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Issue 73

Kayaking the Kermadec Islands

Exploring the Ahaura River Planning a Trip – Dreams with Deadlines

Competition Fishing

An Adventure to the Outer Marlborough Sounds

Making the most of competition day

$7.50 NZ $7.50 AUST

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Issue 73

Autumn 2014

PAGE 3


Contents

Technical Sea Kayaking Kayaking the Kermadec Islands An Adventure to the Outer Marlborough Sounds Our Abel Tasman Experience

6 12 16

Fishing Competition Fishing

18

White Water Two Rivers: Exploring the Ahaura River and A Day on the Grey Mike Dawson - Olympian Kayaker

22 48

Multisport Godzone Adventure Racing Speight’s Coast to Coast is over ... What next?

28 31

Planning a Trip – Dreams with Deadlines. Trip Card - Hahei to Hotwater Beach Trip Card - Narrow Neck to Rangitoto Knots - Tying an Ashley Bend

32 42 43 45

Health Keep Your Kayaking Knees Happy

38

Puzzles Soduku Quick Crossword Puzzle Solutions

36 37 44

First Aid Concussion

39

Bush Craft Paranoia keeps us alive

40

Leader Profile

11

Kayaks Kayak listings

46


Editorial I am trying to write but I am distracted. Staring at the bay is bringing last night’s quick trip to check on Dacre Cottage to mind. It was a beautiful sunset, the sea was flat, fish were flying, Mars, I think it was, shone low on the eastern horizon, phosphorescence lit the way. Searching for inspiration I’ve thought on what friends and colleagues have shared, so here goes. Do we treat where we live like owners or trespassers? At home my kids will claim “I have tidied my bedroom” but when I ask them to mow our lawns or tidy the kitchen the answer is often “why me”. The bedroom is theirs so they feel responsible. But other family members could be responsible for lawn mowing or kitchen duty. Don’t get me wrong they are great kids and they do their fair share. I talk about ‘my’ estuary. This week I’ve referred two poachers and a hooligan to the police and DOC, spoken with council contractors and officers about track maintenance and the long awaited replacement of the now beautiful Dacre Cottage roof. I am also watching the street being dug up today and will be on the case if sediment controls are not in place before day’s end. In my head it’s ‘mine’! Of course it is also everyone else’s but I look after ‘my’ patch. Where I live, people care for the neighbourhood so no one sticks out doing this. Thinking of ownership do you say “It’s my country and my world”? If so what can ‘you’ do to look after your corner better? A friend said to me “Have you seen www.lawa.org.nz? It is a great website collating information on past and current health of our streams

Issue 73 and rivers. It measures whether they are improving or declining.” This helps all of us to improve our nation’s water ways. Interesting where some of the start-up money came from, the Tindal Foundation was one, good on them. There was a fundraiser at our local park, live music and arts and craft, a great day. It was here that I was talking to one of the volunteers from Forest and Bird about the local environment. I was saying how many things needed sorting, not least of all the reported 1000 tons of sediment getting into our estuary every year. She made the comment that to get change you need to talk to your local board and councillors and MP’s and while I have talked to some, I could talk to a lot more. So the winter plan will be to collar them and continue along with many others, getting the message to them that we need to continue to increase the protection of land bordering our rivers, streams and coast. Make sure this winter you get out and help on a tree planting, they are great fun, they really help and you will find yourself saying in years to come “that is ‘my’ tree”. Enjoy the rest of the calm autumn and as always the winter will give many great trips for the well prepared and we will catch up in a month or two with issue 74. Happy and safe paddling Peter Townend

Copyright: The opinions expressed by contributors and the information stated in advertisements/articles are not necessarily agreed to by the editors or publisher of New Zealand Kayak Magazine. Pricing: At the time of printing the prices in this magazine were accurate. However they may change at any time. EDITOR: Peter Townend Ph: 0274 529 255 / (09) 476 7066 Email: pete@canoeandkayak.co.nz PUBLISHER: New Zealand Kayak Magazine is published four times per year by Canoe & Kayak Ltd. PRINTING: MHP Print DISTRIBUTION: MagMag SUBSCRIPTIONS: (see page 44) New Zealand – 4 Issues = $25 Overseas – 4 Issues = $40

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CONTRIBUTORS: We welcome contributors’ articles and photos. Refer to www.canoeandkayak.co.nz/guide New Zealand Kayak Magazine ‘Contributors Guidelines’ for more details. ALL CONTRIBUTIONS TO: James Fitness Email: james@canoeandkayak.co.nz New Zealand Kayak Magazine Front page: Paddling in the Kermadecs Photo by : Guy Stevens Contents page: - Rob Brown at Kawhia Harbour Photos by: Ruth E. Henderson Issue 73

Autumn 2014

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Kayaking the Kermadec Islands

By Guy Stevens

World class diving, walking and kayaking in one of the most remote corners of New Zealand.

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Little did I know what I was getting myself into when signing up for the trip in June 2013. Having just bought my Q-Kayak Skua and having done a few paddles in the Hauraki Gulf with the Yakity Yak Club, a week kayaking around some NZ islands sounded good. All the paddlers I knew said what a great trip it would be. Then it became clear this was to be more of an adventure than I thought – seeing the islands on a map gives no real idea of how remote they are. 1000 kms from Tauranga – a small distance given today’s means of transport – but not if going by a freighter. The ship had been chartered by the Department of Conservation (DOC) to resupply the five personnel on the island, exchange some volunteers, and take tradesmen out for repair work. Tim , our trip leader had negotiated that six kayakers could accompany DOC on the ship, take our gear, and do some paddling for the six days the ship was at the island before returning to Tauranga. The voyage was 60 hours – two and a half days – each way. From www.doc.govt.nz “The Kermadec Islands are the visible surface of a chain of about 80 volcanoes, stretching between Tonga and New Zealand. It supports New Zealand’s only truly subtropical marine systems, and historically low levels of fishing have left this environment largely undisturbed and abundant. The Kermadecs have a mild, subtropical climate with occasional violent cyclones. The area is volcanically active and earthquakes can be an almost daily occurrence. The region has never been connected to a larger landmass. In their isolation, the Kermadecs have evolved a unique subtropical and temperate biodiversity, both above and below the waterline.

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All of the islands support breeding colonies of sea birds. The largest colonies are located on the relatively small islets off the Raoul and Macauley Islands, which remained rat-free following human discovery. The New Zealand Government annexed the Kermadecs in 1887. In 1934 most of Raoul Island and all of the other islands in the group were set aside as a flora and fauna reserve, later to become a nature reserve. A marine reserve was created in 1990”. I was relatively new to paddling and had six months to get paddle fit. I tried to fit in a lot of paddles on weekends, but something always got in the way and I only managed a few. From some research, I also found that there were plentiful diving opportunities. Two metre spotted grouper, and as it is a Galapagos shark nursery area, sharks are seen on almost every dive. As a keen scuba diver I was now starting to get excited. The six paddlers (Guy, Tim, Nadia, Russell, Ashley and I) were all recreational kayakers. A few weeks before the trip we met as a group for the first time – for some, the first time meeting the others. Trip preparation included a briefing by DOC on what to expect on the island and also in the water, including what was dangerous – and of the four dangerous critters out there, sharks were the least likely, with the most likely cone shells -the slowest moving predators on earth! The week of the trip we dropped our kayaks and gear off at the DOC quarantine station, where it was inspected for cleanliness, stowaways, seeds and so on that could be left on the island. When we set sail from Tauranga on a sunny and balmy summer evening, we were reminded that this was a working ship, not a cruise liner, by the safety briefing given by the ship’s mate as we left – for example – if a man overboard occurs, the captain will only attempt a rescue if it does not put the rescuers lives at risk. I’ll bet P&O never tell you that.

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Paddling along the coastline there were great volcanic sculptures in the layers of ash and lava – now high in the cliffs. The water was very clear at three metres you could see the bottom. We didn’t see any sharks in the water, but a myriad of a brightly coloured fish. Paddling back from the west the wind blew up to 20 knots at times, tough but fun and the windiest I have ever paddled in. Nine kms in 3.5 hours.

Two days of sailing proved challenging for some – day one relatively calm, but over the course of day two the swell increased from one metre to eight metres. A 50 m ship is not big in an eight metre swell and many disappeared to their bunks having succumbed to seasickness. By dawn on Monday, Raoul Island was in sight. The swell had calmed, and the skies were starting to clear. Raoul Island – looked prehistoric with jungle clad hills swathed in low cloud. You could imagine dinosaurs or King Kong being at home. Launching from the ship involved our kayaks being passed from the deck down to crew in a zodiac. The paddler then jumped into the zodiac and inserted themselves into their kayak. Despite my being the relative novice, I was the only one with experience getting into a kayak this way (from a trip to Antarctica), and gave the first demonstration. All quite easy with the crew helping to make sure spray skirts were in place. So I was ready for my 21st paddle at one of the most remote islands in the Pacific.

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Ba ck to the ship and time for a swim. Four scuba and two snorkelers enjoyed water at 25 degrees. The diving was world class with great visibility. The sharks we heard about were 2-3 metres long, and as one of the largest reef sharks, not normally dangerous unless provoked. We were warned that they were inquisitive and that was certainly the case, one swimming up to within a metre of me. The following day, we had nice calm seas as we paddled along the coastline. We were in a cove with a small amount of swell breaking gently on a vertical cliff while looking at the wreck of a container on the shore. I had turned around to paddle out of the cove and was almost caught by a large wave sweeping in. This one had started to break on an offshore reef before it got to me. Fortunately as my bow was facing the right direction I was able to paddle over the swell. Two metres further to the left where it was breaking and I may have been finding out what the cliff felt like. We then headed out to the Meyer Islands – about 1.5 km. These islands were never populated or infested by rats, so the seabird nesting was

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Day 3: Torrential rain and the long range weather forecast was predicting a sub-tropical low to be over the Kermadecs on Friday morning. Winds not as bad as a cyclone, but large swells predicted. This brought an end to the kayaking on the trip as the swell and winds everywhere except in the lee of the island were too risky. Day 4: Check with the island and good to go for our island walk. Landing at Fishing Rock was going to be challenging, so all donned life vests and helmets. Then into the zodiac and across to the landing. The landing is on rocks that are washed by the swell, and is achieved by the boat driver ramming the boat up onto the rocks with the swell, keeping the engine revving high. He yells “go” you grab a rope , leap out of the boat onto a rudimentary step , and then hanging onto the rope you climb up a few more steps chiselled into the rock, prolific. There are only two weeks a year when one bird or another is not on the island building nests or raising chicks. Several petrels were quite curious about us and came to inspect – attempting landings on heads or cameras mounted on kayaks. The islands have several sections and gaps between them as narrow as two metres, so some good opportunities for rock gardening and catching a wave through the gaps. We then headed further north and paddled around Nugent Island which is the most northern point of NZ. At this point the swell picked up to around two metres and it was good fun dealing with a swell coming from the north, followed by a wave from the west as the swell bounced off the islands. Over 20 kms paddled made this my longest paddle and biggest swell I have encountered to date.

