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75th Issue

Summer is here Destination Russell

Kayak Fishing How to Catch Kingfish Proudly supported by:

Celebrating our 75th issue Articles From the Archives


Proud Sponsors of the


YAKIMA AD

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Issue 75

Christmas 2014

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Contents

Loads on roof racks Changes to Tide Tables & Coastguard App Trip Card - Raglan Harbour Trip Card - Red Beach to Army Bay

24 39 42 43

Health Get Your Summer Body Back

40

Canoe Polo Fourth Place for the NZ Women’s Paddle Ferns 22

Puzzles Soduku Quick Crossword Puzzle Solutions

41 41 46

White Water Freestyle in Canada

47

First Aid Jelly Fish And Kayaking

30

Multisport Fast lines for River Racing - from the archive To Wing or not to Wing - from the archive

32 33

Bush Craft A Beach a Week Adapt, Improvise and Overcome

28 34

Technical Cool Strokes - from the archive Jeff Allen Master Classes T Rescue - from the archive

12 14 14

Kayaks & Product Barracuda Interface Icom VHF/ Starport Drink Holder Kayak listings

36 38 44

Sea Kayaking Choice: Russell Yakity Yak Update

6 10

Fishing Kayak Kings

16

The Auckland Awesome Serve Awards www.awesomeservice.co.nz Congratulations Russell Williams! Russell Williams from the Roof Rack Centre in Sandringham is this month's Auckland Awesome Service Award winner. He was nominated by happy customer Sarah Jack: "The service we have had from Russell and his staff at the Roof Rack Centre is superb. Late last year we wanted roof rails and a roof box as our car wasn't large enough for the holiday paraphernalia of a small family. Russell was incredibly knowledgeable about the various products on the market and helped us decide on the best solutions for our needs.

He made the whole process very straightforward, ordered the stock he didn't have on hand to come in within a couple of days and spent time fitting the products to the car and giving us a lesson in how to use them. The prices were also very competitive. A year later, we got a new car and the roof rails no longer fitted. I went into the Roof Rack Centre fully expecting to have to buy new rails, but hoping that they might have a second hand market for our old ones to help keep the cost down. Their service completely exceeded my expectations when they not only exchanged our rails for a trade-in set that fitted our new car, but also spent a good half hour fitting the replacement rails - all at absolutely no cost. The service provided by Russell and his team is nothing short of excellent". Congratulations Russell Williams - Auckland Roof Rack Centre!


Editorial

Issue 75 End of another year, and would the wind stop blowing so hard!

EDITOR: Peter Townend Ph: 0274 529 255 Email: pete@canoeandkayak.co.nz PUBLISHER: New Zealand Kayak Magazine is published four times per year by Canoe & Kayak Ltd. PRINTING: MHP Print DISTRIBUTION: MagMag SUBSCRIPTIONS: (see page 46) New Zealand – 4 Issues = $25 Overseas – 4 Issues = $40 Copyright: The opinions expressed by contributors and the information stated in advertisements/articles are not necessarily agreed to by the editors or publisher of New Zealand Kayak Magazine. Pricing: At the time of printing the prices in this magazine were accurate. However they may change at any time. CONTRIBUTORS: We welcome contributors’ articles and photos. Refer to www.canoeandkayak.co.nz/guide New Zealand Kayak Magazine ‘Contributors Guidelines’ for more details. ALL CONTRIBUTIONS TO: James Fitness Email: james@canoeandkayak.co.nz New Zealand Kayak Magazine Front page: Shelley Stuart, North Shore leader, at Roberton (Motuarohia) Island, BOI Contents page: - Lunch at Roberton Island, BOI Photos by: Ruth E Henderson

This year has seen a quieter year for my paddling but has still had an adventure or two. The highlights are, as always the Whanganui and this year saw an autumn trip with family from Whakahoro to Pipiriki over four days which was great. This we named the ‘Nui’ trip as it was not the whole trip we normally do and then this spring we had a small club trip in canoes from Ohinepana to Whakahoro over three days, the ‘Whanga’ trip. This is the first time for years I have paddled the river in the spring and it was stunning. Banks bright with yellow kowhai flower, stunning streaks of black and royal blue and dabs of white as the tuis fought off any trespasser in their tree. In twenty plus years I have never seen such bird life as we did on this trip. A must do for next year. Kayak surfing has been a blast, with my head swelling the other day as I broke a blade of my favourite paddle doing a huge turn on a great wave, I found myself upside down and managed to pull off an elegant roll. I retrieved the broken blade and then ‘canoe style’ paddled to catch a wave and surfed to the beach. If you have not learnt to roll you may not understand the feeling of pride and amazement the first time you roll up on your own. With this roll and the subsequent surf there was the same feeling of pride in oneself and a reassuring confidence boost that this fella has not lost it just yet. Recently a couple of hours with Andy Fuller from Day Two with the senior Canoe & Kayak team on the slalom course on the Kaituna brushing up my skills was great; the salmon paddlers really know how it’s done! A further paddle with Peter and Bronnie from Taranaki on the Manganui River and then the Waitara, with some big bouncy water have reignited my white water fire. Fishing has been slow for me as time has not allowed, however my mates have been dropping in a steady supply so we are not starving. In fact the paua and crayfish that my mates Cilla and Mike dropped in on a special day of mine (50th) was very tasty. The battle on the environmental front continues with the Auckland Unitary Plan processes

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terrifying me and most others involved. The plan has ended up as an excuse for developers to have another go at changing the current rules. In our area, the southern hills of the Okura Estuary, probably the last piece of rural land (ten acre blocks). There is an application for it to be urbanised into hundreds and possibly thousands of houses. The land has had two Environmental Court decisions rejecting urbanisation over the last 30 years and yet here we go again raising tens of thousands of dollars to pay for the legal team and specialists to allow common sense to prevail and leave some green hills behind the areas we love to paddle. Canoe & Kayak is putting several thousand into the battle and your support is needed to help. Please go to www.longbaypark.org.nz to donate. This summer sees my family heading off on a Northern hemisphere adventure and then on our return I am off with my mate Steve Knowles to Campbell Island to do a tad of volunteering to help remove an old building from this subantarctic Island. It is funny that with an adventure packed summer planned in some of the coldest places of the world, after paddling my new toy yesterday (a twelve foot solo canoe) and mowing Dacre Cottage lawns, I felt like I was going to be missing out on great time we usually have here during the summer. So while we are away, make the most of the paddling and remember to do your bit to make your neck of the woods just that little bit better. Cheers Peter Townend

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Choice: Russell By Ruth E. Henderson

It was a difficult decision. Within my circle of paddling buddies and clubs there were a multitude of plans and emails flying around, attempting to entice me to join them in sunny northland either at Russell or Tutukaka or avoid the exodus of city traffic and stay locally at Motuihe Island or Te Muri, or head south to the mystic Waikaremoana, or be lured east to Hahei and Hot Water Beach. What a dilemma. Typically Labour Weekend is a bit dodgy, liable to throw in a spring mix of heavy rain and high winds. The forecast didn’t look too bad…regardless, I was definitely (or was it defiantly?) going to be ‘outta here’ and ‘over there’, somewhere. Still nursing an Easter injury, I didn’t want to get caught short on a Hauraki Gulf island, nor hold up anyone on a serious multi-day paddle and I could sneak away before those beholden to 9 to 5 jobs…so, I opted for the North Shore Yakity Yak club trip, base cabin and camping experience at Russell in the Bay of Islands. It proved to be a good choice. Nine of us plus Monty, Dave and Jacqui’s fox terrier on his first camping holiday congregated at the Orongo Bay Holiday Park; half had elected to pitch tents and half to share a cabin. The wekas and boys off the Coastal Classic yachts in the nearby cabins were a bit rowdy and took a while to settle down, but those who walked to the end of the camp ground were rewarded with kiwis calling. Next morning breakfast over, trip leader Joya, tossed around a few paddling options for the weekend…out to Roberton (Motuarohia) Island for a spot of rock gardening got the first days vote. We launched at Long Beach and headed over to Cooks Cove – the wind was a bit beam-on but nothing serious and once there, the swell was negligible so Denise a PAGE 6

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cave junkie was happy. (Note - where Denise goes do not blindly follow.) Soon we were on the northern side and able to cruise into the lagoon. The circumnavigator in me insisted we couldn’t possible stop for a late morning tea or early lunch, so out we went to round the eastern end. In an easterly, thru a few narrow wind-tunnels, a stupid idea. (Note - Ruth has a few dumb ideas, you do not have to listen). Lunch was deserved and leisurely as we eyed up the white caps. Finally with a “let’s just do it” we ferry glided our way back. It was a lovely ride, a good way to end a 15 km day on the water. Over a few convivial predinner drinks and a myriad of snacks, the following day’s plan evolved. The wind was due to drop and we were all eager for a slightly bigger day, so selected Moturoa Island and the Black Rocks. Rob grabbed his map and worked

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out it’d be about 20 km plus about 5 km for those going all the way around Moturoa Is. Parking near the Russell boat ramp, we ambled and rock gardened to Fraser Rock. Then paddling across the silky seas, Eloise beside me making perfect reflections, we reached the imposing Battleship Rock and the dark walled clusters of the Black Rocks. They’d make a good place to play hide and seek, but the nesting sea birds didn’t like us lingering. The lunch beach, on the north side of Moturoa was pretty perfect; sand, shade trees, looking out to rocks and yachts and the hills beyond. Shelley wandered about with her camera, taking care not to disturb the dotterel’s nest and cleverly using someone’s colourful kayaking attire, framed the typical Bay of Islands scene; we were loath to leave, but someone had to cook dinner… On our last day we knew the bad weather was coming, wind rising to 35 knots forecast - and when the going gets tough? Greg goes paddling and the rest of us go walking. So while Greg paddled across to Paihia and up the Haumi River before circling

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back, we strode out on the Okiato walkway starting at Orongo Bay heading for a latte at Russell. Mangroves, an oyster farm and a refuse transfer station lead us past some pretty colonial style homes and gardens to a Russell strangely empty after the influx of yachties. Reunited with Greg it was a quick pack up of dry tents, before a yummy luncheon platter at Omata Estate and the sounds of the sixties and seventies as we drove back towards the big smoke. Did I make the right choice? Everybody who went kayaking anywhere, made the right choice! But yes, the Bay of Islands has to be in the “top ten” of any list of coastal sea

kayaking destinations and Orongo Bay Holiday Park with its accommodating and gracious hosts, plentiful cabins and selfcontained units, huge camping grounds, dog-friendly stance and central location to many places to paddle or explore on foot if the weather is wicked, is worth another visit, perhaps in the winter so we can ‘come home’ to a roaring fire. And that ‘typical’ Labour Weekend weather? That came the next day with lashings of thunder and lightning!

