • Schools • Clubs • Tourist groups

Want to have fun, meet new people, have challenging and enjoyable trips, and learn new skills? PLUS get a regular email newsletter and this magazine! Also, get a discount on kayaking courses and purchases from Canoe & Kayak stores. Then, join us!

Whether it’s an afternoon amble, a full days frolic or a wicked weekend adventure we can take you there. If there’s somewhere you’d like to paddle we can provide you with experienced guides, local knowledge, safe up to date equipment and a lot of fun.

Contact your local store on 0508 KAYAKNZ

Phone Canoe & Kayak on 0508 KAYAKNZ to find out more


DISCOVER ANOTHER WORL ON DEV

NORTH

D ROA

S.H.1

15 Niven Street Unit 6, 631 Devon Road 77 Spa Road, Taupo Waiwhakaiho, New Plymouth Onekawa, Napier Telephone: 07 378 1003 Telephone: 06 769 5506 Telephone: 06 842 1305

502 Sandringham Rd Telephone: 09 815 2073 Arenel Ltd T/A Canoe & Kayak Auckland

Peter & Bronnie van Lith Trading as Canoe & Kayak Taranaki

Acme Kayaking Limited Trading as Canoe & Kayak Taupo

BRONCOS

Canoe & Kayak Limited Trading as Canoe & Kayak Hawke’s Bay

BAY OF PLENTY ROAD

SOUTHERN MOTORAWAY

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RD

GREAT SOUTH RD

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FIRST DRIVEWAY

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NORTH SHORE SILVERDALE MANUKAU NORTH

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TO TAURANGA BRIDGE

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MACDONALD

STREET

WIRI STATION ROAD

LIQUORLAND

HEWLETTS

ROAD

TARADALE ROAD

EET

LAKE TERRACE

NORTH

HAWKE’S BAY

RIVER

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SANDRINGHAM

WAIWHAKAIHO

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KFC

MAUNGANUI ROAD

3/5 Mac Donald Street Unit 2/20 Constellation Drive, 6 Tavern Road, Mount Maunganui (off Hewlett 710 Great South Road, Manukau (Off Ascension Place), Mairangi Bay, Silverdale 09 262 0209 Telephone: 07 574 7415 Auckland - Telephone: 09 479 Telephone: 1002 09 421 0662 Telephone: Canoe & Kayak Limited Jenanne Investment Limited Flood Howarth & Partners Limited Trading as Canoe & Kayak North Shore

WELLINGTON

KILLARNEY ROAD

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ATEA D RIVE

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KAHIKATEA DRIVE KA HIK NORTH

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DUKE STREET

JOIN THE

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DUKE STREET

Trading as Canoe & Kayak Manukau

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Canoe & Kayak Limited Trading as Canoe & Kayak Distribution

AG AN G

NGAUR The Corner Greenwood St 2 Centennial Highway, & Duke St, State Highway 1 bypass Ngauranga, Wellington PHONE YOUR NEAREST Hamilton Telephone: 04 477 6911 Telephone: 07 847 5565 CANOE & KAYAK CENTRE J & M Downey Limited On Water Adventures Limited

Trading as Canoe & Kayak Waikato

Trading as Canoe & Kayak Bay of Plenty

Easy finance available Conditions and booking fee apply

Trading as Canoe & Kayak Wellington

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