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and to safety. The kayakers managed to get on land safely, but a crew member slipped and went into the water – recovered safely. Our guide for the day, took us to the highest point on the island for a look over the two calderas – green lake and blue lake. As we were walking along the well-formed track our guide identified a number of plants that were special to the island. We had heard of weeding programs on the island, and after passing many common garden weeds we found out that they only target five plants. We reached the turnoff to the peak Moumoukai – this was just a track, only navigable on foot. A steep but manageable climb through the forest with not much to distinguish the track from the bush. It was by now pouring with rain, and the steep track became slippery and muddy. After 30 mins of walking we reached the summit drenched to the skin, and were rewarded with a great view of the inside of a cloud. After a visit to the DOC hostel and a warm drink, time to leave and back down the track to Fishing Rock. Getting off was supposed to be easier than getting on, but the swell was washing higher over the rocks. This time it was stand on the rock, holding the rope, wait for the zodiac to ram up on the rocks and then step on. When my turn came, we had to abort twice and go back up the rocks and wait for large waves to wash over. On the third attempt I stood on the bow of the zodiac and stepped forward into the boat, straight into a crewman’s arms and safety. Not sure what would have happened had I overbalanced, but I am told my entry looked good! Then back to the ship in a two metre swell and a 20 knot wind and driving rain. When we pulled up to the ship to get back on, the zodiac was rising and falling two metres against the ship – at the top you could

without a hitch - no-one can predict the weather. When I think back on all we did - from swimming with large pelagic creatures, kayaking in the strongest winds and biggest swells I have encountered, getting on and off the ship, on and off the island, climbing that muddy trail, plus the trips there and back, we packed more adventure into 11 days than some people do in a lifetime. I hope the photos and videos will do it justice. Best of all, six people met for the trip, but six friends said goodbye at the end.

step straight on to the ship. I thought this scene was just like in the movies when you see people being rescued during a cyclone. The trick was to grab the wrists of the two crew on the ship and at the top of the swell jump onto the ship. On the final two days, conditions were too bad for kayaking or diving – we just had to accept it was one of the hazards of going to a remote place. Sailing back was similar – 8-10 metre swell which only calmed as we reached New Zealand. Thanks to Russell and Larraine Williams (C&K Auckland) for encouraging me to attempt the trip, and to Tim Muhundan for organising a superb adventure that went off PAGE 10

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Leader Profile

Leader Profile Meet some of our awesome leaders. Without their support the club wouldn’t be what it is today.

Ruth with good friend Peter Alexander from Arapuni

Sophie Pearson (taupo) Sophie began kayaking in the USA eight years ago. Since moving to New Zealand four years ago she’s paddled mainly around the north half of the North Island. She’s organised trips on Lake Taupo, to some of the Rotorua lakes and in Auckland. She especially enjoys kayak-camping and used to kayak out to an island off the Cape Canaveral coast to camp out and watch shuttle launches. Her favourite paddle around Taupo is to Orakei Korako - “crystal clear water, a range of scenery, amazing geothermal features along the river bank, a slot canyon to walk up, a warm-water waterfall for a shoulder massage, and a hot pool to relax in - how can you beat a day like that?”

NEW AGENCIES & EXISTING TERRITORIES AVAILABLE THROUGH OUT NEW ZEALAND Call Pete Townend pete@canoeandkayak.co.nz or phone 09 476 7066

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Issue 73

Autumn 2014

P A G E 11


An Adventure to the Outer Marlborough Sounds

By Noel Pepperell

Seven kayakers met at the Wellington ferry terminal for the 3 pm sailing to Picton. Kayakers and dog owners are the absolute last to board. We all trudged on, trailing our boats behind us. The ferry had sailed by the time we got upstairs to the lounge.. Arriving at 6 pm, we walked around the waterfront to the launching site beside the marina. We were on the water by 7 pm and heading out to Kumutoto Bay, 11 km, for our first night. The wind was getting up so we hugged the eastern side till we got to Karaka Point. Just as we were about to cross to the western side of Queen Charlotte Sound, the new replacement ferry come out of Tory Channel. After it rattled past we ferryglided to Allports Island and then onto Kumutoto Bay. Three members peeled off to a night of luxury in a friend’s house, while the rest camped, monitoring the weather, hoping the wind would drop. The weather would continue to vary dramatically from what was forecast at the beginning of the trip. The Sounds do not have a specialist forecast so interpreting the Cook Strait and Cape Jackson forecast is based upon your local knowledge. Thursday was better as the wind had dropped in the bay, however there was still some chop in the Queen Charlotte Sound. We all met up and headed off for Schoolhouse Bay, some 26 km. The wind was still pouring out of Tory Channel, giving us a side swell and a little headwind as we approached the Tory Channel intersection. As the Sounds are quite narrow you do not get a long swell, but the coast, wind and shipping cause a variety of surface conditions which keep your attention. Once we got past the Tory Channel passage the wind changed to a tailwind and we enjoyed a slight following sea which gave great fun PAGE 12

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surfing along on till we turned towards Endeavour Inlet. As the wind was still energetically blowing into the bay, I was pleased that we stayed at the entrance for lunch at Mint Bay before cutting across to Scott Point into Resolution Bay, and the campsite at Schoolhouse Bay. This camp is the first on the Queen Charlotte track as there is no camping at Ship Cove. The camp got quite full with our six tents and three more from late afternoon trampers who came through. The local wekas were in full attendance here. You could hear their calling out “fresh meat” to each other soon after our arrival. Mike learned their cunning ways after having a bag taken which was found amongst cutty grass and stinging nettle. Ket and Rob lost one night’s pasta due to their marauding. We carried a picnic table down to the lower level and enjoyed a well earned beer in the sun. It was at this point that Mike discovered the gourmet nature of our culinary habits. He will not be living on dry tack on the next trip. The sunshine continued the next morning and we traveled round the headland and into Ship Cove. This is where Captain Cook landed in Jan 1770 and watered and replenished the ships stores. It is a fantastic sheltered bay, protected from all but a strong north-easterly, and not too far up the Sound from open water. It is a wonderfully pretty memorial site. Were you aware that when Cook mapped NZ, the west coast of the mainland United States was largely unknown except by the Spanish and Portuguese? It was not until 1805 that Lewis and Clarke got to the mouth of the Columbia River and saw the Pacific Ocean for the first time. We left in brilliant sunshine for the 3 km trip across to Motuara Island. The high-level cloud approached and by the time we arrived the fine weather was gone. We had a quick visit on the island, which is a bird www.kayaknz.co.nz


Ship Cove

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and sea sanctuary, before the haul upwind to Long Island. Because of the weather change we bypassed the intended visit to Pickersgill Island and went straight across to Blumine Island. A quick paddle round to the western side found us at the camp site arriving at the same time as the rain. There were already three large tents up so we squeezed in setting up in the rain. We snacked at a sheltered beach then walked the 3 km uphill to the gun emplacements from WWII. Photos attest to how quickly the forest can re-grow. What was once cleared and eroded land in 1940 is now covered in large trees blocking much of the views. In the end the guns were never used as after Pearl Harbour the needs of the American Fleet changed and the requirement for a safe anchorage disappeared. It is now a bird sanctuary. We saw pigeon, tui and a pair of saddleback on the way back. Ket was very interested in seeing these and next morning went back to where we saw them. While she was away, they were sitting in the tree above our campsite. The wekas here were not as intent as those at Schoolhouse Bay. Losses were low but once more, Ket and Robs’ diet was compromised. We awoke to the sound of bird song and a cruise liner going past. Across the bay a pod of dolphins sped by. We headed across to Awapawa Island and followed the coast round to the entrance to Tory Channel. Here the waters were calmer and seemingly deeper. Even close to the edge, the wake from the ferries rocked us but did not break. The tide was coming in. At two small headlands the water was pouring around the corner and it was an effort to get past. The weather was getting more threatening by the minute and we could see rain towards the channel entrance. We turned away from the channel and coasted downwind into Ngaruru Bay campsite. PAGE 14

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This campsite is bush clad and flat. Those of us who chose a tentsite with harbor views very quickly re-located to a site away from the edge and behind the shrubbery. After moving the picnic table and putting up the tent fly we were comfortable when the rain arrived and the wind strength increased. When a call went up that two other kayaks were approaching we thought they were joking. What we thought was a professional guide and two clients in a double, was in fact, three other Wellingtonians. We had seen them two days earlier getting delivered by water taxi to Schoolhouse Bay and then again on Motuara Island. They also had misgivings on the weather. The evening was spent round the picnic table, sheltering from the rain, eating and chatting. The next morning the weather was still wild. Marine and website reports were not promising so we arranged for a boat pickup in the form of a flatdeck barge with twin outboard motors. By 10.30 we were speeding back towards Kumutoto Bay. We slowed to look at a pod of dolphins before meeting with our other club group that were doing a shorter Sounds trip and who were getting an early ride back to Picton. As we were unable to change the ferry tickets to an earlier sailing and the sea had abated, we decided to hit the water again. We headed along the coast to Lochmara Bay. Here, there is a restaurant and accommodation, which is only accessible by water or by foot. We had a gourmet lunch, very much enjoyed by Mike who needed a change from dehydrated meals. We needed that food, as by the time we left, the wind had moved in from the Cook Strait and onto the Sounds. I should have realised this fact when looking up to the massive lenticular clouds standing above the Kaikoura mountains. Heading straight into the southerly to Picton was hard work. Thank goodness the front hatch has a good seal. We all www.kayaknz.co.nz


used up our lunches and after an hour or so got into the calm waters on the western side of Mabel Island. As we crossed the main channel to the eastern shore, we could see a paddle boarder and his young child in a plastic canoe calmly moving about in the protected waters. An easy paddle down the coast saw us idle up to the beach we left four days earlier. A pub dinner and then onto the ferry. As we left Tory Channel the ship started to move and soon we were in a full Cook Strait storm with accompanying sea-sickness for those who suffer from it. It was great to turn into the Wellington harbour.

Disembarking the Cook Strait ferry

A great trip that was enjoyed by all. Neil Thompson, Chris Mercer, Noel Pepperell, Diane Cork, Mike Turnbull, Rob Miller and Ket Bradshaw.