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C h r i s t m a s 2 3/12/2014 014

11:03:14 P A Ga.m. E

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Yakity Yak Kayak Club Trust Update

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Due to the new Adventure Activity Regulations that took effect on November 1 , the Yakity Yak Kayak Club was moved st

into a not-for-profit trust, called the Yakity Yak Kayak Club Trust. All Trustees and Leaders are volunteers, who give their time freely. The position of administrator is a paid position that I currently hold.

The Trust’s Purpose is: (a) to foster the development and increased participation of recreation and sport kayaking and canoeing in New Zealand; and (b) to provide a platform, leadership and a community for people to take up the activity of kayaking and canoeing in a safe and organised way in New Zealand; (c) Promote, develop, organise and train volunteers and leaders for kayaking and canoeing activities organised by the Trust; (d) To co-operate with, and/or assist, other trusts, clubs or organisations having purposes similar to those of the Trust A substantial benefit is that it negates the requirement to have the club’s safety systems and leaders audited under the regulations. An onerous ordeal that is not common in a club environment. We have been working hard to get the new organisation up and running smoothly.  Hopefully, there will be very little change noticeable by club members. Canoe & Kayak will continue to sponsor the club, and the club will use their local C&K as their main provider of training.  As the club is now a trust, there is the opportunity to obtain sponsorship from elsewhere, giving greater opportunity for additional discounted/free training & resources for members and leaders.  It is up to each region to apply for and obtain sponsorship, and any sponsorship obtained will stay in that region to be used by the regional coordinator as appropriate. We ask that all current club members please complete the online Re-enrolment Form.  This is to ensure that we have everyone’s full and current details, and a complete database of members and leaders. To find this form, please go here –www.yakityyak.co.nz/rejoin

It is important that you complete this as soon as possible; otherwise you will not be on the updated list of current club members. Current club members are those who have completed a Canoe & Kayak Skills Course (sea, or white water) within the last 12 months, OR have completed the course previously, AND paid their annual membership fee within the last 12 months - $75 per individual; or $115 per family. If you have not done your course within the last 12 months, nor paid club membership within the last 12 months, we need you to get on to this before your next trip please. If your membership has lapsed, you will not need to pay to do the course again, but we do need you to pay your annual membership. We understand that some club members may have some confusion about their membership status. Don’t fret about this, just contact Larraine at info@yakityyak.co.nz and we will sort it out. We prefer you to pay your club membership fees online; into the club bank account by direct credit, by cheque, or through your local bank.  For payment options see here www.yakityyak.co.nz/rejoin Unfortunately payments can NOT be taken through the shop, sorry. We hope that you all see these changes as positive, and we believe that the club will continue to thrive as it has in the past. This is still work in progress and we welcome any comments or suggestions. Thank you for your patience and your cooperation. Interim Board of Trustees Russell Williams – Chairman Peter Townend Treffery Townend James Fitness Larraine Williams - Administrator

Photo by Uta Machold

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cool STROKES

From the Archives: ISSUE 11

Guts and determination decrease with time and even the strongest person tires quickly when wasting energy. Here are some extracts from the Auckland Kayak Schools Operation manual to help develop your technique. If your copy of NZK gets all wet whilst trying to follow the instructions get onto a good skills course. Secondary Coaching Points to fine tune your power strokes. Paddle splash on entry results from starting to pull the paddle back before it is submerged, hence wasting a lot of energy.

This is the paddle stroke which gets us from A to B and thus requires a lot of focus. A poor power stroke makes it hard to keep up with the group and makes any trip much less enjoyable.

Paddle splash on exit is the result of not feathering your paddle blade to allow a clean exit from the water. The paddle should be removed vertically at the hip. If you are lifting water think how heavy the water on each blade is. It will be anything from a quarter to one full kilo – after many thousands of paddle strokes on any trip, you are going to be either real strong or real tired!

Primary Coaching Points In the main picture Rob is making a box shape with his arms and paddle. This is the starting point of a good paddling style. To begin, the paddle goes in the water at your toes to give the maximum length of stroke.

The top hand punching out at eye level is the strongest place to be pushing forward. If your hand is going higher then think about dropping the other hand further into the water, this will bring the top hand down.

The paddle stays close to the side of the kayak, to minimise the turning effect on your kayak. Ensure you keep the blade fully immersed. Remove the paddle at the hip as beyond the hip the paddle is starting to lose its effectiveness.

Trunk Rotation Trunk rotation is where the majority of sustainable power comes from. Briefly this involves using the main body muscle groups to supply the majority of power to the paddle. It is done by concentrating on pulling the paddle down the side of the kayak by twisting your body rather than pulling with your arms. Rob is keeping his body position forward and constant at all times. PAGE 12

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Sweep Strokes

Low Braces

The sweep stroke turns your kayak in tight areas or in windy conditions. Start with box shape as shown in Primary Coaching Points. The paddle goes in at the toes with the top hand in a lower position than the power stroke.

The low brace is used to prevent capsize and with enough practice will become a reflex reaction to an imminent capsize. It should be developed in shallow water where the paddle can hit the bottom to prevent an actual capsize and then progress to deep water as confidence and ability improve. When starting to capsize, make a vertical box as in power and sweep strokes but bring paddle shaft down to your spray skirt.

The paddle is pulled around in a half circle away from the kayak.

Use the back of the blade to push down, keeping your elbows above the shaft. This is the strongest position for your body giving more power whilst reducing the chances of injury. The paddle finishes at the back of the kayak.

The body provides power by twisting from the waist and also reduces stress on the shoulder by limiting over extension.

Use a ‘hip flick’ to recover your kayak. This is the use of your lower body (including your feet, knees and butt) to anchor yourself firmly into the kayak. Your hips will provide a flexible point from which you can flick the kayak back into the level position. When the paddle has provided enough support recover by twisting the blade forward into a vertical position before removing it from the water.

Keep your top hand close to the spray deck to extend the paddle to its maximum reach and provide greater leverage to help your turn.

Keep the blade fully immersed and your head facing forward and the kayak level. www.kayaknz.co.nz

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Jeff Allen Master Classes

Exclusive to Canoe & Kayak; we are proud to offer the series of Jeff Allen Master Classes in his first visit to New Zealand in March 2015. Jeff Allen, started paddling as a young lad in the cub scouts and has continued to this day. It wasn't until 2000 that he became engaged in the sport at a professional level, where he started to teach sea kayaking for Cornwall College in the UK. In 2003 Jeff established Sea Kayaking Cornwall, a small business dedicated to teaching and guiding at all levels. In the same year he decided to gain more practical experience of expedition sea kayaking. He journeyed to Japan in 2004, where, along with Hadas Feldman made a complete un-supported expedition of its four main islands, Honshu-Kyushu, Shikoku and Hokkaido. The following year, 2005, Jeff was a part of the British team that circumnavigated South Georgia, in 2007. He began an exploration of the Scandinavian Peninsula by sea kayak and ski and in 2012, took a crack at breaking Mick Omeara's 20 year old record in circumnavigating Ireland, along with Harry Whelan. They managed to cleave almost nine days from the 1000 mile record, establishing a time just in excess of 24 days. For Jeff Sea Kayaking is more than a sport, it's his way of life. He calls it a 'Commitment to the blade'. In all Jeff has journeyed in excess of 20,000 miles by sea kayak, has taught and guided professionally in many locations around the globe, but this will be his first visit to New Zealand. This is an amazing opportunity for us to learn and develop our sea kayaking skills from a world class, highly qualified sea kayak instructor. During his short time here Jeff is offering us a selection of courses that aim to give you the ability to gain further knowledge, skills and an understanding of many aspects of sea kayaking and water safety. An occasion not to be missed by any aspiring kayaker.

The importance of being able to empty or get back into your kayak may be simply convenient or absolutely crucial depending on the circumstances. The modern sea kayak can travel long distances relatively easily and handles varying weather conditions. These qualities may, on some occasions, result in an unplanned capsize. The premise that paddlers are usually with a buddy allows us to assume that one paddler of the pair has remained upright. This sets the stage for an assisted rescue. 1. After capsizing a kayak, the swimmer holds onto his or her kayak and paddle. The rescuer makes visual and voice contact with the swimmer to ensure he/she is okay and realizes that help is at hand. The rescuer reminds him/ her to hold onto kayak and paddle. 2. The rescuer then paddles to the bow of the capsized kayak. If possible, the swimmer gives their paddle to the rescuer to be placed safely under the forward deck bungies of the rescuer’s kayak. The swimmer moves to the stern whilst continuing to hold onto the kayak. Remember it is possible for the wind to blow the kayak away faster than a person can swim. The rescuer is now across the bow of the overturned kayak, at a 90 degree angle to the cockpit, grasping the bow. The rescuer stows their own paddle under their forward bungie alongside the other (see main pic above).

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From the Archives: ISSUE 12

T-rescues By Ross Huff and Andy Blake

5. The empty boat is bought alongside, with its stern next to the rescuer’s bow. Both paddles are stowed under the bungies on the disengaged side. To assist the swimmer climb into his/her kayak by keeping it stable, the rescuer holds the front of the empty kayak’s cockpit rim with the hand farthest from the swimmer’s kayak, and positions the near side arm over the foredeck. 3. To empty water from the upturned kayak, the rescuer lifts the boat until the hull lies under the bow of the upturned kayak. The rescuer then flattens the hull, whilst pulling the bow of the waterlogged kayak onto their cockpit rim. When directed, the swimmer helps by pushing down on the stern of the waterlogged kayak This is especially necessary with a heavily loaded boat. 4. The rescuer now lifts the bow to head height as the stern is pushed further down by the swimmer. Most of the water drains from the cockpit. The kayak is rotated to float upright. The bow is lowered. Be very careful to turn the rudder away from the persons face at the stern.

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6. The rescuer asks the swimmer to let their feet float behind and mount the back hatch behind the cockpit, positioning the belly button in the centre of the hatch. Use the rescuer’s kayak for stability. The swimmer swivels around to face the stern of their kayak, again using the rescuer’s kayak for support. Legs slide into the cockpit whilst keeping body weight and head low. With the groin over the cockpit seat, the swimmer turns towards the rescuer. The swimmer finally sits in the seat. 7. The kayak should be virtually empty of water. However, continue to support the swimmer’s kayak until the spray skirt is fastened and composure recovered. 8. Ensure he/she is okay, and happy to carry on under their own power. Release him/her.

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Kayak Kings

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By Jason Walker

www.kayaknz.co.nz


One of the most highly rated sports fish in New Zealand is the kingfish. A fish that is prized not only for it’s flesh which can be eaten so many different ways but also for the strong fight it puts up when hooked. These fish are pure muscle and can bring the biggest of anglers to their knees by their powerful runs. Holding on to your rod once hooked up to a

formed by a reef or other underwater structure – pins and rocky shoreline, or may simply be straight tidal flow such as an estuary for example.  Food for kingfish, like many creatures, is a driver to make them stay in an area, they are aggressively greedy carnivores feeding mainly on small fish.