Tui Excel A versatile, go anywhere kayak

Penguin A tried and true winner that delivers affordable excellence

Shearwater A proven design that just got better

Skua An exceptional performance sea kayak

Southern Endeavour

For all the kayak specs. and stockists, visit www.q-kayaks.co.nz or phone 06 326 8667 Skua - 1st Plastic Sea Kayak -Trans Taupo Race 2011 - Circumnavigation around the South Island. www.kayaknz.co.nz

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Our Abel Tasman Experience By Lucas Jones

From January 16 to 22, my wife Elanita and I joined the Wellington Yakity Yak Club in kayaking the Abel Tasman National Park. We haven’t always been brave seafaring kayakers. We moved from sunny California to Wellington in

of Abel Tasman, the first European to discover New Zealand for whom the park is named, and Murderers Bay. As the story goes, it was named after four Dutch sailors were killed in that first encounter when the Maori, (fair enough), misunderstood the European ‘peace sign’ of firing a cannon off

June of last year looking for a chance to explore the antipodes, and we joined the club after taking our sea kayaking course with Neil. In addition, following the Whanganui River Journey, it is my personal goal to complete as many of the Great Walks of New Zealand as I can without walking. We took the ferry into Picton and slept the night there, before our fearless leader Neil and fellow kayaker Arne generously drove us by car, van and trailer over the hills to Marahau. The distance between Picton and Marahau only looks like a couple of centimeters max on a map, but felt considerably further. Joining the trip were Jill, Liam, Matt and Shelley, Matt and Peggy, Edgar and his son Andre, and Erin and Adrienne joining us from other centers. Unfortunately, our first day kayaking on the water, to Anchorage via the Mad Mile, was cancelled due to excessive wind. I don’t know exactly how strong, but certainly several knots too many, Neil said it would have been gusting 35 knots at times. However, for some of us less experienced seamen and women, the bumpy water taxi ride crowded amongst piles of kayaks and gear was thrill enough for the day. Arriving in Anchorage, we found a large, lively campground full of backpackers, where we all enjoyed our first camp-cooked meal together and watched the quail sauntering and fantails hopping about. Neil had organised a non kayaking day for us that was going to be filled with a journey down a river so the following day we met up with our canyoning guides from Abel Tasman Canyons . Together we hiked up about an hour with increasingly beautiful views of Torrent Bay. Our guides were excellent, and always knew just when to stop for a snack before we even had a chance to grumble. We paused on the hike to hear the story PAGE 16

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Courtesy: Abel Tasman Canyons www.kayaknz.co.nz


midday. There, Abel Tasman Kayaks kindly let us use its facilities and enjoy some much-anticipated hot showers after a wet morning on the water. to the side. Luckily, to the best of my knowledge, no one from the Yakity Yak Kayak Club was murdered there nor murdered anyone else. We reached the Torrent River, which we would follow down all the way to Cleopatra’s pool. We donned thick wetsuits to protect ourselves against the chilly water, and did our best to “ninja walk,” as advised, navigating the slippery rocks. We then enjoyed a combination of abseiling (“rappelling” to us Americans), jumping, sliding, and swimming as we made our way down. It was as though our guides had a portable ropes course in their bags that they expertly put up and took down repeatedly. Our tallest jump was a full eight metres, enough force to somehow remove my shoe, although there was always a shorter jumping option as well. It was a lot of fun and a unique experience away from the traffic of the popular campsites. The next day, we paddled to Mosquito Bay by way of Tonga Island and Shag Harbour, about 19 km in total. Tonga Island was a great place to spot wildlife including seals, one pretty cute little penguin, and of course a lot of shags. We enjoyed our best weather this third day, and the light shone on the water revealing that color of pounamu that had enchanted me from the pictures. This was true nowhere more than in Shag Harbour, my favorite stop of the trip, an incredibly serene spot where you can paddle into tiny coves and caves that feel like a world all of your own. On our way to Shag Harbour we also passed the beautiful Tonga Arches, which tantalizes with narrow passages which, alas, are in fact dead ends. We camped at Mosquito Bay, where many of us enjoyed a swim, before we were shown how low tides can empty an entire shallow bay here. Liam proved his penchant for charming his way into leftovers from boating campers that were leaving that afternoon, which I believe included fresh fish, a steak, veggies, soda, and maybe a kayak or two. Some Irishmen have more than just luck on their side. On day four, we paddled another 13 km, passing Pinnacle Islands, Te Pukatea Bay, and Adele Island. Adele Island was the highlight of the wildlife watching for me, when a seal pup paused to look at me with huge black eyes before he resumed nursing at his mama seal. We spent a leisurely afternoon at Observation Beach, playing cards, cooking, and trying to get some of our clothes dry. Some of our number went out for an extra paddle, but as I recall the visibility was poor at the time, obscured as it was by the inside of my eyelids. Besides our club, we shared the beach only with a rather romantic oystercatcher couple. While the female nested, the male was fiercely protective, squawking at anyone who crossed his perimeter and even beak-punching a seagull who dared to come too close. After three days of excellent weather, we awoke to rain and wind, dampening our tents as well as our ambition. We scaled back our plans for the day, but most of us still elected to visit iconic Split Apple Rock, an uncanny sight that lives up to its name, before returning to Marahau about www.kayaknz.co.nz

There is nothing like the first gluttonous meal after any sort of camping trip, and in this case we enjoyed fish ‘n’ chips at the delicious Smokehouse in Mapua. In Nelson we made our own happy hour at the holiday park parking lot, while Matt and Peggy helped me conspire to surprise Elanita with a birthday cake after a group dinner at the piratethemed Smugglers Cove. On the last day of our trip we drove back to Picton to catch the ferry, tired but content knowing we’d made twelve new friends in the process of exploring one of New Zealand’s most beautiful spots.

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Competition Fishing

By Jason Walker

For as long as man has been fishing there has been competition, tales of who has been catching the biggest fish.It is natural human instinct to try and be better that your fellow man. There are competitions for all the various fishing disciplines; big game fishing chasing the big fish of the deep sea, fly fishing where people are trying to catch the often shy freshwater fish, shore based comps such as the famous 90 Mile Beach comp, and various recreational boat fishing competitions that are held around the country. There are even casting competitions where the competitors stand in a field and toss lumps of lead from one end to the other to see who can cast the furthest with accuracy.

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So with all these competitions going on it was only a matter of time before kayak fishing got some of the competition action. Not just its own competitions but more and more kayaks are getting their own sections in some of the bigger competitions - often because the kayaks are beating the boat fisherman to the prizes which doesn’t go down too well. Kayak fishermen not only have the boat comps they can take part in and some kayak only competitions, there is now a kayak fishing series to compete in too.

Autumn 2014

Jai Sanders - 2012 Kayak Fishing World Cup Winner (Feb 2013)

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Let’s look at these and some ideas and tips that might help you win one of them one day!

Boat Fishing Competitions Many boat fishing competitions have recognised that kayak fishing is a growing sport and even that many boaties have sold up and turned to kayaks as their chosen method of getting to the fishing spots. Therefore many now have a separate kayak section where the kayak anglers compete with other kayak anglers for trophies and prizes, or as a minimum a lot of competitions have kayak anglers fishing against the boat fishermen. Now the latter may not sound very appealing to the kayak angler as he or she is having to compete against someone that can go as far and wide as they like but as many experienced kayak anglers and those of us like myself who came from years of boat fishing know there are also some good fish in close if you can approach them in a stealthy kayak! There is no loud motor or water slapping against an alloy hull to scare the fish off and no loud anchor dropping in the water. Another advantage we have over boaties is the weather, when the weather isn’t great for boats the kayakers can normally still get out. What would have historically been a fishing competition where the boats didn’t go out and therefore catch nothing is now one where the kayaks cleaned up!

Kayak Only Competitions As the sport of kayak fishing grows dedicated kayak fishing competitions have appeared and they are growing in number year after year. These allow kayak anglers to compete against each other on a more level playing field man against man. No more ‘he who has the biggest boat and budget’ type of competition, kayaks only have a limited range so even those who want to head out aren’t really going to get that far in a day especially as they have to paddle back for weigh in too.

As I said there are a few new kayak only competitions popping up but the oldest and most well attended is the Kayak Fishing Classic which is held in Taranaki. It is run by the local kayak fishing club and has become one of the must do competitions for kayakers in New Zealand. The main reason for this is that the competition is so very well run and very well supported by all the sponsors with some great prizes up for grabs with Viking Kayaks as the main sponsor, they also go the extra mile to make the whole event a success for more than just the anglers themselves. For example all of the

If there is one thing I’ve learnt from fishing with many people is those that presevere are often rewarded with the best fish.

fish weighed in are auctioned off to the local public with the assistance of a local real estate agent donating his time to do the auctioning and all the proceeds are donated to the local Coastguard. Once you have purchased your fish from the auction the local fish processors had some staff on hand who for a gold coin donation would professionally fillet your fish for you, this also made for great entertainment and education for all us fishermen too, and a yummy fillet on the bbq for dinner. The competition is fished over two days across five species and the winners are decided by the person who catches the biggest fish of each species. To encourage people to fish together (always a good thing for safety) there is also a team competition; this is awarded to the team who weighs in the highest total weight of fish over the competition.

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New Zealand Kayak Fishing Series Started last year, the series is a dedicated kayak fishing series which has been created by Orton Events and is being run to find the best kayaker angler in New Zealand. It is being competed for across several competitions where the anglers are awarded points for each kilo of fish they weigh. The five rounds are: Coromandel Gold Rush 2013 Taranaki Classic Auckland Clasic Cove to Cape Coromandel Gold Rush 2014

Competition Strategies I’ve talked about the competitions that are out there so you know what’s on offer but the next question is how you win them? Well whilst I’ve won several fishing competitions over the years I’ll say up front I’m no habitual competition winner and I don’t have any single guaranteed win tip for you to copy but I do have some of my own strategies and some that I’ve got from interviews I’ve done with other competition winners that I will share that may just help you win the big one too. Recon and Research This one is quite simple, make sure you know where you are fishing, if you don’t normally fish there then do some research, see what you can find out about the location. There are a couple of options open to you; reports and people. Reports are a good way to find out how the location has fished in the past, have a troll through old fishing magazines for any reports or hit the internet and see if you can find trip reports from people who have fished there and see what they have to say. Quite often people who have done

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well in a particular area will let the odd secret slip as they describe their day and with enough reports and photographs you may be able to build up a bit of knowledge. The second option you have is people. Again hit the internet to see who’s fished there and drop them a line, they may not give you GPS coordinates but most people will share enough information to get you heading in the right direction – but of course they may be trying to cast you astray so be careful who you trust. Another way that I know winners have used in the past is reconnaissance trips prior to a competition. This entails actually going to the spots you intend to fish during the competition and actually fishing there to see what the spot turns up – just be sure to put the big ones back and hope you pick them up during the competition – you can’t catch them if you take them home the week before! Make a Plan Once you have your spots picked out make a plan for how you intend to get there, to and from your accommodation, and to and from the event. Again a reconnaissance mission will help you work out the travel times.The last thing you want to do is miss a weigh in because you are late. Travel times will also help you get on the water at the right time, which brings up a fishing plan, what time can you fish from and to? If the competition states fishing starts at 5.00am that means fishing not launching at the beach, some guys will make sure they have already launched and paddled to their spot so they are dropping their first baits at 5.00am! Perseverance If there is one thing I’ve learnt from fishing with many people is those that presevere are often rewarded with the best fish. I’ve often come off the water early if the fishing is slow only to be followed a couple of hours later by my mate to find he picked up a nice fish after I left! Competition fishing is no

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different, if for example the fishing window is eight hours then make sure you make the most of the entire time. If after six hours you have nothing in the bin and the fishing is slow don’t give up. There are two reasons for this, one is you never know when the fish will turn up and second there is a huge possibility that it’s the same for the other competitors so if they are giving up then by sticking to it you are increasing your chances.

Winning Fish Techniques and Baits This is linked to your recon and research, when travelling to foreign waters make sure you find out what techniques and baits for best for an area, it’s no good fishing your softbaits and lures if the locals only ever catch their fish on cut baits. A great example of this is the Taranaki Classic - this is a really a bait fishing competition, yes you will catch some fish on softies but realistically all the big snapper fall to big cut baits.

Know the Rules My final tip is make sure you understand the rules of the competition. If you get it wrong there is every chance your fish might not get weighed or worse you could be disqualified altogether! Make sure you attend the competition briefing as this is where last minute rule changes, fishing times and boundaries are announced. Just remember it’s called fishing not catching, so don’t stress out too much when you are having a bad day at a competition, you can’t win them all so just make sure you enjoy yourself.

Target Species Make sure you understand what species you are targeting for the competition, different competitions target different species; some only target snapper while others include a range of species. Also understand how the competition works i.e. is it just the biggest fish that wins or the person who catches the most weight over all the species, this will very much dictate how you fish and what you keep and what goes back. Some competitions will also have a Grand Slam prize for the person who catches all the species in a competition. A good way to make sure you don’t get it wrong is to print out the species list and take it with you on the kayak, there’s nothing worse than getting back to the weigh in to find there is a prize for gurnard and you’ve been putting them back all day!

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Two Rivers: Exploring the Ahaura River and a Day on the Grey by Nathan Fa’avae

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The Southern Alps have a large number of big rivers draining off them and especially on the western flanks into the Tasman Sea. One such river is the Ahaura, well known amongst trout fishers but not a commonly paddled river by kayaks. In context of West Coast paddling, because the Ahaura is only Grade two, it is overlooked by most who are traveling to the region for harder Grade four - five paddle trips. I have always been intrigued by the river that offers a two day semi-wilderness trip before joining the Grey River. In February we planned a trip with three inflatable kayaks, three adults and four children. Our plan was to drive as far up the valley as possible and take out in Ahaura Township. To access the put in the road through Nelson Creek and Haupiri links to the upper reaches. There is also scope for a helidrop in sub alpine, there are a number of options but I suspect flying into the Waiheke River would offer the most water. The night before departure it rained heavily which topped the river up nicely, which was an added bonus in the upper reaches that are braided. The Waikiti River was running high so we launched in that and paddled about 1km to meet the Ahaura. About 60 km in total, the first 30 km is braided river with some fun wave trains and small rapids. The valley is wide with some towering mountains to gaze up at for the first section. After the rain there were majestic waterfalls pouring off the sheer walls as we paddled by. It was a damp day when we started so by lunchtime the kids were cold. We stopped on a river beach and warmed ourselves by a fire with some nutritious food. Seen from afar, Hamers Flat marks the start of the gorge section which extends about 20 km. This is the remote and wild part of the trip, steep canyon walls, thick bush and very deep green pools, numerous fish and eel sitings. There are a few rapids, the main one at Jim’s Flat Hut. The camping is superb with plenty of options on the river flats through the gorge. By late afternoon the kids were ready to stop and we wanted to give

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them plenty of time to explore on land. While they love the journey down river by boat, the camping is the real highlight for them. It’s also a valued time for adults sitting by the fire sipping a hot drink. We found a superb river beach terrace just below Stag Flat (we saw a few deer too!) Our second day was hot and sunny and while the water was a tad brisk, a few swims were enjoyed as we traveled along. The final 10 km the river braids again with more little rapids. It is an excellent trip, not advised in flooding high water though. It’s ideal for family,

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inflatable kayak trips, open canoes for experienced paddlers and ideal for a long paddle in a multisport racing kayak. With the advancement of technology in inflatable kayaks now, more river trips are being opened up for people to enjoy. It’s essentially the same as preparing for a tramping trip but instead of lugging all your gear around on your back, you can strap it to the boat, hop aboard and let the adventure unfold. If you can make the effort to paddle the Ahaura, I’d be very surprised if you see anyone else, it’d be on of the least paddled rivers in the South Island but is highly worthy of a visit.

A Day on the Grey Looking for a friendly whitewater wilderness adventure? The Grey River (Māwheranui) offers magic one to two day trips that offer a remote and thrilling experience. I paddled it the first time many years ago, an overnight trip in whitewater boats. I made a note to take the kids there when they were older. This summer, armed with our Incept inflatable boat we headed into the Grey River for a day trip, the main focus being the Gentle Annie Gorge. The Grey River headwaters are high in the Southern Alps, beginnings are at Lake Christabel nestled in the mountains around Lewis Pass. The section is Grade three but it’s mostly Grade two. With a moderate summer flow we felt happy taking the kids on the premise they could walk any rapids they or we determined not suitable. As it turned out all the rapids were excellent but the kids did opt to walk around one of them.

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canopy above creating a tunnel like atmosphere. It really is a very special place to float through and relaxing contrast to the hours of whitewater rapids we’d be negotiating all morning. There are some excellent rocks to climb and leap off for those seeking a hit or wishing to cool off. It’s also a very popular spot for trout. A day on the Grey is possibly one of the most wild day trips we’ve done with the kids and the overnight trip would be equally rewarding. Anyone planning to paddle the Grey should contact Nathan Topp at Inland Adventures, phone: 0800 INLAND (465 263), for flow and safety information. He can also help with boats, shuttles and making your trip a memorable one. What’s special about the Grey is that in a very short time you are in a wilderness setting, thick native forest to the river bed and for the most part, the Grey River is very continuous whitewater. Our lunch spot was enjoyed under hot sunshine and blessed with not a sandfly in sight, which was the polar opposite to the put in - where the sandflies had put on a massive welcome ceremony. The Gentle Annie Gorge has an exciting lead in rapid but once in the gorge the fascination is the tranquility, moss covered canyon, glass clear water and the forest

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GODZONE ADVENTURE RACE Team Seagate win the 3rd chapter of the Godzone Adventure Race, this year a 520 km circuit around Kaikoura. The elite squad of Nathan Fa’avae, Chris Forne, Sophie Hart and Stuart Lynch took 3 days, 17 hours and 36 minutes to take victory more than 12 hours ahead of the second place team. Team Captain Fa’avae reports: It’d be fair to say that for Sophie, Stu and myself, paddling is our preferred discipline. While we are passionate about mountain biking, hiking and other outdoor sports, put a paddle in our hands and we’re ducks to water. Chris likes the paddle stages but rates the hiking stages as his first choice. Part of the reason we like the paddling so much is that it is a real strength of the team so it often transpires into time gaps that we can pry open between us and the competition. The 2014 Godzone contained some great paddle legs. The first stage was a kayak / run where two team members ran around Kaikoura peninsula

while the other two paddled, then switched over so everyone got to do both sections. Sophie and I snatched the chance to start in boats, we love paddle starts! For safety reasons the paddle was shortened from 12 km to 6 km because of a large southerly swell bowling up the coast. Sheltered behind the northern side of the peninsula we still had to contend with dumping shore break getting off and back to the beach. While a ‘blink of an eyelid’ stage in terms of the greater course, there is pride at stake for the paddlers. This was a kayak race. Handicapped by a low race number (#1), meant we had the furthest to paddle to reach the first turn around 1500 metres along the beach. At that point Sophie and I had moved through 36 kayaks to have three more in front, the chase was on. Two kilometres punching directly out to sea and rounding a buoy sent us on a downwind leg for two kilometres. Catching some long runs we glided up to the lead boat and paddled side by side back to the beach, a photo finish but I reckon we got it, but Bob and Jo reckon they did so expect a rematch sometime. After a 53 km bike, 51 km hike, 151 km bike and another 38 km hike we arrived at

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the Hurunui River, this time for a 101 km down river canoe stage. Supplied with two inflatable kayaks and four canoe paddles, the intention of the Race Director was for us to use single bladed paddles. I like canoeing but not for 101 km and especially not through the grade three Maori Gully. Having cleared it with the Race Director, we packed four, four piece kayak paddles into our gear boxes for the stage. This was not only faster but was much less fatiguing on our bodies as we are trained kayakers but not trained canoeists.

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With a dark zone being enforced between 8.30 pm and 7.00 am, we had to camp riverside for the night. We’d got on the river at 4.30 pm and managed to get about 35 km downstream to camp. Here we enjoyed a very rare treat in Adventure Racing, a stop and a decent sleep. Warm clothes, cooker, hot meal, tent, sleeping mat and bag equals divine luxury in such an event, and just when you thought it couldn’t get any better, we went to sleep knowing in the morning we’d still be paddling.

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The next day on the river was a pleasant morning and most of the afternoon journeying down river to the ocean, taking in many special spots that only a kayak could access. Off the river we biked another 28 km, hiked 25 km, biked another 38 km before dropping back to sea level for the final kayak stage, a mere 26 km cruise up the Kaikoura Coast to the finish line outside the township. The last obstacle was launching through the reef into a pitch black night, our head lights just making out of enough of the land and rocky outcrops and get clear of the shore. The town lights shimmering in the distance. Rounding the peninsula itself we were in total darkness but that was soon softened

with the first light of the morning sun. A couple of hours later we slid onto the beach and over the finish line. Another successful outing and plenty of paddling, just how we like it.

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Speight’s Coast to Coast is over… What’s next? Congratulations to all of those who competed in the Speight’s Coast to Coast in February. It was a pleasure training and getting to know so many of you for your first year of multisport. For some of you the Coast may have been the “bucket list” project of suffering, for the rest, the beginning of the bug.

considered a family event which has parent child team options and bears the kids in mind when setting the course. There is also the Spring Challenge in Hokitika, the women only team multisport/adventure race. You can also participate in events that are pursuit specific such as MTB, Triathlon, Road Cycling, Kayaking and Trail running. Most of these are shown on the calendar page of www.multisport.net.nz.