We have all seen the photos and articles written about landing these beasts off boats but can they be caught from kayaks too? Oh yes they can!  The lack of a huge motor strapped to the back of your vessel means that you won’t be heading way out over the horizon to sit on one of those kingfish holding pins we all read about but the humble kayak is still a very capable fishing craft to land yourself a legal kingfish from.

The structure creating the currents the kingfish love so much will also hold smaller fish which creates a perfect larder for our kingfish. Their diet is varied but some of the favourites are slimy mackerel, kahawai, pilchards, squid, and other common fish on the menu depending on your location include: octopus, flying fish, piper, mullet, koheru, anchovies, sauries. There are also reports of many other fish being found in the stomachs of captured kingies such as snapper, tarakihi, flounder, sea horses, crayfish, shrimp, frost fish, and other weird and wonderful deep sea creatures.

In this article we will cover everything from how to find the kingfish, what to look for on your fishfinder, the various methods you can use, techniques for these methods, and handling a kingfish on your kayak. We’ll also cover how you can actually get to fish some of those more remote kingfish holding pins from your kayak if you really want to.

With such a varied diet it can make targeting the kingfish appear very easy, unfortunately even though we have a fish that looks like it will eat anything you put in front of it the old kingfish can be a fussy fish at times and even if presented with it’s favourite dish if that’s not what it’s looking for today you can be wasting your time.

Where

Hunting

monster kingfish will quickly test your stamina.

Well before we can attempt to catch our prized fish firstly we need to understand how the kingfish lives, what it lives on and where it hunts it’s food.  There are several ingredients that make up the ideal place to find kingfish the most critical two are current and food.  Kingfish are most commonly found sitting in current, this may be current

In summary rocky shorelines, headlands, pinnacles, islands, and reef structures are the best places to head to, once there look to see where the current is flowing. There’s no fixed rule as to whether you should be sitting up or down current when fishing for kingfish not like if you were looking to target snapper.  Your approach doesn’t require so much stealth, you’re not trying to silently cast a small bait or lure into the spot you think the fish will be sitting. Kingfish tend to be on the move most of the time either swimming in the current or chasing a meal so before you start fishing for them you

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need to find them first and thankfully they are normally found in medium to large schools so using your electronics makes this part easy! You are looking for something different on your sounder than you would when looking for most other fish. Normally you are looking for slow moving fish such as snapper and for these you are looking for arches on your sounder, the arch is formed from a slow moving fish under your kayak.   With kingfish due to their speed they show up as a simple dash rather then the arch, they also tend to sit mid water rather then at the top or bottom of the water column.

Baits and Lures Once you find the school it’s time to park your paddle, grab your rod, and drop your line in the water to tempt those fish to jump on your hook. The question is what do you put on that hook? There are plenty of options available to the modern kingfish hunter, from the classic dead and live baits to the more modern offerings.

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Real Bait The classic kingfish bait is nothing more simple than real bait itself, they can be presented both live and dead but the preference would always be a live bait as a correctly presented live bait with either a hook through it’s back just in front of it’s dorsal find or upper lip will give off the tell tale vibrations of an injured fish through the water that the kingfish will quickly home in on. Dead baits are best fished un-weighted and left to naturally fall through the water column whereas the live baits are normally fished at the top or the bottom of the water, the top is easily achieved by using a balloon tied to your line this acts as a float and stops the live bait from swimming too far down to escape the kingfish.  To fish the bottom hook your live bait on to a dropper rig with a sinker on the bottom this will keep your bait fixed in one area – a danger with this rig is snagging your sinker on the bottom so make sure you use a short length of lightweight mono to attach your sinker to the dropper rig, that way if you get snagged all you’ll lose is the sinker.

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Artificial Baits Whilst kingfish love fish candies they are also huge suckers for anything that moves fast through the water, in fact the faster the better sometimes! There are both top water and deep-water options available.

Top Water For the top water you can make use of bibbed trolling lures such as those from Rapala. These are designed to be cast out of the back or side of your kayak and towed around as you paddle. The bib on the lure causes them to dive under the surface and they are designed to wriggle as they are towed, some even have rattles built in to give off those vibrations of a dying real fish which kingfish take as a free meal signal. Other top water options are poppers and stick baits, these are both cast and retrieved, as they are wound back to the kayak they dart across the waters surface creating vibrations and splashes to attract the target. Whilst both of these can be used from the kayak, casting great distances can be more difficult than in a boat so you may find these a little harder to use effectively.

Deep Water If your targets are sitting mid water or deeper and they can’t be drawn to the surface with the top water options then jigs will be your friend. A jig on a basic level is simply a piece of lead in a stick like pattern with a hook attached at one end that is flicked over the side and is dropped free fall to flutter to the bottom of the ocean, from there it is brought back up the water column jerking/jigging it as you wind up the line. Some of the first jigs on the market in NZ were the Grim Reaper lures, actually made and designed in NZ, introduced to the market in the mid 1980’s and still available today. These are shorter jigs and normally come fitted with a treble hook, changing these trebles to a single hook won’t drop your catch rate much and are a lot kinder on the fish not to mention yourself

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too if you bring an angry kingfish on board your kayak. Those  treble hooks are great at hooking everything on the kayak as well as the fish! After these first jigs were introduced and found to be successful in landing some big kingfish the tackle companies and retailers went looking overseas to see what was on offer. Not long after this we started to see knife jigs from Japan turn up on our shelves with ZEST being some of the first courtesy of Chris Wong.  These proved even more deadly on our local kingfish population and quickly gained a huge following. The knife jigs are rigged with a single assist hook, this set up consists of a single hook attached to a short length of cord, normally kevlar, which in turn in attached to the jig by the use of solid and split rings at the same point as you attach your leader material.

The “Jig” As mentioned above the jigs work because of the flutter and wobble from the shape of the jig but it’s also from the way the jig is retrieved, this is the “jigging” part, there are several variations but they breakdown to two different methods, speed jigging and mechanical jigging. Speed jigging came along with the first wave of jigs and is carried out by dropping your jig to the bottom. Holding the rod still you then quickly (as fast as you can) wind the reel handle for around five turns to quickly bring the jig back to the surface, pausing for up to a second, and repeating - five turns, pause, five turns, pause - until you have retrieved the jig back to the surface or at least far away from the school at which point you drop it down and start again.

Mechanical jigging This method sees the jig heading to the bottom again but once there you are now going to both lift and drop the rod whilst winding the reel at the

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Ronny Fisher - Fully featured fishing PFD Thin-vent back works with high-back SOT seats Numerous pockets for tackle, gear and tool storage Tough Cordura fabric

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same time, it’s a technique that needs a little practice but once mastered is very effective. There are many videos available online to show you the exact technique. On a kayak with practice you can carry out both techniques but honestly the speed jigging method is much easier and has been proven to work well.

Hook Up Time So whatever method you choose to target your kingfish what do you do when you actually hook up? Well, given the power of these beasts the first advice is simply to hold on and enjoy the ride! Seriously though there are a few differences between fishing from a boat and a kayak when it comes to playing and landing a kingfish.  Leverage is the biggest loss you’ll soon discover, there’s no gunnels on a kayak that you can brace yourself against so rather than fishing out the side of the kayak like you would on a boat you want to fish out the front, this gives you the entire length of the kayak as leverage plus the added bonus of not having to test that stability of your kayak to it’s limit and beyond if it’s decent size fish! You want to keep the rod pointing forward and as close to the side of the kayak but the line is not touching (otherwise you’ll end up with a bust off).

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Sleigh Ride Kayaks offer very little resistance to the kingfish like a boat does so don’t be surprised if you end up getting towed around by that horse of a fish. It’s a great feeling but be very aware of your environment. That fish is swimming for freedom, it’s trying its best to bust you off on the bottom or reef, the fish is going to keep running so you need to get control as quick as you can. You will get the fish under your control once you have removed the angle in the line and have the fish directly under the kayak.

The Fight Now the fish is directly under the kayak the fight begins. The kingfish is really going to test your strength, there’s not much I can say here it’s all down to you to get that fish up, lift and wind down, lift and wind down, it’s a matter of wearing that fish out hopefully before you wear out! Again as above try to keep the fish out the front of the kayak so you don’t give the fish the opportunity to roll you out of your kayak.

The Landing Ok so you’ve hooked it, been for the ride, slogged out the fight and now you have the fish up to the kayak, now what? Kingfish have an incredible knack of finding that last fight when you least expect it so make sure you are ready. Firstly back off your drag, if the fish makes a run for it again you don’t want to be dragged overboard with it. Secondly get a grip, either gaff

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the fish or slide it up the side of the kayak and on to your lap, it’s normally at this point the fish will go mental and start thrashing around the top of your kayak and they are STRONG! I’ve seen many items knocked off including fishfinders, as the fish smashed the mount clean in half! So be prepared keep a firm grip on the fish and don’t be afraid to use your legs by sliding the fish under them to hold the fish in place until you’ve despatched it.

Reel

Mothership

You can use both overhead and spin gear on the kayak but overhead reels are advised. If you catch a donkey of a kingfish then the runs are going to be hard and fast, a spin reel hanging under the rod gets pulled down to the kayak or your legs making it impossible to wind any line until you lift the rod whereas an overhead even if pulled hard down on to the kayak you can still winch that fish up as the reel is free to turn.

Gear

Line

If you want to venture to those pinnacles way over the horizon that the guys in boats target then one option is to use a mothership. There aren’t many dedicated kayak mothership charter operators in NZ but if you head down to the marina or hit the internet you’ll soon find that there are a few operators who have boats big enough to take one or two kayaks out. They take you to the fishing grounds, drop you and your kayak off then while the rest of the clients fish from the boat you are free to paddle around and go fishing, if you hook that big one you can soon paddle it back to the mothership to drop it off. 

Rods and reels for kingfish on a kayak do not differ from boat gear and is really only limited by your budget. There are a few guides though that are worth following to help keep you out of trouble if nothing else.

Rod Buy yourself a good quality jigging rod but keep yourself to a 250g rod or less, this will mean you won’t have too stiff a rod and enable you to put pressure on the fish and hopefully stay in the kayak.

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Braid is the way to go as it gives you much more direct contact to the fish and removes any water resistance that is key when jigging. Breaking strength really should be limited to a max of 80lb on the kayak as in the worst case scenario and you get hooked up on the bottom you want to be able to bust off; 80lb will be hard to bust off anything higher will be near impossible.

Hopefully this article has given you some ideas and pointers to help you go out and catch yourself what is one of our most popular sports fish. Good luck!

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Fourth Place for the NZ Women’s Paddle Ferns

The New Zealand Women’s Canoe Polo team the Paddle Ferns have just returned home from their 2014 World Championships campaign in France where they finished in 4th place. The team set off on tour at the start of September competing in three lead up competitions in the Netherlands, France and Belgium where they placed 3rd, 1st and 1st respectively. The 2014 Canoe Polo World Championships were held from the 24 – 28 September in Thury-Harcourt in the Normandy region of France. The Paddle Ferns world championships competition started with some tough pool games against Denmark, Italy and Poland with the team successfully coming through 1st in their pool.