Multisport is all about what next? How can I improve technique? How can I get faster? And everyone’s favourite – what toys do I need to get there?

Also, look out for training events in your area with qualified and experienced coaches.

In this issue we are going to discuss options of what is coming up this coming multisport season and where to look to find more information. There are many multisport events in New Zealand and all of them unique. The Speight’s Coast to Coast is just one format of multisport event and the most famous at that,. But there are many more that consist of different pursuits and target different demographics of competitor.

It’s worth doing further research into these and other events that interest you as there are many that need support crew, are unassisted, require multiple days of dedication and lots of travel over a large area. Developing your training programme around these events is a great idea as you can use them as practise runs not only for your athletic performance but also as transition or support crew training.

Many events consist of a number of the following: mountain biking, road cycling, trail running, flat water kayaking, white water kayaking, walking and more. Triathlons and Adventure races are also often considered ‘Multisport’. There are events that are special in unique ways, such as the 3D Rotorua;

As mentioned in a previous article – Grab a buddy…or 10, improve and keep those skills up whilst training with others. Chris’ weekly kayaking pod sessions in partnership with Canoe & Kayak are starting up again this April in multiple locations around Auckland. More information will be on the web shortly or ask at Canoe & Kayak North Shore and Auckland.

Here are just a few of the well-known multisport events in New Zealand that also consist of a paddling course. •

The Crazyman, Wellington, 4th May 2014 - www.crazyman.co.nz

The Peak to Peak, Queenstown, 26th July 2014 - www.southerntraverse.com

The Nugget, Waihi, 10th May 2014 - www.thenugget.co.nz

Coromandel Classic, Coromandel, 22-24th August 2014 - www.coromandelclassic.co.nz

3D Rotorua, Rotorua, 1st June 2014 - www.3drotorua.co.nz (Sponsored by Canoe & Kayak)

Motu Challenge, Opotiki, 11th October 2014 - www.motuchallenge.co.nz

Congratulations to all who started the Speight’s Coast to Coast this year. It’s a long road and half the battle is just getting there. Now looking to next year...

Grade Two certification and brush up courses run through out the year. Contact your nearest Canoe & Kayak Centre for details.

Will you be there in 2015?

w wCoast w . ktoaCoast y a k2014 n z v1.indd . c o . n1z

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Planning a Trip – Dreams with Deadlines By Ruth E. Henderson

Tucks Bay, Coromandel.

Maps strewn over the dining table, tumbling to the lounge floor, tide chart and diary to hand – it’s exciting – planning ahead; scheduling time out, time with friends, time to play. Playtime has to be taken seriously; the body and soul need refreshing, restoring, revitalizing and the only way to make things happen is to plan ahead. Give your dreams deadlines. Put the house painting on hold and organise time-out. Spur of the moment stuff doesn’t often work for me: I find planning in advance works best – that way my non-kayaking but understanding husband Ian knows what I’ll be doing and when, and gets used to the idea…and if I make a plan where he can be ‘camp-mother’, the kennels can be booked, the neighbours lined up to water the vegie patch, or a house swap arranged… The New Zealand coast, rivers and lakes offer endless opportunities for adventure, for fun whether you have a morning, a whole day, a weekend or a week. So, where to start? You’ll get plenty of ideas listening to other kayakers, reading magazines and books, or checking out the likes of Vincent Maire or Alex Ferguson’s Sea Kayaker’s Guides. Even the KASK “Manual for Sea Kayaking” has a chapter on “Places to go”. Once I have an idea, that’s when I reach for a map (or print one off) and my piece of string. The one cm to one km scale is good to work with. The string makes a very flexible ruler, as not often do we paddle in straight lines! So, toying with destinations first, achievable distances second, I next reach for the Tide Calendar which graphically shows ‘everything’. Not just the time of the high or low tide, but the difference between the two, moon phases, king tides, even good fishing days… These facts may be important if you are keen on mooching up through the mangroves or paddling under a full moon, or getting yourself some shellfish; they may dictate your destination. The tides are definitely important for launching, landing and lunch spots on tidal beaches, harbours or rivers. And unless you are into ‘resistance training’ it makes sense to paddle with the flow of the tide. For a weekend trip the next thing to tee up is accommodation or a campsite. Don’t presume just because it is winter that there will be a warm PAGE 32

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and cosy cabin available. Other people are ‘getting-away’ too. If paddling with an active club, and wanting to get a good turn-out, the timing of a trip can be important. Working on two weeks out from a big weekend, works. Some people have to stay home and ‘clean out the garage’ every second weekend… Next look at luring your friends or other kayakers along too. List what the on-the-water features are…caves, rock- gardening, seals; look at what else you can do if it’s a ‘rainy’ day - think of some Plan B’s. Make up a trip plan and let the fun roll in…

Twenty Points to Ponder when Planning a Trip:

1. Maps or charts - A map is my starting point when tossing around ideas for a trip. I prefer topo maps as they show the topography, the steepness of the surrounding countryside, cliffs, possible landing spots, portages, roads for access or egress, walking tracks for possible Plan B’s… Kayakers who come from a sailing background like charts. www.kayaknz.co.nz


2. Access – unless a map shows a boat ramp, not every road supposedly ending on the water’s edge, does. More often than not the road stops at a farmers gate or cliff face. Local knowledge is very useful. Ask around. Sometimes the access road or track is almost hidden...

6. Lunch stops – the latte crowd may want a coffee shop, but mostly it’ll be a cooker boil up or a thermos flask on the river or beach. All you want is somewhere to haul the boats up and stretch out for a bit, maybe with some shade... Hard to find sometimes: Mark any ‘finds’ on your map for next time. Unlike pit stops they need to be a bit comfortable.

3. Car parking – this can be an issue on narrow winding roads with no pull over areas, such as up the Coromandel Peninsula. Car pool where possible. Ask a farmer if you can park in their paddock. In isolated areas or places prone to theft, if somebody is offering parking from $5 a day, take it, and know you will still have wheels when you get back.

7. Landings – these can be fraught with difficulty: The steepness of the river bank or the beach, the surf, the current or rip. With an inexperienced group it may pay to have done a reconnaissance trip or to choose to paddle inside the harbour!

4. Launching site – In popular spots or even down what looks like a country lane be considerate – other water users may want access too and need to swing around in an arc to reverse their trailer. Once you have un-loaded your kayak, shift your car out of the way. A kayak trolley can be useful. In a busy place don’t hog the retail car parking spaces.

protect yourself from the elements 5. Pit stops – comfort breaks, call them what you will - on most club / non-expedition trips you and your fellow paddlers like to get out, stretch the legs, have a snack, have a pee every couple of hours. Sometimes suitable spots are hard to find if the river or tide is higher than normal! www.kayaknz.co.nz

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8. Tidal landings and launchings – it can be crucial to get your timing right. What a difference a few hours can make. Maybe you should have an early start, or shouldn’t programme in a three hour mid-day walk or there may be no water to land on and you may have a very long portage.

12. Weather – you cannot predict the weather months out, but you can avoid periods of equinox wind. Try paddling in the winter – you often get calm and sunny days! On serious expedition trips, you may need to watch and wait for a weather window. Or if you have inflexible time-off, are already organised to be away - go away anyway, but change to Plan B. You’ll still have fun. There are many websites that a week out are pretty accurate. My current favourites are www.windfinder.com which can be area specific or www.metvuw.com

9. Portage – to get to your overnight campsite it may be necessary to portage. Pack wheels, or arrange to have sufficient to share around the group. If road walking, it could be wise to wear your hi-vis vest or hat.

10. The tide – a tide chart is the second tool I turn to. It is common sense really, to factor the tide into a day’s paddle, but I have seen people surprised and disappointed by the lack of water, just when they expected to go for a paddle, or very tired when they ended up paddling against the current. For a pleasurable paddle, go with the tidal flow. Paddle up when the tide is going in and back when it is going out.

11. Accommodation – it pays to phone and have a chat with people renting out baches, or with camping ground proprietors. Some are inflexible on rules such as one car per campsite or cabin. Others will happily allow you, after a morning check-out, to use the showers at the end of the day. PAGE 34

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13. Campsite – is it big enough for your group? What are the facilities? Is there water on tap or do you need to bring your own? Are there toilets or do you need to bring a spade? In winter is there a campsite which has cabins and a place to congregate?

14. Cooking – are open fires permitted or is there a fire ban. Gas cookers or BBQ allowed? If flying in to another island (or country) where can you buy gas? If using a camp ground kitchen do you need to bring your own pots and pans?

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15. Equipment – apart from standard paddling and safety gear, what other stuff should you consider bringing – a kayak trolley, fishing line, gumboots, hot water bottle…. Make up check-lists of essential then optional gear. Don’t forget your paddle!

17. Attractions – what are the ‘selling’ points for your trip? Is there rock gardening, caves, good fishing, interesting rock formations, limestone rocks, waterfalls, swimming holes, blackberries…

16. Flexibility – particularly on a multi-day trip you may need to change plans, have different options. Not everybody can or wants to paddle in 20 knot headwinds. Allow for discussion. Have a few alternatives up your sleeve. Maybe have different pods doing different routes or distances.

18. Plan B’s – if it is too windy and rough for your original plan, can you paddle somewhere else nearby that is more sheltered? Can you switch coasts or go in a harbour? What else can you do in the district? Most kayakers also walk, tramp or cycle. You can still end up having an active fun day or weekend away.

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19. Skill level – it’s important to know what ability level will be needed on your trip and to target the right folk. Be clear about what will be required…”able to paddle in 15 knot winds for up to four hours”. Or have different options and another person to look after that group.

Rhino Deck Keyhole Cockpit The best-selling Rhino Deck for most current plastic boats. RRP $188.95 Neoprene Shorts Comfortable and flexible. A must for your kit. RRP $102.95

www.rasdex.co.nz 03 967 3040 www.kayaknz.co.nz

20. Additional Hazards - A RAMS form (Risk Analysis Management) will list many. One you won’t find listed, but I have discovered, are duck shooters, especially on the first weekend of May. If there are mai mai’s about be warned. There are others! Think about where you are going and when and other water sports. Is there a fishing competition on making passage a nightmare just before weigh-in time? Can you avoid the water skiing lanes? Issue 73

Autumn 2014

PAGE 35


Sudoku

Sudoku The objective is to fill the 9×9 grid with digits so that each column, each row, and each of the nine 3×3 sub-grids that compose the grid contains all of the digits from 1 to 9. Solution on page 44

5 4

8

4

1

7 6 9

2

5 4 8

3 5

8 7 6

8 5 6

6

9

3 4

2

3

Photo of the Nelson Lakes supplied by Chris Mercer.

A Comfortable Entry Level Sea Kayak

• • • • • • • • •

Two Large Storage Compartments Two Large Hatches Comfortable Foam Padded Seat Easy to use Rudder System Stable and Comfortable to Paddle New Zealand Made with Top Quality UV Stabilized Plastic Orange Fade - A Stunning, Safe Colour Two Year Warranty Exclusive to Canoe & Kayak

All this at an affordable price

P AMatariki G E v5.indd 36

1I

ssue 73

Autumn 2014

w w w20/01/2014 . k a y a k 11:29:57 n z . c oa.m. .nz


Crossword

Quick Crossword Test your knowledge of kayaking and kayaking safety.

1 2 4

3 5

Across

6

2. A wet kayaker wearing a cotton shirt is rapidly cooled by this 5. Cloud formation that indicates an approaching cold front 12 6. How often should you renew your first aid certificate? (3,5) 8. Name of a rock along the coast from Marahau, Abel Tasman (5,5) 11. When breaking out, you are exiting what? 15. The VHF safety signal to alert mariners of an important navigational or meteorological warning 16. A method of increasing the effective pull on a rescue line (6,4) 20. Slurred speech, strange behavior and loss of fine motor co-ordination are all signs of? 27 24. The cardinal mark indicated by two downward facing black triangles 26. The collision rules clearly state that in a head-on or a near head–on situation you must alter your course to 27. Magenta diamonds with a letter inside indicate (5,7) 28. A waterproof jacket with rubber neck and wrist seals (3,3)

Down

1. The symbol # on a chart indicates (4,6) 3. Extra floatation (3,4) 4. It take 30 minutes to aquire in the dark (5,6) 7. This technique is used to avoid submerging the bow of the kayak by ensuring it lands flat when it hits the base of the waterfall 9. Chart Datum is measured at the ____ tide mark 10. The speed limit of 5 knots applies when within 50 m of another 12. What is the most important thing when approaching a swimming paddler to do a rescue? (4,4,6)

7 8

9

10 11 13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21 25

24

22

23

26

28

13. Generally, a white water paddle would be inappropriate for a sea kayaker because it is too ____? 14. Magnetic forces within your particular boat causing compass inaccuracies 17. Rocker in a kayak refers to the amount of ___________ curve in the kayak hull 18. Rescue rope (5,3) 19. When a ‘Mayday’ call is not warranted, but urgency is required (3,3) 21. Any obstacle that will potentially catch hold of a person is called what? 22. The conventional buoyage direction in N.Z 23. Meridians of Longitude are which parallel lines on a chart 25. You should always wear a one while kayak surfing

Join Us For A Kayaking Adventure - Specialty Tours

Taupo Maori Carvings Half day guided trip to the rock carvings, Lake Taupo... only accessible by boat. A leisurely paddle of about 3 km to the rock carvings. The largest is over 10 m high and from below in a kayak it is imposing.

$95 per person (bookings essential). Phone 0800 KAYAKN for details.

www.kayaknz.co.nz

Waikato River Discovery Glow Worm Kayak Tour

2 hour guided kayak trip. Experience the magnificent upper reaches of the mighty Waikato River - Soak in the geothermal hot springs - Take in the stunning environment... a perfect trip for all the family...

Adult $49, Children $29 Special group and family rates. Call 0800 KAYAKN for details.

Join us for a picturesque paddle on Lake McLaren to view glow worms by night or beautiful waterfalls by day. This trip takes about 1.5-2hours and is suitable for paddlers with no experience. All gear, hot drinks and nibbles are supplied. Price $99 per person.

Phone Canoe & Kayak BOP for bookings 07 574 7415

Issue 73

Sugar Loaf Island From Ngamutu Beach harbour we head out on the open sea to Sugar Loaf Island Marine Reserve. View the scenic & rugged Taranaki coastline as we draw closer to the Islands. Enjoy the seal colony and experience the thrill of close up views of these fascinating marine mammals. Allow 3 hours subject to weather. $95.00 per person. Phone 06 769 5506

Autumn 2014

PAGE 37


Health

Keep Your Kayaking Knees Happy Your precious knees Good kayaking and most of your leg movements are dependent on your knees. They also support the whole upper body - so many thanks required! Being in a kayak means you will encounter terrain that is “un-level”, such as rocks, choppy water, sand holes, hikes etc.

This challenges your knees

in a 3D manner which is great, if your knees are prepared for this. Here is a major problem: “Your World is Flat” (2D) so your knees are not used to moving in 3D… This will leave your unprepared knees prone to injury. Bless rather than curse your knees and prepare them for the demands you ask of them while kayaking. Your knees are composed of ligaments not muscles, so you must train and prepare them quite differently. The flat surfaces of our contemporary lifestyles (2D world) provide no challenge to your ligaments and they become weak and prone to injury in 3D kayaking demands. Your knee should be trained in multiple movement patterns with slow held motions to excite and engage the ligaments; otherwise they become unstable and weak. Here are some exercises to help: Draw soft figure 8’s in the sand with each leg and bent knees (you must do this for two minutes each leg to affect your ligaments) Stand still with bent knees and do soft circles with your knees clockwise and counterclockwise (you must do this for two minutes each leg to affect your ligaments).

If you have flexible joints and hyperextension tendencies you are especially vulnerable to knee problems so seek professional advice as there are essential supplements to assist this and strengthen those loose ligaments. Classified as a hinge joint, your knee is the meeting point for your shin (tibia and fibula) and your upper legs (femur) which are all joined together via a barrage of ligaments to secure this precious joint. Without this joint we could be walking on stilt legs (very unattractive), and most sports as we know them would be impossible – so give them the time and attention they deserve! The function and health of this joint is dependent on the balance of the pulleys and levers (muscles/tendons) that attach to it. For instance, weak hamstrings and strong quads create excessive load to the ACL (anterior cruciate ligament): the most commonly injured ligament in the knee. Balanced muscles, healthy ligaments and good posture are critical to this joint. So get yourself assessed via a length / tension assessment by a qualified professional. Call my office for more details. I invite you to sign up for my weekly – “30 Second Healthy Habit” Blog at : www.drtheresadobson.com One Body – One you for Life! Dr Theresa Dobson www.activecare.co.nz

Yoga offers several 3D knee exercises that are great for your precious knees

Key Points to Remember:

Fact: The most complicated joint in your body is your knee. Classified as a pivotal hinge joint that allows flexion (bending), extension (straightening) and small amounts of rotation, it is a ligament filled joint. Those of you who have endured knee injuries and surgeries know these three lettered ligaments well: ACL, PCL, MCL and LCL. Injury to this joint is the reason most people visit orthopaedic physicians. It is also the joint most vulnerable to acute injury and osteoarthritis with the ACL the most commonly injured ligament.

PAGE 38

Issue 73

Autumn 2014

Hydrate, hydrate, hydrate.

Train and rehabilitate to address the ligaments not just the muscles.

Seek professional advice – it is a complicated joint!

Get your spine checked to ensure postural imbalances are addressed.

Come to My Body’s GPS – Body workshop to learn more!

www.kayaknz.co.nz


First Aid

Head Injuries Concussion or Compression injury “The term ‘head trauma’ or ‘head injury’ is used to mean the original injury. A head injury does not always cause an injury to the brain, and the terms ‘head’ and ‘brain’ are used to distinguish between the original injury to the head and consequent injury to the brain respectively.” Excert ACC Head injuries can be an on-going problem for patients. Our actions during our initial time with the patient can make a big difference to their outcome. The brain is housed in the skull, which is a chamber that cannot expand. In some head injuries, blood vessels are damaged and blood leaks into the skull. If it is not stopped, it can put more pressure on the brain, therefore starving it of oxygen and causing damage and eventually death.

Hairline fracture Subdural hematoma

Lie the patient down with their head slightly higher than their feet If the patient is conscious and complains of pain to the spine or any weakness or numbness, do not move them unless it is critical to do so. Instruct the patient not to move or nod their head. If patient is sitting in a car seat, hold their head from behind by placing both hands around the patients’ ears, with palms and thumbs against the back of the skull. The fingers are placed under the angel of the jaw. The patients head can be gently brought back into alignment with the rest of the body and held with the patient facing forward. Do not let the patients head go until the paramedics have placed a stiff neck collar on the patient, even if the patient regains consciousness.

Johanna Verheijen First Training Ltd Diploma Outdoor Recreation Leadership Bachelor Sport and Recreation

Signs and Symptoms of a Head Injury •

Altered level of consciousness. This is the most significant indicator. Is the patient getting any worse?

Blood or fluid coming from the patient’s ears or nose

Pulse becoming slower and stronger

Unequal pupils

Bruising around the eyes (racoon eyes) or behind the ears (battles sign)

Nausea and vomiting

Restlessness and possible combativeness

Treatment of Head Injured Patients •

Treat for spine injury – immobilise the neck

Call an ambulance if possible

Dress any wounds

Monitor and record vital signs

www.kayaknz.co.nz

Issue 73

Autumn 2014

PAGE 39


Bush Craft

Paranoia Keeps us alive Andy Blake reflects on the benefits of carrying a survival kit One of the reasons why our species has done so well over the centuries is due to our large intelligent brain . This enables us to manufacturer tools that allows us to accomplish things that other “animals” cannot. This coupled with the “adapt and overcome “philosophy certainly helps us when we are trying to survive in the face of adversity. Another thing that can help us as outdoors people is by always carrying a small survival kit. It is often said, that, the more knowledge contained between your ears - the less that is required in your survival kit. Although this may be true - whilst in a tricky situation is not the best time to test your survival skills - like starting a fire with a firebow. For a kayaker, there are many reasons why you may be caught out on a paddle: injury, gear failure, getting lost and unanticipated weather or sea conditions are just a few. So when that day trip turns out to be an overnight trip, what extra gear do you have with you to keep you safe? There are countless accounts of trampers or hunters having to spend unplanned nights in the bush - you should pack your kayak and your BA