Ask for a Beckson Pump Most kayakers only ever buy one pump. Make it the best kayaker’s bilge pump. Ask other kayakers and checkout what the professionals use. Chances are they will recommend using a Beckson Thirsty Mate. Why? Because Beckson is a trusted brand, been around a long time and they pump alot of water (rated at 30 litres a min). Plus they last for ages. Unrestricted opening allows for great pumping volume

Distributed by Great Stuff Ltd. For additional information, www.greatstuffltd.co.nz or email greatstuffltd@orcon.net.nz

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BECKAD-Dec14

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Round two resulted in a draw to the Netherlands, a win against Switzerland and a loss to Great Britain, leaving the Paddle Ferns tied on points with the Dutch. As the teams were also equal on goals for and against a re-match was needed to decide on who would get the semi-final position, a rare situation! Cheered on by the many New Zealand supporters the team secured the last semi-final spot beating the Dutch 4-2. This meant a Germany New Zealand semi-final. The Paddle Ferns played a disciplined game taking the lead in the second half however the Germans showed their experience equalising the game in the final minutes to take the game into golden goal extra time, where the Germans came away with the win. The team’s final game was against the French, who played strongly in front of a very large home crowd with a final score of 6-3 to the French. Although disappointed with the end result the team played well to maintain their 4th standing in the world in a very tight competition.

www.kayaknz.co.nz

All photos courtesy of Tony Griffin

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Loads on Roof Racks

by James Fitness

With the holiday season upon us, now is the time to consider how we transport our beloved kayaks and what regulations apply to carrying them.

The bare facts are;

Transport Authorities know that ever more kayaks are being carried on our roads and are keen to enforce the laws that are applicable.

A load must not extend more than 3 metres forward of the front edge of the front seat or 4 metres behind the rear axle.

A load must not extend more than 1.25 metres from the centre of the vehicle.

In an all too familiar occurance, a reader reported; We came back from Mt Maunganui carrying a Perception Eco Bezhig and a Bliss Stick MAC1 on my roof racks. With a flag attached the load overhung the car’s tail by about 1 metre. But as usual with weekend kayaking we were behind time and driving home in the dark. Exiting Hunterville we were pulled over by a police officer for not having a light on our overhanging load. Luckily for us the officer was in a nice mood and let us off the $350 fine with a warning. He suggested that all we needed was a bike light and, since our flag was faded and thrashed from lots of use, we should probably get a new one. Nicholas, finding no information on the regulations, asked NZ Kayak Magazine for help.

Regulations on overhanging loads

If a load extends more than one metre beyond the front or rear, or 200mm beyond the sides of your vehicle, during daylight you must attach: flags (coloured white or fluorescent red, orange or yellow, at least 400 mm long by 300 mm wide) or standard hazard warning panels (coloured yellow/green with an orange stripe, at least 400 mm long by 300 mm wide). During the hours of darkness, you must have lights on the load visible in clear weather for at least 200 metres: at the rear and facing backward, coloured red (if the load extends sideways or to the rear) at the front and facing forward, coloured white or amber (if the load extends sideways or forwards) (reference: http://www.nzta.govt.nz/resources/ glovebox-guide-safe-loading-towing/docs/guide-safeloading-towing.pdf) Suggestions Before you buy a roof rack, check the weight your vehicle can safely carry on its roof. (Look in the vehicle’s manual). Check the roof rack’s safe load. Consult your roof rack specialist to find the system which best suits your vehicle and the accessories needed for your specific load. While weight will seldom be your problem, bulkiness and length are very likely to cause trouble. When a kayak overhangs, and regardless of the accessories used to mount it, you must tie the bow to the front of the car and the stern to the back to prevent the boat from lifting in the wind. There is huge leverage at the end of a kayak which could well rip your roof rack off! And no, this will not be covered by warranty. The normal spacing of roof racks to suit the shape of most kayaks is about 700mm. Any further apart and your kayak will touch the roof between the bars. The accessories you’ll need will depend on the number of boats to be carried, what the kayak is made of, and what else you are carrying. If you are carrying composite boats you should

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invariably use a set of kayak cradles. These four pads hold the kayak firmly in place without the need to over-tighten the load straps and cause compression cracks. There is often space on the roof rack to fit two cradles alongside each other for two kayaks, or to hold one kayak and a box and bike carrier for the multisporters. Upright bars are more practical when carrying up to four boats. Stack them on either side of the bars, with hulls facing hulls to prevent indentation from the cockpit shapes.

Remember that ... •

the more weight on the roof, the less weight can be carried inside your vehicle.

roof racks increase wind resistance and buffeting.

you may need to travel more slowly and your vehicle will use more fuel.

Obviously, the more you have on your roof, the sturdier the straps will need to be. Bungy cords are never substantial enough.

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20/01/2014 11:29:57 a.m.


Discover Another World. We’ll show you how!

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Summer Enrolments Enrolments Open Now.

Join Join the the Yakity Yakity Yak Yak Kayak Kayak Club Club now, now, and and let let the the adventures adventures begin. begin.

Greg Dudding fishing with Yakity Yakers exploring at Black Rocks, BOI Photo by: Ruth E. Henderson

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A Beach a Week By Ruth E. Henderson

Advertisers know this: it can take up to three exposures to an idea or a suggestion for us to take ACTION. And so it was for me and rubbish! My first conscious encounter with the enormity of beach rubbish was about 15 years ago, when my husband Ian and I took on the task of organising the clean-up of the coastline of Kawau Island under the direction of “Clean NZ”. It was disgusting: we ended up with a barge load. Albeit it did include the sort of stuff city dwellers can dump at their curb-side inorganic rubbish collections…but the old washing machines, and motors had been dumped on the foreshore, and on an island with no roads, let alone one leading to a landfill, there was no likely hood of a truck taking them away. Stuff had been left to rot and rust. Not good for the world we live in, possibly fractionally better than ‘deep-sixing’ as islanders call dumping at sea? The rubbish bag contents were revealing. As part of the “Clean NZ” we had to empty a sample number of rubbish bags, and tally up the contents. Lolly wrappers, drink bottle tops, fish bait packaging, polystyrene meat trays, not much glass… a ‘logical’ collection as most of the rubbish had blown off boats and floated ashore. The second time I was forced to look at beach rubbish was with my grandsons at the Auckland Museum exhibition “Water”. The kids and I had a lot of fun touching screens and pushing buttons in the interactive displays. Then came a time of selfexamination, the moment of truth: Standing there with young Joel and Troy, we had to tick boxes, make a commitment, promise to do something to help clean up our water and waterways. My shame at not already automatically ‘doing something’ as simple as picking up rubbish, was momentary, fleeting. It took Facebook to unveil the big wake up call. It was graphic: there were birds, dead birds, sea birds…being dissected. The stomach contents were disturbing, not because I’m squeamish (I do clean my own fish!), but rather because those poor birds had died from eating rubbish. Just as a child may not distinguish a button or a bead from a lolly, the shags had eaten the rings and circles of plastic from bottle tops, fragments of polystyrene trays, plastic soft-baits, and any small colourful PAGE 28

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Richard with the huge chunks of polystyrene and snowdrifts of it, on Kahangaro Island, one of the Cavalli Islands.

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thing. In other words, if it looks like food, they’ll eat it, feel full, and either die of starvation or a blocked digestive system. That was the third thing and I was finally galvanised into action: to clean a beach a week. What will it take for you to do the same? Ok, not everyone lives beside the water, but you do go kayaking on the stuff or run or walk in parks, or along roads. Take a bag; you’ll be surprised at how often you will fill it with potentially dangerous rubbish. And, if you find something extraordinary, call DOC HOT or the Press. Richard and Peter did the later when at Easter our group found the massive pollution caused by a polystyrene-filled pontoon. It had torn free from Motukawaiti Island and broken up during Cyclone Lusi. We were upset the day we saw polystyrene balls scattered across the southern end of Motukawanui, the biggest island in the Cavallis. Then we were outraged when we landed in a sea of white balls and came upon the man-sized chunks on Kahangaro Island, about 1.5km further south. Northern Advocate’s Peter de Graf’s, articles forced the Northland Regional Council to follow thru on their abatement notice requiring the pontoon’s owners to clean up the polystyrene and now the use of polystyrene in the marine environment in floating docks may be restricted in the wake of this serious environmental incident.

One beach and one day’s haul on the east coast of Kawau Island.

and another day - same beach.

Big or small…you too can make a difference to the wildlife you love to encounter or watch… dolphins to shags: clean a beach a week.

What others are doing Read about what other people are doing – here’s a handful of websites…and that’s without even looking at the plight of turtles!

Part of the ‘Clean NZ’ haul.

www.seatrash.blogspot.com www.surfrider.org www.visiondive.com www.balloonsblow.org

www.kayaknz.co.nz

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Jellyfish and Kayaking By Johanna Verheijen

Portugese Man of War

Jellyfish tentacles contain microscopic barbed stingers. Each stinger has a tiny bulb that holds venom and a coiled, sharp-tipped tube. The jellyfish uses the venom to protect itself and kill prey. When you brush against a tentacle, tiny triggers on its surface release the stingers. The tube penetrates the skin and releases venom. It affects the immediate area of contact and may enter the bloodstream. Jellyfish that have washed up on a beach may still release venomous stingers if touched. Types of jellyfish

Common signs and symptoms of jellyfish stings include: // Burning, prickling, stinging pain // Red, brown or purplish tracks on the skin — a "print" of the tentacles' contact with your skin // Itching // Swelling // Tingling and numbness // Throbbing pain that radiates up a leg or an arm

While many types of jellyfish are relatively harmless to humans, some can cause severe pain and are more likely to cause a systemic reaction. These jellyfish cause more-serious problems in people:

Severe jellyfish stings can affect multiple body systems. These reactions may appear rapidly or several hours after the stings.

Box Jellyfish. Also called sea wasps, box jellyfish can cause intense pain. Life-threatening reactions — although rare — are more common with this type. The more dangerous species of box jellyfish are in the warm waters of the Pacific and Indian oceans. Portuguese Man-of-War. Also called bluebottle jellyfish, Portuguese man-of-war jellyfish live mostly in warmer seas. This type has a blue or purplish gas-filled bubble that keeps it afloat on the water and acts as sails. PAGE 30

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Box Jellyfish www.kayaknz.co.nz


First Aid Signs and symptoms of severe jellyfish stings include: // Nausea and vomiting // Headache // Muscle and joint problems // Weakness and dizziness // Fever // Loss of consciousness // Difficulty breathing // Heart problems The severity of your reaction depends on: The type and size of the jellyfish Your age, size and health, with severe reactions more likely in children and people in poor health How long you were exposed to the stingers

The sting causes a severe allergic reaction, including but not limited to difficulty breathing, dizziness or light-headedness, nausea, or palpitations. The sting came from a box jellyfish. Box jellies have extremely potent venom. They are found off the coast of Australia, and elsewhere in the Indo-Pacific, as well as Hawaii. They are pale blue in color and have a cube-shaped head, or "medusa." They can grow approximately 6 feet (2 metres) long.