Buoyancy Aid Contents

with the belief that someday this will happen to you. So what should you carry in your buoyancy aid and also in your survival kit. My buoyancy aid contains: Knife, flares, water bladder, waterproof plastic poncho, sunscreen, muesli bars, VHF, thermal hat, Leatherman multi-tool, small first aid kit and my survival kit. On a longer trip I will also have an EPIRB/ PLB. My Survival kit contains: Tin foil cup, Survival kit all packed away. lighter or fire steel, waterproof matches and striker in sealed bag, telescopic straw, 9 volt LED torch, candles, signal mirror, 50 metres of fishing braid, 2-3 condoms, single sided razor blades, pencil and paper, sewing kit, piece of rubber tube or solid fuel

survival kit Contents

Tin Foil Cup

Knife Blades

Signal Mirror

Inner Tube

Drink Bladder

Wettex Tablet

Sewing Kit Plastic Poncho Fishing Set

Survival Kit Take 5 Form

VHF

Pen & Paper

Warm Hat

Knife

Small First Aid kit

Muesli Bars

Sunscreen

Flare

Magic Candles

Waterproof Plasters Condoms

Multitool

Waterproof Matches

Cotton Wool/ Vaseline

Telescopic Straw

LED Torch Lighter or Fire Steel

Survival Blanket

Plastic Poncho

PLB Braid

PAGE 40

Issue 73

Autumn 2014

www.kayaknz.co.nz


firelighter , small bag of cotton wool laced with Vaseline, fishing set, wettex tablets and a survival blanket. All of these have multiple uses - Condoms can be used as water carriers, flares can be used to start fires and survival blankets are great for attracting attention. All of these items are carefully packed into a waterproof dry bag which fits easily into my rear pocket of my BA. I tie a piece of wool across the top so I can see at a glance if someone has opened and maybe removed something. I always have these safety items “on me” and not somewhere in my kayak as you are only a kayaker if sitting in a kayak! After that you are a “swimmer - or a sinker!”

adventure equipment

Some people may think that this is going “over board” but trust me, when someone really needs something that you have – its gold! Elevates you to organised, prepared, hero level quickly. Remember the old Army saying- Paranoia keeps us alive!

Adventure Touring Cag

Kurve Touring PFD

Make loading kayaks easy Easy quick mounting and dismounting boat roller. No need for a heavy permanently mounted system that effects handling and fuel consumption. 2 mounting positions to fit most vehicles. Just apply to clean glass or paintwork when needed. Then use roller to roll kayak onto your vehicle.

Phone your closest kayak retailer or for further information email Great Stuff Ltd Distributed by Great Stuff Ltd. www.greatstuffltd.co.nz or email greatstuffltd@xtra.co.nz

SeattleAD-Jan14

Igneous Touring Boot

Strobe Ladies Cag

RFD New Zealand Limited 0800 777 009 Auckland Wellington Nelson Christchurch Filename: SURVITECpos_PMS.eps Colourway:

&

100% Pantone PMS 158c

&

100% Process Black

Kiwi Association of Sea Kayakers N.Z. Inc. (KASK) YAK qtr page 14-01 colour white background.indd 1

Annual subscription is $35.00.

Kask PO Box 23, Runanga 7841, West Coast

www.kask.co.nz

www.kayaknz.co.nz

4/02/2014 10:44:46 a.m.

KASK is a network of sea kayakers throughout New Zealand KASK publishes a 200 page sea kayaking handbook which is just $15 to new members; the handbook contains all you need to know about sea kayaking: techniques and skills, resources, equipment, places to go etc. KASK publishes a bi-monthly newsletter containing trip reports, events, book reviews, technique/equipment reviews and a ‘bugger’ file. KASK holds national sea kayaking forums. Issue 73

Autumn 2014

PAGE 41


Trip Card # 016 Hahei to Hotwater Beach

Hahei to Hotwater Beach Route card No. 016 Skill level: Intermediate Distance: 20 Km

Chart no: NZ531 Tidal Port:Tauranga

Start/ finish point: Hahei Beach HW/ LW: Tidal times/ notes: Coastguard contact: Whitianga 07 866 2883 VHF Channel 86 Hotwater Beach Lifeguards: 07 866 3589 Comms coverage: VHF coverage is good and cell phones works in Hahei. Introduction: One of New Zealands iconic paddles. Some of the best rock gardening and a soak in the popular hot pools on the beach. Description: Leaving Hahei, paddle east out to the point before turning south. Follow the cliff lined coast with its numerous rocky outcrops. This is a great opportunity to do a spot of fishing and snorkelling in and around the bays and islets. Note the coast between Hahei and Hotwater beach does not have any easily accessible exit points. Landing at Hotwater Beach can be a bit tricky if the surf is up. The hotwater can be found on the beach inside the set of rocks at the southern end of the beach. Caution - the water is hot!

Hazards: Hot water Dumping surf at both Hahei & Hotwater Beach Rips at Hotwater Beach Recreational Boat users Accommodation: Hahei Holiday Park 41 Harsant Avenue Hahei 07 866 3889 www.haheiholidays.co.nz Cabins

Car & Boat Parking

Camping

Toilets

Sites with power

Showers

Laundry

Internet Kiosk & wireless

Fishing

h

Hot Water Pools

Bird and wildlife watching Please note; Every care has been taken to ensure the information contained in this Trip Card is correct at the time of publication, but things change and you will need to confirm the information provided. You will also need to get further information to ensure a safe trip, this will include an up to date, relevant weather forecast and the ability to understand its implications for the area and talking to locals in the area to garner new information on any hazards in the area. It is also expected that an appropriate level of knowledge, skills and equipment are required to safely complete the trip. Please do not hesitate to contact us if you are unsure of any information or you find the Trip Card needs updating. Cheers Peter Townend,Yakity Yak Kayak Club. Updated: April 2014


Trip Card # 014 Narrow Neck Beach to Rangitoto Island

Narrow Neck Beach to Rangitoto Island Route card No. 014 Skill level: Beginners Distance: 10 Km Start/ finish point: Tidal times/ notes: Coastguard contact: Comms coverage:

Narrow Neck Beach Narrow Neck beach – shallow at low tide, Rangitoto Island – sharp volcanic rocks/reefs at all stages of tide. Auckland 09 303 4303/ *500 VHF Channel 82 VHF coverage excellent, Cell phones very good

Introduction: A challenging yet rewarding paddle with great scenery and plenty to do on and around Rangitoto Island. Description: : Launch from Narrow Neck beach yacht club on path of shortest distance to Rangitoto Island making haste between shipping channel. Head along the rocky shores to northern end of Rangitoto passing between the lighthouse and island to McKenzie Bay. The bay has DOC toilets and is a great place to refuel or use as base to start your trek to the summit taking in the amazing views of Auckland city and the Hauraki Gulf. If you’re up for a dip the snorkelling at either end of bay is good too.

Toilets on Island Fishing

Chart no: NZ5322 Tidal Port: Auckland

h

Hazards: Very busy major shipping channel, lots of recreational boating traffic also, strong currents, exposure to wind, local sailing club plus swimmers at Narrow Neck, sharp rocks on Rangitoto.

Historic Sites Bird and wildlife watching

Please note; Every care has been taken to ensure the information contained in this Trip Card is correct at the time of publication, but things change and you will need to confirm the information provided. You will also need to get further information to ensure a safe trip, this will include an up to date, relevant weather forecast and the ability to understand its implications for the area and talking to locals in the area to garner new information on any hazards in the area. It is also expected that an appropriate level of knowledge, skills and equipment are required to safely complete the trip. Please do not hesitate to contact us if you are unsure of any information or you find the Trip Card needs updating. Cheers Peter Townend,Yakity Yak Kayak Club. Updated: April 2014


o

Crossword Solution

t e b i r c s Sub

From page 37

&

have it

to your d e r e v i l de

door

4 issues for $25, saving $5.00 off the news-stand price, delivered free in NZ. Overseas subscription $NZ40 including postage.

Send form to: New Zealand Kayak Magazine. PO Box 35123, Browns Bay, Auckland, 0753. Or phone 0508 529 2569 Or email: info@canoeandkayak.co.nz Or buy on-line at canoeandkayak.co.nz/subscribe

Payment Details Visa/ Mastercard Name on Card:

Cheque (payable to Canoe & Kayak.)

Signature:

Expiry date:

Card No:

Verification Code:

Yes - I’d like to subscribe to New Zealand Kayak Magazine at the addres below. Gift Subscription - Please send New Zealand Kayak Magazine as a gift to the person below.

OR:

First Name: Surname: Email: Address: Post Code:

White Water Courses

Want to learn, or brush up your skills? Give us a call. 0508 529 256 PAGE 44 White Water bw.indd 1

Issue 73

Phone:

Sudoku Solution From page 36

1 9 5 8 6 4 3 2 7

7 6 8 3 2 9 4 5 1

3 4 2 7 5 1 6 9 8

2 8 3 5 1 9 4 7 6

9 6 4 8 7 3 5 1 2

5 1 7 4 2 6 8 3 9

6 4 2 7 5 1 9 3 8

1 8 5 9 3 6 2 4 7

9 7 3 2 8 4 1 6 5

www.kayaknz.co.nz

Autumn 2014 26/11/2012 8:26:19 a.m.


Knots

Tying an Ashley Bend

This knot is used to tie two ropes together. It is a reliable knot with very little tendency to slip, although it can be hard to untie after being heavily loaded.

1. Start with two overhand loops side by side. 2. 1.

2. Over lap the loops 4 & 5. Carefully tighten on itself

3. Pass the two tails through the intersecting loop.

3.

4.

5.

7.

6 & 7. Once tight the standing parts of the rope can be pulled in opposite directions.

6.

Join Us For A Kayaking Adventure - River Tours

River Tours

Mokau River

White Water Paddling

Waitara River Tours

Exploring beautiful estuaries. Enjoy a scenic trip with wildlife and wonderful views.

Enjoy this beautiful scenic river which winds through some of New Zealand’s lushest vegetation. Camping overnight and exploring some of New Zealand’s pioneering history. A true Kiwi experience.

Need some excitement? Take a kayak down a wicked Grade Two river run... this is a whole day of thrills and fantastic scenery down some of New Zealand’s best rivers.

For those who are slightly more adventurous at heart, this is a scenic trip with the excitement of Grade Two rapids. Midway down, we paddle under the historic Betran Road Bridge where we will stop for a snack.