Quick quiz 1.

What’s the first course of action if you get stung by a jelly fish?

2.

Can jelly fish stings be life threatening?

3.

Should you rub the sting area with ointment?

4.

Can you be stung by washed up blue bottle jelly fish?

5.

Can you get your partner to pee on the sting site?

6.

Does an ice pack help relieve the pain?

7.

When is medical help needed?

8.

Can we use an epi pen or ana pen for someone showing signs of an allergic reaction?

9.

If the patient shows no signs of a reaction, then are they going to be ok?

10.

Can a jelly fish sting cause a cardiac arrest?

How much of your skin is affected

Treatment: Remove stingers. Remove any pieces of jellyfish tentacle in your skin by rinsing the wound with seawater. You can also try gently scraping off the stingers with the edge of an ID card or a credit card. Avoid getting sand on the wound. And don't rinse with fresh water or rub the area with a towel, as these actions may activate more stingers. Take a hot shower or apply ice packs. Hot water — as hot as you can tolerate — and later ice packs may help ease pain. Take a pain reliever. Apply calamine lotion to help relieve itching and discomfort. Know when to call emergency services and seek immediate help. Most jellyfish stings do not require medical intervention. However, if you or someone else finds themselves in the following situations, seek immediate medical help: The sting itself covers more than half your arm, half your leg, a large part of your torso, or your face or genitals.

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Quick quiz

Answers

1.

Remove from the water and carefully remove the stingers.

2.

Yes. Stings can be life threatening especially the for the young and the elderly or those with immune issues.

3.

Just use hot water. Once stingers have been removed monitor for allergic reaction.

4.

Jelly fish that have been washed up can still sting. So supervise children on beaches that have washed up jellyfish.

5.

Whatever floats your boat! It really doesn't work, don't believe everything you see on TV!

6.

Ice packs are great for relieving the pain around the sting site.

7.

Medical help is needed if the person shows signs of a severe allergic reaction.

8.

If the person has an epi pen or ana pen then get the person to use it by injecting it in their outer thigh muscle - treat for shock and call 111

9.

An allergic reaction can occur several hours after being stung. So monitor the person for several hours.

10.

In an extreme reaction the person can have a cardiac arrest, so start DRSABCD immediately.

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Edd

y lin

e

Eddy

Downstream ‘V’

Fastest line

e

y lin

Edd

Upstream ‘V’

Eddy Fastest line

Upstream Current i.e. Eddy

line

River Flow

Fast lines for River Racing

From the Archives: ISSUE 53

by Peter Townend

To paddle a river fast you need to recognise where the river current will help, not hinder, you. It is natural to think of the river as a mass of water which reaches the sea, but on the way it is a three dimensional, massively complex group of currents heading in different directions. It only takes a quick look in some eddies and you will see the same flotsam going around and around for an age. Or look at a weir type obstacle. Flotsam will stay in the wave area, sometimes forever. Understanding what causes eddies is probably the first step to fast river kayaking. How do eddies form? An eddy forms when flow is impeded by an obstacle such as a rock or bank. Downstream the water level is lower than the water hitting the upstream side. Some water flows around the obstacle and tries to fill the downstream ‘hole’. Hence an upstream current forms below obstacles.

How do you see eddies on the river? The area where upstream and downstream currents meet is the ‘Eddy line’. When the bow of your kayak enters the upstream you will slow down and often spin 180 degrees. When looking down the river the ‘Upstream V’ is the shape that ‘Eddy lines’ make either side of an obstacle. The ‘Downstream V’ is the shape ‘Eddy lines’ make between two obstacles in a rapid. What is the best line to take? A beginner is told to aim for the ‘Downstream V’ to avoid obstacles and the Upstream V. This is good advice. However it often means that you will paddle in rougher water at the bottom of the rapid. Large waves almost always lurk at the bottom of a big ‘Downstream V’. A trick is two bits of advice. 1/ Start the rapid in the Downstream V on the side from which you’ll exit the rapid. This sets you up for step 2/ paddle down the side of the waves at the bottom of the ‘Downstream V’ along the Eddy line. This allows for a faster more stable paddle. Look at any moving water (picture is of a small stream) and you will see these features. Spend the time understanding them and you will be faster, happier, drier and enjoy your kayak racing a heap more.

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To Wing or not to Wing – That is the question. By Rob Howarth

From the Archives: ISSUE 32

The wing paddle has defined itself in paddle sports as a tool to make you go faster. But there is a key word behind the increased forwards paddle efficiency that the wing paddle has to offer – coaching. Some Multisporters will choose a wing paddle as their first blade; others seem to naturally migrate to a wing paddle over time. The wing blade is designed to increase forwards paddling efficiency and was first used by the Swedish National Team in the mid 1980’s. So what makes this tool so effective over a regular paddle? Well, to begin with let’s define what it is that allows the wing paddle to gain that forwards efficiency: Firstly the shape of the blade captures more water during the stroke and therefore allows for less energy loss through spillage over the sides of the blade. Secondly due to the aerofoil shape of the blade it can generate ‘lift’ as it is pulled through the water- in other words the paddle becomes self-propelling. This lift occurs when a pressure differential is created as water flows at different speeds over the two faces of the blades (for those scientists out there this is Bernoulli's principal at work). This only occurs however when the blade is moving correctly through the water. Thirdly the wing blade has a flow path through the water that helps the kayaker to use the big muscle groups, the abs, the chest and the lats. These muscles have much more longevity than the arms, which paddlers tend to utilise when using a regular blade. However don’t be fooled into thinking that the purchase of a wing paddle will instantly increase your speed and efficiency. The majority of paddlers who have taught themselves how to use a wing paddle have poor technique and are not maximising the benefits that a wing paddle has to offer. There is only one solution – Coaching. The maximum efficiency gain is about 4-5% over a regular blade, but this is not an automatic result. The theory behind the wing paddle is excellent, but in order to take advantage of this tool and ensure efficiency of the

paddle stroke (therefore increased speed) the blade needs to be used correctly. Coaching will provide you with knowledge and understanding about the optimal body and paddle position to help you gain the most from your wing blade. Most self taught paddlers have no idea of these concepts and are missing out. The results from coaching sessions speak for themselves, if you are spending $400 - $500 on a new toy you are crazy not to get some coaching. Do not despair however if you are still using a regular blade and do not want to move into a wing paddle. Regular paddles offer a much easier learning curve for the full range of paddle strokes such as draw strokes and sweep strokes. And as for forward paddling remember that the basics of efficient paddling are the same whether you are using a regular blade or a wing – utilise body rotation and engage those big muscle groups. And the same key word still applies – Coaching. For more information on regular and wing paddle coaching clinics contact rob@canoeandkayak.co.nz or drop into your local Canoe & Kayak centre.

Grade Two certification and brush up courses run through out the year. Contact your nearest Canoe & Kayak Centre for details.

It’s a long road. Half the battle is getting there. w wCoast w . ktoaCoast y a k2015 n z v1.indd . c o . n1z

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Bush Craft

Adapt, Improvise and Overcome Andy Blake reflects on the benefits of carrying a survival kit number of motivated enthusiastic professionals – Kia Kaha! As well as being the United States Marine Corps popular phrase and one of Clint Eastwood’s classic sayings, “adapt, improvise and overcome!” Is a great mantra to live by when the ‘proverbial’ hits the fan! You may find yourself in unfamiliar surroundings, with little or no supplies; cold, wet and alone and you may even be injured, remember that as Murphy’s law states – anything that can go wrong, will go wrong… so deal with it. The inner strength and creativity that can be drawn upon from oneself to get through is boundless. Adapt Things sometimes are going to be different than what you are used to and things will not always go your way. Don’t consider this to be an impediment but an opportunity to thrive – see it as a challenge. If there is no shelter – then make it yourself. If you have no food or water, well find something. Think of some of the harrowing survival stories of others who have walked to the ends of hell just to survive – Frodo for instance! He did have big feet though. Even though we are creatures of habit, it is in our DNA to change for our own survival. Improvise You may find yourself with limited equipment but as the people on “Naked and Afraid” can attest – it is not the equipment someone has but the ability to look outside of the square and improvise to achieve a goal. If these people can survive 21 days with just a knife and a firestarter in an unfamiliar environment and … NAKED then it is more important what is found between your ears (and you know how to tap into that knowledge) and not what is possessed in your bag.

Everything in my survival kit has multiple uses but can be substituted by something we can make or find. One of the main reasons our species has done so well is its very dextrous hands and the large brain that enables us to make things. Google the survival uses of a broken cell phone or the multiple uses of a tin can to see the weird and wonderful and creative uses common day items can have. Have you ever read the book titled “100 Uses Of A Dead Cat” – what a creative mind that person had! The knife has multiple uses like skinning an animal, preparing food, cutting line and chopping. A knife can be improvised by using shards of rock, shells and even the pieces of glass that can be found amongst the stones on a beach. The pencil used for writing a message or even writing a will, can be improvised by using charcoal or crushed coloured rock. The pencil can also be shaved into a fire fuzz stick as the wood is very dry. Condoms can be used for water carrying, slingshot or tourniquet and protecting a burn. Improvise with flax or sphagnum moss and spider webs. A tin foil cup is great for boiling water and for signalling. Improvise by using the bulbous base of the Nikau palm or deep depression in rock. It is possible, using a burning ember, to hollow out a large depression in a piece of wood. Then use very hot rocks to heat your water instead of using an external heat source as with a cooking pot.

A fire bow

Overcome Use the creative part of the brain to stimulate a solution driven methodology to any problem. If you can’t go over an obstacle, try going around it. In all problems there can be many different solutions. I once heard a metal work teacher at school asking his students to design a can opener – the next day he was shown 30 different designs of a seemingly simple tool. My NZ Army days have shown me the value of shared group knowledge and what can be achieved, often under harsh conditions, by a small PAGE 34

Issue 75

Christmas 2014

www.kayaknz.co.nz


A signal mirror is great for signalling a plane or checking to see how your beard is going but a smokey signal fire burning green foliage also works very well.

perfect and can be very labour intensive. Pre European Maori didn’t possess matches or lighters to get their fires going, they had to use other techniques.

Fire lighting tools can be improvised by primitive fire lighting techniques like the fire bow. These techniques are harder to

Cordage, snares line, fish traps and even nets or your hammock can be fashioned from Flax.

Knives come in many forms.

As with all outdoor skills, it is crucial to practice and hone these skills - don’t let an overdue overnight stay in the wilds threaten your life- rather make it an opportunity to challenge and strengthen your resolve.

Various cordage I carry.

Join Us For A Kayaking Adventure - River Tours

River Tours

Mokau River

White Water Paddling

Waitara River Tours

Exploring beautiful estuaries. Enjoy a scenic trip with wildlife and wonderful views.

Enjoy this beautiful scenic river which winds through some of New Zealand’s lushest vegetation. Camping overnight and exploring some of New Zealand’s pioneering history. A true Kiwi experience.

Need some excitement? Take a kayak down a wicked Grade Two river run... this is a whole day of thrills and fantastic scenery down some of New Zealand’s best rivers.

For those who are slightly more adventurous at heart, this is a scenic trip with the excitement of Grade Two rapids. Midway down, we paddle under the historic Betran Road Bridge where we will stop for a snack.

Phone Canoe & Kayak on 07 378 1003 for details

Phone Canoe & Kayak 06 769 5506

Phone Canoe & Kayak on 07 378 1003 for details

Allow 2 hours paddle only. Priced at $85. Phone: 06 769 5506

www.kayaknz.co.nz

Issue 75

Christmas 2014

PAGE 35


New Product

Barracuda Interface

Gordon Robinson of Barracuda Kayaks has bought out a new concept in thermoformed plastic hulls. The New Interface has developed from the growing demand for lower volume kayaks that do not require large amounts of storage space. Ideal for day trips and weekends. The Barracuda Interface has moved away from the more common rounded hull, to a ‘V’ hull with hard chines. Although this may feel slightly more tippy for the uninitiated, with a bit of paddling time, this is easily overcome.

In choppy water the Interface slices through the water with little effort or splash. A combination of the ‘V’ hull and nicely formed bow. The deck is lower in profile, with plenty of storage bungees, flush hatches and a front glove box to keep all your bits and pieces in. Being thermoformed, the interface is light, so easily loaded and unloaded from the car. The Interface is available in three volumes, low, medium and high. All in all a great new adition to the Barracuda range.

With less rocker than the Beachcomber, the Interface tracks easily and is approximately 15 – 20% faster. This also means the Interface is less manoeuvrable than the Beachcomber, but this is easily outweighed by the increased speed and reduced pitching. The hard chines provide precise manoeuvring as you begin to use the rail to assist steering. It handles surf really well and in broach entry holds onto the wave where the Beachcomber can tend to get pushed out in front of the white water. The chine slices into the face of the wave to hold its position.

Kiwi Association of Sea Kayakers N.Z. Inc. (KASK) Annual subscription is $35.00.

Kask PO Box 23, Runanga 7841, West Coast

www.kask.co.nz

PAGE 36

Issue 75

KASK is a network of sea kayakers throughout New Zealand

KASK publishes a bi-monthly newsletter containing trip reports, events, book reviews, technique/ equipment reviews and a ‘bugger’ file. KASK holds national sea kayaking forums.

Christmas 2014

www.kayaknz.co.nz


I have been following the development of The Interface for about 18 months and it certainly lives up to its expectations!

Interface Dimensions Length Overall:  

5195mm

Width Overall:    

575mm

Depth Overall:    

It tracks well but hip steers beautifully, it is fast and in a following sea it is a surfers dream - I love it! Rob Howarth Canoe & Kayak North Shore

360mm    add 16mm for medium volume & 35mm for high volume

Paddler Weight Ranges Low volume:               50 - 70kg Medium volume:  

70 - 85kg

High volume:                85 - 110kg Hatches & Cockpit Front hatch opening:   275mm x 200mm Rear Hatch opening:   400mm x 200mm

adventure equipment

Cockpit opening:       800mm x 415mm

“I tried out the Interface in a 15 knot wind and choppy sea. It handled really nicely, with excellent forward speed and good directional stability, although of course, this means that slow speed manoeuvrability is not so good. It has good thigh braces and the resultant contact with the kayak helps with rolling which it does extremely well. The surf was tiny, but it seemed to handle it without problems. I believe that it is an excellent kayak for a capable paddle who wants to go places.” Larraine Williams Canoe & Kayak Auckland

ACCESSORY LEASHES

DECK MOUNT ROD HOLDERS DECK BAGS

Adventure Touring Cag MICRO .75 & 1.5 LITRE DRY BAGS

PADDLE LEASHES

Kurve Touring PFD

PADDLE FLOATS

OMNI AND OPTI DRY BAGS

99 LITRE BACK PACK DRY BAGS

KAYAK COMPASSES

FLUSH MOUNT ROD HOLDER

140 LITRE BACK PACK DRY BAGS KAYAK FOLDING CART

AUDIO CONNECT PHONE / MP3 BAGS

Igneous Touring Boot

Strobe Ladies Cag

LENGTH OPENING LATITUDE DRY BAGS BECKSON PUMPS

KUDO DELUXE SEATS

Phone your closest kayak retailer or for further information email Great Stuff Ltd Distributed by Great Stuff Ltd. www.greatstuffltd.co.nz or email greatstuffltd@xtra.co.nz

GSAD-Mar14

RFD New Zealand Limited 0800 777 009 Auckland Wellington Nelson Christchurch Filename: SURVITECpos_PMS.eps Colourway:

PAGE 37

Issue 75

Christmas 2014

&

100% Pantone PMS 158c

YAK qtr page 14-01 colour white background.indd 1

&

100% Process Black

www.kayaknz.co.nz 4/02/2014 10:44:46 a.m.


Product Focus

ICOM IC-M23 VHF Marine Transceiver Expect more from your marine radio Ever been out on your kayak and needed to use your radio? But it’s fallen into the water and even though it’s waterproof, has been swallowed up by the sea? That means you haven’t got Icom’s IC-M23 Float ‘n Flash on board with you. Icom pioneered the floating VHF marine radio and sets a new trend yet again with the IC-M23 which not only floats but has a flashing feature.

The RAILBLAZA DrinkHold

The radio flashes when in contact with water even when the power is off and can even be spotted from a rescue helicopter at night if you’ve found yourself in a sticky situation. Its unique flashing feature lets you locate it in the water if it’s fallen overboard so it can be easily fished out! The IC-M23’s tough, submersible construction is equivalent to IPX7 (it can withstand 1m depth of water for 30 minutes) and has convenient one-touch access to Channel 16. The smallest and lightest VHF Marine Handheld radio in the Icom range, the IC-M23 has a unique AquaQuake draining function. With the push of a button, the radio vibrates to eject water from the grill to keep the radio dry. A staple item on the water, be sure to make Icom’s Float n’ Flash ICM23 a must have on the water this kayaking season. Contact Icom NZ on 0800 744 062 for your nearest dealer location to make sure you have one the next time you go out on the water.

Buy it online at canoeandkayak.co.nz/icom

New Product, the RAILBLAZA DrinkHold Hold more than just your drink, on any boat, kayak or vehicle, with a high quality RAILBLAZA drink holder. The new drink holder from RAILBLAZA will hold bottles, cups and cans, and has slots for lures and fishing pliers. It’s made in New Zealand from high quality UV resistant plastic. With the right RAILBLAZA mount, it can mount on rails, inflatables, vertical or horizontal surfaces, and is available in black or white. As with all RAILBLAZA products it is installed in minutes, and comes with all the necessary fasteners. For more information, and a list of RAILBLAZA dealers go to www.railblaza.com, or see RAILBLAZA in use on youtube.com/railblaza.

Buy it online at canoeandkayak.co.nz/railblaza www.kayaknz.co.nz

Issue 75

Christmas 2014

PAGE 38


Changes to Tide Tables and Coastguard App Earlier this year, LINZ updated their tidal data to include the adjustment for daylight saving. So now you do not have to adjust the time shown on your tide tables. For those of you that use the Coastguard Tide & Weather phone app, you need to update it – to overcome the daylight savings bug. This is an Apple (IoS) only App, put out under Coastguard Northern Region’s banner, that added in an hour for Daylight Saving Tides (just as we all did for years). When, this year, LINZ started showing Daylight Saving Tides with the hour already added, the Coastguard App wasn’t ‘aware’ and so it gave tide times with an extra hour added onto the correct times. A new version of the App has been made available – and Coastguard have alerted its members – but some users may remain unaware.

Sourced from http://www.linz.govt.nz/ E-mail address customersupport@linz.govt.nz

NEW ZEALAND HYDROGRAPHIC AUTHORITY TIDE PREDICTIONS

AUCKLAND Lat. 36° 51' S Long. 174° 46' E

JANUARY 2015 N.Z. LOCAL TIMES AND HEIGHTS OF HIGH AND LOW WATERS Time

m

1

0444 1050 1709 2316

3.0 0.8 3.1 0.6

2

0545 1149 1807

3

Time

m

9

0441 1109 1711 2332

0.6 3.1 0.7 3.0

Time

m

17

0506 1106 1716 2332

2.8 1.0 2.9 0.8

3.0 0.8 3.0

10

0519 1147 1750

0.7 3.1 0.8

18

0605 1202 1816

0013 0643 1244 1903

0.6 3.1 0.8 3.0

11

0010 0559 1225 1830

2.9 0.7 3.0 0.8

19

4

0106 0735 1335 1955

0.6 3.1 0.8 3.0

12

0049 0640 1305 1911

2.9 0.8 3.0 0.8

5

0156 0824 1423 2044

0.6 3.2 0.7 3.1

13

0130 0725 1347 1955

6

0241 0909 1508 2130

0.6 3.2 0.7 3.1

14

7

0323 0951 1551 2213

0.5 3.2 0.7 3.0

8

0403 1031 1631 2253

0.6 3.2 0.7 3.0

Th

Fr

Sa

Su

Mo

Tu

We

Th

Time

m

25

0537 1208 1809

0.3 3.6 0.3

2.9 0.9 2.9

26

0031 0629 1300 1902

3.4 0.4 3.5 0.4

0029 0701 1257 1915

0.7 3.1 0.7 3.1

27

0124 0724 1354 1956

3.3 0.6 3.3 0.5

20

0123 0753 1350 2011

0.5 3.3 0.6 3.2

28

0219 0823 1449 2052

3.2 0.7 3.2 0.6

2.8 0.9 2.9 0.9

21

0215 0845 1443 2105

0.4 3.4 0.4 3.3

29

0319 0925 1546 2151

3.1 0.8 3.1 0.7

0216 0815 1433 2043

2.8 1.0 2.9 0.9

22

0306 0935 1535 2157

0.3 3.6 0.3 3.5

30

0421 1027 1645 2252

3.0 0.9 3.0 0.8

15

0308 0909 1522 2136

2.7 1.0 2.8 0.9

23

0356 1026 1626 2249

0.2 3.6 0.3 3.5

31

0522 1127 1744 2351

3.0 0.9 2.9 0.8

16

0406 1007 1617 2233

2.7 1.0 2.8 0.9

24

0446 1117 1718 2339

0.2 3.6 0.2 3.5

Fr

Sa

Su

Mo

Tu

We

Th

Fr

Sa

Su

Mo

Tu

We

Th

Fr

Sa

Su

Mo

Tu

We

Th

Fr

Sa



TIMES LISTED ARE N.Z. DAYLIGHT TIME CROWN COPYRIGHT RESERVED

www.kayaknz.co.nz

Issue 75

Christmas 2014

PAGE 39


Health

Get Your Summer Body Back The sweet smell of summer is in the air! You’re listening for the sound of that first cicada to feel the flush of excitement rush through your body as you say to yourself “summer is here”! You envision paddling into the sunset, then …. “Oh no … how will I look in my togs”? The big sweaters of winter made it easy to hide your splurges of warm winter stews, breads and desserts.