Phone Canoe & Kayak on 0508 529 2569 for details

Phone Canoe & Kayak 06 769 5506

Phone Canoe & Kayak on 0508 529 2569 for details

Allow 2 hours paddle only. Priced at $85. Phone: 06 769 5506

www.kayaknz.co.nz

Issue 73

Autumn 2014

PAGE 45


Kayaks

White Water

4.50

620

26

$1699

Reval

5.50

540

24-26

$3495

Kiwi Excel Kiwi Lite Skua Skua Lite Shearwater Shearwater Lite Tasman Express Tasman Express Lite Tasman Express Elite Foveaux Express Southern Skua

3.75 3.75 5.20 5.20 480 480 5.30 5.30 5.30 5.00 5.40

740 740 600 600 610 610 620 620 600 600 600

23 18 27 24 26.5 23 29 25 22 19 22

$1660 $1970 $2890 $3140 $2650 $2900 $2890 $3140 $4590 $4460 $4590

Contour 450 Contour 480 Eco Bezhig

4.50 4.80 5.40

620 620 590

26 27 27

$2499 $2779 $2999

Manitou 13 Looksha 14 Eskia

3.90 4.30 4.90

630 625 635

20.5 26 27

$1299 $2199 $2499

Barracuda Beachcomber

4.90

600

17

$3100

Sea Kayaks Double Length (m)

Width (mm)

Weight (kg)

Price

Q-Kayaks

Southern Endeavour

5.60

800

46

$3540

Mission

Contour 490 Eco Niizh

4.90 5.65

800 770

35 45

$3499 $4569

Necky

Amaruk

5.40

725

41.3

$3499

5.80

700

28

$4300

Barracuda Beachcomber Duo

Great Advice Great Brands Great Service

Width (mm)

Weight (kg)

Price

Astro 58 Magnum 72 Magnum 80 Thunder 65 Thunder 76

1.93 2.41 2.54 2.34 2.44

650 660 254 650 660

15.5 18 67 18.5 29.5

$1725 $1595 $1595 $1895 $1895

Remix 59 Remix 69 Remix 79 Freeride 57 Freeride 67 Stomper 80 Stomper 90

2.57 2.64 2.72 1.98 2.06 2.49 2.57

640 650 670 650 660 650 680

19 20 21 14.5 15 21 22

$1999 $1999 $1999 $1999 $1999 $2049 $2049

2.60

610

16

$1160

Length (m)

Width (mm)

Weight (kg)

Starting Price

Twist 1

2.60

790

6

$1095

Twist 2

3.60

830

9

$1395

Helios 1

3.10

710

13.5

$1595

Helios 2

3.80

750

17

$1895

Sunny

3.80

800

16

$1895

Tasman K40

4.40

670

15

$3036

Pacific K50

5.35

670

20

$3680

Width (mm)

Weight (kg)

Starting Price

Q-Kayaks Stealth

Inflatables

Incept

Necky Mission

Tahe

Length (m)

Riot

Price

Gumotex

Weight (kg)

Multisport Length (m) Q- Kayaks

Ruahine

Matariki

Width (mm)

Q-Kayaks

Canoe & Kayak

Length (m)

Liquid Logic

Sea Kayaks Single

Hurricane (kevlar)

5.90

490

12

$3170

Maximus (kevlar)

6.40

510

16

$3890

Intrigue (kevlar)

4.95

540

12

$2900

Swallow (kevlar)

5.40

480

12

$3000

Firebolt (kevlar)

5.90

450

12.5

$3250

Rebel (kevlar)

5.65

450

11

$3200

Gladiator (kevlar)

5.90

530

13.5

$320 0

F1 (kevlar)

6.20

350

13.5

$3350

Ocean X (kevlar)

6.40

500

16.5

$3750

Duet (kevlar)

7.00

550

26

$5760


Fishing Singles

Sit-on-Top Single

Point 65

Fire Fly

2.40

700

16

$535

Whizz

2.50

770

22

$750

Escapee

3.30

740

23

$775

Escapade

3.50

750

27

$975

Play

3.10

710

18

$499

Escape

3.20

790

17

$649

Explorer

3.40

790

18.20

$749

Navigator

3.80

790

22

$799

Squirt

2.70

760

17

$499

Flow

2.95

750

19

$899

Glide 390 inc rudder

3.90

850

28

$1199

Xstream 420

4.20

730

28

$1299

Frenzy

2.75

790

19.5

$699

Mysto inc seat

2.95

790

21

$799

Starting Price $1599

Marauder

4.30

780

28

Fish n’ Dive

3.80

915

28

$899

Tourer

4.60

710

23

$1699

Prowler 13 inc seat

4.10

710

28

$1399

Tetra 12 Angler inc seat

3.70

710

24.5

$1499

Prowler Ultra 4.1 inc comfort seat

4.10

710

28.5

$1699

Prowler Ultra 4.3 inc zone seat

4.30

740

32.5

$1999

Prowler Elite 4.5 inc comfort seat

4.50

710

31

$1599

Prowler Ultra 4.7 inc zone seat

4.70

740

35

$2249

Torque

4.20

735

32.2

$3499

2.80

730

18

$1229

2.95

750

19

$999

Catch 390 inc rudder

3.90

850

28

$1599

Line 400

4.0

840

32

$1599

$1299

Catch 420 inc rudder

4.20

730

28

$1999

Espri Angler inc delux seat & paddle

3.6

800

22

$1149

Profish 400 inc delux seat & paddle

4.1

780

24

$1699

Profish 440 inc delux seat & paddle

4.4

770

29

$1999

Profish 400 Diamond inc delux seat & paddle

4.1

780

25

$2999

Profish Reload inc delux seat & paddle

4.5

740

29

$2299

SoT Fish Pro

4.20

680

18

$3500

Length (m)

Width (mm)

Weight (kg)

Starting Price

3.00

700

19

$850

Kiwi

3.75

740

20

$1365

Sprite 2

4.50

820

32

$1410

725

21

$999

Scrambler 11 inc seat

3.60

750

23

$999

Tetra 12 inc seat

3.70

Pacer XS inc paddle

2.7

780

16

$599

Ozzie inc paddle

2.7

790

17

$699

Nemo inc paddle

3.2

790

20

$799

Espri inc paddle

3.4

790

18.2

$999

Tequila! Modular

3.0

750

21

$1299

4.20

680

18

$2800

Barracuda SoT Tourer

Weight (kg)

Catch 290

3.30

24

Width (mm)

Line 280

Venus 11 inc seat

710

Length (m)

Cobra

Starting Price

Ocean Kayak

Weight (kg)

Mission

Width (mm)

Viking Kayaks

Viking Kayaks

Ocean Kayak

Mission

Cobra

Q-Kayaks

Length (m)

Barracuda

Sit-on-Top Double Length (m) Q- Kayaks

Cobra

Weight (kg)

Starting Price

Escapade II

3.50

750

26

$900

Delta

4.00

830

32

$1295

Tandem

3.80

799

26

$799

Long Reach

4.40

910

36

$999

Surge

3.90

850

28

$1099

Recreational

Sprite 1 Q- Kayaks

Ocean Kayak

Mission

Width (mm)

Malibu 2

3.65

870

27

$999

Malibu 2 XL inc 2 x seats

4.10

86

33

$1449

Mission

Cabo

4.97

76.5

33

$1699

Viking Kayaks

Viking 2 + 1 inc seats & paddles

3.9

810

27

$1299

Ocean Kayak

Point 65

Tequila! Modular

4.2

750

35

$1999

Point 65

Access 280

2.80

730

18

$989

Access 400

4.00

840

32

$1399

Manitou 13

3.90

630

20.5

$1299

Martini Modular Single

2.90

700

22

$1599

Martini Modular Double

4.2

700

35

$2599


Mike Dawson - Olympian Kayaker Interview by Josh Neilson

I caught up with Mike Dawson to find out what it’s like to live in the shoes of a full time kayaker. I have known Mike for many years and we have been on some awesome trips together.  Our first big trip was to Norway in 2008, where we traveled round in a rental car ticking off some classics and enjoying our first Ekstremsportveko experience.  Since then we have hung out in the States, Italy and Africa together in the Northern Hemisphere before returning to our base in Okere Falls.   Mike has a long list of extreme racing podium finishes and is currently training hard for his next Olympics in Rio. I caught up with Mike over a beer at the Okere Falls Store to give you an insight into what he’s up to these days.

First things first Mike, how did you start kayaking? I kicked off my kayaking in Tauranga. After a few paddles we headed up the Wairoa to try and run the rapids without swimming too often. I was super lucky because my brother already paddled, so I could always tag along on kayak trips after school, helping me improve in the early days & really get into the sport.

In your early days of kayaking were you inspired by anyone in particular? Yes! Big time. There were heaps of really world-class paddlers coming out of Tauranga Boys’ College like Johann Roozenburg and Jared Meehan. So as youngsters we were always looking up to those guys and following

ASTRAL GREENJACKET

Distributor of:

www.performance paddling.co.nz PAGE 48

Issue 73

Autumn 2014

www.kayaknz.co.nz


What was is like to represent NZ in the Olympics? The Olympics is epic. It was an unreal experience. The sheer size of that event is mind-blowing, and to get to represent NZ on that stage was something I’ll remember for a long time.

What is one thing your learnt from the London Olympics that you will use for your next attempt in Rio? To keep it chill. It’s really easy to get blown away by how big this Olympic machine is, especially when the whole of NZ is watching you.

If you had one piece of advice to young kayakers who want to follow in your footsteps what would that be? Live your dream. Get out there, get amongst it and explore the world. 

Finally; I know you have some good plans ahead for 2014. Can you give us a bit of a run down on what might go down this year? 2014 is going to be another rad year. A lot of racing, traveling and hopefully some kiwi domination in all the races by the kiwi boys. I’m just recovering from surgery and then I’ll head to Europe to race slalom and head up to Norway. Who knows after that - maybe a trip back to Africa...  Cheers Mike, it’s been great going on all these missions over the years! Looking forward to many more! 

their exploits racing and running the rapids around the world.

You have been doing slalom and white water racing as well as a bunch of creek boating over the years. Can you explain what you like about each discipline?  I love the freedom of creeking. Getting to go to some amazing places with the sole purpose of running rapids and having a good time on and off the water with great mates. I love getting out in my slalom boat as well because it’s a totally different kind of buzz from creeking. A lot more race focused and about trying to deliver at one moment in a really competitive environment. 

You have been to a lot of countries for kayaking. Do you know how many exactly and where would you say is your favourite place to go? Yeah... It’s getting up there now, 39 countries I think. My favourite place to go is  somewhere new! The best paddling destination so far; the Zambezi.

Last year you did a short trip to Uganda to paddle the Murchison Falls section which is known to have the densest population of crocodiles and hippos in the world. Can you briefly explain what that was like?   Intense! Paddling in Africa is a crazy experience, especially in a place like that. It was awesome to get outside the comfort zone and deal with a bunch of other stuff on top of the rapids plus we were part of an amazing crew so a lot of fun camping out in the heart of Africa.

www.kayaknz.co.nz

Issue 73

Autumn 2014

PAGE 49


Mike Dawson on the Tree Trunk Photo by: Josh Neilson PAGE 50

Issue 73

Autumn 2014

www.kayaknz.co.nz


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Issue 73 final web  

New Zealand Kayak Magazine Issue 73

Issue 73 final web  

New Zealand Kayak Magazine Issue 73