Now it’s time to peel off those big

sweaters and deal to those extra kg’s! It’s natural to gain weight in winter – you are not alone and you can melt those kg’s away with these easy steps! 1. Surround yourself with motivation – Buy yourself some new togs with the “I am a hottie” image and keep your new togs in eyes view daily. Then grab yourself some new kayak gear (maybe that kevlar paddle you have always wanted!) Next go where you see people getting fit – i.e. beaches where you can see other paddlers, parks, gyms etc. Then people watch until you feel excited enough to join in. 2. Infuse the “buddy” system – Ask a friend/partner/relative/co-worker to join together on an exercise and weight loss regime with a specific target date and kg loss amount. When you have someone to answer to, you are less likely to fall victim to your excuses. Create a fun guideline around excuses and plan that you each get only two excuse tickets to use until you reach your goals. This creative process works a charm. 3. Now you’re ready and amped up to commit to an exercise routine - It works best to choose a sport/exercise that you enjoy (so you look forward to it, not dread it), kayaking is a great choice. Then set up a reward system. (A healthy lunch or coffee after I finish my work out!) Make your reward for reaching your target weight a bigger reward, such as a new pair of jeans, or techno toy.

4. Incorporating high intensity training (H.I.T) is a must for quick weight loss. It only takes 15 minutes and can be applied to any exercise/sport; it works great in a kayak too. You simply infuse it into your exercise/sport of choice for the 15 minute duration- then do the rest of the training as normal), it goes like this: • 1 minute warm up at an easy normal pace, next minute go as hard as you can – following minute back to moderate pace – next minute is harder with more intensity. Continue this minute on/ minute off for the next 12 minutes then warm down. • You must increase the intensity at each interval- to kick your fat burning into gear for 24 hours post work out! • A good intensity means you cannot talk and you are getting a sweat up. So get comfortable with “uncomfortable”. •

H.I.T should be done 3 x a week.

Do this and you’ll get your summer body back! I invite you to sign up for my weekly – “30 Second Healthy Habit” Blog at : www.drtheresadobson.com One Body – One you for Life! Dr Theresa Dobson www.drtheresadobson.com

Join Us For A Kayaking Adventure - Specialty Tours

Taupo Maori Carvings Half day guided trip to the rock carvings, Lake Taupo... only accessible by boat. A leisurely paddle of about 3 km to the rock carvings. The largest is over 10 m high and from below in a kayak it is imposing.

$95 per person (bookings essential). Phone 07 378 1003 for details.

PAGE 40

Issue 75

Waikato River Discovery Glow Waitara River Tours Worm Kayak Tour

2 hour guided kayak trip. Experience the magnificent upper reaches of the mighty Waikato River - Soak in the geothermal hot springs - Take in the stunning environment... a perfect trip for all the family...

Adult $49, Children $29 Special group and family rates. Call 07 378 1003 for details.

Christmas 2014

For those who are slightly more adventurous at heart, this is a scenic trip with the excitement of Grade Two rapids. Midway down, we paddle under the historic Betran Road Bridge where we will stop for a snack .

Allow 2 hours paddle only. Priced at $85. Phone: 06 769 5506

Sugar Loaf Island From Ngamutu Beach harbour we head out on the open sea to Sugar Loaf Island Marine Reserve. View the scenic & rugged Taranaki coastline as we draw closer to the Islands. Enjoy the seal colony and experience the thrill of close up views of these fascinating marine mammals.

Allow 3 hours subject to weather. $95.00 per person. Phone 06 769 5506

www.kayaknz.co.nz


Puzzles

Quick Crossword Test your knowledge of kayaking and kayaking safety. 1

16. Venomous jellyfish 18. To get pushed off course so that the kayak is unfavorably oriented broadside to waves, currents, or an obstacle. 19. A paddle stroke used to move the kayak sideways. 23. A two person boat.

2

3

4

10

9

8

7

6

5

Down

11 13

12

14

15 16 17 18 19

20 21 23

Across 1. A compound stroke used for entering an eddy. 3. A navigational method popular in sea kayaking. 4. To deliberately put your boat underneath a wave or hydraulic. 7. Manufacturers of the Reload & Ozzie 9. In first aid, an acronym to remember what to ask a patient. 12. The disturbed water following a moving vessel.

22

2. A cracked bone. 5. An acronym to remember what information to give during a PanPan call. 6. Continous weather forcast broadcast. 8. Newest kayak from Barracuda 10. A permanent line on a compass indicating the direction forward. 11. A condition where the body’s core temperature drops to a dangerous level. 13. A playboating manoeuver. 14. The rails or side edges of a kayak 15. An incoming current created by a rising tide 17. A measure of how difficult it is to capsize. 20. A fitting used for tying lines to. 21. European kayaking apparel brand 22. The movement of a vessel through the water

HELP! When disaster strikes who are you going to call when you are out of Cell Phone range?

Sudoku 4 5 9 2 6

2 8 5

5 9 3

7

4 9 5 2

6 4

3 9

2 4 7 1

4 2 www.kayaknz.co.nz

2 6 9

The objective is to fill the 9×9 grid with digits so that each column, each row, and each of the nine 3×3 sub-grids that compose the grid contains all of the digits from 1 to 9. Solution on page 46

*36 )ORDWV 7RXJK 5HOLDEOH :DWHUSURRI

)DVWÀQG3/% IURP\RXU&DQRH .D\DN&HQWUH

Your position is transmitted to the Rescue Co-ordination Centre within a few minutes and the search area is narrowed down to a few square metres. Peace of mind for loved ones and so small it fits in a pocket! Distributed by Bright Ideas ELB Ltd Ph: 0800 713 656 www.brightideas.co.nz

Issue 75

Christmas 2014

PAGE 41


Trip Card # 019 Raglan Harbour

Raglan

Raglan Harbour Route card No. 0019 Skill level: Intermediate Distance: 24 km

Map no: BD32 Tidal Port: Taranaki

Start point:

Raglan Holiday Park, Wainamu Beach

Finish Point: HW/ LW:

Raglan Holiday Park, Wainamu Beach Raglan tides between 3 - 37 minutes after HW, 12 minutes before to 21 minutes after LW Taranaki Much of Raglan Harbour dries from half tide. Dial 111 VHF Channel 86 or 16 Nowcasting 22 VHF coverage is limited.

Tidal times/ notes: Coastguard contact: Comms coverage:

Introduction: Explore at leisure the Raglan Harbour – limestone rocks, waterfalls and narrow fingers of land.

Description: At the Raglan Kopua Holiday Park, carry boats through the gap in the sand dunes, near the ‘backpackers’ cabins. Paddle across the harbour to Marotaka Pt to see the limestone formations. Continue up the harbour past the wharf, past Lorenzen Bay towards the Narrows. Ignore the first estuary/creek entrance; go in to Okete Bay hugging the coast to find the waterfall. On exiting, head for the Narrows. Want to get there in time to explore, have lunch and depart before the bay dries out.

Possible pit stops – a) as you enter Okete Bay, past the house b) on shallow beach on right before hit the Narrows c) in Haroto Bay where the Paritata Peninsula narrows – but this can be muddy. On exiting the Narrows, head for Motukokako Point to get in the tidal stream for a fast ride back. Do not get too close to the wharf!

Hazards: • Strong tidal currents. Very tidal. You want to use the outgoing and incoming tide and ride the tidal stream back. Do not underestimate this current – beware of the wharf, and make sure you do not get swept along past the camp. • Avoid duck shooting season

Please note; Every care has been taken to ensure the information contained in this Trip Card is correct at the time of publication, but things change and you will need to confirm the information provided. You will also need to get further information to ensure a safe trip, this will include an up to date, relevant weather forecast and the ability to understand its implications for the area and talking to locals in the area to garner new information on any hazards in the area. It is also expected that an appropriate level of knowledge, skills and equipment are required to safely complete the trip. Please do not hesitate to contact us if you are unsure of any information or you find the Trip Card needs updating. Cheers Peter Townend,Yakity Yak Kayak Club. Updated: December 2014


Trip Card # 020 Red Beach/ Tindall’s Bay to Army Bay

Army Bay

Red Beach/ Tindall’s Bay to Army Bay Route card No. 0020 Skill level: Strong Beginner Distance: 20 km Start point: Finish Point: Tidal times/ notes: Coastguard contact: Comms coverage:

Chart no: NZ5321 Tidal Port: Auckland

Red Beach or Tindall’s Bay Red Beach or Tindall’s Bay Dial (09) 303 1303 or *500 VHF Channel 82 or 16 Nowcasting 21 VHF coverage is limited close in to shore. Cell phone coverage is good.

Introduction: This is a lovely paddle with plenty of easy rock gardening between Tindall’s & Army Bay when there is no significant swell. This paddle is sheltered from any southerly wind. There is sometimes a small surf at Army Bay or Red Beach when there is a northerly swell.

Hazards: • Surf Landings - Ensure that participants have necessary skills, or choose a sheltered landing spot and/or land one at a time to give assistance as required. • When rock gardening, wear a helmet if there is any swell.

Description: Paddling from Red Beach you can amble your way along the northern shore line of the Whangaparaoa Peninsula, passing Stanmore Bay, Tindalls Beach to Army Bay. There are plenty of opportunities to stop for lunch. Paddling slightly beyond Army Bay you can drop a line over at Wellington Rock and the surrounding reef.

Stanmore Bay

Please note; Every care has been taken to ensure the information contained in this Trip Card is correct at the time of publication, but things change and you will need to confirm the information provided. You will also need to get further information to ensure a safe trip, this will include an up to date, relevant weather forecast and the ability to understand its implications for the area and talking to locals in the area to garner new information on any hazards in the area. It is also expected that an appropriate level of knowledge, skills and equipment are required to safely complete the trip. Please do not hesitate to contact us if you are unsure of any information or you find the Trip Card needs updating. Cheers Peter Townend,Yakity Yak Kayak Club. Updated: December 2014


Kayaks

White Water Price

Matariki

4.50

620

26

$1699

Kiwi Excel Kiwi Lite Skua Skua Lite Shearwater Shearwater Lite Tasman Express Tasman Express Lite Tasman Express Elite Foveaux Express Southern Skua

3.75 3.75 5.20 5.20 480 480 5.30 5.30 5.30 5.00 5.40

740 740 600 600 610 610 620 620 600 600 600

23 18 27 24 26.5 23 29 25 22 19 22

$1660 $1970 $2890 $3140 $2650 $2900 $2890 $3140 $4590 $4460 $4590

Contour 450 Contour 480 Eco Bezhig

4.50 4.80 5.40

620 620 590

26 27 27

$2549 $2849 $3099

Manitou 13 Looksha 14 Eskia

3.90 4.30 4.90

630 625 635

20.5 26 27

$1299 $2199 $2499

4.90

600

17

$3240

4.90

600

18.2

$3441

Beachcomber Ultralite Beachcomber Ultralite Plus Barracuda Beachcomber Ultralite Pro Interface

4.90

600

5.20

575

19

$3555 $3440

Liquid Logic

Weight (kg)

Length (m)

Width (mm)

Weight (kg)

Price

Magnum 72 Magnum 80 Thunder 65 Thunder 76

2.41 2.54 2.34 2.44

660 254 650 660

18 67 18.5 29.5

$1595 $1595 $1895 $1895

Remix 59 Remix 69 Remix 79 Freeride 57 Freeride 67 Stomper 80 Stomper 90 Flying Squirrel 85 Flying Squirrel 95

2.57 2.64 2.72 1.98 2.06 2.49 2.57 2.66 2.73

640 650 670 650 660 650 680 650 670

19 20 21 14.5 15 21 22 22 23

$1999 $1999 $1999 $1899 $1899 $2049 $2049 $2049 $2049

2.60

610

16

$1160

Length (m)

Width (mm)

Weight (kg)

Starting Price

Twist 1

2.60

790

6

$1095

Twist 2

3.60

830

9

$1395

Helios 1

3.10

710

13.5

$1595

Helios 2

3.80

750

17

$1895

Sunny

3.80

800

16

$1895

Tasman K40

4.40

670

15

$3036

Pacific K50

5.35

670

20

$3680

Q-Kayaks Stealth

Inflatables

Gumotex

Width (mm)

Incept

Necky Mission

Q-Kayaks

Canoe & Kayak

Length (m)

Riot

Sea Kayaks Single

Sea Kayaks Double Length (m)

Width (mm)

Weight (kg)

Price

Q-Kayaks

Southern Endeavour

5.60

800

46

$3540

Mission

Contour 490 Eco Niizh 545 COM

4.90 5.65

800 770

35 55

$3499 $4999

Necky

Amaruk

5.40

725

41.3

$3499

5.80

700

28

$4300

Barracuda Beachcomber Duo

Great Great Advice Advice // Great Great Brands Brands // Great Great Service Service


Sit-on-Top Single Starting Price

Fire Fly

2.40

700

16

$535

Whizz

2.50

770

22

$750

Escapee

3.30

740

23

$775

Escapade

3.50

750

27

$975

Play

3.10

710

18

$549

Escape

3.20

790

17

$649

Explorer

3.40

790

18.20

$749

Navigator

3.80

790

22

$849

Length (m)

Cobra

Weight (kg)

Ocean Kayak

Width (mm)

780

28

3.80

915

28

$899

Tourer

4.60

710

23

$1799

Trident 13 inc seat

4.10

710

28

$1799

Tetra 12 Angler inc seat

3.70

710

24.5

$1499

Trident Ultra 4.1 inc comfort seat

4.10

710

28.5

$2099

Trident Ultra 4.3 inc zone seat

4.30

740

32.5

$2499

Trident Ultra 4.7 inc zone seat

4.70

740

35

$2649

17

$499

19

$949

Glide 390 inc rudder

3.90

850

28

$1249

Xstream 420

4.20

730

28

$1349

Prowler Big Game II

3.90

865

32

$2499

Frenzy

2.75

790

19.5

$749

Line 280

2.80

730

18

$1299

Mysto inc seat

2.95

790

21

$849

Catch 290

2.95

750

19

$1049

3.90

850

28

$1649

Scrambler 11 inc seat

3.60

750

23

$1099

Catch 390 inc rudder Line 400

4.0

840

32

$1599

Tetra 12 inc seat

3.70

710

24

$1349

Catch 420 inc rudder

4.20

730

28

$2049

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2.7

790

17

$599

800

22

$1149

3.2

790

20

$749

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3.6

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3.4

790

18.2

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780

24

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3.6

820

24

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4.20

680

18

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4.4

770

29

$1999

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3.6

820

24

$1899

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4.5

740

29

$2499

SoT Fish Pro

4.20

680

18

$3500

Width (mm)

Weight (kg)

Starting Price

Mission

760

Weight (kg)

Starting Price

Escapade II

3.50

750

26

$900

Delta

4.00

830

32

$1295

Tandem

3.80

799

26

$799

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4.40

910

36

$999

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3.90

850

28

$1149

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3.65

870

27

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Kayak

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4.10

86

33

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Viking Kayaks

Viking 2 + 1 inc seats & paddles

3.9

810

27

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Point 65

Tequila! Modular

4.2

750

35

$1999

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Weight (kg)

Starting Price

Multisport Length (m) Q- Kayaks

4.30

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750

Width (mm)

Ocean

$1699

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2.70

Length (m)

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2.95

Sit-on-Top Double

Cobra

Weight (kg)

Squirt

Barracuda SoT Tourer

Q- Kayaks

Width (mm)

Flow

Viking Kayaks

Viking Kayaks

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Mission

Cobra

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Length (m)

Fishing Singles

Hurricane (kevlar)

5.90

490

12

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Maximus (kevlar)

6.40

510

16

$3890

Barracuda

Recreational Length (m)

Q- Kayaks

Strike

3.1

750

20

$920

Strike Excel

3.1

750

21

$1495

Sprite 1

3.00

700

19

$850

Kiwi

3.75

740

20

$1365

Sprite 2

4.50

820

32

$1895

Access 280

2.80

730

18

$1049

Mission

Access 400

4.00

840

32

$1399

Ocean Kayak

Manitou 13

3.90

630

20.5

$1299


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From page 41

PAGE 46

Issue 75

Christmas 2014

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Freestyle in Canada

By Josh Neilson

After a great time at the Whitewater Grand Prix and some post event creek boating, the rivers continued to rise and out came some of the world’s best freestyle waves. Within a few hours drive of our base in the Ottawa Valley, we had a number of classic waves to choose to paddle over a few. Our first stop was on the Gatineau River for a wave called ‘High Tension’. This wave is part way down a great series of rapids and offers eddy access and a clean medium sized face. The wave changes from steep and fast to soft and mushy depending on the water levels and when it’s pumping you cannot miss it! It’s a great place to hone your skills and practice new tricks because of its retentive nature. With the sun shining and a good crew circling through the eddy you can’t but help to be stoked! Watching the locals rip it up and learning from their precise movements made it easy to improve each ride! We headed back to Ottawa and got word ‘The Ruins’ wave was in. I had seen this wave in videos over the years and knew it was going to be amazing! In years past a hydro scheme stretched out into the Ottawa River on the Quebec side just north of Ottawa City. After it was decommissioned it became a pile of ruins hence the name. From high upstream you ferry glide to the middle of the kilometre wide river and aim for a small island marking the channel for the wave. Once out on the island you have to careful make your way past literally hundreds www.kayaknz.co.nz

Issue 75

Christmas 2014

PAGE 47


Tyler Fox - Ruins Wave, Ottawa River Photo Josh Neilson

of thousands of nesting seagulls and other birds. On the island, you get your first glimpse of this monster wave. A huge V-wave is formed between two of the old dam walls before opening out into the wide river again. As you make your way past the seagulls and out into the flow the size of the wave becomes more apparent. Dropping in feels surreal due to the size and all of a sudden you are surfing even faster than before.

Back in the valley we spent a few days working on Lu and Graham’s cabin by the river until the next wave came in. Next up was ‘Minibus’. I had surfed this wave back in 2007 for the World Champs at less than ideal flows so was eager to get back out and experience it at flows I had heard so much about.

My first pass down the wave was somewhat out of control but soon I found myself taking control and putting in place the techniques learned on the smaller waves. After a couple of goes the tricks started to come out and once again, I was having the time of my life. Tyler, Kim, Lu and I circled round the wave and we called it a day when the sun went down. www.kayaknz.co.nz

Josh Neilson on High Tension Photo by: Tyler Fox Issue 75

Christmas 2014

PAGE 48


Josh Neilson Mini Bus Photo by: Tyler Fox

With a crew of hardcore locals we were set to go as soon as it came in. We were parked less than a 5 minute drive away and were fired up to get out there. By now I had been practicing a range of tricks but had now not quite mastered my main goal for the Spring.

days on the river are. These are just a few of the amazing waves we got to experience in the Spring and there are so many more for all levels of kayaking to be enjoyed in the Ottawa Valley and Quebec region. If you want to get good at play boating I suggest a trip to the Ottawa River!

The infamous ‘Air Screw’ had seen me land on my head a lot in the past few weeks and this was my last opportunity to nail it. The eddy as full of good friends sharing stories and cheering each other on. To access this wave you need patience, someone to set up with the tow rope and a lot of determination. Sitting in the eddy you grab the tow rope from a friend on the rocks. This rope is attached up stream to a tree. With the force of the flow you pendulum out into the flow holding your paddle in one hand and the rope in the other. Once you are out far enough you let go of the rope and are immediately flying down the face of another monster wave. The surfers right side of the wave is steep and clean and the other side sucks into what’s called the ‘Toilet Bowl’.

This article is dedicated to our good friend Juanito De Ugarte who shared these amazing waves with us this year and recently passed away. His passion for life and pointers to help me improve along with his never ending smiles and laughter on the wave and in the eddy will live with me forever. Be safe out there and enjoy the amazing times the rivers give us.

It took a few goes to figure it all out but soon I became comfortable and it was apparent that this was much nicer than the last time I was here. Again watching the locals helped my set up and I could soon feel myself getting closer to nailing the ‘Air Screw’. Half the enjoyment of play boating is being out there surfing, but a big part is also sitting on the bank or in the eddy talking and watching your mates. Everyone passes on tips and you find yourself getting better fast. My last ride for the day was the best! I let go of the rope and hurtled down the face. Without thinking too much I initiated the rail and threw myself over to the left and my boat flew up. A split second passed and I was upside down in the air and rotating fast. Next thing I knew I was all the way around and landing back on the hull of my boat. I had done it! My first air screw and I had the biggest smile on my face.

Thanks to everyone who shares this with me.

Juanito Bussy

Back at home we shared beers and stories about how awesome the www.kayaknz.co.nz

Issue 75

Christmas 2014

PAGE 49


Josh Neilson on the Tow Rope Photo by: Tyler Fox

PAGE 50

Issue 75

Christmas 2014

www.kayaknz.co.nz


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Issue 75  

Each issue contains heaps of great advice on kayaking techniques, paddling destinations, recent kayaking adventures by readers, health, firs...

Issue 75  

Each issue contains heaps of great advice on kayaking techniques, paddling destinations, recent kayaking adventures by readers, health, firs...